WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite radar system

  1. An interactive system for compositing digital radar and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Ghosh, K. K.; Chen, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for compositing digital radar data and GOES satellite data for meteorological analysis. The processing is performed on a user-oriented image processing system, and is designed to be used in the research mode. It has a capability to construct PPIs and three-dimensional CAPPIs using conventional as well as Doppler data, and to composite other types of data. In the remapping of radar data to satellite coordinates, two steps are necessary. First, PPI or CAPPI images are remapped onto a latitude-longitude projection. Then, the radar data are projected into satellite coordinates. The exact spherical trigonometric equations, and the approximations derived for simplifying the computations are given. The use of these approximations appears justified for most meteorological applications. The largest errors in the remapping procedure result from the satellite viewing angle parallax, which varies according to the cloud top height. The horizontal positional error due to this is of the order of the error in the assumed cloud height in mid-latitudes. Examples of PPI and CAPPI data composited with satellite data are given for Hurricane Frederic on 13 September 1979 and for a squall line on 2 May 1979 in Oklahoma.

  2. A general interactive system for compositing digital radar and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, K. K.; Chen, L. C.; Faghmous, M.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reynolds and Smith (1979) have considered the combined use of digital weather radar and satellite data in interactive systems for case study analysis and forecasting. Satellites view the top of clouds, whereas radar is capable of observing the detailed internal structure of clouds. The considered approach requires the use of a common coordinate system. In the present investigation, it was decided to use the satellite coordinate system as the base system in order to maintain the fullest resolution of the satellite data. The investigation is concerned with the development of a general interactive software system called RADPAK for remapping and analyzing conventional and Doppler radar data. RADPAK is implemented as a part of a minicomputer-based image processing system, called Atmospheric and Oceanographic Image Processing System. Attention is given to a general description of the RADPAK system, remapping methodology, and an example of satellite remapping.

  3. IoSiS: a radar system for imaging of satellites in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirousek, M.; Anger, S.; Dill, S.; Schreiber, E.; Peichl, M.

    2017-05-01

    Space debris nowadays is one of the main threats for satellite systems especially in low earth orbit (LEO). More than 700,000 debris objects with potential to destroy or damage a satellite are estimated. The effects of an impact often are not identifiable directly from ground. High-resolution radar images are helpful in analyzing a possible damage. Therefor DLR is currently developing a radar system called IoSiS (Imaging of Satellites in Space), being based on an existing steering antenna structure and our multi-purpose high-performance radar system GigaRad for experimental investigations. GigaRad is a multi-channel system operating at X band and using a bandwidth of up to 4.4 GHz in the IoSiS configuration, providing fully separated transmit (TX) and receive (RX) channels, and separated antennas. For the observation of small satellites or space debris a highpower traveling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) is mounted close to the TX antenna feed. For the experimental phase IoSiS uses a 9 m TX and a 1 m RX antenna mounted on a common steerable positioner. High-resolution radar images are obtained by using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) techniques. The guided tracking of known objects during overpass allows here wide azimuth observation angles. Thus high azimuth resolution comparable to the range resolution can be achieved. This paper outlines technical main characteristics of the IoSiS radar system including the basic setup of the antenna, the radar instrument with the RF error correction, and the measurement strategy. Also a short description about a simulation tool for the whole instrument and expected images is shown.

  4. Haystack Ultrawideband Satellite Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    enable long-range imaging. In 2013, a major upgrade to the facility was completed, adding a millimeter - wave W-band radar capability to Haystack’s X...diameter antenna was completely rebuilt to provide a 100 μm root-mean-square (rms) surface accuracy to support operation at the 3 mm wave - length (W...electromagnetic wave propagation through the troposphere. − The signal processing system lev- eraged Lincoln Laboratory‘s Radar Open Systems

  5. The Cloud Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Improvement in our understanding of the radiative impact of clouds on the climate system requires a comprehensive view of clouds including their physical dimensions, dynamical generation processes, and detailed microphysical properties. To this end, millimeter vave radar is a powerful tool by which clouds can be remotely sensed. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Cloud Radar System (CRS). CRS is a highly sensitive 94 GHz (W-band) pulsed-Doppler polarimetric radar that is designed to fly on board the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. The instrument is currently the only millimeter wave radar capable of cloud and precipitation measurements from above most all clouds. Because it operates from high-altitude, the CRS provides a unique measurement perspective for cirrus cloud studies. The CRS emulates a satellite view of clouds and precipitation systems thus providing valuable measurements for the implementation and algorithm validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that is designed to measure ice cloud distributions on the global scale using a spaceborne 94 GHz radar. This paper describes the CRS instrument and preliminary data from the recent Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). The radar design is discussed. Characteristics of the radar are given. A block diagram illustrating functional components of the radar is shown. The performance of the CRS during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign is discussed.

  6. Satellite radar for monitoring forest resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Roger M.; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the computer analysis results of a study which used Seasat satellite radar data obtained in 1978 and Shuttle Imaging Radar-B data obtained in 1984. The change-detection procedures employed demonstrate that deforestation and reforestation activities can be effectively monitored on the basis of radar data gathered at satellite altitudes. The computer-processing techniques applied to the data encompassed (1) overlay display, (2) ratios, (3) differences, (4) principal-component analysis, and (5) classification; of these, overlay display is noted to quickly and easily yield a qualitative display of the multidate data.

  7. Monitoring civil infrastructure using satellite radar interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) is a precise and efficient technique to monitor deformation on Earth with millimeter precision. Most InSAR applications focus on geophysical phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, or subsidence. Monitoring civil infrastructure with InSAR is relatively new,

  8. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  9. Satellite Monitoring for REDD: Radar vs. Optical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchard, E. T.; Saatchi, S. S.; Ryan, C.; Woollen, E.; Goodman, L. E.; Williams, M.; Gerard, F.; Starkey, M.; Meir, P.

    2010-12-01

    The proposed REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) protocol will only succeed in reducing emissions if deforestation and degradation can be accurately monitored. Ground surveys are prohibitively expensive over large areas, so satellite monitoring will be essential for independently monitoring deforestation and degradation rates, and thus calculating payments. In addition, remote sensing will be needed for developing historical baselines. It is clear that different methodologies will be needed for different project areas, scales and threat types. In addition different methodologies are needed depending on the capabilities of the countries in question: in the context of Africa for example, in-country monitoring tends to be at a basic level, yet for REDD it is important that countries are able to do their own monitoring, so simple methods must be developed and tested. In this paper we present change detection results for different remote sensing methodologies for potential REDD projects in Cameroon and Mozambique. We have shown previously that a good relationship exists between aboveground biomass (AGB) and L-band radar backscatter (Mitchard et al. 2009). The errors in estimation of absolute biomass were still relatively high, in the region of ±25 %. However, it is suspected that some of these errors are intransient, being due to the structure of the landscape and vegetation within a site, and so it has been predicted that errors in change detection are smaller than those for absolute estimation. We present evidence from these sites that this is indeed correct, using ALOS PALSAR L-band radar data from 2007, 2008 and 2009. Optical satellite data is widely used for monitoring deforestation, for example the excellent system run by INPE in Brazil. However, while optical data is good at detecting deforestation occurring progressively in large clear-fell blocks, as in the Amazon, it is less good at detecting small-scale deforestation or degradation

  10. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  11. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar using two satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyasu, K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the feasibility of a bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR) utilizing two satellites. The proposed BISAR assumes that the direction of the two narrow antenna beams are programmed to coincide over the desired area to be imaged. Functionally, the transmitter and receiver portions can be interchanged between the two satellites. The two satellites may be in one orbit plane or two different orbits such as geosynchronous and low-earth orbits. The pulse repetition frequency and imaging geometry are constrained by contours of isodops and isodels. With two images of the same area viewed from different angles, it is possible in principle to derive three-dimensional stereo images. Applications of BISAR include topography, water resource management, and soil moisture determination.. Advantages of BISAR over a monostatic SAR are mentioned, including lower transmitter power and greater ranges in incidence angle and coverage.

  12. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  13. Network radar countermeasure systems integrating radar and radar countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Qiuxi

    2016-01-01

    This is the very first book to present the network radar countermeasure system. It explains in detail the systematic concept of combining radar and radar countermeasures from the perspective of the information acquisition of target location, the optimization of the reconnaissance and detection, the integrated attack of the signals and facilities, and technological and legal developments concerning the networked system. It achieves the integration of the initiative and passivity, detection and jamming. The book explains how the system locates targets, completes target identification, tracks targets and compiles the data.

  14. The SUMO Ship Detector Algorithm for Satellite Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm Greidanus

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Search for Unidentified Maritime Objects (SUMO is an algorithm for ship detection in satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. It has been developed over the course of more than 15 years, using a large amount of SAR images from almost all available SAR satellites operating in L-, C- and X-band. As validated by benchmark tests, it performs very well on a wide range of SAR image modes (from Spotlight to ScanSAR and resolutions (from 1–100 m and for all types and sizes of ships, within the physical limits imposed by the radar imaging. This paper describes, in detail, the algorithmic approach in all of the steps of the ship detection: land masking, clutter estimation, detection thresholding, target clustering, ship attribute estimation and false alarm suppression. SUMO is a pixel-based CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate detector for multi-look radar images. It assumes a K distribution for the sea clutter, corrected however for deviations of the actual sea clutter from this distribution, implementing a fast and robust method for the clutter background estimation. The clustering of detected pixels into targets (ships uses several thresholds to deal with the typically irregular distribution of the radar backscatter over a ship. In a multi-polarization image, the different channels are fused. Azimuth ambiguities, a common source of false alarms in ship detection, are removed. A reliability indicator is computed for each target. In post-processing, using the results of a series of images, additional false alarms from recurrent (fixed targets including range ambiguities are also removed. SUMO can run in semi-automatic mode, where an operator can verify each detected target. It can also run in fully automatic mode, where batches of over 10,000 images have successfully been processed in less than two hours. The number of satellite SAR systems keeps increasing, as does their application to maritime surveillance. The open data policy of the EU

  15. North and northeast Greenland ice discharge from satellite radar interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rignot, E.J.; Gogineni, S.P.; Krabill, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Ice discharge from north and northeast Greenland calculated from satellite radar interferometry data of 14 outlet glaciers is 3.5 times that estimated from iceberg production. The satellite estimates, obtained at the grounding line of the outlet glaciers, differ from those obtained at the glacier...

  16. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  17. Interdisciplinary Earth Science Applications Using Satellite Radar Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.; Shum, C.; Lee, H.; Dai, C.; Yi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite altimetry was conceived as a space geodetic concept for ocean surface topography mapping in the NASA-sponsored 1969 Williamstown, MA Conference, and was tested as part of the passive and active radar payload (S192), along with a radiometer and a scatterometer, on Skylab-1 in May 14, 1973. Since then, numerous radar and laser satellite altimetry missions orbiting/flying-by the Earth, Mars, Mercury, Titan and the Moon have been launched, evolving from the original scientific objective of marine gravity field mapping to a geodetic tool to address interdisciplinary Earth and planetary sciences. The accuracy of the radar altimeter has improved from 0.9 m RMS for the S-192 Skylab Ku-band compressed-pulse altimeter, to 2 cm RMS (2 second average) for the dual-frequency pulse-limited radar altimetry and associated sensors onboard TOPEX/POSEIDON. Satellite altimetry has evolved into a unique cross-disciplinary geodetic tool in addressing contemporary Earth science problems including sea-level rise, large-scale general ocean circulation, ice-sheet mass balance, terrestrial hydrology, and bathymetry. Here we provide a concise review and describe specific results on the additional recent innovative and unconventional applications of interdisciplinary science research using satellite radar altimetry, including geodynamics, land subsidence, snow depth, wetland and cold region hydrology.

  18. North and northeast Greenland ice discharge from satellite radar interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rignot, E.J.; Gogineni, S.P.; Krabill, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Ice discharge from north and northeast Greenland calculated from satellite radar interferometry data of 14 outlet glaciers is 3.5 times that estimated from iceberg production. The satellite estimates, obtained at the grounding line of the outlet glaciers, differ from those obtained at the glacier...... front, because basal melting is extensive at the underside of the floating glacier sections. The results suggest that the north and northeast parts of the Greenland ice sheet may be thinning and contributing positively to sea-level rise.......Ice discharge from north and northeast Greenland calculated from satellite radar interferometry data of 14 outlet glaciers is 3.5 times that estimated from iceberg production. The satellite estimates, obtained at the grounding line of the outlet glaciers, differ from those obtained at the glacier...

  19. Integration of satellite radar interferometry into a GLOF early warning system: a pilot study from the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, Tazio; Wiesmann, Andreas; Caduff, Rafael; Frey, Holger; Huggel, Christian; Kääb, Andreas; Cochachin, Alejo

    2015-04-01

    Glacier lake outburst floods (GLOF) have killed thousands of people in the Andes of Peru and in many other high-mountain regions of the world. The last years have seen progress in the integrative assessment of related hazards, through combined focus on the glacier lake, its dam properties, and processes in the lake surrounding, including the position and fluctuations of the glacier tongue and potential displacements and thermal conditions of adjacent slopes. Only a transient perspective on these factors allows anticipating potential future developments. For a very limited number of cases worldwide, where GLOF hazards and risks have been recognized, early warning systems (EWS) have been developed and implemented. Lake 513 in the Cordillera Blanca of Peru is one of those. Structural GLOF mitigation measures (tunnels to lower the lake level) have been undertaken in the 1990s and could successfully reduce, but not fully prevent, impacts of a GLOF such as that of April 2010 triggered by a rock/ice avalanche from Mount Hualcán. The EWS was implemented during recent years and disposes of automatic cameras, geophones, river run-off measurements, a meteorological station, and real-time communication with the municipality of Carhuaz and the communities in the catchment. An EWS is by definition limited in its concept and Earth Observation (EO) data offer a promising possibility to complement the assessment of the current hazard. In particular, the monitoring and early detection of slope instabilities in ice, rock and sediments that could impact the lake and trigger a GLOF is still a major challenge. Therefore, the potential of optical and SAR satellite data is currently tested for integration into the EWS within the project S:GLA:MO (Slope stability and Glacier LAke MOnitoring) project, funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with the GLACIARES project supported by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. EO data (optical and SAR) are considered

  20. Observing convection with satellite, radar, and lightning measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Ulrich; Nisi, Luca; Clementi, Lorenzo; Ventura, Jordi Figueras i.; Gabella, Marco; Hering, Alessandro M.; Sideris, Ioannis; Trefalt, Simona; Germann, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Heavy precipitation, hail, and wind gusts are the fundamental meteorological hazards associated with strong convection and thunderstorms. The thread is particularly severe in mountainous areas, e.g. it is estimated that on average between 50% and 80% of all weather-related damage in Switzerland is caused by strong thunderstorms (Hilker et al., 2010). Intense atmospheric convection is governed by processes that range from the synoptic to the microphysical scale and are considered to be one of the most challenging and difficult weather phenomena to predict. Even though numerical weather prediction models have some skills to predict convection, in general the exact location of the convective initialization and its propagation cannot be forecasted by these models with sufficient precision. Hence, there is a strong interest to improve the short-term forecast by using statistical, object oriented and/or heuristic nowcasting methods. MeteoSwiss has developed several operational nowcasting systems for this purpose such as TRT (Hering, 2008) and COALITION (Nisi, 2014). In this contribution we analyze the typical development of convection using measurements of the Swiss C-band Dual Polarization Doppler weather radar network, the MSG SEVIRI satellite, and the Météorage lighting network. The observations are complemented with the analysis and forecasts of the COSMO model. Special attention is given to the typical evolutionary stages like the pre-convective environment, convective initiation, cloud top glaciation, start, maximum, and end of precipitation and lightning activity. The pre-convective environment is examined using instability indices derived from SEVIRI observations and the COSMO forecasts. During the early development satellite observations are used to observe the rise of the cloud top, the growth of the cloud droplet or crystals, and the glaciation of the cloud top. SEVIRI brightness temperatures, channel differences, and temporal trends as suggested by

  1. Validation of GPM Ka-Radar Algorithm Using a Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    GPM led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of US (NASA) aims to observe global precipitation. The core satellite is equipped with a microwave radiometer (GMI) and a dual-frequency radar (DPR) which is the first spaceborne Ku/Ka-band dual-wavelength radar dedicated for precipitation measurement. In the DPR algorithm, measured radar reflectivity is converted to effective radar reflectivity by estimating the rain attenuation. Here, the scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are crucial, particularly for wet snow. A melting layer observation using a dual Ka-band radar system developed by JAXA was conducted along the slope of Mt. Zao in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars were observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) were obtained. The experiments were conducted for two winter seasons. During the data analyses, it was found that k estimate easily fluctuates because the estimate is based on double difference calculation. With much temporal and spatial averaging, k-Ze relationship was obtained for melting layers. One of the results is that the height of the peak of k seems slightly higher than that of Ze. The results are compared with in-situ precipitation particle measurements.

  2. Multi-level magmatic system of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) constrained by multi-satellite radar interferometry measurements during the 2011-2012 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P. J.; Samsonov, S. V.; Pepe, S.; Tiampo, K. F.; Tizzani, P.; Fernandez, J.; Sansosti, E.

    2012-12-01

    Starting from July 2011, anomalous seismicity was observed at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain). During the following three months, seismic activity increased both in number of events and in magnitude, while expanding over a large area. In early October 2011 the process led to a submarine eruption, with some uncertainty about the location and timing of vent(s) opening. The site of the eruption was ~10 km from the initial and main earthquake loci, indicative of significant lateral migration. Here, we conduct a multi-frequency, multi-sensor interferometric analysis of space-borne radar images acquired using three different satellites (Radarsat-2, ASAR-ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed). Radar interferometry is used to measure the deformation that occurred from December 2009 to July 2012. InSAR data fully captures both the pre-, co- and post-eruptive phases. Subsequently, elastic modeling of the ground deformation is employed to constrain the dynamics associated with the magmatic and eruptive activity. This study represents one of the first geodetically-constrained active magmatic plumbing system model for any of the Canary Islands volcanoes, and one of the few examples of geodetic measurement of submarine volcanic activity to date. It reveals a complex magmatic system with multiple levels of stagnation, a deeper central system (~8.5 km depth) and a shallower magma reservoir at the flank of the southern rift (~4 km depth). Before eruption, magma propagated ~5 km downrift towards the eruption fissure. From mid-November 2011 to early January 2012 the system was continuously recharged from source(s) deeper than 10 km, which contributed to a relatively atypical long duration for a basaltic eruption (~5 months). The submarine eruption finished on early March 2012. However, on June 24, 2012 the seismic activity resumed and intense ground deformation has been recorded. The anomalous seismicity continued for a month depicting a clear, but different migration path with respect

  3. Monitoring coastal inundation with Synthetic Aperture Radar satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuoki, Yukihiro; Rangoonwala, Amina; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2011-01-01

    Maps representing the presence and absence of surface inundation in the Louisiana coastal zone were created from available satellite scenes acquired by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite and by the European Space Agency's Envisat from late 2006 through summer 2009. Detection of aboveground surface flooding relied on the well-documented and distinct signature of decreased backscatter in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), which is indicative of inundated marsh in the Gulf of Mexico. Even though decreases in backscatter were distinctive, the multiplicity of possible interactions between changing flood depths and canopy height yielded complex SAR-based representations of the marshes.

  4. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  5. Air and spaceborne radar systems an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Lacomme, Philippe; Hardange, Jean-Philippe; Normant, Eric

    2001-01-01

    A practical tool on radar systems that will be of major help to technicians, student engineers and engineers working in industry and in radar research and development. The many users of radar as well as systems engineers and designers will also find it highly useful. Also of interest to pilots and flight engineers and military command personnel and military contractors. """"This introduction to the field of radar is intended for actual users of radar. It focuses on the history, main principles, functions, modes, properties and specific nature of modern airborne radar. The book examines radar's

  6. Development of Non-metal Material Query System for Satellite-borne Radar Based on .NET Framework%基于.NET框架的星载雷达非金属材料查询系统开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丹; 欧屹

    2011-01-01

    Based on .NET framework,the non-metal material query system for satellite-borne radar was developed in the environment of Visual Studio 2005.The web pages were written by ASP.NET while the database was developed using Oracle9i.This system realizes query of non-metal material data for satellite-borne radar in enterprise LAN.It can also carry out data maintenance via administrator account.This system effectively realizes knowledge sharing,and also provides a good cooperative working environment for the enterprise.%基于.NET框架,在Visual Studio 2005环境中开发了星载雷达非金属材料查询系统,前台Web页面和后台数据库分别采用ASP.NET和Oracle9i进行开发。该系统能够在企业局域网范围内实现对星载雷达非金属材料相关信息的查询,且通过登录管理员帐户,可以实现对材料信息的数据维护。该系统有效实现了知识共享,为企业提供了理想的协同工作环境。

  7. Radar signature acquisition using an indigenously designed noise radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.; Thayaparan, T.

    2011-06-01

    A new design of a noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar signature of various targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 30 GHz. The noise radar signature measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-3000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used. The measured results of the target signatures were verified with the simulation results.

  8. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to

  9. Measurements of Cumulonimbus Clouds using quantitative satellite and radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, A. J.; Reynolds, D. W.; Maddox, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported for a preliminary study of SMS-2 digital brightness and IR data obtained at frequent 5-7.5 min intervals. The clouds studied were over the Central and Great Plains in midlatitudes and thus were typical of an environment much different from that of the tropical oceans. The satellite data are compared to radar data for both a severe weather event and weak thundershower activity of the type which might be a target for weather modification efforts. The relative importance of short time interval satellite data is shown for both cases, and possible relationships between the two types of data are presented. It is concluded that (1) using a threshold technique for visible reflected brightness, precipitating vs. nonprecipitating clouds can be discriminated; (2) brightness is well related to cloud size and shape; and (3) satellite-derived growth rates may be a significant parameter to be used in determining storm severity, especially if rapid time sequence data are used during the development phase of the storm.

  10. Reliability of Naval Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    CONFIDENTIAL (THIS PACE IS UNCUIASSFIED) CONFIDENTIAL (U) For airborne radars, 3-M’(Maintenance and Material Management )and RISE (Readiness Improvement...of the 3-M Program reports (3-M from Maintenance and Material Management ) as well as Naval Air Systems Command RISE (Readi-. ness Improvement Summary...TRANSIT PULSE LE11CTR (;As): 12.8 ANTENNA UEIGHr (k 1058 (2331 lbs.) excluding pedestal COMPRESSED PLUE LENGTH (.is): 0.2 BEAN POSITIObiNG TECNIQUES : H)RZ

  11. Linking oil production to surface subsidence from satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haibin; Dvorkin, Jack; Nur, Amos

    Land subsidence over the Belridge and Lost Hills oil fields, Southern California, was measured using spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). During the 105-day period between 11/5/95 and 2/17/96, the subsidence in the center of the Lost Hills field reached 15 cm. We assume that this surface subsidence resulted from the vertical shrinkage of the reservoir, which in turn was due to oil production and the resulting pore pressure drop. We model this mechanical effect using an elastic deformation theoretical solution with input constants taken from relevant experiments. The modeled surface deformation matches the InSAR measured values. This result indicates that it is possible, in principle, to monitor hydrocarbon production using satellite-based measurements of earth deformation.

  12. Earthquake Monitoring in Australia Using Satellite Radar Interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Lin-lin; E. Cheng; D. Polonska; C. Rizos; C. Collins; C. Smith

    2003-01-01

    Are there any earthquakes in Australia? Although most Australians are not as familiar with earthquakes as citizens in countries such as Japan, there are some quakes on the Australian continent every year. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has been widely used in recent years for monitoring crustal deformation due to earthquakes, volcanoes, underground mining, oil extraction,and so on. Hence the follow-on question is, can repeat-pass satellite DInSAR be used in Australian regions to monitor earthquakes? Nine ERS-1 and ERS-2 radar images of the Burakin region in Western Australia were used to form the InSAR pairs.Twenty-two InSAR pairs were formed and were used to study the temporal decorrelation characteristics in the Burakin area. It was found that good coherence could be maintained all over the full scene for a pair spanning 211 d. The repeat cycles of RADARSAT and ERS (all C-band SAR missions) are 24 and 35 drespectively, Furthermore it is easier to maintain good coherence in L-band SAR images (e.g. the JERS-1 mission has a 44 d repeat cycle). Therefore the authors are confident that repeat-pass differential InSAR can be used to monitor ground deformation due to earthquakes in the Burakin region.

  13. Marine parameters from synergy of optical and radar satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, S.; Hoja, D.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.

    In 2001 the European Space Agency ESA will launch the earth observation satellite ENVISAT. It will carry several instruments that provide new opportunities to measure oceanographic variables. Together, they represent the main measurement techniques of satellite oceanography, and complement each other in an ideal manner. These instruments are to be used in synergy to: Improve the analysis of measured wind and ocean wave fields, and thereby improve weather forecasting at weather centers; Determine the extent and variables of sea ice and develop a five-day sea ice prediction model, to support maritime shipping and offshore activities; Monitor and map sediment and suspended matter transport in coastal regions, especially in areas with large river estuaries, which greatly affects shipping lanes, harbors, and dredging activities; Monitor hydrobiological and bio-geochemical variables related to water quality in coastal regions and large inland waters, which affects ecology, coastal development, aquaculture, drinking water supplies, and tourism. To prepare the oceanographic community to make best use of the ENVISAT sensors in the pre-launch phase, existing algorithms to derive marine parameters are used and validated using data from the ERS SAR, the ERS RA, SeaWiFS and IRS MOS sensors now in operation. Derived products are used to address problems that can best be tackled using the synergy of radar and optical data, such as the effect of surface slicks on radar wind measurements, of sea state on ocean color, of wind and waves on the resuspension of suspended matter, and of wind and waves on sea ice variables.

  14. The Archimedes satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart C.; Shurvinton, William D.

    1992-03-01

    Archimedes is a satellite system conceived by the European Space Agency (ESA) to effectively serve the European market for Mobile Radio Services (MRS). This paper describes the requirements and technical design of the Archimedes satellite system. The underlying assumptions and trade-offs behind the design are detailed and the design is compared and contrasted against alternative design solutions, both technically and economically. A path forward for the development of the system is indicated.

  15. Near-Real-Time, Global Radar Data at the Alaska Satellite Facility DAAC from NASA's SMAP Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, S. A.; Allen, A. R.; Dixon, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is supporting NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission, which launches in January 2015. SMAP will measure global soil moisture and its freeze-thaw state every 3 days using an L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and radiometer. ASF, along with the National Snow and Ice Data Center DAAC and NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS), is identifying and developing tools and technologies to facilitate use of global, near-real-time data by the SMAP user community. ASF will host the SMAP Level 1 radar data and make them available for download through ASF's data discovery interface, Vertex, and the ASF Application Programming Interface. Vertex allows a user to search, visualize and download SAR data, browse images and relevant metadata, and will offer the complete SMAP L1 radar archive to the public. The entire SMAP archive consisting of level 1-4 data can be accessed via Reverb, the NASA EOSDIS metadata and service discovery tool. In anticipation of the SMAP launch and data release, ASF has developed and released a new website (https://www.asf.alaska.edu/smap/) and a suite of web resources, including interactive media, technical information, a product guide, related publications, and tools for working with the HDF5 data format. The ASF SMAP team is exploring OPeNDAP and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Webification technologies for enhancing in-browser data visualization and analysis. These technologies, and tools developed with them, represent opportunities for exposing this valuable dataset to areas with limited bandwidth or understanding of radar data. This presentation will highlight the enabling technologies and techniques ASF is employing to bring these data to new scientific and applications users and respond to ever-changing user needs.

  16. Tropical convective systems life cycle characteristics from geostationary satellite and precipitating estimates derived from TRMM and ground weather radar observations for the West African and South American regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiolleau, T.; Roca, R.; Angelis, F. C.; Viltard, N.

    2012-12-01

    In the tropics most of the rainfall comes in the form of individual storm events embedded in the synoptic circulations (e.g., monsoons). Understanding the rainfall and its variability hence requires to document these highly contributing tropical convective systems (MCS). Our knowledge of the MCS life cycle, from a physical point of view mainly arises from individual observational campaigns heavily based on ground radar observations. While this large part of observations enabled the creation of conceptual models of MCS life cycle, it nevertheless does not reach any statistically significant integrated perspective yet. To overcome this limitation, a composite technique, that will serve as a Day-1 algorithm for the Megha-Tropiques mission, is considered in this study. this method is based on a collocation in space and time of the level-2 rainfall estimates (BRAIN) derived from the TMI radiometer onboard TRMM with the cloud systems identified by a new MCS tracking algorithm called TOOCAN and based on a 3-dimensional segmentation (image + time) of the geostationary IR imagery. To complete this study, a similar method is also developed collocating the cloud systems with the precipitating features derived from the ground weather radar which has been deployed during the CHUVA campaign over several Brazilian regions from 2010 up to now. A comparison of the MCSs life cycle is then performed for the 2010-2012 summer seasons over the West African, and South American regions. On the whole region of study, the results show that the temporal evolution of the cold cloud shield associated to MCSs describes a symmetry between the growth and the decay phases. It is also shown that the parameters of the conceptual model of MCSs are strongly correlated, reducing thereby the problem to a single degree of freedom. At the system scale, over both land and oceanic regions, rainfall is described by an increase at the beginning (the first third) of the life cycle and then smoothly decreases

  17. Development of Radar-Satellite Blended QPF (Quantitative Precipitation Forecast) Technique for heavy rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sangmin; Yoon, Sunkwon; Rhee, Jinyoung; Park, Kyungwon

    2016-04-01

    Due to the recent extreme weather and climate change, a frequency and size of localized heavy rainfall increases and it may bring various hazards including sediment-related disasters, flooding and inundation. To prevent and mitigate damage from such disasters, very short range forecasting and nowcasting of precipitation amounts are very important. Weather radar data very useful in monitoring and forecasting because weather radar has high resolution in spatial and temporal. Generally, extrapolation based on the motion vector is the best method of precipitation forecasting using radar rainfall data for a time frame within a few hours from the present. However, there is a need for improvement due to the radar rainfall being less accurate than rain-gauge on surface. To improve the radar rainfall and to take advantage of the COMS (Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite) data, a technique to blend the different data types for very short range forecasting purposes was developed in the present study. The motion vector of precipitation systems are estimated using 1.5km CAPPI (Constant Altitude Plan Position Indicator) reflectivity by pattern matching method, which indicates the systems' direction and speed of movement and blended radar-COMS rain field is used for initial data. Since the original horizontal resolution of COMS is 4 km while that of radar is about 1 km, spatial downscaling technique is used to downscale the COMS data from 4 to 1 km pixels in order to match with the radar data. The accuracies of rainfall forecasting data were verified utilizing AWS (Automatic Weather System) observed data for an extreme rainfall occurred in the southern part of Korean Peninsula on 25 August 2014. The results of this study will be used as input data for an urban stream real-time flood early warning system and a prediction model of landslide. Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (13SCIPS04) from Smart Civil Infrastructure Research Program funded by

  18. Future of phased array radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassyouni, Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    This paper spots the light on the future progress of phased array radar systems, presenting two innovative examples on the directions of development. The first example starts with the classic radar range equation to develop the topology of what is called a "Mobile Adaptive Digital Array Radar" (MADAR) system. The second example discusses the possibility to achieve what is called "Entangled Photonic Radar" (EPR) system. The EPR quantum range equation is derived and compared to the classic one to compare the performance. Block diagrams and analysis for both proposed systems are presented.

  19. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  20. China's Meteorological Satellite Application System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiashen

    2008-01-01

    @@ China's meteorological satellite program consists of five systems,namely the satellite system,the launch vehicle system,the launch center system,TT&C and the ground application system.The satellite system consists of FengYun (FY) polar orbiting series and FY geostationary series,which are launched by LM launch vehicles from Taiyan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) and Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC) respectively.

  1. A review of satellite radar altimetry applied to coastal ocean studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignudelli, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Satellite radar altimetry is today considered a mature technique in open ocean. The data stream from the various satellite missions are routinely used for a number of applications. In the last decade, significant research has been carried out into overcoming the problems to extend the capabilities of radar altimeters to the coastal zone, with the aim to integrate the altimeter-derived measurements of sea level, wind speed and significant wave height into coastal ocean observing systems. More/better (and new) datasets are being produced. Moreover, the advent of new satellite missions, both nadir-viewing (e.g., Sentinel-3) and wide-swath (e.g. SWOT), should globally improve both quantity and quality of coastal altimetry data. In this talk, after a brief review of the challenges in coastal altimetry and description of the new products, we showcase some application examples how the new products can be exploited, and we discuss directions for a global coastal altimetry dataset as an asset for long term monitoring of sea level and sea state in the coastal ocean.

  2. Remote sensing satellite formation for bistatic synthetic aperture radar observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio

    2001-12-01

    In recent years the Italian Space Agency has been proceeding to the definition and launch of small missions. In this ambit, the BISSAT mission was proposed and selected along with five other missions for a competitive Phase A study. BISSAT mission concept consists in flying a passive SAR on board a small satellite, which observes the area illuminated by an active SAR, operating on an already existing large platform. Several scientific applications of bistatic measurements can be envisaged: improvement of image classification and pattern recognition, derivation of medium-resolution digital elevation models, velocity measurements, measurements of sea-wave spectra. BISSAT payload is developed on the basis of the X-band SAR of the COSMO/SkyMed mission, while BISSAT bus is based on an upgrade of MITA. Orbit design has been performed, leading to the same orbit parameters apart from the ascending node right ascension (5.24 degree(s) shift) and the time of the passage on the ascending node (1.17s shift). A minimum distance at the passage of the orbit crossing point of about 42 km (5.7s) is computed. To maintain adequate swath overlap along the orbit, attitude maneuver or antenna electronic steering must be envisaged and traded-off taking into account radar performance and cost of hardware upgrade.

  3. Analysis of the accuracy of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height models using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Mukul; Vinee Srivastava; Malay Mukul

    2015-08-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) carried out in February 2000 has provided near global topographic data that has been widely used in many fields of earth sciences. The mission goal of an absolute vertical accuracy within 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ∼10 m was achieved based on ground validation of SRTM data through various studies using global positioning system (GPS). We present a new and independent assessment of the vertical accuracy of both the X- and C-band SRTM datasets using data from the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of high-precision static GPS stations. These stations exist worldwide, have better spatial distribution than previous studies, have a vertical accuracy of 6 mm and constitute the most accurate ground control points (GCPs) possible on earth; these stations are used as fiducial stations to define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Globally, for outlier-filtered data (135 X-band stations and 290 C-band stations), the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibits a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 8.2 ± 0.7 and 6.9 ± 0.5 m for X- and C-band data, respectively. Continent-wise, Africa, Australia and North America comply with the SRTM mission absolute vertical accuracy of 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ∼10 m. However, Asia, Europe and South America have vertical errors higher than the SRTM mission goal. At stations where both the X- and C-band SRTM data were present, the root mean square error (RMSE) of both the X- and C-bands was identical at 11.5 m, indicating similar quality of both the X- and C-band SRTM data.

  4. Numerical simulation of imaging laser radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shaokun; Lu, Bo; Jiang, Ming; Liu, Xunliang

    2008-03-01

    Rational and effective design of imaging laser radar systems is the key of imaging laser radar system research. Design must fully consider the interrelationship between various parameters. According to the parameters, choose suitable laser, detector and other components. To use of mathematical modeling and computer simulation is an effective imaging laser radar system design methods. This paper based on the distance equation, using the detection statistical methods, from the laser radar range coverage, detection probability, false-alarm rate, SNR to build the laser radar system mathematical models. In the process of setting up the mathematical models to fully consider the laser, atmosphere, detector and other factors on the performance that is to make the models be able to respond accurately the real situation. Based on this using C# and Matlab designed a simulation software.

  5. Satellite radar altimetry for monitoring small rivers and lakes in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulistioadi, Y.B.; Tseng, K.H.; Shum, C.K.; Hidayat, Hidayat; Sumaryono, M.; Suhardiman, A.; Setiawan, F.; Sunarso, S.

    2015-01-01

    Remote sensing and satellite geodetic observations are capable of hydrologic monitoring of freshwater resources. Although satellite radar altimetry has been used in monitoring water level or discharge, its use is often limited to monitoring large rivers (>1 km) with longer interval periods (&g

  6. Kharkiv Meteor Radar System (the XX Age)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2012-09-01

    Kharkiv meteor radar research are of historic value (Kolomiyets and Sidorov 2007). Kharkiv radar observations of meteors proved internationally as the best in the world, it was noted at the IAU General Assembly in 1958. In the 1970s Kharkiv meteor automated radar system (MARS) was recommended at the international level as a successful prototype for wide distribution. Until now, this radar system is one of the most sensitive instruments of meteor radars in the world for astronomical observations. In 2004 Kharkiv meteor radar system is included in the list of objects which compose the national property of Ukraine. Kharkiv meteor radar system has acquired the status of the important historical astronomical instrument in world history. Meteor Centre for researching meteors in Kharkiv is a analogue of the observatory and performs the same functions of a generator and a battery of special knowledge and skills (the world-famous studio). Kharkiv and the location of the instrument were brand points on the globe, as the place where the world-class meteor radar studies were carried out. They are inscribed in the history of meteor astronomy, in large letters and should be immortalized on a world-wide level.

  7. Improved Spectrum Analysis Noise Radar Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    and evaluated. A new spectrum analysis system designed to detect moving targets is presented. Comparison is made of the detection capabilities of all four noise radar systems in the presence of extraneous noise. (Author)

  8. Integrated Satellite-HAP Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianca, Ernestina; De Sanctis, Mauro; De Luise, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    for an efficient hybrid terrestrial-satellite communication system. Two integrated HAP-satellite scenarios are presented, in which the HAP is used to overcome some of the shortcomings of satellite- based communications. Moreover, it is shown that the integration of HAPs with satellite systems can be used......Thus far, high-altitude platform (HAP)-based systems have been mainly conceived as an alternative to satellites for complementing the terrestrial network. This article aims to show that HAP should no longer be seen as a competitor technology by investors of satellites, but as a key element...

  9. Synoptic Analysis of Heavy Rainfall and Flood Observed in Izmir on 20 May 2015 Using Radar and Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Ercument

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a meteorological analysis is conducted on the sudden and heavy rainfall that occurred in Izmir on May 20, 2015. The barotropic model that is observed in upper carts is shown in detail. We can access the data of and analyze the type, severity and amount of many meteorological parameters using the meteorological radars that form a remote sensing system. The one field that uses the radars most intensively is rainfall. Images from the satellite and radar systems are used in the meteorological analysis of the heavy rainfall that occurred in Izmir on 20 May 2015, and the development of the system that led to this rainfall is shown. In this study, data received from Bornova Automatic Meteorological Observation Station (OMGI), which is under the management of Meteorology General Directorate (MGM), Izmir 2. Regional Directorate; satellite images; Radar PPI (Plan Position Indicator) and Radar MAX (Maximum Display) images are evaluated. In addition, synoptic situation, outputs of numerical estimation models, indices calculated from Skew T Log-P diagram are shown. All these results are mapped and analyzed. At the end of these analyses, it is found that this sudden rainfall had developed according to the frontal system motion. A barotropic model occurred on the day of the rainfall over the Aegean Region. As a result of the rainfall that happened in Izmir at 12.00 UTC (Universal Coordinated Time), the May month rainfall record for the last 64 years is achieved with a rainfall amount of 67.7 mm per meter square. Keywords: Izmir, barotropic model, heavy rainfall, radar, synoptic analysis

  10. A satellite-borne radar wind sensor (RAWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard K.; Stuart, Michael; Propp, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    Modeling global atmospheric circulations and forecasting the weather would improve if worldwide information on winds aloft were available. Accurate prediction of weather is important to agriculture, shipping, air traffic, and many other fields. Global system models of climate are of great importance. Current global atmospheric models use pressure measurements and thermodynamic properties to calculate the effects of wind for use in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. Inputs to the NWP models are temperature, pressure and wind velocities at different heights. Clearly direct wind measurements could significantly improve the NWP model performance. The RAdar Wind Sounder (RAWS) program at the University of Kansas is a study of the feasibility and the trade-offs in the design of a space-based radar system to measure wind vectors. This can be done by measuring the Doppler shift of cloud and rain returns from three or more points and calculating the components of the wind vector. The RAWS study to date uses the candidate system selected after preliminary study of frequencies and sensitivities. Two frequencies chosen, 10 and 35 GHz, allow higher sensitivity for clouds and more penetration for rain. The past year was devoted to modeling the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achievable for the two frequencies. The determination of SNR versus cloud penetration depth used a cloud backscattering and attenuation model in the appropriate radar equation. Calculations assumed reasonable losses in reception and transmission, in addition to the atmospheric attenuation. We discovered that ice clouds provide a higher SNR than previously calculated, but some water clouds give lower SNRs than we calculated before. One of the primary issues in the SNR calculation was the choice of the drop size distribution. Although Xin used several distributions (e.g., log normal, Khrigian and Mazin), this year we used the Deirmendjian cloud model. SNR versus cloud penetration plots were generated to

  11. Development of Deep Learning Based Data Fusion Approach for Accurate Rainfall Estimation Using Ground Radar and Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandra, C. V.; Tan, H.; Cifelli, R.; Xie, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall estimation based on onboard satellite measurements has been an important topic in satellite meteorology for decades. A number of precipitation products at multiple time and space scales have been developed based upon satellite observations. For example, NOAA Climate Prediction Center has developed a morphing technique (i.e., CMORPH) to produce global precipitation products by combining existing space based rainfall estimates. The CMORPH products are essentially derived based on geostationary satellite IR brightness temperature information and retrievals from passive microwave measurements (Joyce et al. 2004). Although the space-based precipitation products provide an excellent tool for regional and global hydrologic and climate studies as well as improved situational awareness for operational forecasts, its accuracy is limited due to the sampling limitations, particularly for extreme events such as very light and/or heavy rain. On the other hand, ground-based radar is more mature science for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), especially after the implementation of dual-polarization technique and further enhanced by urban scale radar networks. Therefore, ground radars are often critical for providing local scale rainfall estimation and a "heads-up" for operational forecasters to issue watches and warnings as well as validation of various space measurements and products. The CASA DFW QPE system, which is based on dual-polarization X-band CASA radars and a local S-band WSR-88DP radar, has demonstrated its excellent performance during several years of operation in a variety of precipitation regimes. The real-time CASA DFW QPE products are used extensively for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. In this paper, a neural network based data fusion mechanism is introduced to improve the satellite-based CMORPH precipitation product by taking into account the ground radar measurements. A deep learning system is

  12. Satellite radar altimetry for monitoring small river and lakes in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Sulistioadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing and satellite geodetic observations are capable for hydrologic monitoring of freshwater resources. For the case of satellite radar altimetry, limited temporal resolutions (e.g., satellite revisit period prohibit the use of this method for a short ( To address this scientific challenge, this study tries to monitor small (40–200 m width and medium-sized (200–800 m width rivers and lakes using satellite altimetry through identification and choice of the over-water radar waveforms corresponding to the appropriately waveform-retracked water level. This study addresses the humid tropics of Southeast Asia, specifically in Indonesia, where similar studies do not yet exist and makes use Level 2 radar altimeter measurements generated by European Space Agency's (ESA's Envisat (Environmental Satellite mission. This experiment proves that satellite altimetry provides a good alternative, or the only means in some regions, to measure the water level of medium-sized river (200–800 m width and small lake (extent 2 in Southeast Asia humid tropic with reasonable accuracy. In addition, the procedure to choose retracked Envisat altimetry water level heights via identification or selection of standard waveform shapes for inland water is recommended and should be a standard measure especially over small rivers and lakes. This study also found that Ice-1 is not necessarily the best retracker as reported by previous studies, among the four standard waveform retracking algorithms for Envisat radar altimetry observing inland water bodies.

  13. Knowledge Based Systems and Metacognition in Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Gerard T.; Wicks, Michael C.

    An airborne ground looking radar sensor's performance may be enhanced by selecting algorithms adaptively as the environment changes. A short description of an airborne intelligent radar system (AIRS) is presented with a description of the knowledge based filter and detection portions. A second level of artificial intelligence (AI) processing is presented that monitors, tests, and learns how to improve and control the first level. This approach is based upon metacognition, a way forward for developing knowledge based systems.

  14. Growth of a young pingo in the Canadian Arctic observed by RADARSAT-2 interferometric satellite radar

    OpenAIRE

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Lantz, Trevor C.; Kokelj, Steven V; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in radar technology are increasing our ability to detect Earth surface deformation in permafrost environments. In this paper we use satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) to describe the growth of a large, relatively young pingo in the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands. High-resolution RADARSAT-2 imagery (2011–2014) analyzed with the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) DInSAR revealed a maximum 2.7 cm yr−1 of domed uplift locate...

  15. Detecting weather radar clutter using satellite-based nowcasting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas B.S.; Gill, Rashpal S.; Overgaard, Søren

    2006-01-01

    for the detecting and removal of clutter. Naturally, the improved spatio-temporal resolution of the Meteosat Second Generation sensors, coupled with its increased number of spectral bands, is expected to yield even better detection accuracies. Weather radar data from three C-band Doppler weather radars...... Application Facility' of EUMETSAT and is based on multispectral images from the SEVIRI sensor of the Meteosat-8 platform. Of special interest is the 'Precipitating Clouds' product, which uses the spectral information coupled with surface temperatures from Numerical Weather Predictions to assign probabilities...... by the resolution of the radar data. Subsequently, a supervised classifier was developed based on training data selected by a weather radar expert. Results of classification of data from several different meteorological events are shown. Cases of widespread sea clutter caused by anomalous propagation are especially...

  16. Design of a Radar Based Space Situational Awareness System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschwager, T.; Neff, T.; Suess, I. H.; Foerstner, I. R.

    2013-09-01

    Existing SSA-Networks in most cases consist of sensors which originally were not designed for the purpose of detecting or tracking space debris and active satellites. Furthermore there are different kinds of sensors in use which makes it even more complicated to handle all generated data. Therefore it is reasonable to create a network consisting of homogenous sensors, which means sensors of the same type (like radar or optical) and with the same output format of the data. Technologies that are available for detection and tracking of objects (e.g. optical sensors or radar) will be discussed. Focal point will be on operational availability, reliability and obtainable accuracy. It will be shown that Phased Array Radars are the most reasonable technology to be used while creating a sensor network consisting of homogenous sensors. This paper entails to present a proposal for a network of Phased Array Radars configured for this purpose. The system is intended to detect and track objects that are at least as small as objects that can currently be found in the US SSN catalogue. Furthermore potential hazards in different orbits will be evaluated and discussed to optimize the system on these areas. The system is supposed to be able to create an own object catalogue. Therefore perseverative tracking and required capacity will also be considered. On the basis of these considerations the paper shows how to lay-up such a radar-system starting from scratch. Criteria for detection and tracking of objects will be determined. This part of the work contains aspects like choosing the frequency band or tracking-frequencies for different sizes of objects. In the next step the locations for the sensors will be chosen. Based on thoughts about infrastructure it is plausible to place the radar systems on existing observation sites. By analyzing simulations with different numbers of sensors and / or locations several feasible approaches for such a Space Situational Awareness Network will be

  17. Detecting Weather Radar Clutter by Information Fusion With Satellite Images and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    A method for detecting clutter in weather radar images by information fusion is presented. Radar data, satellite images, and output from a numerical weather prediction model are combined and the radar echoes are classified using supervised classification. The presented method uses indirect...... information on precipitation in the atmosphere from Meteosat-8 multispectral images and near-surface temperature estimates from the DMI-HIRLAM-S05 numerical weather prediction model. Alternatively, an operational nowcasting product called 'Precipitating Clouds' based on Meteosat-8 input is used. A scale...

  18. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  19. Wideband Antennas for Modern Radar Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Yu-Jiun; Lai, Chieh-Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the basics of the antenna and phased array are reviewed and different wideband antennas for modern radar systems are presented. The concepts of the radome and frequency selective surface are also reviewed. The main contents include important parameters of the antenna, and theory and design consideration of the array antenna. Various wideband antennas are introduced and their performances are demonstrated, including: (1) for the phased array radar, the slotted waveguide array ...

  20. Monitoring of Arctic Conditions from a Virtual Constellation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    radars to monitor the melting and freezing cycles of the Arctic Ocean north of 65o. Satellite data collections will support in-situ buoy clusters and... ice -type, and lead expansion/contraction with temporal resolutions from hours to days. Ultimately provide a routine Arctic coverage and generate...OBJECTIVES a) Provide daily Arctic situational awareness from the CSTARS SAR satellite constellation. b) Develop a Neural Network algorithm for ice -type

  1. Meteorological satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Su-Yin

    2014-01-01

    “Meteorological Satellite Systems” is a primer on weather satellites and their Earth applications. This book reviews historic developments and recent technological advancements in GEO and polar orbiting meteorological satellites. It explores the evolution of these remote sensing technologies and their capabilities to monitor short- and long-term changes in weather patterns in response to climate change. Satellites developed by various countries, such as U.S. meteorological satellites, EUMETSAT, and Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Indian satellite platforms are reviewed. This book also discusses international efforts to coordinate meteorological remote sensing data collection and sharing. This title provides a ready and quick reference for information about meteorological satellites. It serves as a useful tool for a broad audience that includes students, academics, private consultants, engineers, scientists, and teachers.

  2. Flood Monitoring and Hydrologic Studies Using Retracked Satellite Radar Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Shum, C.; Lee, H.; Alsdorf, D.; Schwartz, F.

    2008-12-01

    Nadir, pulse-limited radar altimetry measurements have been used to monitor large surface-water bodies. In spite of progress, there is a need for a robust and automated procedure, which allows classification and stage measurements in small water bodies, which lying along the orbital path, using multiple radar altimeter measurements. Here we used an algorithm, which is mainly based on radar scatter waveform response and statistical analysis of mean and standard deviation of the resulting water level change to classify surface- waters from other land covers. We tested the algorithm using 10-Hz retracked radar altimetry measurements from TOPEX over regions including the Amazon River basin, the Prairie Pothole Region in North America, and south-western Taiwan. The estimated water-level stages are compared with data from available stage measurements, and altimetry data available from public data centers. We also applied the algorithm to study the 1997 hundred-year Red River flood, and the June 2008 fifty-year flood in the Upper Midwest of the United States. For the1997 flood, it is found that the flooded regions detected by altimetry include the Red River Basin in North Dakota and Minnesota, the Missouri River Basin in North Dakota and South Dakota, the Minnesota River Basin and the Mississippi River Basin in Minnesota and Iowa. The extent of the flood agrees with the USGS record. The observed water height in Grand Forks reaches 6 meters above the normal. The ENVISAT altimetry is shown to be able to track the ebb and recede of the 2008 Iowa City flood. The results of this study could be applied to provide improved accuracy and potentially automated classification of nadir radar altimetry observed small inland water body measurements for hydrologic studies and for flood monitoring.

  3. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  4. Iceland rising: Solid Earth response to ice retreat inferred from satellite radar interferometry and visocelastic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auriac, A.; Spaans, K.H.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A.; Schmidt, P.; Lund, B.

    2013-01-01

    A broad uplift occurs in Iceland in response to the retreat of ice caps, which began circa 1890. Until now, this deformation signal has been measured primarily using GPS at points some distance away from the ice caps. Here, for the first time we use satellite radar interferometry (interferometric sy

  5. Mapping Offshore Winds Around Iceland Using Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar and Mesoscale Model Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Nawri, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    The offshore wind climate in Iceland is examined based on satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR), coastal meteorological station measurements, and results from two atmospheric model data sets, HARMONIE and NORA10. The offshore winds in Iceland are highly influenced by the rugged coastline. Lee...

  6. The use of airborne laser data to calibrate satellite radar altimetry data over ice sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon; Bamber, J.L.; Krabill, W.B.

    2002-01-01

    -correlated noise can be effectively removed by the so-called relocation error correction method. The adjustment, however, produces a different spatial sampling of the data, which introduces a non-negligible slope related bias to the computation of digital elevation models. In this paper we incorporate high......Satellite radar altimetry is the most important data source for ice sheet elevation modeling but it is well established that the accuracy of such data from satellite borne radar altimeters degrade seriously with increasing surface slope and level of roughness. A significant fraction of the slope...... as a linear function of surface slope. This linear correspondence is in turn tested as a model for adjusting the satellite altimetry data for the observed slope correlated bias. The adjustment is shown to have a significant effect in terms of reducing the bias, thus improving the modeling accuracy of the data....

  7. A new strategic sampling for offshore wind assessment using radar satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, P.; Lafrance, G.; Bernier, M.; Lafrance, J. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Varennes, PQ (Canada); Choisnard, J. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite images have been used for offshore wind assessment. Several offshore wind farms are in operation or under construction in northern Europe. The European target for 2030 is 300 GW, of which half is intended for onshore and half for offshore development. Offshore projects in the east coast United States, the Gulf of Mexico and west coast of Canada are in the planning stage. Information obtained from SAR can be used to supplement current mapping methods of offshore wind energy resources. SAR is a useful tool to localize wind pattern over water surfaces. Other sources of offshore wind observations include meteorological stations such as buoys and masts; remote sensing instruments onboard satellites such as scatterometers (QuikSCAT, ASCAT) or passive microwave radiometers; and numerical weather prediction models. The synergy between scatterometers and SAR was discussed. The SAR system has been used for microscale resolution wind mapping in the Gaspe Peninsula. Strategic sampling zones were chosen in proximity to the QuikSCAT grid. It was concluded that 270 and 570 SAR images are needed to calculate average wind speed (U) and mean power output of a 3 MW wind turbine (P) over the Gaspe Peninsula region, respectively. It was concluded that microscale regional wind mapping can be produced at a lower cost with strategic sampling compared to random sampling. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. THE SYSTEM SIMULATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Xiang Jingcheng; Wang Xuegang

    2004-01-01

    To provide a test platform for Electronic Warfare (EW) system, it is needed to simulate the radar received Intermediate Frequency (IF) signals and radar system functions.This letter gives a description of a radar system simulation software developed for frequencyphase scanning three-dimensional (3-D) radar. Experimental results prove that the software could be used for system evaluation and for training purposes as an attractive alternative to real EW system.

  9. Phase calibration of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar interferometer using optical satellite signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sullivan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The link between natural ion-line enhancements in radar spectra and auroral activity has been the subject of recent studies but conclusions have been limited by the spatial and temporal resolution previously available. The next challenge is to use shorter sub-second integration times in combination with interferometric programmes to resolve spatial structure within the main radar beam, and so relate enhanced filaments to individual auroral rays. This paper presents initial studies of a technique, using optical and spectral satellite signatures, to calibrate the received phase of a signal with the position of the scattering source along the interferometric baseline of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar. It is shown that a consistent relationship can be found only if the satellite passage through the phase fringes is adjusted from the passage predicted by optical tracking. This required adjustment is interpreted as being due to the vector between the theoretical focusing points of the two antennae, i.e. the true radar baseline, differing from the baseline obtained by survey between the antenna foot points. A method to obtain a measurement of the true interferometric baseline using multiple satellite passes is outlined.

  10. Gap Filling of the CALYPSO HF Radar Sea Surface Current Data through Past Measurements and Satellite Wind Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gauci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency (HF radar installations are becoming essential components of operational real-time marine monitoring systems. The underlying technology is being further enhanced to fully exploit the potential of mapping sea surface currents and wave fields over wide areas with high spatial and temporal resolution, even in adverse meteo-marine conditions. Data applications are opening to many different sectors, reaching out beyond research and monitoring, targeting downstream services in support to key national and regional stakeholders. In the CALYPSO project, the HF radar system composed of CODAR SeaSonde stations installed in the Malta Channel is specifically serving to assist in the response against marine oil spills and to support search and rescue at sea. One key drawback concerns the sporadic inconsistency in the spatial coverage of radar data which is dictated by the sea state as well as by interference from unknown sources that may be competing with transmissions in the same frequency band. This work investigates the use of Machine Learning techniques to fill in missing data in a high resolution grid. Past radar data and wind vectors obtained from satellites are used to predict missing information and provide a more consistent dataset.

  11. River monitoring from satellite radar altimetry in the Zambezi River basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailovsky, Claire Irene B.; McEnnis, S.; Berry, P. A. M.;

    2012-01-01

    Satellite radar altimetry can be used to monitor surface water levels from space. While current and past altimetry missions were designed to study oceans, retracking the waveforms returned over land allows data to be retrieved for smaller water bodies or narrow rivers. The objective of this study...... is the assessment of the potential for river monitoring from radar altimetry in terms of water level and discharge in the Zambezi River basin. Retracked Envisat altimetry data were extracted over the Zambezi River basin using a detailed river mask based on Landsat imagery. This allowed for stage measurements...

  12. Radar imaging of solar system ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcke, Leif J.

    We map the planet Mercury and Jupiter's moons Ganymede and Callisto using Earth-based radar telescopes and find that all of these have regions exhibiting high, depolarized radar backscatter and polarization inversion (m c > 1). Both characteristics suggest significant volume scattering from water ice or similar cold-trapped volatiles. Synthetic aperture radar mapping of Mercury's north and south polar regions at fine (6 km) resolution at 3.5 cm wavelength corroborates the results of previous 13 cm investigations of enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion (0.9 caused by simple double-bounce geometries, since the bright, reflective regions do not appear on the radar-facing wall but, instead, in shadowed regions not directly aligned with the radar look direction. Thermal models require the existence of such a layer to preserve ice deposits in craters at other than high polar latitudes. The additional attenuation (factor 1.64 +/- 15%) of the 3.5 cm wavelength data from these experiments over previous 13 cm radar observations is consistent with a range of layer thickness from 0 +/- 11 to 35 +/- 15 cm, depending on the assumed scattering law exponent n. Our 3.5 cm wavelength bistatic aperture synthesis observations of the two outermost Galilean satellites of Jupiter, Ganymede and Callisto, resolve the north-south ambiguity of previous images, and confirm the disk-integrated enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion noted in prior investigations. The direct imaging technique more clearly shows that higher backscatter are as are associated with the terrain that has undergone recent resurfacing, such as the sulci and the impact crater basins. The leading hemispheres of both moons have somewhat higher (20% +/- 5%) depolarized echoes than their trailing hemispheres, suggesting additional wavelength-scale structure in the regolith. Two improvements to existing delay-Doppler techniques enhance data reduction. First, correlation using subsets of the standard

  13. Application of Radar Data to Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanZyl, Jakob J.

    2000-01-01

    The field of synthetic aperture radar changed dramatically over the past decade with the operational introduction of advance radar techniques such as polarimetry and interferometry. Radar polarimetry became an operational research tool with the introduction of the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system in the early 1980's, and reached a climax with the two SIR-C/X-SAR flights on board the space shuttle Endeavour in April and October 1994. Radar interferometry received a tremendous boost when the airborne TOPSAR system was introduced in 1991 by NASA/JPL, and further when data from the European Space Agency ERS-1 radar satellite became routinely available in 1991. Several airborne interferometric SAR systems are either currently operational, or are about to be introduced. Radar interferometry is a technique that allows one to map the topography of an area automatically under all weather conditions, day or night. The real power of radar interferometry is that the images and digital elevation models are automatically geometrically resampled, and could be imported into GIS systems directly after suitable reformatting. When combined with polarimetry, a technique that uses polarization diversity to gather more information about the geophysical properties of the terrain, a very rich multi-layer data set is available to the remote sensing scientist. This talk will discuss the principles of radar interferometry and polarimetry with specific application to the automatic categorization of land cover. Examples will include images acquired with the NASA/JPL AIRSAR/TOPSAR system in Australia and elsewhere.

  14. Development of passive radar systems at TNO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelsema, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2002, the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research – TNO, has been involved in the development of passive radar systems for research purposes. The development has been sponsored partly by the Royal Netherlands Air Force – whose main interest is threat evaluation – and partly by

  15. Simulation of the satellite radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Tonboe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that radar waves penetrate into snow and sea ice, the exact mechanisms for radar-altimeter scattering and its link to the depth of the effective scattering surface from sea ice are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms linked the snow ice interface, i.e. the dominating scattering horizon, directly with the depth of the effective scattering surface. However, simulations using a multilayer radar scattering model show that the effective scattering surface is affected by snow-cover and ice properties. With the coming Cryosat-2 (planned launch 2009 satellite radar altimeter it is proposed that sea ice thickness can be derived by measuring its freeboard. In this study we evaluate the radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty in terms of floe buoyancy, radar penetration and ice type distribution using both a scattering model and ''Archimedes' principle''. The effect of the snow cover on the floe buoyancy and the radar penetration and on the ice cover spatial and temporal variability is assessed from field campaign measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic. In addition to these well known uncertainties we use high resolution RADARSAT SAR data to simulate errors due to the variability of the effective scattering surface as a result of the sub-footprint spatial backscatter and elevation distribution sometimes called preferential sampling. In particular in areas where ridges represent a significant part of the ice volume (e.g. the Lincoln Sea the simulated altimeter thickness estimate is lower than the real average footprint thickness. This means that the errors are large, yet manageable if the relevant quantities are known a priori. A discussion of the radar altimeter ice thickness retrieval uncertainties concludes the paper.

  16. Simulation of the satellite radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonboe, R. T.; Pedersen, L. T.; Haas, C.

    2009-07-01

    Although it is well known that radar waves penetrate into snow and sea ice, the exact mechanisms for radar-altimeter scattering and its link to the depth of the effective scattering surface from sea ice are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms linked the snow ice interface, i.e. the dominating scattering horizon, directly with the depth of the effective scattering surface. However, simulations using a multilayer radar scattering model show that the effective scattering surface is affected by snow-cover and ice properties. With the coming Cryosat-2 (planned launch 2009) satellite radar altimeter it is proposed that sea ice thickness can be derived by measuring its freeboard. In this study we evaluate the radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty in terms of floe buoyancy, radar penetration and ice type distribution using both a scattering model and ''Archimedes' principle''. The effect of the snow cover on the floe buoyancy and the radar penetration and on the ice cover spatial and temporal variability is assessed from field campaign measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic. In addition to these well known uncertainties we use high resolution RADARSAT SAR data to simulate errors due to the variability of the effective scattering surface as a result of the sub-footprint spatial backscatter and elevation distribution sometimes called preferential sampling. In particular in areas where ridges represent a significant part of the ice volume (e.g. the Lincoln Sea) the simulated altimeter thickness estimate is lower than the real average footprint thickness. This means that the errors are large, yet manageable if the relevant quantities are known a priori. A discussion of the radar altimeter ice thickness retrieval uncertainties concludes the paper.

  17. Satellite Formation Design for Space Based Radar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-30

    Practical Guidance Methodology for Relative Motion of LEO Spacecraft Based on the Clohessy-Wiltshire Equations,” AAS Paper 04-252, AAS/AIAA Space...Non- Circular Reference Orbit," AAS Paper 01-222, AAS/AIAA Space Flight Mechanics Meeting, Santa Barbara, CA, Feb 11-16, 2001. 11. D. Brouwer ...Small Eccentricities or Inclinations in the Brouwer Theory of the Artificial Satellite,” The Astronomical Journal, Vol. 68, October 1963, pp. 555

  18. Goldstone Solar System Radar Waveform Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    Due to distances and relative motions among the transmitter, target object, and receiver, the time-base between any transmitted and received signal will undergo distortion. Pre-distortion of the transmitted signal to compensate for this time-base distortion allows reception of an undistorted signal. In most radar applications, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) would be used to store the pre-calculated waveform and then play back this waveform during transmission. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), however, has transmission durations that exceed the available memory storage of such a device. A waveform generator capable of real-time pre-distortion of a radar waveform to a given time-base distortion function is needed. To pre-distort the transmitted signal, both the baseband radar waveform and the RF carrier must be modified. In the GSSR, this occurs at the up-conversion mixing stage to an intermediate frequency (IF). A programmable oscillator (PO) is used to generate the IF along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the RF carrier. This serves as the IF input to the waveform generator where it is mixed with a baseband radar waveform whose time-base has been distorted to match the given time-base distortion function producing the modulated IF output. An error control feedback loop is used to precisely control the time-base distortion of the baseband waveform, allowing its real-time generation. The waveform generator produces IF modulated radar waveforms whose time-base has been pre-distorted to match a given arbitrary function. The following waveforms are supported: continuous wave (CW), frequency hopped (FH), binary phase code (BPC), and linear frequency modulation (LFM). The waveform generator takes as input an IF with a time varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier. The waveform generator supports interconnection with deep-space network (DSN) timing and frequency standards, and

  19. Atmospheric refraction corrections of radiowave propagation for airborne and satellite_borne radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric refraction corrections of radiowave propagation for airborne and satellite_borne radars for the spherically stratified (horizontally homogeneous) atmosphere (including lower atmosphere and ionosphere) are discussed. First, the critical apparent depression angle for radar and the perigee of ray are found using the refractive index profile close to the lowest point of the ray as the refractive index profile of spherically stratified atmosphere, and strict expressions of line_of_sight distance for radar that take account of refraction are presented. Then, to which condition the atmospheric refraction to be corrected belongs is determined, and the positioning corrections for all the twelve atmospheric refractive conditions are made using ray_tracing method. At last, the velocity_measuring corrections are made.

  20. MONITORING OF THE UNDERMINED TERRITORIES OF KARAGANDA COAL BASIN ON THE BASIS OF SATELLITE RADAR INTERFEROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Ozhigina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Karaganda coal basin, mines are located in close proximity to each other and to the city of Karaganda and ongoing mining operations are accompanied by a dangerous process of settling the earth's surface and monitoring are essential for the region's econ-omy. Underground mining leads to the formation of voids in the rock mass, which cause displacement of the earth surface. This paper demonstrates an innovative use of the integrated approach for monitoring on the example of Karaganda coal basin, which includes estimation of the rock mass displacement using leveling profile lines and satellite radar interferometry. It is proved that satellite radar interferometry provides reliable results of surface subsidence measurements in mining areas and can be used for con-sidered sort of monitoring.

  1. Monitoring of the Undermined Territories of Karaganda Coal Basin on the Basis of Satellite Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhigina, S. B.; Mozer, D. V.; Ozhigin, D. S.; Ozhigin, S. G.; Bessimbayeva, O. G.; Khmyrova, E. N.

    2016-06-01

    In the Karaganda coal basin, mines are located in close proximity to each other and to the city of Karaganda and ongoing mining operations are accompanied by a dangerous process of settling the earth's surface and monitoring are essential for the region's econ-omy. Underground mining leads to the formation of voids in the rock mass, which cause displacement of the earth surface. This paper demonstrates an innovative use of the integrated approach for monitoring on the example of Karaganda coal basin, which includes estimation of the rock mass displacement using leveling profile lines and satellite radar interferometry. It is proved that satellite radar interferometry provides reliable results of surface subsidence measurements in mining areas and can be used for con-sidered sort of monitoring.

  2. Performance of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar on the GPM core satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Seto, Shinta; Awaka, Jun; Meneghini, Robert; Kubota, Takuji; Oki, Riko; Chandra, Venkatchalam; Kawamoto, Nozomi

    2016-04-01

    The GPM core satellite was launched on February 28, 2014. This paper describes some of the results of precipitation measurements with the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the GPM core satellite. The DPR, which was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), consists of two radars: Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band radar (KaPR). The performance of the DPR is evaluated by comparing the level 2 products with the corresponding TRMM/PR data and surface rain measurements. The scanning geometry and footprint size of KuPR and those of PR are nearly identical. The major differences between them are the sensitivity, visiting frequency, and the rain retrieval algorithm. KuPR's sensitivity is twice as good as PR. The increase of sensitivity reduces the cases of missing light rain. Since relatively light rain prevails in Japan, the difference in sensitivity may cause a few percentage points in the bias. Comparisons of the rain estimates by GPM/DPR with AMeDAS rain gauge data over Japan show that annual KuPR's estimates over Japan agree quite well with the rain gauge estimates although the monthly or local statistics of these two kinds of data scatter substantially. KuPR's esimates are closer to the gauge estimates than the TRMM/PR. Possible sources of the differences that include sampling errors, sensitivity, and the algorithm are examined.

  3. Observing and Modelling the HighWater Level from Satellite Radar Altimetry During Tropical Cyclones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Xiaoli; Gharineiat, Zahra; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the capability of observing tropical cyclones using satellite radar altimetry. Two representative cyclones Yasi (February 2011) and Larry (March 2006) in the northeast Australian coastal area are selected based also on available tide gauge sea level measurements. It is shown...... levels predicted by the model taken into account of both altimetry and tide-gauge data agree well with those observed at Townsville during cyclone Larry....

  4. An RF tag communication system model for noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qihe; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2008-04-01

    RF (radio-frequency) tags have drawn increasing research interest because of their great potential uses in many radio frequency identification applications. They can also be configured to work with radar as a communication channel by receiving radar acquisition signals, suitably coding these, and retransmitting them back to the radar. This paper proposes a system model for the communication between a noise radar and multiple RF tags. The radar interrogates the RF tags in a region of interest by sending ultrawideband noise signals. Upon receiving the radar's signal, all the tags within the radar's range wake up, and respond to the radar with simple messages. The RF tag filters the radar signal to a unique spectral band, which represents its identification information, and different RF tags occupy different non-overlapping bands of the spectrum of the radar signal. Tag messages are modulated onto the waveform through taps of weighted delays. The radar decodes the RF tag identifications and corresponding messages by cross-correlating the RF tag returned signals with the replica of the radar transmitted signal. Calculations and simulation results both show that the proposed system is capable of communicating simple messages between RF tags and radar.

  5. Influences of weather phenomena on automotive laser radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasshofer, R. H.; Spies, M.; Spies, H.

    2011-07-01

    Laser radar (lidar) sensors provide outstanding angular resolution along with highly accurate range measurements and thus they were proposed as a part of a high performance perception system for advanced driver assistant functions. Based on optical signal transmission and reception, laser radar systems are influenced by weather phenomena. This work provides an overview on the different physical principles responsible for laser radar signal disturbance and theoretical investigations for estimation of their influence. Finally, the transmission models are applied for signal generation in a newly developed laser radar target simulator providing - to our knowledge - worldwide first HIL test capability for automotive laser radar systems.

  6. Application Research on Space Laser Communication in Bistatic Radar System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓萍; 韩绍坤; 郝小宁

    2003-01-01

    There exist three synchronizing problems in the bistatic radar system that some signals of the radar receiver must be synchronized with those of the radar transmitter. Several methods realizing data transmission, which are used to complete the synchronization existing in the bistatic radar system, are described. Then a new idea is brought forward that employs space laser communication in the bistatic radar system to realize its data transmission. The theoretic analysis of the idea's usability and its merits are discussed in details. Finally the latest development of space laser communication is introduced, and the utility of the idea is pointed out further.

  7. Tracking Low Earth Orbit Small Debris with GPS Satellites as Bistatic Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M.; Qaisar, S.; Benson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem and collisions are potentially lethal to satellites. Trajectories for small objects are predicted based on infrequent measurements, and the scale and therefore cost of maneuver required to avoid collisions is a function of trajectory accuracy. Frequent and precise observations will improve trajectory accuracy. In this paper, we extend on aspects of the feasibility of tracking space debris in Low Earth Orbit using emissions from GNSS satellites as bistatic radar illuminators. The wavelengths of GNSS signals are of order 20 cm and our primary focus is to track debris smaller than this, thereby maintaining phase stability of the scattered signals, enabling very long coherent processing intervals. However, the signals scattered by debris will be very weak at a terrestrial receiver, requiring the computationally expensive integration of a large number of signals, over an extended duration and with a large phased array. Detection of such weak signals in the presence of relatively strong direct-arrival signals requires extremely high cross-correlation protection. We show that sufficient cross-correlation protection can be obtained due to the large and varying Doppler shift, and also illustrate a novel processing approach utilizing downshifting of the collected signal to audio frequency. This technique dramatically reduces the cost and complexity of updating debris trajectories. The processing cost of preserving an uncertainty volume of many hundreds of meters around the predicted debris track is very modest, and searching within that uncertainty volume is undertaken at audio sampling rates. Moreover, we explore techniques that further lower the already modest cost of the non-linear search within the preserved uncertainty volume. We conclude with an outline of a system using these techniques that could provide centimetre level tracking of large quantities of small orbital objects at a modest cost.

  8. The 2015 Gorkha earthquake investigated from radar satellites: slip and stress modeling along the MHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Faqi; Walter, Thomas R.; Motagh, Mahdi; Prats, Pau; Wang, Rongjiang; Samsonov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    The active collision at the Himalayas combines crustal shortening and thickening, associated with the development of hazardous seismogenic faults. The 2015 Gorkha earthquake largely affected Kathmandu city and partially ruptured a previously identified seismic gap. With a magnitude of Mw 7.8 as determined by the GEOFON seismic network, the 25 April 2015 earthquake displays uplift of the Kathmandu basin constrained by interferometrically processed ALOS-2, RADARSAT-2, and Sentinel-1 satellite radar data. An area of about 7000 km2 in the basin showed ground uplift locally exceeding 2 m, and a similarly large area (~9000 km2) showed subsidence in the north, both of which could be simulated with a fault that is localized beneath the Kathmandu basin at a shallow depth of 5-15 km. Coulomb stress calculations reveal that those areas that are laterally extending the active fault zone experienced stress increase, exactly at the location where the largest aftershock occurred (Mw 7.3 on 12. May, 2015). The subparallel faults of the thin-skinned system, in turn, experienced clear stress decrease at locations above (or below) the active fault. Therefore, this study provides insights into the shortening and uplift tectonics of the Himalayas and shows the stress redistribution associated with the earthquake.

  9. Measurement of interseismic strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault by satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tim; Parsons, Barry; Fielding, Eric

    In recent years, interseismic crustal velocities and strains have been determined for a number of tectonically active areas through repeated measurements using the Global Positioning System. The terrain in such areas is often remote and difficult, and the density of GPS measurements relatively sparse. In principle, satellite radar interferometry can be used to make millimetric-precision measurements of surface displacement over large surface areas. In practice, the small crustal deformation signal is dominated over short time intervals by errors due to atmospheric, topographic and orbital effects. Here we show that these effects can be over-come by stacking multiple interferograms, after screening for atmospheric anomalies, effectively creating a new interferogram that covers a longer time interval. In this way, we have isolated a 70 km wide region of crustal deformation across the eastern end of the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey. The distribution of deformation is consistent with slip of 17-32 mm/yr below 5-33 km on the extension of the surface fault at depth. If the GPS determined slip rate of 24±1 mm/yr is accepted, the locking depth is constrained to 18±6 km.

  10. Simultaneous Radar and Satellite Data Storm-Scale Assimilation Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter Approach for 24 May 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas A.; Stensrud, David; Wicker, Louis; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Assimilating high-resolution radar reflectivity and radial velocity into convection-permitting numerical weather prediction models has proven to be an important tool for improving forecast skill of convection. The use of satellite data for the application is much less well understood, only recently receiving significant attention. Since both radar and satellite data provide independent information, combing these two sources of data in a robust manner potentially represents the future of high-resolution data assimilation. This research combines Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 13 (GOES-13) cloud water path (CWP) retrievals with Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) reflectivity and radial velocity to examine the impacts of assimilating each for a severe weather event occurring in Oklahoma on 24 May 2011. Data are assimilated into a 3-km model using an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter approach with 36 members over a 2-h assimilation window between 1800 and 2000 UTC. Forecasts are then generated for 90 min at 5-min intervals starting at 1930 and 2000 UTC. Results show that both satellite and radar data are able to initiate convection, but that assimilating both spins up a storm much faster. Assimilating CWP also performs well at suppressing spurious precipitation and cloud cover in the model as well as capturing the anvil characteristics of developed storms. Radar data are most effective at resolving the 3D characteristics of the core convection. Assimilating both satellite and radar data generally resulted in the best model analysis and most skillful forecast for this event.

  11. Simultaneous Radar and Satellite Data Storm-Scale Assimilation Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter Approach for 24 May 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas A.; Stensrud, David; Wicker, Louis; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Assimilating high-resolution radar reflectivity and radial velocity into convection-permitting numerical weather prediction models has proven to be an important tool for improving forecast skill of convection. The use of satellite data for the application is much less well understood, only recently receiving significant attention. Since both radar and satellite data provide independent information, combing these two sources of data in a robust manner potentially represents the future of high-resolution data assimilation. This research combines Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 13 (GOES-13) cloud water path (CWP) retrievals with Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) reflectivity and radial velocity to examine the impacts of assimilating each for a severe weather event occurring in Oklahoma on 24 May 2011. Data are assimilated into a 3-km model using an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter approach with 36 members over a 2-h assimilation window between 1800 and 2000 UTC. Forecasts are then generated for 90 min at 5-min intervals starting at 1930 and 2000 UTC. Results show that both satellite and radar data are able to initiate convection, but that assimilating both spins up a storm much faster. Assimilating CWP also performs well at suppressing spurious precipitation and cloud cover in the model as well as capturing the anvil characteristics of developed storms. Radar data are most effective at resolving the 3D characteristics of the core convection. Assimilating both satellite and radar data generally resulted in the best model analysis and most skillful forecast for this event.

  12. An overview of neural network applications for soil moisture retrieval from radar satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, E.; Paloscia, S.; Pettinato, S.

    2014-10-01

    Frequent and spatially distributed measurements of soil moisture (SMC), at different spatial scales, are advisable for all applications related to the environmental disciplines, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. Satellite sensors operating in the low part of microwave spectrum are very suitable for this purpose, and their signals can be directly related to the moisture content of the observed surfaces, provided that all the contributions from soil and vegetation to the measured signal are properly accounted for. Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from both active (i.e. Synthetic Aperture Radar, SAR or real aperture radars) and passive (radiometers) microwave sensors, the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at different spatial resolutions, varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers. These algorithms, which use the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, such as Advanced Integral Equation (AIEM), Oh models, and Radiative transfer Theory (RTT), have been adapted to the C-band acquisitions from SAR (Envisat/ASAR) and real aperture radar (ASCAT) and to the X-band SAR acquisitions of Cosmo-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X. Moreover, a specific ANN algorithm has also been implemented for the L-band active and passive acquisitions of the incoming SMAP mission. The latter satellite will carry onboard simultaneously one radar and one radiometer operating at the same frequency, but with different spatial resolutions (3 and 40 km, respectively). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites located worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these

  13. On detection performance and system configuration of MIMO radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; WU Yong; PENG YingNing; WANG XiuTan

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar is a new concept with some new characteristics, such as multiple orthogonal waveforms and omnidirectional coverage. Based on Stein's lemma, we use relative entropy as a precise and general measure of error exponent to study detection performance for both MIMO radar and phased array radar. And based on derived analytical results, we further study the system configuration problem of Bistatic MIMO radar systems, where transmitters and receivers are located in different positions. Some interesting results are presented. For phased array radar, when the total numbers of transmitters and receivers are fixed, we should always make the number of transmitters equal to the number of receivers. For MIMO radar, we should use a small number of transmitters in low signal noise ratio (SNR) region, and make the number of transmitters equal to the number of receivers in high SNR region. These results are instructive for deployment of bistatic MIMO radar systems in the future.

  14. Advanced satellite communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  15. High-precision measurement of satellite velocity using the EISCAT radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of measuring the velocity of a hard target using radar pulses reflected from the target flying through the radar beam. The method has two stages. First, the Doppler shifts of the echo pulses are calculated at a high accuracy with an algorithm which largely improves the accuracy given by the Fourier transform. The algorithm also calculates the standard deviations of the Doppler frequencies with Monte Carlo simulation. The second step is to fit the results from a sequence of radar pulses to a velocity model allowing linear variation of the second time derivative of target range. The achieved accuracies are demonstrated using radio pulses reflected by a satellite passing through the beam of the EISCAT UHF radar working at 930-MHz frequency. At high SNR levels, the standard deviations of the frequency from a single pulse reach typically down to 0.2 Hz. The best standard deviations of velocity fit are below 5 mm s−1 while those of the second time derivative of range are below 1 cm s−2.

  16. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P  =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X-Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect.

  17. Collaborative Error Registration Algorithm for Radar System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ze-min; REN Shu-jie; LIU Xi

    2009-01-01

    Affected by common target selection, target motion estimation and time alignment, the radar system error registration algorithm is greatly limited in application. By using communication and time synchronization function of a data link network, a collaborative algorithm is proposed, which makes use of a virtual coordinates constructed by airplane to get high precision measurement source and realize effective estimation of the system error. This algorithm is based on Kalman filter and does not require high capacities in memory and calculation. Simulated results show that the algorithm has better convergence performance and estimation precision, no constrain on sampling period and accords with transfer characteristic of data link and tactical internet perfectly.

  18. Cross-validation Methodology between Ground and GPM Satellite-based Radar Rainfall Product over Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Biswas, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two decades, a large number of rainfall products have been developed based on satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the space time variability of rainfall at many scales and the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different rainfall instruments. In order to produce high-resolution rainfall products for urban flash flood applications and improve the weather sensing capability in urban environment, the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA), in collaboration with National Weather Service (NWS) and North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), has developed an urban radar remote sensing network in DFW Metroplex. DFW is the largest inland metropolitan area in the U.S., that experiences a wide range of natural weather hazards such as flash flood and hailstorms. The DFW urban remote sensing network, centered by the deployment of eight dual-polarization X-band radars and a NWS WSR-88DP radar, is expected to provide impacts-based warning and forecasts for benefit of the public safety and economy. High-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the major goals of the development of this urban test bed. In addition to ground radar-based rainfall estimation, satellite-based rainfall products for this area are also of interest for this study. Typical example is the rainfall rate product produced by the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) onboard Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite. Therefore, cross-comparison between ground and space-based rainfall estimation is critical to building an optimal regional rainfall system, which can take advantages of the sampling differences of different sensors. This paper presents the real-time high-resolution QPE system developed for DFW urban radar network, which is based upon the combination of S-band WSR-88DP and X

  19. Mapping dynamics of deforestation and forest degradation in tropical forests using radar satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Neha; Mitchard, Edward TA; Woo, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Mapping anthropogenic forest disturbances has largely been focused on distinct delineations of events of deforestation using optical satellite images. In the tropics, frequent cloud cover and the challenge of quantifying forest degradation remain problematic. In this study, we detect processes...... of deforestation, forest degradation and successional dynamics, using long-wavelength radar (L-band from ALOS PALSAR) backscatter. We present a detection algorithm that allows for repeated disturbances on the same land, and identifies areas with slow- and fast-recovering changes in backscatter in close spatial...... along the tri-national Interoceanic Highway, as well as in mining areas and areas under no land use allocation. A continuous spatial gradient of disturbance was observed, highlighting artefacts arising from imposing discrete boundaries on deforestation events. The magnitude of initial radar backscatter...

  20. Mapping dynamics of deforestation and forest degradation in tropical forests using radar satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Neha; Mitchard, Edward TA; Woo, Natalia;

    2015-01-01

    Mapping anthropogenic forest disturbances has largely been focused on distinct delineations of events of deforestation using optical satellite images. In the tropics, frequent cloud cover and the challenge of quantifying forest degradation remain problematic. In this study, we detect processes...... of deforestation, forest degradation and successional dynamics, using long-wavelength radar (L-band from ALOS PALSAR) backscatter. We present a detection algorithm that allows for repeated disturbances on the same land, and identifies areas with slow- and fast-recovering changes in backscatter in close spatial...... along the tri-national Interoceanic Highway, as well as in mining areas and areas under no land use allocation. A continuous spatial gradient of disturbance was observed, highlighting artefacts arising from imposing discrete boundaries on deforestation events. The magnitude of initial radar backscatter...

  1. Internal Calibration of HJ-1-C Satellite SAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The HJ-1-C satellite is a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR satellite of a small constellation for environmental and disaster monitoring. At present, it is in orbit and working well. The SAR system uses a mesh reflector antenna and centralized power amplifier, and has an internal calibration function in orbit. This study introduces the internal calibration modes and signal paths. The design and realization of the internal calibrator are discussed in detail. Finally, the internal calibration data acquired in orbit are also analyzed.

  2. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results.

  3. Validation of Chinese HY-2 satellite radar altimeter significant wave height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Xiaomin; LIN Mingsen; XU Ying

    2015-01-01

    Chinese Haiyang-2(HY-2) satellite is the first Chinese marine dynamic environment satellite. The dual-frequency (Ku and C band) radar altimeter onboard HY-2 has been working effective to provide operational significant wave height (SWH) for more than three years (October 1, 2011 to present).We validated along-track Ku-band SWH data of HY-2 satellite against National Data Buoy Center (NDBC)in-situ measurements over a time period of three years from October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2014, the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias of HY-2 SWH is 0.38 m and (–0.13±0.35) m, respectively. We also did cross validation against Jason-2 altimeter SWH data,the RMSE and the mean bias is 0.36m and (–0.22±0.28) m, respectively. In order to compare the statistical results between HY-2 and Jason-2 satellite SWH data, we validated the Jason-2 satellite radar altimeter along-track Ku-band SWH data against NDBC measurements using the same method. The results demonstrate the validation method in this study is scientific and the RMSE and mean bias of Jason-2 SWH data is 0.26 m and (0.00±0.26) m, respectively. We also validated both HY-2 and Jason-2 SWH data every month, the mean bias of Jason-2 SWH data almost equaled to zero all the time, while the mean bias of HY-2 SWH data was no less than –0.31m before April 2013 and dropped to zero after that time. These results indicate that the statistical results for HY-2 altimeter SWH are reliable and HY-2 altimeter along-track SWH data were steady and of high quality in the last three years. The results also indicate that HY-2 SWH data have greatly been improved and have the same accuracy with Jason-2 SWH data after April, 2013. SWH data provided by HY-2 satellite radar altimeter are useful and acceptable for ocean operational applications.

  4. HF Over-the-Horizon Radar System Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    target detection technique and radar equations are applied. Chapter V uses PROPLAB model simulation to bring in the principle of raytracing and... RADAR SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS by Bin-Yi Liu September 2007 Thesis Co-Advisors: Phillip E. Pace Jeffrey B. Knorr THIS PAGE...Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HF Over-the-Horizon Radar System Performance Analysis 6. AUTHOR(S) Bin-Yi Liu 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING

  5. Application of uniform DFT filter bank in radar jamming system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Le; Gao Meiguo

    2006-01-01

    The principle of Uniform DFT filter bank is presented. Exploiting poly-phase structure, radar jamming system samples the intercepted wideband radar signals through analysis filter bank by different channels and linearly modulates the intercepted radar signal according to the theory of signal and system, then synthesizes the jamming signal through the synthesis filter bank. The method merely requires lower sample frequency, reduces the computational complexity and the data quantity to be processed. The un-ideal filter's influence to the result of signals processing is analyzed by simulating the match filter in radar jamming system.

  6. Surface topography of the Greenland Ice Sheet from satellite radar altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Robert A.; Zwally, H. Jay; Major, Judith A.; Brenner, Anita C.

    1989-01-01

    Surface elevation maps of the southern half of the Greenland subcontinent are produced from radar altimeter data acquired by the Seasat satellite. A summary of the processing procedure and examples of return waveform data are given. The elevation data are used to generate a regular grid which is then computer contoured to provide an elevation contour map. Ancillary maps show the statistical quality of the elevation data and various characteristics of the surface. The elevation map is used to define ice flow directions and delineate the major drainage basins. Regular maps of the Jakobshavns Glacier drainage basin and the ice divide in the vicinity of Crete Station are presented. Altimeter derived elevations are compared with elevations measured both by satellite geoceivers and optical surveying.

  7. Offshore wind resource mapping for Europe by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete

    2015-01-01

    For the New European Wind Atlas (NEWA) project with 8 participating countries during5 years (March 2015 – March 2020) we will develop a new wind atlas covering most of the European countries as well as most of the offshore areas in Europe. For the offshore atlas we will rely on a combination...... of satellite remote sensing observations and atmospheric modelling. The satellite data include Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from the European Space Agency from Envisat and the Copernicus mission Sentinel-1. SAR has the advantage of high spatial resolution such that we can cover near-coastal areas where many...... wind farms are planned. In the Danish RUNE project near-shore offshore winds are investigate from SAR, atmospheric modelling and ground-based remote sensing lidar. In the European Space Agency project ResGrow SAR wind resource maps at various locations in the European Seas are used to estimate the wind...

  8. The Omninet mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, A.; Curry, W.

    Mobile Satellite System (MSS) design offering relatively low cost voice, data, and position location services to nonmetropolitan areas of North America is proposed. The system provides spectrally efficient multiple access and modulation techniques, and flexible user interconnection to public and private switched networks. Separate UHF and L-band satellites employing two 9.1 m unfurlable antennas each, achieve a 6048 channel capacity and utilize spot beams. Mobile terminals have modular design and employ 5 dBi omnidirectional antennas. Gateway stations (with two 5 m Ku-band antennas) and base stations (with a single 1.8 m Ku-band antenna) transmit terrestrial traffic to the satellite, where traffic is then transponded via an L-band or UHF downlink to mobile users. The Network Management Center uses two 5-m antennas and incorporates the Integrated-Adaptive Mobile Access Protocol to assure demand assignment of satellite capacity. Preliminary implementation of this low-risk system involves a mobile alphanumeric data service employing receive-only terminals at Ku-band projected for 1987, and plans for the launching of L-band receive-only packages as early as 1988.

  9. Analysis of long-term precipitation pattern over Antarctica derived from satellite-borne radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, L.; Porcù, F.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Panegrossi, G.; Petracca, M.; Sanò, P.

    2015-01-01

    Mass accumulation is a key geophysical parameter in understanding the Antarctic climate and its role in the global system. The local mass variation is driven by a number of different mechanisms: the deposition of snow and ice crystals on the surface from the atmosphere is generally modified by strong surface winds and variations in temperature and humidity at the ground, making it difficult to measure directly the accumulation by a sparse network of ground based instruments. Moreover, the low cloud total water/ice content and the varying radiative properties of the ground pose problems in the retrieval of precipitation from passive space-borne sensors at all frequencies. Finally, numerical models, despite their high spatial and temporal resolution, show discordant results and are difficult to be validated using ground-based measurements. A significant improvement in the knowledge of the atmospheric contribution to the mass balance over Antarctica is possible by using active space-borne instruments, such as the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board the low earth orbit CloudSat satellite, launched in 2006 and still operating. The radar measures the vertical profile of reflectivity at 94 GHz (sensitive to small ice particles) providing narrow vertical cross-sections of clouds along the satellite track. The aim of this work is to show that, after accounting for the characteristics of precipitation and the effect of surface on reflectivity in Antarctica, the CPR can retrieve snowfall rates on a single event temporal scale. Furthermore, the CPR, despite its limited temporal and spatial sampling capabilities, also effectively observes the annual snowfall cycle in this region. Two years of CloudSat data over Antarctica are analyzed and converted in water equivalent snowfall rate. Two different approaches for precipitation estimates are considered in this work. The results are analyzed in terms of annual and monthly averages, as well as in terms of instantaneous values. The

  10. Analysis of long-term precipitation pattern over Antarctica derived from satellite-borne radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Milani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass accumulation is a key geophysical parameter in understanding the Antarctic climate and its role in the global system. The local mass variation is driven by a number of different mechanisms: the deposition of snow and ice crystals on the surface from the atmosphere is generally modified by strong surface winds and variations in temperature and humidity at the ground, making it difficult to measure directly the accumulation by a sparse network of ground based instruments. Moreover, the low cloud total water/ice content and the varying radiative properties of the ground pose problems in the retrieval of precipitation from passive space-borne sensors at all frequencies. Finally, numerical models, despite their high spatial and temporal resolution, show discordant results and are difficult to be validated using ground-based measurements. A significant improvement in the knowledge of the atmospheric contribution to the mass balance over Antarctica is possible by using active space-borne instruments, such as the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR on board the low earth orbit CloudSat satellite, launched in 2006 and still operating. The radar measures the vertical profile of reflectivity at 94 GHz (sensitive to small ice particles providing narrow vertical cross-sections of clouds along the satellite track. The aim of this work is to show that, after accounting for the characteristics of precipitation and the effect of surface on reflectivity in Antarctica, the CPR can retrieve snowfall rates on a single event temporal scale. Furthermore, the CPR, despite its limited temporal and spatial sampling capabilities, also effectively observes the annual snowfall cycle in this region. Two years of CloudSat data over Antarctica are analyzed and converted in water equivalent snowfall rate. Two different approaches for precipitation estimates are considered in this work. The results are analyzed in terms of annual and monthly averages, as well as in terms of

  11. On safe ground? Analysis of European urban geohazards using satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capes, Renalt; Teeuw, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Urban geological hazards involving ground instability can be costly, dangerous, and affect many people, yet there is little information about the extent or distribution of geohazards within Europe's urban areas. A reason for this is the impracticality of measuring ground instability associated with the many geohazard processes that are often hidden beneath buildings and are imperceptible to conventional geological survey detection techniques. Satellite radar interferometry, or InSAR, offers a remote sensing technique to map mm-scale ground deformation over wide areas given an archive of suitable multi-temporal data. The EC FP7 Space project named PanGeo (2011-2014), used InSAR to map areas of unstable ground in 52 of Europe's cities, representing ∼15% of the EU population. In partnership with Europe's national geological surveys, the PanGeo project developed a standardised geohazard-mapping methodology and recorded 1286 instances of 19 types of geohazard covering 18,000 km2. Presented here is an analysis of the results of the PanGeo-project output data, which provides insights into the distribution of European urban geohazards, their frequency and probability of occurrence. Merging PanGeo data with Eurostat's GeoStat data provides a systematic estimate of population exposures. Satellite radar interferometry is shown to be as a valuable tool for the systematic detection and mapping of urban geohazard phenomena.

  12. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  13. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  14. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems... the United States after importation of certain navigation products, including GPS devices, navigation... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  15. Assimilation of radar precipitation and satellite data into a NWP model using a physical initialisation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, M.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Venema, V.; Simmer, C.

    2009-04-01

    We implemented a PI (Physical Initialization) method in the non hydrostatic limited-area model COSMO (version 4.2) of the DWD (German Meteorological Service). The goal is the improvement of quantitative rain nowcasting with a high resolution NWP model. Input radar data is a DWD product: the national radar composite for 16 radars with a spatial resolution of one kilometer and a time resolution of 5 minutes. The conversion from reflectivity to rain rate is already made by DWD. This data is interpolated on the LM grid ( 2.8 × 2.8 km resolution) in order to calculate the analysed precipitation rate which depends on the observed precipitation and the model precipitation. The PIB (Physical Initialization Bonn) takes as input the radar based precipitation product and a cloud top height field retrieved from satellite observations, in our case we are using the SAFNWC products generated from Meteosat Second Generation data by DWD. During the assimilation window PIB adjusts the vertical wind, humidity, cloud water and cloud ice in order to force the model state towards the measurements. The most distinctive feature of the algorithm is the adjustment of the vertical wind profile in the framework of a simple precipitation scheme. The PIB assumes that the rain rate is proportional to the vertical humidity flux at cloud base and the vertical wind is adapted according to the conversion efficiency of saturated water vapor into rain water at the cloud base. This parameter is dynamically adjusted by the comparison between the model precipitation and the radar precipitation. The model is tested in convective cases over Germany, an identical twin experiment is used in order to demonstrate the consistency of PIB with the physics of the NWP model. In the tests which we have already performed this method has improved the forecast of the precipitation patterns, as well as the dynamics of the events. These improvements are found both during the assimilation window and for the first hours

  16. Improvement of antenna decoupling in radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchidin, Liliana; Topor, Raluca; Tamas, Razvan D.; Dumitrascu, Ana; Danisor, Alin; Berescu, Serban

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we present a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna design, which can be used for pulse radiation in UWB communication. The Vivaldi antenna is a special tapered slot antenna with planar structure which is easily to be integrated with transmitting elements and receiving elements to form a compact structure. When the permittivity is very large, the wavelength of slot mode is so short that the electromagnetic fields concentrate in the slot to form an effective and balanced transmission line. Due to its simple structure and small size the Vivaldi antennas are one of the most popular designs used in UWB applications. However, for a two-antenna radar system, there is a high mutual coupling between two such antennas due to open configuration. In this paper, we propose a new method for reducing this effect. The method was validated by simulating a system of two Vivaldi antennas in front of a standard target.

  17. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  18. Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Conti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions will involve satellites with great autonomy and stringent pointing precision, requiring of the Attitude Control Systems (ACS with better performance than before, which is function of the control algorithms implemented on board computers. The difficulties for developing experimental ACS test is to obtain zero gravity and torque free conditions similar to the SCA operate in space. However, prototypes for control algorithms experimental verification are fundamental for space mission success. This paper presents the parameters estimation such as inertia matrix and position of mass centre of a Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator (SACSS, using algorithms based on least square regression and least square recursive methods. Simulations have shown that both methods have estimated the system parameters with small error. However, the least square recursive methods have performance more adequate for the SACSS objectives. The SACSS platform model will be used to do experimental verification of fundamental aspects of the satellite attitude dynamics and design of different attitude control algorithm.

  19. Increased noise signal processing in incoherent radar systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Chesanovskyi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The work is devoted to the method of increasing coherence and noise immunity pulse radar systems with incoherent sources probing signals. Problem. Incongruities between a resolution and a range of pulsed radar systems can not be resolved within the classical approaches of building incoherent radar systems, requiring new approaches in their construction. The main part. The paper presents a method of two-stage processing incoherent pulsed radar signals, allowing to compensate and use the information available to them and the angular amplitude of spurious modulation. Conclusions. Simulation results and research functions of these expressions of uncertainty indicate that use volatility as an additional transmitter modulation allows to significantly improve the resolution and robustness of the radar system.

  20. Integrated protection architectures for radars and communication systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanum, M. van; Monni, S.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2010-01-01

    The protection of phased array T/R modules from high input power levels is an important aspect in reducing vulnerability of radars and communication systems RF electronics in modern military platforms. Different categories of threats can damage the sensitive electronics in the phased-array radar,

  1. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  2. Satellite based radar interferometry to estimate large-scale soil water depletion from clay shrinkage: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, te B.; Hanssen, R.F.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based radar interferometry is a technique capable of measuring small surface elevation changes at large scales and with a high resolution. In vadose zone hydrology, it has been recognized for a long time that surface elevation changes due to swell and shrinkage of clayey soils can serve as

  3. Satellite optical and radar data used to track wetland forest impact and short-term recovery from Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, A.; Middleton, B.; Lu, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Satellite Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and RADARSAT-1 (radar) satellite image data collected before and after the landfall of Hurricane Katrina in the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area on the Louisiana-Mississippi border, USA, were applied to the study of forested wetland impact and recovery. We documented the overall similarity in the radar and optical satellite mapping of impact and recovery patterns and highlighted some unique differences that could be used to provide consistent and relevant ecological monitoring. Satellite optical data transformed to a canopy foliage index (CFI) indicated a dramatic decrease in canopy cover immediately after the storm, which then recovered rapidly in the Taxodium distichum (baldcypress) and Nyssa aquatica (water tupelo) forest. Although CFI levels in early October indicated rapid foliage recovery, the abnormally high radar responses associated with the cypress forest suggested a persistent poststorm difference in canopy structure. Impact and recovery mapping results showed that even though cypress forests experienced very high wind speeds, damage was largely limited to foliage loss. Bottomland hardwoods, experiencing progressively lower wind speeds further inland, suffered impacts ranging from increased occurrences of downed trees in the south to partial foliage loss in the north. In addition, bottomland hardwood impact and recovery patterns suggested that impact severity was associated with a difference in stand structure possibly related to environmental conditions that were not revealed in the prehurricane 25-m optical and radar image analyses. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  4. Satellite based radar interferometry to estimate large-scale soil water depletion from clay shrinkage: possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, te B.; Hanssen, R.F.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based radar interferometry is a technique capable of measuring small surface elevation changes at large scales and with a high resolution. In vadose zone hydrology, it has been recognized for a long time that surface elevation changes due to swell and shrinkage of clayey soils can serve as

  5. Le «puzzle» de la banquise arctique vue par le radar du satellite ERS-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude KERGOMARD

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Le radar à synthèse d'ouverture (SAR à bord du satellite européen ERS-1 est le premier outil de télédétection permettant d’analyser simultanément la distribution des types de glaces de mer dans l’Arctique en relation avec leur dynamique.

  6. High Resolution Software Defined Radar System for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Software Radio Peripheral USRP NI2920, a software defined transceiver so far mainly used in Software Defined Radio applications, is adopted in this work to design a high resolution L-Band Software Defined Radar system. The enhanced available bandwidth, due to the Gigabit Ethernet interface, is exploited to obtain a higher slant-range resolution with respect to the existing Software Defined Radar implementations. A specific LabVIEW application, performing radar operations, is discussed, and successful validations are presented to demonstrate the accurate target detection capability of the proposed software radar architecture. In particular, outdoor and indoor test are performed by adopting a metal plate as reference structure located at different distances from the designed radar system, and results obtained from the measured echo are successfully processed to accurately reveal the correct target position, with the predicted slant-range resolution equal to 6 m.

  7. Satellite Observations of Spatial and Interannual Variability of Lightning and Radar Reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, S. L.; Meagher, J. P.; Haddad, Z. S.

    2004-01-01

    The authors use satellite data to examine the relationship between lightning and upper-level radar reflectivity. They find correlations between average flash rates and upper-level reflectivities over both land and ocean, although both flash rates and reflectivities are much lower over ocean than land. Analysis of the data using Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs) shows similar EOFs for averaged lightning and reflectivity. In contrast, the EOFs of the anomalies of lightning and reflectivity have different spatial patterns; however, both have principal component time series that are correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index and, hence, El Nino. Differences in behavior of the lightning and reflectivity anomaly EOFs and principal components suggest that El Nino plays a smaller role in lightning anomaly than precipitation anomaly.

  8. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Negro, Ciro; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-10-30

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 - December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption.

  9. Study of a Bistatic Radar System Using VLBI Technologies for Detecting Space Debris and the Experimental Verification of its Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Masanobu; Tsuchikawa, Kazutomo; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Katsumoto, Kazuyoshi; Takano, Tadashi

    2007-04-01

    Space debris are increasing around the Earth. The observation of space debris is a key issue for the investigation and monitoring of space environment. But the observation opportunities and the detection ability are limited in existing monostatic radar systems. This paper proposes a bistatic radar which is composed of a transmitting station and a receiving-only station. A carrier wave modulated by PN-PSK signals is used in combination with a VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) recorder for range measurement between space debris and stations. The receiving radio wave is processed on the basis of VLBI techniques. Accordingly, the system is shown to have significant advantages over a monostatic radar. We actually formed a bistatic radar system, and observed a satellite in order to experimentally verify the validity. The configuration of the system, data analysis and the experimental results are described.

  10. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  11. Formation flying orbit design for the distributed synthetic aperture radar satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; ZHOU Yinqing; LI Chunsheng

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying orbit design is one of the key technologies for system design and performance analysis of the distributed SAR satellites. The approximately analytic solution of the passive stable formation flying orbit elements is explored based on the expansion form of Kepler's equation. A new method of orbital parameters design for three-dimensional formation flying SAR satellites is presented, and the precision of the orbital elements is analyzed. Formation flying orbit elements are calculated for the L-Band distributed SAR satellites using the formulas deduced in this paper. The accuracy of the orbital elements is validated by the computer simulation results presented in this paper.

  12. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  13. 78 FR 14920 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating With Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... forwarding and receiving communications signals via a system of satellites or reselling satellite... specialized telecommunications services, such as satellite tracking, communications telemetry, and radar... of Subjects in 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Frequency allocations, Satellites. Federal Communications...

  14. Economics of satellite communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    This paper is partly a tutorial, telling systematically how one goes about calculating the total annual costs of a satellite communications system, and partly the expression of some original ideas on the choice of parameters so as to minimize these costs. The calculation of costs can be divided into two broad categories. The first is technical and is concerned with estimating what particular equipment will cost and what will be the annual expense to maintain and operate it. One starts in the estimation of any new system by listing the principal items of equipment, such as satellites, earth stations of various sizes and functions, telemetry and tracking equipment and terrestrial interfaces, and then estimating how much each item will cost. Methods are presented for generating such estimates, based on a knowledge of the gross parameters, such as antenna size, coverage area, transmitter power and information rate. These parameters determine the system performance and it is usually possible, knowing them, to estimate the costs of the equipment rather well. Some formulae based on regression analyses are presented. Methods are then given for estimating closely related expenses, such as maintenance and operation, and then an approximate method is developed for estimating terrestrial interconnection costs. It is pointed out that in specific cases when tariff and geographical information are available, it is usually better to work with specific data, but nonetheless it is often desirable, especially in global system estimating, to approximate these interconnect costs without recourse to individual tariffs. The procedure results in a set of costs for the purchase of equipment and its maintenance, and a schedule of payments. Some payments will be incurred during the manufacture of the satellite and before any systems operation, but many will not be incurred until the system is no longer in use, e.g. incentives. In any case, with the methods presented in the first section, one

  15. Evidence of hydrocarbon pollution in soil exploiting satellite optical and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Galvan-Pineda, J.; Espinosa-Hernandez, A.; Jimenez-Escalona, J. C.; Ramos-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Oil spills are one of the most important sources of hydrocarbon pollution in soils of areas near centers of extraction, storage or transportation of petroleum products. These spills or leaks can occur arising from deficient maintenance of facilities or accidents. The effects of these spills can spread for kilometers affecting large areas. This has a strong impact on the local ecosystem disturbing the flora and fauna. In costal tourist areas, this type of contaminants represents significant health risks for visitors and therefore, economic losses for the place. For this reason, it is very important to know and identify the areas affected by this type of pollution in order to create action plans for remediation of the ecosystem. Due to the large land extensions that can cover such disasters, satellite images become a valuable tool because of their large spatial coverage. Nowadays, different satellite techniques have been developed to recognize land affected by the presence of hydrocarbons. In the optical spectrum, optical sensing imagery (e.g. Landsat, SPOT, MODIS, etc.) has been widely used. However, these techniques have the intrinsic limitation in scenes with vegetation cover. In contrast, techniques exploiting radar images are still rare. The type of signal that is detected by the radar provides information even in areas with vegetation cover. The radar signal interacts with the vegetation and soil collecting information about the dielectric properties of the soil. This study identifies zones of contaminated soil by using the synergy of optical and radar images. This site of study is located in Paraiso, Tabasco, in Southern Mexico (18°27'N 93°32'W). The region is composed of coastal and tropical forest ecosystems and includes the Port Dos Bocas. The Port Dos Bocas has its points of extractions 130m away from the coast. The annual activities report 10 millions of tons of hydrocarbons transported using around 5500 ships. The methodology presented in this paper

  16. New method to implement digital down converter in radar system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zhigang; Wen Biyang; Zhou Hao; Bai Liyun

    2005-01-01

    Digital down converter (DDC) is the main part of the next generation high frequency (HF) radar. In order to realize the single chip integrations of digital receiver hardware in the next generation HF Radar, a new design for DDC by using FPGA is presented. Some important and practical applications are given in this paper, and the result can prove the validity. Because we can adjust the parameters freely according to our need, the DDC system can be adapted to the next generation HF radar system.

  17. Integrated radar-camera security system: range test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Karol, M.; Markowski, P.

    2012-06-01

    The paper presents the test results of a mobile system for the protection of large-area objects, which consists of a radar and thermal and visual cameras. Radar is used for early detection and localization of an intruder and the cameras with narrow field of view are used for identification and tracking of a moving object. The range evaluation of an integrated system is presented as well as the probability of human detection as a function of the distance from radar-camera unit.

  18. Integrated mobile radar-camera system in airport perimeter security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Dulski, R.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the test results of a mobile system for the protection of large-area objects, which consists of a radar and thermal and visual cameras. Radar is used for early detection and localization of an intruder and the cameras with narrow field of view are used for identification and tracking of a moving object. The range evaluation of an integrated system are presented as well as the probability of human detection as a function of the distance from radar-camera unit.

  19. Signal Processing System for the CASA Integrated Project I Radars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.; Junyent, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the waveform design space and signal processing system for dual-polarization Doppler weather radar operating at X band. The performance of the waveforms is presented with ground clutter suppression capability and mitigation of range velocity ambiguity. The operational waveform is designed based on operational requirements and system/hardware requirements. A dual Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) waveform was developed and implemented for the first generation X-band radars deployed by the Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of the waveforms based on simulations and data collected by the first-generation CASA radars during operations.

  20. Persistent scatterers detection on synthetic aperture radar images acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dǎnişor, Cosmin; Popescu, Anca; Datcu, Mihai

    2016-12-01

    Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PS-InSAR) has become a popular method in remote sensing because of its capability to measure terrain deformations with very high accuracy. It relies on multiple Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions, to monitor points with stable proprieties over time, called Persistent Scatterers (PS)[1]. These points are unaffected by temporal decorrelation, therefore by analyzing their interferometric phase variation we can estimate the scene's deformation rates within a given time interval. In this work, we apply two incoherent detection algorithms to identify Persistent Scatterers candidates in the city of Focșani, Romania. The first method studies the variation of targets' intensities along the SAR acquisitions and the second method analyzes the spectral proprieties of the scatterers. The algorithms were implemented on a dataset containing 11 complex images of the region covering Buzău, Brăila and Focșani cities. Images were acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite in a time span of 5 months, from October 2014 to February 2015. The processing chain follows the requirements imposed by the new C-band SAR images delivered by the Sentinel-1 satellite (launched in April 2014) imaging in Interferometric Wide (IW) mode. Considering the particularities of the TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans in Azimuth) imaging mode[2], special requirements had to be considered for pre-processing steps. The PS detection algorithms were implemented in Gamma RS program, a software which contains various function packages dedicated to SAR images focalization, analysis and processing.

  1. Combined Use of Multi-Temporal Optical and Radar Satellite Images for Grassland Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Dusseux

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the ability of optical images, SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar images and the combination of both types of data to discriminate between grasslands and crops in agricultural areas where cloud cover is very high most of the time, which restricts the use of visible and near-infrared satellite data. We compared the performances of variables extracted from four optical and five SAR satellite images with high/very high spatial resolutions acquired during the growing season. A vegetation index, namely the NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and two biophysical variables, the LAI (Leaf Area Index and the fCOVER (fraction of Vegetation Cover were computed using optical time series and polarization (HH, VV, HV, VH. The polarization ratio and polarimetric decomposition (Freeman–Durden and Cloude–Pottier were calculated using SAR time series. Then, variables derived from optical, SAR and both types of remotely-sensed data were successively classified using the Support Vector Machine (SVM technique. The results show that the classification accuracy of SAR variables is higher than those using optical data (0.98 compared to 0.81. They also highlight that the combination of optical and SAR time series data is of prime interest to discriminate grasslands from crops, allowing an improved classification accuracy.

  2. Radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: Initial deployment of a transportable Doppler radar system for volcano-monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoblitt, R. P.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    centered on the volcano while NEXRAD scanned a full 360 degrees. The sector strategy scanned the volcano more frequently than the 360-degree strategy. Consequently, the USGS system detected event onset within less than a minute, while the NEXRAD required about 4 minutes. The observed column heights were as high as 20 km above sea level and compared favorably to those from NEXRAD. NEXRAD tracked ash clouds to greater distances than the USGS system. This experience shows that Doppler radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

  3. CLASSIFIER FUSION OF HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL AND SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (SAR SATELLITE IMAGERY FOR CLASSIFICATION IN URBAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Alipour Fard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study concerned with fusion of synthetic aperture radar and optical satellite imagery. Due to the difference in the underlying sensor technology, data from synthetic aperture radar (SAR and optical sensors refer to different properties of the observed scene and it is believed that when they are fused together, they complement each other to improve the performance of a particular application. In this paper, two category of features are generate and six classifier fusion operators implemented and evaluated. Implementation results show significant improvement in the classification accuracy.

  4. The accuracy of satellite radar altimeter data over the Greenland ice sheet determined from airborne laser data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamber, J.L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, W.

    1998-01-01

    The 336 days of the geodetic phase of ERS-1 provides dense coverage, by satellite radar altimetry, of the whole of the Greenland ice sheet. These data have been used to produce a digital elevation model of the ice sheet. The errors present in the altimeter data were investigated via a comparison...... with airborne laser altimeter data an absolute accuracy typically in the range 2-10 cm +/- 10 cm. Comparison of differences between the radar and laser derived elevations, showed a correlation with surface slope. The difference between the two data sets ranged from 84 cm +/- 79 cm for slopes below 0.1 degrees...

  5. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2012-02-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5 and 50 MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emissions are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  6. Global navigation satellite systems and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Madry, one of the world's leading experts in the field, provides in a condensed form a quick yet comprehensive overview of satellite navigation. This book concisely addresses the latest technology, the applications, the regulatory issues, and the strategic implications of satellite navigation systems. This assesses the strengths and weaknesses of satellite navigation networks and review of all the various national systems now being deployed and the motivation behind the proliferation of these systems.

  7. Simulation of Ship-Track versus Satellite-Sensor Differences in Oceanic Precipitation Using an Island-Based Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Burdanowitz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The point-to-area problem strongly complicates the validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates, using surface-based point measurements. We simulate the limited spatial representation of light-to-moderate oceanic precipitation rates along ship tracks with respect to areal passive microwave satellite estimates using data from a subtropical island-based radar. The radar data serves to estimate the discrepancy between point-like and areal precipitation measurements. From the spatial discrepancy, two statistical adjustments are derived so that along-track precipitation ship data better represent areal precipitation estimates from satellite sensors. The first statistical adjustment uses the average duration of a precipitation event as seen along a ship track, and the second adjustment uses the median-normalized along-track precipitation rate. Both statistical adjustments combined reduce the root mean squared error by 0.24 mm h − 1 (55% compared to the unadjusted average track of 60 radar pixels in length corresponding to a typical ship speed of 24–34 km h − 1 depending on track orientation. Beyond along-track averaging, the statistical adjustments represent an important step towards a more accurate validation of precipitation derived from passive microwave satellite sensors using point-like along-track surface precipitation reference data.

  8. Engineering implementation of satellite calibration for radar%雷达卫星标校的工程实现研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭佳意; 钮俊清

    2014-01-01

    为确保雷达系统的测量精度,给出了一种用于标校雷达动态跟踪过程中系统误差的工程实现方法--卫星标校法。该方法通过观测卫星轨迹,将量测值与真实星历值比对,通过最优化解法标定雷达的系统误差。考虑雷达结构特点导致的误差和大气折射误差修正后的残余误差,建立了卫星标校的系统误差模型。最后,采用实测数据验证了该误差模型的可行性与可靠性。该方法在标校过程中不受人为、天气等因素影响,可以适应雷达的动态技术状态。%To guarantee the measurement precision of radar system, this paper presents an engineering implementation method, named satellite calibration, used for calibrating the system error in the course of radar dynamic tracking. This method contrasts the measurement value to the real ephemeris value by observing the satellite track, and calibrate the radar’s system errors by using the optimal solution. Considering that the errors caused by the features of radar configuration and the residual errors after correction of atmosphere refraction errors, the author sets up a system error model for satellite calibration, and finally proves the feasibility and reliability of this proposed error model using the test data. As this method is not affected by some factitious and weather factors, it can be also adapted to radar’s dynamic technical state.

  9. Micropower radar systems for law enforcement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Mast, J.; Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    LLNL researchers have pioneered a unique compact low-power and inexpensive radar technology (microradar) that has enormous potential in various industries. Some licenses are currently in place for motion sensors and stud finders. The ultra-wideband characteristics of the microradar (4 to 10 GHz) make it difficult to detect, yet provide potential range resolution of 1 cm at ranges of greater than 20 meters. Real and synthetic apertures arrays of radar elements can address imaging applications behind walls at those distances. Personnel detection applications are currently being tested.

  10. Avalanche Debris Detection Using Satellite- and Drone Based Radar and Optical Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Vickers, H.; Solbø, S. A.; Tøllefsen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The mountainous fjord landscape in the county of Troms, around its capital Tromsø in Northern Norway is prone to high avalanche activity during the snow season. Large avalanches pose a hazard to infrastructure, such as buildings and roads, located between the steep mountainsides and the fjords. A prolonged cold spell during January and February 2014 was followed by rapid new-snow loading during March 2014, inducing a significant avalanche cycle with many spontaneous, size D4 avalanches that affected major transport veins. During and shortly after the avalanche cycle of March 2014, we obtained 11 Radarsat-2 Ultrafine mode scenes, chosen according to reported avalanche activity. We further collected four Radarsat-2 ScanSAR mode scenes and two Landsat-8 scenes covering the entire county of Troms. For one particular avalanche, we obtained a drone-based orthophoto, from which a DEM of the avalanche debris surface was derived, using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. This enabled us to calculate the debris volume accurately. We detected avalanche debris in the radar images visually, by applying two detection algorithms that make use of the increased backscatter in avalanche debris. This backscatter increase is a product of increased snow water equivalent and surface roughness, roughly of the order of 3 dB. In addition, we applied a multi-temporal approach by repeatedly detecting avalanche debris at different acquisition times, as well as a multi-sensor approach, covering similar areas with different sensors. This multi-temporal and multi-sensor approach enabled us to map the spatial extent and magnitude of the March 2014 avalanche cycle in the county Troms. With ESA's Sentinel-1 satellite, providing high-resolution, large swath radar images with a short repeat cycle, a complete avalanche record for a forecasting region could become feasible. In this first test season, we detected more than 550 avalanches that were released during a one-month period over an area of

  11. River monitoring from satellite radar altimetry in the Zambezi River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. Michailovsky

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite radar altimetry can be used to monitor surface water levels from space. While current and past altimetry missions were designed to study oceans, retracking the waveforms returned over land allows data to be retrieved for smaller water bodies or narrow rivers. The objective of this study is the assessment of the potential for river monitoring from radar altimetry in terms of water level and discharge in the Zambezi River basin. Retracked Envisat altimetry data were extracted over the Zambezi River basin using a detailed river mask based on Landsat imagery. This allowed for stage measurements to be obtained for rivers down to 80 m wide with an RMSE relative to in situ levels of 0.32 to 0.72 m at different locations. The altimetric levels were then converted to discharge using three different methods adapted to different data-availability scenarios: first with an in situ rating curve available, secondly with one simultaneous field measurement of cross-section and discharge, and finally with only historical discharge data available. For the two locations at which all three methods could be applied, the accuracies of the different methods were found to be comparable, with RMSE values ranging from 4.1 to 6.5% of the mean annual in situ gauged amplitude for the first method and from 6.9 to 13.8% for the second and third methods. The precision obtained with the different methods was analyzed by running Monte Carlo simulations and also showed comparable values for the three approaches with standard deviations found between 5.7 and 7.2% of the mean annual in situ gauged amplitude for the first method and from 8.7 to 13.0% for the second and third methods.

  12. Thirty years of elevation change on Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves from multimission satellite radar altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Helen Amanda; Padman, Laurie

    2012-02-01

    We use data acquired between 1978 and 2008 by four satellite radar altimeter missions (Seasat, ERS-1, ERS-2 and Envisat) to determine multidecadal elevation change rates (dhi/dt) for six major Antarctic Peninsula (AP) ice shelves. In areas covered by the Seasat orbit (to 72.16°S), regional-averaged 30-year trends were negative (surface lowering), with rates between -0.03 and -0.16 m a-1. Surface lowering preceded the start of near-continuous radar altimeter operations that began with ERS-1 in 1992. The average rate of lowering for the first 14 years of the period was typically smaller than the 30-year average; the exception was the southern Wilkins Ice Shelf, which experienced negligible lowering between 2000 and 2008, when a series of large calving events began. Analyses of the continuous ERS/Envisat time series (to 81.5°) for 1992-2008 reveal a period of strong negative dhi/dt on most ice shelves between 1992 and 1995. Based on prior studies of regional atmospheric and oceanic conditions, we hypothesize that the observed elevation changes on Larsen C Ice Shelf are driven primarily by firn compaction while the western AP ice shelves are responding to changes in both surface mass balance and basal melt rates. Our time series also show that large changes in dhi/dt can occur on interannual time scales, reinforcing the importance of long time series altimetry to separate long-term trends associated with climate change from interannual to interdecadal natural variability.

  13. A Potential Integrated Multiwavelength Radar System at the Medicina Radiotelescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebugnoli, S.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Pluchino, S.

    2009-03-01

    Ground-based radars provide a powerful tool for detection, tracking and identification of the space debris fragments orbiting around Earth at different altitudes. The Medicina Radioastronomical Station is an Italian radio observation facility that is here proposed as receiving part of a bistatic radar system for detecting and tracking space debris at different orbital regions (from Low Earth Orbits up to Geostationary Earth Orbits).

  14. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  15. Reconfigurable signal processor designs for advanced digital array radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Hernan; Zhang, Yan (Rockee); Yu, Xining

    2017-05-01

    The new challenges originated from Digital Array Radar (DAR) demands a new generation of reconfigurable backend processor in the system. The new FPGA devices can support much higher speed, more bandwidth and processing capabilities for the need of digital Line Replaceable Unit (LRU). This study focuses on using the latest Altera and Xilinx devices in an adaptive beamforming processor. The field reprogrammable RF devices from Analog Devices are used as analog front end transceivers. Different from other existing Software-Defined Radio transceivers on the market, this processor is designed for distributed adaptive beamforming in a networked environment. The following aspects of the novel radar processor will be presented: (1) A new system-on-chip architecture based on Altera's devices and adaptive processing module, especially for the adaptive beamforming and pulse compression, will be introduced, (2) Successful implementation of generation 2 serial RapidIO data links on FPGA, which supports VITA-49 radio packet format for large distributed DAR processing. (3) Demonstration of the feasibility and capabilities of the processor in a Micro-TCA based, SRIO switching backplane to support multichannel beamforming in real-time. (4) Application of this processor in ongoing radar system development projects, including OU's dual-polarized digital array radar, the planned new cylindrical array radars, and future airborne radars.

  16. Evaluating Frontal Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and a Satellite Simulator as Compared to Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled a frontal precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. Simulations with bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been evaluated with those remote sensing data. In the current study, we continue similar work to evaluate a spectral bin microphysics (SBM) scheme, HUCM, in the WRF model. The Goddard-Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU) is used to simulate quantities observed by the radar and radiometer. With advanced representation of cloud and precipitation microphysics processes, the HUCM scheme predicts distributions of 7 hydrometeor species as storms evolve. In this study, the simulation with HUCM well captured the structure of the precipitation and its microphysics characteristics. In addition, it improved total precipitation ice mass simulation and corrected, to a certain extent, the large low bias of ice scattering signature in the bulk scheme simulations. However, the radar reflectivity simulations with the HUCM scheme were not improved as compared to the bulk schemes. We conducted investigations to understand how microphysical processes and properties, such as snow break up parameter and particle fall velocities would influence precipitation size distribution and spectrum of water paths, and further modify radar and/or radiometer simulations. Influence by ice nuclei is going to be examined as well.

  17. Integration of WERA Ocean Radar into Tsunami Early Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzvonkovskaya, Anna; Helzel, Thomas; Kniephoff, Matthias; Petersen, Leif; Weber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    High-frequency (HF) ocean radars give a unique capability to deliver simultaneous wide area measurements of ocean surface current fields and sea state parameters far beyond the horizon. The WERA® ocean radar system is a shore-based remote sensing system to monitor ocean surface in near real-time and at all-weather conditions up to 300 km offshore. Tsunami induced surface currents cause increasing orbital velocities comparing to normal oceanographic situation and affect the measured radar spectra. The theoretical approach about tsunami influence on radar spectra showed that a tsunami wave train generates a specific unusual pattern in the HF radar spectra. While the tsunami wave is approaching the beach, the surface current pattern changes slightly in deep water and significantly in the shelf area as it was shown in theoretical considerations and later proved during the 2011 Japan tsunami. These observed tsunami signatures showed that the velocity of tsunami currents depended on a tsunami wave height and bathymetry. The HF ocean radar doesn't measure the approaching wave height of a tsunami; however, it can resolve the surface current velocity signature, which is generated when tsunami reaches the shelf edge. This strong change of the surface current can be detected by a phased-array WERA system in real-time; thus the WERA ocean radar is a valuable tool to support Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS). Based on real tsunami measurements, requirements for the integration of ocean radar systems into TEWS are already defined. The requirements include a high range resolution, a narrow beam directivity of phased-array antennas and an accelerated data update mode to provide a possibility of offshore tsunami detection in real-time. The developed software package allows reconstructing an ocean surface current map of the area observed by HF radar based on the radar power spectrum processing. This fact gives an opportunity to issue an automated tsunami identification message

  18. IMPLEMENTATION OF AERONAUTICAL LOCAL SATELLITE AUGMENTATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojce Ilcev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper introduces development and implementation of new Local Satellite AugmentationSystem as an integration component of the Regional Satellite Augmentation System (RSAS employingcurrent and new Satellite Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS for improvement of the AirTraffic Control (ATC and Air Traffic Management (ATM and for enhancement safety systems includingtransport security and control of flights in all stages, airport approaching, landing, departures and allmovements over airport surface areas. The current first generation of the Global Navigation Satellite SystemGNSS-1 applications are represented by fundamental military solutions for Position, Velocity and Time ofthe satellite navigation and determination systems such as the US GPS and Russian GLONASS (Former-USSR requirements, respectively. The establishment of Aeronautical CNS is also discussed as a part ofGlobal Satellite Augmentation Systems of GPS and GLONASS systems integrated with existing and futureRSAS and LSAS in airports areas. Specific influence and factors related to the Comparison of the Currentand New Aeronautical CNS System including the Integration of RSAS and GNSS solutions are discussedand packet of facts is determined to maximize the new satellite Automatic Dependent Surveillance System(ADSS and Special Effects of the RSAS Networks. The possible future integration of RSAS and GNSS andthe common proposal of the satellite Surface Movement Guidance and Control are presented in thechangeless ways as of importance for future enfacements of ATC and ATM for any hypothetical airportinfrastructure.Keywords: ADSS, ATC, ATM, CNS, GSAS, LRAS, RSAS, SMGC, Special Effects of RSAS.

  19. Fifteen Years of Synthetic Aperture Radar Calibration Using Trihedral Reflectors at the Alaska Satellite Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, W.; Atwood, D.; Lawlor, O. S.; Utley, P.; Slater, C.

    2006-12-01

    For the past 15 years, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has provided calibration support for singly polarized SAR datasets in C-band (ERS-1, ERS-2, and RADARSAT-1 and L-Band (JERS-1. Passive point targets like trihedral corner reflectors offer a reliable and well established means to perform radiometric, geometric, and impulse response measurements for SAR calibration. Routine support of an array of corner reflectors in interior Alaska has permitted ASF an opportunity to monitor satellite health, calibrate SAR processors, and experiment with new reflector designs. Corner reflectors offer the advantages of low maintenance and low cost compared to active devices such as transponders. In order to maintain radar cross section, as the microwave wavelength get longer, so too does the size of the reflector. Increased size means decreased portability, exacerbating the difficulty of providing calibration support in remote locations. In response, ASF is developing low cost, light weight corner reflectors that can be deployed with minimal effort and no maintenance. These efforts will help to extend our present calibration efforts to more remote locations. But more importantly, these designs are expected to play an important role in Permanent Scatterer InSAR (PS-InSAR) methodology. The use of corner reflector arrays in support PS-InSAR may provide new means for monitoring terrain displacements in regions of heavy vegetation. This paper presents some long term measurements from ASF's array of corner reflectors, outlines improvements performed on trihedral corner reflectors, and describes current efforts at ASF to support the next generation of SAR missions and techniques.

  20. Forecast of wheat yield throughout the agricultural season using optical and radar satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieuzal, R.; Baup, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the capabilities of forecasting the yield of wheat using an artificial neural network combined with multi-temporal satellite data acquired at high spatial resolution throughout the agricultural season in the optical and/or microwave domains. Reflectance (acquired by Formosat-2, and Spot 4-5 in the green, red, and near infrared wavelength) and multi-configuration backscattering coefficients (acquired by TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 in the X- and C-bands, at co- (abbreviated HH and VV) and cross-polarization states (abbreviated HV and VH)) constitute the input variable of the artificial neural networks, which are trained and validated on the successively acquired images, providing yield forecast in near real-time conditions. The study is based on data collected over 32 fields of wheat distributed over a study area located in southwestern France, near Toulouse. Among the tested sensor configurations, several satellite data appear useful for the yield forecasting throughout the agricultural season (showing coefficient of determination (R2) larger than 0.60 and a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 9.1 quintals by hectare (q ha-1)): CVH, CHV, or the combined used of XHH and CHH, CHH and CHV, or green reflectance and CHH. Nevertheless, the best accurate forecast (R2 = 0.76 and RMSE = 7.0 q ha-1) is obtained longtime before the harvest (on day 98, during the elongation of stems) using the combination of co- and cross-polarized backscattering coefficients acquired in the C-band (CVV and CVH). These results highlight the high interest of using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data instead of optical ones to early forecast the yield before the harvest of wheat.

  1. Introducing multisensor satellite radiance-based evaluation for regional Earth System modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; Aires, F.

    2014-07-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  2. Introducing Multisensor Satellite Radiance-Based Evaluation for Regional Earth System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  3. Interpretation of Radar Data from the Icy Galilean Satellites and Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrola, Eric Michael

    1995-01-01

    We extend Eshleman's (Science 234, 1986, 587-590) analysis of an icy buried crater model and show that it can explain anomalous 3.5 and 13 cm-lambda radar echoes from the icy Galilean satellites- -radar albedos sigma~ 0.7 -2.6, circular and linear polarization ratios mu C~1.5 and mu L~0.5, and Doppler spectra with cosmTheta scattering law exponents m~1 -2. The model hypothesizes that radio waves are totally internally reflected N times from the walls of buried craters --tens of meters in radii with a water-ice overburden of permittivity varepsilon_1~3.2 varepsilon_0 that is larger than the permittivity varepsilon_2 of the material (probably porous ice) below the crater walls--and are brought to a focus, appearing to come from annular "glory halos" inside the craters, which break up into several coherent glints, each of azimuthal extent H, filling the halo to fraction F. We use geometrical and wave optics to include effects not accounted for by Eshleman, including: the ice overburden, arbitrary crater position, and crater shadowing. The values N = 3 and varepsilon_2/varepsilon _1 = 0.63 give mu_ {C} = 1.6, muL = 0.4, m = 1.9, and spectra that agree well with the general trends in the observations. With FH/ lambda = 10, the areal densities of buried craters on the three satellites required to fit the observed radar albedos are, 0.38, 0.21, and 0.10 for Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. We determine that Triton's N_2 atmosphere's surface pressure is 1.4 +/- 0.1 Pa and "equivalent isothermal temperature" is 42 +/- 4 K using least squares inversion of the 3.6 and 13 cm-lambda Voyager 2 radio occultation phase data with an exponential model of the atmospheric contribution to the phase (1.7 rad at 3.6 cm-lambda in lower 60 km) and a polynomial model of the nonlinear phase drift (1 rad per 100 km altitude) of the Voyager ultrastable oscillator (USO). Assuming vapor pressure equilibrium between the N_2 gas and ice, the surface temperature is 37.5 +/- 0.5 K, which, together

  4. The 2015 Gorkha earthquake investigated from radar satellites: Slip and stress modeling along the MHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqi eDiao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The active collision at the Himalayas combines crustal shortening and thickening, associated with the development of hazardous seismogenic faults. The 2015 Kathmandu earthquake largely affected Kathmandu city and partially ruptured a previously identified seismic gap. With a magnitude of Mw 7.8 as determined by the GEOFON seismic network, the 25 April 2015 earthquake displays uplift of the Kathmandu basin constrained by interferometrically processed ALOS-2, RADARSAT-2 and Sentinel-1 satellite radar data. An area of about 7,000 km² in the basin showed ground uplift locally exceeding 2 m, and a similarly large area (approx. 9000 km2 showed subsidence in the north, both of which could be simulated with a fault that is localized beneath the Kathmandu basin at a shallow depth of 5-15 km. Coulomb stress calculations reveal that the same fault adjacent to the Kathmandu basin experienced stress increase, similar as at sub-parallel faults of the thin skinned nappes, exactly at the location where the largest aftershock occurred (Mw 7.3 on 12. May, 2015. Therefore this study provides insights into the shortening and uplift tectonics of the Himalayas and shows the stress redistribution associated with the earthquake.

  5. Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California, inferred from satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, C.W.; Thatcher, W.; Monastero, F.C.; Hasting, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of deformation from 1992 to 1997 in the southern Coso Range using satellite radar interferometry show deformation rates of up to 35 mm yr-1 in an area ???10 km by 15 km. The deformation is most likely the result of subsidence in an area around the Coso geothermal field. The deformation signal has a short-wavelength component, related to production in the field, and a long-wavelength component, deforming at a constant rate, that may represent a source of deformation deeper than the geothermal reservoir. We have modeled the long-wavelength component of deformation and inferred a deformation source at ???4 km depth. The source depth is near the brittle-ductile transition depth (inferred from seismicity) and ???1.5 km above the top of the rhyolite magma body that was a source for the most recent volcanic eruption in the Coso volcanic field [Manley and Bacon, 2000]. From this evidence and results of other studies in the Coso Range, we interpret the source to be a leaking deep reservoir of magmatic fluids derived from a crystallizing rhyolite magma body.

  6. Characterization of Terrestrial Water Dynamics in the Congo Basin Using GRACE and Satellite Radar Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lyongki; Beighley, R. Edward; Alsdorf, Douglas; Jung, Hahn Chul; Shum, C. K.; Duan, Jianbin; Guo, Junyi; Yamazaki, Dai; Andreadis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The Congo Basin is the world's third largest in size (approximately 3.7 million km^2), and second only to the Amazon River in discharge (approximately 40,200 cms annual average). However, the hydrological dynamics of seasonally flooded wetlands and floodplains remains poorly quantified. Here, we separate the Congo wetland into four 3 degree x 3 degree regions, and use remote sensing measurements (i.e., GRACE, satellite radar altimeter, GPCP, JERS-1, SRTM, and MODIS) to estimate the amounts of water filling and draining from the Congo wetland, and to determine the source of the water. We find that the amount of water annually filling and draining the Congo wetlands is 111 km^3, which is about one-third the size of the water volumes found on the mainstem Amazon floodplain. Based on amplitude comparisons among the water volume changes and timing comparisons among their fluxes, we conclude that the local upland runoff is the main source of the Congo wetland water, not the fluvial process of river-floodplain water exchange as in the Amazon. Our hydraulic analysis using altimeter measurements also supports our conclusion by demonstrating that water surface elevations in the wetlands are consistently higher than the adjacent river water levels. Our research also highlights differences in the hydrology and hydrodynamics between the Congo wetland and the mainstem Amazon floodplain.

  7. River monitoring from satellite radar altimetry in the Zambezi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. Michailovsky

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite radar altimetry can be used to monitor surface water levels from space. While current and past altimetry missions were designed to study oceans, retracking the waveforms returned over land allows data to be retrieved for smaller water bodies or narrow rivers. In this study, retracked Envisat altimetry data was extracted over the Zambezi River Basin using a detailed river mask based on Landsat imagery. This allowed for stage measurements to be obtained for rivers down to 80 m wide with an RMSE relative to in situ levels of 0.32 to 0.72 m at different locations. The altimetric levels were then converted to discharge using three different methods adapted to different data-availability scenarios: first with an in situ rating curve available, secondly with one simultaneous field measurement of cross-section and discharge, and finally with only historical discharge data available. For the two locations at which all three methods could be applied the accuracies of the different methods were found to be comparable, with RMSE values ranging from 5.5 to 7.4 % terms of high flow estimation relative to in situ gauge measurements. The precision obtained with the different methods was analyzed by running Monte Carlo simulations and also showed comparable values for the three approaches with standard deviations found between 8.2 and 25.8 % of the high flow estimates.

  8. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Ciro Del; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 – December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption. PMID:24169569

  9. Design of the American Mobile Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittiver, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) Mobile Satellite System (MSS). A summary of the mobile satellite (MSAT) design and overall performance is provided. The design and components of both the forward link and return link transponders are described in detail. The design and operation of a unique hybrid matrix amplifier that offers flexible power distribution is outlined. The conceptual design and performance of three types of land mobile antennas are described.

  10. Solid-State Cloud Radar System (CRS) Upgrade and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Matt; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Coon, Michael; Venkatesh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The recent decade has brought rapid development in solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) technology. This has enabled the use of solid-state precipitation radar in place of high-power and high-voltage systems such as those that use Klystron or Magnetron transmitters. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has recently completed a comprehensive redesign of the 94 gigahertz Cloud Radar System (CRS) to incorporate a solid-state transmitter. It is the first cloud radar to achieve sensitivity comparable to that of a high-voltage transmitter using solid-state. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Cloud Radar System (CRS) is a 94 gigahertz Doppler radar that flies on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The upgraded CRS system utilizes a state-of-the-art solid-state 94 gigahertz power amplifier with a peak transmit power of 30 watts. The modernized CRS system is detailed here with data results from its deployment during the 2014 Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX).

  11. Integration of Mobil Satellite and Cellular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, E. H.; Estabrook, P.; Pinck, D.; Ekroot, L.

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established.

  12. Experimental millimeter-wave satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Masaaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Shiomi, Tadashi; Kitazume, Susumu

    This paper describes an experimental system of millimeter-wave satellite communications via Japan's Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) and a plan of experiments. Two experimental missions are planned using ETS-VI millimeter-wave (43/38 GHz bands) transponder, considering the millimeter-wave characteristics such as large transmission capacity and possibility to construct a small earth station with a high gain antenna. They are a personal communication system and an inter-satellite communication system. Experimental system including the configuration and the fundamental functions of the onboard transponder and the outline of the experiments are presented.

  13. Satellite Sanitary Systems in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letema, S.; Van Vliet, B.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite sewage collection and treatment systems have been independently developed and managed in East African cities outside the centrally planned and sewered areas. A satellite approach is a promising provisioning option parallel to public sewerage for middle- and high-income residential areas, e

  14. Satellite Sanitary Systems in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letema, S.C.; Vliet, van B.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite sewage collection and treatment systems have been independently developed and managed in East African cities outside the centrally planned and sewered areas. A satellite approach is a promising provisioning option parallel to public sewerage for middle- and high-income residential areas, e

  15. S-band synthetic aperture radar on-board NISAR satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Tapan; Bhan, Rakesh; Putrevu, Deepak; Mehrotra, Priyanka; Chakrabarty, Soumyabrata

    2016-05-01

    provide single, dual, compact and quasi-quad polarization imaging modes. Centre frequency for S-band SAR is 3200MHz with highest bandwidth of 75MHz. S-Band SAR utilizes 24 transmit receive modules (T/R Modules) to illuminate >240kms swath during transmit event and digital beam forming (DBF) on receive to reduce data rate by combining 24 receive channels and enhance SNR of the system. This paper provides details of S-band SAR system design, configuration and realization which is a challenging task since both L-band and S-band radars need to operate at same PRF and clock reference during simultaneous imaging operation. Further to this, SweepSAR technique demands PRF dithering (changing) to avoid dead gaps in the swath due to receive echo conflicting with transmit event.

  16. Advanced tracking and data relay satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this communication satellite system are as follows: to provide NASA needs for satellite tracking and communications through the year 2012; to maintain and augment the current TDRS system when available satellite resources are expended in the latter part of the decade; to provide the necessary ground upgrade to support the augmented services; and to introduce new technology to reduce the system life cycle cost. It is concluded that no ATDRS spacecraft requirement for new modulation techniques, that data rate of 650 MBps is required, and that Space Station Freedom requirement is for 650 MBps data some time after the year 2000.

  17. Radar Based Flow and Water Level Forecasting in Sewer Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Grum, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the first radar based forecast of flow and/or water level in sewer systems in Denmark. The rainfall is successfully forecasted with a lead time of 1-2 hours, and flow/levels are forecasted an additional ½-1½ hours using models describing the behaviour of the sewer system. Both...... radar data and flow/water level model are continuously updated using online rain gauges and online in-sewer measurements, in order to make the best possible predictions. The project show very promising results, and show large potentials, exploiting the existing water infrastructure in future climate...

  18. Reliability Growth Analysis of Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    obtained. In addition, the Cumulative Intensity Function ( CIF ) of a family of satellite systems was analyzed to assess its similarity to that of a...parameters are obtained. In addition, the Cumulative Intensity Function ( CIF ) of a family of satellite systems was analyzed to assess its similarity to that...System Figures 7a through 7i display the real CIF for a variety of GOES missions. These cumulative intensity functions have shapes similar to the

  19. A new digital land mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philip

    A description is given of the different digital services planned to be carried over existing and planned mobile satellite systems. These systems are then compared with analog services in terms of bandwidth and power efficiency. This comparison provides the rationale for the establishment of a digital land mobile satellite service (DLMSS) to use frequencies that are currently available but not yet assigned to a domestic mobile satellite system in the United States. The focus here is on the expected advantages of digital transmission techniques in accommodating additional mobile satellite systems in this portion of the spectrum, and how such techniques can fully satisfy voice, data and facsimile mobile communications requirements in a cost effective manner. A description is given of the system architecture of the DMLSS service proposed by the Geostar Messaging Corporation (GMC) and the market potential of DLMSS.

  20. Routine Ocean Monitoring With Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery Obtained From the Alaska Satellite Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel, W. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Li, X.; Friedman, K.; Monaldo, F.; Thompson, D.; Wackerman, C.; Scott, C.; Jackson, C.; Beal, R.; McGuire, J.; Nicoll, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has been processing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for research and for near-real-time applications demonstrations since shortly after the launch of the European Space Agency's ERS-1 satellite in 1991. The long coastline of Alaska, the vast extent of ocean adjacent to Alaska, a scarcity of in-situ observations, and the persistence of cloud cover all contribute to the need for all-weather ocean observations in the Alaska region. Extensive experience with SAR product processing algorithms and SAR data analysis techniques, and a growing sophistication on the part of SAR data and product users have amply demonstrated the value of SAR instruments in providing this all-weather ocean observation capability. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been conducting a near-real-time applications demonstration of SAR ocean and hydrologic products in Alaska since September 1999. This Alaska SAR Demonstration (AKDEMO) has shown the value of SAR-derived, high-resolution (sub kilometer) ocean surface winds to coastal weather forecasting and the understanding of coastal wind phenomena such as gap winds, barrier jets, vortex streets, and lee waves. Vessel positions and ice information derived from SAR imagery have been used for management of fisheries, protection of the fishing fleet, enforcement of fisheries regulations, and protection of endangered marine mammals. Other ocean measurements, with potentially valuable applications, include measurement of wave state (significant wave height, dominant wave direction and wavelength, and wave spectra), mapping of oil spills, and detection of shallow-water bathymetric features. In addition to the AKDEMO, ASF-processed SAR imagery is being used: (1) in the Gulf of Mexico for hurricane wind studies, and post-hurricane oil-spill and oil-platform analyses (the latter employing ship-detection algorithms for detection of changes in oil-platform locations); (2) in the North Pacific

  1. China's Meteorological Satellite Application System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiashen

    2008-01-01

    @@ (Continued) Applications In Global Environment And Natural Disaster Monitoring 1) Application in world crop yield estimation China is now one of the few nations in the world that can provide operational service with both GEO and polar-orbit meteorological satellites.

  2. Development of a Low-Cost UAV Doppler Radar Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuble, Joseph; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the design of a low cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) doppler radar data system is presented. The topics include: 1) Science and Mission Background; 2) Radar Requirements and Specs; 3) Radar Realization: RF System; 4) Processing of RF Signal; 5) Data System Design Process; 6) Can We Remove the DSP? 7) Determining Approximate Speed Requirements; 8) Radar Realization: Data System; 9) Data System Operation; and 10) Results.

  3. Alignments between galaxies, satellite systems and haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Shi; Frenk, Carlos S; Gao, Liang; Crain, Robert A; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the satellite populations of the Milky Way and Andromeda are puzzling in that they are nearly perpendicular to the disks of their central galaxies. To understand the origin of such configurations we study the alignment of the central galaxy, satellite system and dark matter halo in the largest of the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) simulation. We find that centrals and their satellite systems tend to be well aligned with their haloes, with a median misalignment angle of $33^{\\circ}$ in both cases. While the centrals are better aligned with the inner $10$ kpc halo, the satellite systems are better aligned with the entire halo indicating that satellites preferentially trace the outer halo. The central - satellite alignment is weak (median misalignment angle of $52^{\\circ}$) and we find that around $20\\%$ of systems have a misalignment angle larger than $78^{\\circ}$, which is the value for the Milky Way. The central - satellite alignment is a conseq...

  4. Radar sensing via a Micro-UAV-borne system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Ludeno, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco; Rodi Vetrella, Amedeo; Fasano, Giancarmine

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, the miniaturization of flight control systems and payloads has contributed to a fast and widespread diffusion of micro-UAV (Unmanned Aircraft Vehicle). While micro-UAV can be a powerful tool in several civil applications such as environmental monitoring and surveillance, unleashing their full potential for societal benefits requires augmenting their sensing capability beyond the realm of active/passive optical sensors [1]. In this frame, radar systems are drawing attention since they allow performing missions in all-weather and day/night conditions and, thanks to the microwave ability to penetrate opaque media, they enable the detection and localization not only of surface objects but also of sub-surface/hidden targets. However, micro-UAV-borne radar imaging represents still a new frontier, since it is much more than a matter of technology miniaturization or payload installation, which can take advantage of the newly developed ultralight systems. Indeed, micro-UAV-borne radar imaging entails scientific challenges in terms of electromagnetic modeling and knowledge of flight dynamics and control. As a consequence, despite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is a traditional remote sensing tool, its adaptation to micro-UAV is an open issue and so far only few case studies concerning the integration of SAR and UAV technologies have been reported worldwide [2]. In addition, only early results concerning subsurface imaging by means of an UAV-mounted radar are available [3]. As a contribution to radar imaging via autonomous micro-UAV, this communication presents a proof-of-concept experiment. This experiment represents the first step towards the development of a general methodological approach that exploits expertise about (sub-)surface imaging and aerospace systems with the aim to provide high-resolution images of the surveyed scene. In details, at the conference, we will present the results of a flight campaign carried out by using a single radar

  5. Scanning array radar system for bridge subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Ping; Ren, Yu-Jiun; Yu, Tzu Yang

    2012-04-01

    Early damage detection of bridge has been an important issue for modern civil engineering technique. Existing bridge inspection techniques used by State Department of Transportation (DOT) and County DOT include visual inspection, mechanical sounding, rebound hammer, cover meter, electrical potential measurements, and ultrasonics; other NDE techniques include ground penetrating radar (GPR), radiography, and some experimental types of sensors. Radar technology like GPR has been widely used for the bridge structure detection with a good penetration depth using microwave energy. The system to be presented in this paper is a different type of microwave sensing technology. It is focus on the subsurface detection and trying to find out detail information at subsurface (10 cm) with high resolution radar imaging from a flexible standoff distance. Our radar operating frequency is from 8-12 GHz, which is different from most of the current GPR systems. Scanning array antenna system is designed for adjustable beamwidth, preferable scanning area, and low sidelobe level. From the theoretical analysis and experimental results, it is found that the proposed technique can successfully capture the presence of the near-surface anomaly. This system is part of our Multi- Modal Remote Sensing System (MRSS) and provides good imaging correlations with other MRSS sensors.

  6. Satellite power system (SPS) initial insurance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    The beginning of a process to educate the insurance industry about the Satellite Power System is reported. The report is divided into three sections. In the first section a general history describes how space risks are being insured today. This is followed by an attempt to identify the major risks inherent to the SPS. The final section presents a general projection of insurance market reactions to the Satellite Power System.

  7. Multitarget Identification and Localization Using Bistatic MIMO Radar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guisheng Liao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A scheme for multitarget identification and localization using bistatic MIMO radar systems is proposed. Multitarget can be distinguished by Capon method, as well as the targets angles with respect to transmitter and receiver can be synthesized using the received signals. Thus, the locations of the multiple targets are obtained and spatial synchronization problem in traditional bistatic radars is avoided. The maximum number of targets that can be uniquely identified by proposed method is also analyzed. It is indicated that the product of the numbers of receive and transmit elements minus-one targets can be identified by exploiting the fluctuating of the radar cross section (RCS of the targets. Cramer-Rao bounds (CRB are derived to obtain more insights of this scheme. Simulation results demonstrate the performances of the proposed method using Swerling II target model in various scenarios.

  8. An automated radar-signature measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Juergen

    The design and operation of an automated measurement facility permitting determination of radar cross sections and location and characterization of scattering centers on aircraft models up to 4.5 m in length are described and illustrated with diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. The facility comprises a 15 x 5.8 x 3.8-m measurement chamber, a rotating platform with maximum load 270 kg and elevation range from -5 to +35 deg (precision 0.1 deg), a tunable broadband 2-18-GHz transmitter, a phase-sensitive receiver, and control and data-processing computers. The analytical techniques employed to correct for measurement errors and to resolve scattering centers both longitudinally and transversely (two-dimensional representation) are explained and demonstrated. The facility is currently being used to develop and evaluate stealth-type aircraft designs.

  9. Proceedings of the COST 75 final seminar on advanced weather radar systems; Beitraege des Instituts zum COST 75 final seminar on advanced weather radar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, R.; Flender, F.; Hagen, M.; Hoeller, H.; Keil, C.; Meischner, P.

    1998-07-01

    Across Europe more than 110 weather radars are in operation. More than 60 of them are Doppler radars and this number is increasing steadily. Doppler systems are becoming an operational standard. Most systems operate in C-band, with the exception of the Spanish radar network which is composed of S-band Doppler radars. Radar product composites are available for Scandinavia and Central Europe. National networks exist for the UK, France and Spain. Europe further is fortunate to have 8 polarimetric Doppler radars used mainly for research. In Italy some of those systems are used also for operational nowcasting applications for dedicated customers. The Chilbolton multiparameter Doppler radar operates at S-band. (orig.)

  10. Advanced RADAR Sensors Modeling for Driving Assistance Systems Testing.

    OpenAIRE

    KEDZIA, Jean-Claude; DESOUZA, Philippe; Gruyer, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    With Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) getting always more sophisticated, the related Virtual Prototyping platforms have to propose a very high level of accuracy with improved flexibility regarding vehicles, sensors, environments and scenarios. In this paper a new strategy is introduced for RADAR sensors modeling aimed at allowing high accuracy while limiting the related development efforts.

  11. Optical techniques for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, J. R.

    1985-03-01

    It is concluded that optical techniques offer some advantages for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems. They are clearly ideal for transporting microwave signals over considerable distances, as in remote positioning of radar receivers, provided high dynamic range is not required and an enclosed transmission path is essential. They are an elegant means of distributing low level r.f. or i.f. signals around an active phased array where these signals are of relatively constant amplitude (as in mixer local oscillator applications). However, there is currently a rather restrictive limit on the size of distribution network possible. Optical techniques are obviously suitable for distributing digital control signals to phased array modules and confer considerable immunity to interference. They are less suitable for high dynamic range signals, such as the received radar returns, either at r.f. or when downcovered to i.f. Future developments in coherent optics or in fast optical A/D technology could, however, influence this conclusion. Currently, the optimum applications for optical techniques appear to be i.f. beamformers for multibeam communication satellite systems and in calibration/monitoring systems for phased arrays.

  12. Accuracy analysis of the 2014-2015 Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-sec C-Band height model using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukul, Manas; Srivastava, Vinee; Mukul, Malay

    2016-07-01

    Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data products have been widely used in Earth Sciences without an estimation of their accuracy and reliability even though large outliers exist in them. The global 1 arc-sec, 30 m resolution, SRTM C-Band (C-30) data collected in February 2000 has been recently released (2014-2015) outside North America. We present the first global assessment of the vertical accuracy of C-30 data using Ground Control Points (GCPs) from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Network of high-precision static fiducial stations that define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Large outliers (height error ranging from -1285 to 2306 m) were present in the C-30 dataset and 14% of the data were removed to reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) of the dataset from ˜187 to 10.3 m which is close to the SRTM goal of an absolute vertical accuracy of RMSE ˜10 m. Globally, for outlier-filtered data from 287 GCPs, the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibited a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 6.5 ± 0.5 m. Continent-wise, only Australia, North and South America complied with the SRTM goal. At stations where all the X- and C-Band SRTM data were present, the RMSE of the outlier-filtered C-30 data was 11.7 m. However, the RMSE of outlier-included dataset where C- and X-Band data were present was ˜233 m. The results suggest that the SRTM data must only be used after regional accuracy analysis and removal of outliers. If used raw, they may produce results that are statistically insignificant with RMSE in 100s of meters.

  13. Accuracy analysis of the 2014–2015 Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-sec C-Band height model using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Mukul; Vinee Srivastava; Malay Mukul

    2016-07-01

    Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data products have been widely used in EarthSciences without an estimation of their accuracy and reliability even though large outliers exist in them.The global 1 arc-sec, 30 m resolution, SRTM C-Band (C-30) data collected in February 2000 has beenrecently released (2014–2015) outside North America. We present the first global assessment of thevertical accuracy of C-30 data using Ground Control Points (GCPs) from the International GNSS Service(IGS) Network of high-precision static fiducial stations that define the International Terrestrial ReferenceFrame (ITRF). Large outliers (height error ranging from –1285 to 2306 m) were present in the C-30dataset and 14% of the data were removed to reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) of the datasetfrom ∼187 to 10.3 m which is close to the SRTM goal of an absolute vertical accuracy of RMSE ∼10 m.Globally, for outlier-filtered data from 287 GCPs, the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heightsexhibited a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 6.5 ± 0.5 m. Continent-wise,only Australia, North and South America complied with the SRTM goal. At stations where all the XandC-Band SRTM data were present, the RMSE of the outlier-filtered C-30 data was 11.7 m. However,the RMSE of outlier-included dataset where C- and X-Band data were present was ∼233 m. The resultssuggest that the SRTM data must only be used after regional accuracy analysis and removal of outliers.If used raw, they may produce results that are statistically insignificant with RMSE in 100s of meters.

  14. Satellite Application for Disaster Management Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpanachi, George

    Abstract Satellites are becoming increasingly vital to modern day disaster management activities. Earth observation (EO) satellites provide images at various wavelengths that assist rapid-mapping in all phases of the disaster management cycle: mitigation of potential risks in a given area, preparedness for eventual disasters, immediate response to a disaster event, and the recovery/reconstruction efforts follo wing it. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) assist all the phases by providing precise location and navigation data, helping manage land and infrastructures, and aiding rescue crews coordinate their search efforts. Effective disaster management is a complex problem, because it involves many parameters, which are usually not easy to measure and even identify: Analysis of current situation, planning, optimum resource management, coordination, controlling and monitoring current activities and making quick and correct decisions are only some of these parameters, whose complete list is very long. Disaster management information systems (DMIS) assist disaster management to analyse the situation better, make decisions and suggest further actions following the emergency plans. This requires not only fast and thorough processing and optimization abilities, but also real-time data provided to the DMIS. The need of DMIS for disaster’s real-time data can be satisfied by small satellites data utilization. Small satellites can provide up-to-data, plus a better media to transfer data. This paper suggests a rationale and a framework for utilization of small Satellite data by DMIS. DMIS should be used ‘’before’’, ‘’during’’ and ‘’after’’ the disasters. Data provided by the Small Satellites are almost crucial in any period of the disasters, because early warning can save lives, and satellite data may help to identify disasters before they occur. The paper also presents’ ‘when’’,

  15. 76 FR 67017 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. DOT. ACTION: Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems... waivers to foreign manufacturers of airport avian radar systems that meet the requirements of FAA...

  16. 76 FR 35176 - Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... emission limits be modified for vehicular radar systems operating within the 76- 77 GHz band. Specifically... proposes to modify its rules for vehicular radar systems operating in the 76-77 GHz band as TMC requests... there is very little likelihood that vehicular radar systems operating at either the current or...

  17. High-Resolution Mapping of Sea Ice, Icebergs and Growlers in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, using Ground Based Radar, Satellite, and UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauknes, T. R.; Rouyet, L.; Solbø, S. A.; Sivertsen, A.; Storvold, R.; Akbari, V.; Negrel, J.; Gerland, S.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of sea ­ice has a well­ recognized role in the climate system and its extent and evolution is impacted by the global warming. In addition, calving of icebergs and growlers at the tidewater glacier fronts is a component of the mass loss in polar regions. Understanding of calving and ice ­ocean interaction, in particular at tidewater glacier front remains elusive, and a problematic uncertainty in climate change projections. Studying the distribution, volumetry and motion of sea ­ice, icebergs and growlers is thus essential to understand their interactions with the environment in order to be able to predict at short­term their drifts, e.g. to mitigate the risk for shipping, and at longer term the multiple relations with climate changes. Here, we present the results from an arctic fieldwork campaign conducted in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in April 2016, where we used different remote sensing instruments to observe dynamics of sea ice, icebergs, and growlers. We used a terrestrial radar system, imaging the study area every second minute during the observation period. At the front of the Kronebreen glacier, calving events can be detected and the drift of the generated icebergs and growlers tracked with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. During the field campaign, we collected four Radarsat-2 quad-pol images, that will be used to classify the different types of sea ice. In addition, we used small unmanned aircraft (UAS) instrumented with high resolution cameras capturing HD video and still pictures. This allows to map and measure the size of icebergs and ice floes. Such information is essential to validate sensitivity and detection limits from the ground and satellite based measurements.

  18. Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar-Radiometer Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori information derived from physical models or independent, high-quality observations is incorporated into the solution. In the present study, a database of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures is constructed to serve as a priori information in a passive microwave radiometer algorithm. The precipitation profiles are derived from a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar radiometer algorithm, and the brightness temperatures are TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observed. Because the observed brightness temperatures are consistent with those derived from a radiative transfer model embedded in the combined algorithm, the precipitation brightness temperature database is considered to be physically consistent. The database examined here is derived from the analysis of a month-long record of TRMM data that yields more than a million profiles of precipitation and associated brightness temperatures. These profiles are clustered into a tractable number of classes based on the local sea surface temperature, a radiometer-based estimate of the echo-top height (the height beyond which the reflectivity drops below 17 dBZ), and brightness temperature principal components. For each class, the mean precipitation profile, brightness temperature principal components, and probability of occurrence are determined. The precipitation brightness temperature database supports a radiometer-only algorithm that incorporates a Bayesian estimation methodology. In the Bayesian framework, precipitation estimates are weighted averages of the mean precipitation values corresponding to the classes in the database, with the weights being determined according to the similarity between the observed brightness temperature principal

  19. Simultaneous measurements from the Millstone Hill radar and the Active satellite during the SAID/SAR arc event of the March 1990 CEDAR storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Förster

    Full Text Available During a nearby passage of the Active satellite above the Millstone Hill radar on 21 March 1990 at local sunset, the satellite and the radar performed simultaneous measurements of upper ionospheric parameters in nearly the same spatial volume. For this purpose the radar carried out a special azimuth-elevation scan to track the satellite. Direct comparisons of radar data and in situ satellite measurements have been carried out quite rarely. In this case, the coincidence of co-ordinated measurements and active ionospheric-magnetospheric processes during an extended storm recovery phase presents a unique occasion resulting in a very valuable data set. The measurements show generally good agreement both during quiet prestorm and storm conditions and the combination of radar and satellite observations gives a more comprehensive picture of the physical processes involved. We find a close relationship between the rapid westward ion drift peak at subauroral latitudes (SAID event and the occurrence of a stable auroral red (SAR arc observed after sunset by an all-sky imager and reported in an earlier study of this event. The SAID electric field is caused by the penetration of energetic ions with energies between about 1 keV and 100 keV into the outer plasmasphere to a latitude equatorward of the extent of the plasmasheet electrons. Charge separation results in the observed polarisation field and the SAID. Unusually high molecular ion densities measured by the satellite at altitudes of 700-870 km at subauroral and auroral latitudes point on strong upward-directed ion acceleration processes and an intense neutral gas upwelling. These structures are collocated with a narrow trough in electron density and an electron temperature peak as observed simultaneously by the radar and the satellite probes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density; Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere.

  20. A Synthetic Aperture System Based on Backscattering Signals of Compass Navigation Satellite: Concept and Feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hai-yang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A concept of a bi-static geosynchronous synthetic aperture system, which is formed by reusing backscattered signals of Compass Navigation Satellite System (CNSS, is proposed. The geometric relations of a geostationary satellite of CNSS, located on a geosynchronous satellite receiver, which is illuminated by the backscattered energy of a satellite of CNSS, and a ground station is built up, and following the relations as well as principle of synthetic aperture radar, we expatiate the feasibility of the system by considering parameters such as imaging resolution, ratio of signal to noise and link budget, etc.. Besides, the potential remote sensing applications for measurement of terrain humidity, characteristics of space-time dynamics of changing of terrain surface and atmospheric characteristic, etc..

  1. Mimo radar waveform design for spectrum sharing with cellular systems a Matlab based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Khawar, Awais; Clancy, T Charles

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses spectrum sharing between cellular systems and radars. The book addresses a novel way to design radar waveforms that can enable spectrum sharing between radars and communication systems, without causing interference to communication systems, and at the same time achieving radar objectives of target detection, estimation, and tracking. The book includes a MATLAB-based approach, which provides reader with a way to learn, experiment, compare, and build on top of existing algorithms.

  2. Interference suppression in noise radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukanović, Slobodan; Daković, Miloš; Thayaparan, Thayananthan; Stanković, Ljubiša

    2011-06-01

    This paper addresses the issue of interference suppression in noise radars. The proposed methods can be divided into non-parametric and parametric ones. The considered non-parametric methods are based on linear time-frequency (TF) tools, namely the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and local polynomial Fourier transform (LPFT). The STFT is the simplest TF method, but, due to the resolution problem, it performs poorly with highly nonstationary interferences. The LPFT resolves the resolution problem, however at the cost of increased complexity. In parametric methods, the phase of interference is locally approximated by a polynomial, which is motivated by the Weierstrass's theorem. Using the phase approximation, the corrupted received signal is demodulated and successively filtered. Two methods for polynomial phase approximation are considered, the high-order ambiguity function (HAF) and product high-order ambiguity function (PHAF). The method based on the HAF is computationally efficient; however, it suffers from the identifiability problem when multicomponent signals are considered. The identifiability problem can be resolved using the PHAF.

  3. Doppler radar sensor positioning in a fall detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Popescu, Mihail; Ho, K C; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Falling is a common health problem for more than a third of the United States population over 65. We are currently developing a Doppler radar based fall detection system that already has showed promising results. In this paper, we study the sensor positioning in the environment with respect to the subject. We investigate three sensor positions, floor, wall and ceiling of the room, in two experimental configurations. Within each system configuration, subjects performed falls towards or across the radar sensors. We collected 90 falls and 341 non falls for the first configuration and 126 falls and 817 non falls for the second one. Radar signature classification was performed using a SVM classifier. Fall detection performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for each sensor deployment. We found that a fall is more likely to be detected if the subject is falling toward or away from the sensor and a ceiling Doppler radar is more reliable for fall detection than a wall mounted one.

  4. Odyssey, an optimized personal communications satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Roger J.

    Personal communications places severe demands on service providers and transmission facilities. Customers are not satisfied with the current levels of service and want improvements. Among the characteristics that users seek are: lower service rates, hand held convenience, acceptable time delays, ubiquitous service, high availability, reliability, and high quality. The space industry is developing commercial space systems for providing mobile communications to personal telephones. Provision of land mobile satellite service is fundamentally different from the fixed satellite service provided by geostationary satellites. In fixed service, the earth based antennas can depend on a clear path from user to satellite. Mobile users in a terrestrial environment commonly encounter blockage due to vegetation, terrain or buildings. Consequently, high elevation angles are of premium value. TRW studied the issues and concluded that a Medium Earth Orbit constellation is the best solution for Personal Communications Satellite Service. TRW has developed Odyssey, which uses twelve satellites in medium altitude orbit to provide personal communications satellite service. The Odyssey communications system projects a multibeam antenna pattern to the Earth. The attitude control system orients the satellites to ensure constant coverage of land mass and coastal areas. Pointing can be reprogrammed by ground control to ensure optimized coverage of the desired service areas. The payload architecture features non-processing, "bent pipe" transponders and matrix amplifiers to ensure dynamic power delivery to high demand areas. Circuit capacity is 3000 circuits per satellite. Each satellite weighs 1917 kg (4226 pounds) at launch and the solar arrays provide 3126 Watts of power. Satellites are launched in pairs on Ariane, Atlas, or other vehicles. Each satellite is placed in a circular orbit at an altitude of 10,354 km. There are three orbit planes inclined at 55° to the equatorial plane

  5. A Space Based Solar Power Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, J. M.; Polling, D.; Ustamujic, F.; Yaldiz, R.; et al.

    2002-01-01

    (SPoTS) supplying other satellites with energy. SPoTS is due to be commercially viable and operative in 2020. of Technology designed the SPoTS during a full-time design period of six weeks as a third year final project. The team, organized according to the principles of systems engineering, first conducted a literature study on space wireless energy transfer to select the most suitable candidates for use on the SPoTS. After that, several different system concepts have been generated and evaluated, the most promising concept being worked out in greater detail. km altitude. Each SPoTS satellite has a 50m diameter inflatable solar collector that focuses all received sunlight. Then, the received sunlight is further redirected by means of four pointing mirrors toward four individual customer satellites. A market-analysis study showed, that providing power to geo-stationary communication satellites during their eclipse would be most beneficial. At arrival at geo-stationary orbit, the focused beam has expended to such an extent that its density equals one solar flux. This means that customer satellites can continue to use their regular solar arrays during their eclipse for power generation, resulting in a satellite battery mass reduction. the customer satellites in geo-stationary orbit, the transmitted energy beams needs to be pointed with very high accuracy. Computations showed that for this degree of accuracy, sensors are needed, which are not mainstream nowadays. Therefore further research must be conducted in this area in order to make these high-accuracy-pointing systems commercially attractive for use on the SPoTS satellites around 2020. Total 20-year system lifetime cost for 18 SPoT satellites are estimated at approximately USD 6 billion [FY2001]. In order to compete with traditional battery-based satellite power systems or possible ground based wireless power transfer systems the price per kWh for the customer must be significantly lower than the present one

  6. Multibeam monopulse radar for airborne sense and avoid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2016-10-01

    The multibeam monopulse radar for Airborne Based Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) system concept is the next step in the development of passive monopulse direction finder proposed by Stephen E. Lipsky in the 80s. In the proposed system the multibeam monopulse radar with an array of directional antennas is positioned on a small aircaraft or Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). Radar signals are simultaneously transmitted and received by multiple angle shifted directional antennas with overlapping antenna patterns and the entire sky, 360° for both horizontal and vertical coverage. Digitizing of amplitude and phase of signals in separate directional antennas relative to reference signals provides high-accuracy high-resolution range and azimuth measurement and allows to record real time amplitude and phase of reflected from non-cooperative aircraft signals. High resolution range and azimuth measurement provides minimal tracking errors in both position and velocity of non-cooperative aircraft and determined by sampling frequency of the digitizer. High speed sampling with high-accuracy processor clock provides high resolution phase/time domain measurement even for directional antennas with wide Field of View (FOV). Fourier transform (frequency domain processing) of received radar signals provides signatures and dramatically increases probability of detection for non-cooperative aircraft. Steering of transmitting power and integration, correlation period of received reflected signals for separate antennas (directions) allows dramatically decreased ground clutter for low altitude flights. An open architecture, modular construction allows the combination of a radar sensor with Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B), electro-optic, acoustic sensors.

  7. Meteo-marine parameters for highly variable environment in coastal regions from satellite radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskachevsky, A. L.; Rosenthal, W.; Lehner, S.

    2016-09-01

    The German Bight of the North Sea is the area with highly variable sea state conditions, intensive ship traffic and with a high density of offshore installations, e.g. wind farms in use and under construction. Ship navigation and the docking on offshore constructions is impeded by significant wave heights HS > 1.3 m. For these reasons, improvements are required in recognition and forecasting of sea state HS in the range 0-3 m. Thus, this necessitates the development of new methods to determine the distribution of meteo-marine parameters from remote sensing data with an accuracy of decimetres for HS. The operationalization of these methods then allows the robust automatic processing in near real time (NRT) to support forecast agencies by providing validations for model results. A new empirical algorithm XWAVE_C (C = coastal) for estimation of significant wave height from X-band satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has been developed, adopted for coastal applications using TerraSAR-X (TS-X) and Tandem-X (TD-X) satellites in the German Bight and implemented into the Sea Sate Processor (SSP) for fully automatic processing for NRT services. The algorithm is based on the spectral analysis of subscenes and the model function uses integrated image spectra parameters as well as local wind information from the analyzed subscene. The algorithm is able to recognize and remove the influence of non-sea state produced signals in the Wadden Sea areas such as dry sandbars as well as nonlinear SAR image distortions produced by e.g. short wind waves and breaking waves. Also parameters of very short waves, which are not visible in SAR images and produce only unsystematic clutter, can be accurately estimated. The SSP includes XWAVE_C, a pre-filtering procedure for removing artefacts such as ships, seamarks, buoys, offshore constructions and slicks, and an additional procedure performing a check of results based on the statistics of the whole scene. The SSP allows an

  8. Simultaneous Antarctic Gravity Wave Observations in PMCs from the AIM Satellite and PMSE Observations from PANSY Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzanowicz, M. E.; Yue, J.; Russell, J. M., III; Sato, K.; Kohma, M.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) are high-altitude ice clouds that form in the cold summer mesopause region due to adiabatic cooling caused by an upwelling induced by the global meridional circulation, which is driven by gravity wave dissipation and forcing. Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) are strong coherent echoes also observed in the polar summer mesosphere and are considered to be related to ionization and the small-scale structure associated with PMCs, with their origins thought to be strongly related. The peak PMSE height can be located slightly below the summer mesopause temperature minimum but above the PMC altitude. Upward propagating atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) are usually considered to be the cause of the wave patterns seen in PMCs. Monitoring PMCs and PMSEs will provide important tools in detecting climate change in the upper atmosphere and a better understanding of the earth-climate system. The science goal I plan to accomplish is to investigate the possibility of a connection between gravity wave perturbation characteristics in PMCs from the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) satellite and PMSE structures observed by PANSY (program of the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS radar). Data from the CIPS instrument onboard AIM, PANSY, and AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) will be used. AIM provides a two-dimensional horizontal view of the atmosphere dynamics embedded in PMCs, while PANSY provides a vertical view of PMSEs and gravity waves with high temporal resolution. The combination of AIM and PANSY will provide a three-dimensional view of the atmosphere, AGWs, PMCs and PMSEs. AIRS provides information about AGWs in the stratosphere. Wave analysis of the Fast Fourier Transform or a wavelet analysis will be used to complete the science goal. AIRS will be used to examine how lower atmosphere meteorology may impact the PMC and PMSE structures.

  9. Satellite radar altimetry over ice. Volume 1: Processing and corrections of Seasat data over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Major, Judith A.; Martin, Thomas V.; Bindschadler, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The data-processing methods and ice data products derived from Seasat radar altimeter measurements over the Greenland ice sheet and surrounding sea ice are documented. The corrections derived and applied to the Seasat radar altimeter data over ice are described in detail, including the editing and retracking algorithm to correct for height errors caused by lags in the automatic range tracking circuit. The methods for radial adjustment of the orbits and estimation of the slope-induced errors are given.

  10. Linear Frequency Modulated Signals VS Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing Signals for Synthetic Aperture Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    FREQUENCY MODULATED SIGNALS VS ORTHOGONAL FREQUENCY DIVISION MULTIPLEXING SIGNALS FOR SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR SYSTEMS by Sade A. Holder June...SIGNALS VS ORTHOGONAL FREQUENCY DIVISION MULTIPLEXING SIGNALS FOR SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR SYSTEMS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Sade A. Holder 7...OFDM) signal versus a linear frequency modulated or chirp signal on simulated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. Various parameters of the

  11. 78 FR 19063 - Airworthiness Approval for Aircraft Forward-Looking Windshear and Turbulence Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Turbulence Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for comment... approval for aircraft forward-looking windshear and turbulence radar systems. The planned advisory circular..., Airborne Weather Radar Equipment. The objective is to leverage the installation specific guidance from...

  12. Flood occurrence mapping of the middle Mahakam lowland area using satellite radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hidayat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Floodplain lakes and peatlands in the middle Mahakam lowland area are considered as ecologically important wetland in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. However, due to a lack of data, the hydrological functioning of the region is still poorly understood. Among remote sensing techniques that can increase data availability, radar is well-suitable for the identification, mapping, and measurement of tropical wetlands, for its cloud unimpeded sensing and night and day operation. Here we aim to extract flood extent and flood occurrence information from a series of radar images of the middle Mahakam lowland area. We explore the use of Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR imagery for observing flood inundation dynamics by incorporating field water level measurements. Water level measurements were carried out along the river, in lakes and in peatlands, using pressure transducers. For validation of the open water flood occurrence map, bathymetry measurements were carried out in the main lakes. A series of PALSAR images covering the middle and lower Mahakam area in the years 2007 through 2010 were collected. A fully inundated region can be easily recognized on radar images from a dark signature. Open water flood occurrence was mapped using a threshold value taken from radar backscatter of the permanently inundated river and lakes areas. Radar backscatter intensity analysis of the vegetated floodplain area revealed consistently high backscatter values, indicating flood inundation under forest canopy. We used those values as the threshold for flood occurrence mapping in the vegetated area.

  13. Assessment of the Impact of Reservoirs in the Upper Mekong River Using Satellite Radar Altimetry and Remote Sensing Imageries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ting Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Water level (WL and water volume (WV of surface-water bodies are among the most crucial variables used in water-resources assessment and management. They fluctuate as a result of climatic forcing, and they are considered as indicators of climatic impacts on water resources. Quantifying riverine WL and WV, however, usually requires the availability of timely and continuous in situ data, which could be a challenge for rivers in remote regions, including the Mekong River basin. As one of the most developed rivers in the world, with more than 20 dams built or under construction, Mekong River is in need of a monitoring system that could facilitate basin-scale management of water resources facing future climate change. This study used spaceborne sensors to investigate two dams in the upper Mekong River, Xiaowan and Jinghong Dams within China, to examine river flow dynamics after these dams became operational. We integrated multi-mission satellite radar altimetry (RA, Envisat and Jason-2 and Landsat-5/-7/-8 Thematic Mapper (TM/Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+/Operational  Land Imager (OLI optical remote sensing (RS imageries to construct composite WL time series with enhanced spatial resolutions and substantially extended WL data records. An empirical relationship between WL variation and water extent was first established for each dam, and then the combined long-term WL time series from Landsat images are reconstructed for the dams. The R2 between altimetry WL and Landsat water area measurements is >0.95. Next, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM data were used to diagnose and determine water variation caused by the precipitation anomaly within the basin. Finally, the impact of hydrologic dynamics caused by the impoundment of the dams is assessed. The discrepancy between satellite-derived WL and available in situ gauge data, in term of root-mean-square error (RMSE is at 2–5 m level. The estimated WV variations derived from combined RA

  14. Localization Capability of Cooperative Anti-Intruder Radar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Montanari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available System aspects of an anti-intruder multistatic radar based on impulse radio ultrawideband (UWB technology are addressed. The investigated system is composed of one transmitting node and at least three receiving nodes, positioned in the surveillance area with the aim of detecting and locating a human intruder (target that moves inside the area. Such systems, referred to also as UWB radar sensor networks, must satisfy severe power constraints worldwide imposed by, for example, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC and by the European Commission (EC power spectral density masks. A single transmitter-receiver pair (bistatic radar is considered at first. Given the available transmitted power and the capability of the receiving node to resolve the UWB pulses in the time domain, the surveillance area regions where the target is detectable, and those where it is not, are obtained. Moreover, the range estimation error for the transmitter-receiver pair is discussed. By employing this analysis, a multistatic system is then considered, composed of one transmitter and three or four cooperating receivers. For this multistatic system, the impact of the nodes location on area coverage, necessary transmitted power and localization uncertainty is studied, assuming a circular surveillance area. It is highlighted how area coverage and transmitted power, on one side, and localization uncertainty, on the other side, require opposite criteria of nodes placement. Consequently, the need for a system compromising between these factors is shown. Finally, a simple and effective criterion for placing the transmitter and the receivers is drawn.

  15. Verifying command sequences for satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, James F., III; Ramanna, Sheela

    1992-10-01

    We present a formal basis for the design of a Checker used in validating safe schedules and in selecting error recovery schedules for satellite control systems. This design includes a high-level specification of Checker behavior and properties (called flight rules) of safe schedules. Specifications are written in Timed Linear Logic (TLL). Validation of schedules is performed in terms of real-time telemetry and deduction system proof rules. Telemetry (state information for satellite subsystems) serves as input to the Checker. Detection of violation of a flight rule by the Checker results in the selection of a contingency plan (error recovery schedule). The Checker is illustrated in terms of the TOPEX/Poseidon Oceanographic Satellite System.

  16. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  17. A relativistic and autonomous navigation satellite system

    CERN Document Server

    Delva, Pacôme; Kostić, Uros; Carloni, Sante

    2011-01-01

    A relativistic positioning system has been proposed by Bartolom\\'e Coll in 2002. Since then, several group developed this topic with different approaches. I will present a work done in collaboration with Ljubljana University and the ESA Advanced Concepts Team. We developed a concept, Autonomous Basis of Coordinates, in order to take advantage of the full autonomy of a satellite constellation for navigation and positioning, by means of satellite inter-links. I will present the advantages of this new paradigm and a number of potential application for reference systems, geophysics and relativistic gravitation.

  18. Multiangle Bistatic SAR Imaging and Fusion Based on BeiDou-2 Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (BSAR based on the Global Navigation Service System (GNSSBSAR uses navigation satellites as radar transmitters, which are low in cost. However, GNSS-BSAR images have poor resolution and low Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR. In this paper, a multiangle observation and data processing strategy are presented based on BeiDou-2 navigation satellite imagery, from which twenty-six BSAR images in different configurations are obtained. A region-based fusion algorithm using region of interest segmentation is proposed, and a high-quality fusion image is obtained. The results reveal that the multiangle imaging method can extend the applications of GNSS-BSAR.

  19. Advantages of Hybrid Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Bilajbegović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In a decision-making situation, what kind of GPS equipment to purchase, one always has a dilemma, tobuy hybrid (GPS+GLONASS or only GPS receivers? In the case of completeness of the GLONASS satellite system, this dilemma probably would not have existed. The answer to this dilemma is given in the present paper, but for the constellation of the GLONASS satellites in summer 2006 (14 satellites operational. Due to the short operational period of these satellites (for example GLONASS-M, 5 years, and not launching new ones, at this moment (February 25, 2007, only 10 satellites are operational. For the sake of research and giving answers to these questions, about 252 RTK measurements have been done using (GPS and GNSS receivers, on points with different obstructions of horizon. Besides that, initialisation time has been investigated for both systems from about 480 measurements, using rover's antenna with metal cover, during a time interval of 0.5, 2 and 5 seconds. Moreover, accuracy, firmware declared accuracy and redundancy of GPS and GNSS RTK measurements have been investigating.  

  20. Decision Tool for optimal deployment of radar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    A Decision Tool for air defence is presented. This Decision Tool, when provided with information about the radar, the environment, and the expected class of targets, informs the radar operator about detection probabilities. This assists the radar operator to select the optimum radar parameters. n

  1. Decision Tool for optimal deployment of radar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    A Decision Tool for air defence is presented. This Decision Tool, when provided with information about the radar, the environment, and the expected class of targets, informs the radar operator about detection probabilities. This assists the radar operator to select the optimum radar parameters. n th

  2. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Qin Wang

    Full Text Available High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF. The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results.

  3. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results.

  4. A native IP satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, O.; Schmidt, M.; Ebert, J.; Schlemmer, H.; Kastner-Puschl, S.; Riedler, W.

    2004-08-01

    ≪ In the framework of ESA's ARTES-5 program the Institute of Applied Systems Technology (Joanneum Research) in cooperation with the Department of Communications and Wave Propagation has developed a novel meshed satellite communications system which is optimised for Internet traffic and applications (L*IP—Local Network Interconnection via Satellite Systems Using the IP Protocol Suite). Both symmetrical and asymmetrical connections are supported. Bandwidth on demand and guaranteed quality of service are key features of the system. A novel multi-frequency TDMA access scheme utilises efficient methods of IP encapsulation. In contrast to other solutions it avoids legacy transport network techniques. While the DVB-RCS standard is based on ATM or MPEG transport cells, the solution of the L*IP system uses variable-length cells which reduces the overhead significantly. A flexible and programmable platform based on Linux machines was chosen to allow the easy implementation and adaptation to different standards. This offers the possibility to apply the system not only to satellite communications, but provides seamless integration with terrestrial fixed broadcast wireless access systems. The platform is also an ideal test-bed for a variety of interactive broadband communications systems. The paper describes the system architecture and the key features of the system.

  5. Doppler visibility of coherent random noise radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixi; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-05-01

    Random noise radar has recently been used in a variety of imaging and surveillance applications. These systems can be made phase coherent using the technique of heterodyne correlation. Phase coherence has been exploited to measure Doppler and thereby the velocity of moving targets. The Doppler visibility, i.e., the ability to extract Doppler information over the inherent clutter spectra, is constrained by system parameters, especially the phase noise generated by microwave components. Our paper proposes a new phase noise model for the heterodyne mixer as applicable for ultrawideband (UWB) random noise radar and for the local oscillator in the time domain. The Doppler spectra are simulated by including phase noise contamination effects and compared to our previous experimental results. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) optimization routine is applied to synthesize the effects of a variety of parameter combinations to derive a suitable empirical formula for estimating the Doppler visibility in dB. According to the phase noise analysis and the simulation results, the Doppler visibility of UWB random noise radar depends primarily on the following parameters: (a) the local oscillator (LO) drive level of the receiver heterodyne mixer; (b) the saturation current in the receiver heterodyne mixer; (c) the bandwidth of the transmit noise source, and; (d) the target velocity. Other parameters such as the carrier frequency of the receiver LO and the loaded quality factor of the LO have a small effect over the range of applicability of the model and are therefore neglected in the model formulation. The Doppler visibility curves generated from this formula match the simulation results very well over the applicable parameter range within 1 dB. Our model may therefore be used to quickly estimate the Doppler visibility of random noise radars for trade-off analysis.

  6. Coastal flood inundation monitoring with Satellite C-band and L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Bannister, Terri

    2013-01-01

    Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was evaluated as a method to operationally monitor the occurrence and distribution of storm- and tidal-related flooding of spatially extensive coastal marshes within the north-central Gulf of Mexico. Maps representing the occurrence of marsh surface inundation were created from available Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-Band SAR (PALSAR) (L-band) (21 scenes with HH polarizations in Wide Beam [100 m]) data and Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) Advanced SAR (ASAR) (C-band) data (24 scenes with VV and HH polarizations in Wide Swath [150 m]) during 2006-2009 covering 500 km of the Louisiana coastal zone. Mapping was primarily based on a decrease in backscatter between reference and target scenes, and as an extension of previous studies, the flood inundation mapping performance was assessed by the degree of correspondence between inundation mapping and inland water levels. Both PALSAR- and ASAR-based mapping at times were based on suboptimal reference scenes; however, ASAR performance seemed more sensitive to reference-scene quality and other types of scene variability. Related to water depth, PALSAR and ASAR mapping accuracies tended to be lower when water depths were shallow and increased as water levels decreased below or increased above the ground surface, but this pattern was more pronounced with ASAR. Overall, PALSAR-based inundation accuracies averaged 84% (n = 160), while ASAR-based mapping accuracies averaged 62% (n = 245).

  7. Nanosar-case study of synthetic aperture radar for nano-satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, S.; Oever, M. van den; Mahapatra, P.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Gill, E.; Meijer, R.J.; Verhoeven, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-satellites have a cost advantage due to their low mass and usage of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies. However, the low mass also restricts the functionality of a nano-satellite's payload. Typically, this would imply instruments with very low to low resolution and accuracy, essentially

  8. Nanosar-case study of synthetic aperture radar for nano-satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, S.; Oever, M. van den; Mahapatra, P.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Gill, E.; Meijer, R.J.; Verhoeven, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-satellites have a cost advantage due to their low mass and usage of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies. However, the low mass also restricts the functionality of a nano-satellite's payload. Typically, this would imply instruments with very low to low resolution and accuracy, essentially ruli

  9. Neptunian Satellites observed with Keck AO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, F.; Urata, R.; de Pater, I.; Gibbard, S.; Hammel, H. B.; Berthier, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Neptunian system was observed on 9 different nights between July 2002 and October 2003 with the 10-m Keck telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and its facility instrument NIRC2 coupled with the Adaptive Optics system. Data were recorded in J (1.2μ m), and H (2.2μ m) bands. The angular resolution achieved on a one-minute integration time image is 0.50 arcsec, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 1100 km. The images display small structures such as the rings (de Pater et al. 2004), clouds in the atmosphere (Gibbard et al. 2003), and inner satellites, mainly Proteus, Larissa, Galatea, Despina, and Thalassa. On the 40 images, the positions and intensities of the satellites detected were accurately measured fitting the signal with a gaussian profile. The center of Neptune was obtained by fitting the disk position with an ellipse. After correcting for the detector distortion, we compared the satellite positions with the predicted ones delivered by several ephemerides. We used the JPL (NEP016 + NEP022 + DE405) and two IMCCE ephemerides, an old version (VSOP87+Owen et al., 1991) and a more recent one (DE405+Le Guyader et al., 1993). All cases, we confirmed the presence of an apparent shift between the predicted and the observed positions. Table 1 (see http://astron.berkeley.edu/ fmarchis/Science/Neptune/Satellites/) summarizes the mean distance of the shift for satellites most frequently observed and the various ephemerides. In this presentation, we will report the positions of the satellites, and present their color and possible photometric variations derived from the observations. This work has been partially supported by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST - 9876783.

  10. Lightning protecting materials used on radar system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Damstra, Geert C.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Because of the extensive use in modern systems of very sensitive electronic components, lightning strikes does not represent only a threat, but something that cannot be neglected anymore and safety hazards caused by direct and indirect lightning to the aircraft or naval industry. Everyday new materi

  11. Low probability of intercept-based adaptive radar waveform optimization in signal-dependent clutter for joint radar and cellular communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenguang; Salous, Sana; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jianjiang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of low probability of intercept (LPI)-based adaptive radar waveform optimization in signal-dependent clutter for joint radar and cellular communication systems, where the radar system optimizes the transmitted waveform such that the interference caused to the cellular communication systems is strictly controlled. Assuming that the precise knowledge of the target spectra, the power spectral densities (PSDs) of signal-dependent clutters, the propagation losses of corresponding channels and the communication signals is known by the radar, three different LPI based criteria for radar waveform optimization are proposed to minimize the total transmitted power of the radar system by optimizing the multicarrier radar waveform with a predefined signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) constraint and a minimum required capacity for the cellular communication systems. These criteria differ in the way the communication signals scattered off the target are considered in the radar waveform design: (1) as useful energy, (2) as interference or (3) ignored altogether. The resulting problems are solved analytically and their solutions represent the optimum power allocation for each subcarrier in the multicarrier radar waveform. We show with numerical results that the LPI performance of the radar system can be significantly improved by exploiting the scattered echoes off the target due to cellular communication signals received at the radar receiver.

  12. Combined use of optical and radar satellite data for the monitoring of irrigation and soil moisture of wheat crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fieuzal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of radar signal over irrigated wheat fields and to assess the potentialities of radar observations for the monitoring of soil moisture. Emphasis is put on the use of high spatial and temporal resolution satellite data (Envisat/ASAR and Formosat-2. Time series of images were collected over the Yaqui irrigated area (Mexico throughout one agricultural season from December 2007 to May 2008, together with measurements of soil and vegetation characteristics and agricultural practices. The comprehensive analysis of these data indicates that the sensitivity of the radar signal to vegetation is masked by the variability of soil conditions. On-going irrigated areas can be detected all over the wheat growing season. The empirical algorithm developed for the retrieval of topsoil moisture from Envisat/ASAR images takes advantage of the Formosat-2 instrument capabilities to monitor the seasonality of wheat canopies. This monitoring is performed using dense time series of images acquired by Formosat-2 to set up the SAFY vegetation model. Topsoil moisture estimates are not reliable at the timing of plant emergence and during plant senescence. Estimates are accurate from tillering to grain filling stages with an absolute error about 9% (0.09 m3 m−3, 35% in relative value. This result is attractive since topsoil moisture is estimated at a high spatial resolution (i.e. over subfields of about 5 ha for a large range of biomass water content (from 5 and 65 t ha−1 independently from the viewing angle of ASAR acquisition (incidence angles IS1 to IS6.

  13. Application of Multifractal Analysis to Segmentation of Water Bodies in Optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Images

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Victor Manuel San

    2016-01-01

    A method for segmenting water bodies in optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite images is proposed. It makes use of the textural features of the different regions in the image for segmentation. The method consists in a multiscale analysis of the images, which allows us to study the images regularity both, locally and globally. As results of the analysis, coarse multifractal spectra of studied images and a group of images that associates each position (pixel) with its corresponding value of local regularity (or singularity) spectrum are obtained. Thresholds are then applied to the multifractal spectra of the images for the classification. These thresholds are selected after studying the characteristics of the spectra under the assumption that water bodies have larger local regularity than other soil types. Classifications obtained by the multifractal method are compared quantitatively with those obtained by neural networks trained to classify the pixels of the images in covered against uncovered b...

  14. Rheology of the Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Inferred from Satellite Radar Interferometry Data using an Inverse Control Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E.; Rignot, E.; Joughin, I.; Aubry, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet is surrounded by large floating ice shelves that spread under their own weight into the ocean. Ice shelf rigidity depends on ice temperature and fabrics, and is influenced by ice flow and the delicate balance between bottom and surface accumulation. Here, we use an inverse control method to infer the rigidity of the Ronne Ice Shelf that best matches observations of ice velocity from satellite radar interferometry. Ice rigidity, or flow law parameter B, is shown to vary between 300 and 900 kPa a(sup 1/3). Ice is softer along the side margins due to frictional heating, and harder along the outflow of large glaciers, which advect cold continental ice. Melting at the bottom surface of the ice shelf increases its rigidity, while freezing decreases it. Accurate numerical modelling of ice shelf flow must account for this spatial variability in mechanical characteristics.

  15. Ground settlement of Chek Lap Kok Airport, Hong Kong,detected by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry is used to investigate the slowly accumulating ground settlement at the new Chek Lap Kok Airport in Hong Kong. Most of the land occupied by the airport was reclaimed from the sea and therefore certain ground settlement in the area has been expected. A pair of ERS-2 SAR images spanning nearly a year is used in the study. The high spatial resolution (20 m× 20 m) ground settlement map derived indicates that the settlement that occurred in the area over the time period is as large as 50 mm. The SAR measurement results agree with the levelling measurements at some benchmarks in the area to well within 1 cm(rms error),and the overall correlation between the two types of results is 0.89. The paper presents some brief background of interferometric SAR, and outlines the data processing methods and results.

  16. Rheology of the Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Inferred from Satellite Radar Interferometry Data using an Inverse Control Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E.; Rignot, E.; Joughin, I.; Aubry, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet is surrounded by large floating ice shelves that spread under their own weight into the ocean. Ice shelf rigidity depends on ice temperature and fabrics, and is influenced by ice flow and the delicate balance between bottom and surface accumulation. Here, we use an inverse control method to infer the rigidity of the Ronne Ice Shelf that best matches observations of ice velocity from satellite radar interferometry. Ice rigidity, or flow law parameter B, is shown to vary between 300 and 900 kPa a(sup 1/3). Ice is softer along the side margins due to frictional heating, and harder along the outflow of large glaciers, which advect cold continental ice. Melting at the bottom surface of the ice shelf increases its rigidity, while freezing decreases it. Accurate numerical modelling of ice shelf flow must account for this spatial variability in mechanical characteristics.

  17. Networks for Autonomous Formation Flying Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblock, Eric J.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of three communications networks to support autonomous multi-spacecraft formation flying systems is presented. All systems are comprised of a ten-satellite formation arranged in a star topology, with one of the satellites designated as the central or "mother ship." All data is routed through the mother ship to the terrestrial network. The first system uses a TCP/lP over ATM protocol architecture within the formation the second system uses the IEEE 802.11 protocol architecture within the formation and the last system uses both of the previous architectures with a constellation of geosynchronous satellites serving as an intermediate point-of-contact between the formation and the terrestrial network. The simulations consist of file transfers using either the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or the Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) Protocol. The results compare the IF queuing delay, and IP processing delay at the mother ship as well as application-level round-trip time for both systems, In all cases, using IEEE 802.11 within the formation yields less delay. Also, the throughput exhibited by SAFE is better than FTP.

  18. Communications satellite system for Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegl, W.; Laufenberg, W.

    1980-09-01

    Earlier established requirement estimations were improved upon by contacting African administrations and organizations. An enormous demand is shown to exist for telephony and teletype services in rural areas. It is shown that educational television broadcasting should be realized in the current African transport and communications decade (1978-1987). Radio broadcasting is proposed in order to overcome illiteracy and to improve educational levels. The technical and commercial feasibility of the system is provided by computer simulations which demonstrate how the required objectives can be fulfilled in conjunction with ground networks.

  19. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  20. Coherent Laser Radar Metrology System for Large Scale Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of laser radar metrology inspection system is proposed that incorporates a novel, dual laser coherent detection scheme capable of eliminating both...

  1. Caractérisation spatiale de l’aléa inondation à partir d’images satellites RADAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Hostache

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dans le cadre de la gestion du risque d’inondation, la caractérisation spatiale de l’aléa est une problématique récurrente pour laquelle les techniques de télédétection, en particulier satellitales, peuvent s’avérer très utiles. L’objectif général de notre étude est d’évaluer les apports de l’utilisation de ces données et, en particulier, de développer des méthodes de valorisation des images satellites RADAR d’inondations pour la caractérisation spatiale de l’aléa. A terme, notre étude vise l’aide à la modélisation hydraulique par évaluation de hauteurs et de volumes d’eau. La méthode que nous proposons s’articule en trois étapes principales : 1 cartographie de l’extension des eaux à partir d’images RADAR et extraction des limites informatives, 2 estimation primaire de niveaux d’eau par croisement entre les limites informatives et un MNT, 3 réduction des incertitudes d’estimation des niveaux d’eau par introduction de concepts de cohérence hydraulique.

  2. Experimental 0.22 THz Stepped Frequency Radar System for ISAR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei Yan; Zhang, Cun Lin; Zhao, Ran; Zhao, Yue Jin

    2014-09-01

    High resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging is demonstrated by using a 0.22 THz stepped-frequency (SF) imaging radar system. The synthesis bandwidth of the terahertz (THz) SF radar is 12 GHz, which are beneficial for high resolution imaging. The resolution of ISAR image can reach centimeter-scale with the use of Range-Doppler algorithm (RDA). Results indicate that high resolution ISAR imaging is realized by using 0.22THz SF radar coupled with turntable scanning, which can provide foundations for further research on high-resolution radar image in the THz band.

  3. Monitoring of Arctic Conditions from a Virtual Constellation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    of glaciers and the speed of motion. h) Monitoring of the Northwest Passage. APPROACH 2013 MIZ Pilot Program: Starting in June to end of...Flux Buoy (AOFB), and CRREL Ice Mass Balance (IMB) buoy so comparisons of the in-situ data can be calculated with the SAR data. By tracking the...programming the satellite collections for the dynamic and sometimes erratic movements of the buoy was not trivial and required tasking the satellite

  4. Integrated radar-camera security system: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Palka, N.; Trzcinski, T.; Dulski, R.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.

    2011-06-01

    The nature of the recent military conflicts and terrorist attacks along with the necessity to protect bases, convoys and patrols have made a serious impact on the development of more effective security systems. Current widely-used perimeter protection systems with zone sensors will soon be replaced with multi-sensor systems. Multi-sensor systems can utilize day/night cameras, IR uncooled thermal cameras, and millimeter-wave radars which detect radiation reflected from targets. Ranges of detection, recognition and identification for all targets depend on the parameters of the sensors used and of the observed scene itself. In this paper two essential issues connected with multispectral systems are described. We will focus on describing the autonomous method of the system regarding object detection, tracking, identification, localization and alarm notifications. We will also present the possibility of configuring the system as a stationary, mobile or portable device as in our experimental results.

  5. Multi-agent system for target-adaptive radar tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Alan C.

    2012-06-01

    Sensor systems such as distributed sensor networks and radar systems are potentially agile - they have parameters that can be adjusted in real-time to improve the quality of data obtained for state-estimation and decision-making. The integration of such sensors with cyber systems involving many users or agents permits greater flexibility in choosing measurement actions. This paper considers the problem of selecting radar waveforms to minimize uncertainty about the state of a tracked target. Past work gave a tractable method for optimizing the choice of measurements when an accurate dynamical model is available. However, prior knowledge about a system is often not precise, for example, if the target under observation is an adversary. A multiple agent system is proposed to solve the problem in the case of uncertain target dynamics. Each agent has a different target model and the agents compete to explain past data and select the parameters of future measurements. Collaboration or competition between these agents determines which obtains access to the limited physical sensing resources. This interaction produces a self-aware sensor that adapts to changing information requirements.

  6. Modelling a C-Band Space Surveillance Radar using Systems Tool Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Orbit LOS Line of Sight PRF Pulse Repetition Frequency PSD Power Spectral Density RCS Radar Cross Section RF Radio Frequency SAR Synthetic...Simulation of both monostatic and bistatic radar systems.  Modelling of system characteristics (e.g. transmitter power, frequency, antenna size) and...system definition, search/track modes, refraction and constraints. Synthetic aperture radar ( SAR ) and jammers can be modelled but are not applicable in

  7. Optical and Radar Satellite Remote Sensing for Large Area Analysis of Landslide Activity in Southern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessner, S.; Behling, R.; Teshebaeva, K. O.; Motagh, M.; Wetzel, H. U.

    2014-12-01

    The presented work has been investigating the potential of optical and radar satellite remote sensing for the spatio-temporal analysis of landslide activity at a regional scale along the eastern rim of the Fergana Basin representing the area of highest landslide activity in Kyrgyzstan. For this purpose a multi-temporal satellite remote sensing database has been established for a 12.000 km2 study area in Southern Kyrgyzstan containing a multitude of optical data acquired during the last 28 years as well as TerraSAR-X and ALOS-PALSAR acquired since 2007. The optical data have been mainly used for creating a multi-temporal inventory of backdated landslide activity. For this purpose an automated approach for object-oriented multi-temporal landslide detection has been developed which is based on the analysis of temporal NDVI-trajectories complemented by relief information to separate landslide-related surface changes from other land cover changes. Applying the approach to the whole study area using temporal high resolution RapidEye time series data has resulted in the automated detection of 612 landslide objects covering a total area of approx. 7.3 km². Currently, the approach is extended to the whole multi-sensor time-series database for systematic analysis of longer-term landslide occurrence at a regional scale. Radar remote sensing has been focussing on SAR Interferometry (InSAR) to detect landslide related surface deformation. InSAR data were processed by repeat-pass interferometry using the DORIS and SARScape software. To better assess ground deformation related to individual landslide objects, InSAR time-series analysis has been applied using the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method. Analysis of the results in combination with optical data and DEM information has revealed that most of the derived deformations are caused by slow movements in areas of already existing landslides indicating the reactivation of older slope failures. This way, InSAR analysis can

  8. A Short Range, High Accuracy Radar Ranging System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    radar cross section of a triangular trihedral reflector can be calculated using a= 4ni (0.289 L) 2 2 (5) r, where L, is the length of the...imaximum radar cross section of 16.1 square meters. Alignment of the axis of the corner reflector was done visually: since triangular corner reflectors ...As the aircraft flies its motion causes the radar cross section of each of the many scatterers to fluctuate. If the radar

  9. Comparisons between Canadian prairie MF radars, FPI (green and OH lines and UARS HRDI systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Meek

    Full Text Available Detailed comparisons have been completed between the MF radars (MFR in the Canadian prairies and three other systems: two ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI and the UARS high resolution Doppler imager (HRDI system. The radars were at Sylvan Lake (52°N, 114°W, Robsart 
    (49°N, 109°W and the main continuing facility is at Saskatoon (52°N, 107°W. Statistical comparisons of hourly mean winds (1988-1992 for the Saskatoon MFR and FPI (557.7 nm green line using scatter plots, wind speed-ratios, and direction-difference histograms show excellent agreement for Saskatoon. No serious biases in speeds or directions occur at the height of best agreement, 98 km. If anything, the MFR speeds appear bigger. The same applies to the Sylvan Lake MFR and Calgary FPI, where the best height is 88 km. In both cases these are close to the preferred heights for the emission layers. Differences between measurements seen on individual days are likely related to the influence of gravity waves (GW upon the optical and radar systems, each of which have inherent spatial averaging (350, 50 km respectively, as well as the spatial difference between the nominal measurement locations. For HRDI, similar statistical comparisons are made, using single-overpass satellite winds and hourly means (to improve data quality from MFR. Heights of best agreement, based upon direction-difference histograms, are shown; there is a tendency, beginning near 87 km, for these MFR heights to be 2 or 3 km greater than the HRDI heights. Speeds at these heights are typically larger for the satellite (MFR/HRDI = 0.7–0.8. Reasons for the differences are investigated. It is shown that the estimated errors and short-term (90 min differences are larger for HRDI than for the MFR, indicating more noise or GW contamination. This leads to modest but significant differences in median speed-ratio (MFR/HRDI < 1. Also, comparison

  10. Long Term Monitoring of Ground Motions in Upper Silesia Coal Basin (USCB) Using Satellite Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graniczny, Marek; Przylucka, Maria; Kowalski, Zbigniew

    2016-08-01

    Subsidence hazard and risk within the USCB are usually connected with the deep coal mining. In such cases, the surface becomes pitted with numerous collapse cavities or basins which depth may even reach tens of meters. The subsidence is particularly dangerous because of causing severe damage to gas and water pipelines, electric cables, and to sewage disposal systems. The PGI has performed various analysis of InSAR data in this area, including all three SAR bands (X, C and L) processed by DInSAR, PSInSAR and SqueeSAR techniques. These analyses of both conventional and advanced DInSAR approaches have proven to be effective to detect the extent and the magnitude of mining subsidence impact on urban areas. In this study an analysis of two series of subsequent differential interferograms obtained in the DInSAR technique are presented. SAR scenes are covering two periods and were acquired by two different satellites: ALOS-P ALSAR data from 22/02/2007- 27/05/2008 and TerraSAR-X data from 05/07/2011-21/06/2012. The analysis included determination of the direction and development of subsidence movement in relation to the mining front and statistic comparison between range and value of maximum subsidence detected for each mining area. Detailed studies were performed for Bobrek-Centrum mining area. They included comparison of mining fronts and location of the extracted coal seams with the observed subsidence on ALOS-P ALSAR InSAR interferograms. The data can help in estimation not only the range of the subsidence events, but also its value, direction of changes and character of the motion.

  11. Battlespace surveillance using netted wireless random noise radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surender, Shrawan C.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-05-01

    Network-Centric Warfare (NCW) technology is currently being investigated to enhance the military"s effectiveness in the battlespace by providing the warfighter the necessary information to take proper decisions and win wars. One of the main battlespace requirements is surveillance, especially in today"s guerilla warfare theaters, such as the littoral and urban zones. NCW requires warfighters to be networked, self-organizing, spectrally undetectable, and having precise information about hostile targets in their vicinity. Towards this end, we are developing the concept of Netted Wireless Random Noise Radars, which is presented in this paper. The low probability-of-detection (LPD) and low probability-of-intercept (LPI) properties of random noise radars are well-known. Such radar sensors form a self-organizing network-centric architecture, using a deterministically fragmented spectrum to avoid spectral fratricide. The central concept is to use notch filtering to fragment parts of the band-limited non-coherent random noise waveform spectrum, and use these intermediate bandwidths for network communication (target tracking and track fusion) among the wireless sensors. For target detection and ranging, these sensors transmit random noise waveforms combined with continuous signals carrying digital data. As seen by the hostile target, the transmitted waveform appears random and noise-like. However, for the friendly sensors of this system, the noise-like signal contains camouflaged information. The advantages being envisioned with such a system are lower probability of detection due to noise-like transmissions, mobility to sensors due to the self-organizing capability, spectral efficiency due to fragmentation of spectrum, and better immunity to coherent interference due to the use of non-coherent signal waveforms.

  12. Analysis of chaotic FM system synchronization for bistatic radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Chandra S.; Verdin, Berenice; Flores, Benjamin C.; Boehm, James; Debroux, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    We propose a scheme for bistatic radar that uses a chaotic system to generate a wideband FM signal that is reconstructed at the receiver via a conventional phase lock loop. The setup for the bistatic radar includes a 3 state variable drive oscillator at the transmitter and a response oscillator at the receiver. The challenge is in synchronizing the response oscillator of the radar receiver utilizing a scaled version of the transmitted signal sr(t, x) = αst(t, x) where x is one of three driver oscillator state variables and α is the scaling factor that accounts for antenna gain, system losses, and space propagation. For FM, we also assume that the instantaneous frequency of the received signal, xs, is a scaled version of the Lorenz variable x. Since this additional scaling factor may not be known a priori, the response oscillator must be able to accept the scaled version of x as an input. Thus, to achieve synchronization we utilize a generalized projective synchronization technique that introduces a controller term -μe where μ is a control factor and e is the difference between the response state variable xs and a scaled x. Since demodulation of sr(t) is required to reconstruct the chaotic state variable x, the phase lock loop imposes a limit on the minimum error e. We verify through simulations that, once synchronization is achieved, the short-time correlation of x and xs is high and that the self-noise in the correlation is negligible over long periods of time.

  13. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and

  14. Nexrad-In-Space - A Geostationary Satellite Doppler Weather Radar for Hurricane Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, E.; Chandrasekar, V.; Chen, S. S.; Holland, G. J.; Kakar, R.; Lewis, W. E.; Marks, F. D.; Smith, E. A.; Tanelli, S.; Tripoli, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    The Nexrad-In-Space (NIS) is a revolutionary atmospheric radar observation concept from the geostationary orbiting platform. It was developed over the last 4 years under the auspices of NASA's Earth Science Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). The NIS radar would provide Ka-band (35 GHz) reflectivity and line-of-sight Doppler velocity profiles over a circular Earth region of approximately 5200 km in diameter with a 12-km horizontal resolution, and a minimum detectable signal of 5 dBZ. The NIS radar achieves its superb sampling capabilities by use of a 35-m diameter, deployable antenna made from lightweight membrane material. The antenna has two transmit-receive array pairs that create a dual-beam, spiral-feed combined profile image of both reflectivity and Doppler velocity approximately every 60 minutes. This sampling time can be shortened even further by increasing the number of transmit-receive array pairs. It is generally recognized that the processes important in governing hurricane intensity and structure span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The environmental forcing considerations require a large domain. The vortex response to the environmental forcing ultimately involves convection on small horizontal scales in the eyewall and rainband regions. Resolving this environment-vortex-convection feedback in a numerical model requires observations on the space and time scales necessary to unambiguously define these structures within and surrounding the tropical cyclone. Because the time and space scales of these processes are small, continuous 3-dimensional independent observations of the 3-dimensional wind and precipitation structures will be needed to initialize numerical models critical for this purpose. The proposed NIS Doppler radar would be the first instrument capable of accomplishing this feat at time scales less than hours, and would create the opportunity for hurricane science to enter a new era of understanding and improved prediction. This

  15. Radar-to-Radar Interference Suppression for Distributed Radar Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Qin Wang; Huaizong Shao

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensor networks, including bi- and multi-static radars, provide several operational advantages, like reduced vulnerability, good system flexibility and an increased radar cross-section. However, radar-to-radar interference suppression is a major problem in distributed radar sensor networks. In this paper, we present a cross-matched filtering-based radar-to-radar interference suppression algorithm. This algorithm first uses an iterative filtering algorithm to suppress the radar-to-radar ...

  16. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C. L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  17. Technology for a quasi-GSO satellite communications system

    OpenAIRE

    Katagi, T.; Yonezawa, R.; Chiba, I.; Urasaki, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a satellite communications system using a Quasi Geostationary Satellite Orbit (Quasi-GSO) is proposed. A 24-hour period Quasi-GSO system could give high quality communication to high latitude regions with its satellites observed from earth stations having high elevation angles. In this paper, a system concept and a deployable flat antenna with light weight antenna elements are described proposing it to be a good candidate for mobile communications satellite use.

  18. Resolution of a phase ambiguity in a calibration procedure for polarimetric radar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sletten, M.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Radar Div.)

    1994-01-01

    In response to the remote sensing communities' interest in radar polarimetry, considerable effort has recently been devoted to the development of calibration techniques for polarimetric radar systems. A cross-pol/co-pol phase ambiguity in a previously published calibration procedure for polarimetric radar systems is discussed. The original procedure is modified to resolve the ambiguity while still retaining insensitivity to calibration target orientation. The modified form is then generalized and applied to an ultrawideband radar system for which the ambiguity in the original procedure is particularly evident.

  19. Three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and systems for near-field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed three-dimensional holographic (synthetic aperture) radar imaging techniques and systems for a wide variety of near-field applications. These applications include radar cross-section (RCS) imaging, personnel screening, standoff concealed weapon detection, concealed threat detection, through-barrier imaging, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Sequentially-switched linear arrays are used for many of these systems to enable high-speed data acquisition and 3-D imaging. In this paper, the techniques and systems will be described along with imaging results that demonstrate the utility of near-field 3-D radar imaging for these compelling applications.

  20. Development of radar cross section analysis system of naval ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kookhyun Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A software system for a complex object scattering analysis, named SYSCOS, has been developed for a systematic radar cross section (RCS analysis and reduction design. The system is based on the high frequency analysis methods of physical optics, geometrical optics, and physical theory of diffraction, which are suitable for RCS analysis of electromagnetically large and complex targets as like naval ships. In addition, a direct scattering center analysis function has been included, which gives relatively simple and intuitive way to discriminate problem areas in design stage when comparing with conventional image-based approaches. In this paper, the theoretical background and the organization of the SYSCOS system are presented. To verify its accuracy and to demonstrate its applicability, numerical analyses for a square plate, a sphere and a cylinder, a weapon system and a virtual naval ship have been carried out, of which results have been compared with analytic solutions and those obtained by the other existing software.

  1. Dual-channel and multifrequency radar system calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjernman, Anders; Vivekanandan, J.; Nystrom, Anders

    1995-03-01

    Uncertainty in absolute gain and crosstalk factors are the primary sources of error in dual-channel radar measurements. A full two-port calibration technique compensates for the errors introduced due to an imperfect antenna system and improves the isolation between orthogonal polarization channels as long as the observed cross section is above the equivalent system noise cross section. A novel technique for calibrating a dual-polarized network analyzer-based scatterometer system is discussed. Rigorous two-port S-parameter representation is used to describe absolute gain and crosstalk characteristics. Validity of the crosstalk correction is demonstrated by measuring the point target scattering matrix. Correction factors are obtained by measuring the S-parameters of trihedral and dihedral corner reflectors of known sizes. Results of absolute gain of the antenna system are verified using independent test target cross section measurements.

  2. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  3. Incoherent correlator system for satellite orientation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Aristodemos; Young, Rupert C. D.; Chatwin, Christopher R.; Birch, Philip M.

    2002-03-01

    An incoherent correlator configuration is proposed and experimentally demonstrated that is capable of recognizing star patterns. The device may thus be employed for the orientation and navigation of a satellite or spacecraft. The correlator employs starlight directly and requires no laser or input spatial light modulator for operation. The filter is constructed form an array of mirrors that may be individually appropriately tilted so as recognize a particular star arrangement. The only other components of the system are a converging lens and CCD array detector. The device is capable of determining the pointing direction and rotation of a satellite or space vehicle. Experimental results employing the mirror array device illuminated with a point source early to simulate starlight are presented.

  4. Validation of Satellite-Based Objective Overshooting Cloud-Top Detection Methods Using CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedka, Kristopher M.; Dworak, Richard; Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Two satellite infrared-based overshooting convective cloud-top (OT) detection methods have recently been described in the literature: 1) the 11-mm infrared window channel texture (IRW texture) method, which uses IRW channel brightness temperature (BT) spatial gradients and thresholds, and 2) the water vapor minus IRW BT difference (WV-IRW BTD). While both methods show good performance in published case study examples, it is important to quantitatively validate these methods relative to overshooting top events across the globe. Unfortunately, no overshooting top database currently exists that could be used in such study. This study examines National Aeronautics and Space Administration CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar data to develop an OT detection validation database that is used to evaluate the IRW-texture and WV-IRW BTD OT detection methods. CloudSat data were manually examined over a 1.5-yr period to identify cases in which the cloud top penetrates above the tropopause height defined by a numerical weather prediction model and the surrounding cirrus anvil cloud top, producing 111 confirmed overshooting top events. When applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager proxy data, the IRW-texture (WV-IRW BTD) method offered a 76% (96%) probability of OT detection (POD) and 16% (81%) false-alarm ratio. Case study examples show that WV-IRW BTD.0 K identifies much of the deep convective cloud top, while the IRW-texture method focuses only on regions with a spatial scale near that of commonly observed OTs. The POD decreases by 20% when IRW-texture is applied to current geostationary imager data, highlighting the importance of imager spatial resolution for observing and detecting OT regions.

  5. NanoSAR – Case study of synthetic aperture radar for nano-satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, S.; Oever, M. van den; Mahapatra, P.S.; Sundaramoorthy, P.P.; Gill, E.K.A.; Meijer, R.J.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-satellites have a cost advantage due to their low mass and usage of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies. However, the low mass also restricts the functionality of a nano-satellite’s payload. Typically, this would imply instruments with very low to low resolution and accuracy, essentially

  6. Great Lakes Ice Cover Classification and Mapping Using Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S.; Leshkevich, G.; Kwok, R.

    1998-01-01

    Owing to the size and extent of the Great Lakes and the variety of ice types features found there, the timely and objective qualities inherent in computer processing of satellite data make it well suited for monitoring and mapping ice cover.

  7. Model Order Selection in Multi-baseline Interferometric Radar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Gini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR is a powerful technique to derive three-dimensional terrain images. Interest is growing in exploiting the advanced multi-baseline mode of InSAR to solve layover effects from complex orography, which generate reception of unexpected multicomponent signals that degrade imagery of both terrain radar reflectivity and height. This work addresses a few problems related to the implementation into interferometric processing of nonlinear algorithms for estimating the number of signal components, including a system trade-off analysis. Performance of various eigenvalues-based information-theoretic criteria (ITC algorithms is numerically investigated under some realistic conditions. In particular, speckle effects from surface and volume scattering are taken into account as multiplicative noise in the signal model. Robustness to leakage of signal power into the noise eigenvalues and operation with a small number of looks are investigated. The issue of baseline optimization for detection is also addressed. The use of diagonally loaded ITC methods is then proposed as a tool for robust operation in the presence of speckle decorrelation. Finally, case studies of a nonuniform array are studied and recommendations for a proper combination of ITC methods and system configuration are given.

  8. A novel backpackable ice-penetrating radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Saito, Ryoji; Naruse, Renji

    We have developed a novel ice-penetrating radar system that can be carried on a backpack. Including batteries for a 3 hour continuous measurement, the total weight is 13 kg. In addition, it operates reliably down to -25°C, has a low power consumption of 24 W, and is semi-waterproof. The system has a built-in-one controller with a high-brightness display for reading data quickly, a receiver with 12-bit digitizing, and a 1 kV pulse transmitter in which the pulse amplitude varies by <0.2%. Optical communications between components provides low-noise data acquisition and allows synchronizing of the pulse transmission with sampling. Measurements with the system revealed the 300 m deep bed topography of a temperate valley glacier in the late ablation season.

  9. Design and implementation of a noise radar tomographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuth, Mark A.; Shin, Hee Jung; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2015-05-01

    A hardware system has been developed to perform ultrawideband (UWB) noise radar tomography over the 3-5 GHz frequency range. The system utilizes RF hardware to transmit multiple independent and identically distributed UWB random noise waveforms. A 3-5 GHz band-limited signal is generated using an arbitrary waveform generator and the waveform is then amplified and transmitted through a horn antenna. A linear scanner with a single antenna is used in place of an antenna array to collect backscatter. The backscatter is collected from the transmission of each waveform and reconstructed to form an image. The images that result from each scan are averaged to produce a single tomographic image of the target. After background subtraction, the scans are averaged to improve the image quality. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The system is able to successfully image metallic and dielectric cylinders of different cross sections.

  10. Mapping sea ice using reflected GNSS signals in a bistatic radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Clara; Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Mannucci, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be used as a kind of bistatic radar, with receivers opportunistically recording ground-reflected signals transmitted by the GNSS satellites themselves. This technique, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), has primarily been explored using receivers flown on aircraft or balloons, or in modeling studies. Last year's launch of the TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) satellite represents an enormous opportunity to investigate the potential of using spaceborne GNSS receivers to sense changes in the land and ocean surface. Here, we examine the ability of reflected GNSS signals to estimate sea ice extent and sea ice age, as well as comment on the possibility of using GNSS-R to detect leads and polynyas within the ice. In particular, we quantify how the peak power of Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) generated within the GNSS receiver responds as the satellite flies over the Polar Regions. To compute the effective peak power of each DDM, we first normalize the peak power of the DDM by the noise floor. We also correct for antenna gain, range, and incidence angle. Once these corrections are made, the effective peak power across DDMs may be used as a proxy for changes in surface permittivity and surface roughness. We compare our calculations of reflected power to existing sea ice remote sensing products such as data from the SSMI/S as well as Landsat imagery. Our analysis shows that GNSS reflections are extremely sensitive to the sea ice edge, with increases in reflected power of more than 10 dB relative to reflected power over the open ocean. As the sea ice ages, it thickens and roughens, and reflected power decreases, though it does not decrease below the power over the open ocean. Given the observed sensitivity of GNSS reflections to small features over land and the sensitivity to the sea ice edge, we hypothesize that reflection data could help map the temporal evolution of leads and polynyas.

  11. New signatures of underground nuclear tests revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, P.; Larsen, S.; Galloway, D.; Laczniak, R.J.; Walter, W.R.; Foxall, W.; Zucca, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    New observations of surface displacement caused by past underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are presented using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). The InSAR data reveal both coseismic and postseismic subsidence signals that extend one kilometer or more across regardless of whether or not a surface crater was formed from each test. While surface craters and other coseismic surface effects (ground cracks, etc.) may be detectable using high resolution optical or other remote sensing techniques, these broader, more subtle subsidence signals (one to several centimeters distributed over an area 1-2 kilometers across) are not detectable using other methods [Barker et al., 1998]. A time series of interferograms reveal that the postseismic signals develop and persist for months to years after the tests and that different rates and styles of deformation occur depending on the geologic and hydrologic setting and conditions of the local test area.

  12. Satellite radar altimetry over ice. Volume 2: Users' guide for Greenland elevation data from Seasat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Major, Judith A.; Brenner, Anita C.; Bindschadler, Robert A.; Martin, Thomas V.

    1990-01-01

    A gridded surface-elevation data set and a geo-referenced data base for the Seasat radar altimeter data over Antarctica are described. It is intended to be a user's guide to accompany the data provided to data centers and other users. The grid points are on a polar stereographic projection with a nominal spacing of 20 km. The gridded elevations are derived from the elevation data in the geo-referenced data base by a weighted fitting of a surface in the neighborhood of each grid point. The gridded elevations are useful for the creating smaller-scale contour maps, and examining individual elevation measurements in specific geographic areas. Tape formats are described, and a FORTRAN program for reading the data tape is listed and provided on the tape.

  13. Satellite radar altimetry over ice. Volume 4: Users' guide for Antarctica elevation data from Seasat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Major, Judith A.; Brenner, Anita C.; Bindschadler, Robert A.; Martin, Thomas V.

    1990-01-01

    A gridded surface-elevation data set and a geo-referenced data base for the Seasat radar altimeter data over Greenland are described. This is a user guide to accompany the data provided to data centers and other users. The grid points are on a polar stereographic projection with a nominal spacing of 20 km. The gridded elevations are derived from the elevation data in the geo-referenced data base by a weighted fitting of a surface in the neighborhood of each grid point. The gridded elevations are useful for the creating of large-scale contour maps, and the geo-referenced data base is useful for regridding, creating smaller-scale contour maps, and examinating individual elevation measurements in specific geographic areas. Tape formats are described, and a FORTRAN program for reading the data tape is listed and provided on the tape.

  14. Arctic sea surface height variability and change from satellite radar altimetry and GRACE, 2003-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Thomas W. K.; Bacon, Sheldon; Ridout, Andy L.; Thomas, Sam F.; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Wingham, Duncan J.

    2016-06-01

    Arctic sea surface height (SSH) is poorly observed by radar altimeters due to the poor coverage of the polar oceans provided by conventional altimeter missions and because large areas are perpetually covered by sea ice, requiring specialized data processing. We utilize SSH estimates from both the ice-covered and ice-free ocean to present monthly estimates of Arctic Dynamic Ocean Topography (DOT) from radar altimetry south of 81.5°N and combine this with GRACE ocean mass to estimate steric height. Our SSH and steric height estimates show good agreement with tide gauge records and geopotential height derived from Ice-Tethered Profilers. The large seasonal cycle of Arctic SSH (amplitude ˜5 cm) is dominated by seasonal steric height variation associated with seasonal freshwater fluxes, and peaks in October-November. Overall, the annual mean steric height increased by 2.2 ± 1.4 cm between 2003 and 2012 before falling to circa 2003 levels between 2012 and 2014 due to large reductions on the Siberian shelf seas. The total secular change in SSH between 2003 and 2014 is then dominated by a 2.1 ± 0.7 cm increase in ocean mass. We estimate that by 2010, the Beaufort Gyre had accumulated 4600 km3 of freshwater relative to the 2003-2006 mean. Doming of Arctic DOT in the Beaufort Sea is revealed by Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to be concurrent with regional reductions in the Siberian Arctic. We estimate that the Siberian shelf seas lost ˜180 km3 of freshwater between 2003 and 2014, associated with an increase in annual mean salinity of 0.15 psu yr-1. Finally, ocean storage flux estimates from altimetry agree well with high-resolution model results, demonstrating the potential for altimetry to elucidate the Arctic hydrological cycle.

  15. System implementation for Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. E.; Woerner, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the instrument system which is needed for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS). The system is to be composed of instruments on two of NOAA's near-polar sun-synchronous Tiros-N/NOAA A through G series of operational satellites and on a NASA midinclination satellite of the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) type referred to as ERBS-A/AEM. The Tiros-N/NOAA satellites will be in nominal 833 km altitude circular orbits with orbital inclinations of 98 deg. The AEM satellite will be in a circular orbit with an inclination of approximately 56 deg and a nominal altitude of 600 km. Each satellite will carry wide field-of-view (WFOV) and medium field-of-view (MFOV) sensors, a sensor for measuring the solar constant, and a narrow field-of-view (NFOV) cross-track scanner. The conceptual design of the W/MFOV instrument is discussed along with the conceptual design of the scanner.

  16. Military Hydrology. Report 8. Feasibility of Utilizing Satellite and Radar Data in Hydrologic Forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Keown , Chief, ECG, under the general super- vision of Dr. Lewis E. Link, Chief, ESD, and Dr. John Harrison, Chief, EL. During the preparation of this... Martin , D. W., Stout, J., and Sikdar, 1). N. 1976. "Rainfall Estimation from Geo- synchronous Satellite Imagery During Daylight Hours," NOAA...Technical Report ERL 356-WMPO 7, US Department of Commerce. Griffith, C. G., Woodley, W. L., Grube, P. G., Martin , D. W., Stout, J., and Sikdar. D. N. 1978

  17. Photoelectric radar servo control system based on ARM+FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaixuan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Yeqiu; Dai, Qin; Yao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In order to get smaller, faster, and more responsive requirements of the photoelectric radar servo control system. We propose a set of core ARM + FPGA architecture servo controller. Parallel processing capability of FPGA to be used for the encoder feedback data, PWM carrier modulation, A, B code decoding processing and so on; Utilizing the advantage of imaging design in ARM Embedded systems achieves high-speed implementation of the PID algorithm. After the actual experiment, the closed-loop speed of response of the system cycles up to 2000 times/s, in the case of excellent precision turntable shaft, using a PID algorithm to achieve the servo position control with the accuracy of + -1 encoder input code. Firstly, This article carry on in-depth study of the embedded servo control system hardware to determine the ARM and FPGA chip as the main chip with systems based on a pre-measured target required to achieve performance requirements, this article based on ARM chip used Samsung S3C2440 chip of ARM7 architecture , the FPGA chip is chosen xilinx's XC3S400 . ARM and FPGA communicate by using SPI bus, the advantage of using SPI bus is saving a lot of pins for easy system upgrades required thereafter. The system gets the speed datas through the photoelectric-encoder that transports the datas to the FPGA, Then the system transmits the datas through the FPGA to ARM, transforms speed datas into the corresponding position and velocity data in a timely manner, prepares the corresponding PWM wave to control motor rotation by making comparison between the position data and the velocity data setted in advance . According to the system requirements to draw the schematics of the photoelectric radar servo control system and PCB board to produce specially. Secondly, using PID algorithm to control the servo system, the datas of speed obtained from photoelectric-encoder is calculated position data and speed data via high-speed digital PID algorithm and coordinate models. Finally, a

  18. Methods of satellite oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical basis for remote sensing measurements of climate and ocean dynamics is examined. Consideration is given to: the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere; scattering in the atmosphere; and satellite observations using visible light. Consideration is also given to: the theory of radio scatter from the sea; scatter of centimeter waves from the sea; and the theory of operation of synthetic aperture radars. Additional topics include: the coordinate systems of satellite orbits for oceanographic remote sensing applications; the operating features of the major U.S. satellite systems for viewing the ocean; and satellite altimetry.

  19. NOAA high resolution sea surface winds data from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) on the RADARSAT-2 satellite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-derived high resolution wind products are calculated from high resolution SAR images of normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of the...

  20. Cognitive Dynamic Systems: A Technical Review of Cognitive Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Krishanth; Schwering, Taralyn; Sarraf, Saman

    2016-01-01

    We start with the history of cognitive radar, where origins of the PAC, Fuster research on cognition and principals of cognition are provided. Fuster describes five cognitive functions: perception, memory, attention, language, and intelligence. We describe the Perception-Action Cyclec as it applies to cognitive radar, and then discuss long-term memory, memory storage, memory retrieval and working memory. A comparison between memory in human cognition and cognitive radar is given as well. Atte...

  1. Technical comparison of several global mobile satellite communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparetto, Gary M.

    The era of satellite-based mobile satellite communications (MSC) systems started with the first MARISAT satellite which was launched into a geostationary orbit over the Pacific Ocean in 1976 to provide communications between ships and shore stations. The combination of high cost and unacceptably large equipment has kept the space-based MSC systems from appealing to the wider market of personal mobile communications. The progress made over the last ten years, however, in digital voice processing, satellite technology, and component miniaturization has resulted in the viability of satellite-based mobile satellite communications systems to meet the growing market in personal mobile communications using handsets similar to those currently in use with land-based cellular systems. Three of the more mature LEO/MEO satellite systems are addressed in this paper including GLOBALSTAR, Iridium, and Odyssey. The system architectures of each system are presented along with a description of the satellite and user handset designs and the multiaccess techniques employed. It will be shown that, although a number of similarities exist among the system addressed, each system is unique in a variety of significant design areas. It is concluded that the technical feasibility of satellite-based mobile satellite communications systems seems to be secure. It will be challenging, however, for the vendors to actually develop and deploy these systems in a cost effective, timely, and reliable way that meets a continually evolving set of requirements based upon a rapidly changing technology base.

  2. The interaction of large scale and mesoscale environment leading to formation of intense thunderstorms over Kolkata. Part I: Doppler radar and satellite observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Mukhopadhyay; M Mahakur; H A K Singh

    2009-10-01

    The weather systems that predominantly affect the eastern and northeastern parts of India during the pre-monsoon summer months (March,April and May)are severe thunderstorms,known as Nor ’westers.The storms derive their names from the fact that they frequently strike cities and towns in the southern part of West Bengal in the afternoon from the north-west direction while traveling far from its place of genesis over the Bihar plateau.The storms are devastating in nature particularly due to strong (gusty)winds,heavy rains and hails associated with it.Although these storms are well known for its power of causing damages,studies on them are relatively few due to their small size and sparse network of observations.To address this important issue,the evolution of two Nor ’westers of 12 March and 22 May 2003 over Kolkata is studied in detail in this paper using hourly Doppler weather radar (DWR)observations and high resolution Meteosat-5 imageries.In addition,supporting meteorological reports are used to find the large scale conditions that influence the moisture convergence and vertical wind shear.The genesis of both the storms is found to be over Bihar –Jharkhand region and beyond the range of the DWR.The satellite observations are found to be useful in identifying the location and initiation of the storms.The movements of the storms are captured by the DWR estimated vertical cross-section of reflectivities.The Doppler estimate shows that the 12 March storm had a vertical extent of about 10 –12 km at the time of maturity and that of 22 May reaching up to 18 km signifying deep convection associated with these events.The genesis, maturity and dissipation are well brought out by the hourly DWR and satellite imageries.The DWR observations suggest that the systems move at a speed of 20 –25 m/s.The DWR estimated precipitation shows a detailed spatial distribution around Kolkata with several localized zones of heavy rain and this is found to be well supported by

  3. Optimal Release Control of Companion Satellite System Using Electromagnetic Forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengwen Xu,Peng Shi; Yushan Zhao∗

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic forces generated by the inter⁃action of component satellites can be used to release companion satellites. Optimal release trajectories for companion satellite system using inter⁃electromagnetic forces were investigated. Firstly, nonlinear relative motion dynamic equations of a two⁃craft electromagnetic companion satellite system were derived in spatial polar coordinates. Then principles of electromagnetic satellite formation flying were introduced. Secondly, the characteristics of the electromagnetic companion satellites release were analyzed and optimal release trajectories of companion satellites using electromagnetic forces were obtained using Gauss pseudospectral method. Three performance criteria were chosen as minimum time, minimum acceleration of the separation distance and minimum control acceleration. Finally, three release examples including expansion along separation distance, rotation in orbital plane and stable formation reconfiguration were given to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Results indicated that the release trajectories can converge to optimal solutions effectively and the concept of release companion satellites using electromagnetic forces is practicable.

  4. Digital Meteorological Radar Data Compared with Digital Infrared Data from a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    datai uwere tab~ulaited for compariso;cn with the infrared satellite data) j 20 CIIA1iLTR Ml GEOSTAT] ONAPY ME LW)L- C , TIL LF K Meteorolccj isa I sate...8217):U S f 3 ’ 1 t ’ Iv . e , :]~L ’ bI 1 T-4 THY:-, L,’AClvT!P 3 AND IMVIC]l C t101 KRV~;It Tb 3 ( ji~u>:2;cat L ii 2 ’GD ~Of the L~r [2 u : ~~ I~ rtu ~j

  5. National Satellite Forest Monitoring systems for REDD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) is an effort to create a financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. "REDD+" goes beyond deforestation and forest degradation, and includes the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks. In the framework of getting countries ready for REDD+, the UN-REDD Programme assists developing countries to prepare and implement national REDD+ strategies. For the monitoring, reporting and verification, FAO supports the countries to develop national satellite forest monitoring systems that allow for credible measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of REDD+ activities. These are among the most critical elements for the successful implementation of any REDD+ mechanism. The UN-REDD Programme through a joint effort of FAO and Brazil's National Space Agency, INPE, is supporting countries to develop cost- effective, robust and compatible national monitoring and MRV systems, providing tools, methodologies, training and knowledge sharing that help countries to strengthen their technical and institutional capacity for effective MRV systems. To develop strong nationally-owned forest monitoring systems, technical and institutional capacity building is key. The UN-REDD Programme, through FAO, has taken on intensive training together with INPE, and has provided technical help and assistance for in-country training and implementation for national satellite forest monitoring. The goal of the support to UN-REDD pilot countries in this capacity building effort is the training of technical forest people and IT persons from interested REDD+ countries, and to set- up the national satellite forest monitoring systems. The Brazilian forest monitoring system, TerraAmazon, which is used as a basis for this initiative, allows

  6. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, JPSS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the ground processing component of both Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement, previously known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both segments are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The C3S currently flies the Suomi National Polar Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and transfers mission data from Suomi NPP and between the ground facilities. The IDPS processes Suomi NPP satellite data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. When the JPSS-1 satellite is launched in early 2017, the responsibilities of the C3S and the IDPS will be expanded to support both Suomi NPP and JPSS-1. The JPSS CGS currently provides data processing for Suomi NPP, generating multiple terabytes per day across over two dozen environmental data products; that workload will be multiplied by two when the JPSS-1 satellite is

  7. System architecture for the Canadian interim mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatmadar, M.; Gordon, K.; Skerry, B.; Eldamhougy, H.; Bossler, D.

    1988-05-01

    The system architecture for the Canadian Interim Mobile Satellite Service (IMSS) which is planned for commencement of commercial service in late 1989 is reviewed. The results of an associated field trial program which was carried out to determine the limits of coverage and the preliminary performance characteristics of the system are discussed.

  8. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  9. Satellite power system (SPS) public outreach experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, S.R.

    1980-12-01

    To improve the results of the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program, an outreach experiment was conducted. Three public interest groups participated: the L-5 Society (L-5), Citizen's Energy Project (CEP), and the Forum for the Advancement of Students in Science and Technology (FASST). Each group disseminated summary information about SPS to approximately 3000 constituents with a request for feedback on the SPS concept. The objectives of the outreach were to (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept, and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. Due to the combined efforts of all three groups, 9200 individuals/organizations received information about the SPS concept. Over 1500 receipients of this information provided feedback. The response to the outreach effort was positive for all three groups, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS Project Division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The general response to the SPS differed with each group. The L-5 position is very much in favor of SPS; CEP is very much opposed and FASST is relatively neutral. The responses are analyzed, and from the responses some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented in the appendix. (WHK)

  10. Estimation of an eartquake focal mechanism from a satellite radar interferogram:Application to the December 4, 1992 Landers aftershock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; Sergent, Arnaud; Jacq, Dominique

    1995-05-01

    Interferometric fringes generated by the phase difference between a pair of synthetic-aperture radar images acquired by the ERS-1 satellite were used to estimate the focal mechanism of a small, shallow thrust earthquake. The inversion procedure is an iterative, linerarized least-squares algorithm based on a standard elastic dislocation formulation for coseismic displacements. The preferred estimate is a thrust focal mechanism with its hypocenter at (N34.35 deg +/- 0.4 km, W 116.91 deg +/- 0.2 km, 2.6 +/- 0.3 km depth) on a plane dipping southward beneath the San Bernardino Mountains, with a moment magnitude of 5.4. The strike, dip and rake are N106 deg E +/- 7 deg, 28 deg +/- 4 deg, and 93 deg +/- 4deg, respectively on a fault 3.1 +/- 0.5 km wide and 2.9 +/- 0.4 km long. The precision of these estimates is competitive with seismological determinations.

  11. A multi-subwaveform parametric retracker of the radar satellite altimetric waveform and recovery of gravity anomalies over coastal oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HWANG; CheinWay

    2010-01-01

    The quality of satellite radar altimetric data is very important in studies of geodesy,geophysics,and oceanography.Over coastal oceans,altimeter waveforms are contaminated by the terrain and physical environments so that the accuracy of altimeter data is lower than that over open oceans.Here we develop a new multi-subwaveform parametric retracker(MSPR) to improve the quality of altimeter data for the recovery of gravity anomaly in coastal oceans.The least squares collocation method is used to recover the residual gravity anomaly over the coastal water from altimetric data.The waveform data records from Geosat/GM around Taiwan Island are practically retracked with MSPR.When compared with the Taiwan geoid height,the results retracked by MSPR are more accurate than those retracked by the well-known β-5-parmeter method and from the geophysical data records(GDRs).The gravity anomalies over Taiwan coastal waters are calculated from the retracked altimeter data with the least squares collocation.When we compared gravity anomalies computed using altimeter GDRs with the ship-borne gravity data over Taiwan coastal ocean,we found that the results from retracked data are more accurate than those from GDRs.

  12. Research at the Stanford Center for Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The research is reported in the applications of radar and radio techniques to the study of the solar system, and to space programs. Experiments reported include: bistatic-radar on Apollo missions, development of an unmanned geophysical observatory in the Antartic, Bragg scattering probes of sea states, characteristics of dense solar wind disturbances, and satellite communications for Alaska.

  13. A Scattering Model for Detection of Tunnels Using Video Pulse Radar Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    obtained if a general underground radar system design is to be achieved. In a previous report (91 we have discussed the means of obtaining the propagation...Detector," U. S. Patent 3,967,282, June 29, 1976. [2) J. D. Young, "A Transient Underground Radar for Buried Pipe Location," USNC/URSI Meeting, Boulder

  14. FMCW radar system for detection and classification of small vessels in high sea state conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasselin, J.-P.; Mazuel, S.; Itcia, E.; Huizing, A.G.; Theil, A.

    2012-01-01

    The ROCKWELL COLLINS France radar department is currently developing a FMCW radar system for the detection and the classification of small maritime targets in the frame of the SISMARIS, SARGOS & I2C projects. Several test campaigns have been conducted since 2009 to develop a sensor as well as an

  15. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  16. A Doppler Radar System for Sensing Physiological Parameters in Walking and Standing Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikeh Pour Ebrahim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Doppler radar can be implemented for sensing physiological parameters wirelessly at a distance. Detecting respiration rate, an important human body parameter, is essential in a range of applications like emergency and military healthcare environments, and Doppler radar records actual chest motion. One challenge in using Doppler radar is being able to monitor several patients simultaneously and in different situations like standing, walking, or lying. This paper presents a complete transmitter-receiver Doppler radar system, which uses a 4 GHz continuous wave radar signal transmission and receiving system, to extract base-band data from a phase-shifted signal. This work reports experimental evaluations of the system for one and two subjects in various standing and walking positions. It provides a detailed signal analysis of various breathing rates of these two subjects simultaneously. These results will be useful in future medical monitoring applications.

  17. Two-Dimensional River Flow Patterns Observed with a Pair of UHF Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Hou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A pair of ultrahigh-frequency (UHF radars system for measuring the two-dimensional river flow patterns is presented. The system consists of two all-digital UHF radars with exactly the same hardware structure, operating separately at 329–339 MHz and 341–351 MHz. The adoption of direct radio frequency (RF sampling technique and digital pulse compression simplifies the structure of radar system and eliminates the distortion introduced by the analog mixer, which improves the SNR and dynamic range of the radar. The field experiment was conducted at Hanjiang River, Hubei province, China. Over a period of several weeks, the radar-derived surface velocity has been very highly correlated with the measurements of EKZ-I, with a correlation coefficient of 0.958 and a mean square error of 0.084 m/s.

  18. Moving Target Indication for Multi-channel Airborne Radar Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lidicky, L.

    2010-01-01

    Moving target indication (MTI) using radar is of great interest in civil and military applications. Its uses include airborne or space-borne surveillance of ground moving vehicles (cars, trains) or ships at sea, for instance. Airborne (space-borne) radar offers several advantages when compared to op

  19. Moving Target Indication for Multi-channel Airborne Radar Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lidicky, L.

    2010-01-01

    Moving target indication (MTI) using radar is of great interest in civil and military applications. Its uses include airborne or space-borne surveillance of ground moving vehicles (cars, trains) or ships at sea, for instance. Airborne (space-borne) radar offers several advantages when compared to op

  20. SAW based systems for mobile communications satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, R. C.; Miller, N.; Lee, M.

    1993-01-01

    Modern mobile communications satellites, such as INMARSAT 3, EMS, and ARTEMIS, use advanced onboard processing to make efficient use of the available L-band spectrum. In all of these cases, high performance surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are used. SAW filters can provide high selectivity (100-200 kHz transition widths), combined with flat amplitude and linear phase characteristics; their simple construction and radiation hardness also makes them especially suitable for space applications. An overview of the architectures used in the above systems, describing the technologies employed, and the use of bandwidth switchable SAW filtering (BSSF) is given. The tradeoffs to be considered when specifying a SAW based system are analyzed, using both theoretical and experimental data. Empirical rules for estimating SAW filter performance are given. Achievable performance is illustrated using data from the INMARSAT 3 engineering model (EM) processors.

  1. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  2. Trilateration-based localization algorithm for ADS-B radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Shih

    Rapidly increasing growth and demand in various unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have pushed governmental regulation development and numerous technology research advances toward integrating unmanned and manned aircraft into the same civil airspace. Safety of other airspace users is the primary concern; thus, with the introduction of UAV into the National Airspace System (NAS), a key issue to overcome is the risk of a collision with manned aircraft. The challenge of UAV integration is global. As automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) system has gained wide acceptance, additional exploitations of the radioed satellite-based information are topics of current interest. One such opportunity includes the augmentation of the communication ADS-B signal with a random bi-phase modulation for concurrent use as a radar signal for detecting other aircraft in the vicinity. This dissertation provides detailed discussion about the ADS-B radar system, as well as the formulation and analysis of a suitable non-cooperative multi-target tracking method for the ADS-B radar system using radar ranging techniques and particle filter algorithms. In order to deal with specific challenges faced by the ADS-B radar system, several estimation algorithms are studied. Trilateration-based localization algorithms are proposed due to their easy implementation and their ability to work with coherent signal sources. The centroid of three most closely spaced intersections of constant-range loci is conventionally used as trilateration estimate without rigorous justification. In this dissertation, we address the quality of trilateration intersections through range scaling factors. A number of well-known triangle centers, including centroid, incenter, Lemoine point (LP), and Fermat point (FP), are discussed in detail. To the author's best knowledge, LP was never associated with trilateration techniques. According our study, LP is proposed as the best trilateration estimator thanks to the

  3. Global Ocean Surveillance With Electronic Intelligence Based Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramanan, Haritha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this proposal is to design our own ELINT based satellite system to detect and locate the target by using satellite Trilateration Principle. The target position can be found by measuring the radio signals arrived at three satellites using Time Difference of Arrival(TDOA) technique. To locate a target it is necessary to determine the satellite position. The satellite motion and its position is obtained by using Simplified General Perturbation Model(SGP4) in MATLAB. This SGP4 accepts satellite Two Line Element(TLE) data and returns the position in the form of state vectors. These state vectors are then converted into observable parameters and then propagated in space. This calculations can be done for satellite constellation and non - visibility periods can be calculated. Satellite Trilateration consists of three satellites flying in formation with each other. The satellite constellation design consists of three satellites with an inclination of 61.3° maintained at equal distances between each other. The design is performed using MATLAB and simulated to obtain the necessary results. The target's position can be obtained using the three satellites ECEF Coordinate system and its position and velocity can be calculated in terms of Latitude and Longitude. The target's motion is simulated to obtain the Speed and Direction of Travel.

  4. Assimilation of Doppler weather radar observations in a mesoscale model for the prediction of rainfall associated with mesoscale convective systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Abhilash; Someshwar Das; S R Kalsi; M Das Gupta; K Mohankumar; J P George; S K Banerjee; S B Thampi; D Pradhan

    2007-08-01

    Obtaining an accurate initial state is recognized as one of the biggest challenges in accurate model prediction of convective events. This work is the first attempt in utilizing the India Meteorological Department (IMD) Doppler radar data in a numerical model for the prediction of mesoscale convective complexes around Chennai and Kolkata. Three strong convective events both over Chennai and Kolkata have been considered for the present study. The simulation experiments have been carried out using fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) version 3.5.6. The variational data assimilation approach is one of the most promising tools available for directly assimilating the mesoscale observations in order to improve the initial state. The horizontal wind derived from the DWR has been used alongwith other conventional and non-conventional data in the assimilation system. The preliminary results from the three dimensional variational (3DVAR) experiments are encouraging. The simulated rainfall has also been compared with that derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The encouraging result from this study can be the basis for further investigation of the direct assimilation of radar reflectivity data in 3DVAR system. The present study indicates that Doppler radar data assimilation improves the initial field and enhances the Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) skill.

  5. Optical-fiber-connected 300-GHz FM-CW radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2017-05-01

    300-GHz frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) radar system operated by radio over fiber technologies is configured and demonstrated. Centralized signal generator, which is based on an optical frequency comb generation, provides high-precise FM-CW radar signal. The optical signal is easy to be transported to radar heads through an optical fiber network. Optical-modulator-based optical frequency comb generator is utilized as an optical frequency multiplier from a microwave signal to a 300-GHz terahertz signal by an optical modulation technique. In the study, we discuss the configuration of the network, signal generator and remote radar head for terahertz-wave multi-static radar system.

  6. Rapid damage mapping for the 2015 M7.8 Gorkha earthquake using synthetic aperture radar data from COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS-2 satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Ho; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Owen, Susan; Webb, Frank; Simons, Mark; Sacco, Patrizia; Gurrola, Eric; Manipon, Gerald; Liang, Cunren; Fielding, Eric; Milillo, Pietro; Hua, Hook; Coletta, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake caused more than 8000 fatalities and widespread building damage in central Nepal. The Italian Space Agency’s COSMO–SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite acquired data over Kathmandu area four days after the earthquake and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 SAR satellite for larger area nine days after the mainshock. We used these radar observations and rapidly produced damage proxy maps (DPMs) derived from temporal changes in Interferometric SAR coherence. Our DPMs were qualitatively validated through comparison with independent damage analyses by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research’s United Nations Operational Satellite Applications Programme, and based on our own visual inspection of DigitalGlobe’s WorldView optical pre- versus postevent imagery. Our maps were quickly released to responding agencies and the public, and used for damage assessment, determining inspection/imaging priorities, and reconnaissance fieldwork.

  7. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  8. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  9. Ray-Trace of an Abnormal Radar Echo Using Geographic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Nan Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Weather radar plays a key role in natural disaster mitigation just as surveillance radar does in detecting objects that threaten homeland security. Both together comprise an instrumental part of radar observation. Therefore, quality control of the data gathered through radar detection is extremely important. However, radar waves propagate in the atmosphere, and an anomalous echo can occur if there are significant discontinuities in temperature and humidity in the lower boundary layer. The refractive curvature of the earth makes some errors in observation inevitable. On the night of July 3, 2003, Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD weather radar detected an abnormal echo. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model was utilized to simulate the atmospheric conditions. Radar propagation was simulated using the Advanced Refractivity Engineering Prediction System (AREPS as well as the GIS. The results show the feasibility of establishing an abnormal propagation early-warning system and extending the application of the GIS in serving as the foundation of a Common Operation Picture (COP. Furthermore, the parameters of the boundary layer near the sea's surface in the numerical weather forecasting model need remodification.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(1, pp.63-72, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1487

  10. Solution of inverse localization problem associated to multistatic radar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutkhil M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the problem of inverse localization by a target with the aim to retrieve the position of the target, given the intensity and phase of the electromagnetic waves scattered by this object. Assuming the surface cross section to be known as well as the intensity and phase of the scattered waves, the target position was reconstructed through the echo signals scattered of each bistatic. We develop in the same time a multistatic ambiguity function trough bistatic ambiguity function to investigate several fundamental aspects that determine multistatic radar performance. We used a multistatic radar constructed of two bistatic radars, two transmitters and one receiver.

  11. Communication satellite system beyond the year 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G. J.; Fourquet, J. M.

    1991-10-01

    The primary evolutionary factors of satellite communications technologies are reviewed based on the results of a study of novel satellite developments. A critical evaluation of the viability and availability of the technologies is utilized in conjunction with market forecasts to determine promising commercial strategies. Modern technologies are almost prepared for the development of a class of communications satellites and include bandwidth utilization, spacecraft bus modularity, and functional integration.

  12. Technology development of the Space Transportation System mission and terrestrial applications of satellite technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The Space Transportation System (STS) is discussed, including the launch processing system, the thermal protection subsystem, meteorological research, sound supression water system, rotating service structure, improved hypergol or removal systems, fiber optics research, precision positioning, remote controlled solid rocket booster nozzle plugs, ground operations for Centaur orbital transfer vehicle, parachute drying, STS hazardous waste disposal and recycle, toxic waste technology and control concepts, fast analytical densitometry study, shuttle inventory management system, operational intercommunications system improvement, and protective garment ensemble. Terrestrial applications are also covered, including LANDSAT applications to water resources, satellite freeze forecast system, application of ground penetrating radar to soil survey, turtle tracking, evaluating computer drawn ground cover maps, sparkless load pulsar, and coupling a microcomputer and computing integrator with a gas chromatograph.

  13. Simultaneous single epoch satellite clock modelling in Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongtan, Thayathip

    In order to obtain high quality positions from navigation satellites, range errors have to be identified and either modelled or estimated. This thesis focuses on satellite clock errors, which are needed to be known because satellite clocks are not perfectly synchronised with navigation system time. A new approach, invented at UCL, for the simultaneous estimation, in a single epoch, of all satellite clock offsets within a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) from range data collected at a large number of globally distributed ground stations is presented. The method was originally tested using only data from a limited number of GPS satellites and ground stations. In this work a total of 50 globally distributed stations and the whole GPS constellation are used in order to investigate more fully the capabilities of the method, in terms of both accuracy and reliability. A number of different estimation models have been tested. These include those with different weighting schemes, those with and without tropospheric bias parameters and those that include assumptions regarding prior knowledge of satellite orbits. In all cases conclusions have been drawn based on formal error propagation theory. Accuracy has been assessed largely through the sizes of the predicted satellite clock standard deviations and, in the case of simultaneously estimating satellite positions, their error ellipsoids. Both internal and external reliability have been assessed as these are important contributors to integrity, something that is essential for many practical applications. It has been found that the accuracy and reliability of satellite clock offsets are functions of the number of known ground station clocks and distance from them, quality of orbits and quality of range measurement. Also the introduction of tropospheric zenith delay parameters into the model reduces both accuracy and reliability by amounts depending on satellite elevation angles. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. Recent antenna- and microwave systems designed at CSIR, DPSS for radar systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We have decided to develop some common building blocks for use in radar system at the CSIR, DPSS. The reasons for doing this are: a) The cost of ad-hoc- developed RF subsystems (using connectorised components) is getting to be prohibitive as a...

  15. Global navigation satellite system; Jisedai kokoho senjo system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, S.; Suga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The safety of civil aviation relies on ground navigation aids. In areas where there are no ground aids and on oceanic air routes, aircraft must depend on their own navigation system. The predicted increase in civil aviation traffic in the near future will make it difficult for current navigation aids to support navigation in all phases of flights. To avoid this problem, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is directing the establishment of standards for the global navigation satellite system (GNSS). GNSS employs navigation satellites, such as those of the global positioning system (GPS), to provide navigation capability throughout the world. In Japan, the Electronic Navigation Research Institute, the Ministry of Transport, and the Japan civil Aviation Promotion Foundation are carrying out research on this navigation system. Toshiba has been providing experimental equipment for this research. (author)

  16. Dome growth, collapse, and valley fill at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, from 1995 to 2013: Contributions from satellite radar measurements of topographic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D. W. D.; Biggs, J.; Wadge, G.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Odbert, H. M.; Poland, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Frequent high-resolution measurements of topography at active volcanoes can provide important information for assessing the distribution and rate of emplacement of volcanic deposits and their influence on hazard. At dome-building volcanoes, monitoring techniques such as LiDAR and photogrammetry often provide a limited view of the area affected by the eruption. Here, we show the ability of satellite radar observations to image the lava dome and pyroclastic density current deposits that resulted from 15 years of eruptive activity at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, from 1995 to 2010. We present the first geodetic measurements of the complete subaerial deposition field on Montserrat, including the lava dome. Synthetic aperture radar observations from the Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) and TanDEM-X mission are used to map the distribution and magnitude of elevation changes. We estimate a net dense-rock equivalent volume increase of 108 ± 15M m3 of the lava dome and 300 ± 220M m3 of talus and subaerial pyroclastic density current deposits. We also show variations in deposit distribution during different phases of the eruption, with greatest on-land deposition to the south and west, from 1995 to 2005, and the thickest deposits to the west and north after 2005. We conclude by assessing the potential of using radar-derived topographic measurements as a tool for monitoring and hazard assessment during eruptions at dome-building volcanoes.

  17. Volcanic and Tectonic Activity in the Red Sea Region (2004-2013): Insights from Satellite Radar Interferometry and Optical Imagery

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    Studying recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region is important for improving our knowledge of the Red Sea plate boundary and for regional geohazard assessments. However, limited information has been available about the past activity due to insufficient in-situ data and remoteness of some of the activity. In this dissertation, I have used satellite remote sensing to derive new information about several recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region. I first report on three volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea, the 2007-8 Jebel at Tair eruption and the 2011-12 & 2013 Zubair eruptions, which resulted in formation of two new islands. Series of high- resolution optical images were used to map the extent of lava flows and to observe and analyze the growth and destructive processes of the new islands. I used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the evolution of lava flows, to estimate their volumes, as well as to generate ground displacements maps, which were used to model the dikes that fed the eruptions. I then report on my work of the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion and the 2004 Tabuk earthquake sequence in western Saudi Arabia. I used InSAR observations and stress calculations to study the intruding dike at Harrat Lunayyir, while I combined InSAR data and Bayesian estimation to study the Tabuk earthquake activity. The key findings of the thesis are: 1) The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea indicate that the area is magmatically more active than previously acknowledged and that a rifting episode has been taken place in the southern Red Sea; 2) Stress interactions between an ascending dike intrusion and normal faulting on graben-bounding faults above the dike can inhibit vertical propagation of magma towards the surface; 3) InSAR observations can improve locations of shallow earthquakes and fault model uncertainties are useful to associate earthquake activity with mapped faults; 4). The

  18. Waveform design and diversity for advanced radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gini, Fulvio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, various algorithms for radar signal design, that rely heavily upon complicated processing and/or antenna architectures, have been suggested. These techniques owe their genesis to several factors, including revolutionary technological advances (new flexible waveform generators, high speed signal processing hardware, digital array radar technology, etc.) and the stressing performance requirements, often imposed by defence applications in areas such as airborne early warning and homeland security.Increasingly complex operating scenarios calls for sophisticated algorithms with the

  19. Developing an Ice Volume Estimate of Jarvis Glacier, Alaska, using Ground-Penetrating Radar and High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, N. L.; Campbell, S. W.; Douglas, T. A.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    Jarvis Glacier is an important water source for Fort Greely and Delta Junction, Alaska. Yet with warming summer temperatures caused by climate change, the glacier is melting rapidly. Growing concern of a dwindling water supply has caused significant research efforts towards determining future water resources from spring melt and glacier runoff which feeds the community on a yearly basis. The main objective of this project was to determine the total volume of the Jarvis Glacier. In April 2012, a centerline profile of the Jarvis Glacier and 15 km of 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles were collected in cross sections to provide ice depth measurements. These depth measurements were combined with an interpreted glacier boundary (depth = 0 m) from recently collected high resolution WorldView satellite imagery to estimate total ice volume. Ice volume was calculated at 0.62 km3 over a surface area of 8.82 km2. However, it is likely that more glacier-ice exists within Jarvis Glacier watershed considering the value calculated with GPR profiles accounts for only the glacier ice within the valley and not for the valley side wall ice. The GLIMS glacier area database suggests that the valley accounts for approximately 50% of the total ice covered watershed. Hence, we are currently working to improve total ice volume estimates which incorporate the surrounding valley walls. Results from this project will be used in conjunction with climate change estimates and hydrological properties downstream of the glacier to estimate future water resources available to Fort Greely and Delta Junction.

  20. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  1. Satellite data assimilation in global forecast system in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Swati

    2014-11-01

    Satellite data is very important for model initialization and verification. A large number of satellite observations are currently assimilated into the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF). Apart from Global meteorological observations from GTS, near-real time satellite observations are received at NCMRWF from other operational centres like ISRO, NOAA/NESDIS, EUMETCAST, etc. Recently India has become member of Asia-Pacific Regional ATOVS Retransmission Service (APRARS) for faster access to high resolution global satellite data useful for high resolution regional models. Indian HRPT at Chennai covers the APRARS data gap region over South East Asia. A robust data monitoring system has been implemented at NCMRWF to assess the quantity and quality of the data as well as the satellite sensor strength, before getting assimilated in the models. Validation of new satellite observations, especially from Indian satellites are being carried out against insitu observations and similar space borne platforms. After establishing the quality of the data, Observation System Experiments (OSEs) are being conducted to study their impact in the assimilation and forecast systems. OSEs have been carried out with the Oceansat-2 scatterometer winds and radiance data from Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR sensor. Daily rainfall analysis dataset is being generated by merging satellite estimates and in-situ observations. ASCAT soil wetness measurements from METOP satellite is being assimilated into the global model. Land surface parameters (LuLc and albedo) retrieved from Indian satellites are being explored for its possible usage in the global and regional models. OLR from Indian satellites are used for validating model outputs. This paper reviews the efforts made at NCMRWF in (i) assimilating the data from Indian/International satellites and (ii) generating useful products from the satellite data.

  2. GNSS global navigation satellite systems : GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and more

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann-Wellenhof, Bernhard; Wasle, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    This book is an extension to the acclaimed scientific bestseller "GPS - Theory and Practice". It covers Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and includes the Russian GLONASS, the European system Galileo, and additional systems.

  3. A Parallel, High-Fidelity Radar Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, M.; Fasenfest, B.

    2010-09-01

    Accurate modeling of Space Surveillance sensors is necessary for a variety of applications. Accurate models can be used to perform trade studies on sensor designs, locations, and scheduling. In addition, they can be used to predict system-level performance of the Space Surveillance Network to a collision or satellite break-up event. A high fidelity physics-based radar simulator has been developed for Space Surveillance applications. This simulator is designed in a modular fashion, where each module describes a particular physical process or radar function (radio wave propagation & scattering, waveform generation, noise sources, etc.) involved in simulating the radar and its environment. For each of these modules, multiple versions are available in order to meet the end-users needs and requirements. For instance, the radar simulator supports different atmospheric models in order to facilitate different methods of simulating refraction of the radar beam. The radar model also has the capability to use highly accurate radar cross sections generated by the method of moments, accelerated by the fast multipole method. To accelerate this computationally expensive model, it is parallelized using MPI. As a testing framework for the radar model, it is incorporated into the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA). TESSA is based on a flexible, scalable architecture, designed to exploit high-performance computing resources and allow physics-based simulation of the SSA enterprise. In addition to the radar models, TESSA includes hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, optical brightness calculations, optical system models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, simulation analysis and visualization tools. Within this framework, observations and tracks generated by the new radar model are compared to results from a phenomenological radar model. In particular, the new model will be

  4. Optical-network-connected multi-channel 96-GHz-band distributed radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kuri, Toshiaki; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    The millimeter-wave (MMW) radar is a promising candidate for high-precision imaging because of its short wavelength and broad range of available bandwidths. In particular in the frequency range of 92-100 GHz, which is regulated for radiolocation, an atmospheric attenuation coefficient less than 1 dB/km limits the imaging range. Therefore, a combination of MMW radar and distributed antenna system directly connected to optical fiber networks can realize both high-precision imaging and large-area surveillance. In this paper, we demonstrate a multi-channel MMW frequency-modulated continuous-wave distributed radar system connected to an analog radio-over-fiber network.

  5. Modulation, resolution and signal processing in radar, sonar and related systems

    CERN Document Server

    Benjamin, R; Costrell, L

    1966-01-01

    Electronics and Instrumentation, Volume 35: Modulation, Resolution and Signal Processing in Radar, Sonar and Related Systems presents the practical limitations and potentialities of advanced modulation systems. This book discusses the concepts and techniques in the radar context, but they are equally essential to sonar and to a wide range of signaling and data-processing applications, including seismology, radio astronomy, and band-spread communications.Organized into 15 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the principal developments sought in pulse radar. This text then provides a

  6. Wave activity (planetary, tidal throughout the middle atmosphere (20-100km over the CUJO network: Satellite (TOMS and Medium Frequency (MF radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Planetary and tidal wave activity in the tropopause-lower stratosphere and mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT is studied using combinations of ground-based (GB and satellite instruments (2000-2002. The relatively new MFR (medium frequency radar at Platteville (40° N, 105° W has provided the opportunity to create an operational network of middle-latitude MFRs, stretching from 81° W-142° E, which provides winds and tides 70-100km. CUJO (Canada U.S. Japan Opportunity comprises systems at London (43° N, 81° W, Platteville (40° N, 105° W, Saskatoon (52° N, 107° W, Wakkanai (45° N, 142° E and Yamagawa (31° N, 131° E. It offers a significant 7000-km longitudinal sector in the North American-Pacific region, and a useful range of latitudes (12-14° at two longitudes. Satellite data mainly involve the daily values of the total ozone column measured by the Earth Probe (EP TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and provide a measure of tropopause-lower stratospheric planetary wave activity, as well as ozone variability.

    Climatologies of ozone and winds/tides involving frequency versus time (wavelet contour plots for periods from 2-d to 30-d and the interval from mid 2000 to 2002, show that the changes with altitude, longitude and latitude are very significant and distinctive. Geometric-mean wavelets for the region of the 40° N MFRs demonstrate occasions during the autumn, winter and spring months when there are similarities in the spectral features of the lower atmosphere and at mesopause (85km heights. Both direct planetary wave (PW propagation into the MLT, nonlinear PW-tide interactions, and disturbances in MLT tides associated with fluctuations in the ozone forcing are considered to be possible coupling processes. The complex horizontal wave numbers of the longer period oscillations are provided in frequency contour plots for the TOMS satellite data to demonstrate the differences between lower atmospheric

  7. Wave activity (planetary, tidal) throughout the middle atmosphere (20-100km) over the CUJO network: Satellite (TOMS) and Medium Frequency (MF) radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.; Chshyolkova, T.; Avery, S. K.; Thorsen, D.; MacDougall, J. W.; Hocking, W.; Murayama, Y.; Igarashi, K.

    2005-02-01

    Planetary and tidal wave activity in the tropopause-lower stratosphere and mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) is studied using combinations of ground-based (GB) and satellite instruments (2000-2002). The relatively new MFR (medium frequency radar) at Platteville (40° N, 105° W) has provided the opportunity to create an operational network of middle-latitude MFRs, stretching from 81° W-142° E, which provides winds and tides 70-100km. CUJO (Canada U.S. Japan Opportunity) comprises systems at London (43° N, 81° W), Platteville (40° N, 105° W), Saskatoon (52° N, 107° W), Wakkanai (45° N, 142° E) and Yamagawa (31° N, 131° E). It offers a significant 7000-km longitudinal sector in the North American-Pacific region, and a useful range of latitudes (12-14°) at two longitudes. Satellite data mainly involve the daily values of the total ozone column measured by the Earth Probe (EP) TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and provide a measure of tropopause-lower stratospheric planetary wave activity, as well as ozone variability. Climatologies of ozone and winds/tides involving frequency versus time (wavelet) contour plots for periods from 2-d to 30-d and the interval from mid 2000 to 2002, show that the changes with altitude, longitude and latitude are very significant and distinctive. Geometric-mean wavelets for the region of the 40° N MFRs demonstrate occasions during the autumn, winter and spring months when there are similarities in the spectral features of the lower atmosphere and at mesopause (85km) heights. Both direct planetary wave (PW) propagation into the MLT, nonlinear PW-tide interactions, and disturbances in MLT tides associated with fluctuations in the ozone forcing are considered to be possible coupling processes. The complex horizontal wave numbers of the longer period oscillations are provided in frequency contour plots for the TOMS satellite data to demonstrate the differences between lower atmospheric and MLT wave motions and their

  8. Computer-Aided Communication Satellite System Analysis and Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagl, Thomas W.; And Others

    Various published computer programs for fixed/broadcast communication satellite system synthesis and optimization are discussed. The rationale for selecting General Dynamics/Convair's Satellite Telecommunication Analysis and Modeling Program (STAMP) in modified form to aid in the system costing and sensitivity analysis work in the Program on…

  9. An Instructional Satellite System for the United States: Preliminary Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMolin, James R.; Morgan, Robert P.

    Based on educational, social, political, and other considerations, an instructional satellite system, AVSIN (Ausio-Visual Satellite Instruction), is hypothesized which represents one possible organizational and administrative arrangement for delivering large amounts of quality software to schools and learning centers. The AVSIN system is conceived…

  10. Power Processing Unit For Micro Satellite Electric Propulsion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvas Spiridon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Micro Satellite Electric Propulsion System (MEPS program has been originated by the increasing need to provide a low-cost and low-power Electric Propulsion System (EPS for small satellites ( 92%, small size and weight and high reliability. Its functional modules and preliminary results obtained at breadboard level are also presented.

  11. A comparison of synthetic aperture radars applied for satellite remote sensing of the ocean surface

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilley, D.G.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    surface winds. The environmental interpretation of these remotely sensed ocean data is often restrictEd. by incomplete understanding of SAR systems' capabilities and limitations. Hence, in this paper, the radiometric properties and spatial resolution...

  12. Evaluation of CDMA system capacity for mobile satellite system applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Partrick O.; Geraniotis, Evaggelos A.

    1988-01-01

    A specific Direct-Sequence/Pseudo-Noise (DS/PN) Code-Division Multiple-Access (CDMA) mobile satellite system (MSAT) architecture is discussed. The performance of this system is evaluated in terms of the maximum number of active MSAT subscribers that can be supported at a given uncoded bit-error probability. The evaluation decouples the analysis of the multiple-access capability (i.e., the number of instantaneous user signals) from the analysis of the multiple-access mutliplier effect allowed by the use of CDMA with burst-modem operation. We combine the results of these two analyses and present numerical results for scenarios of interest to the mobile satellite system community.

  13. Nowcasting Convective Storm Evolution in East-Central Florida Using Satellite and Doppler Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    34Pneumatically-Powered Orthosis and Electronic Control System for Stroke Patient Rehabilitation" (93-002), University of California Maj A. L. Burman, "Marine...Colorado State University Maj M. Kulpa, "The Relationship of Recent Tampon Use, Douching, Coitus, and Vaginal Medications to Reported Cervical Cytology...University of Texas Capt W. Brogan, Jr., "Pneumatically-Powered Orthosis and Electronic Control System for Stroke Patient Rehabilitation" (93-002

  14. External calibration technique of millimeter-wave cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zeng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Han, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Lin-Da

    2016-10-01

    The millimeter-wave cloud radar can provide a large number of fine and reliable information for the inversion of cloud macro and micro parameters. A key link of using the millimeter-wave cloud radar to detect the cloud is that the radar must be calibrated. Due to the precision components and severe environment of millimeter-wave cloud radar, subtle changes may take place in the operation process of cloud radar, unless the cloud radar is calibrated regularly. Although the calibration system inside the cloud radar can track and monitor the main working parameters and correct the detection results, it fails to consider the characteristics of the antenna and the mutual influence among different components of cloud radar. Therefore, the external calibration for cloud radar system is very important. Combined with the actual situation of cloud radar under domestic onboard platform, this paper builds a complete external calibration technique process of cloud radar based on the calm sea, providing the theoretical support for the external calibration experiments of the airborne and even satellite-borne millimeter-wave cloud radar developed by our country.

  15. Precision characteristics of two-position radar station in Cartesian coordinate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Docenko

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-position radar station is examined. Analytic expressions for dispersion and intercorrelation of measurement errors in Cartesian coordinate system are obtained. For exampl eerror estimation and analysis were performed.

  16. Microwave Imaging Radar Reflectometer System Utilizing Digital Beam Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fengqi; Li, Meijiao; Domier, Calvin W.; Liu, Xiaoguang; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    Microwave Imaging Reflectometry is a radar-like technique developed to measure the electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Phased Antenna Arrays can serve as electronically controlled ``lenses'' that can generate the required wavefronts by phase shifting and amplitude scaling, which is being realized in the digital domain with higher flexibility and faster processing speed. In the transmitter, the resolution of the phase control is 1.4 degrees and the amplitude control is 0.5 dB/ step. A V-band double-sided, printed bow tie antenna which exhibits 49% bandwidth (46 - 76 GHz) is employed. The antenna is fed by a microstrip transmission line for easy impedance matching. The simple structure and the small antenna are suitable for low cost fabrication, easy circuit integration, and phased antenna array multi-frequency applications. In the receiver part, a sub-array of 32 channels with 200 mil spacing is used to collect the scattered reflected signal from one unit spot on the plasma cutoff surface. Pre-amplification is used to control the noise level of the system and wire bondable components are used to accommodate the small spacing between each channel. After down converting, base band signals are digitized and processed in an FPGA module. U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54531.

  17. System refinement for content based satellite image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NourElDin Laban

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a large increase in satellite generated data especially in the form of images. Hence intelligent processing of the huge amount of data received by dozens of earth observing satellites, with specific satellite image oriented approaches, presents itself as a pressing need. Content based satellite image retrieval (CBSIR approaches have mainly been driven so far by approaches dealing with traditional images. In this paper we introduce a novel approach that refines image retrieval process using the unique properties to satellite images. Our approach uses a Query by polygon (QBP paradigm for the content of interest instead of using the more conventional rectangular query by image approach. First, we extract features from the satellite images using multiple tiling sizes. Accordingly the system uses these multilevel features within a multilevel retrieval system that refines the retrieval process. Our multilevel refinement approach has been experimentally validated against the conventional one yielding enhanced precision and recall rates.

  18. Development of environmental monitoring satellite systems in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    With the increase in global environmental problems,the necessity and urgency of remote sensing technology being applied to environmental monitoring has been widely recognized around the world.China has launched the environment and disaster monitoring and forecasting small satellite constellation HJ-1A/B and the FY3 atmosphere and environmental satellite,but they still cannot fully satisfy requirements for environmental monitoring.This paper summarizes the current status of satellite environmental monitoring in China and the existing problems of inadequate load design and low data utilization efficiency,and discusses the demand for environmental monitoring satellites.Based on the development of foreign satellite systems for environmental monitoring,the future development and key tasks of the environmental monitoring satellite system in China is discussed,as are some related initiatives.

  19. Network coding and its applications to satellite systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Fausto; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Network coding has its roots in information theory where it was initially proposed as a way to improve a two-node communication using a (broadcasting) relay. For this theoretical construct, a satellite communications system was proposed as an illustrative example, where the relay node would...... be a satellite covering the two nodes. The benefits in terms of throughput, resilience, and flexibility of network coding are quite relevant for wireless networks in general, and for satellite systems in particular. This chapter presents some of the basics in network coding, as well as an overview of specific...... scenarios where network coding provides a significant improvement compared to existing solutions, for example, in broadcast and multicast satellite networks, hybrid satellite-terrestrial networks, and broadband multibeam satellites. The chapter also compares coding perspectives and revisits the layered...

  20. Network coding and its applications to satellite systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Fausto; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Network coding has its roots in information theory where it was initially proposed as a way to improve a two-node communication using a (broadcasting) relay. For this theoretical construct, a satellite communications system was proposed as an illustrative example, where the relay node would...... be a satellite covering the two nodes. The benefits in terms of throughput, resilience, and flexibility of network coding are quite relevant for wireless networks in general, and for satellite systems in particular. This chapter presents some of the basics in network coding, as well as an overview of specific...... scenarios where network coding provides a significant improvement compared to existing solutions, for example, in broadcast and multicast satellite networks, hybrid satellite-terrestrial networks, and broadband multibeam satellites. The chapter also compares coding perspectives and revisits the layered...

  1. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is intended to provide investigators in several biological disciplines with a relatively inexpensive method to access space for up to 60 days with eventual recovery on Earth. The RRS will permit totally intact, relatively soft, recovery of the vehicle, system refurbishment, and reflight with new and varied payloads. The RRS is to be capable of three reflights per year over a 10-year program lifetime. The RRS vehicle will have a large and readily accessible volume near the vehicle center of gravity for the Payload Module (PM) containing the experiment hardware. The vehicle is configured to permit the experimenter late access to the PM prior to launch and rapid access following recovery. The RRS will operate in one of two modes: (1) as a free-flying spacecraft in orbit, and will be allowed to drift in attitude to provide an acceleration environment of less than 10(exp -5) g. the acceleration environment during orbital trim maneuvers will be less than 10(exp -3) g; and (2) as an artificial gravity system which spins at controlled rates to provide an artificial gravity of up to 1.5 Earth g. The RRS system will be designed to be rugged, easily maintained, and economically refurbishable for the next flight. Some systems may be designed to be replaced rather than refurbished, if cost effective and capable of meeting the specified turnaround time. The minimum time between recovery and reflight will be approximately 60 days. The PMs will be designed to be relatively autonomous, with experiments that require few commands and limited telemetry. Mass data storage will be accommodated in the PM. The hardware development and implementation phase is currently expected to start in 1991 with a first launch in late 1993.

  2. Space Solar Power Satellite Systems, Modern Small Satellites, and Space Rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsrud, Corey Alexis Marvin

    Space solar power satellite (SSPS) systems is the concept of placing large satellite into geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) to harvest and convert massive amounts of solar energy into microwave energy, and to transmit the microwaves to a rectifying antenna (rectenna) array on Earth. The rectenna array captures and converts the microwave power into usable power that is injected into the terrestrial electric grid for use. This work approached the microwave power beam as an additional source of power (with solar) for lower orbiting satellites. Assuming the concept of retrodirectivity, a GEO-SSPS antenna array system tracks and delivers microwave power to lower orbiting satellites. The lower orbiting satellites are equipped with a stacked photovoltaic (PV)/rectenna array hybrid power generation unit (HPGU) in order to harvest solar and/or microwave energy for on-board use during orbit. The area, and mass of the PV array part of the HPGU was reduced at about 32% beginning-of-life power in order to achieve the spacecraft power requirements. The HPGU proved to offer a mass decrease in the PGU, and an increase in mission life due to longer living component life of the rectenna array. Moreover, greater mission flexibility is achieved through a track and power delivery concept. To validate the potential advantages offered by a HPGU, a mission concept was presented that utilizes modern small satellites as technology demonstrators. During launch, a smaller power receiving "daughter" satellite sits inside a larger power transmitting "mother" satellite. Once separated from the launch vehicle the daughter satellite is ejected away from the mother satellite, and each satellite deploys its respective power transmitting or power receiving hardware's for experimentation. The concept of close proximity mission operations between the satellites is considered. To validate the technology of the space rectenna array part of the HPGU, six milestones were completed in the design. The first

  3. Study on fault locating technology for satellite power system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Bing; JIANG Xing-wei; SONG Zheng-ji

    2005-01-01

    It is currently prevalent to locate faults for a satellite power system based on an expert system, not utilizing all the available information provided by tests. The casual network model for a satellite power system is presented. Considerations for failure probability of each component of the power system, the cost of applying each test, the influence of a precedent test result on the next test selection, and an optimal sequential testing algorithm for fault location is presented. This program is applied to locate the failure component of the power system of a satellite. The results show this program is very effective and it is very fast to generate an optimal diagnosis tree.

  4. Development of software application dedicated to impulse- radar-based system for monitoring of human movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miękina, Andrzej; Wagner, Jakub; Mazurek, Paweł; Morawski, Roman Z.; Sudmann, Tobba T.; Børsheim, Ingebjørg T.; Øvsthus, Knut; Jacobsen, Frode F.; Ciamulski, Tomasz; Winiecki, Wiesław

    2016-11-01

    The importance of research on new technologies that could be employed in care services for elderly and disabled persons is highlighted. Advantages of radar sensors, when applied for non-invasive monitoring of such persons in their home environment, are indicated. A need for comprehensible visualisation of the intermediate results of measurement data processing is justified. Capability of an impulse-radar-based system to provide information, being of crucial importance for medical or healthcare personnel, are investigated. An exemplary software interface, tailored for non-technical users, is proposed, and preliminary results of impulse-radar-based monitoring of human movements are demonstrated.

  5. Freeze/thaw conditions at periglacial landforms in Kapp Linné, Svalbard, investigated using field observations, in situ, and radar satellite monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Christiansen, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    In periglacial landscapes, snow dynamics and microtopography have profound implications of freeze-thaw conditions and thermal regime of the ground. We mapped periglacial landforms at Kapp Linné, central Svalbard, where we chose six widespread landforms (solifluction sheet, nivation hollow, palsa and peat in beach ridge depressions, raised marine beach ridge, and exposed bedrock ridge) as study sites. At these six landforms, we studied ground thermal conditions, freeze-thaw cycles, and snow dynamics using a combination of in situ monitoring and C-band radar satellite data in the period 2005-2012. Based on these physical parameters, the six studied landforms can be classified into raised, dry landforms with minor ground ice content and a thin, discontinuous snow cover and into wet landforms with high ice content located in the topographical depressions in-between with medium to thick snow cover. This results in a differential snow-melting period inferred from the C-band radar satellite data, causing the interseasonal and interlandform variability in the onset of ground surface thawing once the ground becomes snow free. Therefore, variability also exists in the period of thawed ground surface conditions. However, the length of the season with thawed ground surface conditions does not determine the mean annual ground surface temperature, it only correlates well with the active layer depths. From the C-band radar satellite data series, measured relative backscatter trends hint toward a decrease in snow cover through time and a more frequent presence of ice layers from mid-winter rain on snow events at Kapp Linné, Svalbard.

  6. The satellite based augmentation system – EGNOS for non-precision approach global navigation satellite system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej FELLNER

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available First in the Poland tests of the EGNOS SIS (Signal in Space were conducted on 5th October 2007 on the flight inspection with SPAN (The Synchronized Position Attitude Navigation technology at the Mielec airfield. This was an introduction to a test campaign of the EGNOS-based satellite navigation system for air traffic. The advanced studies will be performed within the framework of the EGNOS-APV project in 2011. The implementation of the EGNOS system to APV-I precision approach operations, is conducted according to ICAO requirements in Annex 10. Definition of usefulness and certification of EGNOS as SBAS (Satellite Based Augmentation System in aviation requires thorough analyses of accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability of SIS. Also, the project will try to exploit the excellent accuracy performance of EGNOS to analyze the implementation of GLS (GNSS Landing System approaches (Cat I-like approached using SBAS, with a decision height of 200 ft. Location of the EGNOS monitoring station Rzeszów, located near Polish-Ukrainian border, being also at the east border of planned EGNOS coverage for ECAC states is very useful for SIS tests in this area. According to current EGNOS programmed schedule, the project activities will be carried out with EGNOS system v2.2, which is the version released for civil aviation certification. Therefore, the project will allow demonstrating the feasibility of the EGNOS certifiable version for civil applications.

  7. Integration Of GPS And GLONASS Systems In Geodetic Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciuk, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    The article shows the results of satellites measurements elaborations using GPS & GLONASS signals. The aim of this article is to define the influence of adding GLONASS signals on position determination accuracy. It especially concerns areas with big horizon coverages. Object of the study were analysis of DOP coefficients, code and RTK solutions, and usage of satellite techniques in levelling. The performed studies and analysis show that integrated GPS-GLONASS satellite measurements provide possibility to achieve better results than measurements using single navigation satellite system (GPS).

  8. Wave activity (planetary, tidal) throughout the middle atmosphere (20-100km) over the CUJO network: Satellite (TOMS) and Medium Frequency (MF) radar observations

    OpenAIRE

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.; Chshyolkova, T.; Avery, S. K.; Thorsen, D.; MacDougall, J.W.; Hocking, W.; Murayama, Y.; Igarashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Planetary and tidal wave activity in the tropopause-lower stratosphere and mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) is studied using combinations of ground-based (GB) and satellite instruments (2000-2002). The relatively new MFR (medium frequency radar) at Platteville (40° N, 105° W) has provided the opportunity to create an operational network of middle-latitude MFRs, stretching from 81° W-142° E, which provides winds and tides 70-100km. CUJO (Canada U.S. Japan Opp...

  9. The importance of measuring peak power in radar systems; La importancia de la medida de potencia de pico en sistemas de radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    radar systems are widely used in civil aviation and military, also on Weather monitoring equipment and road traffic control to name a few. Of these systems depends largely on our security and require power measurements with accuracy. This paper focuses on those radars such as aviation that use bursts of pulses, or pulse modulated to obtain more precise details of the target and are highly sensitive receptors for low-noise measures. (Author)

  10. Design of a Ku band Instrumentation Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-14

    small form-factor Ku band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) for use on aerial drones . Group 105 have also been using this radar as an instrumentation...frequency of the LFM chirp would be over the Nyquist frequency. To solve this problem , the bandwidth of the LFM chirp was halved to 275 MHz. The...to 40 m/s based off of the speed of a predator drone . Parameter Value Speed of Light 299720000 m/s Center Frequency 16.75 GHz Wavelength 0.0179 m

  11. Morphology of Dwarf Galaxies in Isolated Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Hong Bae

    2017-08-01

    The environmental dependence of the morphology of dwarf galaxies in isolated satellite systems is analyzed to understand the origin of the dwarf galaxy morphology using the visually classified morphological types of 5836 local galaxies with z ≲ 0.01. We consider six sub-types of dwarf galaxies, dS0, dE, dE_{bc}, dSph, dE_{blue}, and dI, of which the first four sub-types are considered as early-type and the last two as late-type. The environmental parameters we consider are the projected distance from the host galaxy (r_{p}), local and global background densities, and the host morphology. The spatial distributions of dwarf satellites of early-type galaxies are much different from those of dwarf satellites of late-type galaxies, suggesting the host morphology combined with r_{p} plays a decisive role on the morphology of the dwarf satellite galaxies. The local and global background densities play no significant role on the morphology of dwarfs in the satellite systems hosted by early-type galaxies. However, in the satellite system hosted by late-type galaxies, the global background densities of dE and dSph satellites are significantly different from those of dE_{bc}, dE_{blue}, and dI satellites. The blue-cored dwarf satellites (dE_{bc}) of early-type galaxies are likely to be located at r_{p} > 0.3 Mpc to keep their cold gas from the ram pressure stripping by the hot corona of early-type galaxies. The spatial distribution of dE_{bc} satellites of early-type galaxies and their global background densities suggest that their cold gas is intergalactic material accreted before they fall into the satellite systems.

  12. Stability of Satellites in Closely Packed Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, Matthew J; Holman, Matthew J; Perets, Hagai B

    2013-01-01

    We perform numerical integrations of four-body (star, planet, planet, satellite) systems to investigate the stability of satellites in planetary Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs). We find that the majority of closely-spaced stable two-planet systems can stably support satellites across a range of parameter-space which is only slightly decreased compared to that seen for the single-planet case. In particular, circular prograde satellites remain stable out to $\\sim 0.4 R_H$ (where $R_H$ is the Hill Radius) as opposed to $\\sim 0.5 R_H$ in the single-planet case. A similarly small restriction in the stable parameter-space for retrograde satellites is observed, where planetary close approaches in the range 2.5 to 4.5 mutual Hill radii destabilize most satellites orbits only if $a\\sim 0.65 R_H$. In very close planetary pairs (e.g. the 12:11 resonance) the addition of a satellite frequently destabilizes the entire system, causing extreme close-approaches and the loss of satellites over a range of cir...

  13. Wave Activity (Planetary, Tidal) throughout the Middle Atmoshere (25-100 km) over the CUJO Network: Satellite and Medium Frequency (MF) Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A.; Meek, C.; Chshyolkova, T.; Avery, S.; Thorsen, D.; MacDougall, J.; Hocking, W.; Murayama, Y.; Igarashi, K.

    Planetary and tidal wave activity in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT), and assessment of wave activity sources in the lower atmosphere, are studied using combinations of ground based (GB) and satellite instruments (2000-2002). CUJO (Canada U.S. Japan Opportunity) comprises MF radar (MFR) systems at London (43°N, 81°W), Platteville (40°N, 105°W), Saskatoon (52°N, 107°W), Wakkanai (45°N, 142°E) and Yamagawa (31°N, 131°E). It offers a significant mid-latitude 7,000 km longitudinal sector in the North American-Pacific region, and a useful range of latitudes (12-14°) at two longitudes. CUJO provides winds and tides 70-100km. Satellite data include the daily values of the total ozone column measured by the Earth Probe (EP) TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and provides a measure of tropopause-lower stratospheric planetary wave activity as well as ozone variability. The so-called UKMO data (an assimilation system) are used for correlative purposes with the TOMS data. Climatologies of ozone and winds/tides involving frequency versus time (wavelet) contour plots for periods from 2-d to 30-d and the interval from mid 2000 to 2002, show that the changes with altitude, longitude and latitude are very significant and distinctive. Geometric-mean wavelets for the region of the 40°N MFRs demonstrate occasions during the autumn, winter and spring months when there are similarities in the spectral features of the lower atmosphere and at mesopause (85km) heights. Both direct planetary wave (PW) propagation into the MLT, non-linear PW-tide interactions, and disturbances in MLT tides associated with fluctuations in the ozone forcing are considered to be possible coupling processes. The complex horizontal wave numbers of the longer period oscillations are provided in frequency contour plots for the TOMS and UKMO data to demonstrate the differences between lower atmospheric and MLT wave motions and their directions of propagation.

  14. Orbit Determination Using a Decametric Line-of-Sight Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, G.; Meehan, D.; Rutten, M.; Gordon, N.

    2013-09-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of a ground-based bistatic decametric line-of-sight radar for orbit determination of low Earth orbit satellites. Radar observations of the Hubble Space Telescope are used to demonstrate our approach. We present methods for initial orbit determination and for the case of improving an a-priori established orbit descriptor. We discuss the suitability of this class of radar for wide-field space situational awareness and consider a SSA architecture that uses this class of radar to cue high-accuracy narrow field-of-view optical sensors as part of a wide-field high-accuracy system for SSA.

  15. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Smith, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Jointly acquired by NOAA & NASA, the next-generation civilian environmental satellite system, Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), will supply the afternoon orbit & ground system of the restructured NPOESS program. JPSS will replace NOAA's current POES satellites and the ground processing part of both POES & DoD's Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS)(DMSP replacement). JPSS sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and solar-geophysical data. The ground system, or JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), has 6 integrated product teams/segments: Command, Control & Communications (C3S); Interface Data Processing (IDPS); Field Terminal (FTS); Systems Engineering, Integration & Test (SEIT); Operations & Support (O&S); and Sustainment developed by Raytheon Intelligence & Information Systems. The IDPS will process JPSS data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA & DoD processing centers beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and through JPSS & DWSS eras. C3S will: manage overall JPSS & DWSS missions from control/status of space/ground assets to ensure timely delivery of high-quality data to IDPS; provide globally-distributed ground assets to collect/transport mission, telemetry and command data between satellites & processing locations; provide all commanding & state-of-health monitoring functions of NPP, JPSS and DWSS satellites, and delivery of mission data to each Central IDP and monitor/report system-wide health/status and data communications with external systems and between CGS segments. SEIT leads the overall effort, including: manage/coordinate/execute JPSS CGS activities with NASA participation/oversight; plan/conduct all activities related to systems engineering, develop & ensure completeness of JPSS CGS functional & technical baselines and perform integration, deployment, testing and verification; sponsor/support modeling & simulation, performance analysis and trade studies; provide engineering for the product

  16. Tracking method based on separation and combination of the measurements for radar and IR fusion system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qingchao; Wang Wenfei

    2009-01-01

    A new distributed fusion method of radar/infrared (IR) tracking system based on separation and combination of the measurements is proposed by analyzing the influence of rate measurement. The rate information separated from the radar measurements together with measurements of IR form a pseudo vector of IR, and the corresponding filter is designed. The results indicate that the method not only makes a great improvement to the local tracker's performance, but also improves the global tracking precision efficiently.

  17. Delay-Modulated RF Tag System Concept Using Ultrawideband Noise Radar Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) tags have been widely used in inventory tracking, environmental monitoring, battlefield situational awareness, and combat identification due to their low cost, small size, and wireless functionality. This paper explores the application of active RF tags in outdoor environments responding to random noise radar interrogations with predetermined messages. A conceptual system design for communication between radar and RF tags using ultrawideband (UWB) noise waveforms is propo...

  18. Dual-band Planar Bowtie Monopole for a Fall-Detection Radar and Telemetry System

    OpenAIRE

    Soh, Ping Jack; Mercuri, Marco; Pandey, Gokarna; Vandenbosch, Guy; Schreurs, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A dual-band planar bowtie monopole for a fall-detection telemetry radar system is presented. Unidirectionality is successfully enabled by a full ground plane. A compact radiator footprint is achieved by closely spacing two bowtie elements for transmit-receive operation, combined with a simple and effective technique for mutual-coupling reduction. The radar antenna shows target location and speed detection capabilities of up to 4 m with resolution of 30 cm and fall detection success rate of 95...

  19. Accuracy of three-dimensional glacier surface volocities derived from radar interfeometry and ice-soundin radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for analyzing the errors involved in measuring three-dimensional glacier velocities with interferometric radar. We address the surface-parallel flow assumption and an augmented approach with a flux-divergence (FD) term. The errors in an interferometric ERS-1/-2 satellite radar...... dataset with ascending- and descending-orbit data covering Storstrommen glacier, northeast Greenland, are assessed. The FD error assessment is carried out on airborne 60 MHz ice-sounding radar data from the same area. A simple model of an interferometric radar system is developed and analyzed. The error...

  20. Accuracy of three-dimensional glacier surface volocities derived from radar interfeometry and ice-soundin radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for analyzing the errors involved in measuring three-dimensional glacier velocities with interferometric radar. We address the surface-parallel flow assumption and an augmented approach with a flux-divergence (FD) term. The errors in an interferometric ERS-1/-2 satellite radar...... dataset with ascending- and descending-orbit data covering Storstrommen glacier, northeast Greenland, are assessed. The FD error assessment is carried out on airborne 60 MHz ice-sounding radar data from the same area. A simple model of an interferometric radar system is developed and analyzed. The error...

  1. Target Classification for the Installation Security Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION No. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Target Classification for the...INSECTS MEASURED != .,EE FLIGHT (ref 10) L-band radarInsect target cross section (dBsm) Wingless Hawkmoth -60 Honeybee -63 Dragonfly -67 Since no studies

  2. Antenna Array Signal Processing for Multistatic Radar Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.

    2013-01-01

    The introductions of Digital Beam Forming (DBF), original signal exploitation and waveform multiplexing techniques have led to the design of novel radar concepts. Passive Coherent Locator (PCL) and Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) sensors are two examples of innovative approaches. Beside the

  3. Antenna Array Signal Processing for Multistatic Radar Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.

    2013-01-01

    The introductions of Digital Beam Forming (DBF), original signal exploitation and waveform multiplexing techniques have led to the design of novel radar concepts. Passive Coherent Locator (PCL) and Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) sensors are two examples of innovative approaches. Beside the in

  4. NOTE: Preliminary Measurements of the Cryogenic Dielectric Properties of Water-Ammonia Ices: Implications for Radar Observations of Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    1998-12-01

    I report preliminary measurements of the complex permittivity of frozen aqueous ammonia solutions at liquid nitrogen temperatures, representative of those in the saturnian system. The real part of the dielectric constant of 30% ammonia ice is around 4.5 at near-DC frequencies and at ∼1 MHz, compared with around 3.1 for pure water ice. The loss tangents of ammonia-rich ices seem somewhat (∼50%) higher than those for water ice, for which the few low-temperature experiments to date indicate values comparable with predictions by Thompson and Squyres (1990,Icarus86, 336-354) and Maetzler (1998, inSolar System Ices(B. Schmitt, C. DeBergh, and M. Festou, Eds.), pp. 241-257, Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht), but considerably higher than models by Chybaet al. (1998,Icarus, in press). Ammonia-rich ice may reconcile the radar and optical appearance of Titan's surface: the detectability of water-ammonia ice on Titan by the Cassini mission and the implications for Titan's origin and evolution are discussed.

  5. Design of a Printed Dipole Antenna Array for a Passive Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knott

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radar (or Passive Coherent Localisation is an advancing technology for covert operation. The signal transmitted from sources of opportunity such as radio or TV stations is used as illumination for a certain area of interest. Part of the transmitted signal is reflected by radar targets, for example, moving objects such as vehicles or aircraft. Typical radar parameters are derived from the comparison between the direct line-of-sight from the transmitter and the signal scattered from the target object. Such systems are an attractive addition to existing active radar stations because they have the potential to discover low-flying and low-observable targets and no active radar transmitter is required. Printed dipole antennas are very attractive antenna elements for such systems because of their easy fabrication, low-cost, polarisation purity, and low-profile properties. The present paper describes the design of an antenna array using printed dipole elements with flared arms for a passive radar system operating in the GSM900 frequency range. Isolated antenna elements and a small uniform linear antenna array were designed and optimised using computational electromagnetic methods. Several prototypes have been fabricated on conventional microwave PCB substrate material. Preliminary measurement results for antenna matching and far-field radiation patterns are shown.

  6. Merapi 2010 eruption-Chronology and extrusion rates monitored with satellite radar and used in eruption forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, John S.; Schneider, David J.; Griswold, Julia P.; Keeler, Ronald H.; Burton, William C.; Noyles, Christopher; Newhall, Christopher G.; Ratdomopurbo, Antonius

    2013-07-01

    Despite dense cloud cover, satellite-borne commercial Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) enabled frequent monitoring of Merapi volcano's 2010 eruption. Near-real-time interpretation of images derived from the amplitude of the SAR signals and timely delivery of these interpretations to those responsible for warnings, allowed satellite remote sensing for the first time to play an equal role with in situ seismic, geodetic and gas monitoring in guiding life-saving decisions during a major volcanic crisis. Our remotely sensed data provide an observational chronology for the main phase of the 2010 eruption, which lasted 12 days (26 October-7 November, 2010). Unlike the prolonged low-rate and relatively low explosivity dome-forming and collapse eruptions of recent decades at Merapi, the eruption began with an explosive eruption that produced a new summit crater on 26 October and was accompanied by an ash column and pyroclastic flows that extended 8 km down the flanks. This initial explosive event was followed by smaller explosive eruptions on 29 October-1 November, then by a period of rapid dome growth on 1-4 November, which produced a summit lava dome with a volume of ~ 5 × 106 m3. A paroxysmal VEI 4 magmatic eruption (with ash column to 17 km altitude) destroyed this dome, greatly enlarged the new summit crater and produced extensive pyroclastic flows (to ~ 16 km radial distance in the Gendol drainage) and surges during the night of 4-5 November. The paroxysmal eruption was followed by a period of jetting of gas and tephra and by a second short period (12 h) of rapid dome growth on 6 November. The eruption ended with low-level ash and steam emissions that buried the 6 November dome with tephra and continued at low levels until seismicity decreased to background levels by about 23 November. Our near-real-time commercial SAR documented the explosive events on 26 October and 4-5 November and high rates of dome growth (> 25 m3 s- 1). An event tree analysis for the previous

  7. A practical algorithm for the retrieval of floe size distribution of Arctic sea ice from high-resolution satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byongjun Hwang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present an algorithm for summer sea ice conditions that semi-automatically produces the floe size distribution of Arctic sea ice from high-resolution satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar data. Currently, floe size distribution data from satellite images are very rare in the literature, mainly due to the lack of a reliable algorithm to produce such data. Here, we developed the algorithm by combining various image analysis methods, including Kernel Graph Cuts, distance transformation and watershed transformation, and a rule-based boundary revalidation. The developed algorithm has been validated against the ground truth that was extracted manually with the aid of 1-m resolution visible satellite data. Comprehensive validation analysis has shown both perspectives and limitations. The algorithm tends to fail to detect small floes (mostly less than 100 m in mean caliper diameter compared to ground truth, which is mainly due to limitations in water-ice segmentation. Some variability in the power law exponent of floe size distribution is observed due to the effects of control parameters in the process of de-noising, Kernel Graph Cuts segmentation, thresholds for boundary revalidation and image resolution. Nonetheless, the algorithm, for floes larger than 100 m, has shown a reasonable agreement with ground truth under various selections of these control parameters. Considering that the coverage and spatial resolution of satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar data have increased significantly in recent years, the developed algorithm opens a new possibility to produce large volumes of floe size distribution data, which is essential for improving our understanding and prediction of the Arctic sea ice cover

  8. Radar Landmass Simulation Computer Programming (Interim Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    RADAR SCANNING, TERRAIN), (*NAVAL TRAINING, RADAR OPERATORS), (*FLIGHT SIMULATORS, TERRAIN AVOIDANCE), (* COMPUTER PROGRAMMING , INSTRUCTION MANUALS), PLAN POSITION INDICATORS, REAL TIME, DISPLAY SYSTEMS, RADAR IMAGES, SIMULATION

  9. About uncertainties in sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite radar altimetry: results from the ESA-CCI Sea Ice ECV Project Round Robin Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, S.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Skourup, H.; Rinne, E.; Parsakhoo, Z. S.; Djepa, V.; Wadhams, P.; Sandven, S.

    2014-03-01

    One goal of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative sea ice Essential Climate Variable project is to provide a quality controlled 20 year long data set of Arctic Ocean winter-time sea ice thickness distribution. An important step to achieve this goal is to assess the accuracy of sea ice thickness retrieval based on satellite radar altimetry. For this purpose a data base is created comprising sea ice freeboard derived from satellite radar altimetry between 1993 and 2012 and collocated observations of snow and sea ice freeboard from Operation Ice Bridge (OIB) and CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) air-borne campaigns, of sea ice draft from moored and submarine Upward Looking Sonar (ULS), and of snow depth from OIB campaigns, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer aboard EOS (AMSR-E) and the Warren Climatology (Warren et al., 1999). An inter-comparison of the snow depth data sets stresses the limited usefulness of Warren climatology snow depth for freeboard-to-thickness conversion under current Arctic Ocean conditions reported in other studies. This is confirmed by a comparison of snow freeboard measured during OIB and CryoVEx and snow freeboard computed from radar altimetry. For first-year ice the agreement between OIB and AMSR-E snow depth within 0.02 m suggests AMSR-E snow depth as an appropriate alternative. Different freeboard-to-thickness and freeboard-to-draft conversion approaches are realized. The mean observed ULS sea ice draft agrees with the mean sea ice draft computed from radar altimetry within the uncertainty bounds of the data sets involved. However, none of the realized approaches is able to reproduce the seasonal cycle in sea ice draft observed by moored ULS satisfactorily. A sensitivity analysis of the freeboard-to-thickness conversion suggests: in order to obtain sea ice thickness as accurate as 0.5 m from radar altimetry, besides a freeboard estimate with centimetre accuracy, an ice-type dependent sea ice density is as mandatory

  10. Analysis of Maritime Mobile Satellite Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Communications and Surveil- lance, IEE, Conference publication n.95, 13-15 Mar. 1973. 2. Y. Karasawa and T. Shiokawa , Characteristics of L-Band Multipath Fading... Shiokawa . Analysis of M-ultipath Fading due to Sea Suface Scattering in Maritime Satellite Communication, Technical Group on Antennas and Propagation. IECE

  11. Isolated Galaxies and Isolated Satellite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ann, H B; Choi, Yun-Young

    2009-01-01

    We search for isolated galaxies using a volume-limited sample of galaxies with 0.02r_{vir,nei} and \\rho <\\bar{\\rho} well segregates the CIG galaxies. We confirm the morphology conformity between the host and their satellites, which suggests importance of hydrodynamic interaction among galaxies within their virial radii in galaxy evolution.

  12. Architecture analysis of the simplified libration point satellite navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The libration point satellite navigation system is a novel navigation architecture that consists of satellites located in periodic orbits around the Earth-Moon libration points. Superiorities of the proposed system lie in its autonomy and extended navigation capability, which have been proved in our previous works. Based on the candidate architectures obtained before, a detailed analysis of the simplified libration point satellite navigation system, i.e. the Earth-Moon L1,2 two-satellite constellation, is conducted in this work. Firstly, relation between orbits amplitude is derived for the candidate two-satellite constellations to ensure continuous crosslink measurements between libration point satellites. Then, with the use of a reference lunar exploration mission scenario, navigation performances of different constellation configurations are evaluated by Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the amplitude and initial phase combinations of libration point orbits have direct effect on the performance of the two-satellite constellations. By using a cooperative evolutionary algorithm for configuration parameter optimization, some optimal constellations are finally obtained for the simplified navigation architecture. The results obtained in this paper may be a reference for future system design.

  13. Use of CDMA access technology in mobile satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasastry, Jay; Wiedeman, Bob

    1995-01-01

    Use of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) technology in terrestrial wireless systems is fairly well understood. Similarly, design and operation of Power Control in a CDMA-based system in a terrestrial environment is also well established. Terrestrial multipath characteristics, and optimum design of the CDMA receiver to deal with multipath and fading conditions are reliably established. But the satellite environment is different. When the CDMA technology is adopted to the satellite environment, other design features need to be incorporated (for example; interleaving, open-loop and closed-loop power control design, diversity characteristics) to achieve comparable level of system performance. In fact, the GLOBALSTAR LEO/MSS system has incorporated all these features. Contrary to some published reports, CDMA retains the advantages in the satellite environment that are similar to those achieved in the terrestrial environment. This document gives a description of the CDMA waveform and other design features adopted for mobile satellite applications.

  14. Intelligent fault isolation and diagnosis for communication satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallo, Donald P.; Durkin, John; Petrik, Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is a prototype diagnosis expert system to provide the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) System with autonomous diagnosis capability. The system, the Fault Isolation and Diagnosis EXpert (FIDEX) system, is a frame-based system that uses hierarchical structures to represent such items as the satellite's subsystems, components, sensors, and fault states. This overall frame architecture integrates the hierarchical structures into a lattice that provides a flexible representation scheme and facilitates system maintenance. FIDEX uses an inexact reasoning technique based on the incrementally acquired evidence approach developed by Shortliffe. The system is designed with a primitive learning ability through which it maintains a record of past diagnosis studies.

  15. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal

  16. Integrating geologic and satellite radar data for mapping dome-and-basin patterns in the In Ouzzal Terrane, Western Hoggar, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroin, Jean-Paul; Djemai, Safouane; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Brahmi, Boualem; Ouzegane, Khadidja; Kienast, Jean-Robert

    2014-11-01

    The In Ouzzal Terrane (IOT) located in the north-western part of the Tuareg Shield forms an elongated N-S trending block, more than 400 km long and 80 km wide. It involves an Archaean crust remobilized during a very high-temperature metamorphic event related to the Palaeoproterozoic orogeny. The IOT largely crops out in the rocky and sandy desert of Western Hoggar. It corresponds mainly to a flat area with some reliefs composed of Late Panafrican granites, dyke networks or Cambrian volcanic rocks. These flat areas are generally covered by thin sand veneers. They are favorable for discriminating bedrock geological units using imaging radar, backscattering measurements, and field checking, because the stony desert is particularly sensitive to the radar parameters such as wavelength or polarization. The main radar data used are those obtained with the ALOS-PALSAR sensor (L-band), in ScanSAR mode (large swath) and Fine Beam modes. The PALSAR sensor has been also compared to ENVISAT-ASAR and to optical imagery. Detailed mapping of some key areas indicates extensive Archaean dome-and-basin patterns. In certain parts, the supracrustal synforms and orthogneiss domes exhibit linear or circular features corresponding to shear zones or rolling structures, respectively. The geological mapping of these dome-and-basin structures, and more generally of the Archaean and Proterozoic lithological units, is more accurate with the SAR imagery, particularly when using the L-band, than with the optical imagery. A quantitative approach is carried out in order to estimate the backscatter properties of the main rock types. Due to the large variety of configurations, radar satellite imagery such as ALOS PALSAR represents a key tool for geological mapping in arid region at different scales from the largest (e.g., 1:500,000) to the smallest (e.g., 1:50,000).

  17. Propagation considerations in the American Mobile Satellite system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittiver, Charles; Sigler, Charles E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) mobile satellite services (MSS) system with special emphasis given to the propagation issues that were considered in the design is presented. The aspects of the voice codec design that effect system performance in a shadowed environment are discussed. The strategies for overcoming Ku-Band rain fades in the uplink and downlink paths of the gateway station are presented. A land mobile propagation study that has both measurement and simulation activities is described.

  18. Design of House Keeping System for a Certain Micro Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the design of hardware and software of the house keeping system for a certain microsatellite. The system uses microelectronic technique, large scale integrated circuits, processors and computers which has the advantages of strong function, high flexibility and reliability, It satisfies the requirements for efficient performance,light weight, small volume,and low consumption of power for microsatellite.

  19. Satellite Attitude Control System Design considering the Fuel Slosh Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Gadelha de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the satellite attitude control system (ACS becomes more complex when the satellite structure has different type of components like, flexible solar panels, antennas, mechanical manipulators, and tanks with fuel. A crucial interaction can occur between the fuel slosh motion and the satellite rigid motion during translational and/or rotational manoeuvre since these interactions can change the satellite centre of mass position damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. Although, a well-designed controller can suppress such disturbances quickly, the controller error pointing may be limited by the minimum time necessary to suppress such disturbances thus affecting the satellite attitude acquisition. As a result, the design of the satellite controller needs to explore the limits between the conflicting requirements of performance and robustness. This paper investigates the effects of the interaction between the liquid motion (slosh and the satellite dynamics in order to predict what the damage to the controller performance and robustness is. The fuel slosh dynamics is modelled by a pendulum which parameters are identified using the Kalman filter technique. This information is used to design the satellite controller by the linear quadratic regulator (LQR and linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG methods to perform a planar manoeuvre assuming thrusters are actuators.

  20. ALOS Palsar 1.5 Radar Processing System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Americas ALOS Data Node (AADN) With the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) launch of the Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) in January 2006, a new...

  1. Integration of differential global positioning system with ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar for forward imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David C.; Bui, Khang; Nguyen, Lam H.; Smith, Gregory; Ton, Tuan T.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a customer and mission-funded exploratory development program, has been evaluating low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging radar for forward imaging to support the Army's vision for increased mobility and survivability of unmanned ground vehicle missions. As part of the program to improve the radar system and imaging capability, ARL has incorporated a differential global positioning system (DGPS) for motion compensation into the radar system. The use of DGPS can greatly increase positional accuracy, thereby allowing us to improve our ability to focus better images for the detection of small targets such as plastic mines and other concealed objects buried underground. The ability of UWB radar technology to detect concealed objects could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for robotic vehicles, which would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U.S. forces. This paper details the integration and discusses the significance of integrating a DGPS into the radar system for forward imaging. It also compares the difference between DGPS and the motion compensation data collected by the use of the original theodolite-based system.

  2. Radar seeker based autonomous navigation update system using topography feature matching techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, H. D.; Tumbreagel, F.

    1992-11-01

    The discussed navigation update system was designed for an unmanned platform with fire and forget capability. It meets the requirement due to fully autonomous operation. The system concept will be characterized by complementary use of the radar seeker for target identification as well as for navigation function. The system works in the navigation mode during preprogrammable phases where the primary target identification function is not active or in parallel processing. The dual function radar seeker system navigates the drone during the midcourse and terminal phases of the mission. Its high resolution due to range measurement and doppler beam sharpening in context with its radar reflectivity sensing capability are the basis for topography referenced navigation computation. The detected height jumps (coming from terrain elevation and cultural objects) and radar reflectivity features will be matched together with topography referenced features. The database comprises elevation data and selected radar reflectivity features that are robust against seasonal influences. The operational benefits of the discussed system are as follows: (1) the improved navigation performance with high probability of position fixing, even over flat terrain; (2) the operation within higher altitudes; and (3) bad weather capability. The developed software modules were verified with captive flight test data running in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation.

  3. 622 Mbps High-speed satellite communication system for WINDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Yukio; Yoshimura, Naoko; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Gedney, Richard T.; Dollard, Mike

    2006-07-01

    WINDS is the experimental communications satellite currently under joint development by Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The high-speed satellite communication system is very effective for quick deployment of high-speed networks economically. The WINDS will realize ultra high-speed networking and demonstrate operability of satellite communication systems in high-speed internet. NICT is now developing high-speed satellite communication system for WINDS. High-speed TDMA burst modem with high performance TPC error correction is underdevelopment. Up to the DAC on the transmitter and from the ADC on the receiver, all modem functions are performed in the digital processing technology. Burst modem has been designed for a user data rate up to 1244 Mbps. NICT is developing the digital terminal as a user interface and a network controller for this earth station. High compatibility with the Internet will be provided.

  4. Engineering satellite-based navigation and timing global navigation satellite systems, signals, and receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, J

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the design and performance analysis of satnav systems, signals, and receivers. It also provides succinct descriptions and comparisons of all the world’s satnav systems. Its comprehensive and logical structure addresses all satnav signals and systems in operation and being developed. Engineering Satellite-Based Navigation and Timing: Global Navigation Satellite Systems, Signals, and Receivers provides the technical foundation for designing and analyzing satnav signals, systems, and receivers. Its contents and structure address all satnav systems and signals: legacy, modernized, and new. It combines qualitative information with detailed techniques and analyses, providing a comprehensive set of insights and engineering tools for this complex multidisciplinary field. Part I describes system and signal engineering including orbital mechanics and constellation design, signal design principles and underlying considerations, link budgets, qua tifying receiver performance in interference, and e...

  5. IMPGSS - International Medical Program Global Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    additional comments regarding the significance of working with Tachyon and NASK under this Contract). 5.2.5 Requirements - Country/Region Assessments...services on a tentative exploratory basis by Tachyon ]. 5.2.7 Program Development Deliverable A 007 This is currently summarized in the Program Content...based satellite transmissions and transmission pricing based on segmented, limited use data volumes via Tachyon . " A more involved use of evaluation

  6. A Survey of Satellite Communications System Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Myers, Raymond M. Nuber, Jaime L. Prieto , Jr., and Eric R. Wiswell, “Fast Packet Vs. Circuit Switch and Bent Pipe Satellite Network Architectures...2008. 81. Howell, Alan , “INMARSAT HORIZONS PROGRAM,” Institution of Electrical Engineers, Savoy Place, London, 1998. 82. http://www.infosec.gov.hk...ntia-rpt/02- 393/02-393.pdf, NTIA Report 02-393, pages 1-20, May 2002. 134. Sardella, Alan , “Securing Provider Backbone Networks: Packet Filters

  7. An operational satellite remote sensing system for ocean fishery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOZhihua; ZHUQiankun; PANDelu

    2004-01-01

    Ocean environmental information is very important to supporting the fishermen in fishing and satellite remote sensing technology can provide it in large scale and in near real-time. Ocean fishery locations are always far away beyond the coverage of the satellite data received by a land-based satellite receiving station. A nice idea is to install the satellite ground station on a fishing boat. When the boat moves to a fishery location, the station can receive the satellite data to cover the fishery areas. One satellite remote sensing system was once installed in a fishing boat and served fishing in the North Pacific fishery areas when the boat stayed there. The system can provide some oceanic environmental charts such as sea surface temperature (SST) and relevant derived products which are in most popular use in fishery industry. The accuracy of SST is the most important and affects the performance of the operational system, which is found to be dissatisfactory. Many factors affect the accuracy of SST and it is difficult to increase the accuracy by SST retrieval algorithms and clouds detection technology. A new technology of temperature error control is developed to detect the abnormity of satellite-measured SST. The performance of the technology is evaluated to change the temperature bias from-3.04 to 0.05 ℃ and the root mean square (RMS) from 5.71 to 1.75 ℃. It is suitable for employing in an operational satellite-measured SST system and improves the performance of the system in fishery applications. The system has been running for 3 a and proved to be very useful in fishing. It can help to locate the candidates of the fishery areas and monitor the typhoon which is very dangerous to the safety of fishing boats.

  8. A new active array MST radar system with enhanced capabilities for high resolution atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durga rao, Meka; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Patra, Amit; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Narayana Rao, T.; Kamaraj, Pandian; Jayaraj, Katta; Kmv, Prasad; Kamal Kumar, J.; Raghavendra, J.; Prasad, T. Rajendra; Thriveni, A.; Yasodha, Polisetti

    2016-07-01

    A new version of the 53-MHz MST Radar, using the 1024 solid state Transmit-Receive Modules (TRM), necessary feeder network, multi-channel receiver and a modified radar controller has been established using the existing antenna array of 1024 crossed Yagis. The new system has been configured for steering the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis in all 360o azimuth and 20o zenith angle, providing enhanced capability to study the Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere and Ionosphere. The multi channel receiver system has been designed for Spaced Antenna (SA) and Interferometry/ Iamging applications. The new system has also been configured for radiating in circular polarization for its application in the Ionosphere Incoherent Scatter mode. The new active array MST radar at Very-High-Frequency (53-MHz) located at Gadanki (13.45°N, 79.18°E), a tropical station in India, will be used to enhance the observations of winds, turbulence during the passage of convective events over the radar site as deep convection occurs very often at tropical latitudes. The new configuration with enhanced average power, beam agility with multi-channel experiments will be a potential source for studying middle atmosphere and ionosphere. In this paper, we present the system configuration, new capabilities and the first results obtained using the new version of the MST Radar.

  9. Tsinghua-1 Micro-Satellite Power System Architecture and Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Tsinghua-1 Micro-satellite, the first satellite made by Tsinghua University, was launched in 2000. The power system of the Tsinghua-1 Micro-satellite is one of the most important subsystems. It provides all the power for the satellite platform and the payloads. The power system design includes the regulation,protection and distribution of a 4 × 35 W solar array and 7 Ah NiCd batteries. This subsystem essentially offerstwo buses: an unregulated 14 V bus and a regulated 5 V bus. All distributed power lines to the users areprotected by current tripping switches. In addition, some essential loads, such as the tele-command system,are supplied through fuses. The Tsinghua-1 Micro-satellite power system provides an efficient, flexible,reliable, and cost-effective solution for small satellites in low earth orbit. A better maximum power pointtracking method has been used to increase reliability margins and to increase the efficiency of the powersystem. The power system reliability was evaluated using several different tests, such as the power boardtest, the assembly integrate test (AIT), the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) test and the thermal vacuumtest (TVT).``

  10. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) solar array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneiderman, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The SWAS (Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite) solar array system is described. It is an innovative approach to meet the missions requirements. The SWAS satellite provides a three axis stabilized platform to survey a variety of galactic cloud structures. This system includes highly reliable, lightweight launch latch, deployment, and lock mechanisms, and solar array panels that provide the maximum solar cell area. The design of the solar arrays are the result of system trades that included instrument and spacecraft thermal constraints, attitude control system maneuvering rates and pointing accuracies, the power system, and the spacecraft structure.

  11. Design of an FMCW radar baseband signal processing system for automotive application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jau-Jr; Li, Yuan-Ping; Hsu, Wei-Chiang; Lee, Ta-Sung

    2016-01-01

    For a typical FMCW automotive radar system, a new design of baseband signal processing architecture and algorithms is proposed to overcome the ghost targets and overlapping problems in the multi-target detection scenario. To satisfy the short measurement time constraint without increasing the RF front-end loading, a three-segment waveform with different slopes is utilized. By introducing a new pairing mechanism and a spatial filter design algorithm, the proposed detection architecture not only provides high accuracy and reliability, but also requires low pairing time and computational loading. This proposed baseband signal processing architecture and algorithms balance the performance and complexity, and are suitable to be implemented in a real automotive radar system. Field measurement results demonstrate that the proposed automotive radar signal processing system can perform well in a realistic application scenario.

  12. On the Use of Low-Cost Radar Networks for Collision Warning Systems Aboard Dumpers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Tomás González-Partida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of dumpers is one of the main causes of accidents in construction sites, many of them with fatal consequences. These kinds of work machines have many blind angles that complicate the driving task due to their large size and volume. To guarantee safety conditions is necessary to use automatic aid systems that can detect and locate the different objects and people in a work area. One promising solution is a radar network based on low-cost radar transceivers aboard the dumper. The complete system is specified to operate with a very low false alarm rate to avoid unnecessary stops of the dumper that reduce its productivity. The main sources of false alarm are the heavy ground clutter, and the interferences between the radars of the network. This article analyses the clutter for LFM signaling and proposes the use of Offset Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (OLFM-CW as radar signal. This kind of waveform can be optimized to reject clutter and self-interferences. Jointly, a data fusion chain could be used to reduce the false alarm rate of the complete radar network. A real experiment is shown to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system.

  13. 3-dimensional current collection model. [of Tethered Satellite System 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kai-Shen; Shiah, A.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent current collection model of a satellite has been developed for the TSS-1 system. The system has been simulated particularly for the Research of Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) experiment. The Maxwellian distributed particles with the geomagnetic field effects are applied in this numerical simulation. The preliminary results indicate that a ring current is observed surrounding the satellite in the equatorial plane. This ring current is found between the plasma sheath and the satellite surface and is oscillating with a time scale of approximately 1 microsec. This is equivalent to the electron plasma frequency. An hour glass shape of electron distribution was observed when the viewing direction is perpendicular to the equatorial plane. This result is consistent with previous findings from Linson (1969) and Antoniades et al. (1990). Electrons that are absorbed by the satellite are limited from the background ionosphere as indicated by Parker and Murphy (1967).

  14. Information content in reflected global navigation satellite system signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Per; Carlstrom, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The direct signals from satellites in global satellite navigation satellites systems (GNSS) as, GPS, GLONASS and GALILEO, constitute the primary source for positioning, navigation and timing from space. But also the reflected GNSS signals contain an important information content of signal travel...... times and the characteristics of the reflecting surfaces and structure. Ocean reflected signals from GNSS satellite systems reveal the mean height, the significant wave height and the roughness of the ocean. The estimated accuracy of the average surface height can be as low as 10 cm. For low elevations......, the signals reveal the incoherent scatter process at the reflection zone. By using open-loop high-precision GNSS receivers, it is possible to provide the in-phase and quadrature components of the signal at high sample rates, which enables investigation of the spectral signatures of the observations...

  15. Phase control system concepts and simulations. [solar power satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    A phase control system concept for a solar power satellite is proposed which partitions the system into three major levels. The first level of phase control consists of a reference phase distribution system implemented in the form of phase distribution tree structure. The major purpose of the tree structure is to electronically compensate for the phase shift due to the transition path lengths from the center of the spacetenna to each phase control center located in each subarray. In the reference system, this is accomplished using the master slave returnable timing system technique. The second level of phase control consists of the beam steering and microwave power generating system which houses the power transponders. This transponder consists of a set of phase conjugation multipliers driven by the reference phase distribution system output and the output of a pilot spread spectrum receiver which accepts the received pilot via a diplexer connected to a separate receive horn or the subarray itself. The output of the phase conjugation circuits serve as inputs to the third level of the phase control system. The third level of phase control is associated with maintaining an equal and constant phase shift through the microwave power amplifier devices while minimizing the associated phase noise effects on the generated power beam. This is accomplished by providing a phase locked loop around each high power amplifier.

  16. Monolithic microwave integrated circuits for sensors, radar, and communications systems; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 2-4, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Regis F. (Editor); Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to MMICs for airborne phased arrays, monolithic GaAs integrated circuit millimeter wave imaging sensors, accurate design of multiport low-noise MMICs up to 20 GHz, an ultralinear low-noise amplifier technology for space communications, variable-gain MMIC module for space applications, a high-efficiency dual-band power amplifier for radar applications, a high-density circuit approach for low-cost MMIC circuits, coplanar SIMMWIC circuits, recent advances in monolithic phased arrays, and system-level integrated circuit development for phased-array antenna applications. Consideration is also given to performance enhancement in future communications satellites with MMIC technology insertion, application of Ka-band MMIC technology for an Orbiter/ACTS communications experiment, a space-based millimeter wave debris tracking radar, low-noise high-yield octave-band feedback amplifiers to 20 GHz, quasi-optical MESFET VCOs, and a high-dynamic-range mixer using novel balun structure.

  17. Sensitivity of S- and Ka-band matched dual-wavelength radar system for detecting nonprecipitating cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Politovich, Marcia; Rilling, Robert; Ellis, Scott; Pratte, Frank

    2004-12-01

    Remote detection of cloud phase in either liquid, ice or mixed form a key microphysical observation. Evolution of a cloud system and associated radiative properties depend on microphysical characteristics. Polarization radars rely on the shape of the particle to delineate the regions of liquid and ice. For specified transmitter and receiver characteristics, it is easier to detect a high concentrations of larger atmospheric particles than a low concentration of small particles. However, the radar cross-section of a given hydrometeor increases as the transmit frequency of the radar increases. Thus, in spite of a low transmit power, the sensitivity of a millimeter-wave radar might be better than high powered centimeter-wave radars. Also, ground clutter echoes and receiver system noise powers are sensitive functions of radar transmit frequency. For example, ground clutter in centimeter-wave radar sample volumes might mask non-precipitating or lightly precipitating clouds. An optimal clutter filter or signal processing technique can be used to suppress clutter masking its effects and/or enhanced weak cloud echoes that have significantly different Doppler characteristics than stationary ground targets. In practice, it is imperative to investigate the actual performance of S and Ka-band radar systems to detect small-scale, weak cloud reflectivity. This paper describes radar characteristics and the sensitivity of the new system in non-precipitating conditions. Recently, a dual-wavelength S and Ka-band radar system with matched resolution volume and sensitivity was built to remotely detect supercooled liquid droplets. The detection of liquid water content was based on the fact that the shorter of the two wavelengths is more strongly attenuated by liquid water. The radar system was deployed during the Winter Icing Storms Project 2004 (WISP04) near Boulder, Colorado to detect and estimate liquid water content. Observations by dual-wavelength radar were collected in both non

  18. Hybrid Atom Electrostatic System for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The subject of this poster comes within the framework of new concepts identification and development for future satellite gravity missions, in continuation of previously launched space missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and ongoing and prospective studies like NGGM, GRACE 2 or E-GRASP. We were here more focused on the inertial sensors that complete the payload of such satellites. The clearly identified instruments for space accelerometry are based on the electrostatic technology developed for many years by ONERA and that offer a high level of performance and a high degree of maturity for space applications. On the other hand, a new generation of sensors based on cold atom interferometry (AI) is emerging and seems very promising in this context. These atomic instruments have already demonstrated on ground impressive results, especially with the development of state-of-the-art gravimeters, and should reach their full potential only in space, where the microgravity environment allows long interaction times. Each of these two types of instruments presents their own advantages which are, for the electrostatic sensors (ES), their demonstrated short term sensitivity and their high TRL, and for AI, amongst others, the absolute nature of the measurement and therefore no need for calibration processes. These two technologies seem in some aspects very complementary and a hybrid sensor bringing together all their assets could be the opportunity to take a big step in this context of gravity space missions. We present here the first experimental association on ground of an electrostatic accelerometer and an atomic accelerometer and underline the interest of calibrating the ES instrument with the AI. Some technical methods using the ES proof-mass as the Raman Mirror seem very promising to remove rotation effects of the satellite on the AI signal. We propose a roadmap to explore further in details and more rigorously this attractive hybridization scheme in order to assess its potential

  19. Borehole radar system for South African gold and platinum mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogt, D

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available arm contains the battery and the electronics. The resistively loaded arm is designed with a Wu-King taper (Wu and King, 1965), and implemented using 'A W metal film resistors. The receiver is illustrated in Figure 3. The transmitter has similar... directional ambiguity. Acknow^ledgements I would like to thank the CSIR and DEEPMINE for funding this research. I would also like to thank all my colleagues who helped me to build and use the radar, especially Reinhard Bilged, Stephens Letlotla, Marianne...

  20. Guidance and Control System for a Satellite Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Jonathan Lamar; Cox, James; Mays, Paul Richard; Neidhoefer, James Christian; Ephrain, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A distributed guidance and control algorithm was developed for a constellation of satellites. The system repositions satellites as required, regulates satellites to desired orbits, and prevents collisions. 1. Optimal methods are used to compute nominal transfers from orbit to orbit. 2. Satellites are regulated to maintain the desired orbits once the transfers are complete. 3. A simulator is used to predict potential collisions or near-misses. 4. Each satellite computes perturbations to its controls so as to increase any unacceptable distances of nearest approach to other objects. a. The avoidance problem is recast in a distributed and locally-linear form to arrive at a tractable solution. b. Plant matrix values are approximated via simulation at each time step. c. The Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method is used to compute perturbations to the controls that will result in increased miss distances. 5. Once all danger is passed, the satellites return to their original orbits, all the while avoiding each other as above. 6. The delta-Vs are reasonable. The controller begins maneuvers as soon as practical to minimize delta-V. 7. Despite the inclusion of trajectory simulations within the control loop, the algorithm is sufficiently fast for available satellite computer hardware. 8. The required measurement accuracies are within the capabilities of modern inertial measurement devices and modern positioning devices.

  1. Capability of patch antennas in a portable harmonic radar system to track insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring technologies are needed to track insects and gain a better understanding of their behavior, population, migration and movement. A portable microwave harmonic-radar tracking system that utilizes antenna miniaturization techniques was investigated to achieve this goal. The system mainly con...

  2. Advanced signal processing theory and implementation for sonar, radar, and non-invasive medical diagnostic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stergiopoulos, Stergios

    2009-01-01

    Integrates topics of signal processing from sonar, radar, and medical system technologies by identifying their concept similarities. This book covers non-invasive medical diagnostic system applications, including intracranial ultrasound, a technology that attempts to address non-invasive detection on brain injuries and stroke.

  3. Using Weather Radar to Optimise Operation of an Urban Drainage System with Distributed Rainwater Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    2012-01-01

    The perspective of controlling the local rain water storage tanks for a small catchment is investigated to evaluate if a predictive control reduces the CSO from the storm drainage system. A weather radar based nowcast system is used to predict the actual precipitation two hours ahead. In case...

  4. Influence of the underlying surface on the antenna system of the ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu I.; Shipilov, S. E.

    2017-08-01

    Simulation results of the antenna system of the radar of subsurface sounding intended for contactless investigation of the road condition are presented. The elements of the antenna system of ground penetrating radar with extended bandwidth made as a combination of electric and magnetic type radiators have been designed. The transmission coefficient between the elements of the antenna array determining their mutual influence has been calculated. Despite the close arrangement of the elements in the array, the level of mutual influence of the elements is not critical. The developed antenna array can be used both for excitation with short ultrawideband pulses and for frequency steering in the range of 0.8-4 GHz.

  5. Satellite augmentation of cellular type mobile radio telephone systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roy E.

    NASA's ATS-6 satellite relayed voice bandwidth communications between five trucks and the trucking company dispatchers as the trucks traveled throughout the north-eastern quarter of the contiguous United States. The experiment, conducted over a seven month period, demonstrated that propagation characteristics are much different for the satellite-mobile links than for terrestrial-mobile links. A properly designed satellite system can provide high quality, reliable voice and data communications except where the vehicle-satellite path is shadowed by a structure or terrain feature. Mobile equipment in the experiment was adapted from commercial mobile radios. The vehicle antennas were 75 cm tall, 2 cm diam. Another experiment proved the feasibility of vehicle position surveillance using active two-way tone-code ranging through ATS-6 to provide one line of position and passive one-way ranging by measuring the time-of-arrival of a signal from an independent satellite. A position fix was printed out at an earth station 1 sec after it sent the interrogation signal to the distant vehicle, a towboat on the Mississippi River. The line of position from ATS-6 was accurate to 0.1 nautical mile using a voice bandwidth ranging signal. The line of position from the NOAA GOES satellite was accurate to 2 miles, using 100 Hz signal bandwidth. If the signal from the independent satellite had the same bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio as ATS-6, the fixes would have been accurate to about 0.1 nautical mile. A concept study concluded that satellites might be a cost effective augmentation of terrestrial cellular type mobile radio telephone systems. The satellites would serve thinly populated areas where terrestrial systems are not cost effective. In the United States, the satellites would serve about 90% of the land area where 20% of the population resides. A multibeam satellite with many channels in each beam would be compatible with the urban terrestrial systems and together they would

  6. Applications of two-way satellite time and frequency transfer in the BeiDou navigation satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, ShanShi; Hu, XiaoGong; Liu, Li; Guo, Rui; Zhu, LingFeng; Chang, ZhiQiao; Tang, ChengPan; Gong, XiuQiang; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang

    2016-10-01

    A two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) device equipped in the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) can calculate clock error between satellite and ground master clock. TWSTFT is a real-time method with high accuracy because most system errors such as orbital error, station position error, and tropospheric and ionospheric delay error can be eliminated by calculating the two-way pseudorange difference. Another method, the multi-satellite precision orbit determination (MPOD) method, can be applied to estimate satellite clock errors. By comparison with MPOD clock estimations, this paper discusses the applications of the BDS TWSTFT clock observations in satellite clock measurement, satellite clock prediction, navigation system time monitor, and satellite clock performance assessment in orbit. The results show that with TWSTFT clock observations, the accuracy of satellite clock prediction is higher than MPOD. Five continuous weeks of comparisons with three international GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers (ACs) show that the reference time difference between BeiDou time (BDT) and golbal positoning system (GPS) time (GPST) realized IGS ACs is in the tens of nanoseconds. Applying the TWSTFT clock error observations may obtain more accurate satellite clock performance evaluation in the 104 s interval because the accuracy of the MPOD clock estimation is not sufficiently high. By comparing the BDS and GPS satellite clock performance, we found that the BDS clock stability at the 103 s interval is approximately 10-12, which is similar to the GPS IIR.

  7. Improvements and Extensions for Joint Polar Satellite System Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS replaced the afternoon orbit component and ground processing of the old POES system managed by NOAA. JPSS satellites carry sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3), data processing and product delivery. CGS's data processing capability provides environmental data products (Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs)) to the NOAA Satellite Operations Facility. The first satellite in the JPSS constellation, S-NPP, was launched in October 2011. The second satellite, JPSS-1, is scheduled for launch in January 2017. During a satellite's calibration and validation (Cal/Val) campaign, numerous algorithm updates occur. Changes identified during Cal/Val become available for implementation into the operational system for both S-NPP and JPSS-1. In addition, new capabilities, such as higher spectral and spatial resolution, will be exercised on JPSS-1. This paper will describe changes to current algorithms and products as a result of S-NPP Cal/Val and related initiatives for improved capabilities. Improvements include Cross Track Infrared Sounder high spectral processing, extended spectral and spatial ranges for Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite ozone Total Column and Nadir Profiles, and updates to Vegetation Index, Snow Cover, Active Fires, Suspended Matter, and Ocean Color. Updates will include Sea Surface Temperature, Cloud Mask, Cloud Properties, and other improvements.

  8. Synthetic aperture radar image processing techniques for damage detection of FRP-concrete systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzuyang

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic imaging enables researchers and engineers to assess the surface and subsurface condition of concrete structures using radar and microwave sensors. Among existing radar imaging methods, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging offers flexible resolution for various purposes in condition assessment. In this paper, two novel SAR image processing techniques are reported for the subsurface condition assessment of FRP(fiber reinforced polymer)-strengthened concrete systems; mathematical morphology (MM) and the K-R-I transform. Glass FRP (GFRP) and carbon CFRP (CFRP) strengthened concrete cylinders are used as examples. From our experimental results, it is found that both techniques are capable of quantifying SAR images for condition assessment. It is also found that Euler's number and the coefficient of correlation of K-R-I curves of SAR images can be used for monitoring subsurface changes in FRP-concrete systems.

  9. SOFT project: a new forecasting system based on satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Ananda; Orfila, A.; Alvarez, Alberto; Hernandez, E.; Gomis, D.; Barth, Alexander; Tintore, Joaquim

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the SOFT project is to develop a new ocean forecasting system by using a combination of satellite dat, evolutionary programming and numerical ocean models. To achieve this objective two steps are proved: (1) to obtain an accurate ocean forecasting system using genetic algorithms based on satellite data; and (2) to integrate the above new system into existing deterministic numerical models. Evolutionary programming will be employed to build 'intelligent' systems that, learning form the past ocean variability and considering the present ocean state, will be able to infer near future ocean conditions. Validation of the forecast skill will be carried out by comparing the forecasts fields with satellite and in situ observations. Validation with satellite observations will provide the expected errors in the forecasting system. Validation with in situ data will indicate the capabilities of the satellite based forecast information to improve the performance of the numerical ocean models. This later validation will be accomplished considering in situ measurements in a specific oceanographic area at two different periods of time. The first set of observations will be employed to feed the hybrid systems while the second set will be used to validate the hybrid and traditional numerical model results.

  10. The impact of snow depth, snow density and ice density on sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite radar altimetry: results from the ESA-CCI Sea Ice ECV Project Round Robin Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, S.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Skourup, H.

    2015-01-01

    sonar (ULS), and of snow depth from OIB campaigns, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Warren climatology (Warren et al., 1999). We compare the different data sets in spatiotemporal scales where satellite radar altimetry yields meaningful results. An inter-comparison of the snow...

  11. Maritime surveillance with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and automatic identification system (AIS) onboard a microsatellite constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E. H.; Zee, R. E.; Fotopoulos, G.

    2012-11-01

    New developments in small spacecraft capabilities will soon enable formation-flying constellations of small satellites, performing cooperative distributed remote sensing at a fraction of the cost of traditional large spacecraft missions. As part of ongoing research into applications of formation-flight technology, recent work has developed a mission concept based on combining synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with automatic identification system (AIS) data. Two or more microsatellites would trail a large SAR transmitter in orbit, each carrying a SAR receiver antenna and one carrying an AIS antenna. Spaceborne AIS can receive and decode AIS data from a large area, but accurate decoding is limited in high traffic areas, and the technology relies on voluntary vessel compliance. Furthermore, vessel detection amidst speckle in SAR imagery can be challenging. In this constellation, AIS broadcasts of position and velocity are received and decoded, and used in combination with SAR observations to form a more complete picture of maritime traffic and identify potentially non-cooperative vessels. Due to the limited transmit power and ground station downlink time of the microsatellite platform, data will be processed onboard the spacecraft. Herein we present the onboard data processing portion of the mission concept, including methods for automated SAR image registration, vessel detection, and fusion with AIS data. Georeferencing in combination with a spatial frequency domain method is used for image registration. Wavelet-based speckle reduction facilitates vessel detection using a standard CFAR algorithm, while leaving sufficient detail for registration of the filtered and compressed imagery. Moving targets appear displaced from their actual position in SAR imagery, depending on their velocity and the image acquisition geometry; multiple SAR images acquired from different locations are used to determine the actual positions of these targets. Finally, a probabilistic inference

  12. Network connectivity paradigm for the large data produced by weather radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzi, Diego; Bechini, Renzo; Boraso, Rodolfo; Cremonini, Roberto; Fratianni, Simona

    2014-05-01

    The traffic over Internet is constantly increasing; this is due in particular to social networks activities but also to the enormous exchange of data caused especially by the so-called "Internet of Things". With this term we refer to every device that has the capability of exchanging information with other devices on the web. In geoscience (and, in particular, in meteorology and climatology) there is a constantly increasing number of sensors that are used to obtain data from different sources (like weather radars, digital rain gauges, etc.). This information-gathering activity, frequently, must be followed by a complex data analysis phase, especially when we have large data sets that can be very difficult to analyze (very long historical series of large data sets, for example), like the so called big data. These activities are particularly intensive in resource consumption and they lead to new computational models (like cloud computing) and new methods for storing data (like object store, linked open data, NOSQL or NewSQL). The weather radar systems can be seen as one of the sensors mentioned above: it transmit a large amount of raw data over the network (up to 40 megabytes every five minutes), with 24h/24h continuity and in any weather condition. Weather radar are often located in peaks and in wild areas where connectivity is poor. For this reason radar measurements are sometimes processed partially on site and reduced in size to adapt them to the limited bandwidth currently available by data transmission systems. With the aim to preserve the maximum flow of information, an innovative network connectivity paradigm for the large data produced by weather radar system is here presented. The study is focused on the Monte Settepani operational weather radar system, located over a wild peak summit in north-western Italy.

  13. The Saturn System's Icy Satellites: New Results from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly M.; Buratti, Bonnie; Hendrix, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens is a multidisciplinary, international planetary mission consisting of an orbiting spacecraft and a probe. The Huygens probe successfully landed on Titan's surface on January 14, 2005, while the orbiter has performed observations of Saturn, its rings, satellites, and magnetosphere since it entered orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. The Cassini mission has been prolific in its scientific discoveries about the Saturn system. In this special section, we present new mission results with a focus on the 'icy satellites,' which we define as all Saturn's moons with the exception of Titan. The results included in this section have come out of the Cassini SOST--Satellites Orbiter Science Team--a multi-instrument and multidiscipline group that works together to better understand the icy satellites and their interactions with Saturn and its rings. Other papers included in this issue present ground-based observations and interior modeling of these icy moons.

  14. Spatial Cloud Detection and Retrieval System for Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Nasr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In last the decade we witnessed a large increase in data generated by earth observing satellites. Hence, intelligent processing of the huge amount of data received by hundreds of earth receiving stations, with specific satellite image oriented approaches, presents itself as a pressing need. One of the most important steps in earlier stages of satellite image processing is cloud detection. Satellite images having a large percentage of cloud cannot be used in further analysis. While there are many approaches that deal with different semantic meaning, there are rarely approaches that deal specifically with cloud detection and retrieval. In this paper we introduce a novel approach that spatially detect and retrieve clouds in satellite images using their unique properties .Our approach is developed as spatial cloud detection and retrieval system (SCDRS that introduce a complete framework for specific semantic retrieval system. It uses a Query by polygon (QBP paradigm for the content of interest instead of using the more conventional rectangular query by image approach. First, we extract features from the satellite images using multiple tile sizes using spatial and textural properties of cloud regions. Second, we retrieve our tiles using a parametric statistical approach within a multilevel refinement process. Our approach has been experimentally validated against the conventional ones yielding enhanced precision and recall rates in the same time it gives more precise detection of cloud coverage regions.

  15. Dependent surveillance through an experimental satellite data link system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, G. A.

    The development and testing of an experimental dependent aircraft-surveillance system using a satellite data link is reported. In this system, the aircraft position is determined onboard using GPS or inertial navigation, enclosed in a message block using a data-link system, and transmitted to an Inmarsat GEO communication satellites; the ground station receives and analyzes the data to keep constant track of the aircraft position. The hardware implementation and the results of demonstrations performed on flights from Iowa to Wisconsin and the North Atlantic are discussed, and diagrams and maps are provided.

  16. Assessment of human respiration patterns via noncontact sensing using Doppler multi-radar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Changzhi

    2015-03-16

    Human respiratory patterns at chest and abdomen are associated with both physical and emotional states. Accurate measurement of the respiratory patterns provides an approach to assess and analyze the physical and emotional states of the subject persons. Not many research efforts have been made to wirelessly assess different respiration patterns, largely due to the inaccuracy of the conventional continuous-wave radar sensor to track the original signal pattern of slow respiratory movements. This paper presents the accurate assessment of different respiratory patterns based on noncontact Doppler radar sensing. This paper evaluates the feasibility of accurately monitoring different human respiration patterns via noncontact radar sensing. A 2.4 GHz DC coupled multi-radar system was used for accurate measurement of the complete respiration patterns without any signal distortion. Experiments were carried out in the lab environment to measure the different respiration patterns when the subject person performed natural breathing, chest breathing and diaphragmatic breathing. The experimental results showed that accurate assessment of different respiration patterns is feasible using the proposed noncontact radar sensing technique.

  17. Considerations for a Radar System to Detect an Ocean Underneath the Icy Shell of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Gogineni, Prasad; Green, James; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Taylor, William; Benson, Robert; Reinisch, Bodo; Song, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The detection of an ocean underneath Europa is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. An orbiting surface penetrating radar has the potential of providing that measurement thus yielding information regarding the possibility of life support on Europa. Radars in the MHz range have successfully monitored the kilometer-deep ice shelves of Greenland and Antarctica, including the detection of Lake Vostok (and others) below an ice sheet thickness of about 4 km. The performance of a radar system orbiting Europa will be subject to several potential complications and unknowns. Besides ionospheric dispersion and the actual depth of the ocean, which is estimated between 2 and 30 km, major unknowns affecting radar performance are the temperature profile, the amount of salt and other impurities within the ice crust as well as the surface roughness. These impurities can in part be produced at the highly irradiated surface by magnetospheric interactions and transported downward into the ice crust by geologic processes. The ionospheric interference must also be modeled from effects of these interactions on production of the thin neutral atmosphere and subsequent ionization of the neutrals. We investigated these uncertainties through radar simulations using different surface and ice characteristics over a frequency range from 10 to 50 MHz. The talk will present results from these simulations discussing potential limitations.

  18. Radiofrequency testing of satellite segment of simulated 30/20 GHz satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.; Kerczewski, R.

    1985-01-01

    A laboratory communications system has been developed that can serve as a test bed for the evaluation of advanced microwave (30/20 GHz) components produced under NASA technology programs. The system will ultimately permit the transmission of a stream of high-rate (220 Mbps) digital data from the originating user, through a ground terminal, through a hardware-simulated satellite, to a receiving ground station, to the receiving user. This report contains the results of radiofrequency testing of the satellite portion of that system. Data presented include output spurious responses, attainable signal-to-noise ratios, a baseline power budget, usable frequency bands, phase and amplitude response data for each of the frequency bands, and the effects of power level variation.

  19. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Senith Satellite System Using Current Geostationary Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX realizes accurate synchronization between an atomic clock at a ground station and the QZSS onboard crystal oscillator, reduces overall cost and satellite power consumption, as well as onboard weight and volume, and is expected to have a longer lifetime than a system with onboard atomic clocks. Since a QZSS does not yet exist, we have been conducting synchronization experiments using geostationary earth orbit satellites (JCSAT-1B or Intelsat-4 to confirm that RESSOX is an excellent system for timing synchronization. JCSAT-1B, the elevation angle of which is 46.5 degrees at our institute, is little affected by tropospheric delay, whereas Intelsat-4, the elevation angle of which is 7.9 degrees, is significantly affected. The experimental setup and the results of uplink experiments and feedback experiments using mainly Intelsat-4 are presented. The results show that synchronization within 10 ns is realized.

  20. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  1. Feasibility of sea ice typing with synthetic aperture radar (SAR): Merging of Landsat thematic mapper and ERS 1 SAR satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Konrad; Heinrichs, John

    1994-01-01

    Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat thematic mapper (TM) images were acquired for the same area in the Beaufort Sea, April 16 and 18, 1992. The two image pairs were colocated to the same grid (25-m resolution), and a supervised ice type classification was performed on the TM images in order to classify ice free, nilas, gray ice, gray-white ice, thin first-year ice, medium and thick first-year ice, and old ice. Comparison of the collocated SAR pixels showed that ice-free areas can only be classified under calm wind conditions (less than 3 m/s) and for surface winds greater than 10 m/s based on the backscattering coefficient alone. This is true for pack ice regions during the cold months of the year where ice-free areas are spatially limited and where the capillary waves that cause SAR backscatter are dampened by entrained ice crystals. For nilas, two distinct backscatter classes were found at -17 dB and at -10 dB. The higher backscattering coefficient is attributed to the presence of frost flowers on light nilas. Gray and gray-white ice have a backscatter signature similar to first-year ice and therefore cannot be distinguished by SAR alone. First-year and old ice can be clearly separated based on their backscattering coefficient. The performance of the Geophysical Processor System ice classifier was tested against the Landsat derived ice products. It was found that smooth first-year ice and rough first-year ice were not significantly different in the backscatter domain. Ice concentration estimates based on ERS 1 C band SAR showed an error range of 5 to 8% for high ice concentration regions, mainly due to misclassified ice-free and smooth first-year ice areas. This error is expected to increase for areas of lower ice concentration. The combination of C band SAR and TM channels 2, 4, and 6 resulted in ice typing performance with an estimated accuracy of 90% for all seven ice classes.

  2. GOLD MINERAL PROSPECTING USING PHASED ARRAY TYPE L-BAND SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (PALSAR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING DATA, CENTRAL GOLD BELT, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ of Peninsular Malaysia is one of the significant structural zones in Sundaland, Southeast Asia. It forms the boundary between the Gondwana-derived Sibumasu terrane in the west and Sukhothai arc in the east. The BRSZ is also genetically related to the sediment-hosted/orogenic gold deposits associated with the major lineaments and form-lines in the central gold belt Central Gold Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. In tropical environments, heavy tropical rainforest and intense weathering makes it impossible to map geological structures over long distances. Advances in remote sensing technology allow the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data in geological structural analysis for tropical environments. In this investigation, the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR satellite remote sensing data were used to analyse major geological structures in Peninsular Malaysia and provide detailed characterization of lineaments and form-lines in the BRSZ, as well as its implication for sediment-hosted/orogenic gold exploration in tropical environments. The major geological structure directions of the BRSZ are N-S, NNE-SSW, NE-SW and NW-SE, which derived from directional filtering analysis to PALSAR data. The pervasive array of N-S faults in the study area and surrounding terrain is mainly linked to the N-S trending of the Suture Zone. N-S striking lineaments are often cut by younger NE-SW and NW-SE-trending lineaments. Gold mineralized trends lineaments are associated with the intersection of N-S, NE-SW, NNW-SSE and ESE-WNW faults and curvilinear features in shearing and alteration zones. Lineament analysis on PALSAR satellite remote sensing data is a useful tool for detecting the boundary between the Gondwana-derived terranes and major geological features associated with suture zone especially for large inaccessible regions in tropical environments.

  3. FPGA based hardware optimized implementation of signal processing system for LFM pulsed radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Noor ul; Jun, Wang

    2016-11-01

    Signal processing is one of the main parts of any radar system. Different signal processing algorithms are used to extract information about different parameters like range, speed, direction etc, of a target in the field of radar communication. This paper presents LFM (Linear Frequency Modulation) pulsed radar signal processing algorithms which are used to improve target detection, range resolution and to estimate the speed of a target. Firstly, these algorithms are simulated in MATLAB to verify the concept and theory. After the conceptual verification in MATLAB, the simulation is converted into implementation on hardware using Xilinx FPGA. Chosen FPGA is Xilinx Virtex-6 (XC6LVX75T). For hardware implementation pipeline optimization is adopted and also other factors are considered for resources optimization in the process of implementation. Focusing algorithms in this work for improving target detection, range resolution and speed estimation are hardware optimized fast convolution processing based pulse compression and pulse Doppler processing.

  4. Design and Implementation of a FPGA and DSP Based MIMO Radar Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The work presented in this paper is aimed at the implementation of a real-time multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO imaging radar used for area surveillance. In this radar, the equivalent virtual array method and time-division technique are applied to make 16 virtual elements synthesized from the MIMO antenna array. The chirp signal generater is based on a combination of direct digital synthesizer (DDS and phase locked loop (PLL. A signal conditioning circuit is used to deal with the coupling effect within the array. The signal processing platform is based on an efficient field programmable gates array (FPGA and digital signal processor (DSP pipeline where a robust beamforming imaging algorithm is running on. The radar system was evaluated through a real field experiment. Imaging capability and real-time performance shown in the results demonstrate the practical feasibility of the implementation.

  5. ECCM schemes in netted radar system based on temporal pulse diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Abdalla; Zhao Yuan; Bin Tang

    2016-01-01

    For a netted radar system to counteract the deception electronic countermeasure (ECM) signals, an effective electronic counter countermeasure (ECCM) approach is proposed. The pro-posed approach is realized based on the new signaling strategy for the temporal pulse diversity, which makes use of transmitting pulses at each pulse repetition interval (PRI) with specific trans-mission pulse block, and then fol owing proper processing and information fusion. The existence of the deceptive ECM signal is confirmed by one station, while the other stations in the netted radar with same parameters applied the pulse diversity skil ful y. Meanwhile, this method ensured that, pulse diversity can be ap-plied in netted radar. The performance assessment shows that the proposed solutions are effective in presence of ECM signals. This algorithm has been demonstrated by simulations. The presented simulation results are in excel ent consensus with theoretical pre-dictions.

  6. Chaotic signal reconstruction with application to noise radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lidong; Hu, Jinfeng; He, Zishu; Han, Chunlin; Li, Huiyong; Li, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Chaotic signals are potentially attractive in engineering applications, most of which require an accurate estimation of the actual chaotic signal from a noisy background. In this article, we present an improved symbolic dynamics-based method (ISDM) for accurate estimating the initial condition of chaotic signal corrupted by noise. Then, a new method, called piecewise estimation method (PEM), for chaotic signal reconstruction based on ISDM is proposed. The reconstruction performance using PEM is much better than that using the existing initial condition estimation methods. Next, PEM is applied in a noncoherent reception noise radar scheme and an improved noncoherent reception scheme is given. The simulation results show that the improved noncoherent scheme has better correlation performance and range resolution especially at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs).

  7. Chaotic signal reconstruction with application to noise radar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lidong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chaotic signals are potentially attractive in engineering applications, most of which require an accurate estimation of the actual chaotic signal from a noisy background. In this article, we present an improved symbolic dynamics-based method (ISDM for accurate estimating the initial condition of chaotic signal corrupted by noise. Then, a new method, called piecewise estimation method (PEM, for chaotic signal reconstruction based on ISDM is proposed. The reconstruction performance using PEM is much better than that using the existing initial condition estimation methods. Next, PEM is applied in a noncoherent reception noise radar scheme and an improved noncoherent reception scheme is given. The simulation results show that the improved noncoherent scheme has better correlation performance and range resolution especially at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs.

  8. The principle of the positioning system based on communication satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    It is a long dream to realize the communication and navigation functionality in a satellite system in the world. This paper introduces how to establish the system, a positioning system based on communication satellites called Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS). Instead of the typical navigation satellites, the communication satellites are configured firstly to transfer navigation signals from ground stations, and can be used to obtain service of the positioning, velocity and time, and to achieve the function of navigation and positioning. Some key technique issues should be first solved; they include the accuracy position determination and orbit prediction of the communication satellites, the measur- ing and calculation of transfer time of the signals, the carrier frequency drift in communication satellite signal transfer, how to improve the geometrical configuration of the constellation in the system, and the integration of navigation & communication. Several innovative methods are developed to make the new system have full functions of navigation and communication. Based on the development of crucial techniques and methods, the CAPS demonstration system has been designed and developed. Four communication satellites in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) located at 87.5°E, 110.5°E, 134°E, 142°E and barometric altimetry are used in the CAPS system. The GEO satellites located at 134°E and 142°E are decommissioned GEO (DGEO) satellites. C-band is used as the navigation band. Dual frequency at C1=4143.15 MHz and C2=3826.02 MHz as well as dual codes with standard code (CA code and precision code (P code)) are adopted. The ground segment consists of five ground stations; the master station is in Lintong, Xi’an. The ground stations take a lot of responsibilities, including monitor and management of the operation of all system components, determination of the satellite position and prediction of the satellite orbit, accomplishment of the virtual atomic clock

  9. Final Environmental Statement. Continental United States Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Corporation developed and released a Concept Formulation Package/Technical Development Plan for the CONUS OTH-B Radar System. Various alterna - tives and...Force to consider all corrients made by the State. d. In May 1972, Governor Carti of Maine in a le.tt r to the Air Force expressed his appreciation

  10. Design of an ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar system using impulse radiating antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, J.B.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Giri, D.V.

    1999-01-01

    At TNO-FEL, one of the research programs is to explore the use of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic fields in a bi-static ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system for the detection, location and identification of buried items of unexploded ordnance (e.g. land mines). In the present paper we describe

  11. Design of an ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar system using impulse radiating antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, J.B.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Giri, D.V.

    1998-01-01

    At TNO-FEL, one of the research programs is to explore the use of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic fields in a bi-static ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system for the detection, location and identification of buried items of unexploded ordnance (e.g. land mines). In the present paper we describe

  12. Integration of satellite fire products into MPI Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystova, Iryna G.; Kloster, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Fires are the ubiquitous phenomenon affecting all natural biomes. Since the beginning of the satellite Era, fires are being continuously observed from satellites. The most interesting satellite parameter retrieved from satellite measurements is the burned area. Combined with information on biomass available for burning the burned area can be translated into climate relevant carbon emissions from fires into the atmosphere. In this study we integrate observed burned area into a global vegetation model to derive global fire emissions. Global continuous burned area dataset is provided by the Global Fire Emissions Dataset (GFED). GFED products were obtained from MODIS (and pre-MODIS) satellites and are available for the time period of 14 years (1997-2011). This dataset is widely used, well documented and supported by periodical updates containing new features. We integrate the global burned area product into the land model JSBACH, a part of the Earth-System model developed at the Max Plank Institute for Meteorology. The land model JSBACH simulates land biomass in terms of carbon content. Fire is an important disturbance process in the Earth's carbon cycle and affects mainly the carbon stored in vegetation. In the standard JSBACH version fire is represented by process based algorithms. Using the satellite data as an alternative we are targeting better comparability of modeled carbon emissions with independent satellite measurements of atmospheric composition. The structure of burned vegetation inside of a biome can be described as the balance between woody and herbaceous vegetation. GFED provides in addition to the burned area satellite derived information of the tree cover distribution within the burned area. Using this dataset, we can attribute the burned area to the respective simulated herbaceous or woody biomass within the vegetation model. By testing several extreme cases we evaluate the quantitative impact of vegetation balance between woody and herbaceous

  13. Satellite systems for personal applications concepts and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Richharia, Madhavendra

    2010-01-01

    Presents the concepts, technology, and role of satellite systems in support of personal applications, such as mobile and broadband communications, navigation, television, radio and multimedia broadcasting, safety of life services, etc. This book presents a novel perspective on satellite systems, reflecting the modern personal technology context, and hence a focus on the individual as end-user. The book begins by outlining key generic concepts before discussing techniques adopted in particular application areas; next, it exemplifies these techniques through discussion of state-of-art c

  14. Design and characteristics of a multiband communication satellite antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kenji; Itanami, Takao; Kumazawa, Hiroyuki; Ohtomo, Isao

    1995-04-01

    Feasibility studies on a multiband communication satellite antenna system and the key technologies involved in devising this system are described. The proposed multiband communication satellite utilizes four frequency bands: Ka (30/20 GHz), Ku (14/12 GHz), C (6/4 GHz), and S (2.6/2.5 GHz). It has six beam configurations, three multibeam and three shaped-beam. The following key technologies are presented: (1) a low-loss frequency selective subreflector (FSR) for compact feeds, (2) a low-loss and broadband frequency selective surface (FSS), and (3) a highly accurate and reliable mesh reflector.

  15. Flexible end-to-end system design for synthetic aperture radar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Evan C.; Edwards, Matthew C.; Bradley, Joshua P.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents ARTEMIS, Inc.'s approach to development of end-to-end synthetic aperture radar systems for multiple applications and platforms. The flexible design of the radar and the image processing tools facilitates their inclusion in a variety of application-specific end-to-end systems. Any given application comes with certain requirements that must be met in order to achieve success. A concept of operation is defined which states how the technology is used to meet the requirements of the application. This drives the design decisions. Key to adapting our system to multiple applications is the flexible SlimSAR radar system, which is programmable on-the-fly to meet the imaging requirements of a wide range of altitudes, swath-widths, and platform velocities. The processing software can be used for real-time imagery production or post-flight processing. The ground station is adaptable, and the radar controls can be run by an operator on the ground, on-board the aircraft, or even automated as part of the aircraft autopilot controls. System integration takes the whole operation into account, seeking to flawlessly work with data links and on-board data storage, aircraft and payload control systems, mission planning, and image processing and exploitation. Examples of applications are presented including using a small unmanned aircraft at low altitude with a line of sight data link, a long-endurance UAV maritime surveillance mission with on-board processing, and a manned ground moving target indicator application with the radar using multiple receive channels.

  16. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    cumulative distribution function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 CORA COvert RAdar...PaRaDe), developed by the Insti- tute of Electronic Systems at the Warsaw University of Technology [59, 60]; COvert RAdar ( CORA ), developed by the German

  17. Improvement of orbit determination accuracy for Beidou Navigation Satellite System with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengpan; Hu, Xiaogong; Zhou, Shanshi; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhu, Lingfeng; Li, Xiaojie; Wu, Shan; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Yang; Cao, Yueling

    2016-10-01

    The Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) manages to estimate simultaneously the orbits and clock offsets of navigation satellites, using code and carrier phase measurements of a regional network within China. The satellite clock offsets are also directly measured with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT). Satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals and comparisons with the precise ephemeris indicate that the radial error of GEO satellites is much larger than that of IGSO and MEO satellites and that the BDS orbit accuracy is worse than GPS. In order to improve the orbit determination accuracy for BDS, a new orbit determination strategy is proposed, in which the satellite clock measurements from TWSTFT are fixed as known values, and only the orbits of the satellites are solved. However, a constant systematic error at the nanosecond level can be found in the clock measurements, which is obtained and then corrected by differencing the clock measurements and the clock estimates from orbit determination. The effectiveness of the new strategy is verified by a GPS regional network orbit determination experiment. With the IGS final clock products fixed, the orbit determination and prediction accuracy for GPS satellites improve by more than 50% and the 12-h prediction User Range Error (URE) is better than 0.12 m. By processing a 25-day of measurement from the BDS regional network, an optimal strategy for the satellite-clock-fixed orbit determination is identified. User Equivalent Ranging Error is reduced by 27.6% for GEO satellites, but no apparent reduction is found for IGSO/MEO satellites. The SLR residuals exhibit reductions by 59% and 32% for IGSO satellites but no reductions for GEO and MEO satellites.

  18. Satellite-aided mobile radio concepts study: Concept definition of a satellite-aided mobile and personal radio communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The satellite system requires the use of a large satellite antenna and spacecraft array power of about 12 kW or more depending on the operating frequency. Technology developments needed include large offset reflector multibeam antennas, satellite electrical power sybsystems providing greater than 12 kW of power, signal switching hardware, and linearized efficient solid state amplifiers for the satellite-aided mobile band. Presently there is no frequency assignment for this service, and it is recommended that an allocation be pursued. The satellite system appears to be within reasonable extrapolation of the state of the art. It is further recommended that the satellite-aided system spacecraft definition studies and supporting technology development be initiated.

  19. State transition storyboards: A tool for designing the Goldstone solar system radar data acquisition system user interface software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. D.

    1987-01-01

    Effective user interface design in software systems is a complex task that takes place without adequate modeling tools. By combining state transition diagrams and the storyboard technique of filmmakers, State Transition Storyboards were developed to provide a detailed modeling technique for the Goldstone Solar System Radar Data Acquisition System human-machine interface. Illustrations are included with a description of the modeling technique.

  20. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  1. The principle of the positioning system based on communication satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI GuoXiang; SHI HuLi; WU HaiTao; LI ZhiGang; GUO Ji

    2009-01-01

    It is a long dream to realize the communication and navigation functionality in a satellite system in the world.This paper introduces how to establish the system,a positioning system based on communication satellites called Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS).Instead of the typical navigation satelIites,the communication satellites are configured firstly to transfer navigation signals from ground stations,and can be used to obtain service of the positioning,velocity and time,and to achieve the function of navigation and positioning.Some key technique issues should be first solved; they include the accuracy position determination and orbit prediction of the communication satellites,the measuring and calculation of transfer time of the signals,the carrier frequency drift in communication satellite ignal transfer,how to improve the geometrical configuration of the constellation in the system,and the integration of navigation & communication.Several innovative methods are developed to make the new system have full functions of navigation and communication.Based on the development of crucial techniques and methods,the CAPS demonstration system has been designed and developed.Four communication satellites in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) located at 87.5°E,110.5°E,134°E,142°E and barometric altimetry are used in the CAPS system.The GEO satellites located at 134°E and 142°E re decommissioned GEO (DGEO) satellites.C-band is used as the navigation band.Dual frequency at C1=4143.15 MHz and C2=3826.02 MHz as well as dual codes with standard code (CA code and precision code (P code)) are adopted.The ground segment consists of five ground stations; the master station is in Lintong,Xi'an.The ground stations take a lot of responsibilities,including monitor and management of the operation of all system components,determination of the satellite position and prediction of the satellite orbit,accomplishment of the virtual atomic clock measurement,transmission and receiving

  2. Equatorial dynamics observed by rocket, radar, and satellite during the CADRE/MALTED campaign 1. Programmatics and small-scale fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Richard A.; Lehmacher, Gerald A.; Schmidlin, Frank J.; Fritts, David C.; Mitchell, J. D.; Croskey, C. L.; Friedrich, M.; Swartz, W. E.

    1997-11-01

    In August 1994, the Mesospheric and Lower Thermospheric Equatorial Dynamics (MALTED) Program was conducted from the Alca‸ntara rocket site in northeastern Brazil as part of the International Guará Rocket Campaign to study equatorial dynamics, irregularities, and instabilities in the ionosphere. This site was selected because of its proximity to the geographic (2.3°S) and magnetic (~0.5°S) equators. MALTED was concerned with planetary wave modulation of the diurnal tidal amplitude, which exhibits considerable amplitude variability at equatorial and subtropical latitudes. Our goals were to study this global modulation of the tidal motions where tidal influences on the thermal structure are maximum, to study the interaction of these tidal structures with gravity waves and turbulence at mesopause altitudes, and to gain a better understanding of dynamic influences and variability on the equatorial middle atmosphere. Four (two daytime and two nighttime) identical Nike-Orion payloads designed to investigate small-scale turbulence and irregularities were coordinated with 20 meteorological falling-sphere rockets designed to measure temperature and wind fields during a 10-day period. These in situ measurements were coordinated with observations of global-scale mesospheric motions that were provided by various ground based radars and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) through the Coupling and Dynamics of Regions Equatorial (CADRE) campaign. The ground-based observatories included the Jicamarca radar observatory near Lima, Peru, and medium frequency (MF) radars in Hawaii, Christmas Island, and Adelaide. Since all four Nike-Orion flights penetrated and overflew the electrojet with apogees near 125 km, these flights provided additional information about the electrodynamics and irregularities in the equatorial ionospheric E region and may provide information on wave coupling between the mesosphere and the electrojet. Simultaneous with these flights, the CUPRI 50

  3. An Orbiting Standards Platform for communication satellite system RF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R. G.; Woodruff, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Orbiting Standards Platform (OSP) is a proposed satellite dedicated to performing RF measurements on space communications systems. It would consist of a quasi-geostationary spacecraft containing an ensemble of calibrated RF sources and field strength meters operating in several microwave bands, and would be capable of accurately and conveniently measuring critical earth station and satellite RF performance parameters, such as EIRP, gain, figure of merit (G/T), crosspolarization, beamwidth, and sidelobe levels. The feasibility and utility of the OSP concept has been under joint study by NASA, NBS, Comsat and NTIA. A survey of potential OSP users was conducted by NTIA as part of this effort. The response to this survey, along with certain trends in satellite communications system design, indicates a growing need for such a measurement service.

  4. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  5. A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    critical geometrical details; re- casting the FDTD update equations on a grid conformal to a curvilinear coordinate system (e.g., cylindrical); and...Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Sensors

  6. Design and Tests of A Cable Detection Laser Imaging Radar System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-ran; YUAN Jin

    2005-01-01

    Rotorcraft in low-level flight is endangered by power lines or telephone wires. The development of automation tools that can detect obstacles in the flight path and warn the crew would significantly reduce pilot workload and increase safety. Therefore, a cable detection radar system is developed. The real-time dynamic imaging synchronizing with radar space scanning has been implemented in developed ladar system. The requirements of the flight mission to prevent "wire strike"are analyzed and estimated, the advantages and disadvantages of the millimeter wave system with the laser system are weighted. The result shows that Laser system is the best suited for helicopter avoidance obstacle. In addition, several design gist of detecting wire radar that was used in the developed ladar system is proposed and the developed zero backlash imaging technology and several advanced warning function are described. The detailed results of system ground tests and the performances description are presented. The ground test of the developed ladar system has demonstrated that the developed imaging ladar system performance can achieve and satisfy the requirements of the mission to prevent "wire strike".

  7. Design and Realization of Phased Array Radar Optical Fiber Transmission System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shan-qing; LIU Feng; LONG Teng

    2007-01-01

    One optical fiber transmission system is designed.The modularization optical fiber transmission adapters were utilized in the system,so the system structure could be flexibly scalable.The sub-array adapter and signal processor adapter were designed and realized utilizing the new field programmable gate array (FPGA) which could drive the optical transceiver.The transmission agreement was designed based on the data stream.In order to solve the signal synchronization problem of the optical fiber transmitted phased array radar,a method named synchronous clock was designed.The fiber transmission error code rate of the system was zero with an experimental transmission velocity of 800 Mbit/s.The phased array radar system has detected the airplane target,thus validated the feasibility of the design method.

  8. Surface Ruptures and Building Damage of the 2003 Bam, Iran, Earthquake Mapped by Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Talebian, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Nazari, H.; Jackson, J. A.; Ghorashi, M.; Walker, R.

    2005-01-01

    We use the interferometric correlation from Envisat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to map the details of the surface ruptures related to the 26 December 2003 earthquake that devastated Bam, Iran. The main strike-slip fault rupture south of the city of Bam has a series of four segments with left steps shown by a narrow line of low correlation in the coseismic interferogram. This also has a clear expression in the field because of the net extension across the fault. Just south of the city limits, the surface strain becomes distributed over a width of about 500 m, probably because of a thicker layer of soft sedimentary material.

  9. MMW radar enhanced vision systems: the Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) and Radar-Enhanced Vision System (REVS) are rotary and fixed wing enhanced flight vision systems that enable safe flight operations in degraded visual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jack; Schneider, John; Cariani, Pete

    2013-05-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed rotary and fixed wing millimeter wave radar enhanced vision systems. The Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) is a rotary-wing enhanced vision system that enables multi-ship landing, takeoff, and enroute flight in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE). HALS has been successfully flight tested in a variety of scenarios, from brown-out DVE landings, to enroute flight over mountainous terrain, to wire/cable detection during low-level flight. The Radar Enhanced Vision Systems (REVS) is a fixed-wing Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) undergoing prototype development testing. Both systems are based on a fast-scanning, threedimensional 94 GHz radar that produces real-time terrain and obstacle imagery. The radar imagery is fused with synthetic imagery of the surrounding terrain to form a long-range, wide field-of-view display. A symbology overlay is added to provide aircraft state information and, for HALS, approach and landing command guidance cuing. The combination of see-through imagery and symbology provides the key information a pilot needs to perform safe flight operations in DVE conditions. This paper discusses the HALS and REVS systems and technology, presents imagery, and summarizes the recent flight test results.

  10. The 94 GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA ER-2 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Racette, Paul E.; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    The 94-GHz (W-band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimeteric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the surface up to the aircraft altitude in the lower stratosphere. The radar is especially well suited for cirrus cloud studies because of its high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution. This paper describes the CRS motivation, instrument design, specifications, calibration, and preliminary data &om NASA s Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) field campaign. The unique combination of CRS with other sensors on the ER-2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study cloud radiative effects on the global energy budget. CRS observations are being used to improve our knowledge of atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics at 94 GHz, and to provide datasets for algorithm implementation and validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar to provide the first direct global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems.

  11. Testing a satellite automatic nutation control system. [on synchronous meteorological satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrasiar, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Testing of a particular nutation control system for the synchronous meteorological satellite (SMS) is described. The test method and principles are applicable to nutation angle control for other satellites with similar requirements. During its ascent to synchronous orbit, a spacecraft like the SMS spins about its minimum-moment-of-inertia axis. An uncontrolled spacecraft in this state is unstable because torques due to fuel motion increase the nutation angle. However, the SMS is equipped with an automatic nutation control (ANC) system which will keep the nutation angle close to zero. Because correct operation of this system is critical to mission success, it was tested on an air-bearing table. The ANC system was mounted on the three-axis air-bearing table which was scaled to the SMS and equipped with appropriate sensors and thrusters. The table was spun up in an altitude chamber and nutation induced so that table motion simulated spacecraft motion. The ANC system was used to reduce the nutation angle. This dynamic test of the ANC system met all its objectives and provided confidence that the ANC system will control the SMS nutation angle.

  12. Origin of the Different Architectures of the Jovian and Saturnian Satellite Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Takanori; Stewart, Glen R.; Ida, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The Jovian regular satellite system mainly consists of four Galilean satellites that have similar masses and are trapped in mutual mean motion resonances except for the outer satellite, Callisto. On the other hand, the Saturnian regular satellite system has only one big icy body, Titan, and a population of much smaller icy moons. We have investigated the origin of these major differences between the Jovian and Saturnian satellite systems by semi-analytically simulating the growth and orbital ...

  13. Comparison of mesospheric winds from a high-altitude meteorological analysis system and meteor radar observations during the boreal winters of 2009-2010 and 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, J.; Hoppel, K.; Kuhl, D.; de Wit, R.; Stober, G.; Espy, P.; Baker, N.; Brown, P.; Fritts, D.; Jacobi, C.; Janches, D.; Mitchell, N.; Ruston, B.; Swadley, S.; Viner, K.; Whitcomb, T.; Hibbins, R.

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of horizontal winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) during the boreal winters of 2009-2010 and 2012-2013 produced with a new high-altitude numerical weather prediction (NWP) system. This system is based on a modified version of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) with an extended vertical domain up to ∼116 km altitude coupled with a hybrid four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system that assimilates both standard operational meteorological observations in the troposphere and satellite-based observations of temperature, ozone and water vapor in the stratosphere and mesosphere. NAVGEM-based MLT analyzed winds are validated using independent meteor radar wind observations from nine different sites ranging from 69°N-67°S latitude. Time-averaged NAVGEM zonal and meridional wind profiles between 75 and 95 km altitude show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with corresponding meteor radar wind profiles. Wavelet analysis finds that the 3-hourly NAVGEM and 1-hourly radar winds both exhibit semi-diurnal, diurnal, and quasi-diurnal variations whose vertical profiles of amplitude and phase are also in good agreement. Wavelet analysis also reveals common time-frequency behavior in both NAVGEM and radar winds throughout the Northern extratropics around the times of major stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) in January 2010 and January 2013, with a reduction in semi-diurnal amplitudes beginning around the time of a mesospheric wind reversal at 60°N that precedes the SSW, followed by an amplification of semi-diurnal amplitudes that peaks 10-14 days following the onset of the mesospheric wind reversal. The initial results presented in this study demonstrate that the wind analyses produced by the high-altitude NAVGEM system accurately capture key features in the observed MLT winds during these two boreal winter periods.

  14. Multi-agent robotic systems and applications for satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Miguel A.

    A revolution in the space sector is happening. It is expected that in the next decade there will be more satellites launched than in the previous sixty years of space exploration. Major challenges are associated with this growth of space assets such as the autonomy and management of large groups of satellites, in particular with small satellites. There are two main objectives for this work. First, a flexible and distributed software architecture is presented to expand the possibilities of spacecraft autonomy and in particular autonomous motion in attitude and position. The approach taken is based on the concept of distributed software agents, also referred to as multi-agent robotic system. Agents are defined as software programs that are social, reactive and proactive to autonomously maximize the chances of achieving the set goals. Part of the work is to demonstrate that a multi-agent robotic system is a feasible approach for different problems of autonomy such as satellite attitude determination and control and autonomous rendezvous and docking. The second main objective is to develop a method to optimize multi-satellite configurations in space, also known as satellite constellations. This automated method generates new optimal mega-constellations designs for Earth observations and fast revisit times on large ground areas. The optimal satellite constellation can be used by researchers as the baseline for new missions. The first contribution of this work is the development of a new multi-agent robotic system for distributing the attitude determination and control subsystem for HiakaSat. The multi-agent robotic system is implemented and tested on the satellite hardware-in-the-loop testbed that simulates a representative space environment. The results show that the newly proposed system for this particular case achieves an equivalent control performance when compared to the monolithic implementation. In terms on computational efficiency it is found that the multi

  15. The international maritime satellite communications system INMARSAT (Handbook)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, Viktor A.

    The organization and services provided by the INMARSAT satellite communications system are summarized. The structure and operation of the system are described with reference to transmission line parameters, frequency assignment, signals, telex communications, electrical parameters of communication channels, modulation, synchronization, and methods of protection against errors in the transmission of discrete messages. The discussion also covers the principal components of the INMARSAT system and the operation of ship-based stations.

  16. A Fault tolerant Control Supervisory System development Procedurefor Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard

    The paper presents a stepwise procedure to develop a fault tolerant control system for small satellites. The procedure is illustrated through implementation on the AAUSAT-II spacecraft. As it is shown the presented procedure requires expertise from several disciplines that are nevertheless...

  17. Multi-spectral band selection for satellite-based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clodius, W.B.; Weber, P.G.; Borel, C.C.; Smith, B.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of satellite based multispectral imaging systems requires the consideration of a number of tradeoffs between cost and performance. The authors have recently been involved in the design and evaluation of a satellite based multispectral sensor operating from the visible through the long wavelength IR. The criteria that led to some of the proposed designs and the modeling used to evaluate and fine tune the designs will both be discussed. These criteria emphasized the use of bands for surface temperature retrieval and the correction of atmospheric effects. The impact of cost estimate changes on the final design will also be discussed.

  18. Search and rescue satellite-aided tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudell, B.; Gutwein, J. M.; Vollmers, R.; Wammer, D.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of Sarsat is to demonstrate that satellites can greatly facilitate the monitoring, detection, and location of distress incidents alerted by Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) and Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) carried on commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft and some marine vessels. The detection and location will be accomplished by relaying, via satellite, ELT/EPIRB distress information to ground stations, which will complete the data processing and forward alert and position location data to rescue coordination services. This paper presents a Sarsat system description and a summary of Coast Guard and USAF objectives for the initial demonstration and evaluation tests of Sarsat.

  19. US Integrated Ocean Observing System HF Radar Network: National Applications and International Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, J.

    2016-12-01

    The US Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), a partnership of academic institutions and Federal agencies, within NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS), operates the nation's only high-frequency (HF) radar network providing near-real-time 2-D maps of ocean of surface currents speed and direction. This system supports US Coast Guard search and rescue operations, NOAA response to oil spills, port navigation and tracking of harmful algal bloom. In the research realm, the data are helping to understand oceanographic processes such as the warm water mass off of the west coast of the US and are routinely ingested into oceanographic models and are used for research into tsunami detection. A key component of the network is the data management system that ingests and distributes hourly data from radars throughout US coastal areas as well as Canada and Mexico, comprising nearly 150 radars. HF radar operators outside the US have adopted the data file formats that were developed by the US IOOS and these data are displayed publicly in near-real-time. To enhance the utility of HF radar data to end-users in all parts of the globe, operational products are needed. Recently in the US, quasi-operational products have been developed, or are under development, including: 2-D maps in AWIPS-II, tidal analysis and prediction from NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products & Services (CO-OPS), tsunami detection algorithms led by National Tsunami Warning Center, and significant wave height pilot project. These products will be highlighted and potential for international use discussed.

  20. Space Systems Failures Disasters and Rescues of Satellites, Rockets and Space Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s deep space missions were dispatched in pairs in case one was lost in launch or failed during its journey. Following the triumphs of the Viking landings on Mars in 1976 and both Voyagers spacecraft successfully surveying the outer giant planets of the Solar System, it was decided by NASA to cut costs and send out just a single probe. Although Magellan successfully mapped Venus by radar, it suffered from problems during the flight. Then came the loss of Mars Observer, whose engine exploded as it was preparing to enter Mars’ orbit because it was using technology designed for Earth’s satellites and the engine was not suited to spending several months in space. Later came the high-profile losses of Mars Climate Observer and Mars Polar Lander - a consequence of the faster, better, cheaper philosophy introduced by Dan Goldin in 1993. Even the highly successful Galileo mission suffered a major setback when its high-gain antenna (also based on satellite mission suffered a major setback when ...

  1. Sensor system for Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Takashi; Kuze, Akihiko; Kondo, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    Global warming has become a very serious issue for human beings. In 1997, the Kyoto Protocol was adopted at the Third Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3), making it mandatory for developed nations to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by six (6) to eight (8) per cent of their total emissions in 1990, and to meet this goal sometime between 2008 and 2012. The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is design to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) from orbit. GOSAT is a joint project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Ministry of Environment (MOE), and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). JAXA is responsible for the satellite and instrument development, MOE is involved in the instrument development, and NIES is responsible for the satellite data retrieval. The satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2008. In order to detect the CO2 variation of boundary layers, both the technique to measure the column density and the retrieval algorithm to remove cloud and aerosol contamination are investigated. Main mission sensor of the GOSAT is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with high optical throughput, spectral resolution and wide spectral coverage, and a cloud-aerosol detecting imager attached to the satellite. The paper presents the mission sensor system of the GOSAT together with the results of performance demonstration with proto-type instrument aboard an aircraft.

  2. Oceanography from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that oceanographers have benefited from the space program mainly through the increased efficiency it has brought to ship operations. For example, the Transit navigation system has enabled oceanographers to compile detailed maps of sea-floor properties and to more accurately locate moored subsurface instrumentation. General descriptions are given of instruments used in satellite observations (altimeter, color scanner, infrared radiometer, microwave radiometer, scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar). It is pointed out that because of the large volume of data that satellite instruments generate, the development of algorithms for converting the data into a form expressed in geophysical units has become especially important.

  3. Chosen results of field tests of synthetic aperture radar system installed on board UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniewski, Piotr; Komorniczak, Wojciech; Lesnik, Czeslaw; Cyrek, Jacek; Serafin, Piotr; Labowski, Michal; Wajszczyk, Bronislaw

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents a synthetic information on a UAV-based radar terrain imaging system, its purpose, structure and working principle as well as terrain images obtained from flight experiments. A SAR technology demonstrator has been built as a result of a research project conducted by the Military University of Technology and WB Electronics S.A. under the name WATSAR. The developed system allows to obtain high resolution radar images, both in on-line and off-line modes, independently of the light conditions over the observed area. The software developed for the system allows to determine geographic coordinates of the imaged objects with high accuracy. Four LFM-CW radar sensors were built during the project: two for S band and two for Ku band, working with different signal bandwidths. Acquired signals were processed with the TDC algorithm, which allowed for a number of analyses in order to evaluate the performance of the system. The impact of the navigational corrections on a SAR image quality was assessed as well. The research methodology of the in-flight experiments of the system is presented in the paper. The projects results show that the developed system may be implemented as an aid to tactical C4ISR systems.

  4. Accuracy Performance Evaluation of Beidou Navigation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Hu, Y. N.

    2017-03-01

    Accuracy is one of the key elements of the regional Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) performance standard. In this paper, we review the definition specification and evaluation standard of the BDS accuracy. Current accuracy of the regional BDS is analyzed through the ground measurements and compared with GPS in terms of dilution of precision (DOP), signal-in-space user range error (SIS URE), and positioning accuracy. The Positioning DOP (PDOP) map of BDS around Chinese mainland is compared with that of GPS. The GPS PDOP is between 1.0-2.0 and does not vary with the user latitude and longitude, while the BDS PDOP varies between 1.5-5.0, and increases as the user latitude increases, and as the user longitude apart from 118°. The accuracies of the broadcast orbits of BDS are assessed by taking the precise orbits from International GNSS Service (IGS) as the reference, and by making satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals. The radial errors of the BDS inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium orbit (MEO) satellites broadcast orbits are at the 0.5m level, which are larger than those of GPS satellites at the 0.2m level. The SLR residuals of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites are 65.0cm, which are larger than those of IGSO, and MEO satellites, at the 50.0cm level. The accuracy of broadcast clock offset parameters of BDS is computed by taking the clock measurements of Two-way Satellite Radio Time Frequency Transfer as the reference. Affected by the age of broadcast clock parameters, the error of the broadcast clock offset parameters of the MEO satellites is the largest, at the 0.80m level. Finally, measurements of the multi-GNSS (MGEX) receivers are used for positioning accuracy assessment of BDS and GPS. It is concluded that the positioning accuracy of regional BDS is better than 10m at the horizontal component and the vertical component. The combined positioning accuracy of both systems is better than one specific system.

  5. A satellite-tracking millimeter-wave reflector antenna system for mobile satellite-tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Arthur C. (Inventor); Jamnejad, Vahraz (Inventor); Woo, Kenneth E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A miniature dual-band two-way mobile satellite tracking antenna system mounted on a movable ground vehicle includes a miniature parabolic reflector dish having an elliptical aperture with major and minor elliptical axes aligned horizontally and vertically, respectively, to maximize azimuthal directionality and minimize elevational directionality to an extent corresponding to expected pitch excursions of the movable ground vehicle. A feed-horn has a back end and an open front end facing the reflector dish and has vertical side walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a lesser horn angle and horizontal top and bottom walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a greater horn angle. An RF circuit couples two different signal bands between the feed-horn and the user. An antenna attitude controller maintains an antenna azimuth direction relative to the satellite by rotating it in azimuth in response to sensed yaw motions of the movable ground vehicle so as to compensate for the yaw motions to within a pointing error angle. The controller sinusoidally dithers the antenna through a small azimuth dither angle greater than the pointing error angle while sensing a signal from the satellite received at the reflector dish, and deduces the pointing angle error from dither-induced fluctuations in the received signal.

  6. Satellite-Tracking Millimeter-Wave Reflector Antenna System For Mobile Satellite-Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Arthur C. (Inventor); Jamnejad, Vahraz (Inventor); Woo, Kenneth E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature dual-band two-way mobile satellite-tracking antenna system mounted on a movable vehicle includes a miniature parabolic reflector dish having an elliptical aperture with major and minor elliptical axes aligned horizontally and vertically, respectively, to maximize azimuthal directionality and minimize elevational directionality to an extent corresponding to expected pitch excursions of the movable ground vehicle. A feed-horn has a back end and an open front end facing the reflector dish and has vertical side walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a lesser horn angle and horizontal top and bottom walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a greater horn angle. An RF circuit couples two different signal bands between the feed-horn and the user. An antenna attitude controller maintains an antenna azimuth direction relative to the satellite by rotating it in azimuth in response to sensed yaw motions of the movable ground vehicle so as to compensate for the yaw motions to within a pointing error angle. The controller sinusoidally dithers the antenna through a small azimuth dither angle greater than the pointing error angle while sensing a signal from the satellite received at the reflector dish, and deduces the pointing angle error from dither-induced fluctuations in the received signal.

  7. Cyber security with radio frequency interferences mitigation study for satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wei, Sixiao; Chen, Genshe; Tian, Xin; Shen, Dan; Pham, Khanh; Nguyen, Tien M.; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Satellite systems including the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and the satellite communications (SATCOM) system provide great convenience and utility to human life including emergency response, wide area efficient communications, and effective transportation. Elements of satellite systems incorporate technologies such as navigation with the global positioning system (GPS), satellite digital video broadcasting, and information transmission with a very small aperture terminal (VSAT), etc. The satellite systems importance is growing in prominence with end users' requirement for globally high data rate transmissions; the cost reduction of launching satellites; development of smaller sized satellites including cubesat, nanosat, picosat, and femtosat; and integrating internet services with satellite networks. However, with the promising benefits, challenges remain to fully develop secure and robust satellite systems with pervasive computing and communications. In this paper, we investigate both cyber security and radio frequency (RF) interferences mitigation for satellite systems, and demonstrate that they are not isolated. The action space for both cyber security and RF interferences are firstly summarized for satellite systems, based on which the mitigation schemes for both cyber security and RF interferences are given. A multi-layered satellite systems structure is provided with cross-layer design considering multi-path routing and channel coding, to provide great security and diversity gains for secure and robust satellite systems.

  8. Mobile satellite news gathering (SNG) system; Soko SNG (Satellite News Gathering) shasaikyoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Commercialization was made for broadcasting stations on a mobile station system capable of capturing a satellite automatically while the system is moving. Its feature is the enhanced tracking accuracy as a result of using the Company's original null-sensor (see Note), and detecting and controlling intersecting polarized waves of reference signals from the satellite. The material for transmission is digitally transmitted by MPEG2, making it possible to transmit more data than by conventional systems. The system is being used for live broadcasting of marathon races and emergency news broadcasting. It is expected that the system may be applied to applications other than broadcasting stations, such as automobiles and ships. (Note: A null-sensor is a unit used for adjusting antenna directions for an SNG transmitter. It uses IF receiving signals of H/V polarized waves of parabolic antenna as an input, and outputs the main polarized wave level and the intersecting polarized wave level.) (translated by NEDO)

  9. Deep Stochastic Radar Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Tim Allan; Holder, Martin; Winner, Hermann; Kochenderfer, Mykel

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and validation of advanced driver assistance systems requires accurate sensor models. Modeling automotive radar is complicated by effects such as multipath reflections, interference, reflective surfaces, discrete cells, and attenuation. Detailed radar simulations based on physical principles exist but are computationally intractable for realistic automotive scenes. This paper describes a methodology for the construction of stochastic automotive radar models based on deep l...

  10. Operational reservoir inflow forecasting with radar altimetry: The Zambezi case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailovsky, Claire Irene B.; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    cannot be measured from space, radar altimetry can track surface water level variations at crossing locations between the satellite ground track and the river system called virtual stations (VS). Use of radar altimetry versus traditional monitoring in operational settings is complicated by the low...... temporal resolution of the data (between 10 and 35 days revisit time at a VS depending on the satellite) as well as the fact that the location of the measurements is not necessarily at the point of interest. However, combining radar altimetry from multiple VS with hydrological models can help overcome...

  11. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 5: Special emphasis studies. [rectenna and solar power satellite design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Satellite configurations based on the Satellite Power System baseline requirements were analyzed and a preferred concept selected. A satellite construction base was defined, precursor operations incident to establishment of orbital support facilities identified, and the satellite construction sequence and procedures developed. Rectenna construction requirement were also addressed. Mass flow to orbit requirements were revised and traffic models established based on construction of 60 instead of 120 satellites. Analyses were conducted to determine satellite control, resources, manufacturing, and propellant requirements. The impact of the laser beam used for space-to-Earth power transmission upon the intervening atmosphere was examined as well as the inverse effect. The significant space environments and their effects on spacecraft components were investigated to define the design and operational limits imposed by the environments on an orbit transfer vehicle. The results show that LEO altitude 300 nmi and transfer orbit duration 6 months are preferrable.

  12. Progress report on the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Y.; Imel, D.; Chu, A.; Miller, T.; Moller, D.; Skotnicki, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIRSAR has served as a test-bed for both imaging radar techniques and radar technologies for over a decade. In fact, the polarimetric, cross-track interferometric, and along-track introferometric radar techniques were all developed using AIRSAR.

  13. MICROPROCESSOR-BASED DATA-ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR A BOREHOLE RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jerry A.; Wright, David L.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient microprocessor-based system is described that permits real-time acquisition, stacking, and digital recording of data generated by a borehole radar system. Although the system digitizes, stacks, and records independently of a computer, it is interfaced to a desktop computer for program control over system parameters such as sampling interval, number of samples, number of times the data are stacked prior to recording on nine-track tape, and for graphics display of the digitized data. The data can be transferred to the desktop computer during recording, or it can be played back from a tape at a latter time. Using the desktop computer, the operator observes results while recording data and generates hard-copy graphics in the field. Thus, the radar operator can immediately evaluate the quality of data being obtained, modify system parameters, study the radar logs before leaving the field, and rerun borehole logs if necessary. The system has proven to be reliable in the field and has increased productivity both in the field and in the laboratory.

  14. Artificial Neural Network-Based Clutter Reduction Systems for Ship Size Estimation in Maritime Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicen-Bueno R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of clutter in maritime radars deteriorates the estimation of some physical parameters of the objects detected over the sea surface. For that reason, maritime radars should incorporate efficient clutter reduction techniques. Due to the intrinsic nonlinear dynamic of sea clutter, nonlinear signal processing is needed, what can be achieved by artificial neural networks (ANNs. In this paper, an estimation of the ship size using an ANN-based clutter reduction system followed by a fixed threshold is proposed. High clutter reduction rates are achieved using 1-dimensional (horizontal or vertical integration modes, although inaccurate ship width estimations are achieved. These estimations are improved using a 2-dimensional (rhombus integration mode. The proposed system is compared with a CA-CFAR system, denoting a great performance improvement and a great robustness against changes in sea clutter conditions and ship parameters, independently of the direction of movement of the ocean waves and ships.

  15. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  16. A portable W-band radar system for enhancement of infrared vision in fire fighting operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenner, Mathias; Zech, Christian; Hülsmann, Axel; Kühn, Jutta; Schlechtweg, Michael; Hahmann, Konstantin; Kleiner, Bernhard; Ulrich, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present a millimeter wave radar system which will enhance the performance of infrared cameras used for fire-fighting applications. The radar module is compact and lightweight such that the system can be combined with inertial sensors and integrated in a hand-held infrared camera. This allows for precise distance measurements in harsh environmental conditions, such as tunnel or industrial fires, where optical sensors are unreliable or fail. We discuss the design of the RF front-end, the antenna and a quasi-optical lens for beam shaping as well as signal processing and demonstrate the performance of the system by in situ measurements in a smoke filled environment.

  17. The shrinking rainforest, and the need for accurate data a satellite radar approach to quantifying Indonesia's palm oil obsession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trischan, John

    Rapid deforestation has been occurring in Southeast Asia for majority of the last quarter century. This is due in large by the expansion of oil palm plantations. These plantations fill the need globally for the palm oil they provide. On the other hand, they are removing some of the last remaining primary rainforests on the planet. The issue concerning the ongoing demise of rainforests in the region involves the availability of data in order to monitor the expansion of palm, at the cost of rainforest. Providing a simplified approach to mapping oil palm plantations in hopes of spreading palm analysis regionally in an effort to obtain a better grasp on the land use dynamics. Using spatial filtering techniques, the complexity of radar data are simplified in order to use for palm detection.

  18. Reservoir monitoring and characterization using satellite geodetic data: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations from the Krechba field, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Deformation in the material overlying an active reservoir is used to monitor pressure change at depth. A sequence of pressure field estimates, eleven in all, allow us to construct a measure of diffusive travel time throughout the reservoir. The dense distribution of travel time values means that we can construct an exactly linear inverse problem for reservoir flow properties. Application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data gathered over a CO{sub 2} injection in Algeria reveals pressure propagation along two northwest trending corridors. An inversion of the travel times indicates the existence of two northwest-trending high permeability zones. The high permeability features trend in the same direction as the regional fault and fracture zones. Model parameter resolution estimates indicate that the features are well resolved.

  19. The MUSES Satellite Team and Multidisciplinary System Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John C.; Paiz, Alfred R.; Young, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    In a unique partnership between three minority-serving institutions and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a new course sequence, including a multidisciplinary capstone design experience, is to be developed and implemented at each of the schools with the ambitious goal of designing, constructing and launching a low-orbit Earth-resources satellite. The three universities involved are North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T), University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), and California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). The schools form a consortium collectively known as MUSES - Minority Universities System Engineering and Satellite. Four aspects of this project make it unique: (1) Including all engineering disciplines in the capstone design course, (2) designing, building and launching an Earth-resources satellite, (3) sustaining the partnership between the three schools to achieve this goal, and (4) implementing systems engineering pedagogy at each of the three schools. This paper will describe the partnership and its goals, the first design of the satellite, the courses developed at NCA&T, and the implementation plan for the course sequence.

  20. Satellite Imagery Assisted Road-Based Visual Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, A.; Gibbens, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing demand for unmanned aerial systems as autonomous surveillance, exploration and remote sensing solutions. Among the key concerns for robust operation of these systems is the need to reliably navigate the environment without reliance on global navigation satellite system (GNSS). This is of particular concern in Defence circles, but is also a major safety issue for commercial operations. In these circumstances, the aircraft needs to navigate relying only on information from on-board passive sensors such as digital cameras. An autonomous feature-based visual system presented in this work offers a novel integral approach to the modelling and registration of visual features that responds to the specific needs of the navigation system. It detects visual features from Google Earth* build a feature database. The same algorithm then detects features in an on-board cameras video stream. On one level this serves to localise the vehicle relative to the environment using Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM). On a second level it correlates them with the database to localise the vehicle with respect to the inertial frame. The performance of the presented visual navigation system was compared using the satellite imagery from different years. Based on comparison results, an analysis of the effects of seasonal, structural and qualitative changes of the imagery source on the performance of the navigation algorithm is presented. * The algorithm is independent of the source of satellite imagery and another provider can be used

  1. Localization of an air target by means of GNSS-based multistatic radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Daulet Sh.; Raskaliyev, Almat S.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of utilizing transmitters of opportunity for target detection, tracking and positioning is of great interest to the radar community. In particular the optional use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has lately triggered scientific research that has purpose to take advantage of this source of signal generation for passive radar. Number of studies have been conducted previously on development of GNSS-based bistatic and multistatic radars for detection and range estimation to the object located in the close atmosphere. To further enrich research in this area, we present a novel method for coordinate determination of the air target by means of the GNSS-based multistatic radar.

  2. Ambiguity Function and Resolution Characteristic Analysis of DVB-S Signal for Passive Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the performance research on the ambiguity function and resolution of passive radar based on DVB-S (Digital Video Broadcasting-Satellite signal. The radar system structure and signal model of DVB-S signal are firstly studied, then the ambiguity function of DVB-S signal is analyzed. At last, it has been obtained how the bistatic radar position impacts the resolution. Theoretical analyses and computer simulation show that DVB-S signal is applicable as an illuminator for passive radar.

  3. TerraSAR-X high-resolution radar remote sensing: an operational warning system for Rift Valley fever risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignolles, Cécile; Tourre, Yves M; Mora, Oscar; Imanache, Laurent; Lafaye, Murielle

    2010-11-01

    In the vicinity of the Barkedji village (in the Ferlo region of Senegal), the abundance and aggressiveness of the vector mosquitoes for Rift Valley fever (RVF) are strongly linked to rainfall events and associated ponds dynamics. Initially, these results were obtained from spectral analysis of high-resolution (~10 m) Spot-5 images, but, as a part of the French AdaptFVR project, identification of the free water dynamics within ponds was made with the new high-resolution (down to 3-meter pixels), Synthetic Aperture Radar satellite (TerraSAR-X) produced by Infoterra GmbH, Friedrichshafen/Potsdam, Germany. During summer 2008, within a 30 x 50 km radar image, it was found that identified free water fell well within the footprints of ponds localized by optical data (i.e. Spot-5 images), which increased the confidence in this new and complementary remote sensing technique. Moreover, by using near real-time rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), NASA/JAXA joint mission, the filling-up and flushing-out rates of the ponds can be accurately determined. The latter allows for a precise, spatio-temporal mapping of the zones potentially occupied by mosquitoes capable of revealing the variability of pond surfaces. The risk for RVF infection of gathered bovines and small ruminants (~1 park/km(2)) can thus be assessed. This new operational approach (which is independent of weather conditions) is an important development in the mapping of risk components (i.e. hazards plus vulnerability) related to RVF transmission during the summer monsoon, thus contributing to a RVF early warning system.

  4. TerraSAR-X high-resolution radar remote sensing: an operational warning system for Rift Valley fever risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Vignolles

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the vicinity of the Barkedji village (in the Ferlo region of Senegal, the abundance and aggressiveness of the vector mosquitoes for Rift Valley fever (RVF are strongly linked to rainfall events and associated ponds dynamics. Initially, these results were obtained from spectral analysis of high-resolution (~10 m Spot-5 images, but, as a part of the French AdaptFVR project, identification of the free water dynamics within ponds was made with the new high-resolution (down to 3-meter pixels, Synthetic Aperture Radar satellite (TerraSAR-X produced by Infoterra GmbH, Friedrichshafen/Potsdam, Germany. During summer 2008, within a 30 x 50 km radar image, it was found that identified free water fell well within the footprints of ponds localized by optical data (i.e. Spot-5 images, which increased the confidence in this new and complementary remote sensing technique. Moreover, by using near real-time rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, NASA/JAXA joint mission, the filling-up and flushingout rates of the ponds can be accurately determined. The latter allows for a precise, spatio-temporal mapping of the zones potentially occupied by mosquitoes capable of revealing the variability of pond surfaces. The risk for RVF infection of gathered bovines and small ruminants (~1 park/km2 can thus be assessed. This new operational approach (which is independent of weather conditions is an important development in the mapping of risk components (i.e. hazards plus vulnerability related to RVF transmission during the summer monsoon, thus contributing to a RVF early warning system.

  5. Cross-polarization borehole radar system with a RF analog optical transmission link. Hikaridenso ni yoru chokko henpa bore hole radar keisoku system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miwa, T.; Sato, M.; Niitsuma, H. (Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    The cross-polarization borehole radar system (BRS) was reported. The RF analogue optical transmission system (using the optical fiber cable) was introduced into the signal transmission between the sonde and the surface station to broaden the band and to heighten the S/N ratio. The sonde consisted of cable head (to transmit the trigger signal), receiving antenna, and transmitting antenna. The transmitting antenna was excited by the trigger signal from the surface to generate the pulse by the pulse generator. The signal received by the receiving antenna was sent to the oscilloscope on the surface. The field test of cross-polarization borehole system revealed that the effect of noise associated with the BRS employing the eccentric cable did not appear on the BRS. Examples of field test of the cross-polarization borehole measurement system employing the BRS were described. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Verification measurements of the Karoo Array timing system: a laser radar based time transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrits, R.; Bauermeister, E.; Gamatham, R.; Adams, G.; Malan, J. A.; Burger, J. P.; Kapp, F.; Gibbon, T.; Kriel, H.; Abbott, T.

    2016-02-01

    An optical fiber based laser radar time transfer system has been developed for the 64-dish MeerKAT radiointerferometer telescope project to provide accurate atomic time to the receivers of the telescope system. This time transfer system is called the Karoo Array Timing System (KATS). Calibration of the time transfer system is essential to ensure that time is accurately transferred to the digitisers that form part of the receivers. Frequency domain reflectometry via vector network analysers is also used to verify measurements taken using time interval counters. This paper details the progress that is made in the verification measurements of the system in order to ensure that time, accurate to within a few nanoseconds of the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC, is available at the point where radio signals from astronomical sources are received. This capability enables world class transient and timing studies with a compact radio interferometer, which has inherent advantages over large single dish radio-telescopes, in observing the transient sky.

  7. Interoperability of satellite-based augmentation systems for aircraft navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Donghai

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is pioneering a transformation of the national airspace system from its present ground based navigation and landing systems to a satellite based system using the Global Positioning System (GPS). To meet the critical safety-of-life aviation positioning requirements, a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS), the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), is being implemented to support navigation for all phases of flight, including Category I precision approach. The system is designed to be used as a primary means of navigation, capable of meeting the Required Navigation Performance (RNP), and therefore must satisfy the accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability requirements. In recent years there has been international acceptance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), spurring widespread growth in the independent development of SBASs. Besides the FAA's WAAS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service System (EGNOS) and the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau's MTSAT-Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS) are also being actively developed. Although all of these SBASs can operate as stand-alone, regional systems, there is increasing interest in linking these SBASs together to reduce costs while improving service coverage. This research investigated the coverage and availability improvements due to cooperative efforts among regional SBAS networks. The primary goal was to identify the optimal interoperation strategies in terms of performance, complexity and practicality. The core algorithms associated with the most promising concepts were developed and demonstrated. Experimental verification of the most promising concepts was conducted using data collected from a joint international test between the National Satellite Test Bed (NSTB) and the EGNOS System Test Bed (ESTB). This research clearly shows that a simple switch between SBASs made by the airborne equipment is the most effective choice for achieving the

  8. Automatic charge control system for satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, B. M.; Cohen, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The SCATHA and the ATS-5 and 6 spacecraft provided insights to the problem of spacecraft charging at geosychronous altitudes. Reduction of the levels of both absolute and differential charging was indicated, by the emission of low energy neutral plasma. It is appropriate to complete the transition from experimental results to the development of a system that will sense the state-of-charge of a spacecraft, and, when a predetermined threshold is reached, will respond automatically to reduce it. A development program was initiated utilizing sensors comparable to the proton electrostatic analyzer, the surface potential monitor, and the transient pulse monitor that flew in SCATHA, and combine these outputs through a microprocessor controller to operate a rapid-start, low energy plasma source.

  9. Preliminary design of a space system operating a ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Marco; Ponte, Salvatore; Grassi, Michele; Moccia, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Ground-penetrating radars (GPR) are currently used only in ground campaigns or in few airborne installations. A feasibility analysis of a space mission operating a GPR for archaeological applications is presented in this work with emphasis on spacecraft critical aspects: antenna dimension and power required for achieving adequate depth and accuracy. Sensor parametric design is performed considering two operating altitudes (250 and 500 km) and user requirements, such as minimum skin depth, vertical and horizontal resolution. A 500-km altitude, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. sun-synchronous orbit is an adequate compromise between atmospheric drag and payload transmitted average power (12 kW) to achieve a 3-m penetration depth. The satellite bus preliminary design is then performed, with focus on critical subsystems and technologies. The payload average power requirement can be kept within feasible limits (1 kW) by using NiH2 batteries to supply the radar transmitter, and with a strong reduction of the mission duty cycle ( 40km×1100km are observed per orbit). As for the electric power subsystem, a dual-voltage strategy is adopted, with the battery charge regulator supplied at 126 V and the bus loads at 50 V. The overall average power (1.9 kW), accounting for both payload and bus needs, can be supplied by a 20m2 GaAs solar panel for a three-year lifetime. Finally, the satellite mass is kept within reasonable limits (1.6 tons) using inflatable-rigidisable structure for both the payload antenna and the solar panels.

  10. A Reusable Software Architecture for Small Satellite AOCS Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Laursen, Karl Kaas

    2006-01-01

    with both hardware and on-board software. Some of the key issues addressed by the framework are automatic translation of mathematical specifications of hybrid systems into executable software entities, management of execution of coupled models in a parallel distributed environment, as well as interaction......This paper concerns the software architecture called Sophy, which is an abbreviation for Simulation, Observation, and Planning in HYbrid systems. We present a framework that allows execution of hybrid dynamical systems in an on-line distributed computing environment, which includes interaction...... with external components, hardware and/or software, through generic interfaces. Sophy is primarily intended as a tool for development of model based reusable software for the control and autonomous functions of satellites and/or satellite clusters....

  11. Gravimetry, Relativity, and the Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tarantola, Albert; Pozo, Jose Maria; Coll, Bartolome

    2009-01-01

    Relativity is an integral part of positioning systems, and this is taken into account in today's practice by applying many "relativistic corrections" to computations performed using concepts borrowed from Galilean physics. A different, fully relativistic paradigm can be developed for operating a positioning system. This implies some fundamental changes. For instance, the basic coordinates are four times (with a symmetric meaning, not three space coordinate and one time coordinate) and the satellites must have cross-link capabilities. Gravitation must, of course, be taken into account, but not using the Newtonian theory: the gravitation field is, and only is, the space-time metric. This implies that the positioning problem and the gravimetry problem can not be separated. An optimization theory can be developed that, because it is fully relativistic, does not contain any "relativistic correction". We suggest that all positioning satellite systems should be operated in this way. The first benefit of doing so wou...

  12. Analysis of satellite broadcasting systems for digital television

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gaudenzi, Riccardo; Elia, Carlo; Viola, Roberto

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the new concept of digital direct satellite broadcasting (D-DBS), which allows unprecedented flexibility by providing a large number of audio-visual services. The concept elaborated on in this paper assumes an information rate of about 40 Mb/s, which is compatible with practically all present-day transponders. After discussion of the general system concept, the optimization procedure is introduced and results of the transmission system optimization are presented. Channel distortion and uplink/downlink interference effects are taken into account by means of a time domain system computer simulation approach. It is shown, by means of link budget analysis, how a medium power direct-to-home TV satellite can provide multimedia services to users equipped with small (60 cm) dish antennas.

  13. An active attitude control system for a drag sail satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Willem Herman; Jordaan, Hendrik Willem

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the development and simulation results of a full ADCS subsystem for the deOrbitSail drag sail mission. The deOrbitSail satellite was developed as part of an European FP7 collaboration research project. The satellite was launched and commissioning started on 10th July 2015. Various new actuators and sensors designed for this mission will be presented. The deOrbitSail satellite is a 3U CubeSat to deploy a 4 by 4 m drag sail from an initial 650 km circular polar low earth orbit. With an active attitude control system it will be shown that by maximising the drag force, the expected de-orbiting period from the initial altitude will be less than 50 days. A future application of this technology will be the use of small drag sails as low-cost devices to de-orbit LEO satellites, when they have reached their end of life, without having to use expensive propulsion systems. Simulation and Hardware-in-Loop experiments proved the feasibility of the proposed attitude control system. A magnetic-only control approach using a Y-Thomson spin, is used to detumble the 3U Cubesat with stowed sail and subsequently to 3-axis stabilise the satellite to be ready for the final deployment phase. Minituarised torquer rods, a nano-sized momentum wheel, attitude sensor hardware (magnetometer, sun, earth) developed for this phase will be presented. The final phase will be to deploy and 3-axis stabilise the drag sail normal to the satellite's velocity vector, using a combined Y-momentum wheel and magnetic controller. The design and performance improvements when using a 2-axis translation stage to adjust the sail centre-of-pressure to satellite centre-of-mass offset, will also be discussed, although for launch risk reasons this stage was not included in the final flight configuration. To accurately determine the drag sail's attitude during the sunlit part of the orbit, an accurate wide field of view dual sensor to measure both the sun and nadir vector direction was developed for

  14. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  15. Flood-threat zoning map of the urban area of Chocó (Quibdó. A study based on interpreting radar, satellite and aerial photograph images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamir Maturana Córdoba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A zoning map of areas which flood due to the Atrato River and its tributaries (the Cabí, Caraño and Yesca over-flowing in the urban area of Chocó (Quibdo was drawn up to be used by aid authorities and Quibdó city as a planning and control tool. This research relied on CIAF (Centro Interamericano de Fotointerpretación support and assessment. This entity is a subsidiary institution of the Instituto Geográfico Agustín Codazzi which provided their installations and the required geographical material. This research was initially based on interpreting radar (INTERA, satellite (LANDSAT and aerial photographic images; this was verified by field verification of the in-terpreted data. Other variables such as climatic, geological, temperature, topographic conditions, historic and hydrological series and facts regarding the region were studied as additional information required for drawing conclusions. Aerial photographs provided the most reliable images due to their scales, quantity and quality and the date of when they were taken. Radar images (INTERA were also important when visually analysing a sector’s topography as they were produced by an active microwave sensor (totally eliminating climatic obstacles. On the contrary, satellite images did not have great relevance due to the amount of clouds hampering any kind of analysis. Complementing these results, a calibration curve for analysing this section’s maximum flow values was based on historical series data regarding the Atrato River’s flows and maximum levels recorded at the Quibdo hydrographical station and the river-bed’s cross-section. Implications that the river would overflow or has over-flowed were statistically estimated on these results, thereby setting the limits (supported by cartographic data for the corresponding areas at risk of flooding. A map marking areas at risk of flooding in the urban zone of Quibdó was then designed and a document prepared concluding that

  16. Embedded DSP-based telehealth radar system for remote in-door fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garripoli, Carmine; Mercuri, Marco; Karsmakers, Peter; Jack Soh, Ping; Crupi, Giovanni; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Pace, Calogero; Leroux, Paul; Schreurs, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth systems and applications are extensively investigated nowadays to enhance the quality-of-care and, in particular, to detect emergency situations and to monitor the well-being of elderly people, allowing them to stay at home independently as long as possible. In this paper, an embedded telehealth system for continuous, automatic, and remote monitoring of real-time fall emergencies is presented and discussed. The system, consisting of a radar sensor and base station, represents a cost-effective and efficient healthcare solution. The implementation of the fall detection data processing technique, based on the least-square support vector machines, through a digital signal processor and the management of the communication between radar sensor and base station are detailed. Experimental tests, for a total of 65 mimicked fall incidents, recorded with 16 human subjects (14 men and two women) that have been monitored for 320 min, have been used to validate the proposed system under real circumstances. The subjects' weight is between 55 and 90 kg with heights between 1.65 and 1.82 m, while their age is between 25 and 39 years. The experimental results have shown a sensitivity to detect the fall events in real time of 100% without reporting false positives. The tests have been performed in an area where the radar's operation was not limited by practical situations, namely, signal power, coverage of the antennas, and presence of obstacles between the subject and the antennas.

  17. Comparative of signal processing techniques for micro-Doppler signature extraction with automotive radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Hervas, Berta; Maile, Michael; Flores, Benjamin C.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the automotive industry has experienced an evolution toward more powerful driver assistance systems that provide enhanced vehicle safety. These systems typically operate in the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and have demonstrated high efficiency in collision and risk avoidance. Microwave radar systems are particularly relevant due to their operational robustness under adverse weather or illumination conditions. Our objective is to study different signal processing techniques suitable for extraction of accurate micro-Doppler signatures of slow moving objects in dense urban environments. Selection of the appropriate signal processing technique is crucial for the extraction of accurate micro-Doppler signatures that will lead to better results in a radar classifier system. For this purpose, we perform simulations of typical radar detection responses in common driving situations and conduct the analysis with several signal processing algorithms, including short time Fourier Transform, continuous wavelet or Kernel based analysis methods. We take into account factors such as the relative movement between the host vehicle and the target, and the non-stationary nature of the target's movement. A comparison of results reveals that short time Fourier Transform would be the best approach for detection and tracking purposes, while the continuous wavelet would be the best suited for classification purposes.

  18. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  19. The European Satellite Navigation System Galileo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.W. Hein; T. Pany

    2003-01-01

    This paper starts with a brief discussion of the Galileo project status and with a description of the present Galileo architecture (space segment, ground segment, user segment). It focuses on explaining special features compared to the American GPS system. The presentation of the user segment comprises a discussion of the actual Galileo signal structure. The Galileo carrier frequency, modulation scheme and data rate of all 10 navigation signals are described as well as parameters of the search and rescue service. The navigation signals are used to realize three types of open services, the safety of life service, two types of commercial services and the public regulated service. The signal performance in terms of the pseudorange code error due to thermal noise and multipath is discussed as well as interference to and from other radionavigation services broadcasting in the E5 and E6 frequency band. The interoperability and compatibility of Galileo and GPS is realized by a properly chosen signal structures in E5a/L5 and E2-L1-E1 and compatible geodetic and time reference frames. Some new results on reciprocal GPS/Galileo signal degradation due to signal overlay are presented as well as basic requirements on the Galileo code sequences.

  20. Autonomous Attitude Determination and Control System for the Ørsted Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Wisniewski, Rafal; Blanke, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system.......The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system....