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Sample records for satellite sensors sam

  1. Validation of aerosol measurements by the satellite sensors SAM II and Sage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    A global data base on stratospheric aerosols has been obtained with the aid of the sensors SAM II and SAGE since the satellites carrying the sensors were launched in October 1978 and Feburary 1979, respectively. Several major comparative experiments have been conducted to acquire correlative data for validating the extinction profiles measured by these satellite sensors. The present investigation has the objective to present results from the first two of these experiments, which were conducted at Sondrestorm, Greenland, in November 1978, and at Poker Flat, Alaska, in July 1979. In both experiments, extinction profiles derived from the correlative sensors (dustsonde, lidar, filter, wire impactor) agreed, to within their respective uncertainties, with the extinction profiles measured by SAM II and SAGE (which in turn agreed with each other).

  2. SAM-2 ground-truth plan: Correlative measurements for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement-2 (SAM 2) sensor on the Nimbus G satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Pepin, T. J.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SAM-2 will fly aboard the Nimbus-G satellite for launch in the fall of 1978 and measure stratospheric vertical profiles of aerosol extinction in high latitude bands. The plan gives details of the location and times for the simultaneous satellite/correlative measurements for the nominal launch time, the rationale and choice of the correlative sensors, their characteristics and expected accuracies, and the conversion of their data to extinction profiles. The SAM-2 expected instrument performance and data inversion results are presented. Various atmospheric models representative of polar stratospheric aerosols are used in the SAM-2 and correlative sensor analyses.

  3. Variation in the stratospheric aerosol associated with the North Cyclonic Polar Vortex as measured by the SAM II satellite sensor. [Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, G. S.; Farrukh, U. O.; Trepte, C. R.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Optical depth data gathered by the stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM II) satellite during the 1979-80 winter season are analyzed to study mean atmospheric motions. The spacecraft photometer yielded extinction rates over the Northern Hemisphere in the 8-30 km altitude interval. Filtering was performed to remove the effects of high clouds and polar stratospheric clouds. Free horizontal mixing was prevalent below 14 km, as was a systematic difference across the polar jet stream above that altitude. The aerosol declined in altitude as the winter progressed. The polar vortex is concluded to have a base at the 14 km altitude and an outer boundary which coincides with the jet stream axis. The model accords with atmospheric tracer measurements made during the open-air nuclear testing programs in the 1950s.

  4. Soil Moisture Monitoring Using GNSS-R Signals; First Experimental Results with the SAM Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egido, A.; Martin-Puig, C.; Felip, D.; Garcia, M.; Caparrini, M.; Farres, E.; Ruffini, G.

    2009-04-01

    is the most sensitive band to soil volumetric water content, i.e. soil moisture. Secondly, variations on thermal background do not contaminate GNSS-R signals as they do for other remote sensing techniques, such as radiometry. Finally, GNSS scatterometry from space has a potential higher spatial resolution than microwave radiometry, due to the highly stable carrier and code modulations of the incident signals which enables the use of Delay Doppler Mapping. However, in order to be able to obtain accurate SM estimates there are several effects that need to be taken into consideration. Some of those are mainly due to diffuse scattering effects over the soil surface, for instance effects due to surface roughness, vegetation canopy, and noise. This paper reviews the theoretical approach for SM retrieval using GNSS-R, and focuses on the description of the development of an innovative GNSS-R system for soil moisture retrieval (named SAM). The validation campaigns performed with the SAM sensor, together with the results obtained are presented in the paper, which is finalized with the conclusions achieved and the ideas for future work on GNSS-R based sensors. AKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to thank the European Space Agency for partially funding the SAM system development in the framework of the GSTP program, and Tragsatec for their collaboration in the acquisition of ground truth data and satellite imagery processing used for the SAM instrument validation. REFERENCES [1] A. Kavak, G. Xu, W.J. Vogel, GPS Multipath Fade Meassurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties, University of Texas, Austin, 1998. [2] D. Masters, V. Zavorotny, S. Katzberg, W. Emery GPS Signal Scattering from Land for Moisture Content Determination IGARSS Proceedings, July 24-28, 2000.

  5. Cross-Reactive Sensor Array for Metal Ion Sensing Based on Fluorescent SAMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Crego-Calama

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent self assembled monolayers (SAMs on glass were previouslydeveloped in our group as new sensing materials for metal ions. These fluorescent SAMs arecomprised by fluorophores and small molecules sequentially deposited on a monolayer onglass. The preorganization provided by the surface avoids the need for complex receptordesign, allowing for a combinatorial approach to sensing systems based on small molecules.Now we show the fabrication of an effective microarray for the screening of metal ions andthe properties of the sensing SAMs. A collection of fluorescent sensing SAMs wasgenerated by combinatorial methods and immobilized on the glass surfaces of a custom-made 140 well microtiter-plate. The resulting libraries are easily measured and show variedresponses to a series cations such as Cu2+ , Co2+ , Pb2+ , Ca2+ and Zn2+ . These surfaces are notdesigned to complex selectively a unique analyte but rather they are intended to producefingerprint type responses to a range of analytes by less specific interactions. The unselectiveresponses of the library to the presence of different cations generate a characteristic patternfor each analyte, a “finger print” response.

  6. Cross-Reactive Sensor Array for Metal Ion Sensing Based on Fluorescent SAMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basabe-Desmonts, Lourdes; van der Baan, Frederieke; Zimmerman, Rebecca S.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Crego-Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass were previously developed in our group as new sensing materials for metal ions. These fluorescent SAMs are comprised by fluorophores and small molecules sequentially deposited on a monolayer on glass. The preorganization provided by the surface avoids the need for complex receptor design, allowing for a combinatorial approach to sensing systems based on small molecules. Now we show the fabrication of an effective microarray for the screening of metal ions and the properties of the sensing SAMs. A collection of fluorescent sensing SAMs was generated by combinatorial methods and immobilized on the glass surfaces of a custom-made 140 well microtiter-plate. The resulting libraries are easily measured and show varied responses to a series cations such as Cu2+, Co2+, Pb2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+. These surfaces are not designed to complex selectively a unique analyte but rather they are intended to produce fingerprint type responses to a range of analytes by less specific interactions. The unselective responses of the library to the presence of different cations generate a characteristic pattern for each analyte, a “finger print” response.

  7. Role of Satellite Sensors in Groundwater Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumitra Mukherjee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial as well as spectral resolution has a very important role to play in water resource management. It was a challenge to explore the groundwater and rainwater harvesting sites in the Aravalli Quartzite-Granite-Pegmatite Precambrian terrain of Delhi, India. Use of only panchromatic sensor data of IRS-1D satellite with 5.8-meter spatial resolution has the potential to infer lineaments and faults in this hard rock area. It is essential to identify the location of interconnected lineaments below buried pediment plains in the hard rock area for targeting sub-surface water resources. Linear Image Self Scanning sensor data of the same satellite with 23.5-meter resolution when merged with the panchromatic data has produced very good results in delineation of interconnected lineaments over buried pediment plains as vegetation anomaly. These specific locations of vegetation anomaly were detected as dark red patches in various hard rock areas of Delhi. Field investigation was carried out on these patches by resistivity and magnetic survey in parts of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU, Indira Gandhi national Open University, Research and Referral Hospital and Humayuns Tomb areas. Drilling was carried out in four locations of JNU that proved to be the most potential site with ground water discharge ranging from 20,000 to 30,000 liters per hour with 2 to 4 meters draw down. Further the impact of urbanization on groundwater recharging in the terrain was studied by generating Normalized difference Vegetation Index (NDVI map which was possible to generate by using the LISS-III sensor of IRS-1D satellite. Selection of suitable sensors has definitely a cutting edge on natural resource exploration and management including groundwater.

  8. Sensor Calibration in Support for NOAA's Satellite Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sensor calibration, including its definition, purpose, traceability options, methodology, complexity, and importance, is examined in this paper in the context of supporting NOAA's satellite mission. Common understanding of sensor calibration is essential for the effective communication among sensor vendors,calibration scientists, satellite operators, program managers, and remote sensing data users, who must cooperate to ensure that a nation's strategic investment in a sophisticated operational environmental satellite system serves the nation's interest and enhances the human lives around the world. Examples of calibration activities at NOAA/NESDIS/ORA are selected to further illustrate these concepts and to demonstrate the lessons learned from the past experience.

  9. Coherent Evaluation of Aerosol Data Products from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval from satellite has practically become routine, especially during the last decade. However, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, thereby leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus, and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood, there will be no way of developing reliable model inputs and climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is providing well-calibrated globally representative ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products. Through a recently developed web-based Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), we are utilizing the advantages offered by collocated AERONET and satellite products to characterize and evaluate aerosol retrieval from multiple sensors. Indeed, MAPSS and its companion statistical tool AeroStat are facilitating detailed comparative uncertainty analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MAPSS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  10. Autonomous satellite constellation orbit determination using the star sensor and inter-satellite links data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A method of autonomous orbit determination for a satellite constellation using a star sensor combined with inter satellite links(ISLs) is studied.Two types of simulated observation data,Three-Satellite Constellation ISLs and background stellar observations by a CCD star sensor,are first produced.Based on these data,an observation equation is built for the constellation joint autonomous orbit determination,in which the simulations are run.The accuracy of this method with different orbital determination models are analyzed and compared with regard to the effect of potential measurement errors.The results show that autonomous satellite constellation orbit determination using star sensor measurement and ISLs data is feasible.Finally,this paper arrives at several conclusions which contribute to extending this method to a more general satellite constellation.

  11. Sandwich Sam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    SAM, a 28-year-old Canadian, has a nice family name: Goodman. Four years ago, he came to China and now he owns two cafes. Sam is not tall. To match his loose black sweater, he wears a pair of jeans which are so long that the trouser legs are wrinkled over his sneakers. Why did he think of running a cafe in Beijing? "After graduating from college, I went to Hong Kong to be a fitness coach for half a year. Then, I went to South Korea. While sightseeing, I taught English to make a living.

  12. Evaluation on Radiometric Capability of Chinese Optical Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aixia; Zhong, Bo; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric capability of on-orbit sensors should be updated on time due to changes induced by space environmental factors and instrument aging. Some sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), have onboard calibrators, which enable real-time calibration. However, most Chinese remote sensing satellite sensors lack onboard calibrators. Their radiometric calibrations have been updated once a year based on a vicarious calibration procedure, which has affected the applications of the data. Therefore, a full evaluation of the sensors’ radiometric capabilities is essential before quantitative applications can be made. In this study, a comprehensive procedure for evaluating the radiometric capability of several Chinese optical satellite sensors is proposed. In this procedure, long-term radiometric stability and radiometric accuracy are the two major indicators for radiometric evaluation. The radiometric temporal stability is analyzed by the tendency of long-term top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance variation; the radiometric accuracy is determined by comparison with the TOA reflectance from MODIS after spectrally matching. Three Chinese sensors including the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera onboard Huan Jing 1 satellite (HJ-1), as well as the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR) and Medium-Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) onboard the Feng Yun 3 satellite (FY-3) are evaluated in reflective bands based on this procedure. The results are reasonable, and thus can provide reliable reference for the sensors’ application, and as such will promote the development of Chinese satellite data. PMID:28117745

  13. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  14. Séries temporais de NDVI do sensor SPOT Vegetation e algoritmo SAM aplicados ao mapeamento de cana‑de‑açúcar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Vicente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o mapeamento de área de cana‑de‑açúcar por meio de série temporal, de seis anos de dados do índice de vegetação por diferença normalizada (NDVI, oriundos do sensor Vegetation, a bordo do satélite "système pour l'observation de la Terre" (SPOT. Três classes de cobertura do solo (cana‑de‑açúcar, pasto e floresta, do Estado de São Paulo, foram selecionadas como assinaturas espectro‑temporais de referência, que serviram como membros extremos ("endmembers" para classificação com o algoritmo "spectral angle mapper" (SAM. A partir desta classificação, o mapeamento da área de cana‑de‑açúcar foi realizado com uso de limiares na imagem-regra do SAM, gerados a partir dos valores dos espectros de referência. Os resultados mostram que o algoritmo SAM pode ser aplicado a séries de dados multitemporais de resolução moderada, o que permite eficiente mapeamento de alvo agrícola em escala mesorregional. Dados oficiais de áreas de cana‑de‑açúcar, para as microrregiões paulistas, apresentam boa correlação (r² = 0,8 com os dados obtidos pelo método avaliado. A aplicação do algoritmo SAM mostrou ser útil em análises temporais. As séries temporais de NDVI do sensor SPOT Vegetation podem ser utilizadas para mapeamento da área de cana‑de‑açúcar em baixa resolução.

  15. Femto-Satellite Sensor Node Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key challenge for reducing a traditional satellite to such a small size is to remove the maximum possible functionality that is not critical for creating a...

  16. Status of the Third Miniature Sensor Technology Integration Satellite Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, David; Hurtz, Rick; McClelland, Jim; Cellarius, Mark; Meyers, AI

    1994-01-01

    The MSTI-3 satellite is the third in a series established to test, in realistic scenarios, miniature spacecraft and sensor technologies for missile detection and tracking on low-cost, low-earth orbit technology demonstration satellites. Cooperative demonstrations are planned to combine MSTI-provided target track file information, with interceptor technology tests, to fully demonstrate technologies associated with theater missile defense (TMO) targeting. The program is sponsored by the Ballist...

  17. An autonomous navigation algorithm for high orbit satellite using star sensor and ultraviolet earth sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baohua, Li; Wenjie, Lai; Yun, Chen; Zongming, Liu

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous navigation algorithm using the sensor that integrated the star sensor (FOV1) and ultraviolet earth sensor (FOV2) is presented. The star images are sampled by FOV1, and the ultraviolet earth images are sampled by the FOV2. The star identification algorithm and star tracking algorithm are executed at FOV1. Then, the optical axis direction of FOV1 at J2000.0 coordinate system is calculated. The ultraviolet image of earth is sampled by FOV2. The center vector of earth at FOV2 coordinate system is calculated with the coordinates of ultraviolet earth. The autonomous navigation data of satellite are calculated by integrated sensor with the optical axis direction of FOV1 and the center vector of earth from FOV2. The position accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 1000 meters to 300 meters. And the velocity accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 100 m/s to 20 m/s. At the same time, the period sine errors of the autonomous navigation for satellite are eliminated. The autonomous navigation for satellite with a sensor that integrated ultraviolet earth sensor and star sensor is well robust.

  18. Cross calibration of IRS-P4 OCM satellite sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Naik, P.; Nayak, S.R.

    The cross calibration of ocean color satellite sensor, IRS-P4 OCM using the radiative transfer code, with SeaWiFS as a reference are presented here. Since the bands of IRS-P4 OCM are identical to those of SeaWiFS and SeaWiFS has been continuously...

  19. Out-of-band effects of satellite ocean color sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua; Naik, Puneeta; Son, SeungHyun

    2016-03-20

    We analyze the sensor out-of-band (OOB) effects for satellite ocean color sensors of the sea-viewing wild field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS), the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS) for phytoplankton-dominated open oceans and turbid coastal and inland waters, following the approach of Wang et al. [Appl. Opt.40, 343 (2001)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.40.000343]. The applicability of the open ocean water reflectance model of Morel and Maritorena [J. Geophys. Res.106, 7163 (2001)JGREA20148-022710.1029/2000JC000319] (MM01) for the sensor OOB effects is analyzed for oligotrophic waters in Hawaii. The MM01 model predicted OOB contributions for oligotrophic waters are consistent with the result from in situ measurements. The OOB effects cause an apparent shift in sensor band center wavelengths in radiometric response, which depends on the sensor spectral response function and the target radiance being measured. Effective band center wavelength is introduced and calculated for three satellite sensors and for various water types. Using the effective band center wavelengths, satellite and in situ measured water optical property data can be more meaningfully and accurately compared. It is found that, for oligotrophic waters, the OOB effect is significant for the SeaWiFS 555 nm band (and somewhat 510 nm band), MODIS 412 nm band, and VIIRS 551 nm band. VIIRS and SeaWiFS have similar sensor OOB performance. For coastal and inland waters, however, the OOB effect is generally not significant for all three sensors, even though some small OOB effects do exist. This study highlights the importance of understanding the sensor OOB effect and the necessity of a complete prelaunch sensor characterization on the quality of ocean color products. Furthermore, it shows that hyperspectral in situ optics measurements are preferred for the purpose of accurately validating satellite-measured normalized water

  20. GEO Satellites as Space Weather Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    Solar Energy , Jan. 2016. Lohmeyer, W. and K. Cahoy, "Space Weather Radiation Effects on Geostationary Satellite Solid-State Power Amplifiers...with space weather observations and models. We analyzed two component types: solar cells and high power amplifiers. For amplifiers, we identified the...analysis  focused  on  two  component  types:   solar  cells  and  high   power  amplifiers.  We  have  calculated

  1. Sensor system for Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Takashi; Kuze, Akihiko; Kondo, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    Global warming has become a very serious issue for human beings. In 1997, the Kyoto Protocol was adopted at the Third Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3), making it mandatory for developed nations to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by six (6) to eight (8) per cent of their total emissions in 1990, and to meet this goal sometime between 2008 and 2012. The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is design to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) from orbit. GOSAT is a joint project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Ministry of Environment (MOE), and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). JAXA is responsible for the satellite and instrument development, MOE is involved in the instrument development, and NIES is responsible for the satellite data retrieval. The satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2008. In order to detect the CO2 variation of boundary layers, both the technique to measure the column density and the retrieval algorithm to remove cloud and aerosol contamination are investigated. Main mission sensor of the GOSAT is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with high optical throughput, spectral resolution and wide spectral coverage, and a cloud-aerosol detecting imager attached to the satellite. The paper presents the mission sensor system of the GOSAT together with the results of performance demonstration with proto-type instrument aboard an aircraft.

  2. Autonomous sensor-based dual-arm satellite grappling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Brian; Tso, Kam; Litwin, Todd; Hayati, Samad; Bon, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Dual-arm satellite grappling involves the integration of technologies developed in the Sensing and Perception (S&P) Subsystem for object acquisition and tracking, and the Manipulator Control and Mechanization (MCM) Subsystem for dual-arm control. S&P acquires and tracks the position, orientation, velocity, and angular velocity of a slowly spinning satellite, and sends tracking data to the MCM subsystem. MCM grapples the satellite and brings it to rest, controlling the arms so that no excessive forces or torques are exerted on the satellite or arms. A 350-pound satellite mockup which can spin freely on a gimbal for several minutes, closely simulating the dynamics of a real satellite is demonstrated. The satellite mockup is fitted with a panel under which may be mounted various elements such as line replacement modules and electrical connectors that will be used to demonstrate servicing tasks once the satellite is docked. The subsystems are housed in three MicroVAX II microcomputers. The hardware of the S&P Subsystem includes CCD cameras, video digitizers, frame buffers, IMFEX (a custom pipelined video processor), a time-code generator with millisecond precision, and a MicroVAX II computer. Its software is written in Pascal and is based on a locally written vision software library. The hardware of the MCM Subsystem includes PUMA 560 robot arms, Lord force/torque sensors, two MicroVAX II computers, and unimation pneumatic parallel grippers. Its software is written in C, and is based on a robot language called RCCL. The two subsystems are described and test results on the grappling of the satellite mockup with rotational rates of up to 2 rpm are provided.

  3. Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Design Concepts and Performance Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.; Meister, Gerhard; Monosmith, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    In late 1978, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched the Nimbus-7 satellite with the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and several other sensors, all of which provided major advances in Earth remote sensing. The inspiration for the CZCS is usually attributed to an article in Science by Clarke et al. who demonstrated that large changes in open ocean spectral reflectance are correlated to chlorophyll-a concentrations. Chlorophyll-a is the primary photosynthetic pigment in green plants (marine and terrestrial) and is used in estimating primary production, i.e., the amount of carbon fixed into organic matter during photosynthesis. Thus, accurate estimates of global and regional primary production are key to studies of the earth's carbon cycle. Because the investigators used an airborne radiometer, they were able to demonstrate the increased radiance contribution of the atmosphere with altitude that would be a major issue for spaceborne measurements. Since 1978, there has been much progress in satellite ocean color remote sensing such that the technique is well established and is used for climate change science and routine operational environmental monitoring. Also, the science objectives and accompanying methodologies have expanded and evolved through a succession of global missions, e.g., the Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS), the Seaviewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and the Global Imager (GLI). With each advance in science objectives, new and more stringent requirements for sensor capabilities (e.g., spectral coverage) and performance (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) are established. The CZCS had four bands for chlorophyll and aerosol corrections. The Ocean Color Imager (OCI) recommended for the NASA Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and Ocean Ecosystems (PACE) mission includes 5 nanometers hyperspectral coverage from 350 to

  4. A satellite digital controller or 'play that PID tune again, Sam'. [Position, Integral, Derivative feedback control algorithm for design strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem discussed is to design a digital controller for a typical satellite. The controlled plant is considered to be a rigid body acting in a plane. The controller is assumed to be a digital computer which, when combined with the proposed control algorithm, can be represented as a sampled-data system. The objective is to present a design strategy and technique for selecting numerical values for the control gains (assuming position, integral, and derivative feedback) and the sample rate. The technique is based on the parameter plane method and requires that the system be amenable to z-transform analysis.

  5. Aeronautical satellite antenna steering using magnetic field sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, John; Dufour, Martial

    1993-01-01

    Designers of aeronautical satellite terminals are often faced with the problem of steering a directive antenna from an airplane or helicopter. This problem is usually solved by using aircraft orientation information derived from inertial sensors on-board the aircraft in combination with satellite ephemeris information calculated from geographic coordinates. This procedure works well but relies heavily on avionics that are external to the terminal. For the majority of small aircraft and helicopters which will form the bulk of future aeronautical satcom users, such avionics either do not exist or are difficult for the satellite terminal to interface with. At the Communications Research Center (CRC), work has been undertaken to develop techniques that use the geomagnetic field and satellite antenna pointing vectors (both of which are stationary in a local geographical area) to track the position of a satellite relative to a moving platform such as an aircraft. The performance of this technique is examined and a mathematical steering transformation is developed within this paper. Details are given regarding the experimental program that will be undertaken to test the concepts proposed herein.

  6. The global middle-atmosphere aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2: comparison with satellite and in-situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hommel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate results from a three-dimensional middle-atmosphere aerosol-climate model which has been developed to study the evolution of stratospheric aerosols. Here we focus on the stratospheric background period and evaluate several key quantities of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols and their precursors with observations and other model studies. It is shown that the model fairly well reproduces in situ observations of the aerosol size and number concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Compared to measurements from the limb-sounding SAGE II satellite instrument, modelled integrated aerosol quantities are more biased the lower the moment of the aerosol population is. Both findings are consistent with earlier work analysing the quality of SAGE II retrieved e.g. aerosol surface area densities in the volcanically unperturbed stratosphere (SPARC/ASAP, 2006; Thomason et al., 2008; Wurl et al., 2010.

    The model suggests that new particles are formed over large areas of the LS, albeit nucleation rates in the upper troposphere are at least one order of magnitude larger than those in the stratosphere. Hence, we suggest that both, tropospheric sulphate aerosols and particles formed in situ in the LS are maintaining the stability of the stratospheric aerosol layer in the absence of direct stratospheric emissions from volcanoes. Particle size distributions are clearly bimodal, except in the upper branches of the stratospheric aerosol layer where aerosols evaporate. Modelled concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN are smaller than measured in regions of the aerosol layer where aerosol mixing ratios are largest. This points to an overestimated particle growth by coagulation.

    Transport regimes of tropical stratospheric aerosol have been identified from modelled aerosol mixing ratios and correspond to those deduced from satellite extinction measurements. We found that convective

  7. 77 FR 42419 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Global Navigation Satellite Sensor Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... International, Inc. Global Navigation Satellite Sensor Units AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... augmentation system (WAAS) global navigation satellite sensor units (GNSSU). This AD requires you cease all... positioning system (GPS) sensor and the same software as the Model KGS200 Mercury\\2\\ GNSSU. A software problem...

  8. Satellite Attitude Determination with Low-Cost Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springmann, John C.

    This dissertation contributes design and data processing techniques to maximize the accuracy of low-cost attitude determination systems while removing pre-flight calibration requirements. This enables rapid development of small spacecraft to perform increasingly complex missions. The focus of this work is magnetometers and sun sensors, which are the two most common types of attitude sensors. Magnetometer measurements are degraded by the magnetic fields of nearby electronics, which traditionally limit their utility on satellites unless a boom is used to provide physical separation between the magnetometer and the satellite. This dissertation presents an on-orbit, attitude-independent method for magnetometer calibration that mitigates the effect of nearby electronics. With this method, magnetometers can be placed anywhere within the spacecraft, and as demonstrated through application to flight data, the accuracy of the integrated magnetometer is reduced to nearly that of the stand-alone magnetometer. Photodiodes are light sensors that can be used for sun sensing. An individual photodiode provides a measurement of a single sun vector component, and since orthogonal photodiodes do not provide sufficient coverage due to photodiode field-of-view limitations, there is a tradeoff between photodiode orientation and sun sensing angular accuracy. This dissertation presents a design method to optimize the photodiode configuration for sun sensing, which is also generally applicable to directional sensors. Additionally, an on-orbit calibration method is developed to estimate the photodiode scale factors and orientation, which are critical for accurate sun sensing. Combined, these methods allow a magnetometer to be placed anywhere within a spacecraft and provide an optimal design technique for photodiode placement. On-orbit calibration methods are formulated for both types of sensors that correct the sensor errors on-orbit without requiring pre-flight calibration. The calibration

  9. Resilient Sensor Networks with Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Missing Sensors: An Example of Space Weather Forecasting by Multiple Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-04-15

    This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make a decision for providing its satellite service. The proposed model is resilient to failures of sensors or missing data due to the satellite operation. In the proposed model, the missing data of a sensor is interpolated by other sensors associated. This paper demonstrates two examples of space weather forecasting that involves the missing observations in some test cases. In these examples, the sensor network for space weather forecasting continues a diagnosis by replacing faulted sensors with virtual ones. The demonstrations showed that the proposed model is resilient against sensor failures due to suspension of hardware failures or technical reasons.

  10. Coherent Uncertainty Analysis of Aerosol Measurements from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS altogether, a total of 11 different aerosol products were comparatively analyzed using data collocated with ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations within the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS, http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/mapss/ and http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/aerostat/). The analysis was performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol optical depth or thickness (AOD or AOT) retrievals during 2006-2010 to available collocated AERONET measurements globally, regionally, and seasonally, and deriving a number of statistical measures of accuracy. We used a robust statistical approach to detect and remove possible outliers in the collocated data that can bias the results of the analysis. Overall, the proportion of outliers in each of the quality-screened AOD products was within 12%. Squared correlation coefficient (R2) values of the satellite AOD retrievals relative to AERONET exceeded 0.6, with R2 for most of the products exceeding 0.7 over land and 0.8 over ocean. Root mean square error (RMSE) values for most of the AOD products were within 0.15 over land and 0.09 over ocean. We have been able to generate global maps showing regions where the different products present advantages over the others, as well as the relative performance of each product over different landcover types. It was observed that while MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS provide accurate retrievals over most of the landcover types, multi-angle capabilities make MISR the only sensor to retrieve reliable AOD over barren and snow / ice surfaces. Likewise, active sensing enables CALIOP to retrieve aerosol properties over bright-surface shrublands more accurately than the other sensors, while POLDER, which is the only one of the sensors capable of measuring polarized aerosols, outperforms other sensors in

  11. Coherent uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from multiple satellite sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrenko

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua, MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS – altogether, a total of 11 different aerosol products – were comparatively analyzed using data collocated with ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET stations within the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS, http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/mapss/ and http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/aerostat/. The analysis was performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol optical depth or thickness (AOD or AOT retrievals during 2006–2010 to available collocated AERONET measurements globally, regionally, and seasonally, and deriving a number of statistical measures of accuracy. We used a robust statistical approach to detect and remove possible outliers in the collocated data that can bias the results of the analysis. Overall, the proportion of outliers in each of the quality-screened AOD products was within 12%. Squared correlation coefficient (R2 values of the satellite AOD retrievals relative to AERONET exceeded 0.6, with R2 for most of the products exceeding 0.7 over land and 0.8 over ocean. Root mean square error (RMSE values for most of the AOD products were within 0.15 over land and 0.09 over ocean. We have been able to generate global maps showing regions where the different products present advantages over the others, as well as the relative performance of each product over different landcover types. It was observed that while MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS provide accurate retrievals over most of the landcover types, multi-angle capabilities make MISR the only sensor to retrieve reliable AOD over barren and snow/ice surfaces. Likewise, active sensing enables CALIOP to retrieve aerosol properties

  12. Coherent uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from multiple satellite sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrenko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua, MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS – altogether, a total of 11 different aerosol products – were comparatively analyzed using data collocated with ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET stations within the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS, http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/mapss/ and http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/aerostat/. The analysis was performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol optical depth or thickness (AOD or AOT retrievals during 2006–2010 to available collocated AERONET measurements globally, regionally, and seasonally, and deriving a number of statistical measures of accuracy. We used a robust statistical approach to detect and remove possible outliers in the collocated data that can bias the results of the analysis. Overall, the proportion of outliers in each of the quality-screened AOD products was within 7%. Squared correlation coefficient (R2 values of the satellite AOD retrievals relative to AERONET exceeded 0.8 for many of the analyzed products, while root mean square error (RMSE values for most of the AOD products were within 0.15 over land and 0.07 over ocean. We have been able to generate global maps showing regions where the different products present advantages over the others, as well as the relative performance of each product over different land cover types. It was observed that while MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS provide accurate retrievals over most of the land cover types, multi-angle capabilities make MISR the only sensor to retrieve reliable AOD over barren and snow/ice surfaces. Likewise, active sensing enables CALIOP to retrieve aerosol properties over bright-surface closed shrublands more accurately than the other sensors, while POLDER, which is the only one of the sensors capable of measuring polarized aerosols, outperforms other sensors in certain

  13. Fluxgate sensor for the vector magnetometer onboard the ’Astrid-2’ satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauer, Peter; Risbo, T.; Merayo, José M.G.

    2000-01-01

    The vector magnetometer sensor onboard the Astrid-2 satellite is made as a compact ringcore fluxgate sensor with single axis compensation. The ringcores used in the sensor are identical to the cores used in the fluxgate (CSC-) sensor in the high quality magnetometer onboard the field mapping...... satellite called 'Orsted'. To obtain good axial stability special attention is drawn to the mechanical construction of the tri-axial sensor configuration. Almost all parts of the sensor are machined from the glassy material MACOR(R) that has approximately the same thermal expansion coefficient as the core...... ribbon. The single axis compensated ringcore sensors are known to have some linearity problems with large uncompensated fields perpendicular to the measuring axis, This phenomenon is also seen for the Astrid-2 sensor, and from a coil-calibration of the flight-spare sensor we observe: non...

  14. An Object Model for Integrating Diverse Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors: A Case Study of Union Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuli Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Earth Observation sensor web environment, the rapid, accurate, and unified discovery of diverse remote sensing satellite sensors, and their association to yield an integrated solution for a comprehensive response to specific emergency tasks pose considerable challenges. In this study, we propose a remote sensing satellite sensor object model, based on the object-oriented paradigm and the Open Geospatial Consortium Sensor Model Language. The proposed model comprises a set of sensor resource objects. Each object consists of identification, state of resource attribute, and resource method. We implement the proposed attribute state description by applying it to different remote sensors. A real application, involving the observation of floods at the Yangtze River in China, is undertaken. Results indicate that the sensor inquirer can accurately discover qualified satellite sensors in an accurate and unified manner. By implementing the proposed union operation among the retrieved sensors, the inquirer can further determine how the selected sensors can collaboratively complete a specific observation requirement. Therefore, the proposed model provides a reliable foundation for sharing and integrating multiple remote sensing satellite sensors and their observations.

  15. Earth's thermal radiation sensors for attitude determination systems of small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertat, I.; Linhart, R.; Masopust, J.; Vobornik, A.; Dudacek, L.

    2017-07-01

    Satellite attitude determination is a complex process with expensive hardware and software and it could consume the most of resources (volume, mass, electric power), especially of small satellites as CubeSats. Thermal radiation infrared detectors could be one of useful sensors for attitude determination systems in such small satellites. Nowadays, these sensors are widely used in contact-less thermometers and thermo-cameras resulting in a low-cost technology. On low Earth orbits the infrared thermal sensors can be utilized for coarse attitude determination against a relative warm and close Earth's globe.

  16. Innovative Large Scale Wireless Sensor Network Architecture Using Satellites and High-Altitude Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Albagory

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network has many applications and very active research area. The coverage span of this network is very important parameter where wide coverage area is a challenge. This paper proposes an architecture for large-scale wireless sensor network (LSWSN based on satellites and the High-Altitude Platforms (HAP where the sensor nodes are located on the ground and a wide coverage sink station may be in the form of a satellite or a network of HAPs. A scenario is described for multilayer LSWSN and a study for the system requirements has been established showing the number of Satellites, HAPs and coverage per each sink according to the elevation angle requirements. The Satellite-HAP-Sensor multilayer LSWSN architecture has the feasibility for effective energy and earth coverage and is optimum for covering largely sparse regions.

  17. Capacity Model and Constraints Analysis for Integrated Remote Wireless Sensor and Satellite Network in Emergency Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the capacity problem of an integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network (IWSSN in emergency scenarios. We formulate a general model to evaluate the remote sensor and satellite network capacity. Compared to most existing works for ground networks, the proposed model is time varying and space oriented. To capture the characteristics of a practical network, we sift through major capacity-impacting constraints and analyze the influence of these constraints. Specifically, we combine the geometric satellite orbit model and satellite tool kit (STK engineering software to quantify the trends of the capacity constraints. Our objective in analyzing these trends is to provide insights and design guidelines for optimizing the integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network schedules. Simulation results validate the theoretical analysis of capacity trends and show the optimization opportunities of the IWSSN.

  18. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) - Space Weather Sensors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) maintains a constellation of sun-synchronous, near-polar orbiting satellites. The orbital period is 101 minutes...

  19. SAM in a Nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Explains what the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers' Strategic Assessment Model (SAM) is and how to use it to achieve organizational excellence through continuous improvement. Showing features of both the Malcolm Baldrige programs and the Balanced Scorecard, the SAM components are described along with an explanation of the four…

  20. Combined Geometric and Neural Network Approach to Generic Fault Diagnosis in Satellite Actuators and Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Blanke, Mogens; Castaldi, P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme for diagnosis of faults affecting the sensors measuring the satellite attitude, body angular velocity and flywheel spin rates as well as defects related to the control torques provided by satellite reaction wheels. A nonlinear geometric design is used to avoid...... on a detailed nonlinear satellite model with embedded disturbance description. The results document the efficacy of the proposed diagnosis scheme....

  1. A method of autonomous orbit determination for satellite using star sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Jianbo; XU; Jin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a method of autonomous orbit determination using star sensor is studied. By building relatively consummate dynamical models which simulate attitude motion of satellite and observation from satellite to background stars, the simulant computation of this method is executed, and it is shown that the method of autonomous orbit determination is feasible. Academic and calculation analyses have been done for the relation between the direction of star sensor with respect to satellite-body coordinate system and the accuracy of autonomous orbit determination.

  2. The Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) for Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrieval Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Among the known atmospheric constituents, aerosols represent the greatest uncertainty in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood ', there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource,., an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MAPSS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  3. Toward a Coherent Detailed Evaluation of Aerosol Data Products from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols represent one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood, there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource, an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, TerraMISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MASS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  4. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-05-27

    This manual describes the photovoltaic performance model in the System Advisor Model (SAM). The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains and distributes SAM, which is available as a free download from https://sam.nrel.gov. These descriptions are based on SAM 2015.1.30 (SSC 41).

  5. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  6. Combined Geometric and Neural Network Approach to Generic Fault Diagnosis in Satellite Actuators and Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, P.; Blanke, Mogens; P. Castaldi; Mimmo, N.; S. Simani

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme for diagnosis of faults affecting the sensors measuring the satellite attitude, body angular velocity and flywheel spin rates as well as defects related to the control torques provided by satellite reaction wheels. A nonlinear geometric design is used to avoid that aerodynamic disturbance torques have unwanted influence on the residuals exploited for fault detection and isolation. Radial basis function neural networks are used to obtain fault estimation filt...

  7. Combined Geometric and Neural Network Approach to Generic Fault Diagnosis in Satellite Actuators and Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Blanke, Mogens; Castaldi, P.;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme for diagnosis of faults affecting the sensors measuring the satellite attitude, body angular velocity and flywheel spin rates as well as defects related to the control torques provided by satellite reaction wheels. A nonlinear geometric design is used to avoid...... that aerodynamic disturbance torques have unwanted influence on the residuals exploited for fault detection and isolation. Radial basis function neural networks are used to obtain fault estimation filters that do not need a priori information about the fault internal models. Simulation results are based...... on a detailed nonlinear satellite model with embedded disturbance description. The results document the efficacy of the proposed diagnosis scheme....

  8. SAM Theory Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Rui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The System Analysis Module (SAM) is an advanced and modern system analysis tool being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. SAM development aims for advances in physical modeling, numerical methods, and software engineering to enhance its user experience and usability for reactor transient analyses. To facilitate the code development, SAM utilizes an object-oriented application framework (MOOSE), and its underlying meshing and finite-element library (libMesh) and linear and non-linear solvers (PETSc), to leverage modern advanced software environments and numerical methods. SAM focuses on modeling advanced reactor concepts such as SFRs (sodium fast reactors), LFRs (lead-cooled fast reactors), and FHRs (fluoride-salt-cooled high temperature reactors) or MSRs (molten salt reactors). These advanced concepts are distinguished from light-water reactors in their use of single-phase, low-pressure, high-temperature, and low Prandtl number (sodium and lead) coolants. As a new code development, the initial effort has been focused on modeling and simulation capabilities of heat transfer and single-phase fluid dynamics responses in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) systems. The system-level simulation capabilities of fluid flow and heat transfer in general engineering systems and typical SFRs have been verified and validated. This document provides the theoretical and technical basis of the code to help users understand the underlying physical models (such as governing equations, closure models, and component models), system modeling approaches, numerical discretization and solution methods, and the overall capabilities in SAM. As the code is still under ongoing development, this SAM Theory Manual will be updated periodically to keep it consistent with the state of the development.

  9. Satellite retrieved aerosol properties for battlespace characterization and sensor performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Sea basing operations in coastal environments require a rapid and accurate description of the physical conditions in the region. Battlespace characterization and sensor performance assist in optimizing the efficiency and safety of operations, of which the detection of targets at low level above the

  10. Satellite retrieved aerosol properties for battlespace characterization and sensor performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Sea basing operations in coastal environments require a rapid and accurate description of the physical conditions in the region. Battlespace characterization and sensor performance assist in optimizing the efficiency and safety of operations, of which the detection of targets at low level above the

  11. The Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS): the future of hyperspectral satellite sensors. Imagery of Oostende coastal and inland waters

    OpenAIRE

    B. De Mol; Ruddick, K

    2004-01-01

    The gap between airborne imaging spectroscopy and traditional multi spectral satellite sensors is decreasing thanks to a new generation of satellite sensors of which CHRIS mounted on the small and low-cost PROBA satellite is the prototype. Although image acquisition and analysis are still in a test phase, the high spatial and spectral resolution and pointability have proved their potential. Because of the high resolution small features, which were before only visible on airborne images, becom...

  12. Ocean Wind Fields from Satellite Active Microwave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Zecchetto, S.

    2010-01-01

    Scatterometer QuikSCAT data have been downloaded from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PODAAC) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, USA. The ASCAT data have been obtained from the Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut (Dutch Meteorological Service KNMI, www.knmi.nl) operating in the framework of the Ocean & Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (www.osi-saf.org) of EUMETSAT. The Envisat ASAR Wide Swath image has been downloaded from the ESA web ser...

  13. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  14. Energy-Efficient Optimal Power Allocation in Integrated Wireless Sensor and Cognitive Satellite Terrestrial Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengchao; Li, Guangxia; An, Kang; Gao, Bin; Zheng, Gan

    2017-09-04

    This paper proposes novel satellite-based wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which integrate the WSN with the cognitive satellite terrestrial network. Having the ability to provide seamless network access and alleviate the spectrum scarcity, cognitive satellite terrestrial networks are considered as a promising candidate for future wireless networks with emerging requirements of ubiquitous broadband applications and increasing demand for spectral resources. With the emerging environmental and energy cost concerns in communication systems, explicit concerns on energy efficient resource allocation in satellite networks have also recently received considerable attention. In this regard, this paper proposes energy-efficient optimal power allocation schemes in the cognitive satellite terrestrial networks for non-real-time and real-time applications, respectively, which maximize the energy efficiency (EE) of the cognitive satellite user while guaranteeing the interference at the primary terrestrial user below an acceptable level. Specifically, average interference power (AIP) constraint is employed to protect the communication quality of the primary terrestrial user while average transmit power (ATP) or peak transmit power (PTP) constraint is adopted to regulate the transmit power of the satellite user. Since the energy-efficient power allocation optimization problem belongs to the nonlinear concave fractional programming problem, we solve it by combining Dinkelbach's method with Lagrange duality method. Simulation results demonstrate that the fading severity of the terrestrial interference link is favorable to the satellite user who can achieve EE gain under the ATP constraint comparing to the PTP constraint.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Accuracy of Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosols from space has been a subject of extensive research, with multiple sensors retrieving aerosol properties globally on a daily or weekly basis. The diverse algorithms used for these retrievals operate on different types of reflected signals based on different assumptions about the underlying physical phenomena. Depending on the actual retrieval conditions and especially on the geographical location of the sensed aerosol parcels, the combination of these factors might be advantageous for one or more of the sensors and unfavorable for others, resulting in disagreements between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the use of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to analyze and intercompare aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Based on this intercomparison, we are determining geographical locations where these products provide the greatest accuracy of the retrievals and identifying the products that are the most suitable for retrieval at these locations. The analyses are performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol products to available collocated ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations, during the period of 2006-2010 when all the satellite sensors were operating concurrently. Furthermore, we will discuss results of a statistical approach that is applied to the collocated data to detect and remove potential data outliers that can bias the results of the analysis.

  16. Performance Analysis of Integrated Wireless Sensor and Multibeam Satellite Networks Under Terrestrial Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance of integrated wireless sensor and multibeam satellite networks (IWSMSNs under terrestrial interference. The IWSMSNs constitute sensor nodes (SNs, satellite sinks (SSs, multibeam satellite and remote monitoring hosts (RMHs. The multibeam satellite covers multiple beams and multiple SSs in each beam. The SSs can be directly used as SNs to transmit sensing data to RMHs via the satellite, and they can also be used to collect the sensing data from other SNs to transmit to the RMHs. We propose the hybrid one-dimensional (1D and 2D beam models including the equivalent intra-beam interference factor β from terrestrial communication networks (TCNs and the equivalent inter-beam interference factor α from adjacent beams. The terrestrial interference is possibly due to the signals from the TCNs or the signals of sinks being transmitted to other satellite networks. The closed-form approximations of capacity per beam are derived for the return link of IWSMSNs under terrestrial interference by using the Haar approximations where the IWSMSNs experience the Rician fading channel. The optimal joint decoding capacity can be considered as the upper bound where all of the SSs’ signals can be jointly decoded by a super-receiver on board the multibeam satellite or a gateway station that knows all of the code books. While the linear minimum mean square error (MMSE capacity is where all of the signals of SSs are decoded singularly by a multibeam satellite or a gateway station. The simulations show that the optimal capacities are obviously higher than the MMSE capacities under the same conditions, while the capacities are lowered by Rician fading and converge as the Rician factor increases. α and β jointly affect the performance of hybrid 1D and 2D beam models, and the number of SSs also contributes different effects on the optimal capacity and MMSE capacity of the IWSMSNs.

  17. Performance Analysis of Integrated Wireless Sensor and Multibeam Satellite Networks Under Terrestrial Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjun; Yin, Hao; Gong, Xiangwu; Dong, Feihong; Ren, Baoquan; He, Yuanzhi; Wang, Jingchao

    2016-10-14

    This paper investigates the performance of integrated wireless sensor and multibeam satellite networks (IWSMSNs) under terrestrial interference. The IWSMSNs constitute sensor nodes (SNs), satellite sinks (SSs), multibeam satellite and remote monitoring hosts (RMHs). The multibeam satellite covers multiple beams and multiple SSs in each beam. The SSs can be directly used as SNs to transmit sensing data to RMHs via the satellite, and they can also be used to collect the sensing data from other SNs to transmit to the RMHs. We propose the hybrid one-dimensional (1D) and 2D beam models including the equivalent intra-beam interference factor β from terrestrial communication networks (TCNs) and the equivalent inter-beam interference factor α from adjacent beams. The terrestrial interference is possibly due to the signals from the TCNs or the signals of sinks being transmitted to other satellite networks. The closed-form approximations of capacity per beam are derived for the return link of IWSMSNs under terrestrial interference by using the Haar approximations where the IWSMSNs experience the Rician fading channel. The optimal joint decoding capacity can be considered as the upper bound where all of the SSs' signals can be jointly decoded by a super-receiver on board the multibeam satellite or a gateway station that knows all of the code books. While the linear minimum mean square error (MMSE) capacity is where all of the signals of SSs are decoded singularly by a multibeam satellite or a gateway station. The simulations show that the optimal capacities are obviously higher than the MMSE capacities under the same conditions, while the capacities are lowered by Rician fading and converge as the Rician factor increases. α and β jointly affect the performance of hybrid 1D and 2D beam models, and the number of SSs also contributes different effects on the optimal capacity and MMSE capacity of the IWSMSNs.

  18. Impact of Missing Passive Microwave Sensors on Multi-Satellite Precipitation Retrieval Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of one or two missing passive microwave (PMW input sensors on the end product of multi-satellite precipitation products is an interesting but obscure issue for both algorithm developers and data users. On 28 January 2013, the Version-7 TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA products were reproduced and re-released by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center because the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager-Sounder-F16 (SSMIS-F16 input data were unintentionally disregarded in the prior retrieval. Thus, this study investigates the sensitivity of TMPA algorithm results to missing PMW sensors by intercomparing the “early” and “late” Version-7 TMPA real-time (TMPA-RT precipitation estimates (i.e., without and with AMSU-B, SSMIS-F16 sensors with an independent high-density gauge network of 200 tipping-bucket rain gauges over the Chinese Jinghe river basin (45,421 km2. The retrieval counts and retrieval frequency of various PMW and Infrared (IR sensors incorporated into the TMPA system were also analyzed to identify and diagnose the impacts of sensor availability on the TMPA-RT retrieval accuracy. Results show that the incorporation of AMSU-B and SSMIS-F16 has substantially reduced systematic errors. The improvement exhibits rather strong seasonal and topographic dependencies. Our analyses suggest that one or two single PMW sensors might play a key role in affecting the end product of current combined microwave-infrared precipitation estimates. This finding supports algorithm developers’ current endeavor in spatiotemporally incorporating as many PMW sensors as possible in the multi-satellite precipitation retrieval system called Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement mission (IMERG. This study also recommends users of satellite precipitation products to switch to the newest Version-7 TMPA datasets and

  19. Dynamic Range and Sensitivity Requirements of Satellite Ocean Color Sensors: Learning from the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Feng, Lian; Lee, Zhongping; Davis, Curtiss O.; Mannino, Antonio; McClain, Charles R.; Franz, Bryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensor design and mission planning for satellite ocean color measurements requires careful consideration of the signal dynamic range and sensitivity (specifically here signal-to-noise ratio or SNR) so that small changes of ocean properties (e.g., surface chlorophyll-a concentrations or Chl) can be quantified while most measurements are not saturated. Past and current sensors used different signal levels, formats, and conventions to specify these critical parameters, making it difficult to make cross-sensor comparisons or to establish standards for future sensor design. The goal of this study is to quantify these parameters under uniform conditions for widely used past and current sensors in order to provide a reference for the design of future ocean color radiometers. Using measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard the Aqua satellite (MODISA) under various solar zenith angles (SZAs), typical (L(sub typical)) and maximum (L(sub max)) at-sensor radiances from the visible to the shortwave IR were determined. The Ltypical values at an SZA of 45 deg were used as constraints to calculate SNRs of 10 multiband sensors at the same L(sub typical) radiance input and 2 hyperspectral sensors at a similar radiance input. The calculations were based on clear-water scenes with an objective method of selecting pixels with minimal cross-pixel variations to assure target homogeneity. Among the widely used ocean color sensors that have routine global coverage, MODISA ocean bands (1 km) showed 2-4 times higher SNRs than the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (Sea-WiFS) (1 km) and comparable SNRs to the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS)-RR (reduced resolution, 1.2 km), leading to different levels of precision in the retrieved Chl data product. MERIS-FR (full resolution, 300 m) showed SNRs lower than MODISA and MERIS-RR with the gain in spatial resolution. SNRs of all MODISA ocean bands and SeaWiFS bands (except the SeaWiFS near-IR bands

  20. Saharan dust detection using multi-sensor satellite measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Qu, John J; Hao, X

    2017-02-01

    Contemporary scientists have vested interest in trying to understand the climatology of the North Atlantic Basin since this region is considered as the genesis for hurricane formation that eventually get shipped to the tropical Atlantic region and the Caribbean. The effects of atmospheric water cycle and the climate of West Africa and the Atlantic basin are hugely impacted by the radiative forcing of Saharan dust. The focus area in this paper would be to improve the dust detection schemes by employing the use of multi sensor measurements in the thermal emissive wavelengths using legacy sensors such as Terra (T) and Aqua (A) MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), fusing with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Previous work by Hao and Qu (2007) had considered a limited number of thermal infrared channels which led to a correlation coefficient R(2) value of 0.765 between the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at 550 nm and the modeled dust index. In this work, we extend the thermal infrared based dust detection by employing additional channels: the 8.55 μm which has shown high sensitivity to the Saharan dust, along with water vapor channel of 7.1 μm and cloud top channel of 13.1 μm. Also, the dust pixels were clearly identified using the OMI based aerosol types. The dust pixels were cleanly segregated from the other aerosol types such as sulfates, biomass, and other carbonaceous aerosols. These improvements led to a much higher correlation coefficient R(2) value of 0.85 between the modified dust index and the AOT in comparison to the previous work. The key limitations from the current AOT products based on MODIS and were put to test by validating the improved dust detection algorithm. Two improvements were noted. First, the dust measurement radiometry using MODIS is significantly improved by at least an order of 2. Second the spatial measurements are enhanced by a factor of at least 10.

  1. Saharan dust detection using multi-sensor satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha Madhavan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientists have vested interest in trying to understand the climatology of the North Atlantic Basin since this region is considered as the genesis for hurricane formation that eventually get shipped to the tropical Atlantic region and the Caribbean. The effects of atmospheric water cycle and the climate of West Africa and the Atlantic basin are hugely impacted by the radiative forcing of Saharan dust. The focus area in this paper would be to improve the dust detection schemes by employing the use of multi sensor measurements in the thermal emissive wavelengths using legacy sensors such as Terra (T and Aqua (A MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, fusing with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. Previous work by Hao and Qu (2007 had considered a limited number of thermal infrared channels which led to a correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.765 between the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT at 550 nm and the modeled dust index. In this work, we extend the thermal infrared based dust detection by employing additional channels: the 8.55 μm which has shown high sensitivity to the Saharan dust, along with water vapor channel of 7.1 μm and cloud top channel of 13.1 μm. Also, the dust pixels were clearly identified using the OMI based aerosol types. The dust pixels were cleanly segregated from the other aerosol types such as sulfates, biomass, and other carbonaceous aerosols. These improvements led to a much higher correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.85 between the modified dust index and the AOT in comparison to the previous work. The key limitations from the current AOT products based on MODIS and were put to test by validating the improved dust detection algorithm. Two improvements were noted. First, the dust measurement radiometry using MODIS is significantly improved by at least an order of 2. Second the spatial measurements are enhanced by a factor of at least 10.

  2. Viewing Atmospheric Aerosols from the MODIS Satellite Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, L.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently aboard both the Terra and Aqua satellites produces a suite of products designed to characterize global aerosol distribution, optical thickness and particle size. Never before has a space-borne instrument been able to provide such detailed information, complementing field and modeling efforts to produce a comprehensive picture of aerosol characteristics. The three years of Terra-MODIS data have been validated by comparing with co-located AERONET observations of aerosol optical thickness and derivations of aerosol size parameters. Some 8000 comparison points located at 133 AERONET sites around the globe show that the MODIS aerosol optical thickness retrievals are accurate to within the pre-launch expectations, on a global basis. The global statistics, however, can hide local biases in the product. Some of these biases will be discussed. Nevertheless, the products can be used and are currently being used to answer some pressing questions concerning aerosol radiative forcing, aerosol-cloud interaction, estimating aerosol sources and height of transport, and Air Quality forecasting. A survey of current applications of MODIS aerosol products will be presented.

  3. Monitoring Animal Behaviour and Environmental Interactions Using Wireless Sensor Networks, GPS Collars and Satellite Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Corke

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Remote monitoring of animal behaviour in the environment can assist in managing both the animal and its environmental impact. GPS collars which record animal locations with high temporal frequency allow researchers to monitor both animal behaviour and interactions with the environment. These ground-based sensors can be combined with remotely-sensed satellite images to understand animal-landscape interactions. The key to combining these technologies is communication methods such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs. We explore this concept using a case-study from an extensive cattle enterprise in northern Australia and demonstrate the potential for combining GPS collars and satellite images in a WSN to monitor behavioural preferences and social behaviour of cattle.

  4. Amazon vegetation greenness as measured by satellite sensors over the last decade

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, P.M.; Dash, J.; Jeganathan, C.

    2011-01-01

    [1] During the last decade two major drought events, one in 2005 and another in 2010, occurred in the Amazon basin. Several studies have claimed the ability to detect the effect of these droughts on Amazon vegetation response, measured through satellite sensor vegetation indices (VIs). Such monitoring capability is important as it potentially links climate changes (increasing frequency and severity of drought), vegetation response as observed through vegetation greenness, and land-atmosphere ...

  5. Offset of a Drag-Free Sensor from the Center of Gravity of Its Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott R.

    2003-01-01

    The drag-free satellite is one that encloses a proof mass, shielding it from atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure (SRP). By sensing the location of the proof mass in the body and using thrusters to force the spacecraft to follow the proof mass in a closed-loop fashion, the effects of drag and SRP may be eliminated from the spacecraft orbit. Thus, several benefits may be gained, including improved ephemeris propagation and reduced operational costs. The package including the proof mass and the location sensing equipment may be considered as a single sensor; if generalized, such a sensor could be manufactured and used more easily in satellite designs, similar to how current missions use, for example, rate gyros and magnetometers. The flight heritage of the technology has been such that the proof mass sensor is a primary facet of the mission, allowing it to dominate design considerations. In particular, this paper discusses the effects that may be expected if a generalized drag-free sensor is placed some distance away from the spacecraft center of gravity. The proof mass will follow a given gravitational orbit, and a separation from the spacecraft center of gravity places the spacecraft itself in a different orbit from the proof mass, requiring additional fuel just to maintain function of the drag- free sensor. Conclusions include some guiding principles for determining whether certain mission characteristics may restrict or preclude the use of drag-free sensors for that mission. These principles may be used both by mission planners considering drag-free missions and by hardware designers considering or pursuing the development of such generalized sensors.

  6. Signal Conditioning for the Kalman Filter: Application to Satellite Attitude Estimation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Segundo; Girón-Sierra, Jose M; Polo, Óscar R; Angulo, Manuel

    2016-10-31

    Most satellites use an on-board attitude estimation system, based on available sensors. In the case of low-cost satellites, which are of increasing interest, it is usual to use magnetometers and Sun sensors. A Kalman filter is commonly recommended for the estimation, to simultaneously exploit the information from sensors and from a mathematical model of the satellite motion. It would be also convenient to adhere to a quaternion representation. This article focuses on some problems linked to this context. The state of the system should be represented in observable form. Singularities due to alignment of measured vectors cause estimation problems. Accommodation of the Kalman filter originates convergence difficulties. The article includes a new proposal that solves these problems, not needing changes in the Kalman filter algorithm. In addition, the article includes assessment of different errors, initialization values for the Kalman filter; and considers the influence of the magnetic dipole moment perturbation, showing how to handle it as part of the Kalman filter framework.

  7. Epipolar Resampling of Cross-Track Pushbroom Satellite Imagery Using the Rigorous Sensor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, Mojtaba; Valadan Zoej, Mohammad Javad; Mokhtarzade, Mehdi

    2017-01-11

    Epipolar resampling aims to eliminate the vertical parallax of stereo images. Due to the dynamic nature of the exterior orientation parameters of linear pushbroom satellite imagery and the complexity of reconstructing the epipolar geometry using rigorous sensor models, so far, no epipolar resampling approach has been proposed based on these models. In this paper for the first time it is shown that the orientation of the instantaneous baseline (IB) of conjugate image points (CIPs) in the linear pushbroom satellite imagery can be modeled with high precision in terms of the rows- and the columns-number of CIPs. Taking advantage of this feature, a novel approach is then presented for epipolar resampling of cross-track linear pushbroom satellite imagery. The proposed method is based on the rigorous sensor model. As the instantaneous position of sensors remains fixed, the digital elevation model of the area of interest is not required in the resampling process. Experimental results obtained from two pairs of SPOT and one pair of RapidEye stereo imagery with different terrain conditions shows that the proposed epipolar resampling approach benefits from a superior accuracy, as the remained vertical parallaxes of all CIPs in the normalized images are close to zero.

  8. Signal Conditioning for the Kalman Filter: Application to Satellite Attitude Estimation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segundo Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most satellites use an on-board attitude estimation system, based on available sensors. In the case of low-cost satellites, which are of increasing interest, it is usual to use magnetometers and Sun sensors. A Kalman filter is commonly recommended for the estimation, to simultaneously exploit the information from sensors and from a mathematical model of the satellite motion. It would be also convenient to adhere to a quaternion representation. This article focuses on some problems linked to this context. The state of the system should be represented in observable form. Singularities due to alignment of measured vectors cause estimation problems. Accommodation of the Kalman filter originates convergence difficulties. The article includes a new proposal that solves these problems, not needing changes in the Kalman filter algorithm. In addition, the article includes assessment of different errors, initialization values for the Kalman filter; and considers the influence of the magnetic dipole moment perturbation, showing how to handle it as part of the Kalman filter framework.

  9. Epipolar Resampling of Cross-Track Pushbroom Satellite Imagery Using the Rigorous Sensor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Jannati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epipolar resampling aims to eliminate the vertical parallax of stereo images. Due to the dynamic nature of the exterior orientation parameters of linear pushbroom satellite imagery and the complexity of reconstructing the epipolar geometry using rigorous sensor models, so far, no epipolar resampling approach has been proposed based on these models. In this paper for the first time it is shown that the orientation of the instantaneous baseline (IB of conjugate image points (CIPs in the linear pushbroom satellite imagery can be modeled with high precision in terms of the rows- and the columns-number of CIPs. Taking advantage of this feature, a novel approach is then presented for epipolar resampling of cross-track linear pushbroom satellite imagery. The proposed method is based on the rigorous sensor model. As the instantaneous position of sensors remains fixed, the digital elevation model of the area of interest is not required in the resampling process. Experimental results obtained from two pairs of SPOT and one pair of RapidEye stereo imagery with different terrain conditions shows that the proposed epipolar resampling approach benefits from a superior accuracy, as the remained vertical parallaxes of all CIPs in the normalized images are close to zero.

  10. Spatial Scaling of Snow Observations and Microwave Emission Modeling During CLPX and Appropriate Satellite Sensor Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimates of snow water equivalent and other properties play an important role in weather, natural hazard, and hydrological forecasting and climate modeling over a range of scales in space and time. Remote sensing-derived estimates have traditionally been of the "snapshot" type, but techniques involving models with assimilation are also being explored. In both cases, forward emission models are useful to understand the observed passive microwave signatures and developing retrieval algorithms. However, mismatches between passive microwave sensor resolutions and the scales of processes controlling subpixel heterogeneity can affect the accuracy of the estimates. Improving the spatial resolution of new passive microwave satellite sensors is a major desire in order to (literally) resolve such subpixel heterogeneity, but limited spacecraft and mission resources impose severe constraints and tradeoffs. In order to maximize science return while mitigating risk for a satellite concept, it is essential to understand the scaling behavior of snow in terms of what the sensor sees (brightness temperature) as well as in terms of the actual variability of snow. NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment-1 (CLPX-1: Colorado, 2002 and 2003) was designed to provide data to measure these scaling behaviors for varying snow conditions in areas with forested, alpine, and meadow/pasture land cover. We will use observations from CLPX-1 ground, airborne, and satellite passive microwave sensors to examine and evaluate the scaling behavior of observed and modeled brightness temperatures and observed and retrieved snow parameters across scales from meters to 10's of kilometers. The conclusions will provide direct examples of the appropriate spatial sampling scales of new sensors for snow remote sensing. The analyses will also illustrate the effects and spatial scales of the underlying phenomena (e.g., land cover) that control subpixel heterogeneity.

  11. Barium Strontium Titanate Thin Film Growth with rotational speed variation as a satellite temperature sensor prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadi; Rika, W.; Sulidah; Irzaman; Hardhienata, Hendradi

    2017-01-01

    Barium Strontium Titanate(BST) is a promising material for sensor devices such as temperature and infrared sensor. BaxSr1-xTiO3 thin films with affordable Si substrate were prepared by chemical solution deposition method and spin coating technique for 30 seconds with variation in rotation speed (3000 rpm, 5500 rpm and 8000 rpm). A high baking temperature at 8500C has been used for 15 hours during the annealing process. The thickness of BST film was calculated via gravimetric calculation. USB 2000 VIS-NIR was used to characterize the optical properties of BST thin film. The obtained reflectance curve showed that the most reflected wavelengths were in the range of 408-452 nm respectively. The result of the optical film characterization is very important for further development as a sensor in satellite technology.

  12. Assimilation of Real-Time Satellite And Human Sensor Networks for Modeling Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulov, O.; Halem, M.; Lary, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of underlying technologies needed to address the merging of a web of real time satellite sensor Web (SSW) and Human Sensor Web (HSW) needed to augment the US response to extreme events. As an initial prototyping step and use case scenario, we consider the development of two major system tools that can be transitioned from research to the responding operational agency for mitigating coastal oil spills. These tools consist of the capture of Situation Aware (SA) Social Media (SM) Data, and assimilation of the processed information into forecasting models to provide incident decision managers with interactive virtual spatial temporal animations superimposed with probabilistic data estimates. The system methodologies are equally applicable to the wider class of extreme events such as plume dispersions from volcanoes or massive fires, major floods, hurricane impacts, radioactive isotope dispersions from nuclear accidents, etc. A successful feasibility demonstration of this technology has been shown in the case of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill where Human Sensor Networks have been combined with a geophysical model to perform parameter assessments. Flickr images of beached oil were mined from the spill area, geolocated and timestamped and converted into geophysical data. This data was incorporated into General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME), a Lagrangian forecast model that uses near real-time surface winds, ocean currents, and satellite shape profiles of oil to generate a forecast of plume movement. As a result, improved estimates of diffusive coefficients and rates of oil spill were determined. Current approaches for providing satellite derived oil distributions are collected from a satellite sensor web of operational and research sensors from many countries, and a manual analysis is performed by NESDIS. A real time SA HSW processing system based on geolocated SM data from sources such as Twitter, Flickr, YouTube etc., greatly

  13. Spectral Discrimination and Reflectance Properties of Various Vine Varieties from Satellite, UAV and Proximate Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakizi, C.; Oikonomou, M.; Karantzalos, K.

    2015-04-01

    An assessment of the spectral discrimination between different vine varieties was undertaken using non-destructive remote sensing observations at the veraison period. During concurrent satellite, aerial and field campaigns, in-situ reflectance data were collected from a spectroradiometer, hyperspectral data were acquired from a UAV and multispectral data from a high-resolution satellite imaging sensor. Data were collected during a three years period (i.e, 2012, 2013 and 2014) over five wine-growing regions, covering more than 1000ha, in Greece. Data for more than twenty different vine varieties were processed and analysed. In particular, reflectance hyperspectral data from a spectroradiometer (GER 1500, Spectra Vista Corporation, 350-1050nm, 512 spectral bands) were calculated from the raw radiance values and then were correlated with the corresponding reflectance observations from the UAV and satellite data. Reflectance satellite data (WorldView-2, 400nm-1040nm, 8 spectral bands, DigitalGlobe), after the radiometric and atmospheric correction of the raw datasets, were classified towards the detection and the discrimination of the different vine varieties. The concurrent observations from in-situ hyperspectral, aerial hyperspectral and satellite multispectral data over the same vines were highly correlated. High correlations were, also, established for the same vine varieties (e.g., Syrah, Sauvignon Blanc) cultivated in different regions. The analysis of in-situ reflectance indicated that certain vine varieties, like Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, Ksinomavro and Agiorgitiko possess specific spectral properties and detectable behaviour. These observations were, in most cases, in accordance with the classification results from the high resolution satellite data. In particular, Merlot and also Sauvignon Blanc were detected and discriminated with high accuracy rates. Surprisingly different clones from the same variety could be separated (e.g., clones of Syrah), while they

  14. Comparison of Satellite-Derived Wind Measurements with Other Wind Measurement Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, Michael; Herman, Leroy

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the good data from the Jimsphere launches with the data from the satellite system. By comparing the wind speeds from the Fixed Pedestal System 16 (FPS-16) Radar/Jimsphere Wind System and NASA's 50-MHz Radar Wind Profiler, the validation of winds from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 7 (GOES-7) is performed. This study provides an in situ data quality check for the GOES-7 satellite winds. Comparison was made of the flowfields in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere of case studies of pairs of Jimsphere balloon releases and Radar Wind Profiler winds during Space Shuttle launches. The mean and standard deviation of the zonal component statistics, the meridional component statistics, and the power spectral density curves show good agreement between the two wind sensors. The standard deviation of the u and v components for the STS-37 launch (consisting of five Jimsphere/Radar Wind Profiler data sets) was 1.92 and 1.67 m/s, respectively; for the STS-43 launch (there were six Jimsphere/Wind Profiler data sets) it was 1.39 and 1.44 m/s, respectively. The overall standard deviation was 1.66 m/s for the u component and 1.55 m/s tor the v component, and a standard deviation of 2.27 m/s tor the vector wind difference. The global comparison of satellite with Jimsphere balloon vector winds shows a standard deviation of 3.15 m/s for STS-43 and 4.37 m/s for STS-37. The overall standard deviation of the vector wind was 3.76 m/s, with a root-mean-square vector difference of 4.43 m/s. These data have demonstrated that this unique comparison of the Jimsphere and satellite winds provides excellent ground truth and a frame of reference during testing and validation of satellite data

  15. CareSam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liveng, Anne; Christensen, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    negative cultural perceptions of help-needing elderly and the people who support them in everyday life? In answering these questions and thereby reflecting on our own work process we apply a caring, a learning and a political perspective. Hereby the article wishes to formulate a methodological point......This article presents findings and discussions generated on the basis of the Danish-Swedish development project CareSam. The article will on the one hand focus on how work in groups consisting of representatives from different levels in the elderly care sector at one time served as learning spaces...... in the project-groups this paper will ask whether it is possible to represent care work for elderly people with all the ambiguities it holds: How can we as researchers represent both meaningfulness and straining dimensions of care work? Can we avoid either supporting Florence Nightingale-ideals or cementing...

  16. Phase Compensation Sensor for Ranging Consistency in Inter-Satellite Links of Navigation Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Hu, Mei

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) can be enhanced significantly by introducing the inter-satellite links (ISL) of a navigation constellation. In particular, the improvement of the position, velocity, and time accuracy, and the realization of autonomous functions require the ISL distance measurement data as the original input. For building a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency between navigation satellites becomes a crucial problem to be addressed. Considering the frequency aging drift and the relativistic effect of the navigation satellite, the frequency and phase adjustment (FPA) instructions for the 10.23 MHz must be injected from the ground station to ensure the time synchronization of the navigation constellation. Moreover, the uncertainty of the initial phase each time the onboard clock equipment boots also results in a pseudo-range offset. In this Ref., we focus on the influence of the frequency and phase characteristics of the onboard clock equipment on the ranging consistency of the ISL and propose a phase compensation sensor design method for the phase offset. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method not only realized a phase compensation for the pseudo-range jitter, but, when the 1 PPS (1 pulse per second) falls in the 10.23 MHz skip area, also overcomes the problem of compensating the ambiguous phase by directly tracking the 10.23 MHz to ensure consistency in the ranging. PMID:28245572

  17. Land use change detection based on multi-date imagery from different satellite sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stow, Douglas A.; Collins, Doretta; Mckinsey, David

    1990-01-01

    An empirical study is conducted to assess the accuracy of land use change detection using satellite image data acquired ten years apart by sensors with differing spatial resolutions. The primary goals of the investigation were to (1) compare standard change detection methods applied to image data of varying spatial resolution, (2) assess whether to transform the raster grid of the higher resolution image data to that of the lower resolution raster grid or vice versa in the registration process, (3) determine if Landsat/Thermatic Mapper or SPOT/High Resolution Visible multispectral data provide more accurate detection of land use changes when registered to historical Landsat/MSS data. It is concluded that image ratioing of multisensor, multidate satellite data produced higher change detection accuracies than did principal components analysis, and that it is useful as a land use change enhancement method.

  18. Geometric Quality Assessment of Bundle Block Adjusted Mulit- Sensor Satellite Imageries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Bhawani Kumar, P. S.; Radhadevi, P. V.; Srinivas, V.; Saibaba, J.; Varadan, G.

    2014-11-01

    The integration of multi-sensor earth observation data belonging to same area has become one of the most important input for resource mapping and management. Geometric error and fidelity between adjacent scenes affects large-area digital mosaic if the images/ scenes are processed independently. A block triangulation approach "Bundle Block Adjustment (BBA)" system has been developed at ADRIN for combined processing of multi-sensor, multi-resolution satellite imagery to achieve better geometric continuity. In this paper we present the evaluation results of BBA software along with performance assessment and operational use of products thus generated. The application evaluation deals with functional aspects of block-adjustment of satellite imagery consisting of data from multiple sources, i.e. AWiFs, LISS-3, LISS-4 and Cartosat-1 in various combinations as single block. It has provision for automatic generation of GCPs and tie-points using image metafile/ Rational Polynomial Coefficient's (RPC's) and ortho/ merged/ mosaicked products generation. The study is carried out with datasets covering different terrain types (ranging from high mountainous area, moderately undulating terrain, coastal plain, agriculture fields, urban area and water-body) across Indian subcontinent with varying block sizes and spatial reference systems. Geometric accuracy assessment is carried out to figure out error propagation at scene based ortho/ merged products as well as block level. The experimental results confirm that pixel tagging, geometric fidelity and feature continuity across adjacent scenes as well as for multiple sensors reduced to a great extent, due to the high redundancy. The results demonstrate that it is one of the most affective geometric corrections for generating large area digital mosaic over High mountainous terrain using high resolution good swath satellite imagery, like Cartosat-1, with minimum human intervention.

  19. Monolithic sensors for low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we describe the characteristics and performances of a monolithic sensor designed for low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites, whose mechanics is based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum. The latter, developed for ground-based applications, exhibits unique features (compactness, lightness, scalability, low resonance frequency and high quality factor), consequence of the action of the gravitational force on its inertial mass. In this paper we introduce and discuss the general methodology used to extend the application of ground-based folded pendulums to space, also in total absence of gravity, still keeping all their peculiar features and characteristics.

  20. Combined Use of Polar and Geostationary Satellite Sensors For Aerosol Characterization Over The Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. J.; Cervino, M.; Levizzani, V.; Silva, A. M.

    Aerosol particles play an important role in the Earth's climate due to their direct and indirect interaction with the atmosphere. Monitoring of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosol is thus crucial for a radiative forcing quantification at the lo- cal, regional and global scales. Ground-based measurements provide accurate aerosol properties. However, given the strong spatial and temporal variability of tropospheric aerosols ground measurements cannot cover the global scale. On the other hand, satellite-based algorithms for aerosol retrievals presently do not match the accuracy of ground-based results. Most satellite algorithms are based on a single sensor, thus often suffering from specific limitations (poor spatial or spectral resolution, long re- visitation time, poor cloud mask). A method to exploit the synergy between the polar orbiting Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) onboard ERS-2 and the METEOSAT geostationary system was proposed (Costa et al., 2001), aiming at increasing the accuracy of the aerosol charac- terization and monitoring of the optical thickness. A validation of the algorithm is done by comparing satellite retrievals with results obtained via independent space-time co- located ground-based measurements from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) and from other state of the art algorithms that make use of satellite measurements such as the MODIS official aerosol product. Results of the ongoing validation are pre- sented for relevant transport events of desert dust and biomass burning aerosol over the Atlantic and Indian Oceans during year 2000. References: Costa,M.J., M.Cervino, E.Cattani, F.Torricella, V.Levizzani, and A.M.Silva, 2001: "Aerosol characterization and optical thickness retrievals using GOME and METEOSAT satellite data". Meteor. Atmos. Phys., (in press). Acknowledgements: METEOSAT imagery was kindly made available by EUMET- SAT. We thank the AERONET investigators and their staff for establishing and main- taining the

  1. An Optical Sensor Network for Vegetation Phenology Monitoring and Satellite Data Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Heliasz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a network of sites across Fennoscandia for optical sampling of vegetation properties relevant for phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration. The network currently consists of five sites, distributed along an N-S gradient through Sweden and Finland. Two sites are located in coniferous forests, one in a deciduous forest, and two on peatland. The instrumentation consists of dual-beam sensors measuring incoming and reflected red, green, NIR, and PAR fluxes at 10-min intervals, year-round. The sensors are mounted on separate masts or in flux towers in order to capture radiation reflected from within the flux footprint of current eddy covariance measurements. Our computations and model simulations demonstrate the validity of using off-nadir sampling, and we show the results from the first year of measurement. NDVI is computed and compared to that of the MODIS instrument on-board Aqua and Terra satellite platforms. PAR fluxes are partitioned into reflected and absorbed components for the ground and canopy. The measurements demonstrate that the instrumentation provides detailed information about the vegetation phenology and variations in reflectance due to snow cover variations and vegetation development. Valuable information about PAR absorption of ground and canopy is obtained that may be linked to vegetation productivity.

  2. An optical sensor network for vegetation phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklundh, Lars; Jin, Hongxiao; Schubert, Per; Guzinski, Radoslaw; Heliasz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We present a network of sites across Fennoscandia for optical sampling of vegetation properties relevant for phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration. The network currently consists of five sites, distributed along an N-S gradient through Sweden and Finland. Two sites are located in coniferous forests, one in a deciduous forest, and two on peatland. The instrumentation consists of dual-beam sensors measuring incoming and reflected red, green, NIR, and PAR fluxes at 10-min intervals, year-round. The sensors are mounted on separate masts or in flux towers in order to capture radiation reflected from within the flux footprint of current eddy covariance measurements. Our computations and model simulations demonstrate the validity of using off-nadir sampling, and we show the results from the first year of measurement. NDVI is computed and compared to that of the MODIS instrument on-board Aqua and Terra satellite platforms. PAR fluxes are partitioned into reflected and absorbed components for the ground and canopy. The measurements demonstrate that the instrumentation provides detailed information about the vegetation phenology and variations in reflectance due to snow cover variations and vegetation development. Valuable information about PAR absorption of ground and canopy is obtained that may be linked to vegetation productivity.

  3. Pico-satellite Autonomous Navigation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensor Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ke; WANG Hao; TU Binjie; JIN Zhonghe

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a near-Earth satellite orbit estimation method for pico-satellite applications with light-weight and low-power requirements.The method provides orbit information autonomously from magnetometer and sun sensor, with an extended Kalman filter (EKF).Real-time position/velocity parameters are estimated with attitude independently from two quantities: the measured magnitude of the Earth's magnetic field, and the measured dot product of the magnetic field vector and the sun vector.To guarantee the filter's effectiveness, it is recommended that the sun sensor should at least have the same level of accuracy as magnetometer.Furthermore, to reduce filter's computation expense, simplification methods in EKF's Jacobian calculations are introduced and testified, and a polynomial model for fast magnetic field calculation is developed.With these methods,50% of the computation expense in dynamic model propagation and 80% of the computation burden in measurement model calculation can be reduced.Tested with simulation data and compared with original magnetometer-only methods, filter achieves faster convergence and higher accuracy by 75% and 30% respectively, and the suggested simplification methods are proved to be harmless to filter's estimation performance.

  4. An overview of neural network applications for soil moisture retrieval from radar satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, E.; Paloscia, S.; Pettinato, S.

    2014-10-01

    Frequent and spatially distributed measurements of soil moisture (SMC), at different spatial scales, are advisable for all applications related to the environmental disciplines, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. Satellite sensors operating in the low part of microwave spectrum are very suitable for this purpose, and their signals can be directly related to the moisture content of the observed surfaces, provided that all the contributions from soil and vegetation to the measured signal are properly accounted for. Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from both active (i.e. Synthetic Aperture Radar, SAR or real aperture radars) and passive (radiometers) microwave sensors, the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at different spatial resolutions, varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers. These algorithms, which use the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, such as Advanced Integral Equation (AIEM), Oh models, and Radiative transfer Theory (RTT), have been adapted to the C-band acquisitions from SAR (Envisat/ASAR) and real aperture radar (ASCAT) and to the X-band SAR acquisitions of Cosmo-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X. Moreover, a specific ANN algorithm has also been implemented for the L-band active and passive acquisitions of the incoming SMAP mission. The latter satellite will carry onboard simultaneously one radar and one radiometer operating at the same frequency, but with different spatial resolutions (3 and 40 km, respectively). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites located worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these

  5. Phase Compensation Sensor for Ranging Consistency in Inter-Satellite Links of Navigation Constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Hu, Mei

    2017-02-24

    Theperformanceoftheglobalnavigationsatellitesystem(GNSS)canbeenhancedsignificantly by introducing the inter-satellite links (ISL) of a navigation constellation. In particular, the improvement of the position, velocity, and time accuracy, and the realization of autonomous functions require the ISL distance measurement data as the original input. For building a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency between navigation satellites becomes a crucial problem to be addressed. Considering the frequency aging drift and the relativistic effect of the navigation satellite, the frequency and phase adjustment (FPA) instructions for the 10.23 MHz must be injected from the ground station to ensure the time synchronization of the navigation constellation. Moreover, the uncertainty of the initial phase each time the onboard clock equipment boots also results in a pseudo-range offset. In this Ref., we focus on the influence of the frequency and phase characteristics of the onboard clock equipment on the ranging consistency of the ISL and propose a phase compensation sensor design method for the phase offset. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method not only realized a phase compensation for the pseudo-range jitter, but, when the 1 PPS (1 pulse per second) falls in the 10.23 MHz skip area, also overcomes the problem of compensating the ambiguous phase by directly tracking the 10.23 MHz to ensure consistency in the ranging.

  6. On-orbit Demonstration of a Sun Sensor on the Micro-Satellite MAIDO-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okubo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 219 1249 International Islamic University 10 2 1466 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} A 50-kg-class microsatellite “MAIDO-1 (SOHLA-1” was launched, along with six other piggyback subsatellites, by a Japanese H-2A rocket on January 23, 2009. The fundamental and detailed designs of the satellite were developed by university students under the technical guidance of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA. A string-type sun sensor (Fudai Sun Sensor; FSS was also developed by the students with the technical assistance of JAXA and Advanced Engineering Services (AES Co. Ltd. The FSS was mounted on the satellite as an experimental component. This paper reports the development of MAIDO-1 and FSS as well as the satellite operation by the students and the results of on-orbit experiments. ABSTRAK: Satu mikrosatelit kelas 50 kg “MAIDO-1 (SOHLA-1” telah dilancarkan, bersama enam lagi subsatelit gendong, dengan menggunakan roket H-2A (Jepun pada 23 Januari, 2009. Reka bentuk satelit yang asas dan terperinci dibangunkan oleh para pelajar universiti di bawah bimbingan teknikal Agensi Explorasi Aeroangkasa Jepun (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA. Sejenis penderia matahari bertali (Fudai Sun Sensor; FSS juga dibangunkan oleh para penuntut dengan bantuan teknikal dari pihak JAXA dan Advanced Engineering Services (AES Sdn. Bhd. FSS telah dilekapkan ke satelit sebagai komponen eksperimental. Kertas ini membentangkan perkembangan MAIDO-1 dan FSS, operasi satelit oleh pelajar-pelajar dan keputusan eksperimen semasa dalam orbit.

  7. Study of land surface temperature and spectral emissivity using multi-sensor satellite data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Srivastava; T J Majumdar; Amit K Bhattacharya

    2010-02-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to estimate land surface temperatures (LST) and spectral emissivities over a hard rock terrain using multi-sensor satellite data. The study area, of about 6000 km2, is a part of Singhbhum–Orissa craton situated in the eastern part of India. TIR data from ASTER, MODIS and Landsat ETM+ have been used in the present study. Telatemp Model AG-42D Portable Infrared Thermometer was used for ground measurements to validate the results derived from satellite (MODIS/ASTER) data. LSTs derived using Landsat ETM+ data of two different dates have been compared with the satellite data (ASTER and MODIS) of those two dates. Various techniques, viz., temperature and emissivity separation (TES) algorithm, gray body adjustment approach in TES algorithm, Split-Window algorithms and Single Channel algorithm along with NDVI based emissivity approach have been used. LSTs derived from bands 31 and 32 of MODIS data using Split-Window algorithms with higher viewing angle (50°) (LST1 and LST2) are found to have closer agreement with ground temperature measurements (ground LST) over waterbody, Dalma forest and Simlipal forest, than that derived from ASTER data (TES with AST 13). However, over agriculture land, there is some uncertainty and difference between the measured and the estimated LSTs for both validation dates for all the derived LSTs. LST obtained using Single Channel algorithm with NDVI based emissivity method in channel 13 of ASTER data has yielded closer agreement with ground measurements recorded over vegetation and mixed lands of low spectral contrast. LST results obtained with TIR band 6 of Landsat ETM+ using Single Channel algorithm show close agreement over Dalma forest, Simlipal forest and waterbody with LSTs obtained using MODIS and ASTER data for a different date. Comparison of LSTs shows good agreement with ground measurements in thermally homogeneous area. However, results in agriculture area with less homogeneity show

  8. Retrieving the Height of Smoke and Dust Aerosols by Synergistic Use of Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    The Aerosol Single scattering albedo and Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm was first introduced in Jeong and Hsu (2008) to provide aerosol layer height and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass burning smoke aerosols. By using multiple satellite sensors synergistically, ASHE can provide the height information over much broader areas than lidar observations alone. The complete ASHE algorithm uses aerosol data from MODIS or VIIRS, OMI or OMPS, and CALIOP. A simplified algorithm also exists that does not require CALIOP data as long as the SSA of the aerosol layer is provided by another source. Several updates have recently been made: inclusion of dust layers in the retrieval process, better determination of the input aerosol layer height from CALIOP, improvement in aerosol optical depth (AOD) for nonspherical dust, development of quality assurance (QA) procedure, etc.

  9. Micro-Satellite Attitude Determination with Only a Single Horizon Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Gaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through using measurement from only a single horizon sensor, this paper presented a quaternion-based 3-axis attitude determination method, which can be implemented on board micro-satellites and applied over a whole orbital period. Firstly, a description of attitude representation on the quaternion is given. Secondly, a detailed modeling formulation with nadir vector and measurement equations on attitude estimation system is demonstrated. Afterwards, a correction is made to eliminate the estimation error resulted from Earth’s oblateness, and able to further improve the accuracy of the attitude determination algorithm. Finally, a six degree-of-freedom closed-loop simulation is used to validate the accuracy of the attitude determination method given in this paper.

  10. Use of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Satellite for the Namibia SensorWeb Flood Early Warning Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Handy, Matthew; Policelli, Fritz; Katjizeu, McCloud; Van Langenhove, Guido; Aube, Guy; Saulnier, Jean-Francois; Sohlberg, Rob; Silva, Julie; Kussul, Nataliia; Skakun, Sergii; Ungar, Stephen; Grossman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in November 2000 as a one year technology demonstration mission for a variety of space technologies. After the first year, it was used as a pathfinder for the creation of SensorWebs. A SensorWeb is the integration of variety of space, airborne and ground sensors into a loosely coupled collaborative sensor system that automatically provides useful data products. Typically, a SensorWeb is comprised of heterogeneous sensors tied together with a messaging architecture and web services. Disasters are the perfect arena to use SensorWebs. One SensorWeb pilot project that has been active since 2009 is the Namibia Early Flood Warning SensorWeb pilot project. The Pilot Project was established under the auspices of the Namibian Ministry of Agriculture Water and Forestry (MAWF)/Department of Water Affairs, the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS)/Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) and moderated by the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). The effort began by identifying and prototyping technologies which enabled the rapid gathering and dissemination of both space-based and ground sensor data and data products for the purpose of flood disaster management and water-borne disease management. This was followed by an international collaboration to build small portions of the identified system which was prototyped during that past few years during the flood seasons which occurred in the February through May timeframe of 2010 and 2011 with further prototyping to occur in 2012. The SensorWeb system features EO-1 data along with other data sets from such satellites as Radarsat, Terra and Aqua. Finally, the SensorWeb team also began to examine the socioeconomic component to determine the impact of the SensorWeb technology and how best to assist in the infusion of this technology in lesser affluent areas with low levels of basic

  11. Experimental design for the evaluation of high-T(sub c) superconductive thermal bridges in a sensor satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine P.; Lee, Kasey M.

    1994-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites, which consist of cryogenic infrared sensor detectors, electrical instrumentation, and data acquisition systems, are used to monitor the conditions of the earth's upper atmosphere in order to evaluate its present and future changes. Currently, the electrical connections (instrumentation), which act as thermal bridges between the cryogenic infrared sensor and the significantly warmer data acquisition unit of the sensor satellite system, constitute a significant portion of the heat load on the cryogen. As a part of extending the mission life of the sensor satellite system, the researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) are evaluating the effectiveness of replacing the currently used manganin wires with high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as the electrical connections (thermal bridges). In conjunction with the study being conducted at NASA-LaRC, the proposed research is to design a space experiment to determine the thermal savings on a cryogenic subsystem when manganin leads are replaced by HTS leads printed onto a substrate with a low thermal conductivity, and to determine the thermal conductivities of HTS materials. The experiment is designed to compare manganin wires with two different types of superconductors on substrates by determining the heat loss by the thermal bridges and providing temperature measurements for the estimation of thermal conductivity. A conductive mathematical model has been developed and used as a key tool in the design process and subsequent analysis.

  12. Comparing Manual and Semi-Automated Landslide Mapping Based on Optical Satellite Images from Different Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hölbling

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Object-based image analysis (OBIA has been increasingly used to map geohazards such as landslides on optical satellite images. OBIA shows various advantages over traditional image analysis methods due to its potential for considering various properties of segmentation-derived image objects (spectral, spatial, contextual, and textural for classification. For accurately identifying and mapping landslides, however, visual image interpretation is still the most widely used method. The major question therefore is if semi-automated methods such as OBIA can achieve results of comparable quality in contrast to visual image interpretation. In this paper we apply OBIA for detecting and delineating landslides in five selected study areas in Austria and Italy using optical Earth Observation (EO data from different sensors (Landsat 7, SPOT-5, WorldView-2/3, and Sentinel-2 and compare the OBIA mapping results to outcomes from visual image interpretation. A detailed evaluation of the mapping results per study area and sensor is performed by a number of spatial accuracy metrics, and the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches for landslide mapping on optical EO data are discussed. The analyses show that both methods produce similar results, whereby the achieved accuracy values vary between the study areas.

  13. NIR- and SWIR-based on-orbit vicarious calibrations for satellite ocean color sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Lide; Voss, Kenneth

    2016-09-05

    The near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithms are used in satellite ocean color data processing, with the SWIR-based algorithm particularly useful for turbid coastal and inland waters. In this study, we describe the NIR- and two SWIR-based on-orbit vicarious calibration approaches for satellite ocean color sensors, and compare results from these three on-orbit vicarious calibrations using satellite measurements from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP). Vicarious calibration gains for VIIRS spectral bands are derived using the in situ normalized water-leaving radiance nLw(λ) spectra from the Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) in waters off Hawaii. The SWIR vicarious gains are determined using VIIRS measurements from the South Pacific Gyre region, where waters are the clearest and generally stable. Specifically, vicarious gain sets for VIIRS spectral bands of 410, 443, 486, 551, and 671 nm derived from the NIR method using the NIR 745 and 862 nm bands, the SWIR method using the SWIR 1238 and 1601 nm bands, and the SWIR method using the SWIR 1238 and 2257 nm bands are (0.979954, 0.974892, 0.974685, 0.965832, 0.979042), (0.980344, 0.975344, 0.975357, 0.965531, 0.979518), and (0.980820, 0.975609, 0.975761, 0.965888, 0.978576), respectively. Thus, the NIR-based vicarious calibration gains are consistent with those from the two SWIR-based approaches with discrepancies mostly within ~0.05% from three data processing methods. In addition, the NIR vicarious gains (745 and 862 nm) derived from the two SWIR methods are (0.982065, 1.00001) and (0.981811, 1.00000), respectively, with the difference ~0.03% at the NIR 745 nm band. This is the fundamental basis for the NIR-SWIR combined atmospheric correction algorithm, which has been used to derive improved satellite ocean color products over open oceans and turbid coastal/inland waters. Therefore, a unified

  14. [In-Flight Radiometric Calibration for ZY-3 Satellite Multispectral Sensor by Modified Reflectance-Based Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Xie, Yong; Gu, Xing-fa; Yu, Tao; Liu, Qi-yue; Gao, Rong-jun

    2015-03-01

    Through integrating multi-spectral sensor characteristics of ZY-3 satellite, a modified reflectance-based method is proposed and used to achieve ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor in-flight radiometric calibration. This method chooses level 1A image as data source and establishes geometric model to get an accurate observation geometric parameters at calibration site according to the information provided in image auxiliary documentation, which can reduce the influences on the calibration accuracy from image resampling and observation geometry errors. We use two-point and multi-points methods to calculate the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor based on the large campaign at Dongying city, Shan Dong province. Compared with ZY-3 official calibration coefficients, multi-points method has higher accuracy than two-point method. Through analyzing the dispersion between each calibration point and the fitting line, we find that the residual error of water calibration site is larger than others, which of green band is approximately 67.39%. Treating water calibration site as an error, we filter it out using 95.4% confidence level as standard and recalculate the calibration coefficients with multi-points method. The final calibration coefficients show that the relative differences of the first three bands are less than 2% and the last band is less than 5%, which manifests that the proposed radiometric calibration method can obtain accurate and reliable calibration coefficients and is useful for other similar satellites in future.

  15. Sensors, Circuits, and Satellites - NGSS at it's best: the integration of three dimensions with NASA science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, G. J.; Roberts-Harris, D.

    2013-12-01

    A set of innovative classroom lessons were developed based on informal learning activities in the 'Sensors, Circuits, and Satellites' kit manufactured by littleBits™ Electronics that are designed to lead students through a logical science content storyline about energy using sound and light and fully implements an integrated approach to the three dimensions of the Next Generation of Science Standards (NGSS). This session will illustrate the integration of NGSS into curriculum by deconstructing lesson design to parse out the unique elements of the 3 dimensions of NGSS. We will demonstrate ways in which we have incorporated the NGSS as we believe they were intended. According to the NGSS, 'The real innovation in the NGSS is the requirement that students are required to operate at the intersection of practice, content, and connection. Performance expectations are the right way to integrate the three dimensions. It provides specificity for educators, but it also sets the tone for how science instruction should look in classrooms. (p. 3). The 'Sensors, Circuits, and Satellites' series of lessons accomplishes this by going beyond just focusing on the conceptual knowledge (the disciplinary core ideas) - traditionally approached by mapping lessons to standards. These lessons incorporate the other 2 dimensions -cross-cutting concepts and the 8-practices of Sciences and Engineering-via an authentic and exciting connection to NASA science, thus implementing the NGSS in the way they were designed to be used: practices and content with the crosscutting concepts. When the NGSS are properly integrated, students are engaged in science and engineering content through the coupling of practice, content and connection. In the past, these two dimensions have been separated as distinct entities. We know now that coupling content and practices better demonstrates what goes on in real world science and engineering. We set out to accomplish what is called for in NGSS by integrating these

  16. System for Award Management (SAM) API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The SAM API is a RESTful method of retrieving public information about the businesses, organizations, or individuals (referred to as entities) within the SAM entity...

  17. Hail detection algorithm for the Global Precipitation Measuring mission core satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Kamil; Battaglia, Alessandro; Lang, Timothy J.; Tanelli, Simone; Cecil, Daniel J.; Tridon, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    By exploiting an abundant number of extreme storms observed simultaneously by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite's suite of sensors and by the ground-based S-band Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over continental US, proxies for the identification of hail are developed based on the GPM core satellite observables. The full capabilities of the GPM observatory are tested by analyzing more than twenty observables and adopting the hydrometeor classification based on ground-based polarimetric measurements as truth. The proxies have been tested using the Critical Success Index (CSI) as a verification measure. The hail detection algorithm based on the mean Ku reflectivity in the mixed-phase layer performs the best, out of all considered proxies (CSI of 45%). Outside the Dual frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) swath, the Polarization Corrected Temperature at 18.7 GHz shows the greatest potential for hail detection among all GMI channels (CSI of 26% at a threshold value of 261 K). When dual variable proxies are considered, the combination involving the mixed-phase reflectivity values at both Ku and Ka-bands outperforms all the other proxies, with a CSI of 49%. The best-performing radar-radiometer algorithm is based on the mixed-phase reflectivity at Ku-band and on the brightness temperature (TB) at 10.7 GHz (CSI of 46%). When only radiometric data are available, the algorithm based on the TBs at 36.6 and 166 GHz is the most efficient, with a CSI of 27.5%.

  18. Estimating stream discharge from a Himalayan Glacier using coupled satellite sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, S. F.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Haritashya, U. K.; Tarpanelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 4th IPCC report highlighted our limited understanding of Himalayan glacier behavior and contribution to the region's hydrology. Seasonal snow and glacier melt in the Himalayas are important sources of water, but estimates greatly differ about the actual contribution of melted glacier ice to stream discharge. A more comprehensive understanding of the contribution of glaciers to stream discharge is needed because streams being fed by glaciers affect the livelihoods of a large part of the world's population. Most of the streams in the Himalayas are unmonitored because in situ measurements are logistically difficult and costly. This necessitates the use of remote sensing platforms to obtain estimates of river discharge for validating hydrological models. In this study, we estimate stream discharge using cost-effective methods via repeat satellite imagery from Landsat-8 and SENTINEL-1A sensors. The methodology is based on previous studies, which show that ratio values from optical satellite bands correlate well with measured stream discharge. While similar, our methodology relies on significantly higher resolution imagery (30 m) and utilizes bands that are in the blue and near-infrared spectrum as opposed to previous studies using 250 m resolution imagery and spectral bands only in the near-infrared. Higher resolution imagery is necessary for streams where the source is a glacier's terminus because the width of the stream is often only 10s of meters. We validate our methodology using two rivers in the state of Kansas, where stream gauges are plentiful. We then apply our method to the Bhagirathi River, in the North-Central Himalayas, which is fed by the Gangotri Glacier and has a well monitored stream gauge. The analysis will later be used to couple river discharge and glacier flow and mass balance through an integrated hydrologic model in the Bhagirathi Basin.

  19. Retrievals of Falling Snow from Satellite-borne Active and Passive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gail; Munchak, S. Joseph; Johnson, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Precipitation, including rain and snow, is a critical part of the Earth's energy and hydrology cycles. Precipitation impacts latent heating profiles locally while global circulation patterns distribute precipitation and energy from the equator to the poles. For the hydrological cycle, falling snow is a primary contributor in northern latitudes during the winter seasons. Falling snow is the source of snow pack accumulations that provide fresh water resources for many communities in the world. Furthermore, falling snow impacts society by causing transportation disruptions during severe snow events. In order to collect information on the complete global precipitation cycle, both liquid and frozen precipitation must be collected. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch in February 2014, is well designed to detect and estimate falling snow. The GPM core carries a passive radiometer with frequencies (10-183 GHz) and an active radar with Ku- and Ka-band frequencies. Combined with the 65o inclination of the GPM Core satellite, these instruments allow for the GPM Core to sense and retrieve information about falling snow and light rain in regions of the earth where snow is common. The GPM Core's comprehensive active and passive channel set will also allow it to serve as a unifying reference for GPM constellation radiometer satellites. Since falling snow from space is the next precipitation measurement challenge from space, information is needed to guide retrieval algorithm development for these current and future missions. This information includes thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, sensitivity to macroscale snow event system characteristics, and sensitivity to microscale snowflake particle characteristics. While the work in this area will continue for many years to come, our group has made substantial progress in this area by identifying minimum detectable melted rates of ~0.5 mm hr-1. Results

  20. Geostationary Communications Satellites as Sensors for the Space Weather Environment: Telemetry Event Identification Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, A.; Cahoy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Reliability of geostationary communication satellites (GEO ComSats) is critical to many industries worldwide. The space radiation environment poses a significant threat and manufacturers and operators expend considerable effort to maintain reliability for users. Knowledge of the space radiation environment at the orbital location of a satellite is of critical importance for diagnosing and resolving issues resulting from space weather, for optimizing cost and reliability, and for space situational awareness. For decades, operators and manufacturers have collected large amounts of telemetry from geostationary (GEO) communications satellites to monitor system health and performance, yet this data is rarely mined for scientific purposes. The goal of this work is to acquire and analyze archived data from commercial operators using new algorithms that can detect when a space weather (or non-space weather) event of interest has occurred or is in progress. We have developed algorithms, collectively called SEER (System Event Evaluation Routine), to statistically analyze power amplifier current and temperature telemetry by identifying deviations from nominal operations or other events and trends of interest. This paper focuses on our work in progress, which currently includes methods for detection of jumps ("spikes", outliers) and step changes (changes in the local mean) in the telemetry. We then examine available space weather data from the NOAA GOES and the NOAA-computed Kp index and sunspot numbers to see what role, if any, it might have played. By combining the results of the algorithm for many components, the spacecraft can be used as a "sensor" for the space radiation environment. Similar events occurring at one time across many component telemetry streams may be indicative of a space radiation event or system-wide health and safety concern. Using SEER on representative datasets of telemetry from Inmarsat and Intelsat, we find events that occur across all or many of

  1. The Critical Need for Future Mid-Resolution Thermal Infrared Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.

    2006-12-01

    Eight future applications of data from mid-resolution thermal infrared satellite sensors are suggested, from least to most significant as follows: 8. Map thin ice unsafe for ice-fishing in the Great Lakes as a warning to winter fishermen; 7. Map ammonia plumes to locate large ammonia stockpiles (Homeland Security) and to monitor concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs); 6. Map types of surface algae in ocean, lakes, and rivers, especially those containing surface diatoms; 5. Monitor urban heat islands to determine the cooling affects of painting visibly dark surfaces with bright paints or coatings; 4. Map rock-types and soil-types of non- vegetated regions world-wide, a task which ASTER cannot complete in its current lifetime; 3. Detect surface warming of rocks under increased stress and pressure as an earthquake precursor; 2. Map pollutant gases, especially sulfur dioxide, which is important both for smokestack monitoring and volcanic eruption precursors; 1. Map methane escape into the atmosphere from methane clathrate destabilization as a key warning of imminent and drastic temperature rises in the troposphere. Each of these applications will be briefly discussed and past examples will be given for most of them.

  2. Quantifying Above-Cloud Aerosols through Integrating Multi-Sensor Measurements from A-Train Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying above-cloud aerosols can help improve the assessment of aerosol intercontinental transport and climate impacts. Large-scale measurements of aerosol above low-level clouds had been generally unexplored until very recently when CALIPSO lidar started to acquire aerosol and cloud profiles in June 2006. Despite CALIPSO s unique capability of measuring above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD), such observations are substantially limited in spatial coverage because of the lidar s near-zero swath. We developed an approach that integrates measurements from A-Train satellite sensors (including CALIPSO lidar, OMI, and MODIS) to extend CALIPSO above-cloud AOD observations to substantially larger areas. We first examine relationships between collocated CALIPSO above-cloud AOD and OMI absorbing aerosol index (AI, a qualitative measure of AOD for elevated dust and smoke aerosol) as a function of MODIS cloud optical depth (COD) by using 8-month data in the Saharan dust outflow and southwest African smoke outflow regions. The analysis shows that for a given cloud albedo, above-cloud AOD correlates positively with AI in a linear manner. We then apply the derived relationships with MODIS COD and OMI AI measurements to derive above-cloud AOD over the whole outflow regions. In this talk, we will present spatial and day-to-day variations of the above-cloud AOD and the estimated direct radiative forcing by the above-cloud aerosols.

  3. Strategies for nanoplasmonic core-satellite biomolecular sensors: Theory-based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Benjamin M.; Waldeisen, John R.; Wang, Tim; Lee, Luke P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a systematic theoretical study of core-satellite gold nanoparticle assemblies using the Generalized Multiparticle Mie formalism. We consider the importance of satellite number, satellite radius, the core radius, and the satellite distance, and we present approaches to optimize spectral shift due to satellite attachment or release. This provides clear strategies for improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio for molecular detection, enabling simple colorimetric assays. We quantify the performance of these strategies by introducing a figure of merit. In addition, we provide an improved understanding of the nanoplasmonic interactions that govern the optical response of core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  4. Strategies for nanoplasmonic core-satellite biomolecular sensors: Theory-based Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Benjamin M; Waldeisen, John R; Wang, Tim; Lee, Luke P

    2009-11-09

    We present a systematic theoretical study of core-satellite gold nanoparticle assemblies using the Generalized Multiparticle Mie formalism. We consider the importance of satellite number, satellite radius, the core radius, and the satellite distance, and we present approaches to optimize spectral shift due to satellite attachment or release. This provides clear strategies for improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio for molecular detection, enabling simple colorimetric assays. We quantify the performance of these strategies by introducing a figure of merit. In addition, we provide an improved understanding of the nanoplasmonic interactions that govern the optical response of core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  5. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...... to the layer of air closest to the surface. UHI spatial characteristics have been assessed using air temperatures measured by both weather stations and brightness temperature maps from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board ENVISAT polar-orbiting satellite. In total, 634 daytime...... and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI) during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3-4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations. © 2010...

  6. Evaluating Landsat 8 Satellite Sensor Data for Improved Vegetation Mapping Accuracy of the New Hampshire Coastal Watershed Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Lindsay

    Remote sensing is a technology that has been used for many years to generate land cover maps. These maps provide insight as to the landscape, and features that are on the ground. One way in which this is useful is through the visualization of forest cover types. The forests of New England have been notoriously difficult to map, due to their high complexity and fine-scale heterogeneity. In order to be able to better map these features, the newest satellite imagery available may be the best technology to use. Landsat 8 is the newest satellite created by a team of scientists and engineers from the United States Geological Survey and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was launched in February of 2013. The Landsat 8 satellite sensor is considered an improvement over previous Landsat sensors, as it has three additional bands: (1) a coastal/ aerosol band, band 1, that senses light in deep blue, (2) a cirrus band, band 9, that provides detection of wispy clouds that may interfere with analysis, and (3) a Quality Assessment band whose bits contain information regarding conditions that may affect the quality and applicability of certain image pixels. In addition to these added bands, the data generated by Landsat 8 are delivered at an increased radiometric resolution compared with previous Landsat sensors, increasing the dynamic range of the data the sensor can retrieve. In order to investigate the satellite sensor data, a novel approach to classifying Landsat 8 imagery was used. Object-Based Image Analysis was employed, along with the random forest machine learning classifier, to segment and classify the land cover of the Coastal Watershed of southeastern New Hampshire. In order to account strictly for band improvements, supervised classification using the maximum likelihood classifier was completed, on imagery created: (1) using all of the original bands provided by Landsat 8, and (2) an image created using Landsat 8 bands that were only available on

  7. Simulation of Ship-Track versus Satellite-Sensor Differences in Oceanic Precipitation Using an Island-Based Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Burdanowitz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The point-to-area problem strongly complicates the validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates, using surface-based point measurements. We simulate the limited spatial representation of light-to-moderate oceanic precipitation rates along ship tracks with respect to areal passive microwave satellite estimates using data from a subtropical island-based radar. The radar data serves to estimate the discrepancy between point-like and areal precipitation measurements. From the spatial discrepancy, two statistical adjustments are derived so that along-track precipitation ship data better represent areal precipitation estimates from satellite sensors. The first statistical adjustment uses the average duration of a precipitation event as seen along a ship track, and the second adjustment uses the median-normalized along-track precipitation rate. Both statistical adjustments combined reduce the root mean squared error by 0.24 mm h − 1 (55% compared to the unadjusted average track of 60 radar pixels in length corresponding to a typical ship speed of 24–34 km h − 1 depending on track orientation. Beyond along-track averaging, the statistical adjustments represent an important step towards a more accurate validation of precipitation derived from passive microwave satellite sensors using point-like along-track surface precipitation reference data.

  8. Variability of the wind field in the tropical oceans as observed by satellite sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grima, N.; Bentamy, A.; Quilfen, Y. [IFREMER/Brest, Plouzane (France)

    1995-12-31

    It is generally agreed today that the knowledge of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean is essential for understanding climate and ocean circulation, especially in tropical regions where the oceans are mainly and quickly influenced by wind action. The wind stress is the primary force driving the topical oceans from daily to interannual time scales. Conventional measurements from ships of the wind vectors are not available with a sufficient quality regarding the data accuracy as well as their coverage. Satellite observations of the surface wind over the sea are now available on a routine basis at the Institut Francais de Recherche pour l`Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), derived from the European Remote Sensing-1 (ERS-1) scatterometer and altimeter and from the radiometer Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). More than 3 years of weekly stress fields (1991--1994) with a resolution of one degree in latitude and longitude are produced using an objective analysis method. The accuracy of these gridded winds was evaluated by comparison with TAO buoys in the tropical Pacific area (Riou, 1995). The root mean square differences are of the order of 1.2 m/s and 15 degrees. The greatest differences are observed in the TOGA/COARE region where the wind variability is largest on the weekly scale. The low frequencies (monthly to interannual) of the wind variability are discussed and compared to those obtained from the TAO buoys. In this paper the time and space scales of the sea surface wind are described using a complex EOF analysis. One of the most interesting results is that the weekly averaged wind fields derived from ERS-1 scatterometer are useful to depict a 30--50-day oscillation over the tropical Pacific ocean.

  9. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM-SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas

    2015-09-28

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM-SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. © 2015 Wenz et al.

  10. SAM and the Particle Physics Data Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LauriLoebel-Carpenter; LeeLueking; 等

    2001-01-01

    The D0 experiment's data and job management system software,SAM,is an operational prototype of many of the concepts being developed for Grid computing .We explain how the components of SAM map into the Data Grid architecture,We discuss the future use of Grid components to either replace existing components of SAM or to extend its functionality and utility.owrk being carried out as part of the Particle Physics Data Grid(PPDG) project.

  11. Observing lake ice phenology across Alaska using in situ sensors, aircraft, and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.; Grosse, G.; Bodony, K.; Sturdivant, E.; Frey, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    late spring are evaluated in relation to models based on 0°C ATID for Alaska lake districts and accumulated freezing degree days (AFDD) for the Koyukuk lake district where a longer period of lake ice phenology data is available from aircraft surveys. To place short term lake ice phenology into a longer term context, we used a combination of remote sensing (optical and radar satellites imagery), in situ sensors, and ice growth and decay models on one large lake of regional significance to Arctic Alaska, Teshekpuk Lake. Because of its large area (850 km2) and shallow depth (7 m maximum), Teshekpuk may have the longest annual ice-cover duration of any lake in Alaska and thus a sentinel for analysis of Arctic climate change. Our long-term analysis (1947 to present) of both ice-out and ice-on timing suggest a mean open-water duration of 63 days and moderate trend towards an increasing open-water season (0.5 days per year, r2=0.21) primarily driven by earlier ice-out timing. Our analysis also suggests that Teshekpuk Lake may have maintained at partial perennial ice cover in 1956 and 1969. Future work on this lake, as well the ice phenology of other lakes and lake districts in Arctic and Boreal regions, will seek to understand both the limnological and climatological consequences ice phenology in the context of climate change and variability.

  12. An Image-Based Sensor System for Autonomous Rendez-Vous with Uncooperative Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Miravet, Carlos; Krouch, Eloise; del Cura, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper are described the image processing algorithms developed by SENER, Ingenieria y Sistemas to cope with the problem of image-based, autonomous rendez-vous (RV) with an orbiting satellite. The methods developed have a direct application in the OLEV (Orbital Life Extension Extension Vehicle) mission. OLEV is a commercial mission under development by a consortium formed by Swedish Space Corporation, Kayser-Threde and SENER, aimed to extend the operational life of geostationary telecommunication satellites by supplying them control, navigation and guidance services. OLEV is planned to use a set of cameras to determine the angular position and distance to the client satellite during the complete phases of rendez-vous and docking, thus enabling the operation with satellites not equipped with any specific navigational aid to provide support during the approach. The ability to operate with un-equipped client satellites significantly expands the range of applicability of the system under development, compar...

  13. Identifying and monitoring urban heat island in Bucharest using satellite time series and low cost meteorological sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandric, Ionut; Onose, Diana; Vanau, Gabriel; Ioja, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    The present study is focusing on the identification of urban heat island in Bucharest using both remote sensing products and low cost temperature sensors. The urban heat island in Bucharest was analyzed through a network of sensors located in 56 points (47 inside the administrative boundary of the city, 9 outside) 2009-2011. The network lost progressively its initial density, but was reformed during a new phase, 2013-2015. Time series satellite images from MODIS were intersected with the sensors for both phases. Statistical analysis were conducted to identify the temporal and spatial pattern of extreme temperatures in Bucharest. Several environmental factors like albedou, presence and absence of vegetation were used to fit a regression model between MODIS satellite products sensors in order to upscale the temperatures values recorded by MODIS For Bucharest, an important role for air temperature values in urban environments proved to have the local environmental conditions that leads to differences in air temperature at Bucharest city scale between 3-5 °C (both in the summer and in the winter). The UHI maps shows a good correlation with the presence of green areas. Differences in air temperature between higher tree density areas and isolated trees can reach much higher values, averages over 24 h periods still are in the 3-5 °C range The results have been obtained within the project UCLIMESA (Urban Heat Island Monitoring under Present and Future Climate), ongoing between 2013 and 2015 in the framework of the Programme for Research-DevelopmentInnovation for Space Technology and Advanced Research (STAR), administrated by the Romanian Space Agency Keywords: time series, urban heat island

  14. Space-based visible observation strategy for beyond-LEO objects based on an equatorial LEO satellite with multi-sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-peng; Huang, Jian-yu; Chen, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Many space-based visible observation strategies based on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites for observing Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) objects were proposed previously. However, there were few studies about other beyond-LEO objects (Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO) objects, Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) objects, and Molniya objects). In this paper, a space-based visible observation strategy is proposed for observing GEO objects, GTO objects, MEO objects (especially global navigation satellites), and Molniya objects simultaneously to get more orbital data, using an earth-oriented equatorial LEO satellite with three sensors. This work is focused on the pointing geometry. Brightness of observed objects and sensitivity of sensors are assumed under the relative ideal conditions. First, the distribution characteristics of these beyond-LEO objects are discussed. And in order to observe global navigation satellites efficiently, joint regions formed by the track superposition of two adjacent orbits in a constellation are proposed. To offset the influence of the earth shadow and constraint of sun-target-observer angle, two sensors pointing inside of the equatorial plane are used to observe GEO and GTO objects. The installation angle of the third sensor is optimized to obtain a relative high coverage rate for observing global navigation satellites and Molniya objects based on joint regions. Finally, the coverage rate, the number of observations, and observation duration under different sensors with different field of views (FOVs) are compared and analyzed respectively.

  15. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor active geological processes is described. Specifically, threats posed by volcanic eruptions are briefly outlined, and essential monitoring requirements are discussed. As an application example, a collaborative, multi-agency operational volcano monitoring system in the north Pacific is highlighted with a focus on the 2007 eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Russia. The data from this system have been used since 2004 to detect the onset of volcanic activity, support the emergency response to large eruptions, and assess the volcanic products produced following the eruption. The overall utility of such integrative assessments is also summarized. The work described in this chapter was originally funded through two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Science research grants that focused on the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. A skilled team of volcanologists, geologists, satellite tasking experts, satellite ground system experts, system engineers and software developers collaborated to accomplish the objectives. The first project, Automation of the ASTER Emergency Data Acquisition Protocol for Scientific Analysis, Disaster Monitoring, and Preparedness, established the original collaborative research and monitoring program between the University of Pittsburgh (UP), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, and affiliates on the ASTER Science Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as associates at the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) in Japan. This grant, completed in 2008, also allowed for detailed volcanic analyses and data validation during three separate summer field campaigns to Kamchatka Russia. The second project, Expansion and synergistic use

  16. Samsø Energy Vision 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Hansen, Kenneth; Ridjan, Iva

    The purpose of this report is to investigate potential scenarios for converting Samsø into 100% renewable energy supply in 2030 with focus on local electricity and biomass resources. Firstly, a 2013 reference scenario is established to investigate whether Samsø is 100% renewable today. Next, scen...

  17. An optical sensor network for vegetation phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklundh, L.; Jin, H.; Schubert, P.

    2011-01-01

    in coniferous forests, one in a deciduous forest, and two on peatland. The instrumentation consists of dual-beam sensors measuring incoming and reflected red, green, NIR, and PAR fluxes at 10-min intervals, year-round. The sensors are mounted on separate masts or in flux towers in order to capture radiation...

  18. High-frequency performance of electric field sensors aboard the RESONANCE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampl, M.; Macher, W.; Gruber, C.; Oswald, T.; Kapper, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Mogilevsky, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present the high-frequency properties of the eight electric field sensors as proposed to be launched on the spacecraft "RESONANCE" in the near future. Due to the close proximity of the conducting spacecraft body, the sensors (antennas) have complex receiving features and need to be well understood for an optimal mission and spacecraft design. An optimal configuration and precise understanding of the sensor and antenna characteristics is also vital for the proper performance of spaceborne scientific instrumentation and the corresponding data analysis. The provided results are particularly interesting with regard to the planned mutual impedance experiment for measuring plasma parameters. Our computational results describe the extreme dependency of the sensor system with regard to wave incident direction and frequency, and provides the full description of the sensor system as a multi-port scatterer. In particular, goniopolarimetry techniques like polarization analysis and direction finding depend crucially on the presented antenna characteristics.

  19. Monitoring Animal Behaviour and Environmental Interactions Using Wireless Sensor Networks, GPS Collars and Satellite Remote Sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Handcock, Rebecca N; Swain, Dave L; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J; Patison, Kym P; Wark, Tim; Valencia, Philip; Corke, Peter; O'Neill, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    ...). We explore this concept using a case-study from an extensive cattle enterprise in northern Australia and demonstrate the potential for combining GPS collars and satellite images in a WSN to monitor...

  20. Coseismic displacements from SAR image offsets between different satellite sensors: Application to the 2001 Bhuj (India) earthquake

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Teng

    2015-09-05

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image offset tracking is increasingly being used for measuring ground displacements, e.g., due to earthquakes and landslide movement. However, this technique has been applied only to images acquired by the same or identical satellites. Here we propose a novel approach for determining offsets between images acquired by different satellite sensors, extending the usability of existing SAR image archives. The offsets are measured between two multiimage reflectivity maps obtained from different SAR data sets, which provide significantly better results than with single preevent and postevent images. Application to the 2001 Mw7.6 Bhuj earthquake reveals, for the first time, its near-field deformation using multiple preearthquake ERS and postearthquake Envisat images. The rupture model estimated from these cross-sensor offsets and teleseismic waveforms shows a compact fault slip pattern with fairly short rise times (<3 s) and a large stress drop (20 MPa), explaining the intense shaking observed in the earthquake.

  1. Unscented predictive variable structure filter for satellite attitude estimation with model errors when using low precision sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lu; Li, Hengnian

    2016-10-01

    For the satellite attitude estimation problem, the serious model errors always exist and hider the estimation performance of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ACDS), especially for a small satellite with low precision sensors. To deal with this problem, a new algorithm for the attitude estimation, referred to as the unscented predictive variable structure filter (UPVSF) is presented. This strategy is proposed based on the variable structure control concept and unscented transform (UT) sampling method. It can be implemented in real time with an ability to estimate the model errors on-line, in order to improve the state estimation precision. In addition, the model errors in this filter are not restricted only to the Gaussian noises; therefore, it has the advantages to deal with the various kinds of model errors or noises. It is anticipated that the UT sampling strategy can further enhance the robustness and accuracy of the novel UPVSF. Numerical simulations show that the proposed UPVSF is more effective and robustness in dealing with the model errors and low precision sensors compared with the traditional unscented Kalman filter (UKF).

  2. CE-SAM: a conversational interface for ISR mission support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzocaro, Diego; Parizas, Christos; Preece, Alun; Braines, Dave; Mott, David; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.

    2013-05-01

    There is considerable interest in natural language conversational interfaces. These allow for complex user interactions with systems, such as fulfilling information requirements in dynamic environments, without requiring extensive training or a technical background (e.g. in formal query languages or schemas). To leverage the advantages of conversational interactions we propose CE-SAM (Controlled English Sensor Assignment to Missions), a system that guides users through refining and satisfying their information needs in the context of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations. The rapidly-increasing availability of sensing assets and other information sources poses substantial challenges to effective ISR resource management. In a coalition context, the problem is even more complex, because assets may be "owned" by different partners. We show how CE-SAM allows a user to refine and relate their ISR information needs to pre-existing concepts in an ISR knowledge base, via conversational interaction implemented on a tablet device. The knowledge base is represented using Controlled English (CE) - a form of controlled natural language that is both human-readable and machine processable (i.e. can be used to implement automated reasoning). Users interact with the CE-SAM conversational interface using natural language, which the system converts to CE for feeding-back to the user for confirmation (e.g. to reduce misunderstanding). We show that this process not only allows users to access the assets that can support their mission needs, but also assists them in extending the CE knowledge base with new concepts.

  3. AROSICS: An Automated and Robust Open-Source Image Co-Registration Software for Multi-Sensor Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Scheffler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial co-registration is a mandatory prerequisite when dealing with remote sensing data. Inter- or intra-sensoral misregistration will negatively affect any subsequent image analysis, specifically when processing multi-sensoral or multi-temporal data. In recent decades, many algorithms have been developed to enable manual, semi- or fully automatic displacement correction. Especially in the context of big data processing and the development of automated processing chains that aim to be applicable to different remote sensing systems, there is a strong need for efficient, accurate and generally usable co-registration. Here, we present AROSICS (Automated and Robust Open-Source Image Co-Registration Software, a Python-based open-source software including an easy-to-use user interface for automatic detection and correction of sub-pixel misalignments between various remote sensing datasets. It is independent of spatial or spectral characteristics and robust against high degrees of cloud coverage and spectral and temporal land cover dynamics. The co-registration is based on phase correlation for sub-pixel shift estimation in the frequency domain utilizing the Fourier shift theorem in a moving-window manner. A dense grid of spatial shift vectors can be created and automatically filtered by combining various validation and quality estimation metrics. Additionally, the software supports the masking of, e.g., clouds and cloud shadows to exclude such areas from spatial shift detection. The software has been tested on more than 9000 satellite images acquired by different sensors. The results are evaluated exemplarily for two inter-sensoral and two intra-sensoral use cases and show registration results in the sub-pixel range with root mean square error fits around 0.3 pixels and better.

  4. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of the GÖKTÜRK-2 Satellite Sensor Using Tuz GÖLÜ (landnet Site) from Ndvi Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarya, Ufuk; Hakkı Demirhan, İsmail; Seda Deveci, Hüsne; Teke, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Can; Küpçü, Ramazan; Feray Öztoprak, A.; Efendioğlu, Mehmet; Fehmi Şimşek, F.; Berke, Erdinç; Zübeyde Gürbüz, Sevgi

    2016-06-01

    TÜBİTAK UZAY has conducted a research study on the use of space-based satellite resources for several aspects of agriculture. Especially, there are two precision agriculture related projects: HASSAS (Widespread application of sustainable precision agriculture practices in Southeastern Anatolia Project Region (GAP) Project) and AKTAR (Smart Agriculture Feasibility Project). The HASSAS project aims to study development of precision agriculture practice in GAP region. Multi-spectral satellite imagery and aerial hyperspectral data along with ground measurements was collected to analyze data in an information system. AKTAR aims to develop models for irrigation, fertilization and spectral signatures of crops in Inner Anatolia. By the end of the project precision agriculture practices to control irrigation, fertilization, pesticide and estimation of crop yield will be developed. Analyzing the phenology of crops using NDVI is critical for the projects. For this reason, absolute radiometric calibration of the Red and NIR bands in space-based satellite sensors is an important issue. The Göktürk-2 satellite is an earth observation satellite which was designed and built in Turkey and was launched in 2012. The Göktürk-2 satellite sensor has a resolution 2.5 meters in panchromatic and 5 meters in R/G/B/NIR bands. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor was performed via the ground-based measurements - spectra-radiometer, sun photometer, and meteorological station- in Tuz Gölü cal/val site in 2015. In this paper, the first ground-based absolute radiometric calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor using Tuz Gölü is demonstrated. The absolute radiometric calibration results of this paper are compared with the published cross-calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor utilizing Landsat 8 imagery. According to the experimental comparison results, the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor coefficients for red and NIR bands

  5. ABSOLUTE RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF THE GÖKTÜRK-2 SATELLITE SENSOR USING TUZ GÖLÜ (LANDNET SITE FROM NDVI PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Sakarya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available TÜBİTAK UZAY has conducted a research study on the use of space-based satellite resources for several aspects of agriculture. Especially, there are two precision agriculture related projects: HASSAS (Widespread application of sustainable precision agriculture practices in Southeastern Anatolia Project Region (GAP Project and AKTAR (Smart Agriculture Feasibility Project. The HASSAS project aims to study development of precision agriculture practice in GAP region. Multi-spectral satellite imagery and aerial hyperspectral data along with ground measurements was collected to analyze data in an information system. AKTAR aims to develop models for irrigation, fertilization and spectral signatures of crops in Inner Anatolia. By the end of the project precision agriculture practices to control irrigation, fertilization, pesticide and estimation of crop yield will be developed. Analyzing the phenology of crops using NDVI is critical for the projects. For this reason, absolute radiometric calibration of the Red and NIR bands in space-based satellite sensors is an important issue. The Göktürk-2 satellite is an earth observation satellite which was designed and built in Turkey and was launched in 2012. The Göktürk-2 satellite sensor has a resolution 2.5 meters in panchromatic and 5 meters in R/G/B/NIR bands. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor was performed via the ground-based measurements - spectra-radiometer, sun photometer, and meteorological station- in Tuz Gölü cal/val site in 2015. In this paper, the first ground-based absolute radiometric calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor using Tuz Gölü is demonstrated. The absolute radiometric calibration results of this paper are compared with the published cross-calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor utilizing Landsat 8 imagery. According to the experimental comparison results, the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor coefficients for

  6. New optical sensor systems for high-resolution satellite, airborne and terrestrial imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Börner, Anko; Lehmann, Frank

    2007-10-01

    The department of Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 25 years experience with high-resolution imaging technology. The technology changes in the development of detectors, as well as the significant change of the manufacturing accuracy in combination with the engineering research define the next generation of spaceborne sensor systems focusing on Earth observation and remote sensing. The combination of large TDI lines, intelligent synchronization control, fast-readable sensors and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing instruments. This class of instruments is feasible for high-resolution sensor systems regarding geometry and radiometry and their data products like 3D virtual reality. Systemic approaches are essential for such designs of complex sensor systems for dedicated tasks. The system theory of the instrument inside a simulated environment is the beginning of the optimization process for the optical, mechanical and electrical designs. Single modules and the entire system have to be calibrated and verified. Suitable procedures must be defined on component, module and system level for the assembly test and verification process. This kind of development strategy allows the hardware-in-the-loop design. The paper gives an overview about the current activities at DLR in the field of innovative sensor systems for photogrammetric and remote sensing purposes.

  7. A global study of NDVI difference among moderate-resolution satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingwang; Liu, Yuanbo

    2016-11-01

    Moderate-resolution sensors, including AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and VIIRS (Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite), have provided over forty years of global scientific data. In the form of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), these data greatly benefit environmental studies. However, their usefulness is compromised by sensor differences. This study investigates the global NDVI difference and its spatio-temporal patterns among typical moderate-resolution sensors, as supported by state-of-the-art remote sensing derived products. Our study demonstrates that the atmosphere plays a secondary role to LULC (Land Use/Land Cover) in inter-sensor NDVI differences. With reference to AVHRR/3, AVHRR/1 and 2 exhibit negative NDVI biases for vegetated land cover types. In summer (July), the area of negative bias shifts northward, and the magnitude increases in the Northern Hemisphere. For most LULC types, the bias generally shifts in the negative direction from winter (January) to summer. A linear regression of the NDVI difference versus NDVI shows a close correlation between the slope value and vegetation phenology. Overall, NDVI differences are controlled by LULC type and vegetation phenology. Our study can be used to generate a long-term, consistent NDVI data set from composite MODIS and AVHRR NDVI data. LULC-dependent and temporally variable correction equations are recommended to reduce inter-sensor NDVI differences.

  8. Will the aerosol derived from the OCM satellite sensor be representative of the aerosol over Goa?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Talaulikar, M.; Suresh, T.; Rodrigues, A.; Desa, E.; Chauhan, P.

    is within a tolerable limit considering the error in the instrument, measurement and satellite-derived values. Seasonal variations are also observed of the variations of the aerosol data at noon from those in the morning and evening. Variations of data...

  9. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the chemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  10. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Biotoxin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the pathogen methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  11. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Radiochemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the radiochemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  12. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Pathogen Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the biotoxin methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  13. Discovery of charmed particles : Sam Ting

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The great physics event of the year was the discovery of charmed particles in the USA. One of the co-discoverers, Sam Ting, was at CERN involved in an ISR experiment and described the discovery to a packed auditorium.

  14. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Atreya, S. K.; Manning, H. L.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Sam Team

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers. SAM Instrument Suite: SAM’s instruments are a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), a 6-column Gas Chromatograph (GC), and a 2-channel Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). SAM can identify organic compounds in Mars rocks to sub-ppb sensitivity and secure precise isotope ratios for C, H, and O in carbon dioxide and water and measure trace levels of methane and its carbon 13 isotope. The SAM gas processing system consists of valves, heaters, pressure sensors, gas scrubbers and getters, traps, and gas tanks used for calibration or combustion experiments [2]. A variety of calibrant compounds interior and exterior to SAM will allow the science and engineering teams to assess SAM’s performance. SAM has been calibrated and tested in a Mars-like environment. Keeping Educators and the Public Informed: The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) goals of the SAM team are to make this complex chemical laboratory and its data widely available to educators, students, and the public. Formal education activities include developing templates for professional development workshops for educators to teach them about SAM and Curiosity, incorporating data into Mars Student Data Teams, and writing articles

  15. 基于混合SAMs包裹的纳米团簇和SPA的抗体固定方法用于糖化血红蛋白免疫场效应型传感器的制备%Antibody Immobilization Based on Nano Spheres Modified by Mixed SAMs and SPA for HbAlc Immuno-FET Sensor Fabrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛茜男; 边超; 佟建华; 孙楫舟; 张虹; 夏善红

    2011-01-01

    本文提出了一种新型的抗体固定方法,并利用该方法制备了免疫场效应型传感器用于糖化血红蛋白水平的检测.首先,纳米金颗粒由混合自组装膜(SAMs)包裹形成一种功能化的纳米团簇.然后这种纳米团簇以自组装的方式固定在传感器金电极表面.之后,葡萄糖球菌蛋白ACSPA)被固定在纳米团簇表面用来定向固定抗体.利用该方法,纳米团簇可在金电极表面均匀分布.由此形成的多层生物膜可定向固定抗体,与抗体具有稳定的结合力,能较好地屏蔽噪声干扰,且与场效应型传感器兼容,利用该传感器对糖化血红蛋白和血红蛋白浓度检测,灵敏度分别为152.8 μV·ng-1 ·mL和13.5 μV·ng-·mL.实验结果表明,该传感器具有较好的一致性和准确度,未来有望发展成为一种微型的用于糖尿病监控的糖化血红蛋白传感器.%An antibody immobilization method was reported to fabricate an immuno-FET sensor for measuring hemoglobin Ale( HbA1 c) level.Firstly,nanogold particles were capped with mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to form functional nano spheres.Then,the nano spheres were immobilized on the Au electrode of the immuno-FET sensor.After that,staphylococcal protein A (SPA) was immobilized on the nano spheres of electrode to further bond antibodies.In this way,nano spheres were distributed uniformly on Au electrode to form multi bionic film with the high ability to immobilize antibodies effectively and orientedly and to suppress noise interference.This biofilm was exactly suitable for the feature of FET sensor.Sensitivities of 152.8 μV·ng-1·mL for HbAlc and 13.5 μV·ng-1 ·mL for hemoglobin were exhibited by this sensor.Good consistency and accuracy were achieved.This sensor has the potential to develop into a micro HbAle sensor for the monitoring of diabetes.

  16. Utilizing low-cost 3U single-sensor satellites for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance mission capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Philip M.; Knuth, Andrew A.; Garrison-Darrin, Margaret A.

    2012-06-01

    Leveraging low cost launch carriers for small satellites with the functionality required for DoD and intelligence missions realizes a hidden potential capability. The Multi-Mission Bus Demonstration (MBD) is a Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) program to demonstrate military operational relevance in a 3U CubeSat form factor. The MBD spacecraft caters to mission versatility and responsive launch capabilities with a standardized bus and interchangeable payload interface design. MBD embraced the challenge of building two space vehicles on an extremely aggressive timeline and demanding budget, causing the development team to evaluate every step of the process to maximize efforts with minimal manpower and cost. MBD is providing a classified DoD payload capability that is truly operationally relevant and may revolutionize the mission area. As a single instrument or payload satellite, also called a SensorSat, MBD is a spacecraft of realizable ISR benefits including effective remote sensing, simplified engineering design and program requirements, and reduced time to launch, all yielding an appealing cost per unit. The SensorSat has potential to detect sufficient information that will act as a complementary component to tactical commanders in heightening battlefield awareness. Recent advancements in technology has put capabilities such as precision navigation, communication intelligence, signal intelligence, tactical warning, environmental intelligence, and a wide variety of ground imaging, at the tip of culmination in a small, economical package. This paper reviews the high functionality of the MBD spacecraft in the miniaturized footprint of 10 cm by 10 cm by 30cm which allows the mission to leverage inexpensive launch opportunities.

  17. 3D-information fusion from very high resolution satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, T.; d'Angelo, P.; Kuschk, G.; Tian, J.; Partovi, T.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl'eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground objects are derived. Combining these elevation based data with a spectral classification allows detection and extraction of objects from the satellite scenes. Beside the object extraction also the DSM and DTM can directly be used for simulation and monitoring of environmental issues. Examples are the simulation of floodings, building-volume and people estimation, simulation of noise from roads, wave-propagation for cellphones, wind and light for estimating renewable energy sources, 3D change detection, earthquake preparedness and crisis relief, urban development and sprawl of informal settlements and much more. Also outside of urban areas volume information brings literally a new dimension to earth oberservation tasks like the volume estimations of forests and illegal logging, volume of (illegal) open pit mining activities, estimation of flooding or tsunami risks, dike planning, etc. In this paper we present the preprocessing from the original level-1 satellite data to digital surface models (DSMs), corresponding VHR ortho images and derived digital terrain models (DTMs). From these components we present how a monitoring and decision fusion based 3D change detection can be realized by using different acquisitions. The results are analyzed and assessed to derive quality parameters for the presented method. Finally the usability of 3D information fusion from VHR satellite imagery is discussed and evaluated.

  18. Combined Geometric and Neural Network Approach to Generic Fault Diagnosis in Satellite Actuators and Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, Pietro; Blanke, Mogens; Castaldi, Paolo; Mimmo, Nicola; Simani, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    This paper suggests a novel diagnosis scheme for detection, isolation and estimation of faults affecting satellite reaction wheels. Both spin rate measurements and actuation torque defects are dealt with. The proposed system consists of a fault detection and isolation module composed by a bank of residual filters organized in a generalized scheme, followed by a fault estimation module consisting of a bank of adaptive estimation filters. The residuals are decoupled from aerodynamic disturbance...

  19. Determination of the Impact of Urbanization on Agricultural Lands using Multi-temporal Satellite Sensor Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, S.; Alganci, U.; Sertel, E.; Ustundag, B.

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the history, agricultural activities have been performed close to urban areas. Main reason behind this phenomenon is the need of fast marketing of the agricultural production to urban residents and financial provision. Thus, using the areas nearby cities for agricultural activities brings out advantage of easy transportation of productions and fast marketing. For decades, heavy migration to cities has directly and negatively affected natural grasslands, forests and agricultural lands. This pressure has caused agricultural lands to be changed into urban areas. Dense urbanization causes increase in impervious surfaces, heat islands and many other problems in addition to destruction of agricultural lands. Considering the negative impacts of urbanization on agricultural lands and natural resources, a periodic monitoring of these changes becomes indisputably important. At this point, satellite images are known to be good data sources for land cover / use change monitoring with their fast data acquisition, large area coverages and temporal resolution properties. Classification of the satellite images provides thematic the land cover / use maps of the earth surface and changes can be determined with GIS based analysis multi-temporal maps. In this study, effects of heavy urbanization over agricultural lands in Istanbul, metropolitan city of Turkey, were investigated with use of multi-temporal Landsat TM satellite images acquired between 1984 and 2011. Images were geometrically registered to each other and classified using supervised maximum likelihood classification algorithm. Resulting thematic maps were exported to GIS environment and destructed agricultural lands by urbanization were determined using spatial analysis.

  20. Energy-Efficient Transmissions for Remote Wireless Sensor Networks: An Integrated HAP/Satellite Architecture for Emergency Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feihong; Li, Hongjun; Gong, Xiangwu; Liu, Quan; Wang, Jingchao

    2015-09-03

    A typical application scenario of remote wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is identified as an emergency scenario. One of the greatest design challenges for communications in emergency scenarios is energy-efficient transmission, due to scarce electrical energy in large-scale natural and man-made disasters. Integrated high altitude platform (HAP)/satellite networks are expected to optimally meet emergency communication requirements. In this paper, a novel integrated HAP/satellite (IHS) architecture is proposed, and three segments of the architecture are investigated in detail. The concept of link-state advertisement (LSA) is designed in a slow flat Rician fading channel. The LSA is received and processed by the terminal to estimate the link state information, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption at the terminal end. Furthermore, the transmission power requirements of the HAPs and terminals are derived using the gradient descent and differential equation methods. The energy consumption is modeled at both the source and system level. An innovative and adaptive algorithm is given for the energy-efficient path selection. The simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive algorithm. It is shown that the proposed adaptive algorithm can significantly improve energy efficiency when combined with the LSA and the energy consumption estimation.

  1. Energy-Efficient Transmissions for Remote Wireless Sensor Networks: An Integrated HAP/Satellite Architecture for Emergency Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihong Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A typical application scenario of remote wireless sensor networks (WSNs is identified as an emergency scenario. One of the greatest design challenges for communications in emergency scenarios is energy-efficient transmission, due to scarce electrical energy in large-scale natural and man-made disasters. Integrated high altitude platform (HAP/satellite networks are expected to optimally meet emergency communication requirements. In this paper, a novel integrated HAP/satellite (IHS architecture is proposed, and three segments of the architecture are investigated in detail. The concept of link-state advertisement (LSA is designed in a slow flat Rician fading channel. The LSA is received and processed by the terminal to estimate the link state information, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption at the terminal end. Furthermore, the transmission power requirements of the HAPs and terminals are derived using the gradient descent and differential equation methods. The energy consumption is modeled at both the source and system level. An innovative and adaptive algorithm is given for the energy-efficient path selection. The simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive algorithm. It is shown that the proposed adaptive algorithm can significantly improve energy efficiency when combined with the LSA and the energy consumption estimation.

  2. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal channels of Imager payload onboard INSAT-3D satellite using MODTRAN model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Pandya; D B Shah; H J Trivedi; S Panigrahy

    2011-02-01

    INSAT-3D is the new generation Indian satellite designed for improved Earth observations through two payloads – Imager and Sounder. Study was conducted with an aim of simulating satellite level signal over land in the infrared channels of the Imager payload using a radiative transfer model MODTRAN. Satellite level at-sensor radiance corresponding to all four infrared channels of INSAT-3D Imager payload is obtained using MODTRAN and sensitivity of at-sensor radiance was inferred as a function of input parameters namely, surface temperature, emissivity, view angle and atmospheric water vapour, which is helpful in understanding the signal simulation scheme needed for retrieving a very critical parameter namely, land surface temperature.

  3. Water-transparency (Secchi Depth) monitoring in the China Sea with the SeaWiFS satellite sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianqiang; Pan, Delu; Mao, Zhihua

    2004-10-01

    Water transparency (Secchi depth) is a basic parameter that describes the optical property of water, and it is a traditional item measured in situ. The traditional method of monitoring water transparency is the in-situ measurement by ship. However, because of its inherent shortcoming, this in situ method can not satisfy the requirement of the large-scale, quick and real-time monitoring of the water transparency. Therefore, it must be combined with the remote sensing technology to fulfill the monitoring of the water transparency. This paper studies the water transparency monitoring in China Sea by using SeaWiFS satellite sensor. First, the inversing algorithm of water transparency is introduced briefly, which based on the radiative transfer theory and bio-optical model of water. Second, the accuracy of the algorithm is validated by using the large-scale in-situ data from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), which covered most of the Northwest Pacific ocean. The result shows the inversing relative error of water transparency is 22.6% by using the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) data, and it is even better in the open sea. Third, using this algorithm and SeaWiFS data, a remote sensing product data set of water transparency in China Sea was generated. Finally, we present the analysis of seasonal distribution and fluctuation patterns of water transparency in China Sea by using the generated remote sensing product collection of water transparency.

  4. Comparability of red/near-infrared reflectance and NDVI based on the spectral response function between MODIS and 30 other satellite sensors using rice canopy spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-11-26

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from -12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, -8.52% to -0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and -9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7-17 showed

  5. Long-Term Record of Arctic and Antarctic Sea and Ice Surface Temperatures from Thermal Infrared Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Cristina; Dybkjær, Gorm; Eastwood, Steinar; Tonboe, Rasmus; Høyer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 µm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  6. Robust Change Vector Analysis (RCVA) for multi-sensor very high resolution optical satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonfeld, Frank; Feilhauer, Hannes; Braun, Matthias; Menz, Gunter

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of rapid land cover/land use changes by means of remote sensing is often based on data acquired under varying and occasionally unfavorable conditions. In addition, such analyses frequently use data acquired by different sensor systems. These acquisitions often differ with respect to sun position and sensor viewing geometry which lead to characteristic effects in each image. These differences may have a negative impact on reliable change detection. Here, we propose an approach called Robust Change Vector Analysis (RCVA), aiming to mitigate these effects. RCVA is an improvement of the widely-used Change Vector Analysis (CVA), developed to account for pixel neighborhood effects. We used a RapidEye and Kompsat-2 cross-sensor change detection test to demonstrate the efficiency of RCVA. Our analysis showed that RCVA results in fewer false negatives as well as false positives when compared to CVA under similar test conditions. We conclude that RCVA is a powerful technique which can be utilized to reduce spurious changes in bi-temporal change detection analyses based on high- or very-high spatial resolution imagery.

  7. A New Damage Assessment Method by Means of Neural Network and Multi-Sensor Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Piscini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Neural Network (ANN is a valuable and well-established inversion technique for the estimation of geophysical parameters from satellite images. After training, ANNs are able to generate very fast products for several types of applications. Satellite remote sensing is an efficient way to detect and map strong earthquake damage for contributing to post-disaster activities during emergency phases. This work aims at presenting an application of the ANN inversion technique addressed to the evaluation of building collapse ratio (CR, defined as the number of collapsed buildings with respect to the total number of buildings in a city block, by employing optical and SAR satellite data. This is done in order to directly relate changes in images with damage that has occurred during strong earthquakes. Furthermore, once they have been trained, neural networks can be used rapidly at application stage. The goal was to obtain a general tool suitable for re-use in different scenarios. An ANN has been implemented in order to emulate a regression model and to estimate the CR as a continuous function. The adopted ANN has been trained using some features obtained from optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images, as inputs, and the corresponding values of collapse ratio obtained from the survey of the 2010 M7 Haiti Earthquake, i.e., as target output. As regards the optical data, we selected three change parameters: the Normalized Difference Index (NDI, the Kullback–Leibler divergence (KLD, and Mutual Information (MI. Concerning the SAR images, the Intensity Correlation Difference (ICD and the KLD parameters have been considered. Exploiting an object-oriented approach, a segmentation of the study area into several regions has been performed. In particular, damage maps have been generated by considering a set of polygons (in which satellite parameters have been calculated extracted from the open source Open Street Map (OSM geo-database. The trained

  8. Simulating Complex Satellites and a Space-Based Surveillance Sensor Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    celestial sphe orbit is indicat nsor was in a h ed by the sate the orange arr ensor to the ta can observe t the viewing.   ) for a satellite ark blue...The cube ted. There ar ating. jection with t is not possible ewing is not p ensor -to-targe code, typically ction for six m so that one ca and...model, futur sses of orbits, pects. thank Dr. Do ts, suggestion Modernization e Research Lab which much o ensors Directo ting Attitude tributions

  9. 3D-Information Fusion from Very High Resolution Satellite Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Krauss, T; P. d'Angelo; G. Kuschk; Tian, J.; T. Partovi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl´eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground ...

  10. Preparation of metal-SAM-dendrimer-SAM-metal junctions by supramolecular metal transfer printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Christian A.; ter Maat, Jurjen; Bisri, Satria Z.; Weusthof, Marcel H. H.; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Huskensa, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Metal-self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-dendrimer-SAM-metal junctions were prepared by a new type of metal transfer printing (mTP) that uses multiple beta-cyclodextrin (beta CD) host-guest interactions between a metal-coated stamp decorated with a monolayer of host molecules and a substrate which is fu

  11. Preparation of metal-SAM-dendrimer-SAM-metal junctions by supramolecular metal transfer printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Christian A.; Maat, ter Jurjen; Bisri, Satria Z.; Weusthof, Marcel H.H.; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Metal-self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-dendrimer-SAM-metal junctions were prepared by a new type of metal transfer printing (mTP) that uses multiple ß-cyclodextrin (ßCD) host-guest interactions between a metal-coated stamp decorated with a monolayer of host molecules and a substrate which is functiona

  12. Imager-to-radiometer inflight cross calibration: RSP radiometric comparison with airborne and satellite sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. McCorkel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP that takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS, which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI. First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  13. Satellite radiometric remote sensing of rainfall fields: multi-sensor retrieval techniques at geostationary scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Infrared Combined Rainfall Algorithm (MICRA consists in a statistical integration method using the satellite microwave-based rain-rate estimates, assumed to be accurate enough, to calibrate spaceborne infrared measurements on limited sub-regions and time windows. Rainfall retrieval is pursued at the space-time scale of typical geostationary observations, that is at a spatial resolution of few kilometers and a repetition period of few tens of minutes. The actual implementation is explained, although the basic concepts of MICRA are very general and the method is easy to be extended for considering innovative statistical techniques or measurements from additional space-borne platforms. In order to demonstrate the potentiality of MICRA, case studies over central Italy are also discussed. Finally, preliminary results of MICRA validation by ground based remote and in situ measurements are shown and a comparison with a Neural Network (NN based technique is briefly illustrated.

  14. Glacier Fluctuations in the Western Himalaya: Multi-temporal Assessment Using Multi-sensor Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, M. P.; Shroder, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Alpine glaciers are retreating and downwasting in many mountain environments. Systematic and quantitative assessments are sorely needed, as regional mass-balance trends are not known, and many glaciers may disappear before we can study them and assess glacier sensitivity to climate forcing. This urgency dictates remote sensing and GIS-based studies to provide baseline information and estimates of mass balance. In the Western Himalaya there is a paucity of quantitative information on glacier fluctuations and meltwater contributions to rising sea level. As part of the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project, we conducted several glacier change-detection studies to assess ice fluctuations on selected glaciers. We compared SPOT imagery from the 1990's to ASTER satellite imagery from the 2000-2004 time period. Ground photography and satellite image analysis using artificial neural networks were used to compare glacier characteristics. Results indicate that some glaciers have retreated, while others exhibit very similar terminus positions to past positions, but have downwasted. Glacier retreat and downwasting have resulted in the disconnection of tributary glaciers to valley glaciers in the Hindu Kush and Nanga Parbat Himalaya. In addition, there are increases in meltwater production on some glaciers, as revealed by surging and variation in the frequency and size of supraglacial lakes. These results identify increased hazard potential in many areas, and suggest negative mass balance for some glaciers. Quantitative results from remote sensing studies, however, should be carefully interpreted, as climate, glacier, lithosphere interactions that dictate glacier fluctuations are not adequately accounted for in image-based analyses of supraglacial conditions. The integration of quantitative remote sensing/GIS information into numerical ice flow/mass balance models is required to obtain better estimates of mass balance and glacier sensitivity to climate forcing.

  15. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  16. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  17. Coastal processes and hazards in the southern california bight: the use and requirements of multiple satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, B.; Digiacomo, P.; Washburn, L.; Jones, B. H.; Bosc, E.

    As part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study, we seek to provide a better understanding of the complex physical, ecological and biogeochemical processes in the coastal waters off southern California. At local and event-scales, this coastal area is characterized by phenomena such as eddies, internal waves and dust storms. At basin and climate scales, this region is impacted by the California Current (the eastern boundary current of the North Pacific) and remote forcing associated with ENSO events that strongly alter wind, current, water mass, and precipitation patterns. Furthermore, the Southern California Bight is adjacent to one of the largest industrialized urban populations in the world, which results in significant anthropogenic inputs to the coastal marine ecosystem, including such pollution hazard concerns as storm/waste-water runoff and oil spills. To address these diverse issues, we utilize a variety of satellite data including high-resolution ocean color observations (e.g., SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MERIS), sea surface temperature measurements (e.g., AVHRR, MODIS, and AATSR), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of surface features and derived wind fields (e.g., RADARSAT, ERS, and ASAR) that are complemented and validated by coincident field data (from moorings, drifters, ships, and shore-based HF radar). These synergistic data sets enable the detection, quantification and understanding of under-sampled and poorly described coastal ocean processes and pollution hazards of the type described above and an assessment of their ecological (e.g., harmful algal blooms), biogeochemical (carbon cycling), and human (pathogens) impact. We will present representative case studies on the observation of these processes and hazards that demonstrate the utility of multiple sensors, as well as assessments of where continuity in multi-sensor observations is required and identification of existing or foreseen observation gaps with recommendations on how these should be

  18. Global, Persistent, Real-time Multi-sensor Automated Satellite Image Analysis and Crop Forecasting in Commercial Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumby, S. P.; Warren, M. S.; Keisler, R.; Chartrand, R.; Skillman, S.; Franco, E.; Kontgis, C.; Moody, D.; Kelton, T.; Mathis, M.

    2016-12-01

    Cloud computing, combined with recent advances in machine learning for computer vision, is enabling understanding of the world at a scale and at a level of space and time granularity never before feasible. Multi-decadal Earth remote sensing datasets at the petabyte scale (8×10^15 bits) are now available in commercial cloud, and new satellite constellations will generate daily global coverage at a few meters per pixel. Public and commercial satellite observations now provide a wide range of sensor modalities, from traditional visible/infrared to dual-polarity synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This provides the opportunity to build a continuously updated map of the world supporting the academic community and decision-makers in government, finanace and industry. We report on work demonstrating country-scale agricultural forecasting, and global-scale land cover/land, use mapping using a range of public and commercial satellite imagery. We describe processing over a petabyte of compressed raw data from 2.8 quadrillion pixels (2.8 petapixels) acquired by the US Landsat and MODIS programs over the past 40 years. Using commodity cloud computing resources, we convert the imagery to a calibrated, georeferenced, multiresolution tiled format suited for machine-learning analysis. We believe ours is the first application to process, in less than a day, on generally available resources, over a petabyte of scientific image data. We report on work combining this imagery with time-series SAR collected by ESA Sentinel 1. We report on work using this reprocessed dataset for experiments demonstrating country-scale food production monitoring, an indicator for famine early warning. We apply remote sensing science and machine learning algorithms to detect and classify agricultural crops and then estimate crop yields and detect threats to food security (e.g., flooding, drought). The software platform and analysis methodology also support monitoring water resources, forests and other general

  19. Effective System for Automatic Bundle Block Adjustment and Ortho Image Generation from Multi Sensor Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilan, A.; Nagasubramanian, V.; Chaudhry, A.; Reddy, D. Rajesh; Sudheer Reddy, D.; Usha Devi, R.; Tirupati, T.; Radhadevi, P. V.; Varadan, G.

    2014-11-01

    Block Adjustment is a technique for large area mapping for images obtained from different remote sensingsatellites.The challenge in this process is to handle huge number of satellite imageries from different sources with different resolution and accuracies at the system level. This paper explains a system with various tools and techniques to effectively handle the end-to-end chain in large area mapping and production with good level of automation and the provisions for intuitive analysis of final results in 3D and 2D environment. In addition, the interface for using open source ortho and DEM references viz., ETM, SRTM etc. and displaying ESRI shapes for the image foot-prints are explained. Rigorous theory, mathematical modelling, workflow automation and sophisticated software engineering tools are included to ensure high photogrammetric accuracy and productivity. Major building blocks like Georeferencing, Geo-capturing and Geo-Modelling tools included in the block adjustment solution are explained in this paper. To provide optimal bundle block adjustment solution with high precision results, the system has been optimized in many stages to exploit the full utilization of hardware resources. The robustness of the system is ensured by handling failure in automatic procedure and saving the process state in every stage for subsequent restoration from the point of interruption. The results obtained from various stages of the system are presented in the paper.

  20. New book: Earth Imaging and Exploration from Space: Satellites - Sensors - Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Olujić

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The book has 516 pages, 310 images-pictures and drawings, 95 plates, it was cited 467 references forin and domestic literature. In fact, that is a glossy full-colour monograph in Croatian language. The book is composed of 8 chapters. It begins with the definition, history and physical principles of remote sensing. Come after information about the carrier rockets for remote sensing and civilian platforms with their sensors. Visual scene analysis and digital image analysis leads to the big 300-pages part dealing with various applications: geology, forestry, agriculture, cartography, meteorology, regional and urban planning, ecology and military applications. There is a chapter about remote sensing and GIS which refers to the use of GPS, concludes the full-text list of acronyms and a glossary of technical terms. The chapter about arriculture dealing with soil mapping, classification land use/cover and crops foreeasting etc. The book can be heavily recommend to any student and experts of remote sensing as a most comprehensive source of information one of the best recent texbooks about this subject.

  1. Spectral and spatial resolution analysis of multi sensor satellite data for coral reef mapping: Tioman Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Kabiri, Keivan

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an assessment of coral reef mapping using multi sensor satellite images such as Landsat ETM, SPOT and IKONOS images for Tioman Island, Malaysia. The study area is known to be one of the best Islands in South East Asia for its unique collection of diversified coral reefs and serves host to thousands of tourists every year. For the coral reef identification, classification and analysis, Landsat ETM, SPOT and IKONOS images were collected processed and classified using hierarchical classification schemes. At first, Decision tree classification method was implemented to separate three main land cover classes i.e. water, rural and vegetation and then maximum likelihood supervised classification method was used to classify these main classes. The accuracy of the classification result is evaluated by a separated test sample set, which is selected based on the fieldwork survey and view interpretation from IKONOS image. Few types of ancillary data in used are: (a) DGPS ground control points; (b) Water quality parameters measured by Hydrolab DS4a; (c) Sea-bed substrates spectrum measured by Unispec and; (d) Landcover observation photos along Tioman island coastal area. The overall accuracy of the final classification result obtained was 92.25% with the kappa coefficient is 0.8940. Key words: Coral reef, Multi-spectral Segmentation, Pixel-Based Classification, Decision Tree, Tioman Island

  2. An offline constrained data assimilation technique for aerosols: Improving GCM simulations over South Asia using observations from two satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraskar, Ankit; Bhushan, Mani; Venkataraman, Chandra; Cherian, Ribu

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol properties simulated by general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit large uncertainties due to biases in model processes and inaccuracies in aerosol emission inputs. In this work, we propose an offline, constrained optimization based procedure to improve these simulations by assimilating them with observational data. The proposed approach explicitly incorporates the non-negativity constraint on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a key metric to quantify aerosol distributions. The resulting optimization problem is quadratic programming in nature and can be easily solved by available optimization routines. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by performing offline assimilation of GCM simulated aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over South Asia (40-120 E, 5-40 N), with satellite AOD measurements from two sensors, namely Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Uncertainty in observational data used in the assimilation is computed by developing different error bands around regional AOD observations, based on their quality assurance flags. The assimilation, evaluated on monthly and daily scales, compares well with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as determined by goodness of fit statistics. Assimilation increased both model predicted atmospheric absorption and clear sky radiative forcing by factors consistent with recent estimates in literature. Thus, the constrained assimilation algorithm helps in systematically reducing uncertainties in aerosol simulations.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis for Multidisciplinary Systems (SAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TM-2017-0017 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) Richard D. Snyder Design & Analysis Branch Aerospace Vehicles...for public release. Distribution is unlimited. 1 AFRL-NASA Collaboration Provide economical, accurate sensitivities for multidisciplinary design and... Concept Refinement Technology Development System Development & Demonstration Production & Deployment Operation & Support • Knowledge is most limited

  4. Essay: Physical Review Letters; Sam Goudsmit's Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Robert K

    2008-01-18

    Sam Goudsmit implemented his vision of converting the Letters section of Physical Review into a distinct journal fifty years ago. Physical Review Letters was designed to publish "only papers that really deserve rapid communication." The new journal became so successful with physicists throughout the world that Physical Review Letters now publishes 3500 Letters per year.

  5. Sam's Journey to "Reach for the Stars"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences as a parent of a child with Down syndrome. Although her son Sam's first years were filled with numerous hospitalizations and visits to pediatricians, which she feared would further delay his development, she soon discovered an organization known as the National Association of Child Development…

  6. Impact of the spatial resolution of satellite remote sensing sensors in the quantification of total suspended sediment concentration: A case study in turbid waters of Northern Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearns, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anthropogenic activities on coastal waters is a cause of concern because such activities add to the total suspended sediment (TSS) budget of the coastal waters, which have negative impacts on the coastal ecosystem. Satellite remote sensing provides a powerful tool in monitoring TSS concentration at high spatiotemporal resolution, but coastal managers should be mindful that the satellite-derived TSS concentrations are dependent on the satellite sensor’s radiometric properties, atmospheric correction approaches, the spatial resolution and the limitations of specific TSS algorithms. In this study, we investigated the impact of different spatial resolutions of satellite sensor on the quantification of TSS concentration in coastal waters of northern Western Australia. We quantified the TSS product derived from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua, Landsat-8 Operational Land Image (OLI), and WorldView-2 (WV2) at native spatial resolutions of 250 m, 30 m and 2 m respectively and coarser spatial resolution (resampled up to 5 km) to quantify the impact of spatial resolution on the derived TSS product in different turbidity conditions. The results from the study show that in the waters of high turbidity and high spatial variability, the high spatial resolution WV2 sensor reported TSS concentration as high as 160 mg L-1 while the low spatial resolution MODIS-Aqua reported a maximum TSS concentration of 23.6 mg L-1. Degrading the spatial resolution of each satellite sensor for highly spatially variable turbid waters led to variability in the TSS concentrations of 114.46%, 304.68% and 38.2% for WV2, Landsat-8 OLI and MODIS-Aqua respectively. The implications of this work are particularly relevant in the situation of compliance monitoring where operations may be required to restrict TSS concentrations to a pre-defined limit. PMID:28380059

  7. Structural Basis for Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boal, Amie K.; Grove, Tyler L.; McLaughlin, Monica I.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Booker, Squire J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02

    The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes RlmN and Cfr methylate 23S ribosomal RNA, modifying the C2 or C8 position of adenosine 2503. The methyl groups are installed by a two-step sequence involving initial methylation of a conserved Cys residue (RlmN Cys{sup 355}) by SAM. Methyl transfer to the substrate requires reductive cleavage of a second equivalent of SAM. Crystal structures of RlmN and RlmN with SAM show that a single molecule of SAM coordinates the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Residue Cys{sup 355} is S-methylated and located proximal to the SAM methyl group, suggesting the SAM that is involved in the initial methyl transfer binds at the same site. Thus, RlmN accomplishes its complex reaction with structural economy, harnessing the two most important reactivities of SAM within a single site.

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF OCEANOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS FOR DETERMINING PELAGIC TUNA FISHING GROUND IN THE NORTH PAPUA WATERS USING MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VlNCENTIUS SlREGAR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The North Papua waters as one of the important fi shing grounds in the world contribute approximately 75% of world production of pelagic tunas. These fishing grounds are still determined by hunting method. This method is time consuming and costly. However, in many areas determination of fishing ground using satellited data lias been applied by detecting the important oceanographic parameter of the presence of fish schooling such as, sea surface temperature and chlorophyl. Mostly these parameters are used integrat edly. The aim of this study is to assess the important oceanographic parameters detected from mu lti-sensor satellites (NO AA/AVHRR, Seawifs and Topex Poisedon for determining fishing ground of pelagic tunas in the North Papua waters at east season. The parameters include Sea Surface Temperature (STT, chlorophyl-a and currents. The ava ilability of data from optic sensor (Seawifs: chl-a and AVHRR: Thermal is limited by the presence of cloud cover. In that case, Topex Poseidon satellite data can be used to provide the currents data. The integration of data from multi-sensors increases the availability of the oceanographic parameters for prediction of the potential fishing zones in the study area.

  9. Push-Broom-Type Very High-Resolution Satellite Sensor Data Correction Using Combined Wavelet-Fourier and Multiscale Non-Local Means Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Seo, Doochun; Jeong, Jaeheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-09-10

    In very high-resolution (VHR) push-broom-type satellite sensor data, both destriping and denoising methods have become chronic problems and attracted major research advances in the remote sensing fields. Since the estimation of the original image from a noisy input is an ill-posed problem, a simple noise removal algorithm cannot preserve the radiometric integrity of satellite data. To solve these problems, we present a novel method to correct VHR data acquired by a push-broom-type sensor by combining wavelet-Fourier and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filters. After the wavelet-Fourier filter separates the stripe noise from the mixed noise in the wavelet low- and selected high-frequency sub-bands, random noise is removed using the multiscale NLM filter in both low- and high-frequency sub-bands without loss of image detail. The performance of the proposed method is compared to various existing methods on a set of push-broom-type sensor data acquired by Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 3 (KOMPSAT-3) with severe stripe and random noise, and the results of the proposed method show significantly improved enhancement results over existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of both qualitative and quantitative assessments.

  10. Spectral interdependence of remote-sensing reflectance and its implications on the design of ocean color satellite sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhongping; Shang, Shaoling; Hu, Chuanmin; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-20

    storage and handling of large volume hyperspectral data as well as for the design of future ocean color satellite sensors.

  11. STM study of short chain hydrophobic thiol SAMs on HOPG and Au capped HOPG under ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alexis; Maurer, Mackenzie; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2015-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayer(SAM) surfaces provide common architecture in many device applications including sensor engineering. The conductivity characteristics and surface molecular structure and orientation of these SAM are important as physiochemical properties are dependent on the surface arrangement. SAMs used in this study are short chain -R terminated (hydrophobic) 1-Butanethiol on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surface and on thermally annealed Au thin film capped on HOPG. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), contact angle measurements and reflective spectroscopy are used to assess the SAM layered surfaces. Solutions of 1-Butanethiol, dissolved in 200 proof Ethanol with 5mM concentration were prepared for the self-assembly process. These solutions were used in developing SAMs on purchased, freshly cleaved HOPG substrates. Au thin layers were sputter deposited on HOPG and subsequently annealed. Initial data shows low Au deposition yields rougher inconsistent surfaces. Ambient conditions under which data was obtained impose fresh surfaces for each investigation. Tentative surface structure, consistency and thiol molecular arrangement of the SAM layer on HOPG and Au capped HOPG will be discussed. National Science Foundation.

  12. The 2010 Eyja eruption evolution by using IR satellite sensors measurements: retrieval comparison and insights into explosive volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscini, A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Scollo, S.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 April-May Eyja eruption caused an unprecedented disruption to economic, political and cultural activities in Europe and across the world. Because of the harming effects of fine ash particles on aircrafts, many European airports were in fact closed causing millions of passengers to be stranded, and with a worldwide airline industry loss estimated of about 2.5 billion Euros. Both security and economical issues require robust and affordable volcanic cloud retrievals that may be really improved through the intercomparison among different remote sensing instruments. In this work the Thermal InfraRed (TIR) measurements of different polar and geostationary satellites instruments as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), have been used to retrieve the volcanic ash and SO2 in the entire eruption period over Iceland. The ash retrievals (mass, AOD and effective radius) have been carried out by means of the split window BTD technique using the channels centered around 11 and 12 micron. The least square fit procedure is used for the SO2 retrieval by using the 7.3 and 8.7 micron channels. The simulated TOA radiance Look-Up Table (LUT) needed for both the ash and SO2 column abundance retrievals have been computed using the MODTRAN 4 Radiative Transfer Model. Further, the volcanic plume column altitude and ash density have been computed and compared, when available, with ground observations. The results coming from the retrieval of different IR sensors show a good agreement over the entire eruption period. The column height, the volcanic ash and the SO2 emission trend confirm the indentified different phases occurred during the Eyja eruption. We remark that the retrieved volcanic plume evolution can give important insights into eruptive dynamics during long-lived explosive activity.

  13. Dynamics of SAMs in Boundary Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manojlović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant molecules have some properties responsible for a number ofremarkable phenomena, such as oriented adsorption of surfactants at surfaces and interfaces. The capability to self -assemble into well- defined structures is often seen as being more important than their surface activity. When a surfactant solution is in contact with a solid surface, the surfactant molecules adsorb onto the surface, ideally forming an adsorbed layer of a high order, termed as a self- assembled monolayer (SAM. Many surface properties are influenced bysuch a film, and therefore, SAMs offer the capability to form ordered organic surface coatings, suitable for various applications, such as wetting or corrosion protection. Due to the flexibility in choosing the molecular architecture, organic molecules have many interesting applications, such as biosensors, in Photoelectronics, in controlling water adsorption or boundary lubricant coating. This paper Focuses on cationic surfactants (quaternary ammonium surfactants with some unique properties that are not present in other surfactants.

  14. Inter-Calibration of Satellite Passive Microwave Land Observations from AMSR-E and AMSR2 Using Overlapping FY3B-MWRI Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Du

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The development and continuity of consistent long-term data records from similar overlapping satellite observations is critical for global monitoring and environmental change assessments. We developed an empirical approach for inter-calibration of satellite microwave brightness temperature (Tb records over land from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E and Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2 using overlapping Tb observations from the Microwave Radiation Imager (MWRI. Double Differencing (DD calculations revealed significant AMSR2 and MWRI biases relative to AMSR-E. Pixel-wise linear relationships were established from overlapping Tb records and used for calibrating MWRI and AMSR2 records to the AMSR-E baseline. The integrated multi-sensor Tb record was largely consistent over the major global vegetation and climate zones; sensor biases were generally well calibrated, though residual Tb differences inherent to different sensor configurations were still present. Daily surface air temperature estimates from the calibrated AMSR2 Tb inputs also showed favorable accuracy against independent measurements from 142 global weather stations (R2 ≥ 0.75, RMSE ≤ 3.64 °C, but with slightly lower accuracy than the AMSR-E baseline (R2 ≥ 0.78, RMSE ≤ 3.46 °C. The proposed method is promising for generating consistent, uninterrupted global land parameter records spanning the AMSR-E and continuing AMSR2 missions.

  15. Jeffries Matusita-Spectral Angle Mapper (JM-SAM) spectral matching for species level mapping at Bhitarkanika, Muthupet and Pichavaram mangroves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, S.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral matching algorithm by integrating the stochastic Jeffries-Matusita measure (JM) and the deterministic Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), to accurately map the species and the associated landcover types of the mangroves of east coast of India using hyperspectral satellite images. The JM-SAM algorithm signifies the combination of a qualitative distance measure (JM) and a quantitative angle measure (SAM). The spectral capabilities of both the measures are orthogonally projected using the tangent and sine functions to result in the combined algorithm. The developed JM-SAM algorithm is implemented to discriminate the mangrove species and the landcover classes of Pichavaram (Tamil Nadu), Muthupet (Tamil Nadu) and Bhitarkanika (Odisha) mangrove forests along the Eastern Indian coast using the Hyperion image dat asets that contain 242 bands. The developed algorithm is extended in a supervised framework for accurate classification of the Hyperion image. The pixel-level matching performance of the developed algorithm is assessed by the Relative Spectral Discriminatory Probability (RSDPB) and Relative Spectral Discriminatory Entropy (RSDE) measures. From the values of RSDPB and RSDE, it is inferred that hybrid JM-SAM matching measure results in improved discriminability of the mangrove species and the associated landcover types than the individual SAM and JM algorithms. This performance is reflected in the classification accuracies of species and landcover map of Pichavaram mangrove ecosystem. Thus, the JM-SAM (TAN) matching algorithm yielded an accuracy better than SAM and JM measures at an average difference of 13.49 %, 7.21 % respectively, followed by JM-SAM (SIN) at 12.06%, 5.78% respectively. Similarly, in the case of Muthupet, JM-SAM (TAN) yielded an increased accuracy than SAM and JM measures at an average difference of 12.5 %, 9.72 % respectively, followed by JM-SAM (SIN) at 8.34 %, 5.55% respectively. For Bhitarkanika, the combined

  16. System Advisor Model, SAM 2014.1.14: General Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.; Freeman, J.; Neises, T.; Wagner, M.; Ferguson, T.; Gilman, P.; Janzou, S.

    2014-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2013.9.20, released on September 9, 2013. SAM is a computer model that calculates performance and financial metrics of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of photovoltaic, concentrating solar power, solar water heating, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financial structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). SAM's advanced simulation options facilitate parametric and sensitivity analyses, and statistical analysis capabilities are available for Monte Carlo simulation and weather variability (P50/P90) studies. SAM can also read input variables from Microsoft Excel worksheets. For software developers, the SAM software development kit (SDK) makes it possible to use SAM simulation modules in their applications written in C/C++, C#, Java, Python, and MATLAB. NREL provides both SAM and the SDK as free downloads at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  17. LSA-SAF evapotranspiration products based on MSG/SEVIRI: improvement opportunities from moderate spatial resolution satellites sensors for vegetation (SPOT-VGT, MODIS, PROBA-V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilain, N.; De Roo, F.; Arboleda, A.; Gellens-Meulenberghs, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF) proposes a panel of land surface related products derived from the EUMETSAT satellites, MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) and EPS/METOP, and produced in near-real time over Europe, Africa and part of South America. With LSA-SAF products, key surface variables are observed, and allows to characterizing the main processes governing land atmosphere processes. Land evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the variables monitored within LSA-SAF. ET at a spatial resolution of approximately 3 km at the sub-satellite point above the equator is derived in near-real time, every 30 minutes, using a simplified land surface model, forced by LSA-SAF radiation products derived from MSG/SEVIRI data. Given that spatial resolution, some smaller scale processes cannot be resolved, though their contribution may affect the total MSG pixel area ET estimates. Besides, information with an increased resolution is expected to have a positive impact on the total accuracy of the modeled ET. A variety of new remote sensing products derived from EO data at a higher spatial resolution are now publicly available. This is an opportunity to assess the improvement that moderate spatial resolution (250 m to 1 km) satellites sensors for surface and vegetation characterization could offer to the evapotranspiration monitoring at the MSG/SEVIRI scale in the context of LSA-SAF. On the basis of a global analysis and on test cases, we show the usefulness of EO data acquired from moderate resolution satellites sensors (SPOT-VGT, MODIS/Terra&Aqua, MERIS) towards the improvement of the LSA-SAF ET products derived from MSG/SEVIRI. In particular, 4 different variables/indices (land cover map, LAI, surface albedo, open water bodies detection) are assessed regarding the LSA-SAF ET products: 1) the investigated processes at small scales unresolved by the geostationary satellite, e.g. open water bodies dynamics, are better taken into account in the final

  18. Selective in situ potential-assisted SAM formation on multi electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Ann-Lauriene; Toader, Violeta; Lennox, R. Bruce; Grutter, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The selective modification of individual components in a biosensor array is challenging. To address this challenge, we present a generalizable approach to selectively modify and characterize individual gold surfaces in an array, in an in situ manner. This is achieved by taking advantage of the potential dependent adsorption/desorption of surface-modified organic molecules. Control of the applied potential of the individual sensors in an array where each acts as a working electrode provides differential derivatization of the sensor surfaces. To demonstrate this concept, two different self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-forming electrochemically addressable ω-ferrocenyl alkanethiols (C11) are chemisorbed onto independent but spatially adjacent gold electrodes. The ferrocene alkanethiol does not chemisorb onto the surface when the applied potential is cathodic relative to the adsorption potential and the electrode remains underivatized. However, applying potentials that are modestly positive relative to the adsorption potential leads to extensive coverage within 10 min. The resulting SAM remains in a stable state while held at potentials <200 mV above the adsorption potential. In this state, the chemisorbed SAM does not significantly desorb nor do new ferrocenylalkythiols adsorb. Using three set applied potentials provides for controlled submonolayer alkylthiol marker coverage of each independent gold electrode. These three applied potentials are dependent upon the specifics of the respective adsorbate. Characterization of the ferrocene-modified electrodes via cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that each specific ferrocene marker is exclusively adsorbed to the desired target electrode.

  19. TOWARD CALIBRATED MODULAR WIRELESS SYSTEM BASED AD HOC SENSORS FOR IN SITU LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AS SUPPORT TO SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASAAD CHAHBOUN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for in situ Land Surface Temperature (LST measurements' campaigns for satellite algorithms validations. The proposed method based on Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is constituted by modules of node arrays. Each of which is constituted by 25 smart nodes scattered throughout a target field. Every node represents a Thermal Infra Red (TIR radiation sensor and keeps a minimum size while ensuring the functions of communication, sensing, and processing. This Wireless-LST (Wi-LST system is convenient to beinstalled on a field pointing to any type of targets (e.g. bare soil, grass, water, etc.. Ad hoc topology is adopted among the TIR nodes with multi-hop mesh routing protocol for communication, acquisition data are transmitted to the client tier wirelessly. Using these emergent technologies, we propose a practical method for Wi-LSTsystem calibration. TIR sensor (i.e. OSM101 from OMEGA society measures temperature, which is conditioned and amplified by an AD595 within a precision of 0.1 °C. Assessed LST is transmitted over thedeveloped ad hoc WSN modules (i.e. MICA2DOT from CROSSBOW society, and collected at in situ base station (i.e. PANASONIC CF19 laptop using an integrated database. LST is evaluated with a polynomialalgorithm structure as part of developed software. Finally, the comparison of the mean values of LST(Wi-LST in each site with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS sensor, obtained from the daily LST product (MOD11C1 developed by the MODIS-NASA Science Team, on board TERRA satellite during the campaign period is provided.

  20. Preparation of metal-SAM-dendrimer-SAM-metal junctions by supramolecular metal transfer printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, C.A.; Maat, ter J.; Bisri, S.Z.; Weusthof, M.H.H.; Salm, C.; Schmitz, J.; Ravoo, B.J.; Huskens, J.; Reinhoudt, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Metal–self-assembled monolayer (SAM)–dendrimer–SAM–metal junctions were prepared by a new type of metal transfer printing (mTP) that uses multiple -cyclodextrin (CD) host–guest interactions between a metal-coated stamp decorated with a monolayer of host molecules and a substrate which is functionali

  1. General Quality Control (QC) Guidelines for SAM Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  2. SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM): Seeing Improvement with a UV Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Cantarutti, Rolando; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Martinez, Manuel; Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The adaptive module of the 4.1 m SOAR telescope, SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM), corrects ground-layer turbulence using an ultraviolet laser guide star. It has been commissioned in 2013 and it is in regular science operation since 2014. SAM works with the CCD imager covering a 3‧ field or with the speckle camera. It operates routinely and stably, delivering resolution in the I band equal to the free-atmosphere seeing. This paper describes the SAM system as a whole, providing essential reference for its users and technical information of interest to instrumentalists. Operation of the instrument, its performance, and science projects done with SAM so far are reviewed.

  3. SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM): seeing improvement with a UV laser

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Martinez, Manuel; Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive module of the 4.1-m SOAR telescope, SAM, corrects ground-layer turbulence using a UV laser guide star. It has been commissioned in 2013 and it is in regular science operation since 2014. SAM works with the CCD imager covering a 3' field or with the speckle camera. It operates routinely and stably, delivering resolution in the I band equal to the free-atmosphere seeing. This paper describes the SAM system as a whole, providing essential reference for its users and technical information of interest to instrumentalists. Operation of the instrument, its performance, and science projects done with SAM so far are reviewed.

  4. The RISCO RapidIce Viewer: An application for monitoring the polar ice sheets with multi-resolution, multi-temporal, multi-sensor satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herried, B.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.; Howat, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Rapid Ice Sheet Change Observatory (RISCO) is a NASA-funded, inter-organizational collaboration created to provide a systematic framework for gathering, processing, analyzing, and distributing consistent satellite imagery of polar ice sheet change for Antarctica and Greenland. RISCO gathers observations over areas of rapid change and makes them easily accessible to investigators, media, and the general public. As opposed to existing data centers, which are structured to archive and distribute diverse types of raw data to end users with the specialized software and skills to analyze them, RISCO distributes processed georeferenced raster image data products in JPEG and GeoTIFF formats, making them immediately viewable in a browser-based application. Currently, the archive includes 16 sensors including: MODIS Terra, MODIS Aqua, MODIS Terra Bands 3-6-7, Landsat MSS, Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI, EO-1, SPOT, ASTER VNIR, Operation IceBridge ATM and LVIS, and commercial satellites such as WorldView-1, WorldView-2, QuickBird-2, GeoEye-1 and IKONOS. The RISCO RapidIce Viewer is a lightweight JavaScript application that provides an interface to viewing and downloading the satellite imagery from predefined areas-of-interest (or 'subsets'), which are normally between 10,000 and 20,000 sq km. Users select a subset (from a map or drop-down) and the archive of individual granules is loaded in a thumbnail grid, sorted chronologically (newest first). For each thumbnail, users can choose to view a larger preview JPG, download a GeoTIFF, or be redirected back to the original data center to see the original imagery or view metadata. There are several options for filtering displayed including by sensor, by date range, by month, or by cloud cover. Last, users can select multiple images to play back as an animation. The RapidIce Viewer is an easy-to-use, software independent application for researchers to quickly monitor daily changes in ice sheets or download historical

  5. Attitude and vibration control of a satellite containing flexible solar arrays by using reaction wheels, and piezoelectric transducers as sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Ijar M.; Rade, Domingos A.; Goes, Luiz C. S.; de Paula Sales, Thiago

    2017-10-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide insight into control-structure interaction for satellites comprising flexible appendages and internal moving components. The physical model considered herein aiming to attend such purpose is a rigid-flexible satellite consisting of a rigid platform containing two rotating flexible solar panels. The solar panels rotation is assumed to be in a sun-synchronous configuration mode. The panels contain surface-bonded piezoelectric patches that can be used either as sensors for the elastic displacements or as actuators to counteract the vibration motion. It is assumed that in the normal mode operation the satellite platform points towards the Earth while the solar arrays rotate so as to follow the Sun. The vehicle moves in a low Earth polar orbit. The technique used to obtain the mathematical model combines the Lagrangian formulation with the Finite Elements Method used to describe the dynamics of the solar panel. The gravity-gradient torque as well as the torque due to the interaction of the Earth magnetic field and the satellite internal residual magnetic moment is included as environmental perturbations. The actuators are three reaction wheels for attitude control and piezoelectric actuators to control the flexible motion of the solar arrays. Computer simulations are performed using the MATLAB® software package. The following on-orbit satellite operating configurations are object of analysis: i) Satellite pointing towards the Earth (Earth acquisition maneuver) by considering the initial conditions in the elastic displacement equal to zero, aiming the assessment of the flexible modes excitation by the referred maneuver; ii) the satellite pointing towards the Earth with the assumption of an initial condition different from zero for the flexible motion such that the attitude alterations are checked against the elastic motion disturbance; and iii) attitude acquisition accomplished by taking into account initial conditions

  6. Fast converging with high accuracy estimates of satellite attitude and orbit based on magnetometer augmented with gyro, star sensor and GPS via extended Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Mekky Ahmed Habib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work is to extend the work done in, Tamer (2009, to provide high accuracy satellite attitude and orbit estimates needed for imaging purposes and also before execution of spacecraft orbital maneuvers for the next Egyptian scientific satellite. The problem of coarse satellite attitude and orbit estimation based on magnetometer measurements has been treated in the literature. The current research expands the field of application from coarse and slow converging estimates to accurate and fast converging attitude and orbit estimates within 0.1°, and 10 m for attitude angles and spacecraft location respectively (1-σ. The magnetometer is used for both spacecraft attitude and orbit estimation, aided with gyro to provide angular velocity measurements, star sensor to provide attitude quaternion, and GPS receiver to provide spacecraft location. The spacecraft under consideration is subject to solar radiation pressure forces and moments, aerodynamics forces and moments, earth’s oblateness till the fourth order (i.e. J4, gravity gradient moments, and residual magnetic dipole moments. The estimation algorithm developed is powerful enough to converge quickly (actually within 10 s despite very large initial estimation errors with sufficiently high accuracy estimates.

  7. Detection, emission estimation and risk prediction of forest fires in China using satellite sensors and simulation models in the past three decades--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; Yao, Feng-Mei; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Li-Min; Boken, Vijendra K

    2011-08-01

    Forest fires have major impact on ecosystems and greatly impact the amount of greenhouse gases and aerosols in the atmosphere. This paper presents an overview in the forest fire detection, emission estimation, and fire risk prediction in China using satellite imagery, climate data, and various simulation models over the past three decades. Since the 1980s, remotely-sensed data acquired by many satellites, such as NOAA/AVHRR, FY-series, MODIS, CBERS, and ENVISAT, have been widely utilized for detecting forest fire hot spots and burned areas in China. Some developed algorithms have been utilized for detecting the forest fire hot spots at a sub-pixel level. With respect to modeling the forest burning emission, a remote sensing data-driven Net Primary productivity (NPP) estimation model was developed for estimating forest biomass and fuel. In order to improve the forest fire risk modeling in China, real-time meteorological data, such as surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, have been used as the model input for improving prediction of forest fire occurrence and its behavior. Shortwave infrared (SWIR) and near infrared (NIR) channels of satellite sensors have been employed for detecting live fuel moisture content (FMC), and the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) was used for evaluating the forest vegetation condition and its moisture status.

  8. Providing output of DIRAC-SAM jobs to the IT-based SAM-Nagios framework

    CERN Document Server

    Volkl, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    Information available on LHCb grid sites in the SAM-Nagios monitor- ing framework - gathered mainly through functional tests - has been sup- plemented with results from LHCbDIRAC SAMJobs published by means of message client newly integrated in LHCbDIRAC. These are displayed as a new metric org.lhcb.DiracTest-lhcb giving additional debug in- formation to system administrators and influencing reports on grid site performances in the future

  9. Non Linear Optimization Applied to Angle-Of Satellite Based Geo-Localization for Biased and Time-Drifting Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Daniel; Roos, Jason; Robinson, Jace; Carpenter, William; Martin, Richard; Taylor, Clark; Sugrue, Joseph; Terzuoli, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sensors are used in a variety of geolocation systems. Many use Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements to estimate the most likely location of a signal. When an object does not emit an RF signal, Angle of Arrival (AOA) measurements using optical or infrared frequencies become more feasible than TDOA or RSS measurements. AOA measurements can be created from any sensor platform with any sort of optical sensor, location and attitude knowledge to track passive objects. Previous work has created a non-linear optimization (NLO) method for calculating the most likely estimate from AOA measurements. Two new modifications to the NLO algorithm are created and shown to correct AOA measurement errors by estimating the inherent bias and time-drift in the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) of the AOA sensing platform. One method corrects the sensor bias in post processing while treating the NLO method as a module. The other method directly corrects the sensor bias within the NLO algorithm by incorporating the bias parameters as a state vector in the estimation process. These two methods are analyzed using various Monte-Carlo simulations to check the general performance of the two modifications in comparison to the original NLO algorithm.

  10. Inversion of Aerosol Optical Depth Based on the CCD and IRS Sensors on the HJ-1 Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To perform a high-resolution aerosol optical depth (AOD inversion from the HJ-1 satellites, a dark pixel algorithm utilizing the HJ-1 satellite data was developed based on the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS algorithm. By analyzing the relationship between the apparent reflectance from the 1.65 μm and 2.1 μm channels of MODIS, a method for estimating albedo using the 1.65 μm channel data of the HJ-1 satellites was established, and a high-resolution AOD inversion in the Chengdu region based on the HJ-1 satellite was completed. A comparison of the inversion results with CE318 measured data produced a correlation of 0.957, respectively, with an absolute error of 0.106. An analysis of the AOD inversion results from different aerosol models showed that the rural aerosol model was suitable as a general model for establishing an aerosol inversion look-up table for the Chengdu region.

  11. Assessment of the aerosol optical depths measured by satellite-based passive remote sensors in the Alberta oil sands region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioris, Christopher E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Abboud, Ihab

    2017-02-01

    Several satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products are assessed in terms of their data quality in the Alberta oil sands region. The instruments consist of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), and AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer). The AOD data products are examined in terms of multiplicative and additive biases determined using local Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) (AEROCAN) stations. Correlation with ground-based data is used to assess whether the satellite-based AODs capture day-to-day, month-to-month, and spatial variability. The ability of the satellite AOD products to capture interannual variability is assessed at Albian mine and Shell Muskeg River, two neighbouring sites in the northern mining region where a statistically significant positive trend (2002-2015) in PM2.5 mass density exists. An increasing trend of similar amplitude (˜ 5 % year-1) is observed in this northern mining region using some of the satellite AOD products.

  12. Sam68 is a novel marker for aggressive neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaohong Zhao,1,* Zuoqing Li,2,* Benfu He,3 Juncheng Liu,2 Suisheng Li,2 Li Zhou,2 Cuiling Pan,2 Zhe Yu,4 Zhe Xu21State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of Experimental Research, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Department of Pediatric Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, 3Oncology Department, PLA421 Hospital, 4Laura Biotech Co, Ltd, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Neuroblastoma (NB is the most common solid extracranial tumor in children. However, the molecular mechanism and progression of NB is largely unknown, and unfortunately, the prognosis is poor. Src-associated in mitosis with a molecular weight of 68 kDa (Sam68 is associated with carcinogenesis and neurogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical and prognostic significance of Sam68 in NB.Methods: The expression of Sam68 in immortalized normal epithelial cells, NB cell lines, and in four cases of paired NB tissue and adjacent normal tissue from the same patient was examined using Western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The proliferation of NB cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Furthermore, Sam68 protein expression was analyzed in 90 NB cases characterized as clinicopathological using immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the diagnostic value and associations of Sam68 with clinical parameters.Results: Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR showed that the expression level of Sam68 was markedly higher in NB cell lines than in the immortalized normal epithelial cells at both messenger RNA and protein levels. The MTT assay revealed that Sam68 expression supported proliferation of NB cells. Sam68 expression levels were significantly up-regulated in tumor tissues in comparison to the

  13. Yield and quality prediction using satellite passive imagery and ground-based active optical sensors in sugar beet, spring wheat, corn, and sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Honggang

    Remote sensing is one possible approach for improving crop nitrogen use efficiency to save fertilizer cost, reduce environmental pollution, and improve crop yield and quality. Feasibility and potential of using remote sensing tools to predict crops yield and quality as well as detect nitrogen requirements, application timing, rate, and places in season were investigated based on 2012-2013 two-year and four-crop (corn, spring wheat, sugar beet, and sunflower) study. Two ground-based active optical sensors, GreenSeeker and Holland Scientific Crop Circle, and the RapidEye satellite imagery were used to collect sensing data. Highly significant statistical relationships between INSEY (NDVI normalized by growing degree days) and crop yield and quality indices were found for all crops, indicating that remote sensing tools may be useful for managing in-season crop yield and quality prediction.

  14. System Advisor Model, SAM 2011.12.2: General Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2011.12.2, released on December 2, 2011. SAM is software that models the cost and performance of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financing structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). Advanced analysis options facilitate parametric, sensitivity, and statistical analyses, and allow for interfacing SAM with Microsoft Excel or with other computer programs. SAM is available as a free download at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  15. SAM Gcms Chromatography Performed at Mars : Elements of Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Buch, A.; François, P.; Cabane, M.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The characterisation of the chemical and mineralogical composition of regolith samples collected with the Curiosity rover is a primary objective of the SAM experiment. These data should provide essential clues on the past habitability of Gale crater. Interpretation of the data collected after SAM pyrolysis evolved gas analysis (EGA) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) experiments on the first soil samples collected by MSL at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater has been challenging due to the concomitant presence in the ovens of an oxychlorine phase present in the samples, and a derivatization agent coming from the SAM wet chemistry experiment (Glavin et al., 2013). Moreover, accurate identification and quantification, in the SAM EGA mode, of volatiles released from the heated sample, or generated by reactions occurring in the SAM pyrolysis oven, is also difficult for a few compounds due to evolution over similar temperature ranges and overlap of their MS signatures. Hence, the GC analyses, coupled with MS, enabled the separation and identification and quantification of most of the volatile compounds detected. These results can have been obtained through tests and calibration done with GC individual spare components and with the SAM testbed. This paper will present a view of the interpretation of the chromatograms obtained when analyzing the Rocknest and John Klein solid samples delivered to SAM, on sols 96 and 199 respectively, supported by laboratory calibrations.

  16. Downscaling Satellite Data for Predicting Catchment-scale Root Zone Soil Moisture with Ground-based Sensors and an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Baldwin, D. C.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture (RZSM) content at a catchment-scale is essential for drought and flood predictions, irrigation planning, weather forecasting, and many other applications. Satellites, such as the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), can estimate near-surface (0-5 cm) soil moisture content globally at coarse spatial resolutions. We develop a hierarchical Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation modeling system to downscale satellite-based near-surface soil moisture and to estimate RZSM content across the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory at a 1-m resolution in combination with ground-based soil moisture sensor data. In this example, a simple infiltration model within the EnKF-model has been parameterized for 6 soil-terrain units to forecast daily RZSM content in the catchment from 2009 - 2012 based on AMSRE. LiDAR-derived terrain variables define intra-unit RZSM variability using a novel covariance localization technique. This method also allows the mapping of uncertainty with our RZSM estimates for each time-step. A catchment-wide satellite-to-surface downscaling parameter, which nudges the satellite measurement closer to in situ near-surface data, is also calculated for each time-step. We find significant differences in predicted root zone moisture storage for different terrain units across the experimental time-period. Root mean square error from a cross-validation analysis of RZSM predictions using an independent dataset of catchment-wide in situ Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements ranges from 0.060-0.096 cm3 cm-3, and the RZSM predictions are significantly (p State Integrated Hydrologic Modeling (PIHM) system. Uncertainty estimates are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to cross validation error during wet and dry conditions, but more so in dry summer seasons. Developing an EnKF-model system that downscales satellite data and predicts catchment-scale RZSM content is especially timely, given the anticipated

  17. Image and Processing Models for Satellite Detection in Images Acquired by Space-based Surveillance-of-Space Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    software. Résumé …..... Dans le cadre de la surveillance de l’espace, les objets spatiaux connus en orbite (OSO), i.e., satellites actifs ou débris...SAPPHIRE et NEOSSat. Ce document contient des modèles qui décrivent la formation des images et le processus d’acquisition de capteurs , basés au sol ou dans

  18. Structural and functional characterization of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase from Pichia ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangyoung; Lee, Wonkyu; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, T Doohun; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2012-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAM-s) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is essential for methylation, transcription, proliferation, and production of secondary metabolites. Here SAM-s from Pichia ciferrii were selectively cloned using RNA CapFishing and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The putative full-length cDNA of SAM-s encoded a 383 amino acid protein (42.6 kDa), which has highly conserved metal binding sites, a phosphate-binding site, and functionally important motifs. The corresponding enzyme was over-expressed in a heterologous host of Pichia pastoris, and then purified to a homogenous form. Enzyme kinetics, immunoblotting, circular dichroism (CD), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and molecular modeling were conducted to characterize the SAM-s from P. ciferrii. Structural and functional studies of SAM-s will provide important insights for industrial applications.

  19. Crystal structures of the SAM-III/S[subscript MK] riboswitch reveal the SAM-dependent translation inhibition mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, C.; Smith, A.M.; Fuchs, R.T.; Ding, F.; Rajashankar, K.; Henkin, T.M.; Ke, A. (Cornell); (OSU)

    2010-01-07

    Three distinct classes of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches have been identified that regulate bacterial gene expression at the levels of transcription attenuation or translation inhibition. The SMK box (SAM-III) translational riboswitch has been identified in the SAM synthetase gene in members of the Lactobacillales. Here we report the 2.2-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Enterococcus faecalis SMK box riboswitch. The Y-shaped riboswitch organizes its conserved nucleotides around a three-way junction for SAM recognition. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which is sequestered by base-pairing with the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence in response to SAM binding, also directly participates in SAM recognition. The riboswitch makes extensive interactions with the adenosine and sulfonium moieties of SAM but does not appear to recognize the tail of the methionine moiety. We captured a structural snapshot of the SMK box riboswitch sampling the near-cognate ligand S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) in which SAH was found to adopt an alternative conformation and fails to make several key interactions.

  20. User requirements and user acceptance of current and next-generation satellite mission and sensor complement, oriented toward the monitoring of water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.; Fowler, T. R.; Robinson, P.

    1975-01-01

    Principal water resources users were surveyed to determine the applicability of remotely sensed data to their present and future requirements. Analysis of responses was used to assess the levels of adequacy of LANDSAT 1 and 2 in fulfilling hydrological functions, and to derive systems specifications for future water resources-oriented remote sensing satellite systems. The analysis indicates that water resources applications for all but the very large users require: (1) resolutions on the order of 15 meters, (2) a number of radiometric levels of the same order as currently used in LANDSAT 1 (64), (3) a number of spectral bands not in excess of those used in LANDSAT 1, and (4) a repetition frequency on the order of 2 weeks. The users had little feel for the value of new sensors (thermal IR, passive and active microwaves). What is needed in this area is to achieve specific demonstrations of the utility of these sensors and submit the results to the users to evince their judgement.

  1. A GIS-based assessment of the suitability of SCIAMACHY satellite sensor measurements for estimating reliable CO concentrations in a low-latitude climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagbeja, Mofoluso A; Hill, Jennifer L; Chatterton, Tim J; Longhurst, James W S

    2015-02-01

    An assessment of the reliability of the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite sensor measurements to interpolate tropospheric concentrations of carbon monoxide considering the low-latitude climate of the Niger Delta region in Nigeria was conducted. Monthly SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide (CO) column measurements from January 2,003 to December 2005 were interpolated using ordinary kriging technique. The spatio-temporal variations observed in the reliability were based on proximity to the Atlantic Ocean, seasonal variations in the intensities of rainfall and relative humidity, the presence of dust particles from the Sahara desert, industrialization in Southwest Nigeria and biomass burning during the dry season in Northern Nigeria. Spatial reliabilities of 74 and 42 % are observed for the inland and coastal areas, respectively. Temporally, average reliability of 61 and 55 % occur during the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Reliability in the inland and coastal areas was 72 and 38 % during the wet season, and 75 and 46 % during the dry season, respectively. Based on the results, the WFM-DOAS SCIAMACHY CO data product used for this study is therefore relevant in the assessment of CO concentrations in developing countries within the low latitudes that could not afford monitoring infrastructure due to the required high costs. Although the SCIAMACHY sensor is no longer available, it provided cost-effective, reliable and accessible data that could support air quality assessment in developing countries.

  2. Comparison of Eight Techniques for Reconstructing Multi-Satellite Sensor Time-Series NDVI Data Sets in the Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Geng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 techniques have been developed to de-noise time-series vegetation index data from different satellite sensors to reconstruct long time-series data sets. Although many studies have compared Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI noise-reduction techniques, few studies have compared these techniques systematically and comprehensively. This study tested eight techniques for smoothing different vegetation types using different types of multi-temporal NDVI data (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR (Global Inventory Modeling and Map Studies (GIMMS and Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL, Satellite Pour l’ Observation de la Terre (SPOT VEGETATION (VGT, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS (Terra with the ultimate purpose of determining the best reconstruction technique for each type of vegetation captured with four satellite sensors. These techniques include the modified best index slope extraction (M-BISE technique, the Savitzky-Golay (S-G technique, the mean value iteration filter (MVI technique, the asymmetric Gaussian (A-G technique, the double logistic (D-L technique, the changing-weight filter (CW technique, the interpolation for data reconstruction (IDR technique, and the Whittaker smoother (WS technique. These techniques were evaluated by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE, the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC, and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC. The results indicate that the S-G, CW, and WS techniques perform better than the other tested techniques, while the IDR, M-BISE, and MVI techniques performed worse than the other techniques. The best de-noise technique varies with different vegetation types and NDVI data sources. The S-G performs best in most situations. In addition, the CW and WS are effective techniques that were exceeded only by the S-G technique. The assessment results are consistent in terms of the three evaluation indexes for GIMMS, PAL, and SPOT data in the study

  3. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2-3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future.

  4. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C.; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2–3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future. PMID:27486664

  5. Potential of multispectral synergism for observing tropospheric ozone by combining IR and UV measurements from incoming LEO (EPS-SG) and GEO (MTG) satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Cuesta, Juan; Emili, Emanuele; Coman, Adriana; Foret, Gilles; Dufour, Gaëlle; Eremenko, Maxim; Chailleux, Yohann; Beekmann, Matthias; Flaud, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Satellite observations offer a great potential for monitoring air quality on daily and global basis. However, measurements from currently in orbit sensors do not allow to probe surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants such as tropospheric ozone (Liu et al., 2010). Using single-band approaches based on spaceborne measurements of either thermal infrared radiance (TIR, Eremenko et al., 2008) or ultraviolet reflectance (UV, Liu et al., 2010) only ozone down to the lower troposphere (3 km) may be observed. A recent multispectral method (referred to as IASI+GOME-2) combining the information of IASI and GOME-2 (both onboard MetOp satellites) spectra, respectively from the TIR and UV, has shown enhanced sensitivity for probing ozone at the lowermost troposphere (LMT, below 3 km of altitude) with maximum sensitivity down to 2.20 km a.s.l. over land, while sensitivity for IASI or GOME-2 only peaks at 3 to 4 km at lowest (Cuesta et al., 2013). Future spatial missions will be launched in the upcoming years on both low and geostationary orbits, such as EPS-SG (EUMETSAT Polar System Second Generation) and MTG (Meteosat Third Generation), carrying respectively IASI-NG (for IR) and UVNS (for UV), and IRS (for IR) and UVN (Sentinel 4, for UV). This new-generation sensors will enhance the capacity to observe ozone pollution and particularly by synergism of multispectral measurements. In this work we develop a pseudo-observation simulator and evaluate the potential of future EPS-SG and MTG satellite observations, through IASI-NG+UVNS and IRS+UVN multispectral methods to observe near-surface O3. The pseudo-real state of atmosphere (nature run) is provided by MOCAGE (MOdèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Échelle) chemical transport model. Simulations are calibrated by careful comparisons with real data, to ensure the best coherence between pseudo-reality and reality, as well as between the pseudo-observation simulator and existing satellite products. We perform full and

  6. Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision...

  7. Sam Wagstaffi unustatud kired / Ahto Külvet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Külvet, Ahto

    2008-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm "Black, White & Gray: Sam Wagstaff and Robert Mapplethorpe" : autor ja režissöör James Crump : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2007. Filmi näidati filminädala "Art in America" raames Tallinnas

  8. Kuula. Kuu artist Sam Sparro. Kuu plaat / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2008-01-01

    Artistist Sam Sparrost. Heliplaatidest: "Sex And The City" Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, "Maestro: Blue Note Trip", Melvin/Soo/Remmel/Julm "Geografix", Alanis Morrisette "Flavors Of Entanglement", Guillemots "Red"

  9. SAM: A Simple Averaging Model of Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the Simple Averaging Model (SAM) which was developed to demonstrate impression-formation computer modeling with less complex and less expensive procedures than are required by most established programs. (RC)

  10. Sam Wagstaffi unustatud kired / Ahto Külvet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Külvet, Ahto

    2008-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm "Black, White & Gray: Sam Wagstaff and Robert Mapplethorpe" : autor ja režissöör James Crump : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2007. Filmi näidati filminädala "Art in America" raames Tallinnas

  11. NACO/SAM observations of sources at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J; Alberdi, A; Pott, J U

    2012-01-01

    Sparse aperture masking (SAM) interferometry combined with Adaptive Optics (AO) is a technique that is uniquely suited to investigate structures near the diffraction limit of large telescopes. The strengths of the technique are a robust calibration of the Point Spread Function (PSF) while maintaining a relatively high dynamic range. We used SAM+AO observations to investigate the circumstellar environment of several bright sources with infrared excess in the central parsec of the Galaxy. For our observations, unstable atmospheric conditions as well as significant residuals after the background subtraction presented serious problems for the standard approach of calibrating SAM data via interspersed observations of reference stars. We circumvented these difficulties by constructing a synthesized calibrator directly from sources within the field-of-view. When observing crowded fields, this novel method can boost the efficiency of SAM observations because it renders interspersed calibrator observations unnecessary...

  12. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  13. Kuula. Kuu artist Sam Sparro. Kuu plaat / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2008-01-01

    Artistist Sam Sparrost. Heliplaatidest: "Sex And The City" Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, "Maestro: Blue Note Trip", Melvin/Soo/Remmel/Julm "Geografix", Alanis Morrisette "Flavors Of Entanglement", Guillemots "Red"

  14. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  15. Cloning and Analysis of Genes SAMS From Glycine soja

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jinping; BAI Xi; LI Yong; JI Wei; WANG Xi; ZHU Yanming

    2008-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) plays important role in trans-methyl reactions. Under the condition of drought (30%PEG),salinity (200 mmol·L-1 NaCI) and low temperature (4℃),total RNA was extracted from the leaf and the first strand of eDNA was synthesized with reverse transcription.S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene (SAMS gene) was amplified by PeR with the first strand eDNA as template and a pair of primers which was based on constructed ESTs sequence.Full-length SAMS gene sequence was obtained by BLAST comparison. According to the analysis, completed sequence of SAMS gene was integrality.The sequence of the SAMS gene was 1185 bp in length with an opening reading frame (ORF) encoding 394 amino acids.The cDNA sequence showed a significant homology to the SAM genes from Phaseolus lunatus (89%),Medicago sativa (85%).A prokaryotie expression vectors based on pET-32b had been constructed and prokaryotie expression was analyzed in order to lay a strong foundation for resist adversity function analysis through situation of genie expression analysis.

  16. Time series analysis of satellite multi-sensors imagery to study the recursive abnormal grow of floating macrophyte in the lake victoria (central Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusilli, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Laneve, Giovanni; Pignatti, Stefano; Santilli, Giancarlo; Santini, Federico

    2010-05-01

    Remote sensing allows multi-temporal mapping and monitoring of large water bodies. The importance of remote sensing for wetland and inland water inventory and monitoring at all scales was emphasized several times by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and from EU projects like SALMON and ROSALMA, e.g. by (Finlayson et al., 1999) and (Lowry and Finlayson, 2004). This paper aims at assessing the capability of time series of satellite imagery to provide information suitable for enhancing the understanding of the temporal cycles shown by the macrophytes growing in order to support the monitor and management of the lake Victoria water resources. The lake Victoria coastal areas are facing a number of challenges related to water resource management which include growing population, water scarcity, climate variability and water resource degradation, invasive species, water pollution. The proliferation of invasive plants and aquatic weeds, is of growing concern. In particular, let us recall some of the problems caused by the aquatic weeds growing: Ø interference with human activities such as fishing, and boating; Ø inhibition or interference with a balanced fish population; Ø fish killing due to removal of too much oxygen from the water; Ø production of quiet water areas that are ideal for mosquito breeding. In this context, an integrated use of medium/high resolution images from sensors like MODIS, ASTER, LANDSAT/TM and whenever available CHRIS offers the possibility of creating a congruent time series allowing the analysis of the floating vegetation dynamic on an extended temporal basis. Although MODIS imagery is acquired daily, cloudiness and other sources of noise can greatly reduce the effective temporal resolution, further its spatial resolution can results not always adequate to map the extension of floating plants. Therefore, the integrated use of sensors with different spatial resolution, were used to map across seasons the evolution of the phenomena. The

  17. Variations in the Sea Ice Edge and the Marginal Ice Zone on Different Spatial Scales as Observed from Different Satellite Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Henrichs, John

    2006-01-01

    The Marginal sea Ice Zone (MIZ) and the sea ice edge are the most dynamic areas of the sea ice cover. Knowledge of the sea ice edge location is vital for routing shipping in the polar regions. The ice edge is the location of recurrent plankton blooms, and is the habitat for a number of animals, including several which are under severe ecological threat. Polar lows are known to preferentially form along the sea ice edge because of induced atmospheric baroclinicity, and the ice edge is also the location of both vertical and horizontal ocean currents driven by thermal and salinity gradients. Finally, sea ice is both a driver and indicator of climate change and monitoring the position of the ice edge accurately over long time periods enables assessment of the impact of global and regional warming near the poles. Several sensors are currently in orbit that can monitor the sea ice edge. These sensors, though, have different spatial resolutions, different limitations, and different repeat frequencies. Satellite passive microwave sensors can monitor the ice edge on a daily or even twice-daily basis, albeit with low spatial resolution - 25 km for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) or 12.5 km for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). Although special methods exist that allow the detection of the sea ice edge at a quarter of that nominal resolution (PSSM). Visible and infrared data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provide daily coverage at 1 km and 250 m, respectively, but the surface observations me limited to cloud-free periods. The Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) has a resolution of 15 to 30 m but is limited to cloud-free periods as well, and does not provide daily coverage. Imagery from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments has resolutions of tens of meters to 100 m, and can be used to distinguish open water and sea ice on the basis of surface

  18. Multi-satellite sensor study on precipitation-induced emission pulses of NOx from soils in semi-arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zörner, Jan; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Sihler, Holger; Veres, Patrick R.; Williams, Jonathan; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We present a top-down approach to infer and quantify rain-induced emission pulses of NOx ( ≡ NO + NO2), stemming from biotic emissions of NO from soils, from satellite-borne measurements of NO2. This is achieved by synchronizing time series at single grid pixels according to the first day of rain after a dry spell of prescribed duration. The full track of the temporal evolution several weeks before and after a rain pulse is retained with daily resolution. These are needed for a sophisticated background correction, which accounts for seasonal variations in the time series and allows for improved quantification of rain-induced soil emissions. The method is applied globally and provides constraints on pulsed soil emissions of NOx in regions where the NOx budget is seasonally dominated by soil emissions. We find strong peaks of enhanced NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) induced by the first intense precipitation after prolonged droughts in many semi-arid regions of the world, in particular in the Sahel. Detailed investigations show that the rain-induced NO2 pulse detected by the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY satellite instruments could not be explained by other sources, such as biomass burning or lightning, or by retrieval artefacts (e.g. due to clouds). For the Sahel region, absolute enhancements of the NO2 VCDs on the first day of rain based on OMI measurements 2007-2010 are on average 4 × 1014  molec cm-2 and exceed 1 × 1015  molec cm-2 for individual grid cells. Assuming a NOx lifetime of 4 h, this corresponds to soil NOx emissions in the range of 6 up to 65 ng N m-2 s-1, which is in good agreement with literature values. Apart from the clear first-day peak, NO2 VCDs are moderately enhanced (2 × 1014  molec cm-2) compared to the background over the following 2 weeks, suggesting potential further emissions during that period of about 3.3 ng N m-2 s-1. The pulsed emissions contribute about 21-44 % to total

  19. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 12; Express/T-160 Project Express A2 and A3 Sensors Operations Procedures Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg. E. and 11 deg. W respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  20. Use of a neuro-variational inversion for retrieving oceanic and atmospheric constituents from satellite ocean colour sensor: application to absorbing aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajard, Julien; Jamet, Cédric; Moulin, Cyril; Thiria, Sylvie

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a new development of the NeuroVaria method. NeuroVaria computes relevant atmospheric and oceanic parameters by minimizing the difference between the observed satellite reflectances and those computed from radiative transfer simulations modelled by artificial neural networks. Aerosol optical properties are computed using the Junge size distribution allowing taking into account highly absorbing aerosols. The major improvement to the method has been to implement an iterative cost function formulation that makes the minimization more efficient. This implementation of NeuroVaria has been applied to sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS) imagery. A comparison with in situ measurements and the standard SeaWiFS results for cases without absorbing aerosols shows that this version of NeuroVaria remains consistent with the former. Finally, the processing of SeaWiFS images of a plume of absorbing aerosols off the US East coast demonstrate the ability of this improved version of NeuroVaria to deal with absorbing aerosols.

  1. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the intercomparison of aerosol data - Part 4: Combined maximum covariance analysis to bridge the gap between multi-sensor satellite retrievals and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques has greatly advanced our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols. Various satellite sensors and the associated retrieval algorithms all add to the information of global aerosol variability, while well-designed surface networks provide time series of highly accurate measurements at specific locations. In studying the variability of aerosol properties, aerosol climate effects, and constraining aerosol fields in climate models, it is essential to make the best use of all of the available information. In the previous three parts of this series, we demonstrated the usefulness of several spectral decomposition techniques in the analysis and comparison of temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth using satellite and ground-based measurements. Specifically, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) successfully captures and isolates seasonal and interannual variability from different aerosol source regions, Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) provides a means to verify the variability in one satellite dataset against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, and Combined Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) realized parallel comparison among multi-satellite, multi-sensor datasets. As the final part of the study, this paper introduces a novel technique that integrates both multi-sensor datasets and ground observations, and thus effectively bridges the gap between these two types of measurements. The Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA) decomposes the cross covariance matrix between the combined multi-sensor satellite data field and AERONET station data. We show that this new method not only confirms the seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol optical depth, aerosol source regions and events represented by different satellite datasets, but also identifies the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in capturing the variability associated with sources, events or aerosol types. Furthermore, by examining the spread of

  2. Obituary: Sam Roweis (1972-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, David

    2011-12-01

    Computer scientist and statistical astronomer Sam Roweis took his own life in New York City on 2010 January 12. He was a brilliant and accomplished researcher in the field of machine learning, and a strong advocate for the use of computational statistics for automating discovery and scientific data analysis. He made several important contributions to astronomy and was working on adaptive astronomical data analysis at the time of his death. Roweis obtained his PhD in 1999 from the California Institute of Technology, where he worked on a remarkable range of subjects, including DNA computing, modeling of dynamical systems, signal processing, and speech recognition. During this time he unified and clarified some of the most important data analysis techniques, including Principal Component Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, and Expectation Maximization. His work was aimed at making data analysis and modeling faster, but also better justified scientifically. The last years of his PhD were spent in Princeton NJ, where he came in contact with a young generation of cosmologists thinking about microwave background and large-scale structure data. In a postdoc at University College London, Roweis co-created the Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) algorithm; a simple but flexible technique for mapping a large data set onto a low-dimensional manifold. The LLE paper obtained more than 2700 citations in 9 years, launched a new sub-field of machine learning known as "manifold learning," and inspired work in data visualization, search, and applied mathematics. In 2001, Roweis took a faculty job at the University of Toronto Computer Science Department. He continued working on data analysis methods that have probabilistic interpretation and therefore scientific applicability, but at the same time have good performance on large data sets. He was awarded a Sloan Fellowship, a Canada Research Chair, and a fellowship of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, among other honors and awards

  3. Active Satellite Sensors for the needs of Cultural Heritage: Introducing SAR applications in Cyprus through ATHENA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhartsiouk, Demetris; Agapiou, Athos; Lynsadrou, Vasiliki; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Brcic, Ramon; Eineder, Michael; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2017-04-01

    Non-invasive landscape investigation for archaeological purposes includes a wide range of survey techniques, most of which include in-situ methods. In the recent years, a major advance in the non-invasive surveying techniques has been the introduction of active remote sensing technologies. One of such technologies is spaceborne radar, known as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). SAR has proven to be a valuable tool in the analysis of potential archaeological marks and in the systematic cultural heritage site monitoring. With the use of SAR, it is possible to monitor slight variations in vegetation and soil often interpreted as archaeological signs, while radar sensors frequently having penetrating capabilities offering an insight into shallow underground remains. Radar remote sensing for immovable cultural heritage and archaeological applications has been recently introduced to Cyprus through the currently ongoing ATHENA project. ATHENA project, under the Horizon 2020 programme, aims at building a bridge between research institutions of the low performing Member States and internationally-leading counterparts at EU level, mainly through training workshops and a series of knowledge transfer activities, frequently taking place on the basis of capacity development. The project is formed as the consortium of the Remote Sensing and Geo-Environment Research Laboratory of the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT), the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). As part of the project, a number of cultural heritage sites in Cyprus have been studied testing different methodologies involving SAR imagery such as Amplitude Change Detection, Coherence Calculation and fusion techniques. The ATHENA's prospective agenda includes the continuation of the capacity building programme with upcoming training workshops to take place while expanding the knowledge of radar applications on conservation and risk monitoring of cultural heritage sites through

  4. Native interface of the SAM domain polymer of TEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowie James U

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TEL is a transcriptional repressor containing a SAM domain that forms a helical polymer. In a number of hematologic malignancies, chromosomal translocations lead to aberrant fusions of TEL-SAM to a variety of other proteins, including many tyrosine kinases. TEL-SAM polymerization results in constitutive activation of the tyrosine kinase domains to which it becomes fused, leading to cell transformation. Thus, inhibitors of TEL-SAM self-association could abrogate transformation in these cells. In previous work, we determined the structure of a mutant TEL-SAM polymer bearing a Val to Glu substitution in center of the subunit interface. It remained unclear how much the mutation affected the architecture of the polymer, however. Results Here we determine the structure of the native polymer interface. To accomplish this goal, we introduced mutations that block polymer extension, producing a heterodimer with a wild-type interface. We find that the structure of the wild-type polymer interface is quite similar to the mutant structure determined previously. With the structure of the native interface, it is possible to evaluate the potential for developing therapeutic inhibitors of the interaction. We find that the interacting surfaces of the protein are relatively flat, containing no obvious pockets for the design of small molecule inhibitors. Conclusion Our results confirm the architecture of the TEL-SAM polymer proposed previously based on a mutant structure. The fact that the interface contains no obvious potential binding pockets suggests that it may be difficult to find small molecule inhibitors to treat malignancies in this way.

  5. Distributed land surface modeling with utilization of multi-sensor satellite data: application for the vast agricultural terrain in cold region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, E.; Uspensky, A.; Gelfan, A.; Startseva, Z.; Volkova, E.; Kukharsky, A.; Romanov, P.; Alexandrovich, M.

    2012-04-01

    area index (LAI) and vegetation cover fraction (VCF). On the base of special technology, the archive has been also prepared for the study area comprising remote sensing MODIS-derived products (LST, E, NDVI, LAI). The new technique for combining MODIS and AMSR-E snow retrievals and generating continuous (gap-free) maps of snow cover characteristics has been developed and tested. Besides, the original technique has been developed and applied to retrieve estimates of LST and E from the SEVIRI/Meteosat-9 data. Thus, the archive of AVHRR, AMSR-E and MODIS remote sensing products has been complemented by the SEVIRI-derived estimates of ls and for two vegetation seasons. Opportunities of utilizing land-surface/snow remote sensing products obtained from the different sensors (SEVIRI/Meteosat-9, AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra & Aqua, AMSR-E/EOS Aqua) in the developed RSBLSM has been studied. Sensitivity of the simulation results to different satellite remote sensing data has been analyzed. The obtained results allowed concluding that utilization of the differently derived satellite-based estimates in the developed model, intensively calibrated and validated against the available ground observations, provides an opportunity for reproducing spatial fields of evapotranspiration, soil moisture and temperature at different soil depths, temperature of soil/vegetation surfaces, snow and other water and heat characteristics for the vast agricultural region.

  6. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 10; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 3 Satellite for the Period of July 1, 2001 to and Including September 30, 2001, Task 27D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  7. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 4; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 3 Satellite, Task 27A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E., and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  8. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 8; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express A" Number 3 Satellite for the Period of January 1, 2001 to and Including March 31, 2001, Task 27C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  9. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 2; Acquire TM Date for Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 2 Satellite for the Period of March 12, 2000 to and Including June 15, 2000, Task 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  10. Technoeconomic Modeling of Battery Energy Storage in SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiOrio, Nicholas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dobos, Aron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Janzou, Steven [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nelson, Austin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lundstrom, Blake [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Detailed comprehensive lead-acid and lithium-ion battery models have been integrated with photovoltaic models in an effort to allow System Advisor Model (SAM) to offer the ability to predict the performance and economic benefit of behind the meter storage. In a system with storage, excess PV energy can be saved until later in the day when PV production has fallen, or until times of peak demand when it is more valuable. Complex dispatch strategies can be developed to leverage storage to reduce energy consumption or power demand based on the utility rate structure. This document describes the details of the battery performance and economic models in SAM.

  11. Quantifying Post-Fire Forest Biomass Recovery in Northeastern Siberia using Hierarchical Multi-Sensor Satellite Imagery and Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L.; Beck, P. S.; Loranty, M. M.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    distribution and regrowth patterns. These results provide a basis for assessing regrowth trajectories in the region using a combination of field measurements and multi-sensor imagery, with the ultimate objective of better capturing forest carbon sequestration under changing fire disturbance regime.

  12. DIORAMA Model of Satellite Body Orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The DIORAMA GPS satellite platform orientation model is described. Satellites need to keep sensors pointed towards the earth and solar panels oriented to face the sun (when not in the earth’s shadow) while they orbit the earth.

  13. Simulated SAM A-scans on multilayer MEMS components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janting, Jakob; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Greisen, Christoffer

    2002-01-01

    A spreadsheet program for simulation of Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) A-scans on multilayer structures has been developed. Using this program, structure variations in samples can be analysed better. Further samples can be prepared to get optimal signal for enhanced failure and materials anal...

  14. Ensuring GRID resource availability with the SAM framework in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Closier, J; Santinelli, R

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has chosen to use the SAM framework (Service Availability Monitoring Environment from EGEE-II) [1] make extensive tests of the LHCb environment at all the accessible grid resources. The availability and the proper definition of the local Computing and Storage Elements, user interfaces as well as the WLCG software environment are checked. The SAM framework is also used to pre-install the LHCb applications in the shared software area provided by each site. The deployment of the LHCb applications is based on a python tool developed inside the experiment. It is used for software management including incremental installation of interdependent packages and clean package removal. After the application software is installed a validation test of the whole MC chain is run. According to the results of the experiment specific SAM tests, the sites are (re)integrated into the LHCb production system managed by DIRAC [2]. The possibility of automated dynamic site certification using the SAM test suite is ...

  15. ISO19770-1:2012 SAM process guidance

    CERN Document Server

    Canavan, Rory

    2012-01-01

    The pocket guide offers a concise summary of the principles of software asset management as conveyed by ISO 19770-1: 2012, and provides advice and guidance on how to kick-start your own SAM programme - something the Standard alone doesn't offer.

  16. Automation of one-loop calculations with GoSam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soden-Fraunhofen, Johann Felix von [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The program package GoSam can be used to calculate multi-leg one-loop amplitudes within and beyond the Standard Model. An extension is additionally presented which allows to calculate integrals where the rank is larger than the number of propagators. One possible application of this feature is the calculation of QCD corrections within models involving extra dimensions.

  17. Social Activity Method (SAM): A Fractal Language for Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, "social activity method" (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for "modes of recontextualisation" that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity--which might be school mathematics or social research or any…

  18. 77 FR 67813 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ..., Assistant Administrator, Southwestern Power Administration, Department of Energy, Williams Center Tower I... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Rate Order Approving an Extension of Power Rate on an Interim Basis....

  19. Sample Analysis at Mars Organic Contaminants Library (SAM-OCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Raul; Misra, Prabhakar; Canham, John; Mahaffy, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars Organic Contaminants Library (SAM-OCL) was developed as one of several components for the Mars rover mission's Contamination Control Protocol. The purpose of SAM-OCL is to determine the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GCMS) signals of different materials composing the Mars Science Laboratory rover. In turn, this allows us to determine which GCMS signals originate from terrestrial contamination or rover material outgassing. The GCMS spectral library has several supplemental components, of which its descriptor spreadsheets are the most important, aimed to make SAM-OCL easily and readily accessible to users in and out of the Mars rover mission. One spreadsheet describes the contaminants that can be found in each file, while the other describes the information regarding each file. The library, along with its supplemental materials, is useful from an organizational and practical sense. Through them we are able to organize large volumes of GCMS data while breaking down the components that each material sample is made off. This allows us easy and fast access to information that will be critical when doing analysis in the data that the SAM instrumentation will obtain.

  20. Role of Sam68 in Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Sánchez-Jiménez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The STAR family of proteins links signaling pathways to various aspects of post-transcriptional regulation and processing of RNAs. Sam68 belongs to this class of heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP K homology (KH single domain-containing family of RNA-binding proteins that also contains some domains predicted to bind critical components in signal transduction pathways. In response to phosphorylation and other post-transcriptional modifications, Sam68 has been shown to have the ability to link signal transduction pathways to downstream effects regulating RNA metabolism, including transcription, alternative splicing or RNA transport. In addition to its function as a docking protein in some signaling pathways, this prototypic STAR protein has been identified to have a nuclear localization and to take part in the formation of both nuclear and cytosolic multi-molecular complexes such as Sam68 nuclear bodies and stress granules. Coupling with other proteins and RNA targets, Sam68 may play a role in the regulation of differential expression and mRNA processing and translation according to internal and external signals, thus mediating important physiological functions, such as cell death, proliferation or cell differentiation.

  1. Spatio-angularly multiplexed (SAM) holographic storage in photorefractive crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shiquan

    In this thesis a novel multiplexing scheme for dense holographic storage in photorefractive crystals, Spatio-Angular Multiplexing (or SAM), is described in detail. In SAM Fourier transform holograms are formed in spatially overlapping regions of a crystal and are distinguished from one another by using variously angled reference beams. SAM takes advantage of both the high storage density possible using angularly multiplexed volume holograms and also the low crosstalk possible using spatially multiplexed Fourier transform holograms. Compared to pure spatial multiplexing, SAM increases the storage capacity by fully utilising the volume of the storage medium. On the other hand, SAM reduces the number of holograms overlapping any one hologram in a given volume, and so increases the diffraction efficiency achievable as compared to pure angular multiplexing. SAM offers the possibility of incorporating the recorded crystal into a content addressable memory (CAM) system for parallel access of all stored patterns. In order to obtain the maximum diffraction efficiency and signal to noise ratio, the hologram must be replayed by a readout beam incident at the correct angle of readout beam. The optimum angle may be shifted away from the angle used in recording by a ''Bragg-shift", caused (under certain conditions) by phase coupling between the two writing beams during recording. Although this Bragg shift is small, a large diffraction efficiency enhancement is obtained when the grating is read out at the optimum angle. We have calculated the Bragg shift, using a numerical calculation based on an earlier theory, and have obtained good agreement with experiment. Using the novel SAM scheme, we have succeeded in storing 756 high resolution binary patterns in an Fe:LiNbO3 crystal of volume 1cm3, with an average diffraction efficiency of 0.5%. This large database is designed for practical use in a novel associative memory system, called a high order feedback neural network (HOFNET

  2. The Performance of CSAM SAM when Cycle Length is extended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Kyung-ho; Moon, Sang-rae [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to verify validation of that, CPC Axial Power Distribution is compared with Axial Power Distribution based on ICI every week. The difference between CPC Axial Power Distribution and Axial Power Distribution based on ICI increases according as fuels are burned. It is called CPC Axial Power Distribution Root Mean Square Error (CPC RMS Error). SAM and calibration of ex-core detector are important factors influencing the magnitude of the difference. According to vendor, the difference is limited by 8%. Otherwise, CPC penalty increases as many as difference increase. Therefore, KHNP developed Constrained Simulated Annealing Method (CSAM), which has better performance than that of Least Square Method (LSM), to calculate SAM constant. The CSA SAM contributed largely to maintain CPC operating margin. Somewhat, KHNP is developing the technology to be able to operate nuclear power plants for 24 month to optimize their efficiency. This paper shows trends of CPC RMS Error in a case of 24 months operation. Trends are based on data of a few OPR1000s under operation. It is data of OPR1000s that CSA SAM is applied. KHNP is developing the technology to extend operation cycle length in order to optimize the operation efficiency of OPR1000. To verify effect of extended operation cycle length on CPC, CPC Axial Power Distribution RMS Error in a case of 24 months operation was expected using operation data of six cycles in OPR1000. In cases that CPC Axial Power Distribution RMS Error exceeds threshold, operation margin is decreased due to CPC penalty. To prevent CPC operation margin from being decreased, improved method to calculate SAM or to calibrate ex-core detector is required. KHNP will consider the way to maintain CPC operation margin along with 24 month operation technology development, hereafter.

  3. Influence of the wet chemistry on the SAM GCMS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Miller, K.; Eigendbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Pinnick, V. T.; Coll, P. J.; François, P.; Cabane, M.; Teinturier, S.; Coscia, D.; Dworkin, J. P.; Summons, R. E.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The SAM GC-MS instrument on the Curiosity rover allows to analyze volatile compounds from the atmosphere or volatile compounds from the Martian regolith and refractory compounds in the regolith after sample treatment using wet chemistry. One portion of the wet chemistry experiment is composed of MTBSTFA (N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (dimethylformamide). Indeed, chemical derivatization of polar molecular compounds is achieved by the MTBSTFA silylation reaction in order to transform refractory polar compounds into a more volatile form that can be analyzed and detected by GC-MS. Results obtained on Rocknest (Leshin et al. 2013; Glavin et al. 2013) and John Klein showed the presence of MTBSTFA reaction products in the system. This means that MTBSTFA is part of the background signal under its gaseous phase and is derived from at least one of the seven MTBSTFA/DMF filled derivatization cups in SAM. Since MTBSTFA is able to react in the gaseous phase, its detection implies the possibility to have some MTBSTFA reactions with all the labile compounds possibly present in the Martian soil, in the sampling system and/or inside the SAM instrument. As such, in order to better understand the portion of products detected coming from internal reactions, we have performed several lab experiments to mimic the SAM pyrolysis and gas processing system. Specifically, we have investigated possible MTBSTFA reactions with organics at high temperatures (100°C up to 600°C) from the SAM trap (Tenax) and with oxychlorine compounds present on Mars (Glavin et al. 2013). References: Leshin et al. Science, in press; Glavin et al. JGR-Planets, accepted.

  4. DNA adenine methylation of sams1 gene in symbiont-bearing Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Taeck J

    2008-10-01

    The expression of amoeba sams genes is switched from sams1 to sams2 when amoebae are infected with Legionella jeonii. To elucidate the mechanism for the inactivation of host sams1 gene by endosymbiotic bacteria, methylation states of the sams1 gene of D and xD amoebae was compared in this study. The sams1 gene of amoebae was methylated at an internal adenine residue of GATC site in symbiont-bearing xD amoebae but not in symbiont-free D amoebae, suggesting that the modification might have caused the inactivation of sams1 in xD amoebae. The sams1 gene of xD amoebae was inactivated at the transcriptional level. Analysis of DNA showed that adenine residues in L. jeonii sams were also methylated, implying that L. jeonii bacteria belong to a Dam methylase-positive strain. In addition, both SAM and Met appeared to act as negative regulators for the expression of sams1 whereas the expression of sams2 was not affected in amoebae.

  5. Genome sequencing and annotation of Stenotrophomonas sp. SAM8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Selim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report draft genome sequence of Stenotrophomonas sp. strain SAM8, isolated from environmental water. The draft genome size is 3,665,538 bp with a G + C content of 67.2% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDAV00000000.

  6. Jo Ann Baumgartner and Sam Earnshaw: Organizers and Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Jo Ann Baumgartner directs the Wild Farm Alliance, based in Watsonville, California. WFA’s mission, as described on the organization’s website, is “to promote agriculture that helps to protect and restore wild Nature.” Through research, publications, presentations, events, policy work, and consulting, the organization works to “connect food systems with ecosystems.” Sam Earnshaw is Central Coast regional coordinator of the Community Alliance with Family Farmers. Working with CAFF’s f...

  7. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  8. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2015-04-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  9. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  10. Advances in satellite oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, O. B.; Cheney, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Technical advances and recent applications of active and passive satellite remote sensing techniques to the study of oceanic processes are summarized. The general themes include infrared and visible radiometry, active and passive microwave sensors, and buoy location systems. The surface parameters of sea surface temperature, windstream, sea state, altimetry, color, and ice are treated as applicable under each of the general methods.

  11. Ablation of the Sam68 RNA binding protein protects mice from age-related bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Richard

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The Src substrate associated in mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68 is a KH-type RNA binding protein that has been shown to regulate several aspects of RNA metabolism; however, its physiologic role has remained elusive. Herein we report the generation of Sam68-null mice by homologous recombination. Aged Sam68-/- mice preserved their bone mass, in sharp contrast with 12-month-old wild-type littermates in which bone mass was decreased up to approximately 75%. In fact, the bone volume of the 12-month-old Sam68-/- mice was virtually indistinguishable from that of 4-month-old wild-type or Sam68-/- mice. Sam68-/- bone marrow stromal cells had a differentiation advantage for the osteogenic pathway. Moreover, the knockdown of Sam68 using short hairpin RNA in the embryonic mesenchymal multipotential progenitor C3H10T1/2 cells resulted in more pronounced expression of the mature osteoblast marker osteocalcin when differentiation was induced with bone morphogenetic protein-2. Cultures of mouse embryo fibroblasts generated from Sam68+/+ and Sam68-/- littermates were induced to differentiate into adipocytes with culture medium containing pioglitazone and the Sam68-/- mouse embryo fibroblasts shown to have impaired adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, in vivo it was shown that sections of bone from 12-month-old Sam68-/- mice had few marrow adipocytes compared with their age-matched wild-type littermate controls, which exhibited fatty bone marrow. Our findings identify endogenous Sam68 as a positive regulator of adipocyte differentiation and a negative regulator of osteoblast differentiation, which is consistent with Sam68 being a modulator of bone marrow mesenchymal cell differentiation, and hence bone metabolism, in aged mice.

  12. Data collection method for delay tolerant wireless sensor network by satellite communication%一种结合卫星通信的容迟无线传感网数据收集方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗青春; 彭伟; 郦苏丹; 王勇

    2011-01-01

    Under the research background of sparse wireless sensor network deploying in wide area, this paper designed a data collection architecture, and orders were sent to sleeping nodes in destined area by satellite Ceocasting. Data Mule collected nodes' data and got back by satellite, and layout the Data Mule's movement path, a convex hull-based algorithm and communication protocol. Simulation results show that this method can solve the data collection problem in sparse wireless sensor network under complex environment, and have good performance.%以广域部署的稀疏无线传感网为研究背景,给出一种无线传感网数据收集系统结构,利用卫星(Geocasting方式向指定地域的处于睡眠状态的无线传感器节点发送指令,利用Data Mule收集节点的数据并通过卫星回传,对Data Mule的运动路径进行了规划,提出了一种基于凸包的算法,并设计了该系统的通信协议.仿真结果表明,该方法能有效解决广域稀疏无线传感网在复杂环境中数据收集的难题,有良好的性能.

  13. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz L. Dickert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE, but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors.

  14. SAM Overview and Operation at the D0 Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LauriLoebel-Carpenter; LeeLueking; 等

    2001-01-01

    SAM is a network-distributed data management system developed at Fermilab for use with Run II data,It is being Employed by the D0 Experiment to store,manage,deliver,and track processing of all data.We describe the design and features of the system including resource management and data transfer mechanisms,We show the operational experience D0 has accumulated to date including data acquisition processing,and all levels of access and delivery.We present various configurations of the system and describe their use in the collaboration.

  15. 轴角传感器对 GEO 卫星跟踪的影响分析%Analysis of Shaft Angle Sensor to the Influence for the GEO Satellite Tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕鑫; 刘京

    2016-01-01

    在卫星导航系统的地面控制系统中使用桁架天线对 GEO 卫星进行跟踪。抛物面天线是地面运控系统的重要组成部分,主要任务是实现对卫星的自动跟踪,保证天线电轴始终准确的对准卫星。为了保证天线的指向精度普遍采用程序跟踪方式对 GEO 卫星进行跟踪。天线通过对比轴角传感器反馈的指向角度和系统解算出的程引角度形成闭环控制,使天线波束精确的指向卫星,保证地面设备与卫星之间的数据传递。本文针对轴角传感器由于其内部弹性结构和工作环境的原因易产生硬件形变,从而引起天线对卫星的跟踪异常,进而对卫星导航系统提供定位导航服务产生影响的问题。根据卫星运动的规律判断卫星异常和其运动位置的关系,分析出卫星载荷异常甚至失锁的故障原理,提出了调整天线偏置角度的应急处置方法。文中分别阐述了天线程序跟踪的原理和工作流程、轴角传感器的工作结构、产生形变后的影响分析和故障处理措施及效果。结论表明故障原理分析正确,应急处置措施可以保证天线所跟踪的卫星不失锁,导航信息传输的星地链路不中断。%Tracking of GEO satellites use truss antenna in the ground control system in satellite navigation sys-tem.Paraboloid antenna is an important part of ground operation control system,the main task is to realize the automatic tracking of the satellite,guarantee the electric axis antenna always accurate alignment of satellite.In order to ensure the anten-na pointing accuracy generally adopts the program tracking mode tracking of GEO satellites.Antenna by comparing the shaft angle sensor feedback pointing angle and system solutions are worked out process lead angle to form a closed loop control,let antenna beam accurate pointing the satellite,Guarantee between the ground equipment and satellite data transmission.The shaft angle

  16. Multiple endmember spectral-angle-mapper (SAM) analysis improves discrimination of Savanna tree species

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cho, Moses A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available architecture. Several mapping methods are applied in remote sensing to quantify species or vegetation community distribution at the local to regional scale. The most commonly used methods include maximum likelihood, spectral mixture analysis (SMA)[1...] and spectral angle mapper (SAM)[2]. The application of some of these methods including SAM and SMA has become popular with the advent of hyperspectral remote sensing. SAM determines the degree of similarity between two spectra by treating the spectra...

  17. Cardiological aging in SAM model: effect of chronic treatment with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, K; Vara, E; García, C; Ariznavarreta, C; Escames, G; Tresguerres, J A F

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on different parameters related to inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in hearts from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated mice (SAM-P8) and senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAM-R1), and the influence of chronic administration of Growth Hormone (GH) on old SAM-P8 mice. Forty male mice were used. Animals were divided into five experimental groups: two 10 month old untreated groups (SAM-P8/SAM-R1), two 2 month old young groups (SAM-P8/SAM-R1) and one 10 month old group (SAM-P8) treated with GH for 30 days. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 10, heme oxygenases 1 and 2, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases, NFkB, Bad, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results were submitted to a two way ANOVA statistical evaluation using the Statgraphics program. Inflammation, as well as, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers were increased in the heart of old SAM-P8 males, as compared to young controls and this situation was not observed in the old SAM-R1 mice. Exogenous GH administration reverted the effect of aging in the described parameters of old SAM-P8 mice. Our results suggest that inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress could play an important role in the observed cardiovascular alterations related to aging of SAM-P8 mice and that GH may play a potential protective effect on the cardiovascular system of these animals.

  18. [Effects of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Juan; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Wang, Jian; Lin, Ya-Ni; Pang, Tian-Xiang; Li, Qing-Hua

    2014-08-01

    This study was purpose to investigate the effect of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat. The sequence of shRNA targeting the site 531-552 of Sam68 mRNA was designed and chemically synthesized, then a single-vector lentiviral, Tet-inducible shRNA-Sam68 system (pLKO-Tet-On) was constructed; next the Jurkat cells were infected with lentivirus to create stable cell clones with regulatable Sam68 gene expression. The inhibitory efficiency of Sam68 gene was assayed by Real-time PCR and Western blot; the cell activity of Jurkat cells was detected with MTT assay; the change of colony forming potential of Jurkat cells was analyzed by colony forming test; the cell cycle distribution was tested by flow cytometry. The results indicated that the expression of Sam68 in experimental cells was statistically decreased as compared with that of the control cells; the cells activity and colony forming capacity of the Jurkat cells with Sam68 gene silence were significantly inhibited; with Sam68 gene silencing, the percentage of S phase cells was significantly increased, while the percentage of G2 phase cells was significantly decreased. It is concluded that the silencing Sam68 gene using shRNA interference can effectively inhibit the proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat.

  19. de regresión OLS y SAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Vilalta y Perdomo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo es demostrar que debido a que algunos fenómenos sociales presentan variación espacial, la modelación de los mismos tiene implicaciones metodológicas importantes, y por lo tanto es recomendable utilizar una técnica de regresión que incorpore la espacialidad de los datos en su diseño. Se siguen dos procedimientos generales: primero se calcula el coeficiente de autocorrelación I de Moran para demostrar la espacialidad del comportamiento electoral en el México urbano entre 1994 y 2000; después se comparan dos técnicas de regresión, ols y sam. De la comparación se concluye que la técnica sam es más robusta que la ols con base en que la primera obtiene coeficientes de regresión más precisos y detecta efectos regionales estadísticamente significativos aun en la presencia de modelos con problemas de heterodasticidad.

  20. Modeling Research on Joint Scheduling of Multiple Imaging Satellites with Multiple Sensors%多星多载荷联合调度问题建模研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘鞘剑; 周装轻; 贺仁杰; 邢立宁

    2011-01-01

    在对多星多载荷联合调度过程及约束条件分析的基础上,从约束建模及启发式调度规则设计的角度对多星多载联合调度方案生成中的关键问题进行了深入研究.建立了基于阶段优化的多星多载荷联合调度模型.提出了基于规则的发式构造算法.%Guided by the application requirements of imaging satellite, the model construction and heuristic rule design of multi imaging satellites joint scheduling problem are focused. All of the research are based on the a-nalysis of the process of joint scheduling and imaging constraints. Firstly, this thesis analyses satellite imaging procedure , imaging constraints, input and output of the problem, ascertains the basic scheduling flow and characteristics of the multi imaging satellites joint scheduling problem. Secondly, in order to solve the problem the construction of heuristic algorithms is focused on.

  1. Homogenised daily lake surface water temperature data generated from multiple satellite sensors: A long-term case study of a large sub-Alpine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareeth, Sajid; Salmaso, Nico; Adrian, Rita; Neteler, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Availability of remotely sensed multi-spectral images since the 1980’s, which cover three decades of voluminous data could help researchers to study the changing dynamics of bio-physical characteristics of land and water. In this study, we introduce a new methodology to develop homogenised Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT) from multiple polar orbiting satellites. Precisely, we developed homogenised 1 km daily LSWT maps covering the last 30 years (1986 to 2015) combining data from 13 satellites. We used a split-window technique to derive LSWT from brightness temperatures and a modified diurnal temperature cycle model to homogenise data which were acquired between 8:00 to 17:00 UTC. Gaps in the temporal LSWT data due to the presence of clouds were filled by applying Harmonic ANalysis of Time Series (HANTS). The satellite derived LSWT maps were validated based on long-term monthly in-situ bulk temperature measurements in Lake Garda, the largest lake in Italy. We found the satellite derived homogenised LSWT being significantly correlated to in-situ data. The new LSWT time series showed a significant annual rate of increase of 0.020 °C yr-1 (*P summer.

  2. Integrated Differential Optical Shadow Sensor for Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Zoellner, Andreas; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a proposed space mission for the detection of gravitational waves. It consists of three drag-free satellites flying in a triangular constellation. A gravitational reference sensor is used in conjunction with a laser interferometer to measure the distance between test masses inside the three satellites. Other future space mission such as DECIGO and BBO also require a gravitational reference sensor. The Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor (MGRS) is being designed for these purposes and consists of two different optical sensors and a UV LED charge management system. The Differential Optical Shadow Sensor (DOSS) is one of the optical sensors and measures the position of a spherical test mass with respect to the surrounding satellite. This measurement is used for the drag-free feedback control loop. This paper describes the most recent, third generation of the experimental setup for the DOSS that uses a fiber coupled super luminescent LED, an integrated mounting ...

  3. Winning Attitude & Dedication to Physical Therapy Keep Sam Schmidt on Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, Nikki Prevenslik

    2006-01-01

    This article relates how Sam Schmidt returned to living a productive life after an accident left him with spinal cord injury. Schmidt was a former Indy Racing League driver who founded Sam Schmidt Motorsports after his accident in 2000. Schmidt's car hit the wall as he exited turn two during a practice session at Walt Disney World Speedway in…

  4. Regioselective patterning of multiple SAMs and applications in surface-guided smart microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanzhao; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin

    2014-12-24

    A top-down nanofabrication technology is developed to integrate multiple SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) into regioselective patterns. With ultraviolet light exposure through regioselectively hollowed hard mask, an existing SAM at designated microregions can be removed and a dissimilar kind of SAM can be regrown there. By repeating the photolithography-like process cycle, diverse kinds of SAM building blocks can be laid out as a desired pattern in one microfluidic channel. In order to ensure high quality of the surface modifications, the SAMs are vapor-phase deposited before the channel is closed by a bonding process. For the first time the technique makes it possible to integrate three or more kinds of SAMs in one microchannel. The technique is very useful for multiplex surface functionalization of microfluidic chips where different segments of a microfluidic channel need to be individually modified with different SAMs or into arrayed pattern for surface-guided fluidic properties like hydrophobicity/philicity and/or oleophobicity/philicity, etc. The technique has been well validated by experimental demonstration of various surface-directed flow-guiding functions. By modifying a microchannel surface into an arrayed pattern of multi-SAM "two-tone" stripe array, surface-guiding-induced 3D swirling flow is generated in a microfluidic channel that experimentally exhibits quick oil/water mixing and high-efficiency oil-to-water chemical extraction.

  5. Chemical analyses of hydroxyapatite formation on SAM surfaces modified with COOH, NH(2), CH(3), and OH functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Isao; Akamatsu, Mai; Fujii, Eri; Poolthong, Suchit; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2010-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite formation was examined at the surface of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified with four functional groups, -COOH, -NH(2), -CH(3), and -OH. For COOH-SAM and NH(2)-SAM, scanning electron spectroscopic observation showed that flake-like sheet crystals covered the whole wafer and small broccoli-like crystals were observed occasionally on the flake-like crystal base layer. For CH(3)-SAM and OH-SAM, no flake-like sheet crystals were observed; broccoli-like crystals were observed in a dispersed manner for CH(3)-SAM, but in localized spots for OH-SAM. X-ray diffraction patterns showed a strong apatite pattern oriented toward the c-axis direction for COOH-SAM. ESCA analysis revealed distinct Ca, P, O peaks for COOH-, NH(2)-, CH(3)-, and OH-SAM. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicated that during the supply of supersaturated calcium phosphate solution, the deposition of precipitates increased monotonically with time for COOH-SAM, increased slightly for NH(2)-SAM, but little increase in deposition was detected for CH(3)-SAM and OH-SAM.

  6. Sam Shepard's plays according to Slovenian theatre directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anina Oblak

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the productions of Sam Shepard's plays in Slovenia during 1985-2000 and the author of the paper primarily pays attention to the Slovenian directors' approach to Shepard's works and the problems that have arisen in the process. Five of Shepard's plays have been staged to date in Slovenia, two early works and three works of new realism. In interviews with the directors (Vinko Möderndorfer, Primož Bebler, Boris Kobal, Dušan Jovanovic and Boris Cavazza as well as three actresses and a choreographer (Alenka Vidrih, Barbara Babič, Vesna Jevnikar, Tanja Zgonc it has emerged that the transplantation of typically American issues to Slovenia and their treatment necessitated a different approach from the one normally taken by the Slovenian directors and actors. Shepard's plays being idiosyncratic, the theatre artists had to either accommodate his material or treat it with different methods that were adapted to suit the Slovenian environment.

  7. NaCo/SAM observations of sources at the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Schödel, R.; Alberdi, A.; Pott, J. U.

    2012-07-01

    Sparse aperture masking (SAM) interferometry combined with Adaptive Optics (AO) is a technique that is uniquely suited to investigate structures near the diffraction limit of large telescopes. The strengths of the technique are a robust calibration of the Point Spread Function (PSF) while maintaining a relatively high dynamic range. We used SAM+AO observations to investigate the circumstellar environment of several bright sources with infrared excess in the central parsec of the Galaxy. For our observations, unstable atmospheric conditions as well as significant residuals after the background subtraction presented serious problems for the standard approach of calibrating SAM data via interspersed observations of reference stars. We circumvented these difficulties by constructing a synthesized calibrator directly from sources within the field-of-view. When observing crowded fields, this novel method can boost the efficiency of SAM observations because it renders interspersed calibrator observations unnecessary. Here, we presented the first NaCo/SAM images reconstructed using this method.

  8. Social activity method (SAM): A fractal language for mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-09-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, social activity method (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for modes of recontextualisation that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity - which might be school mathematics or social research or any empirically observed regularity of practice - recontextualises the practice of another and I shall also present, deploy, and develop an existing scheme - domains of action - in an analysis of school mathematics examination papers and in the structuring of what I refer to as the esoteric domain. This domain is here conceived as a hybrid domain of, first, linguistic and extralinguistic resources that are unambiguously mathematical in terms of both expression and content and, second, pedagogic theory - often tacit - that enables the mathematical gaze onto other practices and so recontextualises them. A second and more general theme that runs through the paper is the claim that there is nothing that is beyond semiosis, that there is nothing to which we have direct access, unmediated by interpretation. This state of affairs has implications for mathematics education. Specifically, insofar as an individual's mathematical semiotic system is under continuous development - the curriculum never being graspable all at once - understanding - as a stable semiotic moment - of any aspect or object of mathematics is always localised to the individual and is at best transient, and the sequencing of such moments may well also be more individualised than consistent in some correspondence with the sequencing of the curriculum. This being the case, a concentration on understanding as a goal may well serve to inhibit the pragmatic acquisition and deployment of mathematical technologies, which should be the principal aim of mathematics teaching and learning. The paper is primarily concerned with mathematics education. SAM, however, is a language that is available for

  9. Economic Analysis Case Studies of Battery Energy Storage with SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiOrio, Nicholas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dobos, Aron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Janzou, Steven [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Interest in energy storage has continued to increase as states like California have introduced mandates and subsidies to spur adoption. This energy storage includes customer sited behind-the-meter storage coupled with photovoltaics (PV). This paper presents case study results from California and Tennessee, which were performed to assess the economic benefit of customer-installed systems. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued.

  10. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  11. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird)

    OpenAIRE

    Atwood, Elizabeth C.; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sen...

  12. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Film

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) is a polar orbiting meteorological sensor with two...

  13. Analysis of a regional change in the sign of the SAM-temperature relationship in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gareth J.; di Battista, Stefano; Naik, Sushant S.; Thamban, Meloth

    2011-01-01

    This study examines regional atmospheric circulation changes associated with a reversal in the sign of the relationship between the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and near-surface temperatures at Halley station, East Antarctica, during the 1980s. We show that the key factor affecting the regional SAM-temperature relationship (STR) is the relative magnitude of two climatological low pressure centres to the west and east of the area, which determines the source region of air masses advected into the locality. The principal difference affecting the STR is shown to be a trend towards a significantly weaker climatological low (higher pressure) at ~20°E during a positive phase of the SAM. Specifically, it is variations in the phase and magnitude of the wave number three patterns of atmospheric circulation, the non-annular component of the SAM, which are the principal factors governing the regional STR. A similar reversal is observed in the sign of the correlation between the SAM and oxygen-isotope values from an ice core located some 1,200 km east of Halley. This relationship is examined throughout the 20th Century, by comparing the isotope data to SAM reconstructions, and demonstrates marked decadal variability. Thus, these data suggest that switches in the STR are more likely to reflect natural variability in the long-wave patterns over the Southern Ocean rather than the influence of an anthropogenic forcing. This finding is important when considering the potential utility of Antarctic isotope data as a proxy for the SAM.

  14. The integrated conjugative plasmid pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens is related to temperate bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-03-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and derivatives contain the 11-kb element pSAM2 present in an integrated state or as a free and integrated plasmid. This element, able to integrate site-specifically in the genome of different Streptomyces species, is conjugative and mobilizes chromosomal markers. Besides these plasmid functions, we have shown that the site-specific recombination system of pSAM2 presents strong similarities with that of several temperate phages. The integration event is promoted by a site-specific recombinase of the integrase family. The int gene encoding this integrase is closely linked to the plasmid attachment site (attP). A small open reading frame (ORF) overlaps the int gene and the predicted protein exhibits similarities with Xis proteins involved in phages excision. The integrated copy of pSAM2 in strain ATCC23877 is flanked by att sequences (attL and attR). Another att sequence (attX) is present in this strain and attX and attL are the boundaries of a 42-kb fragment (xSAM1) absent, as well as pSAM2, from S.ambofaciens DSM40697. Sequences partially similar to pSAM2 int gene are found near the chromosomal integration zone in both S.ambofaciens strains. The possible origin of pSAM2, an element carrying plasmid as well as phage features, is discussed.

  15. Sam68 exerts separable effects on cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resnick Ross J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA-binding protein Sam68 has been implicated in a number of cellular processes, including transcription, RNA splicing and export, translation, signal transduction, cell cycle progression and replication of the human immunodeficiency virus and poliovirus. However, the precise impact it has on essential cellular functions remains largely obscure. Results In this report we show that conditional overexpression of Sam68 in fibroblasts results in both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle is associated with decreased levels of cyclins D1 and E RNA and protein, resulting in dramatically reduced Rb phosphorylation. Interestingly, cell cycle arrest does not require the specific RNA binding ability of Sam68. In marked contrast, induction of apoptosis by Sam68 absolutely requires a fully-functional RNA binding domain. Moreover, the anti-cancer agent trichostatin A potentiates Sam68-driven apoptosis. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that Sam68, an RNA binding protein with multiple apparent functions, exerts functionally separable effects on cell proliferation and survival, dependent on its ability to bind specifically to RNA. These findings shed new light on the ability of signal transducing RNA binding proteins to influence essential cell function. Moreover, the ability of a class of anti-cancer therapeutics to modulate its ability to promote apoptosis suggests that Sam68 status may impact some cancer treatments.

  16. Structural analysis of a putative SAM-dependent methyltransferase, YtqB, from Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Cheol; Song, Wan Seok; Yoon, Sung-il

    2014-04-18

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (MTases) methylate diverse biological molecules using a SAM cofactor. The ytqB gene of Bacillus subtilis encodes a putative MTase and its biological function has never been characterized. To reveal the structural features and the cofactor binding mode of YtqB, we have determined the crystal structures of YtqB alone and in complex with its cofactor, SAM, at 1.9 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. YtqB folds into a β-sheet sandwiched by two α-helical layers, and assembles into a dimeric form. Each YtqB monomer contains one SAM binding site, which shapes SAM into a slightly curved conformation and exposes the reactive methyl group of SAM potentially to a substrate. Our comparative structural analysis of YtqB and its homologues indicates that YtqB is a SAM-dependent class I MTase, and provides insights into the substrate binding site of YtqB.

  17. Friction Properties of OTS SAMs and Silicon Surface under Water Lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; ZHANG Xiangjun; AHMED Imad; LIU Ying; WEN Shizhu

    2009-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of silicon surface covered with octadecyltrichloro-silane (OTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were investigated by a UMT-2 microtribometer with and without water as lubricant, and then compared with that of bare silicon surface. Dry friction measurement results show that OTS SAMs have a very low friction coefficient compared to bare silicon surface under lower sliding velocity and normal contact load. However, heavy wear occurs on OTS SAMs under higher contact stress and sliding velocity. Under water lubrication, OTS SAMs can prevent wear obviously and meanwhile present low coefficient of friction even under high velocities.The improved frictional and anti-wear property on OTS SAMs surface is attributed to the hydrophobic property of OTS and hydrodynamic effect of water. Furthermore, a wear critical phase diagram for OTS SAMs with and without water was proposed, which indicates that OTS SAMs working under water lubrication owns a wider range of available load and velocity to reduce friction and prevent wear.

  18. Polyamine uptake by DUR3 and SAM3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Takeshi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2007-03-09

    It has been reported that GAP1 and AGP2 catalyze the uptake of polyamines together with amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have looked for polyamine-preferential uptake proteins in S. cerevisiae. DUR3 catalyzed the uptake of polyamines together with urea, and SAM3 was found to catalyze the uptake of polyamines together with S-adenosylmethionine, glutamic acid, and lysine. Polyamine uptake was greatly decreased in both DUR3- and SAM3-deficient cells. The K(m) values for putrescine and spermidine of DUR3 were 479 and 21.2 mum, respectively, and those of SAM3 were 433 and 20.7 mum, respectively. Polyamine stimulation of cell growth of a polyamine requiring mutant, which is deficient in ornithine decarboxylase, was not influenced by the disruption of GAP1 and AGP2, but it was diminished by the disruption of DUR3 and SAM3. Furthermore, the polyamine stimulation of cell growth of a polyamine-requiring mutant was completely inhibited by the disruption of both DUR3 and SAM3. The results indicate that DUR3 and SAM3 are major polyamine uptake proteins in yeast. We previously reported that polyamine transport protein kinase 2 regulates polyamine transport. It was found that DUR3 (but not SAM3) was activated by phosphorylation of Thr(250), Ser(251), and Thr(684) by polyamine transport protein kinase 2.

  19. OSUS sensor integration in Army experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganger, Robert; Nowicki, Mark; Kovach, Jesse; Gregory, Timothy; Liss, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Live sensor data was obtained from an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS, formerly Terra Harvest)- based system provided by the Army Research Lab (ARL) and fed into the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) sponsored Actionable Intelligence Technology Enabled Capabilities Demonstration (AI-TECD) Micro Cloud during the E15 demonstration event that took place at Fort Dix, New Jersey during July 2015. This data was an enabler for other technologies, such as Sensor Assignment to Mission (SAM), Sensor Data Server (SDS), and the AI-TECD Sensor Dashboard, providing rich sensor data (including images) for use by the Company Intel Support Team (CoIST) analyst. This paper describes how the OSUS data was integrated and used in the E15 event to support CoIST operations.

  20. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  1. Sam68 Mediates the Activation of Insulin and Leptin Signalling in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pérez-Pérez

    Full Text Available Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. High insulin and leptin levels seem to have a role modulating the growth of these tumours. Sam68 is an RNA-binding protein with signalling functions that has been found to be overexpressed in breast cancer. Moreover, Sam68 may be recruited to insulin and leptin signalling pathways, mediating its effects on survival, growth and proliferation in different cellular types. We aimed to study the expression of Sam68 and its phosphorylation level upon insulin and leptin stimulation, and the role of Sam68 in the proliferative effect and signalling pathways that are activated by insulin or leptin in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. In the human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474, Sam68 protein quantity and gene expression were increased upon leptin or insulin stimulation, as it was checked by qPCR and immunoblot. Moreover, both insulin and leptin stimulation promoted an increase in Sam68 tyrosine phosphorylation and negatively regulated its RNA binding capacity. siRNA was used to downregulate Sam68 expression, which resulted in lower proliferative effects of both insulin and leptin, as well as a lower activation of MAPK and PI3K pathways promoted by both hormones. These effects may be partly explained by the decrease in IRS-1 expression by down-regulation of Sam68. These results suggest the participation of Sam68 in both leptin and insulin receptor signaling in human breast cancer cells, mediating the trophic effects of these hormones in proliferation and cellular growth.

  2. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study - Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in the June 2013, the U.S. EPA and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services (AMS) began a collaborative research project to investigate how sensor-based, stand-alone air measurements (SAMs) and passive samplers (PSs) can help improve information on air pollutan...

  3. Automation of One-Loop Calculations with GoSam: Present Status and Future Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Gavin; Heinrich, Gudrun; Luisoni, Gionata; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Ossola, Giovanni; Reiter, Thomas; Tramontano, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, we describe the GoSam (Golem/Samurai) framework for the automated computation of multi-particle scattering amplitudes at the one-loop level. The amplitudes are generated analytically in terms of Feynman diagrams, and can be evaluated using either D-dimensional integrand reduction or tensor decomposition. GoSam can be used to compute one-loop corrections to Standard Model (QCD and EW) processes, and it is ready to link generic model files for theories Beyond SM. We show the main features of GoSam through its application to several examples of different complexity.

  4. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, microscopically visible granules that cluster around centrosomes. These structures, which contain numerous proteins directly involved in centrosome maintenance, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis, have traditionally been viewed as vehicles for protein trafficking...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  5. An introduction to optimal satellite range scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez Álvarez, Antonio José

    2015-01-01

    The satellite range scheduling (SRS) problem, an important operations research problem in the aerospace industry consisting of allocating tasks among satellites and Earth-bound objects, is examined in this book. SRS principles and solutions are applicable to many areas, including: Satellite communications, where tasks are communication intervals between sets of satellites and ground stations Earth observation, where tasks are observations of spots on the Earth by satellites Sensor scheduling, where tasks are observations of satellites by sensors on the Earth. This self-contained monograph begins with a structured compendium of the problem and moves on to explain the optimal approach to the solution, which includes aspects from graph theory, set theory, game theory and belief networks. This book is accessible to students, professionals and researchers in a variety of fields, including: operations research, optimization, scheduling theory, dynamic programming and game theory. Taking account of the distributed, ...

  6. Satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  7. Comparison of SAM and OBIA as Tools for Lava Morphology Classification - A Case Study in Krafla, NE Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufaristama, Muhammad; Hölbling, Daniel; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2017-04-01

    The Krafla volcanic system is part of the Icelandic North Volcanic Zone (NVZ). During Holocene, two eruptive events occurred in Krafla, 1724-1729 and 1975-1984. The last eruptive episode (1975-1984), known as the "Krafla Fires", resulted in nine volcanic eruption episodes. The total area covered by the lavas from this eruptive episode is 36 km2 and the volume is about 0.25-0.3 km3. Lava morphology is related to the characteristics of the surface morphology of a lava flow after solidification. The typical morphology of lava can be used as primary basis for the classification of lava flows when rheological properties cannot be directly observed during emplacement, and also for better understanding the behavior of lava flow models. Although mapping of lava flows in the field is relatively accurate such traditional methods are time consuming, especially when the lava covers large areas such as it is the case in Krafla. Semi-automatic mapping methods that make use of satellite remote sensing data allow for an efficient and fast mapping of lava morphology. In this study, two semi-automatic methods for lava morphology classification are presented and compared using Landsat 8 (30 m spatial resolution) and SPOT-5 (10 m spatial resolution) satellite images. For assessing the classification accuracy, the results from semi-automatic mapping were compared to the respective results from visual interpretation. On the one hand, the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) classification method was used. With this method an image is classified according to the spectral similarity between the image reflectance spectrums and the reference reflectance spectra. SAM successfully produced detailed lava surface morphology maps. However, the pixel-based approach partly leads to a salt-and-pepper effect. On the other hand, we applied the Random Forest (RF) classification method within an object-based image analysis (OBIA) framework. This statistical classifier uses a randomly selected subset of training

  8. Efficient Data Mining in SAMS through Association Rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Rahul B. Diwate

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a protocol for secure mining of association rules in distributed databases. Previous techniques all people deals with different database, now a day’s people also deals with the distributed database. Can we develop a kind of application in which the people can access the distributed data which is already store in remote location in encrypted format? This proposes system technique is used for efficient data mining in SAMS (Student Assessment Management System through association rules in distributed databases. The current leading techniques are that of Kantarcioglu and Clifton. This proposed system is ready to implements two methods, one that computes the union of private subsets that each of the interacting users hold, and another that tests the inclusion of an element held by one user in a subset held by another .We propose a protocol for secure mining through association rule consist a different level of execution process to secure storage of data and access of data. This paper will focus on such process for secure storage plus secure access of data

  9. Sam Goudsmit--His Physics and His Statesmanship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2010-03-01

    Sam Goudsmit was already a famous theoretical physicist in his thirties, mainly because of his co-discovery of electron spin with George Uhlenbeck while both were students of Paul Ehrenfest in Holland in 1925. He and Uhlenbeck continued their thriving careers at the University of Michigan. Goudsmit's style as a physicist was always to make as close a connection between theory and experiment as possible. Thus, for example, his development with his student Robert Bacher of the technique called ``fractional parentage'' used fruitfully in both atomic and nuclear physics to compute energy levels of unknown states in terms of know ones. He also delved deeply into problems related to determinations of nuclear spins and moments. Partly because of his service as scientific leader of the Alsos project at the end of WWII he became a leading statesman of science. I will describe some of his achievements both as a physicist and as a statesman, prior to his becoming Editor in Chief of the American Physical Society.

  10. Bringing satellite winds to hub-height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Bredesen, Rolv Erlend

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ocean surface can provide detailed information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is very valuable for the mapping of wind resources offshore where other measurements are costly and sparse. Satellite sensors operating at microwave frequencies m...

  11. Satellite imager calibration and validation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhengani, L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The success or failure of any earth observation mission depends on the quality of its data. Data quality is assessed by determining the radiometric, spatial, spectral and geometric fidelity of the satellite sensor. The process is termed calval...

  12. Geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks: positioning and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.; Retscher, G.; Santos, M.; Ding, X.; Gao, Y.; Jin, S.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution focuses on geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks for positioning and applications. The key problems in this area will be addressed together with an overview of applications. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other geodetic techniques play a central role in many a

  13. Geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks: positioning and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.; Retscher, G.; Santos, M.; Ding, X.; Gao, Y.; Jin, S.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution focuses on geodetic sensor systems and sensor networks for positioning and applications. The key problems in this area will be addressed together with an overview of applications. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other geodetic techniques play a central role in many

  14. Must, valge + hall : Sam Wagstaffi ja Robert Mapplethorpe'i portree / Madis Palm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Palm, Madis

    2008-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm "Black, White & Gray: Sam Wagstaff and Robert Mapplethorpe" : autor ja režissöör James Crump : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2007. Filmi näidati filminädala "Art in America" raames Tallinnas

  15. Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) - Smoking-Attributable Mortality (SAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2005-2009. SAMMEC - Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs. Smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) is the number of deaths caused by cigarette...

  16. Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) - Smoking-Attributable Mortality (SAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2005-2009. SAMMEC - Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs. Smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) is the number of deaths caused by cigarette...

  17. Tandem SAM Domain Structure of Human Caskin1: A Presynaptic, Self-Assembling Scaffold for CASK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Knight, Mary Jane; Pennella, Mario A.; Ear, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Bowie, James U. (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-02-07

    The synaptic scaffolding proteins CASK and Caskin1 are part of the fibrous mesh of proteins that organize the active zones of neural synapses. CASK binds to a region of Caskin1 called the CASK interaction domain (CID). Adjacent to the CID, Caskin1 contains two tandem sterile a motif (SAM) domains. Many SAM domains form polymers so they are good candidates for forming the fibrous structures seen in the active zone. We show here that the SAM domains of Caskin1 form a new type of SAM helical polymer. The Caskin1 polymer interface exhibits a remarkable segregation of charged residues, resulting in a high sensitivity to ionic strength in vitro. The Caskin1 polymers can be decorated with CASK proteins, illustrating how these proteins may work together to organize the cytomatrix in active zones.

  18. Role of SAM Chain Length in Enhancing the Sensitivity of Nanopillar Modified Electrodes for Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this report, alkanethiol self assembled monolayers (SAM with two different chain lengths were used to immobilize the functionalizing enzyme (glucose oxidase onto gold nanopillar modified electrodes and the electrochemical processes of these functionalized electrodes in glucose detection were investigated. First, the formation of these SAMs on the nanopillar modified electrodes was characterized by the cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques, and then the detection sensitivity of these functionalized electrodes to glucose was evaluated by the amperometry technique. Results showed that the SAM of alkanethiols with a longer chain length resulted in a higher degree of surface coverage with less defect and a higher electron transfer resistance, whereas the SAM of alkanethiols with a shorter chain length gave rise to a higher detection sensitivity to glucose. This study sheds some new insight into how to enhance the sensing performance of nanopillar modified electrodes.

  19. Must, valge + hall : Sam Wagstaffi ja Robert Mapplethorpe'i portree / Madis Palm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Palm, Madis

    2008-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm "Black, White & Gray: Sam Wagstaff and Robert Mapplethorpe" : autor ja režissöör James Crump : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2007. Filmi näidati filminädala "Art in America" raames Tallinnas

  20. Frequency response and design consideration of GaN SAM avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Yang, Guofeng; Zhou, Dong; Lu, Hai; Wang, Guosheng

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a method is developed for estimating the frequency response characteristics of GaN avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with separated absorption and multiplication regions (SAM). The method calculates the total diode current with varying frequency by solving transport equations analytically and uses a commercial device simulator as a supplement for determining the exact electrical field profile within the device. Due to the high carrier saturation velocity of GaN, a high-gain-bandwidth product over THz is found achievable for GaN SAM-APDs. The potential performances of GaN SAM-APDs with different structural designs are further compared through numerical studies. It is found that a close-to-reach-through design is attractive for simultaneously achieving both relatively low operation voltage and high working frequency. In addition, transit-time limit and RC-delay limit for the frequency response of GaN SAM-APDs are also discussed.

  1. Benchmark Simulation of Natural Circulation Cooling System with Salt Working Fluid Using SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K. K.; Scarlat, R. O.; Hu, R.

    2017-09-03

    Liquid salt-cooled reactors, such as the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR), offer passive decay heat removal through natural circulation using Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops. The behavior of such systems should be well-understood through performance analysis. The advanced system thermal-hydraulics tool System Analysis Module (SAM) from Argonne National Laboratory has been selected for this purpose. The work presented here is part of a larger study in which SAM modeling capabilities are being enhanced for the system analyses of FHR or Molten Salt Reactors (MSR). Liquid salt thermophysical properties have been implemented in SAM, as well as properties of Dowtherm A, which is used as a simulant fluid for scaled experiments, for future code validation studies. Additional physics modules to represent phenomena specific to salt-cooled reactors, such as freezing of coolant, are being implemented in SAM. This study presents a useful first benchmark for the applicability of SAM to liquid salt-cooled reactors: it provides steady-state and transient comparisons for a salt reactor system. A RELAP5-3D model of the Mark-1 Pebble-Bed FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR), and in particular its DRACS loop for emergency heat removal, provides steady state and transient results for flow rates and temperatures in the system that are used here for code-to-code comparison with SAM. The transient studied is a loss of forced circulation with SCRAM event. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first application of SAM to FHR or any other molten salt reactors. While building these models in SAM, any gaps in the code’s capability to simulate such systems are identified and addressed immediately, or listed as future improvements to the code.

  2. Identification of trans-acting factors regulating SamDC expression in Oryza sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Supratim, E-mail: supratim_genetics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Crop Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Division of Plant Biology, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Roychoudhury, Aryadeep [Post Graduate Department of Biotechnology, St. Xavier' s College (Autonomous), 30, Mother Teresa Sarani, Kolkata - 700016, West Bengal (India); Sengupta, Dibyendu N. [Division of Plant Biology, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Identification of cis elements responsible for SamDC expression by in silico analysis. • qPCR analysis of SamDC expression to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. • Detection of SamDC regulators using identified cis-elements as probe by EMSA. • Southwestern Blot analysis to predict the size of the trans-acting factors. - Abstract: Abiotic stress affects the growth and productivity of crop plants; to cope with the adverse environmental conditions, plants have developed efficient defense machinery comprising of antioxidants like phenolics and flavonoids, and osmolytes like polyamines. SamDC is a key enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In our present communication we have done in silico analysis of the promoter region of SamDC to look for the presence of different cis-regulatory elements contributing to its expression. Based on the presence of different cis-regulatory elements we completed comparative analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice lamina of IR-29 and Nonabokra by qPCR in response to the abiotic stress treatments of salinity, drought, cold and the biotic stress treatments of ABA and light. Additionally, to explore the role of the cis-regulatory elements in regulating the expression of SamDC gene in plants we comparatively analyzed the binding of rice nuclear proteins prepared from IR-29 and Nonabokra undergoing various stress treatments. The intensity of the complex formed was low and inducible in IR-29 in contrast to Nonabokra. Southwestern blot analysis helped in predicting the size of the trans-acting factors binding to these cis-elements. To our knowledge this is the first report on the comprehensive analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice and identification of the trans-acting factors regulating its expression.

  3. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precise measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta(sup 13)C) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (deltaD) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx.550 C and above approx.550 C. The combustion experiment on SAM, if properly designed and executed, has the potential to answer multiple questions regarding the origins of volatiles seen thus far in SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA) on Mars. Constraints imposed by SAM and MSL time and power resources, as well as SAM consumables (oxygen gas), will limit the number of SAM combustion experiments, so it is imperative to design an experiment targeting the most pressing science questions. Low temperature combustion experiments will primarily target the quantification of carbon (and nitrogen) contributed by SAM wet chemistry reagants MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) and DMF (Dimethylformamide), which have been identified in the background of blank and sample runs and may adsorb to the sample while the cup is in the Sample Manipulation System (SMS). In addition, differences between the sample and "blank" may yield information regarding abundance and delta(sup 13)C of bulk (both organic and inorganic) martian carbon. High temperature combustion experiments primarily aim to detect refractory organic matter, if present in Cumberland fines, as well as address the question of quantification and deltaD value of water evolution associated with hydroxyl hydrogen in clay minerals.

  4. Satellite and Surface Perspectives of Snow Extent in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Johnathan W.; Perry, Baker L.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing snow cover patterns in mountain regions remains a challenge for a variety of reasons. Topography (e.g., elevation, exposure, aspect, and slope) strongly influences snowfall accumulation and subsequent ablation processes, leading to pronounced spatial variability of snow cover. In-situ observations are typically limited to open areas at lower elevations (Mountains (SAM). MODIS daily snow cover maps and true color imagery are analyzed after selected snow events (e.g., Gulf/Atlantic Lows, Alberta Clippers, and Northwest Upslope Flow) from 2006 to 2012 to assess the spatial patterns of snowfall across the SAM. For each event, we calculate snow cover area across the SAM using MODIS data and compare with the Interactive Multi-sensor Snow and ice mapping system (IMS) and available in-situ observations. Results indicate that Gulf/Atlantic Lows are typically responsible for greater snow extent across the entire SAM region due to intensified cyclogenesis associated with these events. Northwest Upslope Flow events result in snow cover extent that is limited to higher elevations (>1000 m) across the SAM, but also more pronounced along NW aspects. Despite some limitations related to the presence of ephemeral snow or cloud cover immediately after each event, we conclude that MODIS products are useful for assessing the spatial variability of snow cover in heavily forested mountain regions such as the SAM.

  5. ERTS-A satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvocoresses, Alden P.

    1970-01-01

    The first satellite designed to survey the Earth's resources is scheduled to be launched in 1972. This satellite, known as ERTS-A, will telemeter frames of imagery each covering 100-nautical-mile squares of the Earth. Except for the internal anomalies in the sensor system, the imagery, after being properly scaled, rectified, and controlled, may be considered an orthographic view of the Earth and used as a planimetric photomap. The accuracy of this photomap will be limited, principally by the geometric fidelity of the sensor system rather than by external effects, such as relief displacement, which restrict the direct cartographic use of the conventional aerial photograph. ERST-A is not designed as a topographic mapping satellite but does have real potential' for thematic mapping particularly in areas now covered by topographic maps.

  6. Mechanism and Correlated Factors of SAM Phenomenon after Aortic Valve Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing; WEN Jianguo; SHU Liliang; LIU Chao; ZHANG Jingchao; ZHAO Wenzeng

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and correlated factors of systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon after aortic valve replacement, 48 patients with severe aortic valvular stenosis were studied. Tested by echo-Doppler one week after aortic valve replacement, the patients were divided into two groups: SAM group and non-SAM group. The data of the left ventricular end-diastolic diameters, the left ventricular end-systolic diameters, the left ventricular outflow diameters, the thickness of the interventricular septum, the posterior wall of left ventricle, the blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients were recorded and compared. The results showed that no patients died during or after the operation. The blood velocities of left ventricular outflow was increased significantly in 9 patients (>2.5 m/s), and 6 of them developed SAM phenomenon. There was significant difference in all indexes (P<0.05 or P<0.01) except the posterior wall of left ventricle (P>0.05) between two groups. These indicated that the present of SAM phenomenon after aortic valve replacement may be directly related to the increase of blood velocities of left ventricular outflow and intra-cavitary gradients. It is also suggested that smaller left ventricular diastolic diameters, left ventricular systolic diameters, left ventricular outflow diameters and hypertrophy of interventricular septum may be the anatomy basis of SAM phenomenon.

  7. ParaSAM: a parallelized version of the significance analysis of microarrays algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok; Zhao, Jieping; Podolsky, Robert; McIndoe, Richard A

    2010-06-01

    Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) is a widely used permutation-based approach to identifying differentially expressed genes in microarray datasets. While SAM is freely available as an Excel plug-in and as an R-package, analyses are often limited for large datasets due to very high memory requirements. We have developed a parallelized version of the SAM algorithm called ParaSAM to overcome the memory limitations. This high performance multithreaded application provides the scientific community with an easy and manageable client-server Windows application with graphical user interface and does not require programming experience to run. The parallel nature of the application comes from the use of web services to perform the permutations. Our results indicate that ParaSAM is not only faster than the serial version, but also can analyze extremely large datasets that cannot be performed using existing implementations. A web version open to the public is available at http://bioanalysis.genomics.mcg.edu/parasam. For local installations, both the windows and web implementations of ParaSAM are available for free at http://www.amdcc.org/bioinformatics/software/parasam.aspx.

  8. Fabrication and Surface Properties of Composite Films of SAM/Pt/ZnO/SiO 2

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Ke Xin

    2008-12-16

    Through synthetic architecture and functionalization with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), complex nanocomposite films of SAM/Pt/ZnO/SiO2 have been facilely prepared in this work. The nanostructured films are highly uniform and porous, showing a wide range of tunable wettabilities from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity (water contact angles: 0° to 170°). Our approach offers synthetic flexibility in controlling film architecture, surface topography, coating texture, crystallite size, and chemical composition of modifiers (e.g., SAMs derived from alkanethiols). For example, wettability properties of the nanocomposite films can be finely tuned with both inorganic phase (i.e., ZnO/SiO2 and Pt/ZnO/SiO2) and organic phase (i.e., SAMs on Pt/ZnO/SiO2). Due to the presence of catalytic components Pt/ZnO within the nanocomposites, surface reactions of the organic modifiers can further take place at room temperature and elevated temperatures, which provides a means for SAM formation and elimination. Because the Pt/ZnO forms an excellent pair of metal-semiconductors for photocatalysis, the anchored SAMs can also be modified or depleted by UV irradiation (i.e., the films possess self-cleaning ability). Potential applications of these nanocomposite films have been addressed. Our durability tests also confirm that the films are thermally stable and structurally robust in modification- regeneration cycles. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  9. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  10. Discrimination between Closely Related Cellular Metabolites by the SAM-I Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montange, R.; Mondragon, E; van Tyne, D; Garst, A; Ceres, P; Batey, R

    2010-01-01

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA-ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-{angstrom} improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH.

  11. The impact of a ligand binding on strand migration in the SAM-I riboswitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available Riboswitches sense cellular concentrations of small molecules and use this information to adjust synthesis rates of related metabolites. Riboswitches include an aptamer domain to detect the ligand and an expression platform to control gene expression. Previous structural studies of riboswitches largely focused on aptamers, truncating the expression domain to suppress conformational switching. To link ligand/aptamer binding to conformational switching, we constructed models of an S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-I riboswitch RNA segment incorporating elements of the expression platform, allowing formation of an antiterminator (AT helix. Using Anton, a computer specially developed for long timescale Molecular Dynamics (MD, we simulated an extended (three microseconds MD trajectory with SAM bound to a modeled riboswitch RNA segment. Remarkably, we observed a strand migration, converting three base pairs from an antiterminator (AT helix, characteristic of the transcription ON state, to a P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state. This conformational switching towards the OFF state is observed only in the presence of SAM. Among seven extended trajectories with three starting structures, the presence of SAM enhances the trend towards the OFF state for two out of three starting structures tested. Our simulation provides a visual demonstration of how a small molecule (<500 MW binding to a limited surface can trigger a large scale conformational rearrangement in a 40 kDa RNA by perturbing the Free Energy Landscape. Such a mechanism can explain minimal requirements for SAM binding and transcription termination for SAM-I riboswitches previously reported experimentally.

  12. Alternative function for the mitochondrial SAM complex in biogenesis of alpha-helical TOM proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovski, Diana; Guiard, Bernard; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-12-03

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two preprotein translocases: the general translocase of outer membrane (TOM) and the beta-barrel-specific sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM functions as the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins. The channel-forming Tom40 is a beta-barrel protein, whereas all Tom receptors and small Tom proteins are membrane anchored by a transmembrane alpha-helical segment in their N- or C-terminal portion. Synthesis of Tom precursors takes place in the cytosol, and their import occurs via preexisting TOM complexes. The precursor of Tom40 is then transferred to SAM for membrane insertion and assembly. Unexpectedly, we find that the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins with a membrane anchor in the C-terminal portion is SAM dependent. Each SAM protein is necessary for efficient membrane integration of the receptor Tom22, whereas assembly of the small Tom proteins depends on Sam37. Thus, the substrate specificity of SAM is not restricted to beta-barrel proteins but also includes the majority of alpha-helical Tom proteins.

  13. Ocean surveillance satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, D.

    Soviet and U.S. programs involving satellites for surveillance of ships and submarines are discussed, considering differences in approaches. The Soviet program began with the Cosmos 198 in 1967 and the latest, the Cosmos 1400 series, 15 m long and weighing 5 tons, carry radar for monitoring ships and a nuclear reactor for a power supply. Other Soviet spacecraft carrying passive microwave sensors and ion drives powered by solar panels have recently been detonated in orbit for unknown reasons. It has also been observed that the Soviet satellites are controlled in pairs, with sequential orbital changes for one following the other, and both satellites then overflying the same points. In contrast, U.S. surveillance satellites have been placed in higher orbits, thus placing greater demands on the capabilities of the on-board radar and camera systems. Project White Cloud and the Clipper Bow program are described, noting the continued operation of the White Cloud spacecraft, which are equipped to intercept radio signals from surface ships. Currently, the integrated tactical surveillance system program has completed its study and a decision is expected soon.

  14. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  15. Evaluation of three different data fusion approaches that uses satellite soil moisture from different passive microwave sensors to construct one consistent climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schalie, Robin; de Jeu, Richard; Kerr, Yann; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Rodríguez-Fernández, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Dolman, Han

    2016-04-01

    Datasets that are derived from satellite observations are becoming increasingly important for measuring key parameters of the Earth's climate and are therefore crucial in research on climate change, giving the opportunity to researchers to detect anomalies and long-term trends globally. One of these key parameters is soil moisture (SM), which has a large impact on water, energy and biogeochemical cycles worldwide. A long-term SM data record from active and passive microwave satellite observations was developed as part of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI-SM, http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/). Currently the dataset covers a period from 1978 to 2014 and is updated regularly, observations from a several microwave satellites including: ERS-1, ERS-2, METOP-A, Nimbus 7 SMMR, DMSP SSM/I, TRMM TMI, Aqua AMSRE, Coriolis WindSat, and GCOM-W1 AMSR2. In 2009, ESA launched the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, Kerr et al., 2010) mission, carrying onboard a unique L-band radiometer, but its SM retrievals are not yet part of this dataset. Due to the different radiometric characteristics of SMOS, integrating SMOS into the ESA-CCI-SM dataset is not straight forward. Therefore several approaches have been tested to fuse soil moisture retrievals from SMOS and AMSRE, which currently forms the basis of the passive microwave part within ESA-CCI-SM project. These approaches are: 1. A Neural Network Fusion approach (Rodríguez-Fernández et al., 2015), 2. A regression approach (Wigneron et al., 2004; Al-Yaari et al., 2015) and 3. A radiative transfer based approach, using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (Van der Schalie et al., 2016). This study evaluates the three different approaches and tests their skills against multiple datasets, including MERRA-Land, ERA-Interim/Land, the current ESA-CCI-SM v2.2 and in situ measurements from the International Soil Moisture Network and present a recommendation for the potential integration of SMOS soil moisture into the ESA

  16. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  17. Human cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) contains two classes of binding sites for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM): complex regulation of CBS activity and stability by SAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L; Majtan, Tomas; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Kraus, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) is a multidomain tetrameric enzyme essential in the regulation of homocysteine metabolism, whose activity is enhanced by the allosteric regulator SAM (S-adenosylmethionine). Missense mutations in CBS are the major cause of inherited HCU (homocystinuria). In the present study we apply a novel approach based on a combination of calorimetric methods, functional assays and kinetic modelling to provide structural and energetic insight into the effects of SAM on the stability and activity of WT (wild-type) CBS and seven HCU-causing mutants. We found two sets of SAM-binding sites in the C-terminal regulatory domain with different structural and energetic features: a high affinity set of two sites, probably involved in kinetic stabilization of the regulatory domain, and a low affinity set of four sites, which are involved in the enzyme activation. We show that the regulatory domain displays a low kinetic stability in WT CBS, which is further decreased in many HCU-causing mutants. We propose that the SAM-induced stabilization may play a key role in modulating steady-state levels of WT and mutant CBS in vivo. Our strategy may be valuable for understanding ligand effects on proteins with a complex architecture and their role in human genetic diseases and for the development of novel pharmacological strategies.

  18. Probing the nature and resistance of the molecule-electrode contact in SAM-based junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Wan, Albert; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2015-07-01

    It is challenging to quantify the contact resistance and to determine the nature of the molecule-electrode contacts in molecular two-terminal junctions. Here we show that potentiodynamic and temperature dependent impedance measurements give insights into the nature of the SAM-electrode interface and other bottlenecks of charge transport (the capacitance of the SAM (CSAM) and the resistance of the SAM (RSAM)), unlike DC methods, independently of each other. We found that the resistance of the top-electrode-SAM contact for junctions with the form of AgTS-SCn//GaOx/EGaIn with n = 10, 12, 14, 16 or 18 is bias and temperature independent and hence Ohmic (non-rectifying) in nature, and is orders of magnitude smaller than RSAM. The CSAM and RSAM are independent of the temperature, indicating that the mechanism of charge transport in these SAM-based junctions is coherent tunneling and the charge carrier trapping at the interfaces is negligible.It is challenging to quantify the contact resistance and to determine the nature of the molecule-electrode contacts in molecular two-terminal junctions. Here we show that potentiodynamic and temperature dependent impedance measurements give insights into the nature of the SAM-electrode interface and other bottlenecks of charge transport (the capacitance of the SAM (CSAM) and the resistance of the SAM (RSAM)), unlike DC methods, independently of each other. We found that the resistance of the top-electrode-SAM contact for junctions with the form of AgTS-SCn//GaOx/EGaIn with n = 10, 12, 14, 16 or 18 is bias and temperature independent and hence Ohmic (non-rectifying) in nature, and is orders of magnitude smaller than RSAM. The CSAM and RSAM are independent of the temperature, indicating that the mechanism of charge transport in these SAM-based junctions is coherent tunneling and the charge carrier trapping at the interfaces is negligible. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure, Nyquist

  19. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  20. Satellite (Natural)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  1. Drug delivery from therapeutic self-assembled monolayers (T-SAMs) on 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatro, Anil; Johnson, Dave M; Patel, Devang N; Feldman, Marc D; Ayon, Arturo A; Agrawal, C Mauli

    2008-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on 316L stainless steel (SS) has been demonstrated as a viable method to deliver drugs for localized coronary artery stent application. SAMs are highly-ordered, nano-sized molecular coatings, adding 1-10 nm thickness to a surface. Hydroxyl terminated alkanethiol SAMs of 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (-OH SAM) were formed on 316L SS with 48 hr immersion in ethanolic solutions. Attachment of ibuprofen (a model drug) to the functional SAMs was carried out in toluene for 5 hrs at 60 degrees C using Novozume-435 as a biocatalyst. SAM formation and subsequent attachment of ibuprofen was characterized collectively using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and contact angle (CA) measure-ments. The quantitative in vitro release of ibuprofen into a "physiological" buffer solution was characterized using reverse phase HPLC. Drug release kinetics showed that 14.1 microg of ibuprofen eluted over a period of 35 days with 2.7microg being eluted in the first day and the remaining being eluted over a period of 35 days. The drug release kinetics showed an increase in ibuprofen elution that occurred during first 14 days (2.7microg in 1 day to 9.5 microg in 14 days), following which there was a decrease in the rate of elution. Thus, functional SAMs on 316L SS could be used as tethers for drug attachment and could serve as a drug delivery mechanism from stainless steel implants such as coronary artery stents.

  2. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun photometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, Samuel; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, Samuel; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.; Wolfe, Daniel; Thompson, Anne M.

    2007-06-06

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes, and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during 8 Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during 5 Aqua and 5 Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles mean (bias) and rms AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1% and 8.8%, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 h and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and rms LWV differences are -5.4% and 8.8%, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3% and 8.4%, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 km of J31 profiles yield lower bias and rms differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8% to 5.8%, and the rms difference decreases from 21.5% to 16.4%. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2% to +6% and rms differences of ~20% below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5-km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4% compared to AATS over-ocean near surface retrievals. The MODIS Aqua subset (79 grid cells) exhibits a wet bias of 5.1%, and the MODIS-Terra subset (126 grid cells) yields a wet bias of 13.2%.

  3. Bringing satellite winds to hub-height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Bredesen, Rolv Erlend

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ocean surface can provide detailed information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is very valuable for the mapping of wind resources offshore where other measurements are costly and sparse. Satellite sensors operating at microwave frequencies...... measure the amount of radar backscatter from the sea surface, which is a function of the instant wind speed, wind direction, and satellite viewing geometry. A major limitation related to wind retrievals from satellite observations is that existing empirical model functions relate the radar backscatter...

  4. A simulation study on the thermal and wetting behavior of alkane thiol SAM on gold (111) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Meena Devi

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structural, thermal and wetting properties of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of alkane thiol on gold surface. The specific heat capacity of the gold SAM surface was found to linearly increase with the temperature in the range 100-300 K. It was found to drop down at 400 K and this decrease might be attributed to the disorder of the SAM chains. Hydration of gold SAM surface for two different terminal groups, namely methyl (hydrophobic), and hydroxy (hydrophilic) was studied at room temperature. The difference in their wetting behavior and the structure of their interfacial water were examined from the estimation of the z density profile, radial distribution function, hydrogen bonds and orientation of water dipoles in the interfacial region. The present simulation results suggest that the wetting behavior of the gold SAM surface can be modified by altering the terminal functional group of the SAM chains.

  5. SAM Sample preparation and its impact on the detection of organic compounds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Belmahdi, Imene; François, Pascaline; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; navarro, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Pinnick, Veronica; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Mahaffy, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The wet chemistry experiments on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] experiment in the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission supports extraction of polar organic compounds from solid samples that improves their detection either by increasing the release of chemical species from solid sample matrices, or by changing their chemical structure to make compounds more amenable to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The wet chemistry approach provides an alternative to the nominal inert-thermal desorption/pyrolysis analytical protocol used by SAM [1] that is more aptly suited for polar components. SAM, includes two different wet chemistry experiments: MTBSTFA derivatization [2-3] and TMAH thermochemolysis [4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA products in the SAM evolved gas analysis and GCMS experiments, and the implications of this detection. Solid sample were heated up to approximately 840°C at a rate of 35°C/min under He flow. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (Tenax®) over a specific temperature range. Adsorbed volatiles on the GC injection trap (IT) were then released into the GC column (CLP-MXT 30m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm) by rapidly heating the IT to 300°C. Then, in order better understand the part of compounds detected coming from internal reaction we have performed several lab experiments to mimic the SAM device. We have investigated the thermal degradation of Tenax®, and possible interaction with MTBSTFA and perchlorate in the SAM trap (Tenax®) to better constrain interpretations of SAM results on Mars. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Buch, A. et al. (2009) J chrom. A, 43, 143-151. [3] Stalport, F. et al. (2012) Planet. Space Sci. 67: 1-13 [4] Geffroy-Rodier, C. et al. (2009) JAAP, 85, 454-459. Acknowledgements: SAM-GC team acknowledges support from the French Space Agency

  6. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  7. Oxygen Attachment on Alkanethiolate SAMs Induced by Low-Energy Electron Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Sylvain; Bass, Andrew D.; Steffenhagen, Marie; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of 18O2 with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of 1-dodecanethiol, 1-octadecanethiol, 1-butanethiol, and benzyl mercaptan chemisorbed on gold, were studied by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anionic fragments over the incident electron energy range 2–20 eV. Dosing the SAMs with 18O2 at 50 K, results in the ESD of 18O− and 18OH−. Electron irradiation of samples prior to 18O2 deposition demonstrates that intensity of subsequent 18O− and 18OH− desorption signals increase with electron fluence and that absent electron pre-irradiation, no 18O− and 18OH− ESD signals are observed, since oxygen is unable to bind to the SAMs. A minimum incident electron energy of 6–7 eV is required to initiate the binding of 18O2 to the SAMs. O2 binding is proposed to proceed by the formation of CHx−1• radicals via resonant dissociative electron attachment and non-resonant C–H dissociation processes. The weaker signals of 18O− and 18OH− from short-chain SAMs are related to the latter’s resistance to electron induced damage, due to the charge-image dipole quenching and electron delocalization. Comparison between the present results and those for DNA oligonucleotides self-assembled on Au [Mirsaleh-Kohan, N. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 235104] indicates that the oxygen binding mechanism is common to both systems. PMID:23537075

  8. Structural and functional comparison of HemN to other radical SAM enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Gunhild; Kervio, Eric; Morlock, Gaby; Heinz, Dirk W; Jahn, Dieter; Retey, Janos; Schubert, Wolf-Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Radical SAM enzymes have only recently been recognized as an ancient family sharing an unusual radical-based reaction mechanism. This late appreciation is due to the extreme oxygen sensitivity of most radical SAM enzymes, making their characterization particularly arduous. Nevertheless, realization that the novel apposition of the established cofactors S-adenosylmethionine and [4Fe-4S] cluster creates an explosive source of catalytic radicals, the appreciation of the sheer size of this previously neglected family, and the rapid succession of three successfully solved crystal structures within a year have ensured that this family has belatedly been noted. In this review, we report the characterization of two enzymes: the established radical SAM enzyme, HemN or oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase from Escherichia coli, and littorine mutase, a presumed radical SAM enzyme, responsible for the conversion of littorine to hyoscyamine in plants. The enzymes are compared to other radical SAM enzymes and in particular the three reported crystal structures from this family, HemN, biotin synthase and MoaA, are discussed.

  9. Celiac Disease in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM): A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Neetu; Ameta, Gaurav; Chahar, Chandra Kumar

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of Celiac disease among children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This prospective observational study was conducted in PBM Children Hospital, Bikaner from July 2012 through December 2013. All consecutively admitted children with SAM were recruited. All subjects were screened for Celiac disease by serological test for IgA-anti tissue Transglutaminase (IgA tTG) antibodies. All seropositive children underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for small bowel biopsy for the confirmation. Clinical features of patients with and without celiac disease were compared. The sero-prevalence (IgA tTg positivity) of Celiac disease was found to be 15.38% while prevalence of biopsy confirmed Celiac disease was 14.42% among SAM children. Abdominal distension, diarrhea, anorexia, constipation, pain in abdomen, vitamin deficiencies, edema, clubbing and mouth ulcers were more common in patients of Celiac disease compared to patients without Celiac disease but the difference was statistically significant only for abdominal distension and pain abdomen. There is a high prevalence of Celiac disease in SAM. Screening for Celiac disease (especially in presence of pain abdomen and abdominal distension) should be an essential part of work-up in all children with SAM.

  10. Detection of Organics at Mars: How Wet Chemistry Onboard SAM Helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars. Wet chemistry experiment allow organic components to be altered in such a way that improves there detection either by releasing the compounds from sample matricies or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter is particular important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, has onboard two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization and thermochemolysis. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in initial SAM results, and the implications of this detection.

  11. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Janet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM. We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV, revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution.

  12. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Conrad, P. G.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Atreya, S. A.; Manning, H.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers.

  13. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    followed Hale’s into orbit. In 1879, Jules Verne wrote about launching small satellites with a gun possessing a muzzle velocity of 10 000 m/sec (ref. 3...was activated in 1950.11 It was located only a few tens of miles from the spot where Jules Verne had his Baltimore Gun Club fire a manned projectile to...principle, satellites can be launched by a single impulse applied at the Earth’s surface-say, with a large cannon, & la Jules Verne (sec. 8-3). In

  14. A satellite anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, W. B.; Heelis, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design, development, and testing of components of a satellite anemometer, an instrument for measuring neutral winds in the upper atmosphere from a satellite platform. The device, which uses four nearly identical pressure sensors, measures the angle of arrival of the bulk neutral flow in the satellite frame of reference. It could also be used in a feedback loop to control spacecraft attitude with respect to the ram velocity direction. We have now developed miniaturized ionization pressure gauges that will work well from the slip flow region near 115 km up to the base of the exosphere, which covers the entire altitude range currently being considered for Tether. Laboratory tests have demonstrated a very linear response to changes in ram angle out to +/- 20 deg. (transverse wind component of 2.7 km s(exp -1)) from the ram, and a monotonic response to out beyond 45 deg. Pitch (vertical wind) and yaw (horizontal wind) can be sampled simultaneously and meaningfully up to 10 Hz. Angular sensitivity of 30 arc seconds (approximately 1 ms(exp -1) is readily attainable, but absolute accuracy for winds will be approximately 1 deg (130 m/s) unless independent attitude knowledge is available. The critical elements of the design have all been tested in the laboratory.

  15. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  16. Micro-digital sun sensor: an imaging sensor for space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, N.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.; Büttgen, B.; Hakkesteegt, H.C.; Jasen, H.; Leijtens, J.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-Digital Sun Sensor is an attitude sensor which senses relative position of micro-satellites to the sun in space. It is composed of a solar cell power supply, a RF communication block and an imaging chip which is called APS+. The APS+ integrates a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) of 512×512 pixel

  17. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOνA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we have adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this paper we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.

  18. Basis for ligand discrimination between ON and OFF state riboswitch conformations: the case of the SAM-I riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyapati, Vamsi Krishna; Huang, Wei; Spedale, Jessica; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-06-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind to effector ligands and control gene expression. Most consist of two domains. S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAM) binds the aptamer domain of the SAM-I riboswitch and induces conformational changes in the expression domain to form an intrinsic terminator (transcription OFF state). Without SAM the riboswitch forms the transcription ON state, allowing read-through transcription. The mechanistic link between the SAM/aptamer recognition event and subsequent secondary structure rearrangement by the riboswitch is unclear. We probed for those structural features of the Bacillus subtilis yitJ SAM-I riboswitch responsible for discrimination between the ON and OFF states by SAM. We designed SAM-I riboswitch RNA segments forming "hybrid" structures of the ON and OFF states. The choice of segment constrains the formation of a partial P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state, together with a partial antiterminator (AT) helix, characteristic of the ON state. For most choices of P1 vs. AT helix lengths, SAM binds with micromolar affinity according to equilibrium dialysis. Mutational analysis and in-line probing confirm that the mode of SAM binding by hybrid structures is similar to that of the aptamer. Altogether, binding measurements and in-line probing are consistent with the hypothesis that when SAM is present, stacking interactions with the AT helix stabilize a partially formed P1 helix in the hybrids. Molecular modeling indicates that continuous stacking between the P1 and the AT helices is plausible with SAM bound. Our findings raise the possibility that conformational intermediates may play a role in ligand-induced aptamer folding.

  19. GoSam. A program for automated one-loop calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Reiter, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Luisoni, G. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Mastrolia, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Ossola, G. [City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). New York City College of Technology; Tramontano, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    The program package GoSam is presented which aims at the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes for multi-particle processes. The amplitudes are generated in terms of Feynman diagrams and can be reduced using either D-dimensional integrand-level decomposition or tensor reduction, or a combination of both. GoSam can be used to calculate one-loop corrections to both QCD and electroweak theory, and model files for theories Beyond the Standard Model can be linked as well. A standard interface to programs calculating real radiation is also included. The flexibility of the program is demonstrated by various examples. (orig.)

  20. Oxygen Attachment on Alkanethiolate SAMs Induced by Low-Energy Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Sylvain; Bass, Andrew D.; Steffenhagen, Marie; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of 18O2 with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of 1-dodecanethiol, 1-octadecanethiol, 1-butanethiol, and benzyl mercaptan chemisorbed on gold, were studied by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anionic fragments over the incident electron energy range 2–20 eV. Dosing the SAMs with 18O2 at 50 K, results in the ESD of 18O− and 18OH−. Electron irradiation of samples prior to 18O2 deposition demonstrates that intensity of subsequent 18O− and 18OH− desorption signals increase...

  1. Mineral classification map using MF and SAM techniques: A case study in the Nohwa Island, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Sun; Yoon, Wang-Jung [Department of Energy and Resources Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-10

    The purpose of this study is to map pyprophyllite distribution at surface of the Nohwa deposit, Korea by using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) data. For this, combined Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), and Matched Filtering (MF) technique based on mathematical algorithm was applied. The regional distribution of high-grade and low-grade pyrophyllite in the Nohwa deposit area could be differentiated by this method. The results of this study show that ASTER data analysis using combination of SAM and MF techniques will assist in exploration of pyrophyllite at the exposed surface.

  2. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores' extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the CS bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA) radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in Bacillus subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5'-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue

  3. Systematic Analysis Method of Shear-Wave Splitting:SAM Software System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yuan; Liu Xiqiang; Liang Wei; Hao Ping

    2004-01-01

    In order to make a more effective use of the data from regional digital seismograph networks and to promote the study on shear wave splitting and its application to earthquake stressforecasting, SAM software system, i.e., the software on systematic analysis method of shear wave splitting has been developed. This paper introduces the design aims, system structure,function and characteristics about the SAM software system and shows some graphical interfaces of data input and result output. Lastly, it discusses preliminarily the study of shear wave splitting and its application to earthquake forecasting.

  4. Rhodium deposition onto a 4-mercaptopyridine SAM on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolova, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kayser, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kolb, D.M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)]. E-mail: dieter.kolb@uni-ulm.de; Boyen, H.-G. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Ziemann, P. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Mayer, D. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wirth, A. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2007-02-10

    The application of a recently developed method for the deposition of Pd and Pt on top of a SAM, has been successfully extended to Rh, thus proving the versatility of the new concept. Experimental evidence from cyclic voltammetry, in situ STM and ex situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is presented for the deposition of monoatomic high rhodium islands onto a 4-mercaptopyridine self-assembled monolayer on a Au(1 1 1) electrode. By repetitive complexation of the Rh ions to the ring-nitrogen and reduction in a Rh-ion free solution, an almost completely covered SAM is obtained. The consequences of making contacts for molecular electronics are briefly discussed.

  5. A Bifunctional Thioether Linked Coumarin Appended Calix[4]arene Acquires Selectivity Toward Cu(2+) Sensing on Going from Solution to SAM on Gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Kushal; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2016-02-10

    A bifunctional calix[4]arene molecule bearing coumarin moiety on the lower rim and thioether moiety on the upper rim (L1), has been synthesized and well characterized by (1)H, (13)C NMR and mass spectrometry. Suitably functionalized coumarin moieties are well suited for selective recognition of various cations and anions. Among the 10 different metal ions studied, only Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) exhibit appreciable changes in the absorption spectra owing to the availability of functional moieties present at both the lower as well as the upper rim of free L1 in acetonitrile solution. To bring better selectivity, we blocked one of these functional moieties by coating on to a surface so that only the other one is exposed to the environment for sensing. Such a study carried out in the present case using the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of L1 on Au(111) resulted in selective sensing of Cu(2+) over several other metal ions as studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The SAM of L1 on Au(111) was confirmed by different techniques, such as grazing incidence FT-IR, contact angle measurement, cyclic voltammetry and scanning tunneling microscopy. Thus, L1 is proven to be a suitable sensor for Cu(2+) when attached to gold surface.

  6. Sensor assignment to mission in AI-TECD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganger, Robert; de Mel, Geeth; Pham, Tien; Rudnicki, Ronald; Schreiber, Yonatan

    2016-05-01

    Sensor-mission assignment involves the allocation of sensors and other information-providing resources to missions in order to cover the information needs of the individual tasks within each mission. The importance of efficient and effective means to find appropriate resources for tasks is exacerbated in the coalition context where the operational environment is dynamic and a multitude of critically important tasks need to achieve their collective goals to meet the objectives of the coalition. The Sensor Assignment to Mission (SAM) framework—a research product of the International Technology Alliance in Network and Information Sciences (NIS-ITA) program—provided the first knowledge intensive resource selection approach for the sensor network domain so that contextual information could be used to effectively select resources for tasks in coalition environments. Recently, CUBRC, Inc. was tasked with operationalizing the SAM framework through the use of the I2WD Common Core Ontologies for the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) sponsored Actionable Intelligence Technology Enabled Capabilities Demonstration (AI-TECD). The demonstration event took place at Fort Dix, New Jersey during July 2015, and this paper discusses the integration and the successful demonstration of the SAM framework within the AI-TECD, lessons learned, and its potential impact in future operations.

  7. OSOAA: A Vector Radiative Transfer Model of Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System for a Rough Sea Surface Application to the Estimates of the Directional Variations of the Water Leaving Reflectance to Better Process Multi-angular Satellite Sensors Data Over the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, Malik; LaFrance, Bruno; Fougnie, Bertrand; Chowdhary, Jacek; Harmel, Tristan; Waquet, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present a radiative transfer model, so-called OSOAA, that is able to predict the radiance and degree of polarization within the coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the presence of a rough sea surface. The OSOAA model solves the radiative transfer equation using the successive orders of scattering method. Comparisons with another operational radiative transfer model showed a satisfactory agreement within 0.8%. The OSOAA model has been designed with a graphical user interface to make it user friendly for the community. The radiance and degree of polarization are provided at any level, from the top of atmosphere to the ocean bottom. An application of the OSOAA model is carried out to quantify the directional variations of the water leaving reflectance and degree of polarization for phytoplankton and mineral-like dominated waters. The difference between the water leaving reflectance at a given geometry and that obtained for the nadir direction could reach 40%, thus questioning the Lambertian assumption of the sea surface that is used by inverse satellite algorithms dedicated to multi-angular sensors. It is shown as well that the directional features of the water leaving reflectance are weakly dependent on wind speed. The quantification of the directional variations of the water leaving reflectance obtained in this study should help to correctly exploit the satellite data that will be acquired by the current or forthcoming multi-angular satellite sensors.

  8. Satellite Ocean Biology: Past, Present, Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1978 when the first satellite ocean color proof-of-concept sensor, the Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner, was launched, much progress has been made in refining the basic measurement concept and expanding the research applications of global satellite time series of biological and optical properties such as chlorophyll-a concentrations. The seminar will review the fundamentals of satellite ocean color measurements (sensor design considerations, on-orbit calibration, atmospheric corrections, and bio-optical algorithms), scientific results from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) missions, and the goals of future NASA missions such as PACE, the Aerosol, Cloud, Ecology (ACE), and Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GeoCAPE) missions.

  9. Analysis of the interactions between host factor Sam68 and viral elements during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear protein Src-associated protein of 68 kDa in mitosis (Sam68) is known to bind RNA and be involved in cellular processes triggered in response to environmental stresses, including virus infection. Interestingly, Sam68, is a multi-functional protein implicated in the life cycle of retroviru...

  10. Organic chemistry on surfaces: Direct cyclopropanation by dihalocarbene addition to vinyl terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Adamkiewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available C11-Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on silica surfaces are successfully modified in C–C bond forming reactions with dihalocarbenes to generate SAMs, terminated with dihalo- (fluoro, chloro, bromo cyclopropane motifs with about 30% surface coverage.

  11. Organic chemistry on surfaces: Direct cyclopropanation by dihalocarbene addition to vinyl terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamkiewicz, Malgorzata; O'Hagan, David; Hähner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    C11-Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silica surfaces are successfully modified in C-C bond forming reactions with dihalocarbenes to generate SAMs, terminated with dihalo- (fluoro, chloro, bromo) cyclopropane motifs with about 30% surface coverage.

  12. Organic chemistry on surfaces: Direct cyclopropanation by dihalocarbene addition to vinyl terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamkiewicz, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Summary C11-Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silica surfaces are successfully modified in C–C bond forming reactions with dihalocarbenes to generate SAMs, terminated with dihalo- (fluoro, chloro, bromo) cyclopropane motifs with about 30% surface coverage. PMID:25550756

  13. A Simple Small Size and Low Cost Sensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance for Selective Detection of Fe(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Cennamo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF, has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III. DFO-SAM sensors based on appropriate electrochemical techniques can be frequently found in the scientific literature. In this work, we present the first example of a DFO-SAM sensor based on SPR in an optical fiber. The SPR sensing platform was realized by removing the cladding of a plastic optical fiber along half the circumference, spin coating a buffer of Microposit S1813 photoresist on the exposed core, and finally sputtering a thin gold film. The hydroxamate siderophore deferoxamine (DFO, having high binding affinity for Fe(III, is then used in its immobilized form, as self-assembled monolayer on the gold layer surface of the POF sensor. The results showed that the DFO-SAM-POF-sensor was able to sense the formation of the Fe(III/DFO complex in the range of concentrations between 1 μm and 50 μm with a linearity range from 0 to 30 μm of Fe(III. The selectivity of the sensor was also proved by interference tests.

  14. A simple small size and low cost sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for selective detection of Fe(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Alberti, Giancarla; Pesavento, Maria; D'Agostino, Girolamo; Quattrini, Federico; Biesuz, Raffaela; Zeni, Luigi

    2014-03-07

    A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF), has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III). DFO-SAM sensors based on appropriate electrochemical techniques can be frequently found in the scientific literature. In this work, we present the first example of a DFO-SAM sensor based on SPR in an optical fiber. The SPR sensing platform was realized by removing the cladding of a plastic optical fiber along half the circumference, spin coating a buffer of Microposit S1813 photoresist on the exposed core, and finally sputtering a thin gold film. The hydroxamate siderophore deferoxamine (DFO), having high binding affinity for Fe(III), is then used in its immobilized form, as self-assembled monolayer on the gold layer surface of the POF sensor. The results showed that the DFO-SAM-POF-sensor was able to sense the formation of the Fe(III)/DFO complex in the range of concentrations between 1 μm and 50 μm with a linearity range from 0 to 30 μm of Fe(III). The selectivity of the sensor was also proved by interference tests.

  15. Onboard Image Processing System for Hyperspectral Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hihara, Hiroki; Moritani, Kotaro; Inoue, Masao; Hoshi, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Akira; Takada, Jun; Inada, Hitomi; Suzuki, Makoto; Seki, Taeko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Tanii, Jun

    2015-01-01

    .... Since more than 100 channels are required for hyperspectral sensors on Earth observation satellites, fast and small-footprint lossless image compression capability is essential for reducing the size...

  16. Effect of Alkyl Chain Length on Carboxylic Acid SAMs on Ti-6Al-4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin A. Buckholtz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of methyl-terminated carboxylic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs with even numbers of carbons, from eighteen to thirty, was investigated on the oxide surface of Ti-6Al-4V and component metal oxides. Modified surfaces were characterized using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and contact angle analysis. Infrared spectroscopy indicated that using aerosol spray deposition techniques, stable, all-trans SAMs of octacosanoic (28 carbons and triacontanoic (30 carbons acids were formed on the alloy. Films were similarly formed on titanium and aluminum oxide. The surface of vanadium oxide exhibited limited reactivity. MALDI-TOF MS confirmed that formed films were monolayers, without multilayers or aggregates present. Water contact angles are indicative of the presence of hydrophobic methyl groups at the interface. This stable carboxylic acid SAM formation could be a useful alternative to phosphonic acid SAMs for corrosion and other applications.

  17. Molecular junctions based on SAMs of cruciform oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Zhongming; Li, Tao; Jennum, Karsten Stein

    2012-01-01

    Cruciform oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s (OPEs) with an extended tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) donor moiety (OPE5-TTF and OPE3-TTF) and their simple analogues (OPE5-S and OPE3) without conjugated substituents were used to form high quality self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on ultra-flat gold substrates...

  18. Constraints on the Mineralogy of Gale Crater Mudstones from MSL SAM Evolved Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Knudson, C. A.; Andrejkovicova, S.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analysed more than 150 micron fines from 14 sites at Gale Crater. Here we focus on the mudstone samples. Two were drilled from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) in the Sheepbed mudstone. Six were drilled from Murray Formation mudstone: Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP), Buckskin (BK), Oudam (OU), Marimba (MB). SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with X-ray diffraction (e.g., amorphous phases). Here we will focus on SAM H2O data and comparisons to SAM-like analyses of key reference materials.

  19. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  20. Halomethane production in plants: Structure of the biosynthetic SAM-dependent halide methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; James, Agata B.; Edwards, Robert; Naismith, James H.; O’Hagan, David

    2012-01-01

    A product structure of the halomethane producing enzyme in plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) is reported and a model for presentation of chloride/bromide ion to the methyl group of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is presented to rationalise nucleophilic halide attack for halomethane production, gaseous natural products that are produced globally. PMID:20376845

  1. Initial SAM Calibration Gas Experiments on Mars: Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H,; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  2. Initial SAM calibration gas experiments on Mars: Quadrupole mass spectrometer results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Malespin, Charles A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Becker, Richard H.; Benna, Mehdi; Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Manning, Heidi L. K.; Prats, Benito D.; Raaen, Eric; Wong, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is equipped to analyze both martian atmospheric gases and volatiles released by pyrolysis of solid surface materials, with target measurements including chemical and isotopic composition (Mahaffy et al., 2012). To facilitate assessment of instrument performance and validation of results obtained on Mars, SAM houses a calibration cell containing CO2, Ar, N2, Xe, and several fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds (Franz et al., 2014; Mahaffy et al., 2012). This report describes the first two experiments utilizing this calibration cell on Mars and gives results from analysis of data acquired with the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). These data support the accuracy of isotope ratios obtained with the QMS (Conrad et al., 2016; Mahaffy et al., 2013) and provide ground-truth for reassessment of analytical constants required for atmospheric measurements, which were reported in previous contributions (Franz et al., 2015, 2014). The most significant implication of the QMS data involves reinterpretation of pre-launch contamination previously believed to affect only CO abundance measurements (Franz et al., 2015) to affect N2 abundances, as well. The corresponding adjustment to the N2 calibration constant presented here brings the atmospheric volume mixing ratios for Ar and N2 retrieved by SAM into closer agreement with those reported by the Viking mission (Owen et al., 1977; Oyama and Berdahl, 1977).

  3. cljam: a library for handling DNA sequence alignment/map (SAM) with parallel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Toshiki; Yamada, Atsuo; Aoki, Takashi; Nishimura, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can determine DNA bases and the results of sequence alignments are generally stored in files in the Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM) format and the compressed binary version (BAM) of it. SAMtools is a typical tool for dealing with files in the SAM/BAM format. SAMtools has various functions, including detection of variants, visualization of alignments, indexing, extraction of parts of the data and loci, and conversion of file formats. It is written in C and can execute fast. However, SAMtools requires an additional implementation to be used in parallel with, for example, OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) libraries. For the accumulation of next-generation sequencing data, a simple parallelization program, which can support cloud and PC cluster environments, is required. We have developed cljam using the Clojure programming language, which simplifies parallel programming, to handle SAM/BAM data. Cljam can run in a Java runtime environment (e.g., Windows, Linux, Mac OS X) with Clojure. Cljam can process and analyze SAM/BAM files in parallel and at high speed. The execution time with cljam is almost the same as with SAMtools. The cljam code is written in Clojure and has fewer lines than other similar tools.

  4. Local sphere-based co-registration for SAM group analysis in subjects without individual MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraeter, O; Teismann, Inga K; Wollbrink, A; Suntrup, S; Stoeckigt, K; Dziewas, R; Pantev, C

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) is a powerful MEG source localization method to analyze evoked as well as induced brain activity. To gain structural information of the underlying sources, especially in group studies, individual magnetic resonance images (MRI) are required for co-registration. During the last few years, the relevance of MEG measurements on understanding the pathophysiology of different diseases has noticeable increased. Unfortunately, especially in patients and small children, structural MRI scans cannot always be performed. Therefore, we developed a new method for group analysis of SAM results without requiring structural MRI data that derives its geometrical information from the individual volume conductor model constructed for the SAM analysis. The normalization procedure is fast, easy to implement and integrates seamlessly into an existing landmark based MEG-MRI co-registration procedure. This new method was evaluated on different simulated points as well as on a pneumatic index finger stimulation paradigm analyzed with SAM. Compared with an established MRI-based normalization procedure (SPM2) the new method shows only minor errors in single subject results as well as in group analysis. The mean difference between the two methods was about 4 mm for the simulated as well as for finger stimulation data. The variation between individual subjects was generally higher than the error induced by the missing MRIs. The method presented here is therefore sufficient for most MEG group studies. It allows accomplishing MEG studies with subject groups where MRI measurements cannot be performed.

  5. Statement of Facts for 1977 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Walker Thomas v. Sam Nomad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a civil case over an automobile accident. Walker Thomas is suing Sam Nomad for damages that resulted from a collision, for which both parties blame the other. The handout clarifies the laws and…

  6. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the complementary nature of the MSL CheMin and SAM instruments for investigations of martian sample mineralogy. Information on the nature of Yellowknife Bay clay minerals may also be available from the detection of H2 evolved during SAM EGA-MS at high temperature. A likely source of at least some of this H2 is H2O evolved from the smectite clays at high temperature, and it is possible these evolutions can

  7. Consensus Statement National Consensus Workshop on Management of SAM Children through Medical Nutrition Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, H P S; Kapil, Umesh; Vir, Sheila

    2010-08-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is an important preventable and treatable cause of morbidity and mortality in children below five years of age in India. The concerned stakeholders are not in agreement about the role of product based medical nutrition therapy in the management of this condition. In November 2009, a National Consensus Workshop was organized by the Department of Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in collaboration with the Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Epidemiology, Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research, New Delhi, and the Sub-specialty Chapter on Nutrition, Indian Academy of Pediatrics. Presentations by eminent national and international scientists, the ensuing discussions, and opinions expressed by the participants provided the basic framework for drafting the consensus statement. The draft of the consensus statement was circulated to all the participants; it underwent two revisions after consideration of their comments. (i) Critically appraise the current global evidence on the utility of Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) for the management of SAM in under five children; (ii) Formulate a consensus amongst stakeholders regarding the need to introduce product based MNT for the management of SAM in under five children in India; (iii) Identify research priorities for MNT for the management of SAM in under five children in India; and (iv)Ascertain potential challenges for introducing product based MNT in India, if consensus opinion identifies such a need. Guidelines related to the role of MNT in management of children suffering from SAM are presented. Global and regional data document the effectiveness of MNT using ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) and locally formulated products. Adequate caution should be exercised to ensure that MNT for SAM does not interfere with measures for the holistic prevention of childhood undernutrition. Indian manufacture of RUTF is feasible, and can be scaled up. Product

  8. Analysis of chlorocarbon compounds identified in the SAM Investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, Caroline; Mahaffy, P.; Glavin, D.; Buch, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Martin, M.; Miller, K.; Steele, A.; Szopa, C.; SAM; MSL science Team

    2013-10-01

    The gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) mode of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment was designed for the separation and identification of the chemical components of the gases released from a solid sample or trapped from the atmosphere. Gases from solid samples are either produced by heating a cell from ambient to >800-1100oC (EGA mode) or by wet chemistry extraction and reactions (not yet employed on Mars). Prior to EGA analysis of portions of the first 3 solid samples (Rocknest, John Klein and Cumberland) collected by MSL and delivered to SAM, an internal SAM blank run was carried out with an empty quartz cup. These blank analyses are required to understand the background signal intrinsic to the GCMS and its gas manifolds and traps. Several peaks have been identified as part of SAM background, some of them below the nmol level, which attests of the sensitivity of the instrument and as-designed performance of the GCMS. The origin of each peak has been investigated, and two major contributors are revealed; residual vapor from one of the chemicals used for SAM wet chemistry experiment: N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), and the Tenax from the hydrocarbon trap. Supporting lab experiments are in progress to understand the reaction pathways of the molecules identified in the SAM background. These experiments help elucidate which molecules may be interpreted as indigenous to Mars. Of the three solid samples analyzed on 11 runs, it was possible to detect and identify several chlorinated compounds including several chlorohydrocarbons. The chlorine is likely derived from the decomposition of martian perchlorates or other indigenous Cl-containing species while the origin of the carbon is presently under investigation for each detected molecule. To date, a subset these molecules have been identified in lab studies and a terrestrial contribution to the observed products are more easily explained. The combined results from SAM and

  9. Multi-objective optimal sensor deployment for satellite antenna reflector%星载天线反射面传感器多目标优化部署方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文博; 王有懿; 赵志刚; 赵阳

    2012-01-01

    传感器数量和位置的优化部署,是实现大型星载天线在轨获取高精度模态参数亟待解决的关键技术.为克服以往研究中采用单一优化准则所带来的局限性和片面性,设计观测信息正交性最大和能量最大的双优化准则,引入NSGA -Ⅱ算法进行多目标传感器优化部署求解.考虑到该算法仅适合连续性优化变量,存在收敛速度及多样性保持方面的不足,对其在编码方式和遗传算子设计两方面进行改进,并给出所有指标权重组合且分布均匀的Pareto最优解集.设计四种优化方案,进行仿真比较可得:基于改进NSGA -II算法的星载天线传感器多目标优化部署方案,较其他三种方案在性能指标上更优,且该方案更加符合实际工程的多指标优化设计要求,保证优化结果具有更高的灵活性和适应性.%To determine the number and locations of deployed sensors is the key technology to be solved for obtaining high precision modal parameters of large satellite antenna reflector on-orbit. To Bvoid the limitations and one-sidedness of single-objective criterion used in previous research work, the double-objective criterions were designed, which contain the largest orthogonality and the highest vibration energy of observed signals. NSGA- II algorithm was introduced in salving multi-objective optimization problem of sensor deployment. Considering the limitation that only continuous variables can be applicable and the deficiencies in convergence speed and diversity holding of NSGA-1, the coding and genetic operators were improved. Comparing the results of four cases with different single-objective and multi-objective criterions, the solutions based on improved NSGA- D are the best among these four cases according to all indicators, which are of greater flexibility and adaptability and can obtain the uniform distributed Pareto solution set, including all weight combinations of muki objectives. It can more

  10. Insights into the structure, function and evolution of the radical-SAM 23S rRNA methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karminska, K. H.; Purta, E.; Hansen, L .H.

    2010-01-01

    of a 4Fe-4S cluster, a SAM molecule coordinated to the iron-sulfur cluster (SAM1) and a SAM molecule that is the putative methyl group donor (SAM2). All mutations at predicted functional sites affect Cfr activity significantly as assayed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and primer extension analysis....... The investigation has identified essential amino acids and Cfr variants with altered reaction mechanisms and represents a first step towards understanding the structural basis of Cfr activity....

  11. Distributed Anomaly Detection Using Satellite Data From Multiple Modalities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has been a tremendous increase in the volume of Earth Science data over the last decade from modern satellites, in-situ sensors and different climate models....

  12. MODIS 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  13. ASTER 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  14. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the SAMS gene during adventitious root development in IBA-induced tetraploid black locust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jine; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Chunxia; Meng, Sen; Zhao, Zhong; Xu, Xuexuan

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor for ethylene and polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we report the isolation of the 1498 bp full-length cDNA sequence encoding tetraploid black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) SAMS (TrbSAMS), which contains an open reading frame of 1179 bp encoding 392 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of TrbSAMS has more than 94% sequence identity to SAMSs from other plants, with a closer phylogenetic relationship to SAMSs from legumes than to SAMS from other plants. The TrbSAMS monomer consists of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that the TrbSAMS protein localizes mainly to in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts. Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-treated cuttings showed higher levels of TrbSAMS transcript than untreated control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. TrbSAMS and its downstream genes showed differential expression in shoots, leaves, bark, and roots, with the highest expression observed in bark. IBA-treated cuttings also showed higher SAMS activity than control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. These results indicate that TrbSAMS might play an important role in the regulation of IBA-induced adventitious root development in tetraploid black locust cuttings.

  15. MICROWAVE SENSOR DEVELOPMENT IN RECENT TWO YEARS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The development of microwave sensors in recent two years in China are in troduced with an emphasis on spaceborne sensors without the applications in cluded. The microwave sensors as the main payloads to be boarded on the future operational satellites, such as FY-3 meteorological satellites and HY-2 marine satellite are introduced with much in detail. Besides these, four new sensors are outlined, i.e. the imaging radar altimeter,synthetic aperture radiometer, and polarimetric radiometer. Two recently conducted flight experiment campaigns are also introduced with results shown.

  16. A Virtual Environment for Satellite Modeling and Orbital Analysis in a Distributed Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    center of mass to the center of the earth. Interactive modification of the heading or pitch components of satellite orientation is not factored in to... satellite orientation and orientation by simulating thruster-firing activities. Both systems accept actual satellite telemetry for propagating models in the...model by applying rigid body dynamics. Model satellite sensor capabilities to determine FOV. Process actual satellite orientation data. _ __ Incorporate

  17. Analogue Experiments Identify Possible Precursor Compounds for Chlorohydrocarbons Detected in SAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, aboard the Curiosity Rover, has conducted multiple analyses of scooped and drilled samples and has identified a suite of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (Glavin et al., 2013; Leshin et al., 2013). These compounds were identified after samples were pyrolysed at temperatures up to ~835°C through a combination of Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). Since these chlorinated species were well above the background levels determined by empty cup blanks analyzed prior to solid sample analyses, thermal degradation of oxychlorine phases, such as perchlorate, present in the Martian soil, are the most likely source of chlorine needed to generate these chlorohydrocarbons. Laboratory analogue experiments show that terrestrial organics internal to SAM, such as N-methyl-N(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a derivatization agent, can react with perchlorates to produce all of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by SAM. However, in pyrolysis-trap-GCMS laboratory experiments with MTBSTFA, C4 compounds are the predominant chlorohydrocarbon observed, whereas on SAM the C1 chlorohydrocarbons dominate (Glavin et al., 2013). This, in addition to the previous identification of chloromethane and dichloromethane by the 1976 Viking missions (Biemann et al., 1977), suggest that there could be another, possibly Martian, source of organic carbon contributing to the formation of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons, or other components of the solid samples analyzed by SAM are having a catalytic effect on chlorohydrocarbon generation. Laboratory analogue experiments investigated a suite of organic compounds that have the potential to accumulate on Mars (Benner et al., 2000) and thus serve as sources of carbon for the formation of chlorohydrocarbons detected by the SAM and

  18. Early Evolved Gas Results from the Curiosity Rover’s SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Stern, J.; SAM Science Team; MSL Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission is designed to explore the habitability of the selected landing site at Gale crater. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite contributes to this study with a search for organic compounds, an analysis of the composition of inorganic volatiles, and measurements of the isotopic composition light elements. Both atmospheric and solid samples are analyzed. The layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater are important targets for the MSL mission. However, in situ measurements made during the past year of interesting regions close to the Bradbury landing site have revealed a diverse geology and several primary mission objectives have already been realized. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. The MSL cameras, a laser induced breakdown spectrometer, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD instrument CheMin. SAM integrates a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) with a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. Results of SAM atmospheric composition analyses have already been reported (1,2). To date, multiple SAM evolved gas experiments have examined samples from fines scooped from an aeolian drift and from two drilled samples of a mudstone. Major evolved gases are H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, H2S, H2, and a number of minor species. These data help confirm the likely presence of perchlorates, the presence of phylosillicates, and both reduced and oxidized compounds evolved from the same sample. 1) P.R. Mahaffy et al., Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover, Science 343, (2013). 2) C.R. Webster et al., Isotope Ratios of H, C and O in Martian Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Water Measured by the

  19. A modular approach for the construction and modification of glyco-SAMs utilizing 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Mike; Winkler, Tobias; Terfort, Andreas; Lindhorst, Thisbe K

    2008-06-21

    We report the synthesis of a broad variety of functionalized molecules for assembly on gold, allowing the formation of biologically relevant SAMs by a modular approach: either utilizing 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of alkynes and azides in solution or by 'click on SAM'. Extensive studies into the various parameters of SAM formation and stability have been carried out, leading us to deduce reliable conditions under which glyco-decorated self-assembled monolayers can be formed and studied such as in SPR-supported binding assays.

  20. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Investigation: Overview of Results from the First 120 Sols on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; hide

    2013-01-01

    During the first 120 sols of Curiosity s landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 12/7/2012) SAM sampled the atmosphere 9 times and an eolian bedform named Rocknest 4 times. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in EEProm, a high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to optimize experiments based on prior runs.

  1. Standardized added metabolic activity (SAM) IN {sup 18}F-FDG PET assessment of treatment response in colorectal liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, Jeroen; Goethals, I.; Wiele, C.V. de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Bruyne, S. de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Damme, N. van; Ceelen, W. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Ghent (Belgium); Smeets, P. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Troisi, R. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of General and Hepato-Biliary Surgery, Liver Transplantation Service, Ghent (Belgium); Laurent, S.; Geboes, K. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Ghent (Belgium); Peeters, M. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Ghent (Belgium); Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2013-08-15

    Standardized added metabolic activity (SAM) is a PET parameter for assessing the total metabolic load of malignant processes, avoiding partial volume effects and lesion segmentation. The potential role of this parameter in the assessment of response to chemotherapy and bevacizumab was tested in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with potentially resectable liver metastases (mCRC). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 18 mCRC patients with liver metastases before treatment and after five cycles of FOLFOX/FOLFIRI and bevacizumab. Of the 18 patients, 16 subsequently underwent resection of liver metastases. Baseline and follow-up SUV{sub max}, and SAM as well as reduction in SUV{sub max} ({nabla}SUV{sub max}) and SAM ({nabla}SAM) of all liver metastases were correlated with morphological response, and progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS). A significant reduction in metabolic activity of the liver metastases was seen after chemotherapy with a median {nabla}SUV{sub max} of 25.3 % and {nabla}SAM of 94.5 % (p = 0.033 and 0.003). Median baseline SUV{sub max} and SAM values were significantly different between morphological responders and nonresponders (3.8 vs. 7.2, p = 0.021; and 34 vs. 211, p = 0.002, respectively), but neither baseline PET parameters nor morphological response was correlated with PFS or OS. Follow-up SUV{sub max} and SAM as well as {nabla}SAM were found to be prognostic factors. The median PFS and OS in the patient group with a high follow-up SUV{sub max} were 10.4 months and 32 months, compared to a median PFS of 14.7 months and a median OS which had not been reached in the group with a low follow-up SUV{sub max} (p = 0.01 and 0.003, respectively). The patient group with a high follow-up SAM and a low {nabla}SAM had a median PFS and OS of 9.4 months and 32 months, whereas the other group had a median PFS of 14.7 months and a median OS which had not been reached (p = 0.002 for both PFS and OS). {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging is a useful

  2. China Plans to Launch FY-3 Meteorological Satellite in 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China's new generation polar orbit weather satellite FY-3 will be launched by LM-4B launch vehicle in 2006. The FY-3 would be equipped with new global, all-weather, multi-spectral, threedimensional sensors. The new satellite, an improved version of the FY-1, has the resolution of 250m and

  3. Satellite based wind resource assessment over the South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Astrup, Poul; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2014-01-01

    modeling to develop procedures and best practices for satellite based wind resource assessment offshore. All existing satellite images from the Envisat Advanced SAR sensor by the European Space Agency (2002-12) have been collected over a domain in the South China Sea. Wind speed is first retrieved from...

  4. Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) is a series of passive microwave conically scanning imagers and sounders onboard the DMSP satellites beginning...

  5. Evolved Gas Analyses of Sedimentary Materials in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument from Yellowknife Bay to the Stimson Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 10 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g, H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HC1). The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize the evolved H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2 gas traces of sediments analyzed by SAM through sol 1178, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results releative to understanding the geochemical history of Gale Crater.

  6. Internet-Protocol-Based Satellite Bus Architecture Designed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slywczak, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA is designing future complex satellite missions ranging from single satellites and constellations to space networks and sensor webs. These missions require more interoperability, autonomy, and coordination than previous missions; in addition, a desire exists to have scientists retrieve data directly from the satellite rather than a central distribution source. To meet these goals, NASA has been studying the possibility of extending the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite for spacebased applications.

  7. Micro technology based sun sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Pedersen, Martin; Fléron, René

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing interest among universities in the scientific and educational possibilities of picosatellites base on the CubeSat 5 concept. Due to sever mass and dimension constraints place on this type of satellites, new approaches and ideas regarding different systems arises to accommodate...... DTUsat sun sensors are needed along with a magnetometer to obtain unambiguous attitude determination for the ACDS and the payloads - an electrodynamic tether and a camera. The accuracy needed was not obtainable by employing conventional attitude sensors. Hence a linear slit sensor was designed...

  8. A NOVEL INTEREST COVERAGE METHOD BASED ON JENSEN-SHANNON DIVERGENCE IN SENSOR NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yufeng; Wang Wendong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the idea of interest coverage is provided to form clusters in sensor network,which mean that the distance among data trends gathered by neighbor sensors is so small that, in some period, those sensors can be clustered, and certain sensor can be used to replace the cluster to form the virtual sensor network topology. In detail, the Jensen-Shannon Divergence (JSD) is used to characterize the distance among different distributions which represent the data trend of sensors.Then, based on JSD, a hierarchical clustering algorithm is provided to form the virtual sensor network topology. Simulation shows that the proposed approach gains more than 50% energy saving than Statistical Aggregation Methods (SAM) which transmitted data gathered by sensor only when the difference among data exceed certain threshold.

  9. Model-based satellite image fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Sveinsson, J. R.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for pixel-level satellite image fusion derived directly from a model of the imaging sensor. By design, the proposed method is spectrally consistent. It is argued that the proposed method needs regularization, as is the case for any method for this problem. A framework for pixel...

  10. Extrapolating Satellite Winds to Turbine Operating Heights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wind retrievals from satellite sensors are typically performed for the standard level of 10 m. This restricts their full exploitation for wind energy planning, which requires wind information at much higher levels where wind turbines operate. A new method is presented for the vertical extra...

  11. Wide Range Vacuum Pumps for the SAM Instrument on the MSL Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Farley, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Creare Incorporated and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center developed and space qualified two wide range pumps (WRPs) that were included in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument. This instrument was subsequently integrated into the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity Rover," launched aboard an Atlas V rocket in 2011, and landed on August 6, 2012, in the Gale Crater on Mars. The pumps have now operated for more than 18 months in the Gale Crater and have been evacuating the key components of the SAM instrument: a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and six gas chromatograph columns. In this paper, we describe the main design challenges and the ways in which they were solved. This includes the custom design of a miniaturized, high-speed motor to drive the turbo drag pump rotor, analysis of rotor dynamics for super critical operation, and bearing/lubricant design/selection.

  12. Evolution of SAM in an Enhanced Model for Monitoring WLCG Services

    CERN Document Server

    Collados, D; Traylen, S; Imamagic, E; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2010-01-01

    It is four years now since the first prototypes of tools and tests started to monitor the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) services. One of these tools is the Service Availability Monitoring (SAM) framework, which superseded the SFT tool, and has become a keystone for the monthly WLCG availability and reliability computations. During this time, the grid has evolved into a robust, production-level infrastructure, in no small part thanks to the extensive monitoring infrastructure which includes testing, visualization and reporting. Experience gained with monitoring has led to emerging grid monitoring standards, and provided valuable input for the Operations Automation Strategy aimed at the regionalization of monitoring services. This change in scope, together with an ever-increasing number of services and infrastructures, make enhancements in the architecture of existing monitoring tools a necessity. This paper describes the present architecture of SAM, an enhanced and distributed model for monitoring WLCG s...

  13. Parabolic Trough Reference Plant for Cost Modeling with the Solar Advisor Model (SAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C.

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for parabolic trough solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), assisted by WorleyParsons Group Inc., for use with NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM). This report includes an overview and explanation of the model, two summary contract reports from WorleyParsons, and an Excel spreadsheet for use with SAM. The cost study uses a reference plant with a 100-MWe capacity and six hours of thermal energy storage. Wet-cooling and dry-cooling configurations are considered. The spreadsheet includes capital and operating cost by component to allow users to estimate the impact of changes in component costs.

  14. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under th

  15. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  16. The SAM framework: modeling the effects of management factors on human behavior in risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D M; Paté-Cornell, M E

    1996-08-01

    Complex engineered systems, such as nuclear reactors and chemical plants, have the potential for catastrophic failure with disastrous consequences. In recent years, human and management factors have been recognized as frequent root causes of major failures in such systems. However, classical probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) techniques do not account for the underlying causes of these errors because they focus on the physical system and do not explicitly address the link between components' performance and organizational factors. This paper describes a general approach for addressing the human and management causes of system failure, called the SAM (System-Action-Management) framework. Beginning with a quantitative risk model of the physical system, SAM expands the scope of analysis to incorporate first the decisions and actions of individuals that affect the physical system. SAM then links management factors (incentives, training, policies and procedures, selection criteria, etc.) to those decisions and actions. The focus of this paper is on four quantitative models of action that describe this last relationship. These models address the formation of intentions for action and their execution as a function of the organizational environment. Intention formation is described by three alternative models: a rational model, a bounded rationality model, and a rule-based model. The execution of intentions is then modeled separately. These four models are designed to assess the probabilities of individual actions from the perspective of management, thus reflecting the uncertainties inherent to human behavior. The SAM framework is illustrated for a hypothetical case of hazardous materials transportation. This framework can be used as a tool to increase the safety and reliability of complex technical systems by modifying the organization, rather than, or in addition to, re-designing the physical system.

  17. Parabolic Trough Collector Cost Update for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report updates the baseline cost for parabolic trough solar fields in the United States within NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM, available at no cost at https://sam.nrel.gov/, is a performance and financial model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry. SAM is the primary tool used by NREL and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for estimating the performance and cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies and projects. The study performed a bottom-up build and cost estimate for two state-of-the-art parabolic trough designs -- the SkyTrough and the Ultimate Trough. The SkyTrough analysis estimated the potential installed cost for a solar field of 1500 SCAs as $170/m2 +/- $6/m2. The investigation found that SkyTrough installed costs were sensitive to factors such as raw aluminum alloy cost and production volume. For example, in the case of the SkyTrough, the installed cost would rise to nearly $210/m2 if the aluminum alloy cost was $1.70/lb instead of $1.03/lb. Accordingly, one must be aware of fluctuations in the relevant commodities markets to track system cost over time. The estimated installed cost for the Ultimate Trough was only slightly higher at $178/m2, which includes an assembly facility of $11.6 million amortized over the required production volume. Considering the size and overall cost of a 700 SCA Ultimate Trough solar field, two parallel production lines in a fully covered assembly facility, each with the specific torque box, module and mirror jigs, would be justified for a full CSP plant.

  18. Should India Use Commercially Produced Ready To Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF For Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    radha holla

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, nearly 20 million children under five suffer from Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM, a condition which contributes to one million child deaths annually. In India 48% of children under five years of age are stunted and 43 percent are underweight; almost 8 million suffer from SAM. Malnutrition is not a new problem in India, nor is SAM. Several hospitals and non-government organizations are engaged in community-based management of malnutrition using locally produced/procured and locally processed foods along with intensive nutrition education. These programs enable parents to meet the nutritional requirements of their children with foods that are available at low cost. The Supreme Court of India has also directed the government to universalize the Integrated Child Development Scheme and provide one hot cooked meal to children under six years of age to supplement their nutrition. The blame for the increasing number of severely malnourish children can be laid at the door of policies that have destroyed poor people’s access to food. Nonetheless, there is urgent need to ensure that these children do not die; that they recover and maintain a healthy nutritional status. The current thinking – that a centrally produced and processed Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF should supplant the locally prepared indigenous foods in treatment of SAM – ignores the multiple causes of malnutrition and destroys the diversity of potential solutions based on locally available foods. This position paper has been drafted by Dr. Vandana Prasad, Radha Holla and Dr. Arun Gupta, members of the Working Group for Children Under Six – a joint effort of Jan Swasthya Abhiyan (People’s Health Movement – India and the Right to Food Campaign which been advocating for the last three years with the Indian government for decentralized and community-based strategies to combat and prevent malnutrition in children.

  19. SAMMate: a GUI tool for processing short read alignments in SAM/BAM format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemington Erik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology generates tens of millions of short reads for each DNA/RNA sample. A key step in NGS data analysis is the short read alignment of the generated sequences to a reference genome. Although storing alignment information in the Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM or Binary SAM (BAM format is now standard, biomedical researchers still have difficulty accessing this information. Results We have developed a Graphical User Interface (GUI software tool named SAMMate. SAMMate allows biomedical researchers to quickly process SAM/BAM files and is compatible with both single-end and paired-end sequencing technologies. SAMMate also automates some standard procedures in DNA-seq and RNA-seq data analysis. Using either standard or customized annotation files, SAMMate allows users to accurately calculate the short read coverage of genomic intervals. In particular, for RNA-seq data SAMMate can accurately calculate the gene expression abundance scores for customized genomic intervals using short reads originating from both exons and exon-exon junctions. Furthermore, SAMMate can quickly calculate a whole-genome signal map at base-wise resolution allowing researchers to solve an array of bioinformatics problems. Finally, SAMMate can export both a wiggle file for alignment visualization in the UCSC genome browser and an alignment statistics report. The biological impact of these features is demonstrated via several case studies that predict miRNA targets using short read alignment information files. Conclusions With just a few mouse clicks, SAMMate will provide biomedical researchers easy access to important alignment information stored in SAM/BAM files. Our software is constantly updated and will greatly facilitate the downstream analysis of NGS data. Both the source code and the GUI executable are freely available under the GNU General Public License at http://sammate.sourceforge.net.

  20. Sarm1-mediated axon degeneration requires both SAM and TIR interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-08-14

    Axon degeneration is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that eliminates damaged or unneeded axons. Manipulation of this poorly understood pathway may allow treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. In an RNAi-based screen performed in cultured mouse DRG neurons, we observed strong suppression of injury-induced axon degeneration upon knockdown of Sarm1 [SARM (sterile α-motif-containing and armadillo-motif containing protein)]. We find that a SARM-dependent degeneration program is engaged by disparate neuronal insults: SARM ablation blocks axon degeneration induced by axotomy or vincristine treatment, while SARM acts in parallel with a soma-derived caspase-dependent pathway following trophic withdrawal. SARM is a multidomain protein that associates with neuronal mitochondria. Deletion of the N-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence disrupts SARM mitochondrial localization in neurons but does not alter its ability to promote axon degeneration. In contrast, mutation of either the SAM (sterile α motif) or TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor) domains abolishes the ability of SARM to promote axonal degeneration, while a SARM mutant containing only these domains elicits axon degeneration and nonapoptotic neuronal death even in the absence of injury. Protein-protein interaction studies demonstrate that the SAM domains are necessary and sufficient to mediate SARM-SARM binding. SARM mutants lacking a TIR domain bind full-length SARM and exhibit strong dominant-negative activity. These results indicate that SARM plays an integral role in the dismantling of injured axons and support a model in which SAM-mediated multimerization is necessary for TIR-dependent engagement of a downstream destruction pathway. These findings suggest that inhibitors of SAM and TIR interactions represent therapeutic candidates for blocking pathological axon loss and neuronal cell death.

  1. Mitofilin and CHCHD6 physically interact with Sam50 to sustain cristae structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chengli; Wu, Zhifei; Huang, Lei; Wang, Yajie; Xue, Jie; Chen, Si; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Song, Zhiyin; Chen, Shi

    2015-11-04

    The inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) invaginates to form cristae and the maintenance of cristae depends on the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex. Mitofilin and CHCHD6, which physically interact, are two components of the MICOS. In this study, we performed immunoprecipitation experiments with Mitofilin and CHCHD6 antibodies and identified a complex containing Mitofilin, Sam50, and CHCHD 3 and 6. Using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), we generated knockdown/knockout clones of Mitofilin and CHCHD6. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that vesicle-like cristae morphology appeared in cell lines lacking Mitofilin, and mitochondria exhibited lower cristae density in CHCHD6-knockout cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that knockdown of Mitofilin, but not knockout of CHCHD6, affected their binding partners that control cristae morphology. We also demonstrated that Mitofilin and CHCHD6 directly interacted with Sam50. Additionally, we observed that Mitofilin-knockdown cells showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and intracellular ATP content, which were minimally affected in CHCHD6-knockout cells. Taken together, we conclude that the integrity of MICOS and its efficient interaction with Sam50 are indispensable for cristae organization, which is relevant to mitochondrial function.

  2. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Janine M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ryberg, David Severin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a variety of system designs and locations. Many independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort verifying these models beyond the system designs and locations on which they were based. Moreover, major PV modeling software products have not yet incorporated any of these models into their workflows. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. (2013) into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work, we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and we discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for three PV arrays. Next, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical data set to estimate average snow losses across the United States for two typical PV system designs. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nationwide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  3. SAMSVM: A tool for misalignment filtration of SAM-format sequences with support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Ding, Xiaofan; Sun, Xing; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Xue, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Sequence alignment/map (SAM) formatted sequences [Li H, Handsaker B, Wysoker A et al., Bioinformatics 25(16):2078-2079, 2009.] have taken on a main role in bioinformatics since the development of massive parallel sequencing. However, because misalignment of sequences poses a significant problem in analysis of sequencing data that could lead to false positives in variant calling, the exclusion of misaligned reads is a necessity in analysis. In this regard, the multiple features of SAM-formatted sequences can be treated as vectors in a multi-dimension space to allow the application of a support vector machine (SVM). Applying the LIBSVM tools developed by Chang and Lin [Chang C-C, Lin C-J, ACM Trans Intell Syst Technol 2:1-27, 2011.] as a simple interface for support vector classification, the SAMSVM package has been developed in this study to enable misalignment filtration of SAM-formatted sequences. Cross-validation between two simulated datasets processed with SAMSVM yielded accuracies that ranged from 0.89 to 0.97 with F-scores ranging from 0.77 to 0.94 in 14 groups characterized by different mutation rates from 0.001 to 0.1, indicating that the model built using SAMSVM was accurate in misalignment detection. Application of SAMSVM to actual sequencing data resulted in filtration of misaligned reads and correction of variant calling.

  4. Major Volatiles from MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses: Yellowknife Bay Through Lower Mount Sharp

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Stern, J. C.; Freissinet, C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). One was drilled from the Windjana ("WJ") site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation investigated on route to Mount Sharp. Another was drilled from the Confidence Hills ("CH") site on a sandstone of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp (Pahrump Hills). Outcrops are sedimentary rocks that are largely of fluvial or lacustrine origin, with minor aeolian deposits.. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature (T) of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). They can also give constraints on sample organic chemistry. Here, we discuss trends in major evolved volatiles from SAM EGA analyses to date.

  5. Microtribological and electrochemical corrosion behaviors of polydopamine coating on APTS-SAM modified Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou Junfei [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wang Jinqing, E-mail: jqwang@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu Sheng [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhou Jinfang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ren Sili, E-mail: slren@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yang Shengrong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-11-15

    A polydopamine coating (coded as PDAc) was prepared successfully on a Si substrate through a two-step process. Briefly, to improve the adhesion of PDAc on the Si substrate, a self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (coded as APTS-SAM) was firstly generated on the bare Si wafer. Thereafter, the PDAc with different thickness was fabricated through the chemical adsorption and autopolymerization of the dopamine hydrochloride on the APTS-SAM coated Si substrate. The formation of PDAc on the APTS-SAM modified Si substrate was proved by the characterizations of contact angle measurement, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), etc. The ellipsometric thickness measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image analysis showed that the PDAc became thicker and rougher with the deposition time prolongation. Microtribological study showed that the thickness and roughness of the PDAc played a significant role in the tribological properties. In comparison with the bare Si substrate, the PDAc with thinner thickness possessed lower friction and was anticipated to be used as protecting coating in the field of boundary lubrication. The electrochemical corrosion behaviors of the prepared PDAc were investigated using the electrochemical station and a low corrosion current density was revealed, implying that the PDAc had good anti-corrosion capability and might find potential applications in the field of corrosion resistance.

  6. Microtribological and electrochemical corrosion behaviors of polydopamine coating on APTS-SAM modified Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junfei; Wang, Jinqing; Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Jinfang; Ren, Sili; Yang, Shengrong

    2009-11-01

    A polydopamine coating (coded as PDAc) was prepared successfully on a Si substrate through a two-step process. Briefly, to improve the adhesion of PDAc on the Si substrate, a self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (coded as APTS-SAM) was firstly generated on the bare Si wafer. Thereafter, the PDAc with different thickness was fabricated through the chemical adsorption and autopolymerization of the dopamine hydrochloride on the APTS-SAM coated Si substrate. The formation of PDAc on the APTS-SAM modified Si substrate was proved by the characterizations of contact angle measurement, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), etc. The ellipsometric thickness measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image analysis showed that the PDAc became thicker and rougher with the deposition time prolongation. Microtribological study showed that the thickness and roughness of the PDAc played a significant role in the tribological properties. In comparison with the bare Si substrate, the PDAc with thinner thickness possessed lower friction and was anticipated to be used as protecting coating in the field of boundary lubrication. The electrochemical corrosion behaviors of the prepared PDAc were investigated using the electrochemical station and a low corrosion current density was revealed, implying that the PDAc had good anti-corrosion capability and might find potential applications in the field of corrosion resistance.

  7. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryberg, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Freeman, Janine [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a wide variety of system designs and locations. A scattering of independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort spent on verifying these models beyond the system design and location on which they were based. Moreover, none of the major PV modeling software products have incorporated any of these models into their workflow. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. [1] into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for two PV arrays. Following this, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical dataset to estimate average snow losses across the United States for a typical PV system design. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nation-wide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  8. Conformational heterogeneity of the SAM-I riboswitch transcriptional ON state: a chaperone-like role for S-adenosyl methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-05-18

    Riboswitches are promising targets for the design of novel antibiotics and engineering of portable genetic regulatory elements. There is evidence that variability in riboswitch properties allows tuning of expression for genes involved in different stages of biosynthetic pathways by mechanisms that are not currently understood. Here, we explore the mechanism for tuning of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-I riboswitch folding. Most SAM-I riboswitches function at the transcriptional level by sensing the cognate ligand SAM. SAM-I riboswitches orchestrate the biosynthetic pathways of cysteine, methionine, SAM, and so forth. We use base-pair probability predictions to examine the secondary-structure folding landscape of several SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We predict different folding behaviors for different SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We identify several "decoy" base-pairing interactions involving 5' riboswitch residues that can compete with the formation of a P1 helix, a component of the ligand-bound "transcription OFF" state, in the absence of SAM. We hypothesize that blockage of these interactions through SAM contacts contributes to stabilization of the OFF state in the presence of ligand. We also probe folding patterns for a SAM-I riboswitch RNA using constructs with different 3' truncation points experimentally. Folding was monitored through fluorescence, susceptibility to base-catalyzed cleavage, nuclear magnetic resonance, and indirectly through SAM binding. We identify key decision windows at which SAM can affect the folding pathway towards the OFF state. The presence of decoy conformations and differential sensitivities to SAM at different transcript lengths is crucial for SAM-I riboswitches to modulate gene expression in the context of global cellular metabolism.

  9. Sam68 promotes Schwann cell proliferation by enhancing the PI3K/Akt pathway and acts on regeneration after sciatic nerve crush

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weijie, E-mail: 459586768@qq.com; Liu, Yuxi, E-mail: 924013616@qq.com; Wang, Youhua, E-mail: wyouhua1516@163.com

    2016-05-13

    Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis of 68 kD), a KH domain RNA-binding protein, is not only important in signaling transduction cascades, but crucial in a variety of cellular processes. Sam68 is reported to be involved in the phospoinositide3-kinase (PI3K) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways, and it is closely associated with cell proliferation, RNA metabolism, and tumor progression. However, we know little about the role of Sam68 during peripheral nervous system injury and regeneration. In this study, we investigated the expression of Sam68 and its biological significances in sciatic nerve crush. Interestingly, we found Sam68 had a co-localization with S100 (Schwann cell marker). Moreover, after crush, Sam68 had a spatiotemporal protein expression, which was in parallel with proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro, we also observed increased expression of Sam68 during the process of TNF-α-induced Schwann cell proliferation model. Besides, flow cytometry analyses, CCK-8, and EDU were all performed with the purpose of investigating the role of Sam68 in the regulation of Schwann cell proliferation. Even more importantly, we discovered that Sam68 could enhance the phosphorylation of Akt while LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) obviously reversed Sam68-induced cell proliferation. Finally, we detected the variance during regeneration progress through the rat walk footprint test. In summary, all these evidences demonstrated that Sam68 might participate in Schwann cell proliferation partially via PI3K/Akt pathway and also regulate regeneration after sciatic nerve crush. -- Highlights: •The dynamic changes and location of Sam68 after sciatic nerve crush. •Sam68 promoted Schwann cell proliferation via PI3K/Akt pathway. •Sam68 modulated functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush.

  10. Geostationary Satellite (GOES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from radiometer instruments on SMS (ATS) and GOES satellites in geostationary orbit. These satellites produced...

  11. The Arctic Regional Communications Small SATellite (ARCSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph; Kress, Martin; Sims, William; Spehn, Stephen; Jaeger, Talbot; Sanders, Devon

    2013-01-01

    Traditional satellite missions are extremely complex and expensive to design, build, test, launch and operate. Consequently many complementary operational, exploration and research satellite missions are being formulated as a growing part of the future space community capabilities using formations of small, distributed, simple to launch and inexpensive highly capable small scale satellites. The Arctic Regional Communications small SATellite (ARCSAT) initiative would launch a Mini-Satellite "Mothership" into Polar or Sun Sync low-earth-orbit (LEO). Once on orbit, the Mothership would perform orbital insertion of four internally stored independently maneuverable nanosatellites, each containing electronically steerable antennas and reconfigurable software-defined radios. Unlike the traditional geostationary larger complex satellite communication systems, this LEO communications system will be comprised of initially a five small satellite formation that can be later incrementally increased in the total number of satellites for additional data coverage. ARCSAT will provide significant enabling capabilities in the Arctic for autonomous voice and data communications relay, Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA), data-extraction from unattended sensors, and terrestrial Search & Rescue (SAR) beacon detection missions throughout the "data starved desert" of the Arctic Region.

  12. Neptune's small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P.

    1992-04-01

    The small satellites of Neptune and other planets discovered during the Voyager 2 mission are discussed in terms of their composition and relationship to the planetary systems. The satellite Proteus is described in terms of its orbit, five other satellites are described, and they are compared to ther small satellites and systems. Neptune's satellites are hypothesized to be related to the ring system, and the satellite Galatea is related to the confinement of the rings.

  13. The early 1990s change in ENSO-PSA-SAM relationships and its impact on Southern Hemisphere climate

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, JY; Paek, H; Saltzman, ES; T. Lee

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Meteorological Society. This study uncovers an early 1990s change in the relationships between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and two leading modes of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric variability: the southern annular mode (SAM) and the Pacific-South American (PSA) pattern. During austral spring, while the PSA maintained a strong correlation with ENSO throughout the period 1948-2014, the SAM-ENSO correlation changed from being weak before the early 1990s to being ...

  14. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) stably expressing CRISPR-based synergistic activation mediator (SAM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Kai; Zhou, Yan; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Human fibroblasts were engineered to express the CRISPR-based synergistic activation mediator (SAM) complex: dCas9-VP64 and MS2-P65-HSF1. Two induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) clones expressing SAM were established by transducing these fibroblasts with lentivirus expressing OCT4, SOX2, KLF4...... a novel, useful tool to investigate genetic regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation through CRISPR-mediated activation of endogenous genes....

  15. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  16. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  17. Detecting Complex Organic Compounds Using the SAM Wet Chemistry Experiment on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, C.; Buch, A.; Glavin, D. P.; Brault, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Kashyap, S.; Martin, M. G.; Miller, K.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The search for organic molecules on Mars can provide important first clues of abiotic chemistry and/or extinct or extant biota on the planet. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is currently the most relevant space-compatible analytical tool for the detection of organic compounds. Nevertheless, GC separation is intrinsically restricted to volatile molecules, and many molecules of astrobiological interest are chromatographically refractory or polar. To analyze these organics such as amino acids, nucleobases and carboxylic acids in the Martian regolith, an additional derivatization step is required to transform them into volatile derivatives that are amenable to GC analysis. As part of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, a single-step protocol of extraction and chemical derivatization with the silylating reagent N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) has been developed to reach a wide range of astrobiology-relevant refractory organic molecules (Mahaffy et al. 2012; Stalport et al. 2012). Seven cups in the SAM instrument are devoted to MTBSTFA derivatization. However, this chemical reaction adds a protective silyl group in place of each labile hydrogen, which makes the molecule non-identifiable in common mass spectra libraries. Therefore, we have created an extended library of mass spectra of MTBSTFA derivatized compounds of interest, considering their potential occurrence in Mars soils. We then looked specifically for MTBSTFA derivatized compounds using the existing and the newly created library, in various Mars analog soils. To enable a more accurate interpretation of the in situ derivatization GC-MS results that will be obtained by SAM, the lab experiments were performed as close as possible to the SAM flight instrument experimental conditions. Our first derivatization experiments display promising results, the laboratory system permitting an extraction and detection

  18. Evidence for perchlorates and the origin of chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by SAM at the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-10-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of ~0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the Martian regolith.

  19. Sum-frequency generation analyses of the structure of water at amphoteric SAM-liquid water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kouji; Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Gemmei-Ide, Makoto; Kitano, Hiromi; Noguchi, Hidenori; Uosaki, Kohei

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces of both a cover glass and the flat plane of a semi-cylindrical quartz prism were modified with a mixture of positively and negatively charged silane coupling reagents (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)propylmethylphosphonate (THPMP), respectively). The glass surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) prepared at a mixing ratio of APTES:THPMP=4:6 was electrically almost neutral and was resistant to non-specific adsorption of proteins, whereas fibroblasts gradually adhered to an amphoteric (mixed) SAM surface probably due to its stiffness, though the number of adhered cells was relatively small. Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra indicated that total intensity of the OH stretching region (3000-3600cm(-1)) for the amphoteric SAM-modified quartz immersed in liquid water was smaller than those for the positively and negatively charged SAM-modified quartz prisms and a bare quartz prism in contact with liquid water. These results suggested that water molecules at the interface of water and an amphoteric SAM-modified quartz prism are not strongly oriented in comparison with those at the interface of a lopsidedly charged SAM-modified quartz prism and bare quartz. The importance of charge neutralization for the anti-biofouling properties of solid materials was strongly suggested.

  20. Supplementary Material for: A new mode of SAM domain mediated oligomerization observed in the CASKIN2 neuronal scaffolding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background CASKIN2 is a homolog of CASKIN1, a scaffolding protein that participates in a signaling network with CASK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase). Despite a high level of homology between CASKIN2 and CASKIN1, CASKIN2 cannot bind CASK due to the absence of a CASK Interaction Domain and consequently, may have evolved undiscovered structural and functional distinctions. Results We demonstrate that the crystal structure of the Sterile Alpha Motif (SAM) domain tandem (SAM1-SAM2) oligomer from CASKIN2 is different than CASKIN1, with the minimal repeating unit being a dimer, rather than a monomer. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity methods revealed differences in monomer/dimer equilibria across a range of concentrations and ionic strengths for the wild type CASKIN2 SAM tandem and a structure-directed double mutant that could not oligomerize. Further distinguishing CASKIN2 from CASKIN1, EGFP-tagged SAM tandem proteins expressed in Neuro2a cells produced punctae that were distinct both in shape and size. Conclusions This study illustrates a new way in which neuronal SAM domains can assemble into large macromolecular assemblies that might concentrate and amplify synaptic responses.

  1. The German joint research project "concepts for future gravity satellite missions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubelt, Tilo; Sneeuw, Nico; Fichter, Walter; Müller, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Within the German joint research project "concepts for future gravity satellite missions", funded by the Geotechnologies programme of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, options and concepts for future satellite missions for precise (time-variable) gravity field recovery are investigated. The project team is composed of members from science and industry, bringing together experts in geodesy, satellite systems, metrology, sensor technology and control systems. The majority of team members already contributed to former gravity missions. The composition of the team guarantees that not only geodetic aspects and objectives are investigated, but also technological and financial constraints are considered. Conversely, satellite, sensor and system concepts are developed and improved in a direct exchange with geodetic and scientific claims. The project aims to develop concepts for both near and mid-term future satellite missions, taking into account e.g. advanced satellite formations and constellations, improved orbit design, innovative metrology and sensor systems and advances in satellite systems.

  2. Simulation of Satellite Vibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettacchioli, Alain

    2014-06-01

    During every mechanical qualification test of satellites on vibrator, we systematically notice beating phenomena that appear every time we cross a mode's frequency. There could lead to an over-qualification of the tested specimen when the beating reaches a maximum and a under-qualification when the beating passes by a minimum. On a satellite, three lateral modes raise such a problem in a recurring way: the first structure mode (between 10 and 15 hertz) and the two tanks modes (between 35 and 50 hertz).To step forward in the resolution of this problem, we are developing a simulator which is based on the identification of the responses of the accelerometers that are fixed on the satellite and on the shaker slip table. The estimated transfer functions then allow to reconstruct at once the sensors response and the drive which generated them.For the simulation, we do not select all the sensors but only those on the slip table and those used to limit the input level (notching). We may also add those which were close to generate a notching.To perform its calculations, the simulator reproduces on one hand the unity amplitude signal (cola) which serves as frequency reference for the sweep achievement (generally 3 octaves per minute from 5 to 100 and even 150 Hertz), and on the other hand, the vibrator control loop. The drive amplitude is calculated at each cola's period by taking into account a compression factor. The control applied through the amplifier to the shaker coil is the product of this amplitude by the cola. The simulated measurements are updated at each sampling period thanks to the propagation of the identified model. The superposition of these curves on those supplied by real sensors during the tests allows to validate the simulation.Thereby, it seems possible to actively control the beatings thanks to a real-time corrector which uses these identifications.

  3. Tier-scalable reconnaissance: the challenge of sensor optimization, sensor deployment, sensor fusion, and sensor interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Wolfgang; George, Thomas; Tarbell, Mark A.

    2007-04-01

    Robotic reconnaissance operations are called for in extreme environments, not only those such as space, including planetary atmospheres, surfaces, and subsurfaces, but also in potentially hazardous or inaccessible operational areas on Earth, such as mine fields, battlefield environments, enemy occupied territories, terrorist infiltrated environments, or areas that have been exposed to biochemical agents or radiation. Real time reconnaissance enables the identification and characterization of transient events. A fundamentally new mission concept for tier-scalable reconnaissance of operational areas, originated by Fink et al., is aimed at replacing the engineering and safety constrained mission designs of the past. The tier-scalable paradigm integrates multi-tier (orbit atmosphere surface/subsurface) and multi-agent (satellite UAV/blimp surface/subsurface sensing platforms) hierarchical mission architectures, introducing not only mission redundancy and safety, but also enabling and optimizing intelligent, less constrained, and distributed reconnaissance in real time. Given the mass, size, and power constraints faced by such a multi-platform approach, this is an ideal application scenario for a diverse set of MEMS sensors. To support such mission architectures, a high degree of operational autonomy is required. Essential elements of such operational autonomy are: (1) automatic mapping of an operational area from different vantage points (including vehicle health monitoring); (2) automatic feature extraction and target/region-of-interest identification within the mapped operational area; and (3) automatic target prioritization for close-up examination. These requirements imply the optimal deployment of MEMS sensors and sensor platforms, sensor fusion, and sensor interoperability.

  4. Autonomous Collaborative Agents for Onboard Multi-Sensor Re-Targeting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technologies that support the configuration of sensors and satellites, and allow the reconfiguration or retargeting of sensors in response to user demand or...

  5. Influence of chain ordering on frictional properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in nano-lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of organic films to substrates is important in applications that involve solid surfaces in sliding contact. Although the thickness of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is only a few nanometers, they can drastically modify the frictional properties of the underlying substrate, and thus have great potential for serving as boundary lubricants on micro- and nano-scales. This review focuses on the relationship between the structural and compositional properties of SAMs and their frictional response. Adhesion of SAMs to the substrate surface usually occurs through chemisorption of the head groups on the constituent molecules, with molecular interactions such as van der Waals interactions playing important roles in organizing the molecules into surface films, and in controlling their tribological behavior. The durability and wear resistance of SAMs depend on the nature and strength of the binding forces between the head groups and the substrate surfaces, while the adhesion and friction forces are strongly influenced by the interactions of the terminal groups with the counterfaces. Results from both experimental measurements and molecular dynamics simulations consistently indicate that structural ordering of alkyl chains in SAMs reduces their frictional response, and that SAMs formed by molecules with alkyl chains longer than 8 to 10 methylene units are well organized, exhibiting low levels of friction. Less densely packed or more disordered monolayers inherently possess greater numbers of conformational defects at room temperature and present lower barriers to defect creation under the action of a contacting surface, and thus exhibit higher friction. Cross-linking of the spacer chains can reduce the frictional response of disordered films by increasing the chain ordering, but has little impact on SAMs that are already well ordered. On the other hand, introduction of sterically demanding terminal groups and dissimilar molecules reduces molecular ordering in SAMs

  6. Functionalised zinc oxide nanowire gas sensors: Enhanced NO2 gas sensor response by chemical modification of nanowire surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Waclawik

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating with an organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM can enhance surface reactions or the absorption of specific gases and hence improve the response of a metal oxide (MOx sensor toward particular target gases in the environment. In this study the effect of an adsorbed organic layer on the dynamic response of zinc oxide nanowire gas sensors was investigated. The effect of ZnO surface functionalisation by two different organic molecules, tris(hydroxymethylaminomethane (THMA and dodecanethiol (DT, was studied. The response towards ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide was investigated for three sensor configurations, namely pure ZnO nanowires, organic-coated ZnO nanowires and ZnO nanowires covered with a sparse layer of organic-coated ZnO nanoparticles. Exposure of the nanowire sensors to the oxidising gas NO2 produced a significant and reproducible response. ZnO and THMA-coated ZnO nanowire sensors both readily detected NO2 down to a concentration in the very low ppm range. Notably, the THMA-coated nanowires consistently displayed a small, enhanced response to NO2 compared to uncoated ZnO nanowire sensors. At the lower concentration levels tested, ZnO nanowire sensors that were coated with THMA-capped ZnO nanoparticles were found to exhibit the greatest enhanced response. ΔR/R was two times greater than that for the as-prepared ZnO nanowire sensors. It is proposed that the ΔR/R enhancement in this case originates from the changes induced in the depletion-layer width of the ZnO nanoparticles that bridge ZnO nanowires resulting from THMA ligand binding to the surface of the particle coating. The heightened response and selectivity to the NO2 target are positive results arising from the coating of these ZnO nanowire sensors with organic-SAM-functionalised ZnO nanoparticles.

  7. Loving Sam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Kathryn

    1998-01-01

    Describes how the author came to love Mark Twain's writings, taught "Huckleberry Finn" and other of Twain's writings to a ninth-grade class in a Hasidic Jewish Academy, and learned to really love Samuel Clemens. Describes how this love inspired the author to write two books celebrating what she has valued most in 40 years of reading Mark Twain.…

  8. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  9. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  10. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  11. Evaluation of microphysics and precipitation-type frequencies in long-term three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulations using passive and active microwave sensors from the TRMM satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Zeng, X.; Tao, W.; Lang, S.; Zhang, M.; Masunaga, H.

    2007-12-01

    With significant improvements in computational power over the last decades, cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations can now be conducted on larger scales for longer time periods to better understand cloud- precipitation systems. However, even after the decadal development of CRMs, there are many uncertainties in cloud microphysics processes and cloud-precipitation structures due to the lack of routine observations. Therefore, we need to establish a practical CRM evaluation framework using frequent observations from satellites. This evaluation framework consists of i) multi-satellite simulators and ii) the construction of statistical composites that can be used to effectively evaluate cloud-precipitation systems. First, simulated cloud- precipitation structures and microphysics processes are converted to satellite-consistent radar reflectivity and microwave brightness temperature using microwave and radar simulators in the Satellite Data Simulator Unit (SDSU). Second, the CRM-computed and satellite-observed radar reflectivities and microwave brightness temperatures are used to construct two statistical composites. One combines TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) PR (precipitation radar) 13.8-GHz radar echo-top heights and TRMM VIRS (visible/infrared scanner) 10.8-micron brightness temperatures. This composite categorizes precipitating clouds into shallow warm, cumulus congestus, deep stratiform, and deep convective clouds. The other composite combines multi- frequency TMI (TRMM microwave imager) brightness temperatures. The combination of low- and high-frequency channels reveals the performance of the model cloud microphysics in terms of liquid and ice precipitation amounts. In this study, long-term CRM simulations are performed using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model for three cases: ARM TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment), SCSMEX (South China Sea Monsoon Experiment), and KWAJEX (Kwajalein Experiment). Results from the proposed

  12. Formation and Stability of Phenylphosphonic Acid Monolayers on ZnO: Comparison of In Situ and Ex Situ SAM Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapenko, Alexandra; Klöffel, Tobias; Meyer, Bernd; Witte, Gregor

    2016-05-24

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) enable an electronic interface tailoring of conductive metal oxides and offer an alternative to common transparent electrodes in optoelectronic devices. Here, the influence of surface orientation and pretreatment on the formation and stability of SAMs has been studied for the case of phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) on ZnO single crystals. Using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, the thermal stability and orientational ordering of PPA-SAMs on the polar and mixed-terminated ZnO surfaces were analyzed. On all surfaces, PPA-SAMs remain stable up to 550 K, while at higher temperatures a C-P bond cleavage and dissociative desorption takes place yielding two distinct desorption peaks. Based on DFT calculations, these desorption channels are attributed to protonated and deprotonated chemisorbed PPA molecules, which can be related to tri- and bidentate species, hence allowing to determine their relative abundance from the intensity ratio. Beside immersion, an alternative monolayer preparation based on vacuum deposition in combination with controlled desorption of excess multilayers is demonstrated. This enables a SAM preparation on bare ZnO surfaces without any precoating due to exposure to ambient air, which is further compared with SAM formation on intentionally hydroxylated substrates. Corresponding TDS data indicate that initial hydroxylation favors the formation of tridentate and deprotonated bidentate, while the OMBD preparation on bare surfaces yields a larger fraction of protonated bidentate species. The orientation of PPA molecules adopted in the SAMs was determined from the dichroism of K-edge NEXAFS measurements and reveals an almost upright orientation for the deprotonated species, while a slight tilting is obtained for monolayer films with a large fraction of protonated

  13. 沉默Sam68基因表达抑制乳腺癌细胞的上皮-间质转化%Sam68 gene-silencing inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邝紫桥; 章乐虹; 潘小梅; 刘毅俊; 邹颖; 陈欣欣

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨沉默Sam68 (Src-associated substrated during mitosis of 68KD)基因表达对乳腺癌MDA-MB-231细胞上皮-间质转化(epithelial-mesenchymal transition,EMT)的影响.方法:采用实时荧光定量PCR和蛋白质印迹法检测具有不同侵袭能力的乳腺癌MDA-MB-231和MCF-7细胞中Sam68 mRNA及蛋白的表达情况;选择Sam68高表达的MDA-MB-231细胞,利用siRNA技术沉默细胞中内源性Sam68蛋白的表达.随后,采用实时荧光定量PCR和蛋白质印迹法检测EMT标志物E-钙黏蛋白(E-cadherin)和波形蛋白(vimentin) mRNA及蛋白的表达;采用CCK-8法、Transwell小室迁移和侵袭实验检测沉默Sam68基因表达后对乳腺癌MDA-MB-231细胞增殖,迁移和侵袭的影响.结果:Sam68蛋白在高侵袭性的间质型乳腺癌MDA-MB-231细胞中高表达(P<0.05);采用siRNA沉默MDA-MB-231细胞内源性Sam68蛋白的表达后,E-cadherin的表达水平明显上调(P<0.05),而vimentin的表达水平明显下调(P<0.05);MDA-MB-231细胞的增殖能力以及细胞的迁移和侵袭能力明显降低(P值均< 0.05),细胞可能发生间质-上皮转化.结论:Sam68在高侵袭性乳腺癌细胞中高表达,沉默Sam68基因的表达能抑制EMT的发生,并降低细胞增殖、侵袭和迁移能力.

  14. Satellite data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bormin

    2011-01-01

    Satellite Data Compression covers recent progress in compression techniques for multispectral, hyperspectral and ultra spectral data. A survey of recent advances in the fields of satellite communications, remote sensing and geographical information systems is included. Satellite Data Compression, contributed by leaders in this field, is the first book available on satellite data compression. It covers onboard compression methodology and hardware developments in several space agencies. Case studies are presented on recent advances in satellite data compression techniques via various prediction-

  15. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  16. Development of FET-type albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keun-Yong; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Hong-Seok; Bae, Young-Seuk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2008-07-15

    An albumin biosensor based on a potentiometric measurement using Biofield-effect-transistor (BioFET) has been designed and fabricated, and its characteristics were investigated. The BioFET was fabricated using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology. The gate surface of the BioFET was chemically modified by newly developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) synthesized by a thiazole benzo crown ether ethylamine (TBCEA)-thioctic acid to immobilize anti-albumin. SAM formation, antibody immobilization, and antigen-antibody interaction were verified using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The output voltage changes of the BioFET with respect to various albumin concentrations were obtained. Quasi-reference electrode (QRE) and reference FET (ReFET) has been integrated with the BioFET, and its output characteristic was investigated. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the BioFET as the albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

  17. Roles of SAM and DDHD domains in mammalian intracellular phospholipase A1 KIAA0725p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroki; Baba, Takashi; Sato, Seiichi; Ohtsuki, Ryuya; Takemori, Aya; Watanabe, Takuya; Tagaya, Mitsuo; Tani, Katsuko

    2012-04-01

    Members of the intracellular phospholipase A1 family of proteins have been implicated in organelle biogenesis and membrane trafficking. The mammalian family comprises three members: phosphatidic acid-preferring phospholipase A1 (PA-PIA1)/DDHD1, p125/Sec23ip and KIAA0725p/DDHD2, all of which have a DDHD domain. PA-PLAI is mostly cytosolic, while KIAA0725p and p125 are more stably associated with the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and ER exit sites, respectively. Here we show that KIAAO725p and p125 are novel phosphoinositide-binding proteins. Deletion and mutational analyses of KIAAO725p suggested that a sterile alpha-motif (SAM), which is also present inp125, but not in cytosolic PA-PLAI, and the following DDHD domain comprise a minimal region for phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (Pl(4)P)-binding. A construct with mutations in the positively charged cluster of the SAM domain is defective in both phosphoinositide-binding and Golgi/ERGIC targeting. Consistent with the view that the Pl(4)P-binding is important for the membrane association of KIAA0725p, expression of phosphoinositide phosphatase Sacd reduces the association of expressed KIAAO725p with membranes. In addition, we show that deletion of the DDHD domain or introduction of point mutations at the conserved aspartate or histidine residues in the domain abolishes the phospholipase activity of KIAAO725p and PA-PLA1. Together, our results suggest that KIAAO725p is targeted to specific organelle membranes in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner, and that its SAM and DDHD domains are essential for its phosphoinositide-binding and phospholipase activity.

  18. Voltammetric Determination of Prochlorperazine and Ethopropazine Using a Gold Electrode Modified with Decanethiol SAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baizhao Zeng

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The voltammetric behavior of prochlorperazine and ethopropazine at a decanethiol (DEC self-assembled monolayer (SAM modified gold electrode (DEC/Au has been studied. It was observed that prochlorperazine exhibited an anodic peak at about 0.60 V (vs SCE, while ethopropazine exhibited two anodic peaks at about 0.49 V and 0.58 V on DEC/Au in pH 10 sodium carbonate buffer. This was due to their different electrochemical oxidation mechanisms. In this case, the oxidation of prochlorperazine and ethopropazine included one 2e step and two 1e steps, respectively. In the presence of some reductants such as ascorbic acid, the oxidation products of them can catalyze the oxidation of the reductants and thus make the peaks grow. In addition, it was found that the SAM structure became not so compact when prochlorperazine and ethopropazine were present, resulting from their permeating in the SAM. Various conditions were optimized for their determination. Under the selected conditions (i.e. 0.080 M pH 10 sodium carbonate buffer; scan rate: 100 mV/s; accumulation potential: –0.4 V or 0 V; accumulation time: 60 s, the peak currents were linear to prochlorperazine concentration in the ranges of 0.1~2.0 μM and 5.0~50 μM, and linear with ethopropazine in the ranges of 10 nM~0.1 μM and 0.5~20 μM. The RSD was 4.28% for 8 successive measurements of 1.0 μM prochlorperazine. The influence of some coexistents was examined.

  19. SAMS--a systems architecture for developing intelligent health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Özgün; Erdur, Rıza Cenk; Türksever, Mustafa

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, SAMS, a novel health information system architecture for developing intelligent health information systems is proposed and also some strategies for developing such systems are discussed. The systems fulfilling this architecture will be able to store electronic health records of the patients using OWL ontologies, share patient records among different hospitals and provide physicians expertise to assist them in making decisions. The system is intelligent because it is rule-based, makes use of rule-based reasoning and has the ability to learn and evolve itself. The learning capability is provided by extracting rules from previously given decisions by the physicians and then adding the extracted rules to the system. The proposed system is novel and original in all of these aspects. As a case study, a system is implemented conforming to SAMS architecture for use by dentists in the dental domain. The use of the developed system is described with a scenario. For evaluation, the developed dental information system will be used and tried by a group of dentists. The development of this system proves the applicability of SAMS architecture. By getting decision support from a system derived from this architecture, the cognitive gap between experienced and inexperienced physicians can be compensated. Thus, patient satisfaction can be achieved, inexperienced physicians are supported in decision making and the personnel can improve their knowledge. A physician can diagnose a case, which he/she has never diagnosed before, using this system. With the help of this system, it will be possible to store general domain knowledge in this system and the personnel's need to medical guideline documents will be reduced.

  20. PhnJ – A novel radical SAM enzyme from the C–P lyase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhesh S. Kamat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available PhnJ from the C–P lyase complex catalyzes the cleavage of the carbon–phosphorus bond in ribose-1-phosphonate-5-phosphate (PRPn to produce methane and ribose-1,2-cyclic-phosphate-5-phosphate (PRcP. This protein is a novel radical SAM enzyme that uses glycyl and thiyl radicals as reactive intermediates in the proposed reaction mechanism. The overall reaction is initiated with the reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM by a reduced [4Fe–4S]1+-cluster to form an Ado-CH2∙ radical intermediate. This intermediate abstracts the proR hydrogen from Gly-32 of PhnJ to form Ado-CH3 and a glycyl radical. In the next step, there is hydrogen atom transfer from Cys-272 to the Gly-32 radical to generate a thiyl radical. The thiyl radical attacks the phosphorus center of the substrate, PRPn, to form a transient thiophosphonate radical intermediate. This intermediate collapses via homolytic C–P bond cleavage and hydrogen atom transfer from the proS hydrogen of Gly-32 to produce a thiophosphate intermediate, methane, and a radical intermediate at Gly-32. The final product, PRcP, is formed by nucleophilic attack of the C2-hydroxyl on the transient thiophosphate intermediate. This reaction regenerates the free thiol group of Cys-272. After hydrogen atom transfer from Cys-272 to the Gly-32 radical, the entire process is repeated with another substrate molecule without the use of another molecule of SAM or involvement from the [4Fe–4S]-cluster again.

  1. Postmodernism and Language in Sam Shepard's True West and Tooth of Crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Mehrabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sam Shepard has gained a reputation as one of America's foremost living playwrights. In over forty plays, Shepard has broken down traditional notions of dramaturgy in combining both modernist notions of the absurd and familiar icons from the American cultural landscape with an energy tinged by anarchy and violence. Moreover, Shepard has been considered by many critics as a postmodern dramatist. Hassan (1987 piles up a lengthy list of artists from various disciplines whose names epitomize postmodernism for him. The playwrights are: Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco, Harold Pinter and only Sam Shepard and August Wilson from America. One characteristic of postmodern literature in general, is a focus on the instability of meaning and the inadequacy of language to completely and accurately represent truth, along with an irony and playfulness in the treatment of linguistic constructs. In other words, there is a questioning of language as a medium of perception and communication. Language can name the pain but it can’t be the pain; language cannot reach the actual individual feeling. Language is not strong enough to convey the intense emotion.  In postmodern poetics, there is a paradigmatic shift from the idea that language is transparent to the disclosure of its physicality, its intimacy, its obdurate persistence, and its paradoxical fragility. Thus, language is an insufficient means for transforming the ideas that exist in one's mind. The aim of the present article would be to present the ways in which the dramatic language of Sam Shepard, as a postmodern drama, demonstrates inadequacy of language in communication. In order to reach this goal, however, a number of his early dramas will be brought under scrutiny with regard to their language and style from the postmodern point of view. Keywords: Fragmentation, Postmodernism, Language, Grand Narratives, American Drama

  2. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  3. Anodic Behavior of SAM2X5 Material Applied as Amorphous Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C; Day, S D; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-10

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are desirable industrial materials since they are highly resistant to corrosion and possess enhanced hardness for wear resistance. The amorphous materials can be produced from the melt as powder and later spray deposited as coatings on large engineering structures. As a laboratory experiment, SAM2X5 powder was coated on electrochemical specimens of 304SS for testing. Results show that the coated specimens did not perform satisfactorily during the laboratory testing. This is because of partial devitrification during the deposition of the powder on the small specimen substrates.

  4. [Research on identification of cabbages and weeds combining spectral imaging technology and SAM taxonomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qin; Zhang, Shui-fa; Cao, Yang; Zhao, Hui-yi; Dang, Chang-qing

    2015-02-01

    Weeds automatic identification is the key technique and also the bottleneck for implementation of variable spraying and precision pesticide. Therefore, accurate, rapid and non-destructive automatic identification of weeds has become a very important research direction for precision agriculture. Hyperspectral imaging system was used to capture the hyperspectral images of cabbage seedlings and five kinds of weeds such as pigweed, barnyard grass, goosegrass, crabgrass and setaria with the wavelength ranging from 1000 to 2500 nm. In ENVI, by utilizing the MNF rotation to implement the noise reduction and de-correlation of hyperspectral data and reduce the band dimensions from 256 to 11, and extracting the region of interest to get the spectral library as standard spectra, finally, using the SAM taxonomy to identify cabbages and weeds, the classification effect was good when the spectral angle threshold was set as 0. 1 radians. In HSI Analyzer, after selecting the training pixels to obtain the standard spectrum, the SAM taxonomy was used to distinguish weeds from cabbages. Furthermore, in order to measure the recognition accuracy of weeds quantificationally, the statistical data of the weeds and non-weeds were obtained by comparing the SAM classification image with the best classification effects to the manual classification image. The experimental results demonstrated that, when the parameters were set as 5-point smoothing, 0-order derivative and 7-degree spectral angle, the best classification result was acquired and the recognition rate of weeds, non-weeds and overall samples was 80%, 97.3% and 96.8% respectively. The method that combined the spectral imaging technology and the SAM taxonomy together took full advantage of fusion information of spectrum and image. By applying the spatial classification algorithms to establishing training sets for spectral identification, checking the similarity among spectral vectors in the pixel level, integrating the advantages of

  5. Satellite data assimilation in global forecast system in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Swati

    2014-11-01

    Satellite data is very important for model initialization and verification. A large number of satellite observations are currently assimilated into the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF). Apart from Global meteorological observations from GTS, near-real time satellite observations are received at NCMRWF from other operational centres like ISRO, NOAA/NESDIS, EUMETCAST, etc. Recently India has become member of Asia-Pacific Regional ATOVS Retransmission Service (APRARS) for faster access to high resolution global satellite data useful for high resolution regional models. Indian HRPT at Chennai covers the APRARS data gap region over South East Asia. A robust data monitoring system has been implemented at NCMRWF to assess the quantity and quality of the data as well as the satellite sensor strength, before getting assimilated in the models. Validation of new satellite observations, especially from Indian satellites are being carried out against insitu observations and similar space borne platforms. After establishing the quality of the data, Observation System Experiments (OSEs) are being conducted to study their impact in the assimilation and forecast systems. OSEs have been carried out with the Oceansat-2 scatterometer winds and radiance data from Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR sensor. Daily rainfall analysis dataset is being generated by merging satellite estimates and in-situ observations. ASCAT soil wetness measurements from METOP satellite is being assimilated into the global model. Land surface parameters (LuLc and albedo) retrieved from Indian satellites are being explored for its possible usage in the global and regional models. OLR from Indian satellites are used for validating model outputs. This paper reviews the efforts made at NCMRWF in (i) assimilating the data from Indian/International satellites and (ii) generating useful products from the satellite data.

  6. Techniques for Sea Ice Characteristics Extraction and Sea Ice Monitoring Using Multi-Sensor Satellite Data in the Bohai Sea-Dragon 3 Programme Final Report (2012-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Junmin

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of Dragon-3 programme (ID: 10501) are to develop methods for classification sea ice types and retrieving ice thickness based on multi-sensor data. In this final results paper, we give a briefly introduction for our research work and mainly results. Key words: the Bohai Sea ice, Sea ice, optical and

  7. Potensi Tinggalan Arkeologis di Kawasan Bandar Udara Sam Ratulangi Manado: Upaya Pelestarian, Pemanfaatan, dan Pengembangan bagi Masyarakat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanuddin W. Marzuki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The area of Sam Ratulangi airport’s Manado has archaeological heritage which has been know as it is closed for public. This research used descriptive method, using inductive reasoning. Meanwhile, the analysis method used morphologyl, technology, and contextual analysis. This research aimed to find out the potential of archaeological heritage in Sam Ratulangi airport area of Manado. In addition to its strategy of preservation the haritage included veilbox, bungker, and waruga. The preservation can be conducted by doing protection, development, and utilization. The preservation both physical and non physical protection. The effort for its development and utilization was conducted for the purpose of science, education, culture, and tourism. Kawasan Bandar Udara Sam Ratulangi Manado mempunyai potensi tinggalan arkeologis yang selama ini tidak diketahui masyarakat luas, dikarenakan letak tinggalan yang berada dalam kawasan tertutup untuk umum. Penelitian menggunakan metode deskriptif dengan penalaran induktif. Metode analisis menggunakan analisis morfologi, teknologi dan kontekstual. Tujuan penelitian untuk mengetahui potensi tinggalan arkeologis yang terdapat di kawasan Bandar Udara Sam Ratulangi dan strategi pelestariannya. Tinggalan arkeologis yang terdapat di kawasan Bandar Udara Sam Ratulangi meliputi veilbox, bungker, dan waruga. Upaya pelestarian dapat dilakukan dengan cara perlindungan, pengembangan dan pemanfaatan. Upaya perlindungan meliputi perlindungan secara fisik dan non fisik. Upaya pengembangan dan pemanfaatan dilakukan untuk kepentingan ilmu pengetahuan, pendidikan, kebudayaan dan pariwisata.

  8. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions.

  9. Evolved Gas Analyses of the Murray Formation in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Thompson, L. M.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 13 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM-evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HCl) [1- 6]. The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize recent evolved SO2, CO2, O2, and NO gas traces of the Murray formation mudstone, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results relative to understanding the geological history of Gale Crater.

  10. Insights into the structure, function and evolution of the radical-SAM 23S rRNA methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karminska, K. H.; Purta, E.; Hansen, L .H.

    2010-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers combined resistance to five classes of antibiotics that bind to the peptidyl tranferase center of bacterial ribosomes by catalyzing methylation of the C-8 position of 23S rRNA nucleotide A2503. The same nucleotide is targeted by the housekeeping methyltransferase...... of a 4Fe-4S cluster, a SAM molecule coordinated to the iron-sulfur cluster (SAM1) and a SAM molecule that is the putative methyl group donor (SAM2). All mutations at predicted functional sites affect Cfr activity significantly as assayed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and primer extension analysis...

  11. Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of SAMS gene in a mangrove tree Sonneratia alba%红树植物杯萼海桑SAMS 基因的克隆与生物信息学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴秋红; 张自德; 王峰

    2013-01-01

    Sonneratia alba is one of the most salt-tolerant mangroves.S-adenosylmethionine synthetase(SAMS)which was in response to abiotic stresses played an important role in salt tolerance.In order to study the biological mecha-nism of S.alba for adapting stress,the coding region of SaSAMS gene which codes a key enzyme in the S-adenosyl-methionine(SAM)biosynthetic pathway was isolated.Based on the annotation of root transcriptome of S.alba,prim-ers was designed and cDNA of SaSAMS gene was amplified by PCR.The complete coding sequence of SaSAMS gene was 1 182 bp and it encoded a protein of 393 amino acids.Homology comparison and evolutionary tree analysis showed that the SAMS amino acid sequences were relatively conserved in plants.The SaSAMS gene was cloned from a mangrove tree S.alba for the first time and this would facilitate further investigation on molecular mechanism of stress tolerance and regulation networks of stress-related genes in S.alba.%红树植物杯萼海桑是最耐盐的红树植物之一.S-腺苷甲硫氨酸合成酶(S-adenosylmethionine syn-thetase,SAMS)是 S-腺苷甲硫氨酸(S-adenosylmethionine,SAM)生物合成途径的关键酶.SAMS 作为一个逆境胁迫响应蛋白在植物的耐盐调控中发挥着极其重要的作用.本文结合杯萼海桑根的转录组注释,根据编码区序列设计引物,通过PCR克隆杯萼海桑SAMS 基因的编码区 cDNA,并对其进行生物信息分析,为研究杯萼海桑适应逆境的机制奠定理论基础.结果显示PCR扩增了一个长1182 bp 的基因片段,该片段编码由393个氨基酸组成的S-腺苷甲硫氨酸合成酶.同源性比对及进化树分析显示杯萼海桑的SAMS 氨基酸序列进化上相对保守.本研究首次从红树林植物杯萼海桑中克隆S-腺苷甲硫氨酸合成酶基因,并获得其编码区序列,为进一步研究杯萼海桑应对逆境胁迫的分子生物学机制与胁迫相关基因调控网络奠定基础.

  12. On the origin and properties of Ultrafaint Milky Way Satellites in a LCDM Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Maccio', Andrea V; Fontanot, Fabio; Somerville, Rachel S; Koposov, Sergey E; Monaco, Pierluigi

    2009-01-01

    We study the origin and properties of satellite galaxies within Milky Way size haloes as predicted in LCDM model, making use of hydrodynamic and N-body simulations as well as of three different semi-analytic models (SAMs) of galaxy formation. We extract merger trees from high-resolution N-body simulations of four Galaxy-sized DM haloes, and use these as common input for the SAMs. We present a detailed comparison of our predictions with the recent observational data on the Milky Way satellite luminosity function (LF). We find that semi-analytic models with rather standard astrophysical ingredients are able to reproduce the observed luminosity function over six orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to magnitudes as faint as M_V=-2. We also perform a comparison with the actual observed number of satellites as a function of luminosity, by applying the selection criteria of the SSDS to our simulations. We find good agreement for both the luminosity and radial distributions of MW satellites. We investigate which ...

  13. A Study of the Effects of Sensor Noise and Guidance Laws on SAM Effectiveness Against Cruise Missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    k guidance acceleration command vector xviii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xix EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Cruise missile (CM) technology is...Germany, Netherlands, UK, Denmark Turkey, Romania, Poland, and Spain ) contributed to the Maritime Theatre Missile Defence Forum to obtain an impressive

  14. Directed immobilization of reduced antibody fragments onto a novel SAM on gold for myoglobin impedance immunosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Md Morsaline; Hodges, Christopher S; Hays, Henry C W; Millner, P A

    2010-11-01

    The successful construction of an immunosensor depends on having an effective procedure for immobilising the bio-recognition element to the transducer surface. In the present study, an amino-terminated 4-aminothiophenol (ATP) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was modified with heterobifunctional crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate to couple reduced anti-myoglobin half-antibody fragments. The disulphide groups present in the hinge region of IgG molecules were selectively cleaved by 2-mercaptoethylamine to produce reduced half-antibody fragments with free sulphydryl groups. The maleimide terminated 4-ATP SAM modified surface was coupled to these reduced antibody fragments to produce highly oriented immobilization of the half-antibody via its Fc domain and to allow free access to the Fv bindings sites. This represents an improvement by comparison with biotin/avidin mediated IgG attachment which is essentially randomly oriented. Functional immunosensors were able to detect myoglobin in both phosphate buffered saline and whole serum over the range of concentrations from 10(-13)M to 10(-6)M, and order of magnitude better than avidin/biotin linked immunosensors. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was carried out to elucidate the nanotopology of the immunosensor surface at different stages of fabrication; the images demonstrate that half antibodies bind as described and show structural changes on subsequent antigen binding.

  15. Post-translational modification of ribosomally synthesized peptides by a radical SAM epimerase in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Ruffié, Pauline; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are built out of L-amino acids, whereas D-amino acids are generally the hallmark of non-ribosomal synthetic processes. Here we show that the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to produce a novel type of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide that contains D-amino acids, and which we propose to call epipeptides. We demonstrate that a two [4Fe-4S]-cluster radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme converts L-amino acids into their D-counterparts by catalysing Cα-hydrogen-atom abstraction and using a critical cysteine residue as the hydrogen-atom donor. Unexpectedly, these D-amino acid residues proved to be essential for the activity of a peptide that induces the expression of LiaRS, a major component of the bacterial cell envelope stress-response system. Present in B. subtilis and in several members of the human microbiome, these epipeptides and radical SAM epimerases broaden the landscape of peptidyl structures accessible to living organisms.

  16. Superhydrophobic SAM Modified Electrodes for Enhanced Current Limiting Properties in Intrinsic Conducting Polymer Surge Protection Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabarullah, Noor H; Verrelli, Emanuele; Mauldin, Clayton; Navarro, Luis A; Golden, Josh H; Madianos, Leonidas M; Kemp, Neil T

    2015-06-09

    Surface interface engineering using superhydrophobic gold electrodes made with 1-dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) has been used to enhance the current limiting properties of novel surge protection devices based on the intrinsic conducting polymer, polyaniline doped with methanesulfonic acid. The resulting devices show significantly enhanced current limiting characteristics, including current saturation, foldback, and negative differential effects. We show how SAM modification changes the morphology of the polymer film directly adjacent to the electrodes, leading to the formation of an interfacial compact thin film that lowers the contact resistance at the Au-polymer interface. We attribute the enhanced current limiting properties of the devices to a combination of lower contact resistance and increased Joule heating within this interface region which during a current surge produces a current blocking resistive barrier due to a thermally induced dedoping effect caused by the rapid diffusion of moisture away from this region. The effect is exacerbated at higher applied voltages as the higher temperature leads to stronger depletion of charge carriers in this region, resulting in a negative differential resistance effect.

  17. Absence of molecular slip on ultraclean and SAM-coated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Justin; Wood, Clay; Burton, Justin

    2016-11-01

    The liquid/solid boundary condition is a complex problem that is becoming increasingly important for the development of nanoscale fluidic devices. Many groups have now measured slip near an interface at nanoscale dimensions using a variety of experimental techniques. In simple systems, large slip lengths are generally measured for non-wetting liquid/solid combinations, but many conflicting measurements and interpretations remain. We have developed a novel pseudo-differential technique using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure slip lengths on various surfaces. A drop of one liquid is grown on the QCM in the presence of a second, ambient liquid. We have isolated any anomalous boundary effects such as interfacial slip by choosing two liquids which have identical bulk effects on the QCM frequency and dissipation in the presence of no-slip. Slip lengths are -less than 2 nm- for water (relative to undecane) on all surfaces measured, including plasma cleaned gold, SiO2, and two different self assembled monolayers (SAMs), regardless of contact angle. We also find that surface cleanliness is crucial to accurately measure slip lengths. Additionally, clean glass substrates appear to have a significant adsorbed water layer and SAM surfaces show excess dissipation, possibly associated with contact line motion. In addition to investigating other liquid pairs, future work will include extending this technique to surfaces with independently controllable chemistry and roughness, both of which are known to strongly affect interfacial hydrodynamics.

  18. SAM - Sistema Automatizado del Método MECAP para Especificar Casos de Prueba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyer Domínguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Existen cuatro elementos que son relevantes al momento de definir las pruebas: Confiabilidad, Costo, Tiempo y Calidad. El tiempo de desarrollo y el costo del producto se incrementan cuando se desean pruebas confiables y un software de calidad. Pero ¿qué se puede hacer para que los involucrados comprendan que las pruebas deben ser vistas como una red de seguridad? Si la calidad no se contempla antes de comenzar las pruebas, entonces ella no estará cuando se éstas terminen. El objetivo de este artículo es presentar la herramienta, SAM – Sistema Automatizado del Método MECAP que permite especificar Casos de Prueba a partir de Casos de Uso incorporando elementos que promueven la verificación y validación de la trazabilidad entre la Gestión de Requerimientos, el Análisis y Diseño y las Pruebas. SAM soporta el proceso de pruebas de forma automatizada, mejorando la confiabilidad de las mismas

  19. Xichang Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    Xichang Satellite Launch Center(XSLC) is mainly for geosynchronous orbit launches. The main purpose of XSLC is to launch spacecraft, such as broadcasting,communications and meteorological satellites, into geo-stationary orbit.Most of the commercial satellite launches of Long March vehicles have been from Xichang Satellite Launch Center. With 20 years' development,XSLC can launch 5 kinds of launch vehicles and send satellites into geostationary orbit and polar orbit. In the future, moon exploration satellites will also be launched from XSLC.

  20. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of this ground breaking reference work was the most comprehensive reference source available about the key aspects of the satellite applications field. This updated second edition covers the technology, the markets, applications and regulations related to satellite telecommunications, broadcasting and networking—including civilian and military systems; precise satellite navigation and timing networks (i.e. GPS and others); remote sensing and meteorological satellite systems. Created under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, this brand new edition is now expanded to cover new innovative small satellite constellations, new commercial launching systems, innovation in military application satellites and their acquisition, updated appendices, a useful glossary and more.

  1. Wet Chemistry on SAM: How it Helps to Detect Organics on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, Cyril; Glavin, Danny; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Eigenbrode, Jen; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jen; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Dworkin, Jason; Mahaffy, Paul; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars with wet chemistry. This analytical technique modifies organic components in such a way that improves their detection, either by releasing the compounds from sample matrices, or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter effect is particularly important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, onboards two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization [1-2] and thermochemolysis [3-4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment in SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in the first SAM analyzes, and the implications of this detection. Chemical derivatization of polar molecular compounds is achieved by the MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (Dimethylformamide) silylation reaction in order to transform refractory polar compounds into a more volatile form that can be analyzed and detected by GCMS. The first samples of Martian soil (Rocknest, Gale crater) have been analyzed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) and via GC using thermal conductivity (TCD) and MS detection. The samples have been heated up to approximately 840°C with a heating rate of 35°C/min under He flow. The evolved gas was analyzed directly by the QMS in EGA mode. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax TA, Carbosieve G) over a specific temperature range. Trapped volatiles were then released by heating the trap to ~300 °C and sent to the GC under He flow. The first results obtained when running an analysis with an empty cup (no solid sample) showed the presence of MTBSTFA in the system. MTBSTFA was first detected in the EGA-QMS analysis blank then by GC-TCD-QMS analysis. This means that MTBSTFA is part

  2. Surface engineering and adhesion modification of SAM surfaces of 1-hexanethiol and 1-decanethiol: confining Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Morgan; Amroski, Alicia; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Reshani; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Engineering surfaces for adhesion and confinement of bacteria is interesting towards development of respective biosensors, and bio machine interfacing. Investigation was focused towards modification of surfaces towards confinement and entrapment of the nonpathogenic strain Staphylococcus aureus or similar pathogenic strains and to study surface engineering. Clean, flat Au(111) on mica surfaces were used for self assembly for Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM). 1-hexanethiol, and 1-decanethiol were used at total 5 mM solutions in varying ratios, in 200 proof Ethanol solution. Resulting SAM layers were investigated for surface corrugation, morphology and structure variation at different thiol ratios. Observations will be discussed, quantitatively and qualitatively. Eventual mixture ratios were so selected towards optimum conditions for confining Staphylococcus aureus as a model system. SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  3. Preparation and characterization of BiFeO3 thin films by the LPD on OH-functionalized organic SAMs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films were grown on OH-functionalized organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) via liquid-phase deposition (LPD) method at a temperature below 100°C. The BiFeO3 thin films were induced to synthesize on the OH-functionalized organic OTS monolayers prepared on hydroxylated glass substrate by self-assembling technique. The hydrophilic characteristic of the as-prepared OTS-SAMs was measured by contact angle tester. The crystal phase composition, microstructure and topography of the as-synthesized BFO thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. Results show that compact and homogeneous BFO thin films can be formed on the OH-functionalized SAMs at low temperature.

  4. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  5. Sensor Compendium

    CERN Document Server

    Artuso, M; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Caberera, B; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cooper, W; Da Via, C; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Frisch, H; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Golwala, S; Haber, C; Hall, J; Hoppe, E; Irwin, K D; Kagan, H; Kenney, C; Lee, A T; Lynn, D; Orrell, J; Pyle, M; Rusack, R; Sadrozinski, H; Sanchez, M C; Seiden, A; Trischuk, W; Vavra, J; Wetstein, M; Zhu, R-Y

    2013-01-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future ...

  6. Wind Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiaoyang; Ni, Jiqin

    2014-01-01

    Wind measurement is needed in many practical and scientific research situations. Some specific applications require to precisely measuring both wind direction and wind speed at the same time. Current commercial sensors for wind direction and wind speed measurement usually use ultrasonic technology and the sensors are very expensive (> $1500). In addition, the sensors are large in dimension and cannot measure airflow patterns in high spatial resolution. Therefore new and low cost wind speed an...

  7. Sam68 regulates cell proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) via the AKT pathway in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaxun; Xu, Xiaohong; Miao, Xiaobing; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-12-01

    Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis 68 kDa), a substrate for tyrosine kinase c-Src during mitosis, is up-regulated in a variety of human cancers and acts oncogenically promoting tumour progression. This study has explored biological function and clinical significance of Sam68 in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To examine Sam68 expression in NHL, clinically, eight diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and four reactive lymphoid hyperplasia fresh-frozen tissues were obtained for western blot and quantitative real-time PCR analyses. Using immunohistochemical staining, paraffin wax embedded sections from 164 cases of NHL patients were used to evaluate prognostic value of Sam68. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and soft agar colony assays were conducted to investigate the role of Sam68 in cell viability and cell proliferation respectively. Furthermore, effects of Sam68 on cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) was determined by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. Expression status of Sam68 inversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHL, and it was also an independent prognostic factor for the outcomes. In addition, Sam68 was associated with proliferation of NHL cells. Knock-down of its gene inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation by delaying cell cycle progression. Furthermore, OCI-Ly8 and Jeko-1 cells adhering to FN and HS-5 expressed higher Sam68 protein, compared to their suspension counterparts. Sam68 promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) via the AKT pathway. Increased Sam68 expression in NHL resulted in poor prognosis, and it promoted CAM-DR in NHL via AKT. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Satellite-Delivered Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnall, Gail C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the application of satellite information delivery to training. Describes a new trend, horizontal programming. Also discusses vertical programming and in-house production of training materials. Lists vendors of satellite-based training. (CH)

  9. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  10. China's Recoverable Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Boehang

    2008-01-01

    @@ By the end of 2006, China had launched 24 recoverable satellites (FSW) in total. Among them, 23 were launched successfully, of which all but one were successfully recovered. Recoverable satellites launched by China are listed in Table 1.

  11. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  12. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  13. Sensor web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  14. Hierarchical Storage Management at the NASA Center for Computational Sciences: From UniTree to SAM-QFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Ellen; Tarshish, Adina; Palm, Nancy; Patel, Sanjay; Saletta, Marty; Vanderlan, Ed; Rouch, Mike; Burns, Lisa; Duffy, Daniel; Caine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the data management issues associated with a large center like the NCCS and how these issues are addressed. More specifically, the focus of this paper is on the recent transition from a legacy UniTree (Legato) system to a SAM-QFS (Sun) system. Therefore, this paper will describe the motivations, from both a hardware and software perspective, for migrating from one system to another. Coupled with the migration from UniTree into SAM-QFS, the complete mass storage environment was upgraded to provide high availability, redundancy, and enhanced performance. This paper will describe the resulting solution and lessons learned throughout the migration process.

  15. Insight into Sam Francis' painting techniques through the analytical study of twenty-eight artworks made between 1946 and 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeyt, Catherine; Mazurek, Joy; Zebala, Aneta; Burchett-Lere, Debra

    2016-11-01

    The present paper proposes an overview of the painting materials experimented with over the years by Sam Francis, leading figure of the post-World War II American painting, through the analytical study of an extended number of paint samples supplied by the Sam Francis Foundation. In total, 279 samples taken from twenty-eight artworks made between 1946 and 1992, were analyzed by Raman, FTIR and Py-GC/MS techniques. The obtained results revealed the Francis' preference in terms of pigments, i.e., phthalocyanine blues and greens, and outlined unconventional combination of binder media.

  16. The Italian contribution to the CSES satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Livio

    2016-04-01

    parameters and stability of Van Allen belt are constantly modified by natural non-seismic and man-made processes. Therefore, in order to identify seismo-associated perturbations, it is needed to reject the "normal" background effects of the e.m. emissions due to: geomagnetic storms, tropospheric phenomena, and artificial sources (such as power lines, VLF transmitters, HF stations, etc.). Currently, the only available large database is that collected by the Demeter satellite and by rare observations made by some previous space missions, non-dedicated to this purpose. The CSES satellite aims at continuing the exploration started by Demeter with advanced multi-parametric measurements. The configuration of the CSES sensors foresees measurements of energetic particle fluxes, ionospheric plasma parameters and electromagnetic fields, in a wide range of energy and frequencies. The main sensors onboard the satellite are: the HEPD (High Energy Particle Detector) developed by the Italian participants, and the following Chinese sensors: LEPD (Low Energy Particle Detector), LP (Langmuir Probes), IDM (Ion Drift Meter), ICM (Ion Capture Meter), RPA (Retarding Potential Analyzer), EFD (Electric Field Detectors) developed in collaboration with Italian team, HPM (High Precision Magnetometer) and SCM (Search-Coil Magnetometer). The research activity is at an advanced phase, being the various payloads already built and, right now, an intense activity is going on for calibration of the various sensors. In particular, the Italian payload HEPD is under test at the laboratories of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) and the Chinese payloads LP, IDM, ICM, RPA and EFD are tested at the INAF-IAPS "Plasma Chamber" in Rome, which is a facility where the response of the sensors, and their compatibility with ionospheric plasma, can be verified in environmental conditions very similar to those met by the satellite in orbit.

  17. Satellite communication engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kolawole, Michael Olorunfunmi

    2013-01-01

    An undeniably rich and thorough guide to satellite communication engineering, Satellite Communication Engineering, Second Edition presents the fundamentals of information communications systems in a simple and succinct way. This book considers both the engineering aspects of satellite systems as well as the practical issues in the broad field of information transmission. Implementing concepts developed on an intuitive, physical basis and utilizing a combination of applications and performance curves, this book starts off with a progressive foundation in satellite technology, and then moves on

  18. Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    There are three major space launch bases in China, the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center,the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center and the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. All the three launch centers are located in sparsely populated areas where the terrain is even and the field of vision is broad. Security, transport conditions and the influence of the axial rotation

  19. Geodetic Secor Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    simple, and had low-power lem. 17 14. Satellite Orientation . The satellite was designed to maintain a constant relationship between the antenna...the same satellite orientation . Further considerations were Th oscillations, however, when higher orbital ranges (500-2500 nautical miles) -, 3 a

  20. TC-2 Satellite Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On April 18, 2005, TC-2, the second satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), which was jointly developed by CNSA and ESA, was approved to be delivered to the user after the on-board test and trial operation. The satellite is working well and the performance can meet the user's need. The satellite has collected large amount of valuable scientific data

  1. Satellite detection of wastewater diversion plumes in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierach, Michelle M.; Holt, Benjamin; Trinh, Rebecca; Jack Pan, B.; Rains, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Multi-sensor satellite observations proved useful in detecting surfacing wastewater plumes during the 2006 Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP) and 2012 Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) wastewater diversion events in Southern California. Satellite sensors were capable of detecting biophysical signatures associated with the wastewater, compared to ambient ocean waters, enabling monitoring of environmental impacts over a greater spatial extent than in situ sampling alone. Thermal satellite sensors measured decreased sea surface temperatures (SSTs) associated with the surfacing plumes. Ocean color satellite sensors did not measure a distinguishable biological response in terms of chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentrations during the short lived, three-day long, 2006 HTP diversion. A period of decreased chl-a concentration was observed during the three-week long 2012 OCSD diversion, likely in association with enhanced chlorination of the discharged wastewater that suppressed the phytoplankton response and/or significant uptake by heterotrophic bacteria. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data were able to identify and track the 2006 HTP wastewater plume through changes in surface roughness related to the oily components of the treated surfacing wastewater. Overall, it was found that chl-a and SST values must have differences of at least 1 mg m-3 and 0.5 °C, respectively, in comparison with adjacent waters for wastewater plumes and their biophysical impact to be detectable from satellite. For a wastewater plume to be identifiable in SAR imagery, wind speeds must range between ∼3 and 8 m s-1. The findings of this study illustrate the benefit of utilizing multiple satellite sensors to monitor the rapidly changing environmental response to surfacing wastewater plumes, and can help inform future wastewater diversions in coastal areas.

  2. Reusable and mediator-free cholesterol biosensor based on cholesterol oxidase immobilized onto TGA-SAM modified smart bio-chips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M Rahman

    Full Text Available A reusable and mediator-free cholesterol biosensor based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx was fabricated based on self-assembled monolayer (SAM of thioglycolic acid (TGA (covalent enzyme immobilization by dropping method using bio-chips. Cholesterol was detected with modified bio-chip (Gold/Thioglycolic-acid/Cholesterol-oxidase i.e., Au/TGA/ChOx by reliable cyclic voltammetric (CV technique at room conditions. The Au/TGA/ChOx modified bio-chip sensor demonstrates good linearity (1.0 nM to 1.0 mM; R = 0.9935, low-detection limit (∼0.42 nM, SNR∼3, and higher sensitivity (∼74.3 µA µM(-1 cm(-2, lowest-small sample volume (50.0 μL, good stability, and reproducibility. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first statement with a very high sensitivity, low-detection limit, and low-sample volumes are required for cholesterol biosensor using Au/TGA/ChOx-chips assembly. The result of this facile approach was investigated for the biomedical applications for real samples at room conditions with significant assembly (Au/TGA/ChOx towards the development of selected cholesterol biosensors, which can offer analytical access to a large group of enzymes for wide range of biomedical applications in health-care fields.

  3. Reusable and mediator-free cholesterol biosensor based on cholesterol oxidase immobilized onto TGA-SAM modified smart bio-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammed M

    2014-01-01

    A reusable and mediator-free cholesterol biosensor based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) was fabricated based on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioglycolic acid (TGA) (covalent enzyme immobilization by dropping method) using bio-chips. Cholesterol was detected with modified bio-chip (Gold/Thioglycolic-acid/Cholesterol-oxidase i.e., Au/TGA/ChOx) by reliable cyclic voltammetric (CV) technique at room conditions. The Au/TGA/ChOx modified bio-chip sensor demonstrates good linearity (1.0 nM to 1.0 mM; R = 0.9935), low-detection limit (∼0.42 nM, SNR∼3), and higher sensitivity (∼74.3 µA µM(-1) cm(-2)), lowest-small sample volume (50.0 μL), good stability, and reproducibility. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first statement with a very high sensitivity, low-detection limit, and low-sample volumes are required for cholesterol biosensor using Au/TGA/ChOx-chips assembly. The result of this facile approach was investigated for the biomedical applications for real samples at room conditions with significant assembly (Au/TGA/ChOx) towards the development of selected cholesterol biosensors, which can offer analytical access to a large group of enzymes for wide range of biomedical applications in health-care fields.

  4. Philosophy and key features of 'Hodoyoshi' concept for optical remote sensing using 50kg class satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokuchi, A.; Takeyama, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Nojiri, Y.; Miyamura, N.; Iwasaki, A.; Nakasuka, S.

    2010-10-01

    Remote sensing missions have been conventionally performed by using satellite-onboard optical sensors with extraordinarily high reliability, on huge satellites. On the other hand, small satellites for remote-sensing missions have recently been developed intensely and operated all over the world. This paper gives a Japanese concept of the development of nano-satellites(10kg to 50kg) based on "Hodoyoshi" (Japanese word for "reasonable") reliability engineering aiming at cost-effective design of optical sensors, buses and satellites. The concept is named as "Hodoyoshi" concept. We focus on the philosophy and the key features of the concept. These are conveniently applicable to the development of optical sensors on nano-satellites. As major advantages, the optical sensors based on the "Hodoyoshi" concept are "flexible" in terms of selectability of wavelength bands, adaptability to the required ground sample distance, and optimal performance under a wide range of environmental temperatures. The first and second features mentioned above can be realized by dividing the functions of the optical sensor into modularized functional groups reasonably. The third feature becomes possible by adopting the athermal and apochromatic optics design. By utilizing these features, the development of the optical sensors become possible without exact information on the launcher or the orbit. Furthermore, this philosophy leads to truly quick delivery of nano-satellites for remote-sensing missions. On the basis of the concept, we are now developing nano-satellite technologies and five nano-satellites to realize the concept in a four-year-long governmentally funded project. In this paper, the specification of the optical sensor on the first satellite is also reported.

  5. Fabrication and tribological properties of self-assembled monolayer of n-alkyltrimethoxysilane on silicon: Effect of SAM alkyl chain length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lixia; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Kaifeng; Liu, Peng

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that the self-assembled organic molecules on a solid surface exhibit the friction-reducing performance. However, the effect of the molecular size of the self-assembled organic molecules has not been established. In the present work, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkyltrimethoxysilanes with different alkyl chain lengths (C6, C12, or C18) were fabricated on silicon substrate. The water contact angles of the SAMs increased from 26.8° of the hydroxylated silicon substrate to near 60° after self-assembly. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis results showed that the mean roughness (Ra) of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain length. The tribological properties of the SAMs sliding against Al2O3 ball were evaluated on an UMT-2 tribometer, and the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by means of Nano Scratch Tester and surface profilometry. It was found that lowest friction coefficient and smallest width of wear were achieved with the SAMs of C12 alkyl chain (C12-SAM). The superior friction reduction and wear resistance of the SAMs in comparison with the bare silicon substrate are attributed to good adhesion of the self-assembled films to the substrate, especially the C12-SAM with desirable alkyl chain length.

  6. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  7. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  8. Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, C.

    2007-01-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refers to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduced inside the sensor some of the basic functions of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, non-uniformity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the front end of FPA microbolometers processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation thresholding.

  9. SAMOS: a versatile multi-object-spectrograph for the GLAO system SAM at SOAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberto, Massimo; Donahue, Megan; Ninkov, Zoran; Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Gennaro, Mario; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    The 4.1-m SOAR telescope can play a unique role for LSST follow-up studies through an efficient use of its laser-guided Adaptive Optics Module (SAM) that routinely delivers images with FWHM extreme precision. SAMOS can capture R 2,000 - 2, 500 spectra with a nominal 0:33" slit width in the 3,500-9,500 Å spectral range reaching in 3600 s median SNR=5 at AB=22.9 with the red grating and 23.5 with the blue grating, comparable to 8-m class telescopes working in seeing limited conditions. In this contribution we present the SAMOS opto-mechanical design, concept of operation and provide a few examples of compelling science programs that can uniquely benefit from SAMOS sensitivity, angular resolution, versatility and simplicity of use.

  10. Charge dependent asphaltene adsorption onto metal substrate : electrochemistry and AFM, STM, SAM, SEM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batina, N.; Morales-Martinez, J. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (Mexico). Lab. de Nanotecnologia e Ingenieria Molecular; Ivar-Andersen, S. [Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark). Dept. Hem. Eng; Lira-Galeana, C. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro (Mexico). Molecular Simulation Research Program; De la Cruz-Hernandez, W.; Cota-Araiza, L.; Avalos-Borja, M. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Asphaltenes have been identified as the main component of pipeline molecular deposits that cause plugging of oil wells. In this study, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Scanning Auger Microprobe Spectroscopy (SAM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to characterized molecular deposits of Mexican crude oil and asphaltenes formed at a charged metal surface. The qualitative and quantitative characterization involved determining the size and shape of adsorbed molecules and aggregates, and the elemental analysis of all components in molecular films. Samples were prepared by electrolytic deposition under galvanostatic or potentiostatic conditions directly from the crude oil or asphaltene in toluene solutions. The study showed that the formation of asphaltene deposit depends on the metal substrate charge. Asphaltenes as well as crude oil readily adsorbed at the negatively charged metal surface. Two elements were present, notably carbon and sulfur. Their content ratio varied depending on the metal substrate charge.

  11. Re-engineering SAM or Changing the Engine in the Train While it is Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, R.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years at Fermilab we re-architect-ed our SAM1[1] family of data catalog and file transfer tools - including major changes - while continuing to transfer over 1 Pb/month of data to multiple existing experiments and bring new experiments on board. This work was done with less than 3 FTE-years of effort, and the changes made include major ones, such as changing interprocess communication protocols, migrating database back-ends, removing and replacing major components, and supporting new file delivery methods. This paper will summarize the approaches we have used to do this, including using design patterns like the Facade, Adapter, and Command patterns, and assisting experiments one at a time with client migration. This process has allowed us to modernize our infrastructure with reasonable costs in both calendar time and developer effort, while continuing to provide the operating service to our customers with minimal interruptions.

  12. Folding of SAM-II riboswitch explored by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xu; Yongjun, Wang; Zhihong, Li

    2015-01-21

    Riboswitches are cis-acting RNA fragments that function via a conformational transition mechanism when a specific target molecule binds to its binding pocket, representing an inviting new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics. To understand the folding mechanism of SAM-II riboswitch, occurring predominantly in proteobacteria, a 100ns replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent is performed. Our results show that this RNA pseudoknot has multiple folding pathways, and various intermediate structures. The resultant riboswitch conformational transition map is well consistent with the recent fluorescence measurement, which confirms the dynamical properties of this pseudoknot. Moreover, a novel transition pathway is predicted. The global folding dynamics is mainly coupled with the helix rather than the loop region. The potential folding pathways of the riboswitch presented here should lead to a deeper understanding of the folding mechanism of the riboswitch, as well as the conformational change of RNA pseudoknot.

  13. Comparative protective abilities of organothiols SAM coatings applied to copper dissolution in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinapi, F. [Fonds pour la Formation a la Recherche dans l' Industrie et dans l' Agriculture, Rue d' Egmont 5, B-1000 Bruxelles (Belgium); Lejeune, I. [Laboratoire de Chimie et d' Electrochimie des Surfaces, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delhalle, J. [Laboratoire de Chimie et d' Electrochimie des Surfaces, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mekhalif, Z. [Laboratoire de Chimie et d' Electrochimie des Surfaces, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)]. E-mail: zineb.mekhalif@fundp.ac.be

    2007-04-30

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by adsorption of n-organothiols molecules have been formed onto polycrystalline copper surfaces in order to build up barrier films protecting copper from oxidation. In this context, formation of n-dodecanethiol (DT), (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTS) and 11-perfluorobutylundecanethiol (F{sub 4}H{sub 11}) monolayers has been elaborated on copper and evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy while polarization and cyclic voltammetry curves were used to compare the inhibition efficiency of the three organic coatings. Furthermore, atomic absorption spectrometry measurements were carried out in domestic water and in NaCl 0.5 M solutions in order to evaluate and quantify the dissolution of copper electrodes before and after protection. Results showed evidences that, among the three organic compounds assessed, F{sub 4}H{sub 11} is the most suitable candidate to slow down the copper oxidation process.

  14. The Investigation of Identity Construction: A Foucauldian Reading of Sam Shepard's Buried Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeidabadi S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shepard is peculiarly powerful in his symbolic family problem plays: True West, Buried Child and Curse of the Starving Class. He allegorizes the American experience and undermines the myth of America as the New Eden. The present study seeks to critically explore Sam Shepard's Buried Child in terms of Foucauldian conception of identity construction. Shepard is depicting a dystopian world with its bewildered characters; however he has still got a romantic view of individuals trying to grapple with the society in order to get unity and order. This Shephardian attitude towards human beings is seemingly a free agent that overlaps the Foucauldian view which establishes a philosophy focusing on the relationship between the self and the society. The present essay attempts to demonstrate the complicated relationship between the self and the opposing forces.

  15. Detection and Quantification of Nitrogen Compounds in the First Drilled Martian Solid Samples by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Christopher P.; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Buch, Arnaud; Coll, Patrice; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Franz, Heather B.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Ming, Douglas W.; Steele, Andrew; Szopa, Cyril; Wray, James J.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The Sampl;e Analysis at Mars (sam) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected both reduced and oxidized nitrogen bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of surface materials from the three sites at Gale Crater. Preliminary detections of nitrogen species include No, HCN, ClCN, and TFMA ((trifluoro-N-methyl-acetamide), Confirmation of indigenous Martian nitrogen-bearing compounds requires quantifying N contribution from the terrestrial derivatization reagents carried for SAM's wet chemistry experiment that contribute to the SAM background. Nitrogen species detected in the SAM solid sample analyses can also be produced during laboratory pyrolysis experiments where these reagents are heated in the presence of perchlorate a compound that has also been identified by SAM in Mars solid samples.

  16. Detection and Quantification of Nitrogen Compounds in the First Drilled Martian Solid Samples by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; Navarro-Gonzales, R.; Freissinet, C.; McKay, C. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Buch, A.; Brunner, A. E.; Coll, P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D.; Steele, A.; Sutter, B.; Szopa, C.; Wray, J. J.; Conrad, P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected both reduced and oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of surface materials at Yellowknife Bay in Gale Crater. Preliminary detections of nitrogen species include NO, HCN, ClCN, CH3CN, and TFMA (trifluoro-N-methyl-acetamide). Confirmation of indigenous Martian N-bearing compounds requires quantifying N contribution from the terrestrial derivatization reagents (e.g. N-methyl-N-tertbutyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide, MTBSTFA and dimethylformamide, DMF) carried for SAM's wet chemistry experiment that contribute to the SAM background. Nitrogen species detected in the SAM solid sample analyses can also be produced during laboratory pyrolysis experiments where these reagents are heated in the presence of perchlorate, a compound that has also been identified by SAM in Mars solid samples.

  17. Multispectral sensing of natural resources with the MSTI-3 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Michael; Myers, William A.; Baker, H. Vernon

    1995-01-01

    The third satellite in the miniature sensor technology integration (MSTI) program includes two infrared imaging sensors with filter wheels, and a visible imaging spectrometer, with a common telescope and gimballed scan mirror assembly. These sensors will provide high spatial and spectral resolution imagery in the visible and 2.5 - 4.5 micrometers spectral regions. These spectral regions can provide information on the atmospheric aerosol optical thickness and size distribution; the vegetation index and crop classification; upper atmosphere temperatures, and tropospheric water vapor. In addition, the highly accurate pointing and tracking capability of the scan mirror permits a long look at particular events such as volcanic eruptions, major oil-spills, desert dust storms, forest fires and air pollution episodes. This tracking capability could also support ground truth calibration of other satellite sensors.

  18. Possible Detection of Perchlorates by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument: Comparison with Previous Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Gonzalex, Rafael; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; Ming, Doug; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel; McAdam, Amy; Stern, Jennifer; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul; Conrad, Pamela; Martin-Torres, Francisco; Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Grotzinger, John

    2013-01-01

    The first chemical analysis of soluble salts in the soil was carried out by the Phoenix Lander in the Martian Arctic [1]. Surprisingly, chlorine was present as magnesium or calcium perchlorate at 0.4 to 0.6 percent. Additional support for the identification of perchlorate came from the evolved gas analysis which detected the release of molecular oxygen at 350-550C [1]. When Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert were spiked with magnesium perchlorate (1 percent) and heated using the Viking GC-MS protocol, nearly all the organics were combusted but a small amount was chlorinated, forming chloromethane and dichloromethane [2]. These chlorohydrocarbons were detected by the Viking GC-MS experiments when the Martian soil was analyzed but they were considered to be terrestrial contaminants [3]. Reinterpretation of the Viking results suggests trichloromethane, and chloromethylpropene) detected both by SAM QMS and GC-MS derived from known Earth organic contaminants in the instrument [6]. Calcium perchlorate appears to be the best candidate for evolved O2 in the Rocknest samples at this time but other Cl species (e.g., chlorates) are possible and must be evaluated. The potential detection of perchlorates in Rocknest material adds weight to the argument that both Viking Landers measured signatures of perchlorates. Even if the source of the organic carbon detected is still unknown, the chlorine source was likely Martian. Two mechanisms have been hypothesized for the formation of soil perchlorate: (1) Atmospheric oxidation of chlorine; and (2) UV photooxidation of chlorides catalyzed by mineral catalysts [7]. The presence of soil perchlorates in the Martian surface has important implications for the detection of organics [2], carbonates [8] and nitrates [9] by SAM.

  19. Optimisation and Characterisation of Anti-Fouling Ternary SAM Layers for Impedance-Based Aptasensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Miodek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An aptasensor with enhanced anti-fouling properties has been developed. As a case study, the aptasensor was designed with specificity for human thrombin. The sensing platform was developed on screen printed electrodes and is composed of a self-assembled monolayer made from a ternary mixture of 15-base thiolated DNA aptamers specific for human thrombin co-immobilised with 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT and further passivated with 1-mercapto-6-hexanol (MCH. HDT binds to the surface by two of its thiol groups forming alkyl chain bridges and this architecture protects from non-specific attachment of molecules to the electrode surface. Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS, the aptasensor is able to detect human thrombin as variations in charge transfer resistance (Rct upon protein binding. After exposure to a high concentration of non-specific Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA solution, no changes in the Rct value were observed, highlighting the bio-fouling resistance of the surface generated. In this paper, we present the optimisation and characterisation of the aptasensor based on the ternary self-assembled monolayer (SAM layer. We show that anti-fouling properties depend on the type of gold surface used for biosensor construction, which was also confirmed by contact angle measurements. We further studied the ratio between aptamers and HDT, which can determine the specificity and selectivity of the sensing layer. We also report the influence of buffer pH and temperature used for incubation of electrodes with proteins on detection and anti-fouling properties. Finally, the stability of the aptasensor was studied by storage of modified electrodes for up to 28 days in different buffers and atmospheric conditions. Aptasensors based on ternary SAM layers are highly promising for clinical applications for detection of a range of proteins in real biological samples.

  20. Optimisation and Characterisation of Anti-Fouling Ternary SAM Layers for Impedance-Based Aptasensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodek, Anna; Regan, Edward M; Bhalla, Nikhil; Hopkins, Neal A E; Goodchild, Sarah A; Estrela, Pedro

    2015-09-29

    An aptasensor with enhanced anti-fouling properties has been developed. As a case study, the aptasensor was designed with specificity for human thrombin. The sensing platform was developed on screen printed electrodes and is composed of a self-assembled monolayer made from a ternary mixture of 15-base thiolated DNA aptamers specific for human thrombin co-immobilised with 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) and further passivated with 1-mercapto-6-hexanol (MCH). HDT binds to the surface by two of its thiol groups forming alkyl chain bridges and this architecture protects from non-specific attachment of molecules to the electrode surface. Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), the aptasensor is able to detect human thrombin as variations in charge transfer resistance (Rct) upon protein binding. After exposure to a high concentration of non-specific Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) solution, no changes in the Rct value were observed, highlighting the bio-fouling resistance of the surface generated. In this paper, we present the optimisation and characterisation of the aptasensor based on the ternary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) layer. We show that anti-fouling properties depend on the type of gold surface used for biosensor construction, which was also confirmed by contact angle measurements. We further studied the ratio between aptamers and HDT, which can determine the specificity and selectivity of the sensing layer. We also report the influence of buffer pH and temperature used for incubation of electrodes with proteins on detection and anti-fouling properties. Finally, the stability of the aptasensor was studied by storage of modified electrodes for up to 28 days in different buffers and atmospheric conditions. Aptasensors based on ternary SAM layers are highly promising for clinical applications for detection of a range of proteins in real biological samples.