WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite plasma temperature

  1. Contribution of satellite lines to temperature diagnostics with He-like triplet lines in photoionized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feilu; Han, Bo; Salzmann, David; Zhao, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, the He α triplet line ratios (resonance, intercombination, and forbidden lines) are computed for photoionized plasmas, when the contributions of nearby satellite lines are taken into account. The computations have been carried out with our radiative-collisional code, RCF, which is based on the flexible atomic code. The calculations of these line ratios have been done for three materials, namely, silicon, magnesium, and neon. Our calculations are used to derive the plasma temperatures for several astronomical objects, where the spectra are emitted from photoionizing plasmas. It is shown that the incorporation of the satellite lines from doubly excited Li-like ions into the He α triplet lines is necessary to obtain reliable temperature diagnostics for these astrophysical objects.

  2. Microdischarge plasma thrusters for small satellite propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Laxminarayan

    2009-10-01

    Small satellites weighing less than 100 kg are gaining importance in the defense and commercial satellite community owing to advantages of low costs to build and operate, simplicity of design, rapid integration and testing, formation flying, and multi-vehicle operations. The principal challenge in the design and development of small satellite subsystems is the severe mass, volume, and power constraints posed by the overall size of the satellite. The propulsion system in particular is hard to down scale and as such poses a major stumbling block for small satellite technology. Microdischarge-based miniaturized plasma thrusters are potentially a novel solution to this problem. In its most basic form a microdischarge plasma thruster is a simple extension of a cold gas micronozzle propulsion device, where a direct or alternating current microdischarge is used to preheat the gas stream to improve to specific impulse of the device. We study a prototypical thruster device using a detailed, self-consistent coupled plasma and fluid flow computational model. The model describes the microdischarge power deposition, plasma dynamics, gas-phase chemical kinetics, coupling of the plasma phenomena with high-speed flow, and overall propulsion system performance. Unique computational challenges associated with microdischarge modeling in the presence of high-speed flows are addressed. Compared to a cold gas micronozzle, a significant increase in specific impulse (50 to 100 %) is obtained from the power deposition in the diverging supersonic section of the thruster nozzle. The microdischarge remains mostly confined inside the micronozzle and operates in an abnormal glow discharge regime. Gas heating, primarily due to ion Joule heating, is found to have a strong influence on the overall discharge behavior. The study provides a validation of the concept as simple and effective approach to realizing a relatively high-specific impulse thruster device at small geometric scales.

  3. Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ochkin, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    Providing an up-to-date overview on spectroscopical diagnostics of low temperature plasma Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma covers the latest developments and techniques. Written by a distinguished scientist and experienced book author this text is applicable to many fields in materials and surface science as well as nanotechnology and contains numerous appendices with indispensable reference data.

  4. Equatorial plasma bubbles with enhanced ion and electron temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeheung; Min, Kyoung Wook; Kim, Vitaly P.; Kil, Hyosub; Su, Shin-Yi; Chao, Chi Kuang; Lee, Jae-Jin

    2008-09-01

    While the ion and electron temperatures inside equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are normally lower than those in an ambient plasma, bubbles with enhanced temperatures (BETs) are found occasionally in the topside ionosphere. Here we report the characteristics of BETs identified from observations of the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1), the first Korea Multi-purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1), and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 during the solar maximum period between 2000 and 2001. The oxygen ion fraction inside the BETs, which was no lower than that of the ambient ionosphere, was similar to the case of ordinary low-temperature EPBs. These observations indicate that the BETs and low-temperature EPBs detected on the topside were produced by the upward drift of low-density plasma from lower altitudes. The feature that distinguishes BETs from normal EPBs is the occurrence of an unusually fast poleward field-aligned plasma flow relative to the ambient plasma. The BETs occurred preferentially around geomagnetic latitudes of 10° in the summer hemisphere, where the ambient ion and electron temperatures are lower than those in the conjugate winter hemisphere. The occurrence of BETs did not show any notable dependence on geomagnetic activities. The characteristics of the BETs suggest that the BETs were produced by adiabatic plasma heating associated with a fast poleward oxygen ion transport along magnetic flux tubes.

  5. Slow ions in plasma wind tunnels. [satellite-ionosphere interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, W. A.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1976-01-01

    One of the limitations of simulation experiments for the study of interaction between a satellite and its space environment is the background of slow ions in the plasma chamber. These ions appear to be created by charge exchange between the beam ions and residual neutral gas and may affect measurements of the current and potential in the wake. Results are presented for a plasma wind tunnel experiment to study the effect of slow ions on both the ion and electron current distribution and the electron temperature in the wake of a body in a streaming plasma. It is shown that the effect of slow ions for beam ion density not exceeding 3 is not significant for measurements of ion current variations in the wake zone. This is not the case when studies are aimed at the quantitative examination of electron current and temperature variations in the near wake zone. In these instances, the measurements of electron properties in the wake should be done at very low system pressures or over a range of system pressures in order to ascertain the influence of slow ions.

  6. The calculation of satellite line structures in highly stripped plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. Jr.; Kilcrease, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A. [Multicharged Ion Spectra Data Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Recently developed high-resolution x-ray spectrographs have made it possible to measure satellite structures from various plasma sources with great detail. These lines are weak optically thin lines caused by the decay of dielectronic states and generally accompany the resonance lines of H-like and He-like ions. The Los Alamos atomic physics and kinetics codes provide a unique capability for calculating the position and intensities of such lines. These programs have been used to interpret such highly resolved spectral measurements from pulsed power devices and laser produced plasmas. Some of these experiments were performed at the LANL Bright Source and Trident laser facilities. The satellite structures are compared with calculations to diagnose temperatures and densities. The effect of non-thermal electron distributions of electrons on calculated spectra was also considered. Collaborations with Russian scientists have added tremendous value to this research die to their vast experience in x-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  8. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  9. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : High energy universe – Satellite missions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinod Krishan

    2000-11-01

    A variety of satellite missions to observe the high energy universe are currently operating and some more with more versatility and capability are on the anvil. In this paper, after giving a brief introduction to the constituents of the high energy universe and the related plasma physical problems, general as well as specific features of the current and future x-ray and gamma-ray satellite missions are described.

  10. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic upd...

  11. Relativistic QED Plasma at Extremely High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2016-01-01

    Renormalization scheme of QED (Quantum Electrodynamics) at high temperatures is used to calculate the effective parameters of relativistic plasma in the early universe. Renormalization constants of QED play role of effective parameters of the theory and can be used to determine the collective behavior of the medium. We explicitly show that the dielectric constant, magnetic reluctivity, Debye length and the plasma frequency depend on temperature in the early universe. Propagation speed, refractive index, plasma frequency and Debye shielding length of a QED plasma are computed at extremely high temperatures in the early universe. We also found the favorable conditions for the relativistic plasma from this calculations.

  12. Satellite Global and Hemispheric Lower Tropospheric Temperature Annual Temperature Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Brunke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous analyses of the Earth’s annual cycle and its trends have utilized surface temperature data sets. Here we introduce a new analysis of the global and hemispheric annual cycle using a satellite remote sensing derived data set during the period 1979–2009, as determined from the lower tropospheric (LT channel of the MSU satellite. While the surface annual cycle is tied directly to the heating and cooling of the land areas, the tropospheric annual cycle involves additionally the gain or loss of heat between the surface and atmosphere. The peak in the global tropospheric temperature in the 30 year period occurs on 10 July and the minimum on 9 February in response to the larger land mass in the Northern Hemisphere. The actual dates of the hemispheric maxima and minima are a complex function of many variables which can change from year to year thereby altering these dates.Here we examine the time of occurrence of the global and hemispheric maxima and minima lower tropospheric temperatures, the values of the annual maxima and minima, and the slopes and significance of the changes in these metrics.  The statistically significant trends are all relatively small. The values of the global annual maximum and minimum showed a small, but significant trend. Northern and Southern Hemisphere maxima and minima show a slight trend toward occurring later in the year. Most recent analyses of trends in the global annual cycle using observed surface data have indicated a trend toward earlier maxima and minima.

  13. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  14. Plasma Flow Past Cometary and Planetary Satellite Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Michael R.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Kabin, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    The tenuous atmospheres and ionospheres of comets and outer planet satellites share many common properties and features. Such similarities include a strong interaction with their outer radiation, fields and particles environs. For comets the interaction is with the magnetized solar wind plasma, whereas for satellites the interaction is with the strongly magnetized and corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. For this reason there are many common or analogous physical regimes, and many of the same modeling techniques are used to interpret remote sensing and in situ measurements in order to study the important underlying physical phenomena responsible for their appearances. We present here a review of various modeling approaches which are used to elucidate the basic properties and processes shaping the energetics and dynamics of these systems which are similar in many respects.

  15. Temperature estimates for a railgun plasma armature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalenko, Victor [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Clark, Gregory A

    2000-02-07

    A free-flowing plasma in a railgun refers to a plasma which is not impeded by a projectile during a firing. One advantage in performing experiments with such plasmas is that spectroscopic measurements can be made when they are ejected. In this paper we analyse absorption and emission spectra of a free-flowing plasma for wavelengths between 300 and 625 nm in several firings. Calculations of the degree of ionization for the various species identified on the spectra are used to produce an estimate for the temperature of a free-flowing plasma in a RAPID railgun that lies between 11x10{sup 3} and 25x10{sup 3} K. This temperature range is reduced to 11x10{sup 3} K by using a special computer code that predicts the thermochemical functions and transport coefficients of partially- and fully-ionized plasmas. The code is then used to develop temperature estimates of the plasma armature in railgun firings with projectiles. For these plasmas, which are expected to be denser than free-flowing plasmas, a temperature estimate of 14x10{sup 3} K is obtained for a RAPID railgun firing at shot-out. (author)

  16. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  17. Thermodynamics of High Temperature Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Minardi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we discuss how and to what extent the thermodynamic concepts and the thermodynamic formalism can be extended to the description of high temperature states of the plasma not necessarily associated with a Boltzmann distribution and with thermal equilibrium.The discussion is based on the “magnetic or electrostatic entropy concept”, an interpretative and predictive tool based on probability and information, defined in a suitably coarse-grained possibility space of all current density or of all electric charge density distributions under testable constraints, and whose variation properties are proven to be related under certain conditions to the equilibrium and the stability of the system. In the case of magnetic equilibrium the potentiality of the magnetic entropy concept is illustrated by comparing the predictions of the current density and pressure profiles with the observations in different tokamak machines and different tokamak regimes, as well as by showing how the equilibrium and the stability in devices as different as the reversed field pinch or the magnetic well are described by the variation properties of the same entropy functional applied to the different situations. In fact it emerges that the maximum of the entropy can be seen in these different cases as an optimization constraint for the minimum of the magnetic energy. The application of the entropy concept to the electrostatic processes shows in particular that the so-called reactive instabilities (non-dissipative, non-resonant instabilities with a marginal point admit a neighboring state with higher entropy and are therefore of special relevance from the point of view of the physical evolution of the system. In this case the thermodynamic formalism allows the introduction of the concept of “thermodynamic fluctuations” of the macroscopic charge density and provides a method for the calculation of the “thermodynamic” fluctuation levels both on the stable as

  18. Modelling a stationary plasma thruster for satellites; Modelisation d'un propulseur a plasma stationnaire pour satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrigues, L.

    1998-07-01

    Stationary plasma thrusters (SPT) are small propulsion systems with interesting properties for low orbit changes and N-S and E-W corrections of satellites. The functioning principle is based on the creation of a plasma outside the stationary equilibrium and under a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the discharge which leads to the generation of a ion beam used to propel the satellite. The French Stentor satellite project will use SPT-type thrusters. The aim of this work is to better understand the physical phenomena occurring in SPTs using numerical models. A first step has been the elaboration of a Monte Carlo particle model for the analysis of electrons transport inside the thruster and threw a microscopic approach. In a second step, the electrical characteristics (low frequency oscillations of the discharge current, plasma evolution) and the thruster performances (thrust, specific pulse and efficiency) are analyzed. A 1-D, quasi-neutral, transient and self-consistent (fluid and hybrid approaches) model has been elaborated which allows to follow the evolution of the discharge in the channel. Thanks to the use of simplification hypotheses, complete and various studies about the influence of external parameters on the characteristics of the thruster could have been performed (flow rate of injected gas, potential applied, shape and value of the magnetic field). Results are qualitatively in agreement with the experimental results and with results obtained with other models. (J.S)

  19. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  20. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  1. Small satellite attitude determination during plasma brake deorbiting experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Osama; Selkäinaho, Jorma; Soken, Halil Ersin; Kallio, Esa; Visala, Arto

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on attitude estimation during the Plasma Brake Experiment (PBE) onboard a small satellite. The PBE demands that the satellite be spun at a very high angular velocity, up to 200 deg/s, to deploy the tether using centrifugal force. The spin controller, based on purely magnetic actuation, and the PBE demands accurate attitude estimation for the successful execution of the experiment. The biases are important to be estimated onboard small satellites due to the closely integrated systems and relatively higher interference experienced by the sensors. However, bias estimation is even more important for PBE due to the presence of a high voltage unit, onboard the satellite, that is used to charge the tether and can be the source of interference. The attitude and the biases, when estimated simultaneously, results in an augmented state vector that poses a challenge to the proper tuning of process noise. The adaptation of process noise covariance has, therefore, been studied and analysed for the challenging PBE. It has been observed that adapting the process noise covariance improves the estimation accuracy during the spin-up phase. Therefore, it is very important to use adaptive process noise covariance estimation.

  2. Radiation from High Temperature Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-09

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IO7PUOAM i. .’- "--"--o TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMIERS SI I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS .... D...8217’ -REPORT OATM September 19 14. MONITOING AGENCY NAME & AOORESS(I! dilfl ,rn lm Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of tli repot) Unclassified 1S...together (specifically 25-50 X, in aluminum) id show comparable intensities is an indicatiou oE a rather substantial temperatura aradient in the plasma

  3. Low latitude electron temperature observed by the CHAMP satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Truhlik, V.; Richards, P.;

    2012-01-01

    km, although this was not predicted by earlier models. The temperature peaks coincides with the density peaks and are increased during high solar flux. Even more extended possibilities in investigating the ionosphere/thermosphere system are expected from the ESA Swarm satellite constellation mission...

  4. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  5. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  6. Use of satellite land surface temperatures in the EUSTACE global surface air temperature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Rayner, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    EUSTACE (EU Surface Temperatures for All Corners of Earth) is a Horizon2020 project that will produce a spatially complete, near-surface air temperature (NSAT) analysis for the globe for every day since 1850. The analysis will be based on both satellite and in situ surface temperature observations over land, sea, ice and lakes, which will be combined using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The use of satellite data will enable the EUSTACE analysis to offer improved estimates of NSAT in regions that are poorly observed in situ, compared with existing in-situ based analyses. This presentation illustrates how satellite land surface temperature (LST) data - sourced from the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobTemperature project - will be used in EUSTACE. Satellite LSTs represent the temperature of the Earth's skin, which can differ from the corresponding NSAT by several degrees or more, particularly during the hottest part of the day. Therefore the first challenge is to develop an approach to estimate global NSAT from satellite observations. Two methods will be trialled in EUSTACE, both of which are summarised here: an established empirical regression-based approach for predicting NSAT from satellite data, and a new method whereby NSAT is calculated from LST and other parameters using a physics-based model. The second challenge is in estimating the uncertainties for the satellite NSAT estimates, which will determine how these data are used in the final blended satellite-in situ analysis. This is also important as a key component of EUSTACE is in delivering accurate uncertainty information to users. An overview of the methods to estimate the satellite NSATs is also included in this presentation.

  7. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  8. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, K.-I. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); International Center for Space Weather Study and education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  9. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  10. Arbitrary amplitude kinetic Alfven solitary waves in two temperature electron superthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika

    2016-07-01

    Through various satellite missions it is observed that superthermal velocity distribution for particles is more appropriate for describing space and astrophysical plasmas. So it is appropriate to use superthermal distribution, which in the limiting case when spectral index κ is very large ( i.e. κ→∞), shifts to Maxwellian distribution. Two temperature electron plasmas have been observed in auroral regions by FAST satellite mission, and also by GEOTAIL and POLAR satellite in the magnetosphere. Kinetic Alfven waves arise when finite Larmor radius effect modifies the dispersion relation or characteristic perpendicular wavelength is comparable to electron inertial length. We have studied the kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in a plasma comprising of positively charged ions, superthermal hot electrons and Maxwellian distributed cold electrons. Sagdeev pseudo-potential has been employed to derive an energy balance equation. The critical Mach number has been determined from the expression of Sagdeev pseudo-potential to see the existence of solitary structures. It is observed that sub-Alfvenic compressive solitons and super-Alfvenic rarefactive solitons exist in this plasma model. It is also observed that various parameters such as superthermality of hot electrons, relative concentration of cold and hot electron species, Mach number, plasma beta, ion to cold electron temperature ratio and ion to hot electron temperature ratio have significant effect on the amplitude and width of the KAWs. Findings of this investigation may be useful to understand the dynamics of coherent non-linear structures (i.e. KAWs) in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  11. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial reviewa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  12. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David B., E-mail: graves@berkeley.edu [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  13. Spacecraft design project: High temperature superconducting infrared imaging satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The High Temperature Superconductor Infrared Imaging Satellite (HTSCIRIS) is designed to perform the space based infrared imaging and surveillance mission. The design of the satellite follows the black box approach. The payload is a stand alone unit, with the spacecraft bus designed to meet the requirements of the payload as listed in the statement of work. Specifications influencing the design of the spacecraft bus were originated by the Naval Research Lab. A description of the following systems is included: spacecraft configuration, orbital dynamics, radio frequency communication subsystem, electrical power system, propulsion, attitude control system, thermal control, and structural design. The issues of testing and cost analysis are also addressed. This design project was part of the course Advanced Spacecraft Design taught at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  14. Registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiment with plasma injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeinikov, V. G.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Ruzhin, Iu. Ia.; Sobolev, Ia. P.; Skomarovskii, V. S.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Namazov, C. A.; Pokhunkov, A. A.; Nesmeianov, V. I.

    1992-12-01

    Two rocket KOMBI-SAMA experiments with plasma injection at height 100-240 km were performed in August 1987 in the region of Brazilian magnetic anomaly (L = 1.25). The launching time of the rocket was determined so that plasma injection was at the time when COSMOS 1809 satellite passed as close as possible to magnetic tube of injection. Caesium plasma jet was produced during not less than 300 s by an electric plasma generator separated from the payload. When the satellite passed the geomagnetic tube intersecting the injection region an enhancement of ELF emission at 140 Hz, 450 Hz by a factor of 2 was registered on board the satellite. An enhancement of energetic particle flux by a factor of 4-5 was registered on board the rocket. Observed ELF emission below 100 Hz is interpreted as the generation of oblique electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves due to drift plasma instability at the front of the plasma jet.

  15. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Gyro Temperature Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, J. N.; Noonan, C. H.; Garrick, J.

    1996-01-01

    The geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 1/M series of spacecraft are geostationary weather satellites that use the latest in weather imaging technology. The inertial reference unit package onboard consists of three gyroscopes measuring angular velocity along each of the spacecraft's body axes. This digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) is calibrated and used to maintain spacecraft attitude during orbital delta-V maneuvers. During the early orbit support of GOES-8 (April 1994), the gyro drift rate biases exhibited a large dependency on gyro temperature. This complicated the calibration and introduced errors into the attitude during delta-V maneuvers. Following GOES-8, a model of the DIRA temperature and drift rate bias variation was developed for GOES-9 (May 1995). This model was used to project a value of the DIRA bias to use during the orbital delta-V maneuvers based on the bias change observed as the DIRA warmed up during the calibration. The model also optimizes the yaw reorientation necessary to achieve the correct delta-V pointing attitude. As a result, a higher accuracy was achieved on GOES-9 leading to more efficient delta-V maneuvers and a propellant savings. This paper summarizes the: Data observed on GOES-8 and the complications it caused in calibration; DIRA temperature/drift rate model; Application and results of the model on GOES-9 support.

  16. Dependence of Arc Plasma Dispersion Capability on its Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun-Yun; SONG Yang; HE An-Zhi; LI Zhen-Hua

    2008-01-01

    @@ The relationship between the dispersion capability and the temperature of argon arc plasma at Iatm is deduced in view of the plasma's refractive index equation.The results indicate that argon arc plasma has a normal dispersion and its dispersion capability is nonlinear to the plasma's temperature in a wide range of temperature and wavelength region.According to the results of numerical calculation, the preferred optical methods are believed to be suitable for the diagnosis of argon arc plasma in different temperature regions.

  17. MEaSUREs Land Surface Temperature from GOES Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Chen, Wen; Ma, Yingtao; Islam, Tanvir; Borbas, Eva; Hain, Chris; Hulley, Glynn; Hook, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Information on Land Surface Temperature (LST) can be generated from observations made from satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO) such as MODIS and ASTER and by sensors in geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) such as GOES. Under a project titled: "A Unified and Coherent Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Earth System Data Record for Earth Science" led by Jet Propulsion Laboratory, an effort is underway to develop long term consistent information from both such systems. In this presentation we will describe an effort to derive LST information from GOES satellites. Results will be presented from two approaches: 1) based on regression developed from a wide range of simulations using MODTRAN, SeeBor Version 5.0 global atmospheric profiles and the CAMEL (Combined ASTER and MODIS Emissivity for Land) product based on the standard University of Wisconsin 5 km emissivity values (UWIREMIS) and the ASTER Global Emissivity Database (GED) product; 2) RTTOV radiative transfer model driven with MERRA-2 reanalysis fields. We will present results of evaluation of these two methods against various products, such as MOD11, and ground observations for the five year period of (2004-2008).

  18. Temperature measurements in thermal plasmas; Mesures de temperatures dans les plasmas thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauchais, P.; Coudert, J.F. [Limoges Univ., 87 (France)

    1996-05-01

    Thermal plasmas are characterized by a high pressure (10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} Pa) and a high density of particles. Plasmas considered in this paper are produced by electric discharges, arcs, injection torches with cold or hot cathodes, water vortex torches, RF devices and are characterized by temperatures ranging from 6000 to 40000 K and ionization energies ranging from 13.5 and 16 eV (in argon, argon-hydrogen, nitrogen, nitrogen-hydrogen, argon-helium, air, oxygen, CO{sub 2} or water). Temperature measurements in thermal plasmas are difficult due to their extreme luminosity, flow rate and thermal flux, and to their temperature and flow rate gradients. The most common measurement methods are the emission spectroscopy, the laser scattering (Rayleigh, Thomson and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) and the enthalpy probes. The first two methods are non-intrusive, while the last method is intrusive. This paper gives first some general remarks about the principles of each technique and focusses on the problem of fluctuations due to the plasma jet instabilities. Then, it describes briefly each technique and gives some examples of results. Finally, it compares the spectroscopic measurements with other measurements. (J.S.) 80 refs.

  19. Plasma-satellite interaction driven magnetic field perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed-ur-Rehman, E-mail: surehman@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Marchand, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Marchand@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We report the first fully kinetic quantitative estimate of magnetic field perturbations caused by the interaction of a spacecraft with space environment. Such perturbations could affect measurements of geophysical magnetic fields made with very sensitive magnetometers on-board satellites. Our approach is illustrated with a calculation of perturbed magnetic fields near the recently launched Swarm satellites. In this case, magnetic field perturbations do not exceed 20 pT, and they are below the sensitivity threshold of the on-board magnetometers. Anticipating future missions in which satellites and instruments would be subject to more intense solar UV radiation, however, it appears that magnetic field perturbations associated with satellite interaction with space environment, might approach or exceed instruments' sensitivity thresholds.

  20. Estimating the Retrievability of Temperature Profiles from Satellite Infrared Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A method is developed to assess retrievability, namely the retrieval potential for atmospheric temperature profiles, from satellite infrared measurements in clear-sky conditions. This technique is based upon generalized linear inverse theory and empirical orthogonal function analysis. Utilizing the NCEP global temperature reanalysis data in January and July from 1999 to 2003, the retrievabilities obtained with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/3 (HIRS/3)sounding channel data are derived respectively for each standard pressure level on a global scale. As an incidental result of this study, the optimum truncation number in the method of generalized linear inverse is deduced too. The results show that the retrievabilities of temperature obtained with the two datasets are similar in spatial distribution and seasonal change characteristics. As for the vertical distribution, the retrievabilities are low in the upper and lower atmosphere, and high between 400 hPa and 850 hPa. For the geographical distribution, the retrievabilities are low in the low-latitude oceanic regions and in some regions in Antarctica, and relatively high in mid-high latitudes and continental regions. Compared with the HIRS/3 data, the retrievability obtained with the AIRS data can be improved by an amount between 0.15 and 0.40.

  1. Investigation of relationship between plasma gas temperature and reactive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyama, Hideyuki; Kawano, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Matsumura, Yuriko; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, atmospheric non-thermal plasmas have attracted attention as a new sterilization device. In conventional plasma source, since the plasma gas temperature depends on the discharge power, influence of the plasma gas temperature on bactericidal ability by constant power has not been investigated. Therefore, we developed a new plasma source that can control the plasma gas temperature independently of the power, and it was shown that the bactericidal ability is increased with the plasma gas temperature. However, this factor has not been revealed. In this study, we investigated relationship between the bactericidal ability and the concentration of reactive species at each plasma gas temperature. Because reactive species generated by plasma are thought to affect sterilization. So, to investigate lifetime of the sterilizing factor bactericidal ability of Plasma Treated Water made by each gas temperature plasma was investigated. In both experiments, the correlation (R2 = 0.999) was observed between the concentration of singlet oxygen (1O2) and the bactericidal ability. These results show long-lifetime reactive species generated by 1O2 affects the bactericidal ability.

  2. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P  =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X-Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect.

  3. Modelling of a Multi-Temperature Plasma Composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Liani; R.Benallal; Z.Bentalha

    2005-01-01

    @@ Knowledge of plasma composition is very important for various plasma applications and prediction of plasma properties. We use the Saha equation and Debye length equation to calculate the non-local thermodynamicequilibrium plasma composition. It has been shown that the model to 2T with T representing the temperature (electron temperature and heavy-particle temperature) described by Chen and Han [J. Phys. D 32 (1999)1711]can be applied for a mixture of gases, where each atomic species has its own temperature, but the model to 4T is more general because it can be applicable to temperatures distant enough of the heavy particles. This can occur in a plasma composed of big- or macro-molecules. The electron temperature Te varies in the range 8000*20000 K at atmospheric pressure.

  4. UAH Version 6 global satellite temperature products: Methodology and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Christy, John R.; Braswell, William D.

    2017-02-01

    Version 6 of the UAH MSU/AMSU global satellite temperature dataset represents an extensive revision of the procedures employed in previous versions of the UAH datasets. The two most significant results from an end-user perspective are (1) a decrease in the global-average lower tropospheric temperature (LT) trend from +0.14°C decade-1 to +0.11°C decade-1 (Jan. 1979 through Dec. 2015); and (2) the geographic distribution of the LT trends, including higher spatial resolution, owing to a new method for computing LT. We describe the major changes in processing strategy, including a new method for monthly gridpoint averaging which uses all of the footprint data yet eliminates the need for limb correction; a new multi-channel (rather than multi-angle) method for computing the lower tropospheric (LT) temperature product which requires an additional tropopause (TP) channel to be used; and a new empirical method for diurnal drift correction. We show results for LT, the midtroposphere (MT, from MSU2/AMSU5), and lower stratosphere (LS, from MSU4/AMSU9). A 0.03°C decade-1 reduction in the global LT trend from the Version 5.6 product is partly due to lesser sensitivity of the new LT to land surface skin temperature (est. 0.01°C decade-1), with the remainder of the reduction (0.02°C decade-1) due to the new diurnal drift adjustment, the more robust method of LT calculation, and other changes in processing procedures.

  5. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  6. Satellite Microwave Communication Signal Degradation Due To Hall Thruster Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J. C.; Hallock, G. A.; Spencer, E. A.; Meyer, J. W.; Loane, J. T.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a geometric optics vector ray-tracing code, BeamServer, for analyzing the effects of Hall thruster plasma plumes on satellite microwave communication signals. The possible effects include main beam attenuation and squinting, side lobe degradation, and induced cross-polarization. We report on a study of Hall current thruster (HCT) mounting positions on a realistic satellite configuration and a study with a highly shaped reflector. Results indicate HCT signal degradation can occur and should be considered in the satellite design process. Initial results of antenna pattern perturbations due to low frequency plume oscillations driven by thruster instabilities are also given.

  7. Thermal Bremsstrahlung Radiation in a Two-Temperature Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Luo; Shuang-Nan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    In normal one-temperature plasma the motion of ions is usually neglected when calculating the Bremsstrahlung radiation of the plasma.We calculate the Bremsstrahlung radiation of a two-temperature plasma by taking into account of the motion of ions.Our results show that the total radiation power is always lower if the motion of ions is considered.We also apply the two-temperature Bremsstrahlung radiation mechanism for an analytical Advection-Dominated Accretion Flow(ADAF)model:we find the two-temperature correction to the total Bremsstrahlung radiation for ADAF is negligible.

  8. Numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the Tethered-Satellite-System and space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Bharat I.

    1992-01-01

    The first Tethered-Satellite-System (TSS-1), scheduled for a flight in late 1992, is expected to provide relevant information related to the concept of generating an emf in a 20-km-long (or longer) conducting wire. This paper presents numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the TSS system and space plasma, using a 2D and 3D models of the system. The 2D case code simulates the motion of a long cylinder past a plasma, which is composed of electrons and H(+) ions. The system is solved by allowing the plasma to flow past the cylinder with an imposed magnetic field. The more complex 3D case is considered to study the dynamics in great detail. Results of 2D simulation show that the interaction of a satellite with plasma flowing perpendicularly to the magnetic field results in an enhancement in the current collection.

  9. Electron temperature dynamics of TEXTOR plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udintsev, Victor Sergeevich

    2003-01-01

    To study plasma properties in the presence of large and small MHD modes, new high-resolution ECE diagnostics have been installed at TEXTOR tokamak, and some of the already existing systems have been upgraded. Two models for the plasma transport properties inside large m/n = 2/1 MHD islands have been

  10. Electron Temperature and Plasma Flow Measurements of NIF Hohlraum Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brow, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Eder, D.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.; LLNL Collaboration; LLE Collaboration; GA Collaboration; SNL Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing the plasma conditions inside NIF hohlraums, in particular mapping the plasma Te, is critical to gaining insight into mechanisms that affect energy coupling and transport in the hohlraum. The dot spectroscopy platform provides a temporal history of the localized Te and plasma flow inside a NIF hohlraum, by introducing a Mn-Co tracer dot, at strategic locations inside the hohlraum, that comes to equilibrium with the local plasma. K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of the tracer dot is recorded onto an absolutely calibrated X-ray streak spectrometer. Isoelectronic and interstage line ratios are used to infer localized Te through comparison with atomic physics calculations using SCRAM. Time resolved X-ray images are simultaneously taken of the expanding dot, providing plasma (ion) flow information. We present recent results provided by this platform and compare with simulations using HYDRA. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Oxidation Degradation of Aqueous Carbofuran Induced by Low Temperature Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Lumei; Gao, Jinzhang; Hu, Yusen; Liang, Huiguang; Xiao, Wen; Wang, Xingmin

    2008-06-01

    The oxidative degradation of aqueous carbofuran, a heavily used toxic carbamate insecticide by low temperature plasma, was investigated. The results show that the treatment efficiency increases with the increase in initial concentration. Raising the treatment temperature and changing the pH value can result in enhanced degradation of carbofuran in solution. The results also show that low temperature plasma treatment can effectively remove chemical oxygen demand (COD) of carbofuran in the solution.

  12. Oxidation Degradation of Aqueous Carbofuran Induced by Low Temperature Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Lumei; GAO Jinzhang; HU Yusen; LIANG Huiguang; XIAO Wen; WANG Xingmin

    2008-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of aqueous carbofuran, a heavily used toxic carbamate insecticide by low temperature plasma, was investigated. The results show that the treatment efficiency increases with the increase in initial concentration. Raising the treatment temperature and changing the pH value can result in enhanced degradation of carbofuran in solution. The results also show that low temperature plasma treatment can effectively remove chemical oxygen demand (COD) of carbofuran in the solution.

  13. Satellite air temperature estimation for monitoring the canopy layer heat island of Milan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichierri, Manuele; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    2007 and 2010 were processed. Analysis of the canopy layer heat island (CLHI) maps during summer months reveals an average heat island effect of 3–4K during nighttime (with some peaks around 5K) and a weak CLHI intensity during daytime. In addition, the satellite maps reveal a well defined island shape......In this work, satellite maps of the urban heat island of Milan are produced using satellite-based infrared sensor data. For this aim, we developed suitable algorithms employing satellite brightness temperatures for the direct air temperature estimation 2 m above the surface (canopy layer), showing...

  14. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  15. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The magnetospheric electron precipitation along the upward field-aligned currents without the potential difference causes diffuse aurora, and the magnetospheric electrons accelerated by a field-aligned potential difference cause the intense and bright type of aurora, namely discrete aurora. In this study, we are trying to find out when and where the aurora can be caused with or without electron acceleration. We statistically investigate electron density, temperature, thermal current, and conductivity in the plasma sheet using the data from the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) onboard the THEMIS-D satellite launched in 2007. According to Knight (Planet. Space Sci., 1973) and Lyons (JGR, 1980), the thermal current, jth(∝ nT^(1/2) where n is electron density and T is electron temperature in the plasma sheet), represents the upper limit to field aligned current that can be carried by magnetospheric electrons without field-aligned potential difference. The conductivity, K(∝ nT^(-1/2)), represents the efficiency of the upward field-aligned current (j) that the field-aligned potential difference (V) can produce (j=KV). Therefore, estimating jth and K in the plasma sheet is important in understanding the ability of plasma sheet electrons to carry the field-aligned current which is driven by various magnetospheric processes such as flow shear and azimuthal pressure gradient. Similar study was done by Shiokawa et al. (2000) based on the auroral electron data obtained by the DMSP satellites above the auroral oval and the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near Earth plasma sheet at 10-18 Re on February-June 1985 and March-June 1986 during the solar minimum. The purpose of our study is to examine auroral electrons with pitch angle information inside 12 Re where Shiokawa et al. (2000) did not investigate well. For preliminary result, we found that in the dawn side inner magnetosphere (source of the region 2 current), electrons can make sufficient thermal current without field

  16. Ion Temperature-Measurements in Tokamak Plasmas by Rutherford Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanblokland, A. A. E.; Barbian, E. P.; Donne, A. J. H.; van der Grift, A. F.; Grimbergen, T. W. M.; Oyevaar, T.; Schüller, F. C.; Tammen, H. F.; Vanderven, H. W.; Vijverberg, T. F.; Dewinter, F. D. A.; Bertschinger, G.; Cosler, A.; Korten, M.

    1992-01-01

    A Rutherford scattering diagnostic has been applied at the TEXTOR tokamak to obtain spatially and temporally resolved information on the temperature of the bulk ions in the plasma. In the experimental setup, a helium atomic beam (30-keV, 12-mA equivalent current) passes vertically through the plasma

  17. Second topical conference on high-temperature plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahoda, F.C.; Freese, K.B. (comps.)

    1978-02-01

    This report contains the program and abstracts of papers presented at the Second American Physical Society Topical Conference on High Temperature Plasma Diagnostics, March 1-3, 1978, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. Etching with atomic precision by using low electron temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Monroy, G. A.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2017-07-01

    There has been a steady increase in sub-nm precision requirement for many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma processing systems, even during layer-by-layer or ‘atomic layer’ etch. To meet these increasingly stringent requirements, it is necessary to have an accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition during plasma processing. In this work, a new plasma etch system designed to facilitate atomic precision plasma processing is presented. An electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface is used to produce a plasma in this system. This plasma has a significantly lower electron temperature T e ~ 0.3 eV and ion energy E i  plasmas. Electron beam plasmas also have a higher ion-to-radical ratio compared to RF plasmas, so this plasma etch system employs an independent radical source for accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. A low frequency RF bias capability that allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range is another important component of this plasma etch system. The results of etching of a variety of materials and structures in this low-electron temperature plasma system are presented in this study: (1) layer-by-layer etching of p-Si at E i ~ 25-50 eV using electrical and gas cycling is demonstrated; (2) continuous etching of epi-grown µ-Si in Cl2-based plasmas is performed, showing that surface damage can be minimized by keeping E i  etching at low E i.

  19. Physics of High Temperature, Dense Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    34Investigation of the High-Energy Acceleration Mode in the Coaxial Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S28, (1964). I. 9. Dattner, A. and Eninger J...34Studies of a Coaxial Plasma Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S41, (1964). II. 10. Wilcox, J. M., Pugh, E., Dattner, A. and Eninger , J., "Experimental Study of

  20. Simulating strongly coupled plasmas at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.

    2006-10-01

    Realistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the particle dynamics in strongly coupled plasmas require the computation of the mutual Coulomb-force for each pair of charged particles if a correct treatment of long range correlations is required. For plasmas with N > 104 particles this requires a tremendous number of computational steps which can only be addressed using efficient parallel algorithms adopted to modern super-computers. We present a new versatile MD simulation code which can simulate the non-relativistic mutual Coulomb-interaction of a large number of charged particles in arbitrary external field configurations. A demanding application is the simulation of the complete dynamics of in-trap stopping of highly charged ions in a laser cooled plasma of N = 105 24Mg+ ions. We demonstrate that the simulation is capable of delivering results on stopping times and plasma dynamics under realistic conditions. The results suggest that this stopping scheme can compete with in-trap electron cooling and might be an alternative approach for delivering ultra cold highly charged ions for future trap-based experiments aiming for precision mass measurements of stable and radioactive nuclei.

  1. Calculation of Ion Equilibrium Temperature in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金星; 曹明涛; 韩亮; 齐越蓉; 张首刚; 高宏; 李福利; T.C.Killian

    2011-01-01

    We provide a fast iteration method to calculate the ion equilibrium temperature in an ultracold neutral plasma (UNP). The temperature as functions of electron initial temperature and ion density is obtained and compared with the recent UNP experimental data. The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results very well. The calculated ion equilibrium temperature by this method can be applied to study the UNP expansion process more effectively.%We provide a fast iteration method to calculate the ion equilibrium temperature in an ultracold neutral plasma (UNP).The temperature as functions of electron initial temperature and ion density is obtained and compared with the recent UNP experimental data.The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results very well.The calculated ion equilibrium temperature by this method can be applied to study the UNP expansion process more effectively.

  2. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  3. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  4. Ion temperature evolution in an ultracold neutral plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuillen, P., E-mail: patrickmcquillen@rice.edu; Strickler, T.; Langin, T.; Killian, T. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We study the long-time evolution of the ion temperature in an expanding ultracold neutral plasma using spatially resolved, laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy. Adiabatic cooling reduces the ion temperature by an order of magnitude during the plasma expansion, to temperatures as low as 0.2 K. Cooling is limited by heat exchange between ions and the much hotter electrons. We also present evidence for an additional heating mechanism and discuss possible sources. Data are described by a model of the plasma evolution, including the effects of ion-electron heat exchange. We show that for appropriate initial conditions, the degree of Coulomb coupling of ions in the plasma increases during expansion.

  5. Ion Temperature Evolution in an Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    McQuillen, P; Langin, T; Killian, T C

    2015-01-01

    We study the long-time evolution of the ion temperature in an expanding ultracold neutral plasma using spatially resolved, laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy. Adiabatic cooling reduces the ion temperature by an order of magnitude during the plasma expansion, to temperatures as low as 0.2 K. Cooling is limited by heat exchange between ions and the much hotter electrons. We also present evidence for an additional heating mechanism and discuss possible sources. Data are described by a model of the plasma evolution, including the effects of ion-electron heat exchange. We show that for appropriate initial conditions, the degree of Coulomb coupling of ions in the plasma increases during expansion.

  6. Temperature effect on proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells from turkeys with different growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D L; Coy, C S; Strasburg, G M; Reed, K M; Velleman, S G

    2016-04-01

    Poultry selected for growth have an inefficient thermoregulatory system and are more sensitive to temperature extremes. Satellite cells are precursors to skeletal muscle and mediate all posthatch muscle growth. Their physiological functions are affected by temperature. The objective of the current study was to determine how temperature affects satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle (breast muscle) of turkeys selected for increased 16 wk body weight (F line) in comparison to a randombred control line (RBC2) from which the F line originated. Pectoralis major muscle satellite cells were thermally challenged by culturing between 33°C and 43°C to analyze the effects of cold and heat on proliferation and differentiation as compared to control temperature of 38°C. Expression levels of myogenic regulatory factors: myogenic differentiation factor 1 (MYOD1) and myogenin (MYOG) were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). At all sampling times, proliferation increased at a linear rate across temperature in both the RBC2 and F lines. Differentiation also increased at a linear rate across temperature from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. Satellite cells isolated from F line turkeys were more sensitive to both hot and cold temperatures as proliferation and differentiation increased to a greater extent across temperature (33 to 43°C) when compared with the RBC2 line. Expression of MYOD1 and MYOG increased as temperatures increased from 33 to 41°C at all sampling times in both the F and RBC2 lines. These results demonstrate that satellite cell function is sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures and p. major muscle satellite cells from F line turkeys are more sensitive to temperature extremes than RBC2 satellite cells.

  7. Study of the turbulence in the central plasma sheet using the CLUSTER satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, M.; Arancibia Riveros, K.; Bosqued, J.; Antonova, E.

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies are shown that the turbulent processes in the space plasmas are very important. It includes the behavior of the plasma sheet plasma during geomagnetic substorms and storms. Study of the plasma turbulence in the central plasma sheet was made using the CLUSTER satellite mission data. For this studies we used the Cluster Ion Spectrometry experiment (CIS), and fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data for studying fluctuations of the plasma bulk velocity and geomagnetic field fluctuations for different levels of geomagnetic activity and different locations inside the plasma sheet. Case studies for the orbits during quiet geomagnetic conditions, different phases of geomagnetic substroms and storms showed that the properties of plasma turbulence inside the sheet differ significantly for all afore mentioned cases. Variations in the probability distribution functions, flatness factors, local intermittency measure parameters, and eddy diffusion coefficients indicate that the turbulence increases significantly during substorm growth and expansion phases and decreases slowly to the initial level during the recovery phase. It became even stronger during the storm main phase.

  8. Dyeing Performance of Soybean Fiber Treated with Low Temperature Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-ming; SHEN Yong; DING Ying; ZHANG Hui-fang

    2006-01-01

    The soybean fiber was treated with low temperature plasma and the dyeing performance of the treated soybean fiber was also researched. The results show that the speed of dyeing and the percentages of balance dyeing have a sharp increase after being treated. So the dyeing temperature and the dosage of acid can be reduced without damaging the bulk fiber structure.

  9. Modelling of the plasma-MIG welding temperature field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yan; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin; Shi Lei

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation model for the plasma-MIG welding process, which takes the interaction between the plasma arc and MIG arc into account, is presented and the quasi-steady temperature fields on the workpiece are calculated with the model. The 10 mm-5A06 aluminum alloy is welded and the temperature fields are measured with the thermoelectric couple. The simulation results and measured results show that the biggest deviation of peak temperature between them is below 20 ℃ , which indicates good coincidence between the simulation and measurement.

  10. Modeling of plasma in a hybrid electric propulsion for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugroot, Manish; Christou, Alex

    2016-09-01

    As space flight becomes more available and reliable, space-based technology is allowing for smaller and more cost-effective satellites to be produced. Working in large swarms, many small satellites can provide additional capabilities while reducing risk. These satellites require efficient, long term propulsion for manoeuvres, orbit maintenance and de-orbiting. The high exhaust velocity and propellant efficiency of electric propulsion makes it ideally suited for low thrust missions. The two dominant types of electric propulsion, namely ion thrusters and Hall thrusters, excel in different mission types. In this work, a novel electric hybrid propulsion design is modelled to enhance understanding of key phenomena and evaluate performance. Specifically, the modelled hybrid thruster seeks to overcome issues with existing Ion and Hall thruster designs. Scaling issues and optimization of the design will be discussed and will investigate a conceptual design of a hybrid spacecraft plasma engine.

  11. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Sandra L.; Emery, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. During this one year grant, design and construction of an improved infrared radiometer was completed and testing was initiated. In addition, development of an improved parametric model for the bulk-skin temperature difference was completed using data from the previous version of the radiometer. This model will comprise a key component of an improved procedure for estimating the bulk SST from satellites. The results comprised a significant portion of the Ph.D. thesis completed by one graduate student and they are currently being converted into a journal publication.

  12. Generator of chemically active low-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Demirov, N. A.; Spector, N. O.

    2016-11-01

    A new generator of high enthalpy (H 0 > 40 kJ/g), chemically active nitrogen and air plasmas was designed and constructed. Main feature of the generator is an expanding channel of an output electrode; the generator belongs to the class of DC plasma torches with thermionic cathode with an efficiency of 80%. The generator ensures the formation of a slightly divergent plasma jet (2α = 12°) with a diameter of D = 10-12 mm, an electric arc maximum power of 20-50 kW, plasma forming gas flow rate 1.0-2.0 g/s, and the average plasma temperature at an outlet of 8000-11000 K.

  13. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  14. Statistical mechanics of 'negative temperature' states. [for plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, D.; Joyce, G.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the dynamics of a two-dimensional guiding center plasma, recently shown by Taylor and McNamara (1971) to be identical to the dynamics of the discrete vortex model of Onsager (1949). A semirigorous application of the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics to the guiding center plasma (or equivalently, the line vortex system) is presented. An adaptation of the apparatus of the theory of probability is attempted, in the form given by Khinchin (1949) to obtain ensemble-average predictions for the states of the guiding center plasma. Interest focuses primarily on the regime in which the interaction energy is high enough to be above the Onsager 'negative temperature' threshold.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma System for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in using plasmas for additive manufacturing, however these methods use high temperature plasmas to melt the material. We have developed a novel technique of additive manufacturing using a low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet. The jet is attached to the head of a 3D printer to allow for precise control of the plasma's location. Various methods are employed to deposit the material, including using a vaporized precursor or depositing a liquid precursor directly onto the substrate or into the plasma via a nebulizer. Various materials can be deposited including metals (copper using copper (II) acetylacetonate), polymers (PMMA using the liquid monomer), and various hydrocarbon compounds (using alcohols or a 100% methane DBD jet). The rastering pattern for the 3D printer was modified for plasma deposition, since it was originally designed for thermoplastic extrusion. The design constraints for fill pattern selection for the plasma printer are influenced by substrate heating, deposition area, and precursor consumption. Depositions onto pressure and/or temperature sensitive substrates can be easily achieved. Deposition rates range up to 0.08 cm3/hr using tris(2-methoxyethoxy)(vinyl)silane, however optimization can still be done on the system to improve the deposition rate. For example higher concentration of precursor can be combined with faster motion and higher discharge powers to increase the deposition rate without overheating the substrate.

  16. Assessment of the quality of OSIRIS mesospheric temperatures using satellite and ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sheese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS on the Odin satellite is currently in its 12th year of observing the Earth's limb. For the first time, continuous temperature profiles extending from the stratopause to the upper mesosphere have been derived from OSIRIS measurements of Rayleigh-scattered sunlight. Through most of the mesosphere, OSIRIS temperatures are in good agreement with coincident temperature profiles derived from other satellite and ground-based measurements. In the altitude region of 55–80 km, OSIRIS temperatures are typically within 4–5 K of those from the SABER, ACE-FTS, and SOFIE instruments on the TIMED, SciSat-I, and AIM satellites, respectively. The mean differences between individual OSIRIS profiles and those of the other satellite instruments are typically within the combined uncertainties and previously reported biases. OSIRIS temperatures are typically within 2 K of those from the University of Western Ontario's Purple Crow Lidar in the altitude region of 52–79 km, where the mean differences are within combined uncertainties. Near 84 km, OSIRIS temperatures exhibit a cold bias of 10–15 K, which is due to a cold bias in OSIRIS O2 A-band temperatures at 85 km, the upper boundary of the Rayleigh-scatter derived temperatures; and near 48 km OSIRIS temperatures exhibit a cold bias of 5–15 K, which is likely due to multiple-scatter effects that are not taken into account in the retrieval.

  17. Stimulation of plasma waves by electron guns on the ISEE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Torbert, R.; Anderson, R.; Harvey, C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the ISEE-1 satellite experiment relating to observations of the waves stimulated during electron injections, when the spacecraft is passing through the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath, and the solar wind, are discussed. It is shown that the injection of an electron beam current of the order of 10 to 60 microamperes with energies ranging from 0 to 40 eV produces enhancements in the electric wave spectrum. An attempt has been made to identify the low-frequency electrostatic wave observed below the ion plasma frequency as an ion acoustic mode, although the excitation mechanism is not clear. A coupling mechanism between the electron plasma mode and streaming electrons with energies higher than the thermal speed of the cold electron population has been proposed to explain the observations above the electron plasma frequency.

  18. Nonlinear analysis of a simple model of temperature evolution in a satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, Jose; Pérez-Grande, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    We analyse a simple model of the heat transfer to and from a small satellite orbiting round a solar system planet. Our approach considers the satellite isothermal, with external heat input from the environment and from internal energy dissipation, and output to the environment as black-body radiation. The resulting nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the satellite's temperature is analysed by qualitative, perturbation and numerical methods, which show that the temperature approaches a periodic pattern (attracting limit cycle). This approach can occur in two ways, according to the values of the parameters: (i) a slow decay towards the limit cycle over a time longer than the period, or (ii) a fast decay towards the limit cycle over a time shorter than the period. In the first case, an exactly soluble average equation is valid. We discuss the consequences of our model for the thermal stability of satellites.

  19. Integrated Multi-Point Space Plasma Measurements With Four Ionospheric Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C.; Wilkens, M. R.; McHarg, M. G.; Krause, L.; Chun, F.; Enloe, L.; Panholzer, R.; Sakoda, D.; Phelps, R.; D Roussel-Dupre, D.; Colestock, P.; Close, S.

    2006-12-01

    The STP-1 launch scheduled for late 2006 will place four satellites with ionospheric plasma diagnostics into the same nearly circular orbit with an altitude of 560 km and inclination of 35.4°. The satellites will allow for unique multipoint measurements of ionospheric scintillations and their causes. Both the radio and in-situ diagnostics will provide coverage of low- and mid-latitudes. The four satellites, STPSat1, NPSat1, FalconSat3, and CFE will follow the same ground-track but because of drag and mass differences their relative velocities will be different and vary during the lifetime of the satellites. The four satellites will start close together; separate over a few months and coming back together with near conjunctions at six and eight months. Two satellite conjunctions between NPSat1 and STPSat1 will occur most often, approximately one month apart at the end of the mission. STPSat1 is equipped with CITRIS (sCintillation and TEC Receiver In Space) which will measure scintillations in the VHF, UHF and L-band along with measuring Total Electron Content (TEC) along the propagation path. NPSat1 will carry a three-frequency CERTO (Coherent Electromagnetic Radio TOmography) Beacon which broadcasts phase-coherent signals at 150.012 MHz, 400.032 MHz, and 1066.752 MHz. CITRIS will be able to measure TEC and Scintillations along the orbital path (propagation path from NPSat1 to STPSat1) as well as between the CITRIS and the ground. NPSat1 carries electron and ion saturation Langmuir Probes, while FalconSat3 carries the FLAPS (FLAt Plasma Spectrometer) and PLANE (Plasma Local Anomalous Noise Environment). The in-situ diagnostic complement the CITRIS/CERTO radio techniques in many ways. The CIBOLA Flight Experiment (CFE) contains a wide band receiver covering 100 to 500 MHz. The CFE data can be processed to show distortion of wide-band modulations by ionospheric irregularities. CFE and CITRIS can record ground transmissions from the French DORIS beacons which radiate

  20. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, {theta}, and ellipticity angle, {epsilon}, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n{sub e}, and the electron temperature, T{sub e}, and that the separation of n{sub e} and T{sub e} from {theta} and {epsilon} is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I{sub p}, is known and when I{sub p} is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j{sub {phi}}, n{sub e}, and T{sub e} are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j{sub {phi}} without the information of I{sub p} indicates the new method of I{sub p} measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  1. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, θ, and ellipticity angle, ε, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n(e), and the electron temperature, T(e), and that the separation of n(e) and T(e) from θ and ε is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10(20) m(-3), and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I(p), is known and when I(p) is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j(φ), n(e), and T(e) are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j(φ) without the information of I(p) indicates the new method of I(p) measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  2. Anode Spot Formation in Low Pressure and Temperature He Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Brett; Barnat, Edward; Hopkins, Matthew; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    When a small electrode is biased sufficiently above the plasma potential in a low temperature plasma, the electron impact ionization of neutral species near the electrode becomes significant. At neutral gas pressures of 1-100mTorr, it has been previously observed that if this ionization rate is sufficiently high, a double layer may form near the electrode. In some cases the double layer will move outward, separating a high potential plasma attached to the electrode surface from the bulk plasma. This phenomenon is known as an anode spot. A model has been developed describing the formation of anode spots based on observations from 2D particle-in-cell simulations. In this model ionization leads to the buildup of an ion rich region adjacent to the electrode, which modifies the potential structure in a way that traps electrons near the electrode surface. This leads to the formation of a quasineutral plasma near the electrode surface. When the density of this plasma is large enough, the double layer expands due to a pressure imbalance. Observations from PIC simulations were found to be consistent with time resolved measurements of the electron density from laser collision induced fluorescence, and with plasma emission measurements. This research was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  3. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs.

  4. Plasma-nitriding of tantalum at relatively low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; ZHAO Haomin; FEI Qinyong; GENG Man

    2004-01-01

    The combined quadratic orthogonal regression method of experiment design was employed to explore the effects of process parameters of plasma nitriding of tantalum such as total pressure, temperature and original hydrogen molar fraction on the hardness, roughness and structure of nitriding surfaces. The regression equations of hardness, roughness and structure were given according to the results of regression and statistic analysis. And the diffusion activation energy of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions was calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The diffusion activation energy calculated belongs to (155.49 + 10.51)kJ/mol (783-983 K).

  5. Scalar perturbations in two-temperature cosmological plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moortgat, J.B.; Marklund, M.

    2006-01-01

    We study the properties of density perturbations of a two-component plasma with a temperature difference on a homogeneous and isotropic background. For this purpose, we extend the general relativistic gauge-invariant and covariant (GIC) perturbation theory to include a multifluid with a particular e

  6. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, PO Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  7. A statistical method to get surface level air-temperature from satellite observations of precipitable water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Shikauchi, A.; Sugimori, Y.; Kubota, M.

    Vol. 49, pp. 551 to 558. 1993 A Statistical Method to Get Surface Level Air-Temperature from Satellite Observations of Precipitable Water PANKAJAKSHAN THADATHIL*, AKIRA SHIKAUCHI, YASUHIRO SUGIMORI and MASAHISA KUBOTA School of Marine Science... observations for getting the estimates of heat flux across the air-sea boundary (Miller, 1981; Liu, 1988). Bulk method has widely been used for this purpose and the parameters required are: sea surface temperature, and wind speed, air-temperature and specific...

  8. Comparison of satellite-derived land surface temperature and air temperature from meteorological stations on the Pan-Arctic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, M.; Eberle, J.; Hüttich, C.; Schmullius, C.; Herold, M.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based temperature measurements are an important indicator for global climate change studies over large areas. Records from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometer ((A)ATSR) are pr

  9. Numerical simulation of temperature and velocity fields in plasma spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qun-bo; WANG Lu; WANG Fu-chi

    2007-01-01

    Based on the turbulence jet model, with respect to Ar-He mixture plasma gas injecting to ambient atmosphere, the temperature filed and velocity field under typical working conditions were investigated. Given the conditions of I=900 A, FAr=1.98 m3/h, FHe=0.85 m3/h, it is found that both the temperature and the velocity undergo a plateau region near the nozzle exit (0-10 mm) at the very first stage, then decrease abruptly from initial 13 543 K and 778.2 m/s to 4 000 K and 260.0 m/s, and finally decrease slowly again. Meanwhile, the radial temperature and radial velocity change relatively slow. The inner mechanism for such phenomena is due to the complex violent interaction between the high-temperature and high-velocity turbulent plasma jet and the ambient atmosphere. Compared with traditional methods, the initial working conditions can be directly related to the temperature and velocity fields of the plasma jet by deriving basic boundary conditions.

  10. Three temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Bryan M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully-ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray-diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron-ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and co...

  11. Identification and recovery of discontinuous synoptic features in satellite-retrieved brightness temperatures using a radiative transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G. A., III; Mcguirk, J. P.; Thompson, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to recover and identify discontinuous synoptic features from satellite-retrieved brightness temperatures, with attention to near-discontinuities in temperature and moisture that are typically found in fronts and inversions. Efforts are made to ascertain whether the vectors of satellite channel brightness temperatures can be classified according to synoptic source, and whether those sources are amenable to quantification.

  12. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, Ronald

    1997-04-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied within linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). This linear response method is applied to partially ionized systems such as dense, low-temperature plasmas. Here, the conductivity changes from nonmetallic values up to those typical for

  13. Pair correlation functions of strongly coupled two-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we perform the first direct tests of three proposed models for the pair correlation functions of strongly coupled plasmas with species of unequal temperature. The models are all extensions of the Ornstein-Zernike/hypernetted-chain theory used to good success for equilibrium plasmas. Each theory is evaluated at several coupling strengths, temperature ratios, and mass ratios for a model plasma in which the electrons are positively charged. We show that the model proposed by Seuferling et al. [Phys. Rev. A 40, 323 (1989)] agrees well with molecular dynamics over a wide range of mass and temperature ratios, as well as over a range of coupling strength similar to that of the equilibrium hypernetted-chain (HNC) theory. The SVT model also correctly predicts the strength of interspecies correlations and exhibits physically reasonable long-wavelength limits of the static structure factors. Comparisons of the SVT model with the Yukawa one-component plasma (YOCP) model are used to show that ion-ion pair correlations are well described by the YOCP model up to Γe≈1 , beyond which it rapidly breaks down.

  14. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  15. Simulation of land surface temperatures: comparison of two climate models and satellite retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Edwards

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been significant progress in the retrieval of land surface temperature from satellite observations. Satellite retrievals of surface temperature offer several advantages, including broad spatial coverage, and such data are potentially of great value in assessing general circulation models of the atmosphere. Here, retrievals of the land surface temperature over the contiguous United States are compared with simulations from two climate models. The models generally simulate the diurnal range realistically, but show significant warm biases during the summer. The models' diurnal cycle of surface temperature is related to their surface flux budgets. Differences in the diurnal cycle of the surface flux budget between the models are found to be more pronounced than those in the diurnal cycle of surface temperature.

  16. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  17. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  18. A pathway to generating Climate Data Records of sea-surface temperature from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, Peter J.; Corlett, Gary K.

    2012-11-01

    In addition to having known uncertainty characteristics, Climate Data Records (CDRs) of geophysical variables derived from satellite measurements must be of sufficient length to resolve signals that might reveal the signatures of climate change against a background of larger, unrelated variability. The length of the record requires using satellite measurements from many instruments over several decades, and the uncertainty requirement implies that a consistent approach be used to establish the errors in the satellite retrievals over the entire period. Retrieving sea-surface temperature (SST) from satellite is a relatively mature topic, and the uncertainties of satellite retrievals are determined by comparison with collocated independent measurements. To avoid the complicating effects of near-surface temperature gradients in the upper ocean, the best validating measurements are from ship-board radiometers that measure, at source, the surface emission that is measured in space, after modification by its propagation through the atmosphere. To attain sufficient accuracy, such ship-based radiometers must use internal blackbody calibration targets, but to determine the uncertainties in these radiometric measurements, i.e. to confirm that the internal calibration is effective, it is necessary to conduct verification of the field calibration using independent blackbodies with accurately known emissivity and at very accurately measured temperatures. This is a well-justifiable approach to providing the necessary underpinning of a Climate Data Record of SST.

  19. Numerical methods for computing the temperature distribution in satellite systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Valadés Maturano, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] The present thesis has been done at ASTRIUM company to find new methods to obtain temperature distributions. Current software packages such as ESATAN or ESARAD provide not only excellent thermal analysis solutions, at a high price as they are very time consuming though, but also radiative simulations in orbit scenarios. Since licenses of this product are usually limited for the use of many engineers, it is important to provide new tools to do these calculations. In consequence, a dif...

  20. Numerical methods for computing the temperature distribution in satellite systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Valadés Maturano, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] The present thesis has been done at ASTRIUM company to find new methods to obtain temperature distributions. Current software packages such as ESATAN or ESARAD provide not only excellent thermal analysis solutions, at a high price as they are very time consuming though, but also radiative simulations in orbit scenarios. Since licenses of this product are usually limited for the use of many engineers, it is important to provide new tools to do these calculations. In consequence, a dif...

  1. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  2. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  3. Study of High-Temperature Superconductor Diplexers for Satellite Communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Juan-xiu; YANG Kai; LUO Zheng-xiang; BU Shi-rong; NING Jun-song; ZHANG Tian-liang

    2005-01-01

    The high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) resonator and diplexer are simulated by full-wave tools.A newly developed miniature HTSC diplexer is designed and fabricated on double sided YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film (YBCO/LaAlO3/YBCO), the thickness of which is 400 nm for YBCO and 0.5 mm for the LaAlO3. The measured results show a good agreement with the simulation. The volume and mass of the diplexers are greatly reduced by miniaturized configuration.

  4. A High Temperature Liquid Plasma Model of the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a liquid model of the Sun is presented wherein the entire solar mass is viewed as a high density/high energy plasma. This model challenges our current understanding of the densities associated with the internal layers of the Sun, advocating a relatively constant density, almost independent of radial position. The incompressible nature of liquids is advanced to prevent solar collapse from gravitational forces. The liquid plasma model of the Sun is a non-equilibrium approach, where nuclear reactions occur throughout the solar mass. The primary means of addressing internal heat transfer are convection and conduction. As a result of the convective processes on the solar surface, the liquid model brings into question the established temperature of the solar photosphere by highlighting a violation of Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission. Along these lines, the model also emphasizes that radiative emission is a surface phenomenon. Evidence that the Sun is a high density/high energy plasma is based on our knowledge of Planckian thermal emission and condensed matter, including the existence of pressure ionization and liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures. Prior to introducing the liquid plasma model, the historic and scientific justifications for the gaseous model of the Sun are reviewed and the gaseous equations of state are also discussed.

  5. Dissociative recombination coefficient for low temperature equilibrium cesium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momozaki, Yoichi; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2002-07-01

    The dissociative recombination (DR) coefficient in decaying low temperature Cs plasma is calculated based on the experimentally measured relaxation time of decaying Cs plasma by L. P. Harris [J. Appl. Phys. 36, 1543 (1965)]. Results showed that DR is the dominant recombination process over three-body recombination at T<1650 K and PCs of 0.5-20 Torr (67-2666 Pa). The estimated DR coefficient for Cs is between 10-12 and 10-13 m3/s at T<1750 K and PCs of 0.5-20 Torr. Although theory predicts that DR coefficient solely depends on temperature, the present results show pressure dependency. For typical operating conditions in thermionic converters (T<1650 K and PCsless-than-or-equal400 Pa), DR is constant and approx5.26 x10-13 m3/s.

  6. The effect of temperature on proliferation and differentiation of chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells isolated from different muscle types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Rachel L; Halevy, Orna; Yahav, Shlomo; Velleman, Sandra G

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are a muscle stem cell population that mediate posthatch muscle growth and repair. Satellite cells respond differentially to environmental stimuli based upon their fiber-type of origin. The objective of this study was to determine how temperatures below and above the in vitro control of 38°C affected the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells isolated from the chicken anaerobic pectoralis major (p. major) or mixed fiber biceps femoris (b.femoris) muscles. The satellite cells isolated from the p. major muscle were more sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures compared to the b.femoris satellite cells during both proliferation and differentiation. The expressions of myogenic regulatory transcription factors were also different between satellite cells from different fiber types. MyoD expression, which partially regulates proliferation, was generally expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells compared to the b.femoris satellite cells from 33 to 43°C during proliferation and differentiation. Similarly, myogenin expression, which is required for differentiation, was also expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells in response to both cold and hot temperatures during proliferation and differentiation than b. femoris satellite cells. These data demonstrate that satellite cells from the anaerobic p. major muscle are more sensitive than satellite cells from the aerobic b. femoris muscle to both hot and cold thermal stress during myogenic proliferation and differentiation.

  7. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  8. C/NOFS satellite observations of equatorial ionospheric plasma structures supported by multiple ground-based diagnostics in October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, M.; Basu, Su.; Basu, S.; Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Roddy, P. A.; Groves, K. M.

    2011-10-01

    In early October 2008, the C/NOFS satellite orbited near the magnetic equator at its perigee altitude of ˜400 km at dusk in the Peruvian sector. This provided an ideal opportunity for a comparison, under the current very low solar flux condition, of equatorial ionospheric disturbances observed with the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) in situ measurements and ground-based observations available near Jicamarca Observatory. The primary objective was the comparison of plasma density disturbances measured by a Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) instrument on the C/NOFS satellite with VHF scintillation activity at Ancon near Jicamarca for this period. Here we discuss in detail two extreme cases: one in which severe in situ disturbances were accompanied by mild scintillation on a particular day, namely, 10 October while there was little in situ disturbance with strong scintillation on 5 October. This apparent contradiction was diagnosed further by a latitudinal ground-based GPS network at Peruvian longitudes, a Digisonde, and the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) at Jicamarca. The crucial distinction was provided by the behavior of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The EIA was well-developed on the day having severe in situ disturbances (10 Oct). This led to lower equatorial plasma density and total electron content (TEC) at the equator and consequently reduced the scintillations detected at Ancon. On the other hand, on the day with severe scintillations (5 Oct), the EIA was not so well developed as on 10 October, leading to relatively higher equatorial plasma density and TEC. Consequently the severe scintillations at Ancon were likely caused by ionospheric structure located below the altitude of C/NOFS. The NRL SAMI2 model was utilized to gain a greater understanding of the role of neutral winds and electric fields in reproducing the TEC as a function of latitude for both classes of irregularities. Spectral studies with high resolution in situ

  9. Analysis of some methods for obtaining sea surface temperature from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature must be corrected for atmospheric moisture, cloud contamination, reflected solar radiation and other sources of error. Procedures for reducing errors are discussed. It appears that routine accuracies of 1 C are possible, given low noise spectral measurements in the infrared.

  10. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    as the entire atmosphere above. Under conditions of light winds and strong solar insolation, warming of the upper oceanic layer may occur. In this PhD study, remote sensing from satellites is used to obtain information for the near-surface ocean wind and the sea surface temperature over the North Sea...

  11. Fractional calculus approach to study temperature distribution within a spinning satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotindra C. Prajapati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the temperature distribution within spinning satellites and problem is formulated in terms of fractional differential equation. Applying fractional calculus approach, solution of this equation is obtained in terms of Wright generalized hypergeometric function, a generalization of exponential function.

  12. The Relativistic Effect of the Deviation between the CMB Temperatures Obtained by the COBE Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS on the COBE satellite, gives different temperatures of the Cosmic Microwave Background. This deviation has a theoretical explanation in the Doppler effect on the dipole (weak component of the radiation, the true microwave background of the Universe that moves at 365 km/sec, if the monopole (strong component of the radiation is due to the Earth. Owing to the Doppler effect, the dipole radiation temperature (determined by the 1st derivative of the monopole is lower than the monopole radiation temperature, with a value equal to the observed deviation. By this theory, the WMAP and PLANCK satellites, targeting the L2 point in the Sun-Earth-Moon system, should be insensitive to the monopole radiation. In contrast to the launched WMAP satellite, the PLANCK satellite will have on board absolute instruments which will not be able to detect the measured temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background. That the monopole (strong component of the observed Cosmic Microwave Background is generated by the Earth is given a complete theoretical proof herein.

  13. Element Abundances and Source Plasma Temperatures of Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-11-01

    Thirty years ago Breneman and Stone [1] observed that the enhancement or suppression of element abundances in large solar energetic-particle (SEP) events varies as a power of the mass-to-charge ratio, A/Q, of the elements. Since Q during acceleration or transport may depend upon the source plasma temperature T, the pattern of element enhancements can provide a best-fit measure of T. The small SEP events we call 3He-rich or “impulsive” show average enhancements, relative to coronal abundances, rising as the 3.6 power of A/Q to a factor of ∼1000 for (76magnetic reconnection on open field lines in solar flares and jets. It has been recently found that the large shock-accelerated “gradual” SEP events have a broad range of source plasma temperatures; 69% have coronal temperatures of T seed population containing residual impulsive suprathermal ions. Most of the large event-to-event abundance variations and their time variation are largely explained by variations in T magnified by A/Q-dependent fractionation during transport. However, the non-thermal variance of impulsive SEP events (∼30%) exceeds that of the ∼3 MK gradual events (∼10%) so that several small impulsive events must be averaged together with the ambient plasma to form the seed population for shock acceleration in these events.

  14. Temperature Control in Spark Plasma Sintering: An FEM Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Molénat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Powder consolidation assisted by pulsed current and uniaxial pressure, namely, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS, is increasingly popular. One limitation however lies in the difficulty of controlling the sample temperature during compaction. The aim of this work is to present a computational method for the assembly temperature based on the finite elements method (FEM. Computed temperatures have been compared with experimental data for three different dies filled with three materials with different electrical conductivities (TiAl, SiC, Al2O3. The results obtained are encouraging: the difference between computed and experimental values is less than 5%. This allows thinking about this FEM approach as a predictive tool for selecting the right control temperatures in the SPS machine.

  15. Satellite-based detection of global urban heat-island temperature influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, K.P.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Owen, T.W.; Elvidge, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes a satellite-based methodology to assess the urban heat-island influence during warm season months for over 4400 stations included in the Global Historical Climatology Network of climate stations. The methodology includes local and regional satellite retrievals of an indicator of the presence green photosynthetically active vegetation at and around the stations. The difference in local and regional samples of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to estimate differences in mean air temperature. Stations classified as urban averaged 0.90??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.92??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment on the basis of the NDVI-derived temperature estimates. Additionally, stations classified as rural averaged 0.19??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.16??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment. The NDVI-derived temperature estimates were found to be in reasonable agreement with temperature differences observed between climate stations. The results suggest that satellite-derived data sets can be used to estimate the urban heat-island temperature influence on a global basis and that a more detailed analysis of rural stations and their surrounding environment may be necessary to assure that temperature trends derived from assumed rural environments are not influenced by changes in land use/land cover. Copyright 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Ice surface temperatures: seasonal cycle and daily variability from in-situ and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine S.; Dybkjær, Gorm; Høyer, Jacob L.; Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Rasmussen, Till A. S.; Tonboe, Rasmus T.

    2016-04-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter for understanding the climate system, including the Polar Regions. Yet, in-situ temperature measurements over ice- and snow covered regions are sparse and unevenly distributed, and atmospheric circulation models estimating surface temperature may have large biases. To change this picture, we will analyse the seasonal cycle and daily variability of in-situ and satellite observations, and give an example of how to utilize the data in a sea ice model. We have compiled a data set of in-situ surface and 2 m air temperature observations over land ice, snow, sea ice, and from the marginal ice zone. 2523 time series of varying length from 14 data providers, with a total of more than 13 million observations, have been quality controlled and gathered in a uniform format. An overview of this data set will be presented. In addition, IST satellite observations have been processed from the Metop/AVHRR sensor and a merged analysis product has been constructed based upon the Metop/AVHRR, IASI and Modis IST observations. The satellite and in-situ observations of IST are analysed in parallel, to characterize the IST variability on diurnal and seasonal scales and its spatial patterns. The in-situ data are used to estimate sampling effects within the satellite observations and the good coverage of the satellite observations are used to complete the geographical variability. As an example of the application of satellite IST data, results will be shown from a coupled HYCOM-CICE ocean and sea ice model run, where the IST products have been ingested. The impact of using IST in models will be assessed. This work is a part of the EUSTACE project under Horizon 2020, where the ice surface temperatures form an important piece of the puzzle of creating an observationally based record of surface temperatures for all corners of the Earth, and of the ESA GlobTemperature project which aims at applying surface temperatures in models in order to

  17. Element Abundances and Source Plasma Temperatures of Solar Energetic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Reames, Donald V

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago Breneman and Stone observed that the enhancement or suppression of element abundances in large solar energetic-particle (SEP) events varies as a power of the mass-to-charge ratio, A/Q, of the elements. Since Q during acceleration or transport may depend upon the source plasma temperature T, the pattern of element enhancements can provide a best-fit measure of T. The small SEP events we call 3He-rich or "impulsive" show average enhancements, relative to coronal abundances, rising as the 3.6 power of A/Q to a factor of ~1000 for (76<=Z<=82)/O and temperature in the range 2-4 MK. This acceleration is believed to occur in islands of magnetic reconnection on open field lines in solar flares and jets. It has been recently found that the large shock-accelerated "gradual" SEP events have a broad range of source plasma temperatures; 69% have coronal temperatures of T < 1.6 MK, while 24% have T ~ 3 MK, the latter suggesting a seed population containing residual impulsive suprathermal ions. Mos...

  18. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini - VIMS. IV. Daytime temperature maps

    CERN Document Server

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Clark, Roger N; Cruikshank, Dale P; Ciarniello, Mauro; Cerroni, Priscilla; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Brown, Robert H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Nicholson, Phillip D; Jaumann, Ralf; McCord, Thomas B; Sotin, Christophe; Stephan, Katrin; Ore, Cristina M Dalle

    2016-01-01

    The spectral position of the 3.6 micron continuum peak measured on Cassini-VIMS I/F spectra is used as a marker to infer the temperature of the regolith particles covering the surfaces of Saturn's icy satellites. This feature is characterizing the crystalline water ice spectrum which is the dominant compositional endmember of the satellites' surfaces. Laboratory measurements indicate that the position of the 3.6 micron peak of pure water ice is temperature-dependent, shifting towards shorter wavelengths when the sample is cooled, from about 3.65 micron at T=123 K to about 3.55 micron at T=88 K. A similar method was already applied to VIMS Saturn's rings mosaics to retrieve ring particles temperature (Filacchione et al., 2014). We report here about the daytime temperature variations observed on the icy satellites as derived from three different VIMS observation types. Temperature maps are built by mining the complete VIMS dataset collected in years 2004-2009 (pre-equinox) and in 2009-2012 (post equinox) by sel...

  19. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich

    2008-12-09

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron: 3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, and municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  20. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Kondratyuk, A. A.; Vitske, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 μm in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition of fly ash particles to a state of viscous flow occurs at 20 mm distance from the plasma jet. The X-ray phase analysis is carried out for the both original state of fly ash powders and the particles obtained. This analysis shows that fly ash contains 56.23 wt.% SiO2; 20.61 wt.% Al2O3 and 17.55 wt.% Fe2O3 phases that mostly contribute to the integral (experimental) intensity of the diffraction maximum. The LTP treatment results in a complex redistribution of the amorphous phase amount in the obtained spherical particles, including the reduction of O2Si, phase, increase of O22Al20 and Fe2O3 phases and change in Al, O density of O22Al20 chemical unit cell.

  1. SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS IN ELECTRONIC TEMPERATURE OF PHOTOIONISE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Ferouani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the diagnostics in electronic temperature of a plasma purely photoionized, based on the intensity ration of lines emitted by ions helium-like, which have an atomic number Z relatively small. We considered the three lines corresponding to the transitions starting from the excited levels 1s2l towards the fundamental level 1s2 1S0, like appropriate lines. More precisely, the line of resonance w due to the transition 1s2p 1P1 --- 1s2 1 S0, the line of intercombinaison (x,y 1s2p 3 P2,1 --- 1s2 1 S0  as well as prohibited line z due to the transition 1s2 3 S1 --- 1s2 1 S0. These lines appear clearly in the spectra of astrophysical plasmas. As helium-like ion, we chose two, the oxygen O6+ (Z=8 and neon Ne8+ (Z=10. We carried out calculations of the ration of lines intensity G=(z+x+y/w of O6+ and Ne8+  according to the electronic temperature in the range going from 105 to 107 K. We will see that, like it was shown by Gabriel and Jordan in 1969 [1], this intensity ration can be very sensitive to the temperature electronic and practically independent of the electronic density. Consequently, the ration G can be used to determine in a reliable way the electronic temperature of plasma observed [2].

  2. DIAGNOSTIC SPECTROSCOPIQUE EN TEMPERATURE ELECTRONIQUE DES PLASMAS PHOTOIONISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K Ferouani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the diagnostics in electronic temperature of a plasma purely photoionized, based on the intensity ration of lines emitted by ions helium-like, witch have an atomic number Z relatively small. We considered the three lines corresponding to the transitions starting from the excited levels 1s2l towards the fundamental level 1s2 1S0, like appropriate lines. More precisely, the line of resonance w due to the transition 1s2p 1P1 1s2 1 S0, the line of intercombinaison (x,y 1s2p 3 P2,1 1s2 1 S0 as well as prohibited line z due to the transition 1s2 3 S1 1s2 1 S0. These lines appear clearly in the spectra of astrophysical plasmas. As helium-like ion, we chose two, the oxygen O6+ (Z=8 and neon Ne8+ (Z=10. We carried out calculations of the ration of lines intensity G=(zxy/w of O6+ and Ne8+ according to the electronic temperature in the range going from 105 to 107 K. We will see that, like it was shown by Gabriel and Jordan in 1969, this intensity ration can be very sensitive to the temperature electronic and practically independent of the electronic density. Consequently, the ration G can be used to determine in a reliable way the electronic temperature of plasma observed.

  3. On the ultraviolet anomalies of the WASP-12 and HD 189733 systems: Trojan satellites as a plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Kislyakova, K G; Funk, B; Lammer, H; Fossati, L; Eggl, S; Schwarz, R; Boudjada, M Y; Erkaev, N V

    2016-01-01

    We suggest an additional possible plasma source to explain part of the phenomena observed for the transiting hot Jupiters WASP-12b and HD 189733b in their ultraviolet (UV) light curves. In the proposed scenario, material outgasses from the molten surface of Trojan satellites on tadpole orbits near the Lagrange points L$_4$ and L$_5$. We show that the temperature at the orbital location of WASP-12b is high enough to melt the surface of rocky bodies and to form shallow lava oceans on them. In case of WASP-12b, this leads to the release of elements such as Mg and Ca, which are expected to surround the system. The predicted Mg and Ca outgassing rates from two Io-sized WASP-12b Trojans are $\\approx 2.2 \\times 10^{27}$ s$^{-1}$ and $\\approx 2.2 \\times 10^{26}$ s$^{-1}$, respectively. Trojan outgassing can lead to the apparent lack of emission in Mg{\\sc ii}\\,h\\&k and Ca{\\sc ii}\\,H\\&K line cores of WASP-12. For HD 189733b, the mechanism is only marginally possible due to the lower temperature. This may be one...

  4. Molecular Nitrogen Vibrational Temperature in an Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康正德; 蒲以康

    2002-01-01

    Using a technique applied previously to vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen (N*2) in the region of daytime and nighttime aurora, the emission intensity of the N2 second positive band system in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has been analysed and the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules in the ICP is thus determined. The result shows that the vibrational temperature increases with the increase of the neutral gas pressure from 0.04Pa to 10Pa, then decreases with the further increase of the pressure from 10Pa to 100Pa. Also,this is explained by using the Boltzmann relation between the vibrational temperature and the concentration of the vibrationally excited N*2(X1∑+g ) molecules.

  5. On bias of kinetic temperature measurements in complex plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, M.; Moseev, D.; Salewski, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic temperature in complex plasmas is often measured using particle tracking velocimetry. Here, we introduce a criterion which minimizes the probability of faulty tracking of particles with normally distributed random displacements in consecutive frames. Faulty particle tracking results...... in a measurement bias of the deduced velocity distribution function and hence the deduced kinetic temperature. For particles with a normal velocity distribution function, mistracking biases the obtained velocity distribution function towards small velocities at the expense of large velocities, i.e., the inferred...... velocity distribution is more peaked and its tail is less pronounced. The kinetic temperature is therefore systematically underestimated in measurements. We give a prescription to mitigate this type of error....

  6. Transfer and distortion of atmospheric information in the satellite temperature retrieval problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1981-01-01

    A systematic approach to investigating the transfer of basic ambient temperature information and its distortion by satellite systems and subsequent analysis algorithms is discussed. The retrieval analysis cycle is derived, the variance spectrum of information is examined as it takes different forms in that process, and the quality and quantity of information existing at each stop is compared with the initial ambient temperature information. Temperature retrieval algorithms can smooth, add, or further distort information, depending on how stable the algorithm is, and how heavily influenced by a priori data.

  7. Non-equilibrium in low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccogna, Francesco; Dilecce, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    The wide range of applications of cold plasmas originates from their special characteristic of being a physical system out of thermodynamic equilibrium. This property enhances its reactivity at low gas temperature and allows to obtain macroscopic effects with a moderate energy consumption. In this review, the basic concepts of non-equilibrium in ionized gases are treated by showing why and how non-equilibrium functions of the degrees of freedom are formed in a variety of natural and man-made plasmas with particular emphasis on the progress made in the last decade. The modern point of view of a molecular basis of non-equilibrium and of a state-to-state kinetic approach is adopted. Computational and diagnostic techniques used to investigate the non-equilibrium conditions are also surveyed.

  8. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. M.; Klein, R. I.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron-ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  9. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Orpe, PB; Saini, NL; Mukherjee, S.; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K.; Stanek, J.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  10. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  11. Coronal magnetic field and the plasma beta determined from radio and multiple satellite observations

    CERN Document Server

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Nozawa, Satoshi; Takahashi, Takuya; Sawada, Shinpei; Kitagawa, Jun; Miyawaki, Shun; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We derived the coronal magnetic field, plasma density, and temperature from the observation of polarization and intensity of radio thermal free-free emission using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations. We observed a post-flare loop on the west limb 11 April 2013. The line-of-sight magnetic field was derived from the circularly polarized free-free emission observed by NoRH. The emission measure and temperature were derived from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The derived temperature was used to estimate the emission measure from the NoRH radio free-free emission observations. The derived density from NoRH was larger than that determined using AIA, which can be explained by the fact that the low temperature plasma is not within the temperature coverage of the AIA filters used in this study. We also discuss the other observation of the post-flare loops by the EUV Imager onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (...

  12. Low temperature spark plasma sintering of YIG powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Garcia, L. [Department of Nanostructured Materials, Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN). Principado de Asturias - Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain); Suarez, M., E-mail: m.suarez@cinn.e [Department of Nanostructured Materials, Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN). Principado de Asturias - Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain); Fundacion ITMA, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428, Llanera (Spain); Menendez, J.L. [Department of Nanostructured Materials, Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN). Principado de Asturias - Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain)

    2010-07-16

    A transition from a low to a high spin state in the magnetization saturation between 1000 and 1100 {sup o}C calcination temperature is observed in YIG powders prepared by oxides mixture. Spark plasma sintering of these powders between 900 and 950 {sup o}C leads to dense samples with minimal formation of YFeO{sub 3}, opening the way to co-sintering of YIG with metals or metallic alloys. The optical properties depend on the sintering stage: low (high) density samples show poor (bulk) optical absorption.

  13. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, Jens; Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line...... with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width, and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very...

  14. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Predebon, I

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  15. COMPARISON OF THE GROUND AND SATELLITE TEMPERATURE DATA, CASE OF WRANGELL ISLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Grishchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern times, in the country many remote areas are characterized by low density of weather stations, which reduces the accuracy of synoptic forecasts for territories remoted from the weather stations. In this regard, the use of thermal infrared satellite images for simulation of some climatic parameters is considered by the authors as a promising area of science. The article presents the results of comparing the land surface temperature values calculated from Landsat satellites images and ground-measured air temperature values. For the considered seasons the indicators are characterized by a pronounced linear relationship with a high correlation coefficient.

  16. CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) SPACERAD plasma wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    1988-10-01

    This document discusses the Main Electronics Package, two Electric Field Preamps and Search Coil Magnetometer for the AFGL 701 SPACERAD instrumentation on the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) project. This document discusses the scientific objectives and the importance of the Plasma Wave Experiment in the CRRES SPACERAD mission and describes the instrument design rational and the instrument development philosophy. This document also discusses the testing and operations of the experiment and contains a schematic drawing of the instrumentation electronics and lists of the schematics, drawings, and wiring diagrams that describe the as-built configuration of the Plasma Wave Experiment instrumentation. Problems encountered during the construction and testing of the instrument and their resolutions are discussed. Test results from already completed environmental and EMC/RFI tests have already been submitted to AFGL and to the Air Force Headquarters Space Division Space Test Program. The recertification of the calibration of the instrument is recommended in the near future under a new contract covering the re-delivery (necessitated due to the removal during the launch-delay storage period), pre-launch, and launch operations.

  17. Low temperature spark plasma sintering of TC4/HA composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiliang Shao; Lei Cao; Daqian Sun; Zhankui Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Ti6Al4V/hydroxyapatite composites (TC4/HA) have been prepared by high energy ball milling and low temperature spark plasma sintering at 600 °C, 550 °C, 500 °C and 450 °C, respectively. The sintering temperature of the composites was sharply decreased as the result of the activation and surficial modification effects induced from high energy ball milling. The decomposition and reaction of hydro-xyapatite was successfully avoided, which offers the composites superior biocompatibility. The hydro-xyapatite in the composites was distributed in gap uniformly, and formed an ideal network structure. The lowest hardness, compressive strength and Young's modulus of the composites satisfy the requirements of human bone.

  18. High temperature superconductors for fusion at the Swiss Plasma Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, P.; Wesche, R.; Uglietti, D.; Bykovsky, N.

    2017-08-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) may become in future an option for the superconducting magnets of commercial fusion plants. At the Swiss Plasma Center (SPC) the R&D activity toward HTS high current, high field cables suitable for fusion magnets started in 2012 and led in 2015 to the assembly of the first 60 kA, 12 T prototype conductor. The cable concept developed at the SPC is based on the principle of ‘soldered, twisted stacks’ of REBCO tapes. The required number of stacks is assembled in a cored flat cable, cooled by forced flow of supercritical helium. The sample environment of the test facility at SPC has been upgraded with a HTS adapter and a counter-flow heat exchanger to allow testing the HTS sample in a broader range of temperature (4.5 K-50 K) using the existing, NbTi based superconducting transformer and the closed loop refrigerator.

  19. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  20. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  1. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 1021 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  2. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio, E-mail: komori@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than {approx} 1 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is {approx} 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  3. High-Temperature Superconductive Cabling Investigated for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA has been directed by Congress to take a fresh look at the Space Solar Power (SSP) concept that was studied by the Department of Energy and NASA about 20 years ago. To summarize, the concept involves (1) collecting solar energy and converting it to electrical energy via photovoltaic arrays on satellites in Earth orbit, (2) conducting the electricity to the microwave transmitting portion of the satellite, and (3) transmitting the power via microwave transmitters (or possibly via lasers) to ground power station antennas located on the surface of the Earth. One Sun Tower SSP satellite concept is illustrated here. This figure shows many photovoltaic arrays attached to a "backbone" that conducts electricity down to a wireless transmitter, which is pointed toward the Earth. Other variations on this concept use multiple backbones to reduce the overall length of the satellite structure. In addition, non-Sun-Tower concepts are being considered. The objective of the work reported here was to determine the benefits to the SSP concept of using high-temperature superconductors (HTS) to conduct the electricity from the photovoltaic arrays to the wireless power transmitters. Possible benefits are, for example, reduced mass, improved efficiency, and improved reliability. Dr. James Powell of Plus Ultra Technologies, Inc., of Stony Brook, New York, is conducting the study, and it is being managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field via a task-order contract through Scientific Applications International Corp. (SAIC).

  4. Ice Sheet Temperature Records - Satellite and In Situ Data from Antarctica and Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, C. A.; Comiso, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    Recently completed decadal-length surface temperature records from Antarctica and Greenland are providing insights into the challenge of detecting climate change. Ice and snow cover at high latitudes influence the global climate system by reflecting much of the incoming solar energy back to space. An expected consequence of global warming is a decrease in area covered by snow and ice and an increase in Earth's absorption of solar radiation. Models have predicted that the effects of climate warming may be amplified at high latitudes; thinning of the Greenland ice sheet margins and the breakup of Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves suggest this process may have begun. Satellite data provide an excellent means of observing climate parameters across both long temporal and remote spatial domains but calibration and validation of their data remains a challenge. Infrared sensors can provide excellent temperature information but cloud cover and calibration remain as problems. Passive-microwave sensors can obtain data during the long polar night and through clouds but have calibration issues and a much lower spatial resolution. Automatic weather stations are generally spatially- and temporally-restricted and may have long gaps due to equipment failure. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen from ice sheet locations provide another means of determining temperature variations with time but are challenging to calibrate to observed temperatures and also represent restricted areas. This presentation will discuss these issues and elaborate on the development and limitations of composite satellite, automatic weather station, and proxy temperature data from selected sites in Antarctica and Greenland.

  5. PERSPECTIVE Working towards a community-wide understanding of satellite skin temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Cheney

    2010-12-01

    With more than sixty free and publicly available high-quality datasets, including ecosystem variables, radiation budget variables, and land cover products, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS scientific team have contributed significantly to scientific investigations of ecosystems across the globe. The MODIS instrument, launched in December 1999, has 36 spectral bands, a viewing swath of 2330 km, and acquires data at 250 m, 500 m, and 1000 m spatial resolution every one to two days. Radiation budget variables include surface reflectance, skin temperature, emissivity, and albedo, to list a few. Ecosystem variables include several vegetation indices and productivity measures. Land cover characteristics encompass land cover classifications as well as model parameters and vegetation classifications. Many of these products are instrumental in constraining global climate models and climate change studies, as well as monitoring events such as the recent flooding in Pakistan, the unprecedented oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, or phytoplankton bloom in the Barents Sea. While product validation efforts by the MODIS scientific team are both vigorous and continually improving, validation is unquestionably one of the most difficult tasks when dealing with remotely derived datasets, especially at the global scale. The quality and availability of MODIS data have led to widespread usage in the scientific community that has further contributed to validation and development of the MODIS products. In their recent paper entitled 'Land surface skin temperature climatology: benefitting from the strengths of satellite observations', Jin and Dickinson review the scientific theory behind, and demonstrate application of, a MODIS temperature product: surface skin temperature. Utilizing datasets from the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN), daily skin and air temperature from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, and MODIS products (skin temperature, albedo, land

  6. Evaluation of Land Surface Temperature Operationally Retrieved from Korean Geostationary Satellite (COMS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Ra Cho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the precision of land surface temperature (LST operationally retrieved from the Korean multipurpose geostationary satellite, Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS. The split-window (SW-type retrieval algorithm was developed through radiative transfer model simulations under various atmospheric profiles, satellite zenith angles, surface emissivity values and surface lapse rate conditions using Moderate Resolution Atmospheric Transmission version 4 (MODTRAN4. The estimation capabilities of the COMS SW (CSW LST algorithm were evaluated for various impacting factors, and the retrieval accuracy of COMS LST data was evaluated with collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LST data. The surface emissivity values for two SW channels were generated using a vegetation cover method. The CSW algorithm estimated the LST distribution reasonably well (averaged bias = 0.00 K, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 1.41 K, correlation coefficient = 0.99; however, the estimation capabilities of the CSW algorithm were significantly impacted by large brightness temperature differences and surface lapse rates. The CSW algorithm reproduced spatiotemporal variations of LST comparing well to MODIS LST data, irrespective of what month or time of day the data were collected from. The one-year evaluation results with MODIS LST data showed that the annual mean bias, RMSE and correlation coefficient for the CSW algorithm were −1.009 K, 2.613 K and 0.988, respectively.

  7. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  8. Generation of high resolution sea surface temperature using multi-satellite data for operational oceanography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chan-Su; KIM Sun-Hwa; OUCHI Kazuo; BACK Ji-Hun

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we introduce a high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) product generated daily by Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST). The SST product is comprised of four sets of data including eight-hour and daily average SST data of 1 km resolution, and is based on the four infrared (IR) satellite SST data acquired by advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multifunctional Transport Satellites-2 (MTSAT-2) Imager and Meteorological Imager (MI), two microwave radiometer SSTs acquired by Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), and WindSAT within-situ temperature data. These input satellite andin-situ SST data are merged by using the optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm. The root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) of satellite andin-situ data are used as a weighting value in the OI algorithm. As a pilot product, four SST data sets were generated daily from January to December 2013. In the comparison between the SSTs measured by moored buoys and the daily mean KIOST SSTs, the estimated RMSE was 0.71°C and the bias value was –0.08°C. The largest RMSE and bias were 0.86 and –0.26°C respectively, observed at a buoy site in the boundary region of warm and cold waters with increased physical variability in the Sea of Japan/East Sea. Other site near the coasts shows a lower RMSE value of 0.60°C than those at the open waters. To investigate the spatial distributions of SST, the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) product was used in the comparison of temperature gradients, and it was shown that the KIOST SST product represents well the water mass structures around the Korean Peninsula. The KIOST SST product generated from both satellite and buoy data is expected to make substantial contribution to the Korea Operational Oceanographic System (KOOS) as an input parameter for data assimilation.

  9. Departure of high temperature iron lines from the equilibrium state in flaring solar plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kawate, Tomoko; Jess, David B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify if the assumption of ionization equilibrium and a Maxwellian electron energy distribution is valid in flaring solar plasmas. We analyze the 2014 December 20 X1.8 flare, in which the \\ion{Fe}{xxi} 187~\\AA, \\ion{Fe}{xxii} 253~\\AA, \\ion{Fe}{xxiii} 263~\\AA\\ and \\ion{Fe}{xxiv} 255~\\AA\\ emission lines were simultaneously observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Hinode satellite. Intensity ratios among these high temperature Fe lines are compared and departures from isothermal conditions and ionization equilibrium examined. Temperatures derived from intensity ratios involving these four lines show significant discrepancies at the flare footpoints in the impulsive phase, and at the looptop in the gradual phase. Among these, the temperature derived from the \\ion{Fe}{xxii}/\\ion{Fe}{xxiv} intensity ratio is the lowest, which cannot be explained if we assume a Maxwellian electron distribution and ionization equilibrium, even in the case of a multi-thermal structure. This re...

  10. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  11. Long term sea surface temperature trends in US Affiliated Pacific Islands from satellite data, 1982-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Monthly average NOAA satellite-derived Sea Surface Temperature (SST) values from 1982-2003 and their long-term trends are presented for sixteen US affiliated Pacific...

  12. Application of remote sensing to thermal pollution analysis. [satellite sea surface temperature measurement assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, H. W.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Sengupta, S.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model development program for near-field thermal plume discharge and far field general circulation in coastal regions is being carried on at the University of Miami Clean Energy Research Institute. The objective of the program is to develop a generalized, three-dimensional, predictive model for thermal pollution studies. Two regions of specific application of the model are the power plants sites at the Biscayne Bay and Hutchinson Island area along the Florida coastline. Remote sensing from aircraft as well as satellites are used in parallel with in situ measurements to provide information needed for the development and verification of the mathematical model. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to identify problems and limitations of the presently available satellite data and to develop methods for enhancing and enlarging thermal infrared displays for mesoscale sea surface temperature measurements.

  13. Calibration of the Distributed Hydrological Model mHM using Satellite derived Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M.; Samaniego, L. E.; Cuntz, M.

    2012-12-01

    A combined investigation of the water and energy balance in hydrologic models can lead to a more accurate estimation of hydrological fluxes and state variables, such as evapotranspiration and soil moisture. Hydrologic models are usually calibrated against discharge measurements, and thus are only trained on information of few points within a catchment. This procedure does not take into account any spatio-temporal variability of fluxes or state variables. Satellite data are a useful source of information to account for this spatial distributions. The objective of this study is to calibrate the distributed hydrological model mHM with satellite derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) fields provided by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). LST is preferred to other satellite products such as soil moisture or evapotranspiration due to its higher precision. LST is obtained by solving the energy balance by assuming that the soil heat flux and the storage term are negligible on a daily time step. The evapotranspiration is determined by closing the water balance in mHM. The net radiation is calculated by using the incoming short- and longwave radiation, albedo and emissivity data provided by LSA-SAF. The Multiscale Parameter Regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) is used to determine the aerodynamic resistance among other parameters. The optimization is performed within the time period 2008-2010 using three objective functions that consider 1) only discharge, 2) only LST, and 3) a combination of both. The proposed method is applied to seven major German river basins: Danube, Ems, Main, Mulde, Neckar, Saale, and Weser. The annual coefficient of correlation between LSA-SAF incoming shortwave radiation and 28 meteorological stations operated by the German Weather Service (DWD) is 0.94 (RMSE = 29 W m-2) in 2009. LSA-SAF incoming longwave radiation could be further evaluated at two eddy covariance stations with a very similar

  14. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  15. Ion temperature and toroidal rotation in JET's low torque plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Giroud, C.; Reyes Cortes, S.; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure developed as the best method to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of the ion temperature Ti and the toroidal velocity vϕ from Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) data from intrinsic rotation experiments at the Joint European Torus with the carbon wall. The low impurity content observed in such plasmas, resulting in low active CXRS signal, alongside low Doppler shifts makes the determination of Ti and vϕ particularly difficult. The beam modulation method will be discussed along with the measures taken to increase photon statistics and minimise errors from the absolute calibration and magneto-hydro-dynamics effects that may impact the CXRS passive emission.

  16. Exchange corrections in a low-temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Robin; Zamanian, Jens; Brodin, Gert

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the exchange corrections to linear electrostatic wave propagation in a plasma using a quantum kinetic formalism. Specifically, we have considered the zero-temperature limit. In order to simplify the calculations we have focused on the long-wavelength limit, i.e., wavelengths much longer than the de Broglie wavelength. For the case of ion-acoustic waves we have calculated the exchange correction both to the damping rate and the real part of the frequency. For Langmuir waves the frequency shift due to exchange effects is found. Our results are compared with the frequency shifts deduced from commonly used exchange potentials which are computed from density-functional theory.

  17. Intercomparison of planetary-scale diagnostics derived from separate satellite and radiosonde time-mean temperature fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, T.; Chapman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The planetary-scale components of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere troposphere-stratosphere 1973-74 winter circulation are diagnosed using separate time-mean temperature fields based on radiosonde and satellite observations. Meridional cross-sections of zonal wind together with, for zonal wavenumbers 1, 2 and 3, the streamfunction amplitude, phase and Eliassen-Palm flux are displayed, with the relative accuracy of the satellite-derived diagnostics assessed through comparison with the 'ground-truth' radiosonde information. The satellite and radiosonde diagnostics compare most favourably in terms of zonal wind speed and shear, direction of wave propagation and meridional wave structure - all of which are closely related to the differential properties of the atmospheric temperature field. The intensity of the satellite-derived patterns of tropospheric wave propagation is underestimated due to the effects of spatial smoothing and residual cloud contamination present in the satellite radiance measurements.

  18. Validation of Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature Products - Methods and Good Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S. J.; Biard, J.; Ghent, D.

    2014-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for surface water and energy budget calculations that can be obtained globally and operationally from satellite observations. LST is used for many applications, including weather forecasting, short-term climate prediction, extreme weather monitoring, and irrigation and water resource management. In order to maximize the usefulness of LST for research and studies it is necessary to know the uncertainty in the LST measurement. Multiple validation methods and activities are necessary to assess LST compliance with the quality specifications of operational users. This work presents four different validation methods that have been widely used to determine the uncertainties in LST products derived from satellite measurements. 1) The temperature based validation method involves comparisons with ground-based measurements of LST. The method is strongly limited by the number and quality of available field stations. 2) Scene-based comparisons involve comparing a new satellite LST product with a heritage LST product. This method is not an absolute validation and satellite LST inter-comparisons alone do not provide an independent validation measurement. 3) The radiance-based validation method does not require ground-based measurements and is usually used for large scale validation effort or for LST products with coarser spatial resolution (> 1km). 4) Time series comparisons are used to detect problems that can occur during the instrument's life, e.g. calibration drift, or unrealistic outliers due to cloud coverage. This study enumerates the sources of errors associated with each method. The four different approaches are complementary and provide different levels of information about the quality of the retrieved LST. The challenges in retrieving the LST from satellite measurements are discussed using results obtained for MODIS and VIIRS. This work contributes to the objective of the Land Product Validation (LPV) sub-group of the

  19. Modeling directional effects in land surface temperature derived from geostationary satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads Olander

    This PhD-thesis investigates the directional effects in land surface temperature (LST) estimates from the SEVIRI sensor onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The directional effects are caused by the land surface structure (i.e. tree size and shape) interacting with the changing...... sun-target-sensor geometry. The directional effects occur because the different surface components, e.g. tree canopies and bare soil surfaces, will in many cases have significantly different temperatures. Depending on the viewing angle, different fractions of each of the components will be viewed......; shaded and sunlit canopy and background, respectively. Given data on vegetation structure and density, the model estimates the fractions of the four components as well as the directional composite temperature in the view of a sensor, given the illumination and viewing geometry. The modeling results show...

  20. A Three-Dimensional Satellite Retrieval Method for Atmospheric Temperature and Moisture Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; QIU Chongjian; HUANG Jianping

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional variational method iS proposed to simultaneously retrieve the 3-D atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from satellite radiance measurements.To include both vertical structure and the horizontal patterns of the atmospheric temperature and moisture.an EOF technique iS used to decompose the temperature and moisture field in a 3-D space.A number of numerical simulations are conducted and they demonstrate that the 3-D method iS less sensitive to the observation errors compared to the 1-D method.When the observation error iS more than 2.0 K.to get the best results.the truncation number for the EOF'S expansion have to be restricted to 2 in the 1-D method.while it can be set as large as 40 in a 3-D method.This results in the truncation error being reduced and the retrieval accuracy being improved in the 3-D method.Compared to the 1-D method.the rlTLS errors of the 3-D method are reduced by 48%and 36%for the temperature and moisture retrievals,respectively.Using the real satellite measured brightness temperatures at 0557 UTC 31 July 2002,the temperature and moisture profiles are retrieved over a region(20°-45°N,100°-125°E)and compared with 37 collocated radiosonde observations.The results show that the retrieval accuracy with a 3-D method iS significantly higher than those with the 1-D method.

  1. Derivation and evaluation of land surface temperature from the geostationary operational environmental satellite series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have been continuously monitoring the earth surface since 1970, providing valuable and intensive data from a very broad range of wavelengths, day and night. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is currently operating GOES-15 and GOES-13. The design of the GOES series is now heading to the 4 th generation. GOES-R, as a representative of the new generation of the GOES series, is scheduled to be launched in 2015 with higher spatial and temporal resolution images and full-time soundings. These frequent observations provided by GOES Image make them attractive for deriving information on the diurnal land surface temperature (LST) cycle and diurnal temperature range (DTR). These parameters are of great value for research on the Earth's diurnal variability and climate change. Accurate derivation of satellite-based LSTs from thermal infrared data has long been an interesting and challenging research area. To better support the research on climate change, the generation of consistent GOES LST products for both GOES-East and GOES-West from operational dataset as well as historical archive is in great demand. The derivation of GOES LST products and the evaluation of proposed retrieval methods are two major objectives of this study. Literature relevant to satellite-based LST retrieval techniques was reviewed. Specifically, the evolution of two LST algorithm families and LST retrieval methods for geostationary satellites were summarized in this dissertation. Literature relevant to the evaluation of satellite-based LSTs was also reviewed. All the existing methods are a valuable reference to develop the GOES LST product. The primary objective of this dissertation is the development of models for deriving consistent GOES LSTs with high spatial and high temporal coverage. Proper LST retrieval algorithms were studied

  2. Satellite observations of surface temperature during the March 2015 total solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Elizabeth

    2016-09-28

    The behaviour of remotely sensed land surface temperatures (LSTs) from the spinning-enhanced visible and infrared imager (SEVIRI) during the total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 is analysed over Europe. LST is found to drop by up to several degrees Celcius during the eclipse, with the minimum LST occurring just after the eclipse mid-point (median=+1.5 min). The drop in LST is typically larger than the drop in near-surface air temperatures reported elsewhere, and correlates with solar obscuration (r=-0.47; larger obscuration = larger LST drop), eclipse duration (r=-0.62; longer duration = larger LST drop) and time (r=+0.37; earlier eclipse = larger LST drop). Locally, the LST drop is also correlated with vegetation (up to r=+0.6), with smaller LST drops occurring over more vegetated surfaces. The LSTs at locations near the coast and at higher elevation are also less affected by the eclipse. This study covers the largest area and uses the most observations of eclipse-induced surface temperature drops to date, and is the first full characterization of satellite LST during an eclipse (known to the author). The methods described could be applied to Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) LST data over North America during the August 2017 total solar eclipse.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  3. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the d...

  4. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesenberger, M; Kendl, A

    2014-01-01

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very well described by the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the characteristic gradient scale length of the blob. We compare the global gyrofluid model with a partly linearized local model. For low ion temperatures we find that simulations of the global model show more coherent blobs with an increased cross-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in ...

  5. Monte Carlo Sampling of Negative-temperature Plasma States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Krommes; Sharadini Rath

    2002-07-19

    A Monte Carlo procedure is used to generate N-particle configurations compatible with two-temperature canonical equilibria in two dimensions, with particular attention to nonlinear plasma gyrokinetics. An unusual feature of the problem is the importance of a nontrivial probability density function R0(PHI), the probability of realizing a set {Phi} of Fourier amplitudes associated with an ensemble of uniformly distributed, independent particles. This quantity arises because the equilibrium distribution is specified in terms of {Phi}, whereas the sampling procedure naturally produces particles states gamma; {Phi} and gamma are related via a gyrokinetic Poisson equation, highly nonlinear in its dependence on gamma. Expansion and asymptotic methods are used to calculate R0(PHI) analytically; excellent agreement is found between the large-N asymptotic result and a direct numerical calculation. The algorithm is tested by successfully generating a variety of states of both positive and negative temperature, including ones in which either the longest- or shortest-wavelength modes are excited to relatively very large amplitudes.

  6. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  7. The annual cycle of satellite-derived sea surface temperature in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Guillermo P.; Brown, Otis B.; Evans, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    The annual cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean was estimated using four years (July 1984-July 1988) of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer observations. High resolution satellite observations at 1-km space and daily time resolution were grided at 100-km space and 5-day time intervals to develop an analysis dataset for determination of low frequency SST variability. The integral time scale, a measure of serial correlation, was found to vary from 40 to 60 days in the domain of interest. The existence of superannual trends in the SST data was investigated, but conclusive results could not be obtained. The annual cycle (and, in particular, the annual harmonic) explains a large proportion of the SST variability. The estimated amplitude of the cycle ranges between 5 deg and 13 deg C throughout the study area, with minima in August-September and maxima in February. The resultant climatology is compared with an arbitrary 5-day satellite SST field, and with the COADS/ICE SST climatology. It was found that the higher resolution satellite-based SST climatology resolves boundary current structure and has significantly better structural agreement with the observed field.

  8. Atmospheric correction for sea surface temperature retrieval from single thermal channel radiometer data onboard Kalpana satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Naveen R.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Mathur, Aloke K.; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2011-06-01

    An atmospheric correction method has been applied on sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval algorithm using Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) single window channel radiance data onboard Kalpana satellite (K-SAT). The technique makes use of concurrent water vapour fields available from Microwave Imager onboard Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/TMI) satellite. Total water vapour content and satellite zenith angle dependent SST retrieval algorithm has been developed using Radiative Transfer Model [MODTRAN ver3.0] simulations for Kalpana 10.5-12.5 μm thermal window channel. Retrieval of Kalpana SST (K-SST) has been carried out for every half-hourly acquisition of Kalpana data for the year 2008 to cover whole annual cycle of SST over Indian Ocean (IO). Validation of the retrieved corrected SST has been carried out using near-simultaneous observations of ship and buoys datasets covering Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and IO regions. A significant improvement in Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) of K-SST with respect to buoy (1.50-1.02 K) and to ship datasets (1.41-1.19 K) is seen with the use of near real-time water vapour fields of TMI. Furthermore, comparison of the retrieved SST has also been carried out using near simultaneous observations of TRMM/TMI SST over IO regions. The analysis shows that K-SST has overall cold bias of 1.17 K and an RMSD of 1.09 K after bias correction.

  9. Algorithm for Automated Mapping of Land Surface Temperature Using LANDSAT 8 Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Avdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature is an important factor in many areas, such as global climate change, hydrological, geo-/biophysical, and urban land use/land cover. As the latest launched satellite from the LANDSAT family, LANDSAT 8 has opened new possibilities for understanding the events on the Earth with remote sensing. This study presents an algorithm for the automatic mapping of land surface temperature from LANDSAT 8 data. The tool was developed using the LANDSAT 8 thermal infrared sensor Band 10 data. Different methods and formulas were used in the algorithm that successfully retrieves the land surface temperature to help us study the thermal environment of the ground surface. To verify the algorithm, the land surface temperature and the near-air temperature were compared. The results showed that, for the first case, the standard deviation was 2.4°C, and for the second case, it was 2.7°C. For future studies, the tool should be refined with in situ measurements of land surface temperature.

  10. Low-temperature plasma simulations with the LSP PIC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alex; Kaganovich, Igor; Keating, David; Selezneva, Svetlana; Sommerer, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    The LSP (Large-Scale Plasma) PIC-MCC code has been used to simulate several low-temperature plasma configurations, including a gas switch for high-power AC/DC conversion, a glow discharge and a Hall thruster. Simulation results will be presented with an emphasis on code comparison and validation against experiment. High-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) power transmission is becoming more common as it can reduce construction costs and power losses. Solid-state power-electronics devices are presently used, but it has been proposed that gas switches could become a compact, less costly, alternative. A gas-switch conversion device would be based on a glow discharge, with a magnetically insulated cold cathode. Its operation is similar to that of a sputtering magnetron, but with much higher pressure (0.1 to 0.3 Torr) in order to achieve high current density. We have performed 1D (axial) and 2D (axial/radial) simulations of such a gas switch using LSP. The 1D results were compared with results from the EDIPIC code. To test and compare the collision models used by the LSP and EDIPIC codes in more detail, a validation exercise was performed for the cathode fall of a glow discharge. We will also present some 2D (radial/azimuthal) LSP simulations of a Hall thruster. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  11. Comparison of Satellite-Derived and In-Situ Observations of Ice and Snow Surface Temperatures over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Box, Jason E.; Casey, Kimberly A.; Hook, Simon J.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Steffen, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    The most practical way to get a spatially broad and continuous measurements of the surface temperature in the data-sparse cryosphere is by satellite remote sensing. The uncertainties in satellite-derived LSTs must be understood to develop internally-consistent decade-scale land-surface temperature (LST) records needed for climate studies. In this work we assess satellite-derived "clear-sky" LST products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and LSTs derived from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) over snow and ice on Greenland. When possible, we compare satellite-derived LSTs with in-situ air-temperature observations from Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) automatic-weather stations (AWS). We find that MODIS, ASTER and ETM+ provide reliable and consistent LSTs under clear-sky conditions and relatively-flat terrain over snow and ice targets over a range of temperatures from -40 to 0 C. The satellite-derived LSTs agree within a relative RMS uncertainty of approx.0.5 C. The good agreement among the LSTs derived from the various satellite instruments is especially notable since different spectral channels and different retrieval algorithms are used to calculate LST from the raw satellite data. The AWS record in-situ data at a "point" while the satellite instruments record data over an area varying in size from: 57 X 57 m (ETM+), 90 X 90 m (ASTER), or to 1 X 1 km (MODIS). Surface topography and other factors contribute to variability of LST within a pixel, thus the AWS measurements may not be representative of the LST of the pixel. Without more information on the local spatial patterns of LST, the AWS LST cannot be considered valid ground truth for the satellite measurements, with RMS uncertainty approx.2 C. Despite the relatively large AWS-derived uncertainty, we find LST data are characterized by high accuracy but have uncertain absolute precision.

  12. Effects of Slope and Aspect Variations on Satellite Surface Temperature Retrievals and Mesoscale Analysis in Mountainous Terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Alan E.

    1992-03-01

    Surface temperature retrieval in mountainous areas is complicated by the high variability of temperatures that can occur within a single satellite field of view. Temperatures depend in part on slope orientation relative to the sun, which can vary radically over very short distances. The surface temperature detected by a satellite is biased toward the temperatures of the sub-field-of-view terrain elements that most directly face the satellite. Numerical simulations were conducted to estimate the effects of satellite viewing geometry on surface temperature retrievals for a section of central Colorado. Surface temperatures were computed using a mesoscale model with a parameterization of subgrid variations in slope and aspect angles.The simulations indicate that the slope-aspect effect can lead to local surface temperature variations up to 30°C for autumn conditions in the Colorado mountains. For realistic satellite viewing conditions, these variations can give rise to biases in retrieved surface temperatures of about 3°C. Relative biases between retrievals from two satellites with different viewing angles can be over 6°C, which could lead to confusion when merging datasets. The bias computations were limited by the resolution of the available terrain height data (90 m). The results suggest that the biases would be significantly larger if the data resolution was fine enough to represent every detail of the real Colorado terrain or if retrievals were made in mountain areas that have a larger proportion of steep slopes than the Colorado Rockies. The computed bias gradients across the Colorado domain were not large enough to significantly alter the forcing of the diurnal upslope-downslope circulations, according to simulations in which surface temperature retrievals with view-dependent biases were assimilated into time-continuous analyses. View-dependent retrieval biases may be relevant to climatological analysts that rely on remotely sensed data, given that bias

  13. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High-Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Z. A.; Holt, J. B.

    1997-04-01

    KEYNOTE ADDRESS. Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis: Twenty Years of Search and Findings (A. Merzhanov). SOLID-STATE COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS. Recent Progress in Combustion Synthesis of High-Performance Materials in Japan (M. Koizumi & Y. Miyamoto). Modeling and Numerical Computation of a Nonsteady SHS Process (A. Bayliss & B. Matkowsky). New Models of Quasiperiodic Burning in Combustion Synthesis (S. Margolis, et al.). Modeling of SHS Operations (V. Hlavacek, et al.). Combustion Theory for Sandwiches of Alloyable Materials (R. Armstrong & M. Koszykowski). Observations on the Combustion Reaction Between Thin Foils of Ni and Al (U. Anselmi-Tamburini & Z. Munir). Combustion Synthesis of Intermetallic Compounds (Y. Kaieda, et al.). Combustion Synthesis of Nickel Aluminides (B. Rabin, et al.). Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of NiTi Intermetallics (H. Yi & J. Moore). Shock-Induced Chemical Synthesis of Intermetallic Compounds (S. Work, et al.). Advanced Ceramics Via SHS (T. DeAngelis & D. Weiss). In-Situ Formation of SiC and SiC-C Blocked Solids by Self-Combustion Synthesis (S. Ikeda, et al.). Powder Purity and Morphology Effects in Combustion-Synthesis Reactions (L. Kecskes, et al.). Simultaneous Synthesis and Densification of Ceramic Components Under Gas Pressure by SHS (Y. Miyamoto & M. Koizumi). The Use of Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of High-Density Titanium Diboride (P. Zavitsanos, et al.). Metal--Ceramic Composite Pipes Produced by a Centrifugal-Thermit Process (O. Odawara). Simultaneous Combustion Synthesis and Densification of AIN (S. Dunmead, et al.). Fabrication of a Functionally Gradient Material by Using a Self-Propagating Reaction Process (N. Sata, et al.). Combustion Synthesis of Oxide-Carbide Composites (L. Wang, et al.). Heterogeneous Reaction Mechanisms in the Si-C System Under Conditions of Solid Combustion (R. Pampuch, et al.). Experimental Modeling of Particle-Particle Interactions During SHS of TiB2 -Al2O3 (K. Logan

  14. Study of land surface temperature and spectral emissivity using multi-sensor satellite data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Srivastava; T J Majumdar; Amit K Bhattacharya

    2010-02-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to estimate land surface temperatures (LST) and spectral emissivities over a hard rock terrain using multi-sensor satellite data. The study area, of about 6000 km2, is a part of Singhbhum–Orissa craton situated in the eastern part of India. TIR data from ASTER, MODIS and Landsat ETM+ have been used in the present study. Telatemp Model AG-42D Portable Infrared Thermometer was used for ground measurements to validate the results derived from satellite (MODIS/ASTER) data. LSTs derived using Landsat ETM+ data of two different dates have been compared with the satellite data (ASTER and MODIS) of those two dates. Various techniques, viz., temperature and emissivity separation (TES) algorithm, gray body adjustment approach in TES algorithm, Split-Window algorithms and Single Channel algorithm along with NDVI based emissivity approach have been used. LSTs derived from bands 31 and 32 of MODIS data using Split-Window algorithms with higher viewing angle (50°) (LST1 and LST2) are found to have closer agreement with ground temperature measurements (ground LST) over waterbody, Dalma forest and Simlipal forest, than that derived from ASTER data (TES with AST 13). However, over agriculture land, there is some uncertainty and difference between the measured and the estimated LSTs for both validation dates for all the derived LSTs. LST obtained using Single Channel algorithm with NDVI based emissivity method in channel 13 of ASTER data has yielded closer agreement with ground measurements recorded over vegetation and mixed lands of low spectral contrast. LST results obtained with TIR band 6 of Landsat ETM+ using Single Channel algorithm show close agreement over Dalma forest, Simlipal forest and waterbody with LSTs obtained using MODIS and ASTER data for a different date. Comparison of LSTs shows good agreement with ground measurements in thermally homogeneous area. However, results in agriculture area with less homogeneity show

  15. Second Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-01

    1 and is employed to make routine measurements of the evolution of plasma density in the high density ( n > 5 x 1011* cm-3) Alcator A tokamak...plasmas. To exemplify the use of these techniques in fusion plasmas, studies of density fluc- tuations in the ATC and ALCATOR tokamaks will be...character- istics for the excessive incidence of plasma light. Video signals are recorded with a video tape recorder, which starts and stops recording

  16. Barium Strontium Titanate Thin Film Growth with rotational speed variation as a satellite temperature sensor prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadi; Rika, W.; Sulidah; Irzaman; Hardhienata, Hendradi

    2017-01-01

    Barium Strontium Titanate(BST) is a promising material for sensor devices such as temperature and infrared sensor. BaxSr1-xTiO3 thin films with affordable Si substrate were prepared by chemical solution deposition method and spin coating technique for 30 seconds with variation in rotation speed (3000 rpm, 5500 rpm and 8000 rpm). A high baking temperature at 8500C has been used for 15 hours during the annealing process. The thickness of BST film was calculated via gravimetric calculation. USB 2000 VIS-NIR was used to characterize the optical properties of BST thin film. The obtained reflectance curve showed that the most reflected wavelengths were in the range of 408-452 nm respectively. The result of the optical film characterization is very important for further development as a sensor in satellite technology.

  17. A study of temperature's spatial distribution in Neuquen River valley through satellite imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gloria Cogliati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks into the spatial distribution of brightness and surface temperature through the use of LAND SAT7 ETM+ and NO AA-AVHRR satellite imagery in the cultivated valley of the Neuquén river. Studying the spatial distribution of temperatures in an area with a somewhat complex terrain requires the use of a great density of meteorological measurements. It is often impossible to obtain the right density of the argometeorological network due to the high installation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors provide a large flow of information in various resolutions, at considerably lower costs. Determining the valley's warm and cold zones would allow for more efficient irrigation and frost-protection methods, and it would provide tools to improve the area's productive planning.

  18. Electrothermal efficiency, temperature and thermal conductivity of plasma jet in a DC plasma spray torch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugavelayutham; V Selvarajan

    2003-12-01

    A study was made to evaluate the electrothermal efficiency of a DC arc plasma torch and temperature and thermal conductivity of plasma jet in the torch. The torch was operated at power levels from 4 to 20 kW in non-transferred arc mode. The effect of nitrogen in combination with argon as plasma gas on the above properties was investigated. Calculations were made from experimental data. The electrothermal efficiency increased significantly with increase in nitrogen content. The plasma jet temperature and thermal conductivity exhibited a decrease with increase in nitrogen content. The experiment was done at different total gas flow rates. The results are explained on the basis of dissociation energy of nitrogen molecules and plasma jet energy loss to the cathode, anode and the walls of the torch.

  19. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  20. Towards a protocol for validating satellite-based Land Surface Temperature: Application to AATSR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, Darren; Schneider, Philipp; Remedios, John

    2013-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) retrieval accuracy can be challenging as a result of emissivity variability and atmospheric effects. Surface emissivities can be highly variable owing to the heterogeneity of the land; a problem which is amplified in regions of high topographic variance or for larger viewing angles. Atmospheric effects caused by the presence of aerosols and by water vapour absorption can give a bias to the underlying LST. Combined, atmospheric effects and emissivity variability can result in retrieval errors of several degrees. If though these are appropriately handled satellite-derived LST products can be used to improve our ability to monitor and to understand land surface and climate change processes, such as desertification, urbanization, deforestation and land/atmosphere coupling. Here we present validation of an improved LST data record from the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) and illustrate the improvements in accuracy and precision compared with the standard ESA LST product. Validation is a critical part of developing any satellite product, although over the land heterogeneity ensures this is a challenging undertaking. A substantial amount of previous effort has gone into the area of structuring and standardizing calibration and validation approaches within the field of Earth Observation. However, no unified approach for accomplishing this for LST has yet to be practised by the LST community. Recent work has attempted to address this situation with the development of a protocol for validating LST (Schneider et al., 2012) under the auspices of ESA and the support of the wider LST community. We report here on a first application of this protocol to satellite LST data. The approach can briefly be summarised thus: in situ validation is performed where ground-based observations are available - being predominantly homogeneous sites; heterogeneous pixels are validated by way of established radiometric-based techniques (Wan and Li

  1. Liquid general anesthetics lower critical temperatures in plasma membrane vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Ellyn; Machta, Benjamin B; Veatch, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    A large and diverse array of small hydrophobic molecules induce general anesthesia. Their efficacy as anesthetics has been shown to correlate both with their affinity for a hydrophobic environment and with their potency in inhibiting certain ligand gated ion channels. Here we explore the effects that n-alcohols and other liquid anesthetics have on the two-dimensional miscibility critical point observed in cell derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). We show that anesthetics depress the critical temperature (Tc) of these GPMVs without strongly altering the ratio of the two liquid phases found below Tc. The magnitude of this affect is consistent across n-alcohols when their concentration is rescaled by the median anesthetic concentration (AC50) for tadpole anesthesia, but not when plotted against the overall concentration in solution. At AC50 we see a 4{\\deg}C downward shift in Tc, much larger than is typically seen in the main chain transition at these anesthetic concentrations. GPMV miscibility critic...

  2. Simulation of low-temperature plasma interaction with pulverized coal for incineration improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Askarova; E. Karpenko; V. Messerle; A. Ustimenko [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Department of Physics

    2003-07-01

    Plasma activation promotes more effective and environmental friendly low-grade coals incineration. The work presents numerical modeling results of plasma ignition, gasification and thermochemical preparation of a pulverized coal for incineration at power boilers. Thermodynamic code TERRA allows calculating products compound of plasma activated pulverized coal depended on temperature, pressure and plasma source power. Considering plasma source kinetic code PLASMA-COAL gives initial data for 3D-modeling of power boilers furnaces by FLOREAN code. 5 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  4. High resolution 3-D temperature and salinity fields derived from in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guinehut

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an observation-based approach that efficiently combines the main components of the global ocean observing system using statistical methods. Accurate but sparse in situ temperature and salinity profiles (mainly from Argo for the last 10 yr are merged with the lower accuracy but high-resolution synthetic data derived from satellite altimeter and sea surface temperature observations to provide global 3-D temperature and salinity fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. The first step of the method consists in deriving synthetic temperature fields from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations, and salinity fields from altimeter observations, through multiple/simple linear regression methods. The second step of the method consists in combining the synthetic fields with in situ temperature and salinity profiles using an optimal interpolation method. Results show the revolutionary nature of the Argo observing system. Argo observations now allow a global description of the statistical relationships that exist between surface and subsurface fields needed for step 1 of the method, and can constrain the large-scale temperature and mainly salinity fields during step 2 of the method. Compared to the use of climatological estimates, results indicate that up to 50% of the variance of the temperature fields can be reconstructed from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and a statistical method. For salinity, only about 20 to 30% of the signal can be reconstructed from altimeter observations, making the in situ observing system essential for salinity estimates. The in situ observations (step 2 of the method further reduce the differences between the gridded products and the observations by up to 20% for the temperature field in the mixed layer, and the main contribution is for salinity and the near surface layer with an improvement up to 30%. Compared to estimates derived using in situ observations only, the

  5. High Resolution 3-D temperature and salinity fields derived from in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guinehut

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an observation-based approach that combines efficiently the main components of the global ocean observing system using statistical methods. Accurate but sparse in situ temperature and salinity profiles (mainly from Argo for the last 10 years are merged with the lower accuracy but high-resolution synthetic data derived from altimeter and sea surface temperature satellite observations to provide global 3-D temperature and salinity fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. The first step of the method consists in deriving synthetic temperature fields from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and salinity fields from altimeter observations through multiple/simple linear regression methods. The second step of the method consists in combining the synthetic fields with in situ temperature and salinity profiles using an optimal interpolation method. Results show the revolution of the Argo observing system. Argo observations now allow a global description of the statistical relationships that exist between surface and subsurface fields needed for step 1 of the method and can constrain the large-scale temperature and mainly salinity fields during step 2 of the method. Compared to the use of climatological estimates, results indicate that up to 50 % of the variance of the temperature fields can be reconstructed from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and a statistical method. For salinity, only about 20 to 30 % of the signal can be reconstructed from altimeter observations, making the in situ observing system mandatory for salinity estimates. The in situ observations (step 2 of the method reduce additionally the error by up to 20 % for the temperature field in the mixed layer and the main contribution is for salinity and the near surface layer with an improvement up to 30 %. Compared to estimates derived using in situ observations only, the merged fields provide a better reconstruction of the high

  6. Retrieving Clear-Sky Surface Skin Temperature for Numerical Weather Prediction Applications from Geostationary Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojuan Shan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric models rely on high-accuracy, high-resolution initial radiometric and surface conditions for better short-term meteorological forecasts, as well as improved evaluation of global climate models. Remote sensing of the Earth’s energy budget, particularly with instruments flown on geostationary satellites, allows for near-real-time evaluation of cloud and surface radiation properties. The persistence and coverage of geostationary remote sensing instruments grant the frequent retrieval of near-instantaneous quasi-global skin temperature. Among other cloud and clear-sky retrieval parameters, NASA Langley provides a non-polar, high-resolution land and ocean skin temperature dataset for atmospheric modelers by applying an inverted correlated k-distribution method to clear-pixel values of top-of-atmosphere infrared temperature. The present paper shows that this method yields clear-sky skin temperature values that are, for the most part, within 2 K of measurements from ground-site instruments, like the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Infrared Thermometer and the National Climatic Data Center Apogee Precision Infrared Thermocouple Sensor. The level of accuracy relative to the ARM site is comparable to that of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS with the benefit of an increased number of daily measurements without added bias or increased error. Additionally, matched comparisons of the high-resolution skin temperature product with MODIS land surface temperature reveal a level of accuracy well within 1 K for both day and night. This confidence will help in characterizing the diurnal and seasonal biases and root-mean-square differences between the retrievals and modeled values from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5 in preparation for assimilation of the retrievals into GEOS-5. Modelers should find the immediate availability and broad coverage of these skin temperature

  7. Application of satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature in the regional soil moisture simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. K. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As the satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature is sensitive to land surface soil moisture (SM and SM is a basic output variable in model simulation, it is of great significance to use the brightness temperature data to improve SM numerical simulation. In this paper, the theory developed by Yan et al. (2004 about the relationship between satellite microwave remote sensing polarization index and SM was used to estimate the land surface SM from AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System brightness temperature data. With consideration of land surface soil texture, surface roughness, vegetation optical thickness, and the AMSR-E monthly SM products, the regional daily land surface SM was estimated over the eastern part of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results show that the estimated SM is lower than the ground measurements and the NCEP (American National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data at the Maqu Station (33.85° N, 102.57° E and the Tanglha Station (33.07° N, 91.94° E, but its regional distribution is reasonable and somewhat better than that from the daily AMSR-E SM product, and its temporal variation shows a quick response to the ground daily precipitations. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulating ability of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model to land surface SM, the estimated SM was assimilated into the Noah land surface model by the Newtonian relaxation (NR method. The results indicate that, by fine tuning of the quality factor in NR method, the simulated SM values are improved most in desert area, followed by grassland, shrub and grass mixed zone. At temporal scale, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values between simulated and observed SM are decreased 0.03 and 0.07 m3/m3 by using the NR method in the Maqu Station and the Tanglha Station, respectively.

  8. Preliminary study on direct assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Guan, Li

    2017-02-01

    Direct assimilation of cloud-affected microwave brightness temperatures from AMSU-A into the GSI three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation system is preliminarily studied in this paper. A combination of cloud microphysics parameters retrieved by the 1D-Var algorithm (including vertical profiles of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) and atmospheric state parameters from objective analysis fields of an NWP model are used as background fields. Three cloud microphysics parameters (cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) are applied to the control variable. Typhoon Halong (2014) is selected as an example. The results show that direct assimilation of cloud-affected AMSU-A observations can effectively adjust the structure of large-scale temperature, humidity and wind analysis fields due to the assimilation of more AMSU-A observations in typhoon cloudy areas, especially typhoon spiral cloud belts. These adjustments, with temperatures increasing and humidities decreasing in the movement direction of the typhoon, bring the forecasted typhoon moving direction closer to its real path. The assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures can provide better analysis fields that are more similar to the actual situation. Furthermore, typhoon prediction accuracy is improved using these assimilation analysis fields as the initial forecast fields in NWP models.

  9. Measurements of Rotational Temperatures in Atmospheric-Pressure Capillary Plasma Electrode (CPE) Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figus, Margaret; Abramzon, Nina; Becker, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    We report the results of rotational temperature measurements in atmospheric-pressure capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharges in ambient air using the unresolved N2 second positive band. Assuming that the emitting N2 molecules can be described by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution characterized by a single rotational temperature, this temperature is determined from a fit of the measured emission spectrum to a calculated spectrum. If the emitting species are in equilibrium with the bulk gas in the plasma, then this temperature can be interpreted as the gas kinetic temperature in the plasma. We determined rotational temperatures for three different plasma regions: inside the capillary by analyzing radiation emitted along the axis of the capillary, between the capillaries, and perpendicular to the axis of the capillary. Each region has a different plasma density and, therefore, a different gas temperature with the plasma inside the capillary being the hottest. We also measured the rotational temperatures in each region as a function of the plasma power. As expected, the rotational temperatures increase with increasing discharge power. Work supported by the NSF and by ARO through a DURIP award.

  10. Sea Temperature Fiducial Reference Measurements for the Validation and Data Gap Bridging of Satellite SST Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Werenfrid

    2016-08-01

    The Infrared Sea surface temperature Autonomous Radiometer (ISAR) was developed to provide reference data for the validation of satellite Sea Surface Temperature at the Skin interface (SSTskin) temperature data products, particularly the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). Since March 2004 ISAR instruments have been deployed nearly continuously on ferries crossing the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay, between Portsmouth (UK) and Bilbao/Santander (Spain). The resulting twelve years of ISAR data, including an individual uncertainty estimate for each SST record, are calibrated with traceability to national standards (National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA (NIST) and National Physical Laboratory, Teddigton, UK (NPL), Fiducial Reference Measurements for satellite derived surface temperature product validation (FRM4STS)). They provide a unique independent in situ reference dataset against which to validate satellite derived products. We present results of the AATSR validation, and show the use of ISAR fiducial reference measurements as a common traceable validation data source for both AATSR and Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). ISAR data were also used to review performance of the Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) analysis before and after the demise of ESA Environmental Satellite (Envisat) when AATSR inputs ceased This demonstrates use of the ISAR reference data set for validating the SST climatologies that will bridge the data gap between AATSR and SLSTR.

  11. The influence of snow depth and surface air temperature on satellite-derived microwave brightness temperature. [central Russian steppes, and high plains of Montana, North Dakota, and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Allison, L. J.; Diesen, B. C., III

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the steppes of central Russia, the high plains of Montana and North Dakota, and the high plains of Canada were studied in an effort to determine the relationship between passive microwave satellite brightness temperature, surface air temperature, and snow depth. Significant regression relationships were developed in each of these homogeneous areas. Results show that sq R values obtained for air temperature versus snow depth and the ratio of microwave brightness temperature and air temperature versus snow depth were not as the sq R values obtained by simply plotting microwave brightness temperature versus snow depth. Multiple regression analysis provided only marginal improvement over the results obtained by using simple linear regression.

  12. Atmospheric correction for sea surface temperature retrieval from single thermal channel radiometer data onboard Kalpana satellite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naveen R Shahi; Neeraj Agarwal; Aloke K Mathur; Abhijit Sarkar

    2011-06-01

    An atmospheric correction method has been applied on sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval algorithm using Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) single window channel radiance data onboard Kalpana satellite (K-SAT). The technique makes use of concurrent water vapour fields available from Microwave Imager onboard Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/TMI) satellite. Total water vapour content and satellite zenith angle dependent SST retrieval algorithm has been developed using Radiative Transfer Model [MODTRAN ver3.0] simulations for Kalpana 10.5–12.5 m thermal window channel. Retrieval of Kalpana SST (K-SST) has been carried out for every half-hourly acquisition of Kalpana data for the year 2008 to cover whole annual cycle of SST over Indian Ocean (IO). Validation of the retrieved corrected SST has been carried out using near-simultaneous observations of ship and buoys datasets covering Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and IO regions. A significant improvement in Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) of K-SST with respect to buoy (1.50–1.02 K) and to ship datasets (1.41–1.19 K) is seen with the use of near real-time water vapour fields of TMI. Furthermore, comparison of the retrieved SST has also been carried out using near simultaneous observations of TRMM/TMI SST over IO regions. The analysis shows that K-SST has overall cold bias of 1.17 K and an RMSD of 1.09 K after bias correction.

  13. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence triggered by lightning-induced sferics. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics and irregularities inherent to the Earth's low latitude ionosphere.

  14. Global Assessment of Land Surface Temperature From Geostationary Satellites and Model Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Q.; Minnis, P.; daSilva, A. M., Jr.; Palikonda, R.; Yost, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface (or 'skin') temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. In this research we compare two global and independent data sets: (i) LST retrievals from five geostationary satellites generated at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and (ii) LST estimates from the quasi-operational NASA GEOS-5 global modeling and assimilation system. The objective is to thoroughly understand both data sets and their systematic differences in preparation for the assimilation of the LaRC LST retrievals into GEOS-5. As expected, mean differences (MD) and root-mean-square differences (RMSD) between modeled and retrieved LST vary tremendously by region and time of day. Typical (absolute) MD values range from 1-3 K in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude regions to near 10 K in regions where modeled clouds are unrealistic, for example in north-eastern Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and southern Brazil. Typically, model estimates of LST are higher than satellite retrievals during the night and lower during the day. RMSD values range from 1-3 K during the night to 2-5 K during the day, but are larger over the 50-120 W longitude band where the LST retrievals are derived from the FY2E platform

  15. Satellite Observations of Wind Farm Impacts on Nocturnal Land Surface Temperature in Iowa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Harris

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind farms (WFs are believed to have an impact on lower boundary layer meteorology. A recent study examined satellite-measured land surface temperature data (LST and found a local nighttime warming effect attributable to a group of four large WFs in Texas. This study furthers their work by investigating the impacts of five individual WFs in Iowa, where the land surface properties and climate conditions are different from those in Texas. Two methods are used to assess WF impacts: first, compare the spatial coupling between the LST changes (after turbine construction versus before and the geographic layouts of the WFs; second, quantify the LST difference between the WFs and their immediate surroundings (non-WF areas. Each WF shows an irrefutable nighttime warming signal relative to the surrounding areas after their turbines were installed, and these warming signals are generally coupled with the geographic layouts of the wind turbines, especially in summer. This study provides further observational evidence that WFs can cause surface warming at nighttime, and that such a signal can be detected by satellite-based sensors.

  16. Radial distribution of the inner magnetosphere plasma pressure using low-altitude satellite data during geomagnetic storm: the March 1-8, 1982 Event

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanova, M; Bosqued, J M

    2007-01-01

    Plasma pressure distribution in the inner magnetosphere is one of the key parameters for understanding the main magnetospheric processes including geomagnetic storms and substorms. However, the pressure profiles obtained from in-situ particle measurements by the high-altitude satellites do not allow tracking the pressure variations related to the storms and substorms, because a time interval needed to do this generally exceeds the characteristic times of them. On contrary, fast movement of low-altitude satellites makes it possible to retrieve quasi-instantaneous profiles of plasma pressure along the satellite trajectory, using the fluxes of precipitating particles. For this study, we used the Aureol-3 satellite data for plasma pressure estimation, and the IGRF, Tsyganenko 2001 and Tsyganenko 2004 storm time geomagnetic field models for the pressure mapping into the equatorial plane. It was found that during quiet geomagnetic condition the radial pressure profiles obtained coincide with the profiles, obtained ...

  17. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  18. Temperature of hydrogen radio frequency plasma under dechlorination process of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Y.; Abe, K.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.; Amano, K.; Itoh, K.; Oono, T.

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that RF (radio frequency) hydrogen plasmas promote the dechlorination process of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) under irradiation of MW (microwave). A relative emission intensity spectroscope system was used for single-shot imaging of two-dimensional temperature distributions of RF hydrogen plasmas generated in chemical solutions with several mixing ratios of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and insulation oil under MW irradiation. Our experimental results showed that the plasma generation frequencies for the oil-contaminating solutions were higher than that for the pure IPA solution. In addition, the plasma temperature in the compound liquids including both oil and IPA was higher than that in the pure IPA and oil solutions. A combination of the plasma temperature measurements and plasma composition analysis indicated that the hydrogen radicals generated in a chemical solution containing the equal volumes of IPA and oil were almost the same amounts of H and H+, while those produced in the other solutions were mainly H.

  19. Time resolved measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in pulsed fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, O; Stepanov, S; Pfafferott, M; Meichsner, J [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, D-17498, Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of the absolute densities of small radicals like CF, CF{sub 2} and CF{sub 3} in fluorocarbon plasmas is essential for a fundamental understanding of plasma chemical processes and plasma surface interaction. Infrared absorption spectroscopy by means of tunable diode lasers (IR-TDLAS) was established and widely used for density measurements in the last decade. The often unknown parameter in the calculation of absolute radical densities from a measured absorption of a single line is the rotational temperature. In particular, a strong dependence of the line strength on rotational temperature has a significant influence on density calculation. In this paper we report on measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasmas (CCP) with rf (13.56 MHz) powers up to 200 W. Rotational temperatures in continuous and pulsed modes of the discharge were found to be between 300 and 450 K. Furthermore, first measurements of the time dependence of the rotational temperature in pulsed rf plasma are presented. The rotational temperature rises in the plasma phase within 0.1 s and goes down again to the temperature of the background gas in the plasma pause within 0.5 s. It is also shown that accurate density measurements of the radicals by means of single line absorption need correct information about the rotational temperature and careful selection of a suitable absorption line.

  20. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Livadiotis, George

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the difference of the derived temperature as a function of the kappa index. We further consider the concept of using a forward model of a typical plasma instrument to fit its observations. We find that the relative error of the derived temperature is highly depended on the kappa index and occasionally on the instrument's field of view and response.

  1. Dynamic Neural Network-Based Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Fault Detection and Isolation for Formation Flying of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, A.; Khorasani, K.

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a dynamic neural network-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme for the Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) that are used in the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) of satellites that are tasked to perform a formation flying mission. By using data collected from the relative attitudes of the formation flying satellites our proposed "High Level" FDI scheme can detect the pair of thrusters which is faulty, however fault isolation cannot be accomplished. Based on the "High Level" FDI scheme and the DNN-based "Low Level" FDI scheme developed earlier by the authors, an "Integrated" DNN-based FDI scheme is then proposed. To demonstrate the FDI capabilities of the proposed schemes various fault scenarios are simulated.

  2. Progress of International Low-Temperature Plasma Research Overview of the 15th International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴承康

    2001-01-01

    International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (ISPC) is the most influencial international symposium on science and technology research of low-temperature plasma, especially in the fields related to materials processing. People can be rightly informed of the current devel oping trend of this field from the contents of these symposia. This paper vill introduce briefly a general overview of the 15th ISPC. As viewed from the number of papers and their contents, there is still abundant research on thermal plasma, and the needs for micro-electronic technology and high performance films have driven forward continuous and intensive development of the research on low-pressure, non-equilibrium plasmas, while the research on normal pressure, non-equilibrium plasma has become a new highlight in this field.``

  3. Influence of Plasma Temperature on the Concentration of NO Produced by Pulsed Arc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡辉; 陈卫鹏; 张锦丽; 陆僖; 何俊佳

    2012-01-01

    This study conducted experiments on producing inhaled medical nitric oxide (iNO) by pulsed arc discharge in dry and clean air under different discharge current. The concentration of NO and NO2 produced by air discharge, as well as the change of the ratio of NO2/NO under different discharge current were investigated. Through the analysis of plasma emission spectrum, the relationship between discharge current and arc plasma temperature was studied. The results indicate that, as discharge current increases, the arc plasma temperature increases, which then leads to the increase of NO concentration, the decrease of NO2 concentration, and the rapid decrease of the ratio of NO2/NO. When the plasma temperature is 9000 K, the ratio of NO2/NO is approximately 60%, while when the plasma temperature varies between 10550 K and 11300 K, the NO2/NO ratio is within the range of 4.2% to 4.6%.

  4. Plasma Flow and Temperature in a Gliding Reactor with Different Electrode Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sláma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the plasma flow shape depending on the electrode form of a gliding discharge plasma-chemical reactor, and with the temperature distribution along the direction of the plasma flow in one specific electrode form. The shape of the electrodes and their mutual position has a significant influence on the design of a gliding discharge reactor and its applications. It is crucial to know the temperature distribution in the reactor’s chamber design and discharge application. Three configurations with model shapes of wire electrodes were therefore tested (low-divergent, circular, high-divergent and the plasma flow was described. The experiments were performed in air at atmospheric pressure and at room temperature. In order to map the reactive plasma region of the flow we investigated the visible spectral lines that were emitted. The gas temperature was measured using an infrared camera.

  5. Theory of the Jitter radiation in a magnetized plasma accompanying temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The linear stability of a magnetized plasma accompanying temperature gradient was reexamined by using plasma kinetic theory. The anisotropic velocity distribution function was decomposed into two components. One is proportional to the temperature gradient parallel to and the other is proportional to the temperature gradient perpendicular to the back ground magnetic field. Since the amplitude of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is proportional to the heat conductivity and the heat conductivities perpendicular to the magnetic field is strongly reduced, the first component of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is predominant. The anisotropic velocity distribution function induced by the temperature gradient along the back ground magnetic field drives plasma kinetic instability and the circular polarized magnetic plasma waves are excited. The instability is almost identical to Weibel instability in weakly magnetized plasma. However, depending on whether wave vectors of modes are parallel...

  6. Towards a protocol for validating satellite-based Land Surface Temperature: Theoretical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philipp; Ghent, Darren J.; Corlett, Gary C.; Prata, Fred; Remedios, John J.

    2013-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and emissivity are important parameters for environmental monitoring and earth system modelling. LST has been observed from space for several decades using a wide variety of satellite instruments with different characteristics, including both platforms in low-earth orbit and in geostationary orbit. This includes for example the series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) delivering a continuous thermal infrared (TIR) data stream since the early 1980s, the series of Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) providing TIR data since 1991, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments onboard NASA's Terra and Aqua platforms, providing data since the year 2000. In addition, the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard of the geostationary Meteosat satellites is now providing LST at unprecedented sub-hour frequency. The data record provided by such instruments is extremely valuable for a wide variety of applications, including climate change, land/atmosphere feedbacks, fire monitoring, modelling, land cover change, geology, crop- and water management. All of these applications, however, require a rigorous validation of the data in order to assess the product quality and the associated uncertainty. Here we report on recent work towards developing a protocol for validation of satellite-based Land Surface Temperature products. Four main validation categories are distinguished within the protocol: A) Comparison with in situ observations, B) Radiance-based validation, C) Inter-comparison with similar LST products, and D) Time-series analysis. Each category is further subdivided into several quality classes, which approximately reflect the validation accuracy that can be achieved by the different approaches, as well as the complexity involved with each method. Advice on best practices is given for methodology common to all categories. For each validation category, recommendations

  7. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  8. High-temperature coal-syngas plasma characteristics for advanced MHD power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikheev, A.V.; Kayukawa, N.; Okinaka, N.; Kamada, Y.; Yatsu, S. [Hokkaido University, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    Properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma based on syngas (CO, H{sub 2}) combustion products were investigated experimentally with shock tube facility. The experiments were carried out under various MHD generator load and shock tube operation conditions. Important characteristics of syngas plasma such as temperature, electric field, conductivity, and total output power were directly measured and evaluated. Special attention was paid to the influence of syngas composition (CO : H{sub 2} : O{sub 2} ratio). The results show that syngas combustion can provide high plasma ionization and attainable plasma electrical conductivity has an order of 60-80 S/m at gas temperature 3100-3300 K.

  9. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koban, Ina; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Kocher, Thomas [Unit of Periodontology, Dental School, University of Greifswald, Rotgerberstr. 8, 17475 Greifswald (Germany); Matthes, Rutger; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Kramer, Axel [Institute for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, University of Greifswald, Walther-Rathenau-Str. 49 a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Sietmann, Rabea [Institute of Microbiology, University of Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 15, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter, E-mail: ina.koban@uni-greifswald.d [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log{sub 10} reduction factor of 1.5, the log{sub 10} reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  10. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  11. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  12. Global clear-sky surface skin temperature from multiple satellites using a single-channel algorithm with angular anisotropy corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, Benjamin R.; Minnis, Patrick; Chee, Thad; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Yost, Christopher R.; Palikonda, Rabindra

    2017-01-01

    Surface skin temperature (Ts) is an important parameter for characterizing the energy exchange at the ground/water-atmosphere interface. The Satellite ClOud and Radiation Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) employs a single-channel thermal-infrared (TIR) method to retrieve Ts over clear-sky land and ocean surfaces from data taken by geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite imagers. GEO satellites can provide somewhat continuous estimates of Ts over the diurnal cycle in non-polar regions, while polar Ts retrievals from LEO imagers, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), can complement the GEO measurements. The combined global coverage of remotely sensed Ts, along with accompanying cloud and surface radiation parameters, produced in near-realtime and from historical satellite data, should be beneficial for both weather and climate applications. For example, near-realtime hourly Ts observations can be assimilated in high-temporal-resolution numerical weather prediction models and historical observations can be used for validation or assimilation of climate models. Key drawbacks to the utility of TIR-derived Ts data include the limitation to clear-sky conditions, the reliance on a particular set of analyses/reanalyses necessary for atmospheric corrections, and the dependence on viewing and illumination angles. Therefore, Ts validation with established references is essential, as is proper evaluation of Ts sensitivity to atmospheric correction source.This article presents improvements on the NASA Langley GEO satellite and AVHRR TIR-based Ts product that is derived using a single-channel technique. The resulting clear-sky skin temperature values are validated with surface references and independent satellite products. Furthermore, an empirically adjusted theoretical model of satellite land surface temperature (LST) angular anisotropy is tested to improve satellite LST retrievals. Application of the anisotropic correction

  13. Global Clear-Sky Surface Skin Temperature from Multiple Satellites Using a Single-Channel Algorithm with Angular Anisotropy Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, Benjamin R.; Minnis, Patrick; Chee, Thad; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Yost, Christopher R.; Palikonda, Rabindra

    2017-01-01

    Surface skin temperature (T(sub s)) is an important parameter for characterizing the energy exchange at the ground/water-atmosphere interface. The Satellite ClOud and Radiation Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) employs a single-channel thermal-infrared (TIR) method to retrieve T(sub s) over clear-sky land and ocean surfaces from data taken by geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite imagers. GEO satellites can provide somewhat continuous estimates of T(sub s) over the diurnal cycle in non-polar regions, while polar T(sub s) retrievals from LEO imagers, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), can complement the GEO measurements. The combined global coverage of remotely sensed T(sub s), along with accompanying cloud and surface radiation parameters, produced in near-realtime and from historical satellite data, should be beneficial for both weather and climate applications. For example, near-realtime hourly T(sub s) observations can be assimilated in high-temporal-resolution numerical weather prediction models and historical observations can be used for validation or assimilation of climate models. Key drawbacks to the utility of TIR-derived T(sub s) data include the limitation to clear-sky conditions, the reliance on a particular set of analyses/reanalyses necessary for atmospheric corrections, and the dependence on viewing and illumination angles. Therefore, T(sub s) validation with established references is essential, as is proper evaluation of T(sub s) sensitivity to atmospheric correction source. This article presents improvements on the NASA Langley GEO satellite and AVHRR TIR-based T(sub s) product that is derived using a single-channel technique. The resulting clear-sky skin temperature values are validated with surface references and independent satellite products. Furthermore, an empirically adjusted theoretical model of satellite land surface temperature (LST) angular anisotropy is tested to improve

  14. [Two-temperature diagnostic studies by emission spectra for nonequilibrium Ti-H plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chun-feng; Lu, Biao; Wu, Chun-lei; Wang, Yi-fu; Wen, Zhong-wei

    2014-12-01

    Using the T-H solid solution made by titanium absorbed hydrogen as the cathode, the Ti-H plasma produced by the pulsed vacuum are ion source was nonequilibrium: it contained both the component of titanium and hydrogen; there existed gradient in the radiaL, the horizontal and the time. As a result, it could not be described by a single temperature. The present paper assumed that the subsystem consisting of electrons and the subsystem consisting of other heavy particles reached equilibrium respectively, meaning that the Ti-H plasma was described by the two temperatures as electron temperature and heavy ion temperature, it was non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma Using Culdberg-Waage dissociation equation to describe the molecular dissociation process in the system, using Saha ionization equation to describe the atomic ionization process, combining plasma's charge quasi-neutral condition and introducing atomic emission spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic method which would not interfere the plasma at the same time; the temperature and the particle number density of the Ti-H plasma were diagnosed. Using MATLAB as a tool, both the titanium atoms and monovalent titanium ions' ionization were considered, and the calculated results showed that with the electtron density determined by the Stark broadening of spectral lines in advance, except the heavy particle temperature and the hydrogen number density, the Ti-H plasma's parameters could be diagnosed fairly accurately; the accuracy of the electron density values had a great effect on the calculation results; if the heavy particle temperature could be determined in advance, the temperature and the particle number density of the Ti-H plasma could be accurately analyzed quantitatively.

  15. SOME COLLISION PROCESSES IN PLASMAS WITH HIGHER TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KazuoTakayanagi

    1990-01-01

    Some collision processes important in hot and dense plasmas are discussed.Recent calculation of secondary electron velocity distribution in ionizing collision between an electron and a multiply-charged ion is reported.

  16. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas%Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秋艳; 李弘; 陈志鹏; 谢锦林; 刘万东

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnos- tics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron tem- perature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method.

  17. The Feasibility of Applying AC Driven Low-Temperature Plasma for Multi-Cycle Detonation Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dianfeng

    2016-11-01

    Ignition is a key system in pulse detonation engines (PDE). As advanced ignition methods, nanosecond pulse discharge low-temperature plasma ignition is used in some combustion systems, and continuous alternating current (AC) driven low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used for the combustion assistant. However, continuous AC driven plasmas cannot be used for ignition in pulse detonation engines. In this paper, experimental and numerical studies of pneumatic valve PDE using an AC driven low-temperature plasma igniter were described. The pneumatic valve was jointly designed with the low-temperature plasma igniter, and the numerical simulation of the cold-state flow field in the pneumatic valve showed that a complex flow in the discharge area, along with low speed, was beneficial for successful ignition. In the experiments ethylene was used as the fuel and air as oxidizing agent, ignition by an AC driven low-temperature plasma achieved multi-cycle intermittent detonation combustion on a PDE, the working frequency of the PDE reached 15 Hz and the peak pressure of the detonation wave was approximately 2.0 MPa. The experimental verifications of the feasibility in PDE ignition expanded the application field of AC driven low-temperature plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51176001)

  18. Land Surface Temperature- Comparing Data from Polar Orbiting and Geostationary Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comyn-Platt, E.; Remedios, J. J.; Good, E. J.; Ghent, D.; Saunders, R.

    2012-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a vital parameter in Earth climate science, driving long-wave radiation exchanges that control the surface energy budget and carbon fluxes, which are important factors in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and the monitoring of climate change. Satellites offer a convenient way to observe LST consistently and regularly over large areas. A comparison between LST retrieved from a Geostationary Instrument, the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI), and a Polar Orbiting Instrument, the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) is presented. Both sensors offer differing benefits. AATSR offers superior precision and spatial resolution with global coverage but given its sun-synchronous platform only observes at two local times, ~10am and ~10pm. SEVIRI provides the high-temporal resolution (every 15 minutes) required for observing diurnal variability of surface temperatures but given its geostationary platform has a poorer resolution, 3km at nadir, which declines at higher latitudes. A number of retrieval methods are applied to the raw satellite data: First order coefficient based algorithms provided on an operational basis by the LandSAF (for SEVIRI) and the University of Leicester (for AATSR); Second order coefficient based algorithms put forward by the University of Valencia; and an optimal estimation method using the 1DVar software provided by the NWP SAF. Optimal estimation is an iterative technique based upon inverse theory, thus is very useful for expanding into data assimilation systems. The retrievals are assessed and compared on both a fine scale using in-situ data from recognised validation sites and on a broad scale using two 100x100 regions such that biases can be better understood. Overall, the importance of LST lies in monitoring daily temperature extremes, e.g. for estimating permafrost thawing depth or risk of crop damage due to frost, hence the ideal dataset would use a combination of observations

  19. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon–plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented.

  20. Spectroscopic Methods for Determination of Excitation Temperatures of High-Pressure Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; WEN Xiaohui; ZHAN Rujuan; YANG Weihong

    2007-01-01

    A method to determine excitation temperatures based on the optical emission spectroscopy(OES)and Fermi-Dirac distribution was set up,and the temperatures of pure-argon and mixed-gases at different pressures were investigated.In this way we set up a standard process to get the excitation temperatures of plasmas operated at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures.

  1. Retrieving Marine Inherent Optical Properties from Satellites Using Temperature and Salinity-dependent Backscattering by Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, Paul J.; Franz, Bryan Alden; Lefler, Jason Travis; Robinson, Wayne D.; Boss, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Time-series of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs) from ocean color satellite instruments provide valuable data records for studying long-term time changes in ocean ecosystems. Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide a common method for estimating IOPs from radiometric measurements of the marine light field. Most SAAs assign constant spectral values for seawater absorption and backscattering, assume spectral shape functions of the remaining constituent absorption and scattering components (e.g., phytoplankton, non-algal particles, and colored dissolved organic matter), and retrieve the magnitudes of each remaining constituent required to match the spectral distribution of measured radiances. Here, we explore the use of temperature- and salinity-dependent values for seawater backscattering in lieu of the constant spectrum currently employed by most SAAs. Our results suggest that use of temperature- and salinity-dependent seawater spectra elevate the SAA-derived particle backscattering, reduce the non-algal particles plus colored dissolved organic matter absorption, and leave the derived absorption by phytoplankton unchanged.

  2. Influence of temperature fluctuations on plasma turbulence investigations with Langmuir probes

    CERN Document Server

    Nold, B; Ramisch, M; Huang, Z; Müller, H W; Scott, B D; Stroth, U

    2011-01-01

    The reliability of Langmuir probe measurements for plasma-turbulence investigations is studied on GEMR gyro-fluid simulations and compared with results from conditionally sampled I-V characteristics as well as self-emitting probe measurements in the near scrape-off layer of the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. In this region, simulation and experiment consistently show coherent in-phase fluctuations in density, plasma potential and also in electron temperature. Ion-saturation current measurements turn out to reproduce density fluctuations quite well. Fluctuations in the floating potential, however, are strongly influenced by temperature fluctuations and, hence, are strongly distorted compared to the actual plasma potential. These results suggest that interpreting floating as plasma-potential fluctuations while disregarding temperature effects is not justified near the separatrix of hot fusion plasmas. Here, floating potential measurements lead to corrupted results on the ExB dynamics of turbulent structures in the cont...

  3. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, F., E-mail: menacata3@gmail.com; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com; Vasko, I. Y. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  4. Low Temperature Plasma: A Novel Focal Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Hirst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable advances in recent years for the focal treatment of localized prostate cancer, high recurrence rates and detrimental side effects are still a cause for concern. In this review, we compare current focal therapies to a potentially novel approach for the treatment of early onset prostate cancer: low temperature plasma. The rapidly evolving plasma technology has the potential to deliver a wide range of promising medical applications via the delivery of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Studies assessing the effect of low temperature plasma on cell lines and xenografts have demonstrated DNA damage leading to apoptosis and reduction in cell viability. However, there have been no studies on prostate cancer, which is an obvious candidate for this novel therapy. We present here the potential of low temperature plasma as a focal therapy for prostate cancer.

  5. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  6. Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edens, Aaron D.

    2008-09-01

    A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

  7. Effective bacterial inactivation using low temperature radio frequency plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, A; Sankar, R; Mandal, Mahitosh; Neogi, Sudarsan

    2010-08-30

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired infections. In this study, S. aureus was exposed to 13.56MHz radiofrequency (RF) plasma generated by two different gases namely nitrogen and nitrogen-oxygen mixture and their sterilization efficacies were compared. Nitrogen plasma had a significant effect on sterilization due to generation of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, the addition of 2% oxygen showed enhanced effect on the sterilization of bacteria through nitric oxide (NO) emission and various reactive species. The presence of these reactive species was confirmed by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was carried out to study the morphological changes of bacteria after plasma treatment. From the SEM results, it was observed that the bacterial cells treated by N(2)-O(2) mixture plasma were severely damaged. As a result, a log(10) reduction factor of 6 was achieved using N(2)-O(2) plasma after 5min treatment with 100W RF power.

  8. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  9. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (˜2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  10. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin, E-mail: thb@buaa.edu.cn; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue [School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  11. Can satellite land surface temperature data be used similarly to ground discharge measurements for distributed hydrological model calibration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbari, C.; Mancini, M.; Li, J.; Su, Zhongbo

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a new methodology for the calibration of distributed hydrological models at basin scale by constraining an internal model variable using satellite data of land surface temperature. The model algorithm solves the system of energy and mass balances in terms of a representative equi

  12. [Investigation on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure by emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Yuan, Ning; Jia, Peng-ying; Niu, Dong-ying

    2010-11-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce plasma plume in atmospheric pressure argon. Spatially and temporally resolved measurement was carried out by photomultiplier tubes. The light emission signals both from the dielectric barrier discharge and from the plasma plume were analyzed. Furthermore, emission spectrum from the plasma plume was collected by high-resolution optical spectrometer. The emission spectra of OH (A 2sigma + --> X2 II, 307.7-308.9 nm) and the first negative band of N2+ (B2 sigma u+ --> X2 IIg+, 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The rotational temperature obtained is about 443 K by fitting the emission spectrum from the OH, and that from the first negative band of N2+ is about 450 K. The rotational temperatures obtained by the two method are consistent within 5% error band. The gas temperature of the plasma plume at atmospheric pressure was obtained because rotational temperature equals to gas temperature approximately in gas discharge at atmospheric pressure. Results show that gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage.

  13. Study on the correlation between plasma electron temperature and penetration depth in laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibillano, T.; Ancona, A.; Rizzi, D.; Saludes Rodil, S.; Rodriguez Nieto, J.; Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma electron temperature has been estimated starting from the spectroscopic analysis of the optical emission of the lasergenerated plasma plume during quite diverse stainless steel welding procedures (c.w. CO2 and pulsed Nd:YAG). Although the optical emissions present different spectral featu

  14. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocit...

  15. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2–4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating poten...

  16. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  17. Maximizing the Use of Satellite Thermal Infrared Data for Advancing Land Surface Temperature Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Q.; Fu, P.; Gao, F.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a crucial parameter in investigating environmental, ecological processes and climate change at various scales, and is also valuable in the studies of evapotranspiration, soil moisture conditions, surface energy balance, and urban heat islands. These studies require thermal infrared (TIR) images at both high temporal and spatial resolution to retrieve LST. However, currently, no single satellite sensors can deliver TIR data at both high temporal and spatial resolution. Thus, various algorithms/models have been developed to enhance the spatial or the temporal resolution of TIR data, but rare of those can enhance both spatial and temporal details. This paper presents a new data fusion algorithm for producing Landsat-like LST data by blending daily MODIS and periodic Landsat TM datasets. The original Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) was improved and modified for predicting thermal radiance and LST data by considering annual temperature cycle (ATC) and urban thermal landscape heterogeneity. The technique of linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to relate the Landsat radiance with the MODIS one, so that the temporal changes in radiance can be incorporated in the fusion model. This paper details the theoretical basis and the implementation procedures of the proposed data fusion algorithm, Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT). A case study was conducted that predicted LSTs of five dates in 2005 from July to October in Los Angeles County, California. The results indicate that the prediction accuracy for the whole study area ranged from 1.3 K to 2 K. Like existing spatio-temporal data fusion models, the SADFAT method has a limitation in predicting LST changes that were not recorded in the MODIS and/or Landsat pixels due to the model assumption.

  18. Improving Erosion Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings by Elevating the Deposition Temperature Based on the Critical Bonding Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu-Wei; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-09-01

    Interlamellar bonding within plasma-sprayed coatings is one of the most important factors dominating the properties and performance of coatings. The interface bonding between lamellae significantly influences the erosion behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings. In this study, TiO2 and Al2O3 coatings with different microstructures were deposited at different deposition temperatures based on the critical bonding temperature concept. The erosion behavior of ceramic coatings was investigated. It was revealed that the coatings prepared at room temperature exhibit a typical lamellar structure with numerous unbonded interfaces, whereas the coatings deposited at the temperature above the critical bonding temperature present a dense structure with well-bonded interfaces. The erosion rate decreases sharply with the improvement of interlamellar bonding when the deposition temperature increases to the critical bonding temperature. In addition, the erosion mechanisms of ceramic coatings were examined. The unbonded interfaces in the conventional coatings act as pre-cracks accelerating the erosion of coatings. Thus, controlling interlamellar bonding formation based on the critical bonding temperature is an effective approach to improve the erosion resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings.

  19. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  20. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Emil Aputsiaq Flindt; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2017-01-01

    The present study determined the blood plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of the perch Perca fluviatilis at different salinities (0, 10 and 15) and temperatures (5, 10 and 20° C). Blood plasma osmolality increased with salinity at all temperatures. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) increased...... beneficial during cold periods (winter). It is suggested, therefore, that the seasonal migrations of P. fluviatilis between brackish and fresh water is to select an environment that is optimal for metabolism and aerobic scope....

  1. The Application of Microwave Low Temperature Plasma in Pretreatment of Cotton Fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-guang; CUI Gui-xin; GU Zhen-ya

    2005-01-01

    The effect of microwave low temperature plasma pretreatment on desizing and removing natural impurity of cellulose fiber was studied. The influencing factors of pretreatment such as treating power, gas pressures and time were discussed in detail and the final effect had been compared with that of traditional pretreating process of cotton fabric. The results showed that better capillary effect, strength, whiteness and dyeing K/S value could be given by means of microwave low temperature plasma treatment.

  2. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHong; ZHUHesun; 等

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene(PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia.The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement.The results show that low temperature ammonia plasma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity.Chinese hamster ovary(CHO)cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  3. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Stark, David J.; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Mahajan, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. We consider here the simplest problem: the propagation of a low amplitude pulse through a preformed relativistically hot anisotropic electron plasma to explore its intrinsic dielectric properties. We find that: 1) the critical density for propagation depends strongly on the pulse polarization, 2) two plasmas with the same density and average energy per electron can exhibit profoundly different responses to electromagnetic pulses, 3) the anisotropy-driven Weibel instability develops as expected; the timescales of the growth and back reaction (on anisotropy), however, are long enough that sufficient anisotropy persists for the entire duration of the simulation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract Nos. DE-FG02-04ER54742 and DE-AC05-06OR23100 (D. J. S.) and NNSA Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512.

  4. Emission reduction by means of low temperature plasma. Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Fateev, Alexander; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2006-01-01

    The work performed during the project is summarised. In the project we focused on removal of nitrogen oxides NOx (NO, NO2) and, in particular, on removal of nitrogen monoxide (NO) by injection of plasma-produced reactive agents. As reactive agents wetested ozone (O3), NH and NH2 radicals from amm...

  5. Origin of Temperature of Quark-Gluon Plasma in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Initially produced quark-gluon matter at RHIC and LHC does not have a temperature. A quark-gluon plasma has a high temperature. From this quark-gluon matter to the quark-gluon plasma is the early thermalization or the rapid creation of temperature. Elastic three-parton scattering plays a key role in the process. The temperature originates from the two-parton scattering, the three-parton scattering, the four-parton scattering and so forth in quark-gluon matter.

  6. Quantum Cohesion Oscillation of Electron Ground State in Low Temperature Laser Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingxun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Kaixi

    1996-01-01

    The development of radically new technological and economically efficient methods for obtaining chemical products and for producing new materials with specific properties requires the study of physical and chemical processes proceeding at temperature of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) K, temperature range of low temperature plasma. In our paper, by means of Wigner matrix of quantum statistical theory, a formula is derived for the energy of quantum coherent oscillation of electron ground state in laser plasma at low temperature. The collective behavior would be important in ion and ion-molecule reactions.

  7. Proceedings of the US-Japan workshop and the satellite meeting of ITC-9 on physics of high beta plasma confinement in innovative fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Seiichi; Yoshimura, Satoru [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Physics of High Beta Plasma Confinement in Innovative Fusion System was held jointly with the Satellite Meeting of ITC-9 at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki-city during December 14-15, 1998. This proceedings book includes the papers of the talks given at the workshop. These include: Theoretical analysis on the stability of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas; Theory and Modeling of high {beta} plasmas; Recent progressive experiments in high {beta} systems; Formation of high {beta} plasmas using merging phenomenon; Theory and Modeling of a FRC Fusion Reactor. The 15 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Low Temperature Plasma-Surface Interactions: From Computer Chips to Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) are virtually always bounded by surfaces and the nature of the interaction often dominates the plasma physics, chemistry and applications. In this talk, I will present an overview of low temperature plasma-surface interactions with an emphasis on what has been learned during the last several decades. The remarkable evolution of low pressure LTP etching technology and more recent developments in biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure LTP will serve as key examples. This work was supported by DoE and NSF.

  9. Boundary Conditions at the Walls with Thermionic Electron Emission in Two Temperature Modeling of "Thermal" Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pekker, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose new boundary conditions at the hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models. In the derived boundary conditions the walls are assumed to be made from refractory metals and that the erosion of the wall is small and, therefore, is not taken into account in the model. In these boundary conditions the plasma sheath formed at the electrode is considered as the interface between the plasma and the wall. The derived boundary conditions allow the calculation of the heat flux to the walls from the plasma and consequently the thermionic electron current that makes the two temperature thermal model self consistent.

  10. Spontaneous generation of a temperature anisotropy in a strongly coupled magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, T; Hartmann, P; Donkó, Z

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic field was recently shown to enhance field-parallel heat conduction in a strongly correlated plasma whereas cross-field conduction is reduced. Here we show that in such plasmas, the magnetic field has the additional effect of inhibiting the isotropization process between field-parallel and cross-field temperature components thus leading to the emergence of strong and long-lived temperature anisotropies when the plasma is locally perturbed. An extended heat equation is shown to describe this process accurately.

  11. Validation of Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperatures for Waters around Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-An Lee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to validate the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR-derived sea surface temperatures (SST of the waters around Taiwan, we generated a match-up data set of 961 pairs, which included in situ SSTs and concurrent AVHRR measurements for the period of 1998 to 2002. Availability of cloud-free images, i.e., images with more than 85% of cloud-free area in their coverage, was about 2.23% of all AVHRR images during the study period. The range of in situ SSTs was from _ to _ The satellite derived-SSTs through MCSST and NLSST algorithms were linearly related to the in situ SSTs with correlation coefficients of 0.985 and 0.98, respectively. The MCSSTs and NLSSTs had small biases of 0.009 _ and 0.256 _ with root mean square deviations of 0.64 _ and 0.801 _ respectively, therefore the AVHRR-based MCSSTs and NLSSTs had high accuracy in the seas around Taiwan.

  12. Determining Concentrations and Temperatures in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmas used in the manufacturing processes of semiconductors are similar in pressure and temperature to plasmas used in studying the spectroscopy of astrophysical species. Likewise, the developed technology in submillimeter absorption spectroscopy can be used for the study of industrial plasmas and for monitoring manufacturing processes. An advantage of submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is that it can be used to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species without the need for intrusive probes. A continuous wave, 500 - 750 GHz absorption spectrometer was developed for the purpose of being used as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. An important part of this work was the optical design to match the geometry of existing plasma reactors in the manufacturing industry. A software fitting routine was developed to simultaneously fit for the background and absorption signal, solving for concentration, rotational temperature, and translational temperature. Examples of measurements made on inductively coupled plasmas will be demonstrated. We would like to thank the Texas Analog Center of Excellence/Semiconductor Research Corporation (TxACE/SRC) and Applied Materials for their support of this work.

  13. Soluble Proteins Form Film by the Treatment of Low Temperature Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Sanae; Sakakita, Hajime; Ishikawa, Kenji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    It has been pointed out that low temperature plasma in atmosphere was feasible to use for hemostasis without heat injury. Indeed, earlier studies demonstrated that low temperature plasma played an important role to stimulate platelets to aggregate and turned on the proteolytic activities of coagulation factors, resulting in the acceleration of the natural blood coagulation process. On the other hands, our developed equips could immediately form clots upon the contact with plasma flair, while the histological appearance was different from natural coagulation. Based on these findings in formed clots, we sought to determine if plasma flair supplied by our devices was capable of forming film using a series of soluble proteins Following plasma treatment, films were formed from bovine serum albumin, and the other plasma proteins at physiological concentration. Analysis of trans-electron microscope demonstrated that plasma treatment generated small protein particles and made them fuse to be larger aggregations The combined results demonstrated that plasma are capable of aggregating soluble proteins and that platelets and coagulation factors are not necessary for plasma induced blood coagulation. Supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area (21590454, 24590498, and 24108006 to Y. I.).

  14. Pentobarbital effects on plasma catecholamines: temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, D; Halter, J B; Taborsky, G J; Porte, D

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intravenous pentobarbital were studied in dogs. Plasma pentobarbital concentrations were inversely related to epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. Plasma catecholamines appeared fully suppressed at pentobarbital levels greater than 25-30 micrograms/ml. Furthermore, pentobarbital levels were negatively related to rectal temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The methods of pentobarbital administration influenced plasma pentobarbital as well as epinephrine and norepinephrine levels, temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure. These observations suggest the possibility that pentobarbital inhibits the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn may affect temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure. Because pentobarbital anesthesia affects plasma catecholamine concentrations, the regimen used in animal models requires consideration when interpreting data potentially influenced by the sympathetic nervous system.

  15. Effect of low temperature plasma on the functional properties of basmati rice flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumdas, Rohit; Deshmukh, R R; Annapure, U S

    2016-06-01

    The present study deals with the application of low temperature plasma on basmati rice flour and its effect on functional properties such as gel hydrations properties, flour hydration properties, gelatinization temperatures and antioxidant properties. The water holding capacity and water binding capacity were observed to be increased with increase in plasma power and time of treatment as the air plasma is known to make the surface more hydrophilic. XRD analysis revealed there is no significance difference in the crystalline structure after the plasma treatment. DSC shows a decrease in peak temperatures (Tp) after the treatment. Hot paste viscosities were observed to be decease from 692 to 591 BU was corresponded to decrease in peak temperature. The total polyphenolic content and reducing power was observed to be increased. The effects of plasma treatment on functional groups of polyphenols were observed by changes in absorption intensities using FTIR. This study demonstrates that the low temperature plasma treatmentis capable of improving the functional properties of basmati rice.

  16. Au Capping Agent Removal Using Plasma at Mild Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Puspitasari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To prevent sintering, ozone treatment at mild temperature is used to remove the capping agent from supported Au nanoparticles. The Au nanoparticles are first synthesized as a colloidal solution and then supported on alumina. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR shows the capping agent is removed completely. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and catalytic test reactions show the Au does not sinter significantly upon low temperature ozone treatment.

  17. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; YU Yaoting; PAN Jilun; XU Yuanping; ZHU Hesun

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene (PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia. The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement. The results show that low temperature ammonia plcsma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  18. Temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance in Josephson tunnel junctions determined from plasma resonance experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.; Mygind, Jesper

    1978-01-01

    The microwave response at 9 GHz of Sn-O-Sn tunnel-junction current biased at zero dc voltage has been measured just below the critical temperature Tc of the Sn films. The temperature dependence of the cosφ conductance is determined from the resonant response at the junction plasma frequency fp...... of the experiment....

  19. [Comparative study on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peng-Ying; Li, Xue-Chen; Yuan, Ning

    2011-08-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce jet plasma in flowing work gas (argon mixed with trace nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure. The relation between the plasma length and the gas flow rate was obtained by taking the images of the jet plasma. A high-resolution optical spectrometer was used to collect the optical emission spectrum. The emission spectra of the first negative band of N(2+) (B2 Sigma(u+)-->Chi2 Sigma(g+), 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The gas temperature was investigated by this optical method and results show that the gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage. For comparison, a thermometer was used to measure the temperature of the gas emitted from the jet. The results also show that the gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage. The gas temperatures obtained by the two methods are consistent. The difference was analyzed.

  20. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  1. Preliminary study on plasma membrane fluidity of Psychrophilic Yeast Rhodotorula sp. NJ298 in low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The ability of cell to modulate the fluidity of plasma membrane was crucial to the survival of microorganism at low temperature. Plasma membrane proteins, fatty acids and carotenoids profiles of Antarctic psychrophilc yeast Rhodotorula sp. NJ298 were investigated at -3 ℃, 0 ℃ and 8 ℃. The results showed that plasma membrane protein content was greater at -3 ℃ than that at 8 ℃, and a unique membrane polypeptide composition with an apparent molecular mass of 94.7 kDa was newly synthesized with SDS-PAGE analysis; GC analysis showed that the main changes of fatty acids were the percentage of unsaturated fatty acids (C18∶ 1 and C18∶ 2) and shorter chain saturated fatty acid (C10∶ 0) increased along with the decrease of the culture temperature from 8 ℃ to -3 ℃; HPLC analysis indicated that astaxanthin was the major functional carotenoids of the plasma membrane, percentage of which increased from 54.6±1.5% at 8 ℃ to 81.9±2.1% at -3 ℃. However the fluidity of plasma membrane which was determined by measuring fluorescence anisotropy was similar at -3 ℃, 0 ℃ and 8 ℃. Hence these changes in plasma membrane's characteristics were involved in the cellular cold-adaptation by which NJ298 could maintain normal plasma membrane fluidity at near-freezing temperature.

  2. Measurement of neutral gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi Hoong [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Measuring the temperature of neutrals in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) is important as heating of neutral particles will influence plasma characteristics such as the spatial distributions of plasma density and electron temperature. Neutral gas temperatures were deduced using a non-invasive technique that combines gas actinometry, optical emission spectroscopy and simulation which is described here. Argon gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz ICP were found to fall within the range of 500 − 800 K for input power of 140 − 200 W and pressure of 0.05 − 0.2 mbar. Comparing spectrometers with 0.2 nm and 0.5 nm resolution, improved fitting sensitivity was observed for the 0.2 nm resolution.

  3. Photon Temperatures of Hard X-Ray Emission of LHCD Plasmas in HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jawad YOUNIS; WAN Baonian; CHEN Zhongyong; LIN Shiyao; SHI Yuejiang; SHAN Jiafang; LIU Fukun

    2008-01-01

    A detailed study of photon temperatures (Tph) of hard X-ray emission in lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) plasmas is presented.The photon temperature increases with the increase in plasma current and decreases with the increase in plasma density.In lower hybrid power and phase scanning experiments;there is no appreciable change in the photon temperature.The numerical results based on ray-tracing calculation and Fokker-Planck solver gives reasonable explanation for the experimental observation.Both experimental and numerical results reveal that the photon temperature depends mainly on global effects of the fast electron population,synergy between the fast electron and the loop voltage and the Coulomb slowing down.

  4. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of the plasma ion temperature at the T-10 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Barsukov, A. G.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Korobov, K. V.; Krasnyanskii, S. A.; Naumenko, N. N.; Nemets, A. R.; Sushkov, A. V.; Tilinin, G. N.

    2013-08-01

    Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) based on a diagnostic neutral beam has been developed at the T-10 tokamak. The diagnostics allows one to measure the ion temperature profile in the cross section of the plasma column. In T-10 experiments, the measurement technique was adjusted and the elements of the CXRS diagnostics for ITER were tested. The used spectroscopic equipment makes it possible to reliably determine the ion temperature from the Doppler broadening of impurity lines (helium, carbon), as well as of the spectral lines of the working gas. The profiles of the plasma ion temperature in deuterium and helium discharges were measured at different plasma currents and densities, including with the use of active Doppler measurements of lines of different elements. The validity and reliability of ion temperature measurements performed by means of the developed CXRS diagnostics are analyzed.

  5. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Weisz, David G.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B.; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rose, Timothy P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 reactor consists of a glass tube that is attached to an inductively coupled argon plasma generator via an adaptor (ring flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  6. Comparison of Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature from Meteorological Stations on the Pan-Arctic Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schmullius

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based temperature measurements are an important indicator for global climate change studies over large areas. Records from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR and (Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer ((AATSR are providing long-term time series information. Assessing the quality of remote sensing-based temperature measurements provides feedback to the climate modeling community and other users by identifying agreements and discrepancies when compared to temperature records from meteorological stations. This paper presents a comparison of state-of-the-art remote sensing-based land surface temperature data with air temperature measurements from meteorological stations on a pan-arctic scale (north of 60° latitude. Within this study, we compared land surface temperature products from (AATSR, MODIS and AVHRR with an in situ air temperature (Tair database provided by the National Climate Data Center (NCDC. Despite analyzing the whole acquisition time period of each land surface temperature product, we focused on the inter-annual variability comparing land surface temperature (LST and air temperature for the overlapping time period of the remote sensing data (2000–2005. In addition, land cover information was included in the evaluation approach by using GLC2000. MODIS has been identified as having the highest agreement in comparison to air temperature records. The time series of (AATSR is highly variable, whereas inconsistencies in land surface temperature data from AVHRR have been found.

  7. O+ ion conic and plasma sheet dynamics observed by Van Allen Probe satellites during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Yang, J.; Foster, J.; Wygant, J.; Reeves, G.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-05-01

    The Van Allen Probe satellites were near apogee in the late evening local time sector during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm's main phase. About an hour after crossing the ring current's "nose structure" into the plasma sheet, the satellites encountered a quasiperiodic sequence of 0.08-3 keV O+ ions. Pitch angle distributions of this population consistently peaked nearly antiparallel to the local magnetic field. We interpret this population as O+ conics originating in the northern ionosphere. Sequences began as fairly steady state conic fluxes with energies in the ~ 80 to 100 eV range. Over about a half hour buildup phase, O+ energies peaked near 1 keV. During subsequent release phases lasting ~ 20 min, O+ energies returned to low-energy starting points. We argue these observations reflect repeated formations and dissolutions of downward, magnetically aligned electric fields (ɛ||) layers trapping O+ conics between mirror points within heating layers below and electrostatic barriers above. Nearly identical variations were observed at the locations of both satellites during 9 of these 13 conic cycles. Phase differences between cycles were observed at both spacecraft during the remaining events. Most "buildup" to "release" phase transitions coincided with AL index minima. However, in situ magnetometer measurements indicate only weak dipolarizations of tail-like magnetic fields. The lack of field-aligned reflected O+ and tail-like magnetic fields suggest that both ionospheres may be active. However, Southern Hemisphere origin conics cannot be observed since they would be isotropized and accelerated during neutral sheet crossings.

  8. Effects of Plasma Drag on Low Earth Orbiting Satellites due to Heating of Earth's Atmosphere by Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Nwankwo, Victor U J

    2013-01-01

    Solar events, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, heat up the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space environment. Due to this heating and expansion of the outer atmosphere by the energetic ultraviolet, X-ray and particles expelled from the sun, the low Earth-Orbiting satellites (LEOS) become vulnerable to an enhanced drag force by the ions and molecules of the expanded atmosphere. Out of various types of perturbations, Earth directed CMEs play the most significant role. They are more frequent and intense during the active (solar maximum) phase of the sun's approximately 11-year cycle. As we are approaching another solar maximum later in 2013, it may be instructive to analyse the effects of the past solar cycles on the orbiting satellites using the archival data of space environment parameters as indicators. In this paper, we compute the plasma drag on a model LEOS due to the atmospheric heating by CMEs and other solar events as a function of the solar parameters. Using the current forecast ...

  9. ECE diagnostic of high temperature ECRH heated plasmas on FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbini, M; Buratti, P; Tudisco, O; Giruzzi, G; Bruschi, A; Cirant, S; Granucci, G; Simonetto, A; Sozzi, C; Gandini, F; Pacella, D; Fournier, K B; Finkenthal, M

    2000-01-31

    The Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic on FTU tokamak is routinely performed with a Michelson interferometer with spectral range extending up to 1300 GHz. The diagnostic allowed accurate electron temperature measurements during the recent 140 Ghz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) experiments on FTU. Very accurate measurements have been performed on a wide range of electron temperatures and profile peaking. The ECE measurements have been compared with Thomson Scattering and with observations of X-ray spectra from highly stripped molybdenum ions. The suprathermal emission in these conditions has been studied.

  10. Heat Transfer to a Particle Exposed to a Rarefied Plasma with a Great Temperature Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiChen; XinTao

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic-theory analysis is presented concerning the heat transfer from a rarefiled plasma to a spherical particle for the extreme case of free-molecule regime and thin phasma sheath.A great temperature gradient is assumed to exist in the plasma,and thus a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function is employed for each of the gas species.Analytical results show that the existence of a temperature in employed for each of the gas species,Analytical results show that the existence of a temperature gradient in the plasma causes a nonuniform distribution of the local heat flux density on the sphere surface,while the total heat flux to the whole particle is independent of the temperature gradient.The nonuniformity of the local heat flux distributioln is small even for the case with a temperature gradient as great as 106 K/m,but it may significantly enhance the thermophoretic force on an evaporating particle,Heat transfer is mainly caused by atome at low gas temperatures with negligible ionization degree,while it can be attributed to ions and electrons at high plasma temperatures.

  11. The multifractal structure of satellite sea surface temperature maps can be used to obtain global maps of streamlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turiel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Earth observation satellites provide information about many relevant variables of the ocean-climate system, such as temperature, moisture, aerosols, etc. However, to retrieve the velocity field, which is the most relevant dynamical variable, is still a technological challenge, specially in the case of oceans. New processing techniques, emerged from the theory of turbulent flows, have come to assist us in this task. In this paper, we show that multifractal techniques applied to new Sea Surface Temperature satellite products opens the way to build maps of ocean currents with unprecedented accuracy. With the application of singularity analysis, we show that global ocean circulation patterns can be retrieved in a daily basis. We compare these results with high-quality altimetry-derived geostrophic velocities, finding a quite good correspondence of the observed patterns both qualitatively and quantitatively. The implications of this findings from the perspective both of theory and of operational applications are discussed.

  12. Assessing regional crop water demand using a satellite-based combination equation with a land surface temperature componen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, Carmen; Garcia, Monica; Tornos, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    consumption trends in the area. The results showed that the thermal-PT-JPL model is a suitable and simple tool requiring only air temperature and incoming solar radiation apart from standard satellites-products freely available. Our results show that in comparison with the hydrological model conceptual...... to estimate soil surface conductance based on an apparent thermal inertia index. A process-based model was applied to estimate surface energy fluxes including daily ET based on a modified version of the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model at 1km pixel resolution during a chrono......-sequence spanning for more than a decade (2002-2013). The thermal-PT-JPL model was forced with vegetation, albedo, reflectance and temperature products from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from both Aqua and Terra satellites. The study region, B-XII Irrigation District of the Lower...

  13. Simultaneous measurement of electron temperature and density by a line pair method in the RFP plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shimizu, S.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, T.

    2009-11-01

    A line-pair-method has been applied for a simultaneous measurement of the electron temperature and density in ATRAS RFP plasma. Three helium spectrum lines (668nm, 706nm, 728nm) were measured during the discharge at the same time and the electron temperature and density is estimated by using a Collision-Radiation model. To get the signal of the helium impunity line from the RFP discharge, the RFP plasma in the hydrogen gas with a few mixed helium gas was formed. In the typical ATRAS RFP discharge of the plasma current of 60kA, the electron temperature was approximately 50-150 eV and the electron density is the order of 10^18 m-3. During the discharge, the change of the temperature and density are mutually related and this correlation was the almost reverse phase. The periodically change of the temperature and density were also observed. This change synchronizes with a periodically increase of the averaged toroidal magnetic field, which is caused by the toroidal rotation of the increase of the toroidal magnetic field. This rotation, which is deeply related with dynamo effect, makes the plasma energy lose and particles also diffuse toward the plasma edge. As a result, the recycling of the particle and energy are occurred at the same time.

  14. Kinetic Model of Auroral Plasma Formation II: Simultaneous Multi-Satellite Ion Observations and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    survey particle spec- trogram of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) plasma instrument on SCATHA e.g., Olsen, 1981], shown on Figure 4. In...Perraut, J.-A. Sauvaud, J.-M. Bosqued, A. Pedersen, and B. Aparicio , Drift boundary and ULF wave generation near noon at geostationary orbit, Geophys

  15. Destruction mechanisms for formaldehyde in atmospheric pressure low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Daniel G.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is a common pollutant of indoor air in residences and commercial buildings. The removal of CH2O from atmospheric pressure gas streams (N2/O2/H2O/CH2O) using plasmas generated by a dielectric barrier discharge has been theoretically investigated with the goal of cleansing indoor air. The model consists of a full accounting of the electron, ion, and neutral chemical kinetics in contaminated humid air. We find that the destruction of CH2O results dominantly from chemical attack by OH and O radicals, with the primary end products being CO and H2O. The predicted destruction rates for CH2O are typically 2-8 ppm/(mJ cm-3) (parts per million of CH2O in air/energy deposition). The elimination of the unwanted byproducts, CO and NO, using a platinum catalyst is discussed.

  16. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  17. Modelling the influence of temperature anisotropies on poloidal asymmetries of density in the core of rotating plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilato, R.; Maj, O.; Angioni, C.

    2014-07-01

    A consistent set of equations is derived to model poloidal density asymmetries induced by temperature anisotropies in tokamak rotating plasmas. The model can be applied to compute poloidal density asymmetry of highly charged impurities due to additional plasma heating.

  18. Modelling Angular Dependencies in Land Surface Temperatures From the SEVIRI Instrument onboard the Geostationary Meteosat Second Generation Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads Olander; Pinheiro, AC; Proud, Simon Richard

    2010-01-01

    Satellite-based estimates of land surface temperature (LST) are widely applied as an input to models. A model output is often very sensitive to error in the input data, and high-quality inputs are therefore essential. One of the main sources of errors in LST estimates is the dependence on vegetat......Satellite-based estimates of land surface temperature (LST) are widely applied as an input to models. A model output is often very sensitive to error in the input data, and high-quality inputs are therefore essential. One of the main sources of errors in LST estimates is the dependence...... on vegetation structure and viewing and illumination geometry. Despite this, these effects are not considered in current operational LST products from neither polar-orbiting nor geostationary satellites. In this paper, we simulate the angular dependence that can be expected when estimating LST with the viewing...... by different land covers. The results show that the sun-target-sensor geometry plays a significant role in the estimated temperature, with variations strictly due to the angular configuration of more than ±3°C in some cases. On the continental scale, the average error is small except in hot-spot conditions...

  19. Polymer Surface Treatment by Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Surface Discharge Plasma:Its Characteristics and Comparison with Low Pressure Oxygen Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi KUWABARA; Shin-ichi KURODA; Hitoshi KUBOTA

    2007-01-01

    The polymer treatment with a low-temperature plasma jet generated on the atmospheric pressure surface discharge (SD) plasma is performed.The change of the surface property over time,in comparison with low pressure oxygen (O2) plasma treatment,is examined.As one compares the treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma to that by the low pressure O2 plasma of PS (polystyrene) the treatment effects were almost in complete agreement.However,when the atmospheric pressure plasma was used for PP(polypropylene),it produced remarkable hydrophilic effects.

  20. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  1. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-08-26

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  2. An automated processing chains for surface temperature monitoring on Earth's most active volcanoes by optical data from multiple satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The Geohazards Exploitation Platform, or GEP is one of six Thematic Exploitation Platforms developed by ESA to serve data user communities. As a new element of the ground segment delivering satellite results to users, these cloud-based platforms provide an online environment to access information, processing tools, computing resources for community collaboration. The aim is to enable the easy extraction of valuable knowledge from vast quantities of satellite-sensed data now being produced by Europe's Copernicus programme and other Earth observation satellites. In this context, the estimation of surface temperature on active volcanoes around the world is considered. E2E processing chains have been developed for different satellite data (ASTER, Landsat8 and Sentinel 3 missions) using thermal infrared (TIR) channels by applying specific algorithms. These chains have been implemented on the GEP platform enabling the use of EO missions and the generation of added value product such as surface temperature map, from not skilled users. This solution will enhance the use of satellite data and improve the dissemination of the results saving valuable time (no manual browsing, downloading or processing is needed) and producing time series data that can be speedily extracted from a single co-registered pixel, to highlight gradual trends within a narrow area. Moreover, thanks to the high-resolution optical imagery of Sentinel 2 (MSI), the detection of lava maps during an eruption can be automatically obtained. The proposed lava detection method is based on a contextual algorithm applied to Sentinel-2 NIR (band 8 - 0.8 micron) and SWIR (band 12 - 2.25 micron) data. Examples derived by last eruptions on active volcanoes are showed.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence applied to studies of particle behaviour in high-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K.; Uchino, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Maeda, M.; Okada, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we first review the principle of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), then give an overview of tunable laser sources, the crucial hardware for the experiment, and describe methods of calibration to obtain necessary information from the observed fluorescence, followed by the plasma measurements which have already been conducted. Comments are made for the future perspective of LIF for high-temperature plasma diagnostics. (J.P.N.).

  4. Novel fragmentation model for pulverized coal particles gasification in low temperature air thermal plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Rastko D.; Cvetinović Dejan B.; Stefanović Predrag Lj.; Škobalj Predrag D.; Marković Zoran J.

    2016-01-01

    New system for start-up and flame support based on coal gasification by low temperature air thermal plasma is planned to supplement current heavy oil system in Serbian thermal power plants in order to decrease air pollutions emission and operational costs. Locally introduced plasma thermal energy heats up and ignites entrained coal particles, thus starting chain process which releases heat energy from gasified coal particles inside burner channel. Important...

  5. CH spectroscopy for carbon chemical erosion analysis in high density low temperature hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The CH A-X molecular band is measured upon seeding the hydrogen plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI [electron temperature T-e=0.1-2.5 eV and electron density n(e)=(0.5-5) X 10(20) m(-3)] with methane. Calculated inverse photon efficiencies for these conditions range from 3 up to >10(6

  6. Simulation of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lorant, Christophe; Descamps, Pierre; De Wilde, Juray; 1st BeLux workshop on “Coating, Materials, surfaces and Interfaces

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors is challenging due to the coupling of the fluid dynamics, the chemical reactions and the electric field and the stiffness of the resulting mathematical system. The model equations and the rigorous model reduction to reduce the stiffness are addressed in this paper. Considering pure nitrogen plasma, simulations with two configurations are discussed.

  7. Thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of two-temperature helium thermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoxue; Murphy, Anthony B.; Li, Xingwen

    2017-03-01

    Helium thermal plasmas are in widespread use in arc welding and many other industrial applications. Simulation of these processes relies on accurate plasma property data, such as plasma composition, thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients. Departures from LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) generally occur in some regions of helium plasmas. In this paper, properties are calculated allowing for different values of the electron temperature, T e, and heavy-species temperature, T h, at atmospheric pressure from 300 K to 30 000 K. The plasma composition is first calculated using the mass action law, and the two-temperature thermodynamic properties are then derived. The viscosity, diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of the two-temperature helium thermal plasma are obtained using a recently-developed method that retains coupling between electrons and heavy species by including the electron–heavy-species collision term in the heavy-species Boltzmann equation. It is shown that the viscosity and the diffusion coefficients strongly depend on non-equilibrium ratio θ (θ ={{T}\\text{e}}/{{T}\\text{h}} ), through the plasma composition and the collision integrals. The electrical conductivity, which depends on the electron number density and ordinary diffusion coefficients, and the thermal conductivity have similar dependencies. The choice of definition of the Debye length is shown to affect the electrical conductivity significantly for θ  >  1. By comparing with literature data, it is shown that the coupling between electrons and heavy species has a significant influence on the electrical conductivity, but not on the viscosity. Plasma properties are tabulated in the supplementary data.

  8. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    examined. The transformacion temperatures (As. Af. Ms, Mf) of each wire were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electrical resistance...fields. To avoid these problems, it is necessary to capture selected video frames in digital memory while the recorder is in play mode. Time encoding...and time code reading capability is needed to identify and freeze a selected field. The digital freeze frame unit converts the intensity record back

  9. On the interaction between two fireballs in low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriu, D. G., E-mail: dimitriu@uaic.ro; Irimiciuc, S. A.; Popescu, S. [Faculty of Physics, “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi (Romania); Agop, M. [Department of Physics, “Gh. Asachi” Technical University, 59A Mangeron Blvd., 700050 Iasi (Romania); Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R. W. [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, 25 Technikerstr., A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-11-15

    We report experimental results and theoretical modeling showing the interaction between two fireballs excited on two positively biased electrodes immersed in a low-temperature plasma. This interaction leads to a synchronized dynamics of the two fireballs, its frequency depending on the plasma density, the voltages applied on the electrodes, and the distance between the two electrodes. By considering that the plasma particles (electrons, ions, neutrals) move on fractal curves, a theoretical model describing the interaction between the two fireballs is developed. The results of the theoretical model were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Pseudo-Potentials in Dense and He-like Hot temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Claude; Rahal, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    Extending our former derivations in dense and high temperature plasmas of hydrogenic effective interactions mimiking the Heisenberg uncertainty principle [1,2], we worked out in a canonical ensemble, effective interactions in He-like plasmas where an orbital 1s electron remains strongly tighted to the He-like ions. The plasma electrons are then taken into account through appropriate Slater sums obtained in the most economical hydrogenic extension of the He-like bound and scattered states with angular orbital momentum lClementi and C. Roetti, Atomic Data and Nucl. Data Tables, 14,177(1974)

  11. Low Temperature Plasmas Generated and Sustained Indefinitely Using a Focused Microwave Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Remington; Hoff, Brad; Lepell, Paul; AFRL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory has constructed a device that can initiate a plasma discharge in a focused microwave beam and sustain it indefinitely. A 10 kW, 4.5 GHz beam is passed through a vacuum chamber outfitted with pressure windows that are transparent to 4.5 GHz radiation. The pressure windows are large enough in diameter to prevent any interactions between the beam and the metallic chamber. The entire experiment is housed inside an anechoic chamber to minimize reflections. This novel plasma source generates low temperature, low density plasmas that have no contact with the walls which minimizes contamination and sheath formation.

  12. Tokamak Plasmas : Electron temperature $(T_{e})$ measurements by Thomson scattering system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Rajesh; B Ramesh Kumar; S K Varshney; Manoj Kumar; Chhaya Chavda; Aruna Thakkar; N C Patel; Ajai Kumar; Aditya Team

    2000-11-01

    Thomson scattering technique based on high power laser has already proved its superoirity in measuring the electron temperature (e) and density (e) in fusion plasma devices like tokamaks. The method is a direct and unambiguous one, widely used for the localised and simultaneous measurements of the above parameters. In Thomson scattering experiment, the light scattered by the plasma electrons is used for the measurements. The plasma electron temperature is measured from the Doppler shifted scattered spectrum and density from the total scattered intensity. A single point Thomson scattering system involving a -switched ruby laser and PMTs as the detector is deployed in ADITYA tokamak to give the plasma electron parameters. The system is capable of providing the parameters e from 30 eV to 1 keV and e from 5 × 1012 cm-3-5× 1013 cm-3. The system is also able to give the parameter profile from the plasma center ( = 0 cm) to a vertical position of = +22 cm to = -14 cm, with a spatial resolution of 1 cm on shot to shot basis. This paper discusses the initial measurements of the plasma temperature from ADITYA.

  13. Temperature Measurement Challenges and Limitations for In-Flight Particles in Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Bishoy; Gougeon, Patrick; Moreau, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) acquires a significant interest from the industry. The deposited coatings using this technique were proved to have unique microstructural features compared to those built by conventional plasma spraying techniques. In order to optimize this process, in-flight particle diagnostics is considered a very useful tool that helps to control various spraying parameters and permits better coating reproducibility. In that context, the temperature of in-flight particles is one of the most important key elements that helps to optimize and control the SPS process. However, the limitations and challenges associated with this process have a significant effect on the accuracy of two-color pyrometric techniques used to measure the in-flight particle temperature. In this work, the influence of several nonthermal radiation sources on the particle temperature measurement is studied. The plasma radiation scattered by in-flight particles was found to have no significant influence on temperature measurement. Moreover, the detection of the two-color signals at two different locations was found to induce a significant error on temperature measurement. Finally, the plasma radiation surrounding the in-flight particles was identified as the main source of error on the temperature measurement of in-flight particles.

  14. IMPROVEMENT OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MARTENSITIC STAINLESS STEEL BY PLASMA NITRIDING AT LOW TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.T. Xi; D.X. Liu; D. Han; Z.F. Han

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to study the influence of low temperature plasma nitriding on the mechanical properties of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel. Plasma nitriding ezperiments were carried out for 15 h at 350℃ by means of DC-pulsed plasma in 25%N2+ 75%H2 atmosphere. The microstructure, phase composition, and residual stresses profiles of the nitrided layers were determined by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The microhardness profiles of the nitridied surfaces were also studied. The fatigue life, sliding wear, and erosion wear loss of the untreated specimens and plasma nitriding specimens were determined on the basks of a rotating bending fatigue tester, a ball-on-disc wear tester, and a solid particle erosion tester. The results show that the 350℃ nitrided surface is dominated by ε-Fe3N and αN, which is supersaturated nitrogen solid solution. They have high hardness and chemical stabilities. So the low temperature plasma nitriding not only increases the surface hardness values but also improves the wear and erosion resistance. In addition, the fatigue limit of AISI 420 steel can also be improved by plasma nitriding at 350℃ because plasma nitriding produces residual compressive stress inside the modified layer.

  15. Plasma-Wall Interaction and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Artem

    2005-10-01

    Existing Hall thruster models predict that secondary electron emission from the channel walls is significant and that the near-wall sheaths are space charge saturated. The plasma-wall interaction and its dependence on the discharge voltage and channel width were studied through the measurements of the electron temperature, plasma potential, and plasma density in a 2 kW Hall thruster [1,2]. The experimental electron-wall collision frequency is computed using the measured plasma parameters. For high discharge voltages, the deduced electron-wall collision frequency is much lower than the theoretical value obtained for the space charge saturated sheath regime, but larger than the wall recombination frequency. The observed electron temperature saturation appears to be directly associated with a decrease of the Joule heating, rather than with the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission. The channel width is shown to have a more significant effect on the axial distribution of the plasma potential than the discharge voltage. 1. Y. Raitses, D. Staack, M. Keidar, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 12, 057104 (2005). 2. Y. Raitses, D. Staack, A. Smirnov, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 12, 073507 (2005).

  16. Impact of plasma parameter on self-organization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, C.; Idomura, Y.; Maeyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Self-organization in the slab electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is investigated based on gyrokinetic simulations and the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. The scale and the anisotropy of self-organized turbulent structures vary depending on the Rhines scale and the characteristic scale given by the adiabatic response term in the HM equation. The former is determined by competition between the linear wave dispersion and the nonlinear turbulent cascade, while the latter is given as the scale, at which the turbulent cascade is impeded. These scales are controlled by plasma parameters such as the density and temperature gradient, and the temperature ratio of ion to electron. It is found that depending on the plasma parameters, the ETG turbulence shows either isotropic turbulence or zonal flows, which give significantly different transport levels. Although the modulational instability excites zonal modes regardless of the plasma parameters, the final turbulent structure is determined by the self-organization process.

  17. Electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma: Particle-in-Cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Camporeale, Enrico; 10.1088/0004-637X/710/2/1848

    2010-01-01

    We perform fully-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of an hot plasma that expands radially in a cylindrical geometry. The aim of the paper is to study the consequent development of the electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma flow as found in a collisionless stellar wind. Kinetic plasma theory and simulations have shown that the electron temperature anisotropy is controlled by fluctuations driven by electromagnetic kinetic instabilities. In this study the temperature anisotropy is driven self-consistently by the expansion. While the expansion favors an increase of parallel anisotropy ($T_\\parallel>T_\\perp$), the onset of the firehose instability will tend to decrease it. We show the results for a supersonic, subsonic, and static expansion flows, and suggest possible applications of the results for the solar wind and other stellar winds.

  18. Ideal laser-beam propagation through high-temperature ignition Hohlraum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; Dixit, S; Moody, J D; Neumayer, P; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2007-02-23

    We demonstrate that a blue (3omega, 351 nm) laser beam with an intensity of 2 x 10(15) W cm(-2) propagates nearly within the original beam cone through a millimeter scale, T(e)=3.5 keV high density (n(e)=5 x 10(20) cm(-3)) plasma. The beam produced less than 1% total backscatter at these high temperatures and densities; the resulting transmission is greater than 90%. Scaling of the electron temperature in the plasma shows that the plasma becomes transparent for uniform electron temperatures above 3 keV. These results are consistent with linear theory thresholds for both filamentation and backscatter instabilities inferred from detailed hydrodynamic simulations. This provides a strong justification for current inertial confinement fusion designs to remain below these thresholds.

  19. Rotational and Vibrational Temperatures of Atmospheric Double Arc Argon-Nitrogen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jian-Hua; TU Xin; MA Zeng-Yi; CEN Ke-Fa; B.G.Chéron

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique is employed to study the emission of atmospheric argon-nitrogen plasma jet generated by an original dc double anode plasma torch. The molecular bands of the N(+2) first negative system are observed at the torch exit and chosen to evaluate the rotational and vibrational temperatures in comparison with the simulated spectra. The excitation temperature (Texc≈9600 K) is determined from the Boltzmann plot method. The results show that the rotational, vibrational, electron and kinetic temperatures are in good agreement with one another, which indicates that the core region of atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet at the torch exit is close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium state under our experimental conditions.

  20. Geotail observations of temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the dusk plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Nishino

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In search for clues towards the understanding of the cold plasma sheet formation under northward IMF, we study the temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the plasma sheet near the dusk low-latitude boundary observed by the Geotail spacecraft. The two-component protons result from mixing of the cold component from the solar wind and the hot component of the magnetospheric origin, and may be the most eloquent evidence for the transport process across the magnetopause. The cold component occasionally has a strong anisotropy in the dusk flank, and the sense of the anisotropy depends on the observed locations: the parallel temperature is enhanced in the tail flank while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. The hot component is nearly isotropic in the tail while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. We discuss possible mechanism that can lead to the observed temperature anisotropies.

  1. Rayleigh Lidar observed atmospheric temperature characteristics over a western Indian location: intercomparison with satellite observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Vaishnav, Rajesh; Shukla, Krishna K.; Lal, Shyam; Chandra, Harish; Acharya, Yashwant B.

    2017-07-01

    General characteristics of sub-tropical middle atmospheric temperature structure over a high altitude station, Mt. Abu (24.5°N, 72.7°E, altitude 1670 m, above mean sea level (amsl)) are presented using about 150 nights observational datasets of Rayleigh Lidar. The monthly mean temperature contour plot shows two distinct maxima in the stratopause region ( 45-55 km), occurring during February-March and September-October, a seasonal dependence similar to that reported for mid- and high-latitudes respectively. Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) are stronger at an altitude 60 km in the mesospheric temperature in comparison to stratospheric region. A comparison with the satellite (Halogen Occultation Experiment, (HALOE)) data shows qualitative agreement, but quantitatively a significant difference is found between the observation and satellite. The derived temperatures from Lidar observations are warmer 2-3 K in the stratospheric region and 5-10 K in the mesospheric region than temperatures observed from the satellite. A comparison with the models, COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA)-86 and Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Extended (MSISE)-90, showed differences of 3 K in the stratosphere and 5-10 K in the mesosphere, with deviations somewhat larger for CIRA-86. In most of the months and in all altitude regions model temperatures were lower than the Lidar observed temperature except in the altitude range of 40-50 km. MSISE-90 Model temperature overestimates as compared to Lidar temperature during December-February in the altitude region of 50-60 km. In the altitude region of 55-70 km both models deviate significantly, with differences exceeding 10-12 K, particularly during equinoctial periods. An average heating rate of 2.5 K/month during equinoxes and cooling rate of 4 K/month during November-December are found in altitude region of 50-70 km, relatively less heating and cooling rates are found in the altitude range of 30-50 km. The stratospheric

  2. Effects of temperature and plasma treatment on mechanical properties of ceramic fibres

    OpenAIRE

    N.T. Xiem*, D. Kroisová, P. Louda, T.D. Hung, Z. Rozek; D. Kroisová; P. Louda; T.D. Hung; Z. Rozek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is an investigation and comparison of mechanical properties of ceramic fibres after they were influenced by temperature and plasma treatment.Design/methodology/approach: Single filament after being processed at different temperatures (200oC, 400oC, 700oC and 1000oC) and methane plasma treatment was separated with a magnifier, prepared on a punched mounting tab, and was evaluated in accordance with Japanese Industrial Standard.Findings: Preliminary results of the...

  3. Green frequency-doubled laser-beam propagation in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Jones, O; Kirkwood, R K; Meezan, N; Moody, J D; Ross, J; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2omega) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2omega laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2omega light is possible.

  4. Use of SSU/MSU Satellite Observations to Validate Upper Atmospheric Temperature Trends in CMIP5 Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilong Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropospheric and stratospheric temperature trends and uncertainties in the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 model simulations in the period of 1979–2005 have been compared with satellite observations. The satellite data include those from the Stratospheric Sounding Units (SSU, Microwave Sounding Units (MSU, and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU. The results show that the CMIP5 model simulations reproduced the common stratospheric cooling (−0.46–−0.95 K/decade and tropospheric warming (0.05–0.19 K/decade features although a significant discrepancy was found among the individual models being selected. The changes of global mean temperature in CMIP5 simulations are highly consistent with the SSU measurements in the stratosphere, and the temporal correlation coefficients between observation and model simulations vary from 0.6–0.99 at the 99% confidence level. At the same time, the spread of temperature mean in CMIP5 simulations increased from stratosphere to troposphere. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that the temperature variability in the stratosphere is dominated by radioactive gases, volcanic events and solar forcing. Generally, the high-top models show better agreement with observations than the low-top model, especially in the lower stratosphere. The CMIP5 simulations underestimated the stratospheric cooling in the tropics and overestimated the cooling over the Antarctic compared to the satellite observations. The largest spread of temperature trends in CMIP5 simulations is seen in both the Arctic and Antarctic areas, especially in the stratospheric Antarctic.

  5. Measurement of the central ion and electron temperature of tokamak plasmas from the x-ray line radiation of high-Z impurity ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Hill, K.W.; Horton, R.; Roney, W.; Sauthoff, N.; Stodiek, W.

    1982-04-01

    This paper describes measurements of the central ion and electron temperature of tokamak plasmas from the observation of the 1s - 2p resonance lines, and the associated dielectronic (1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2pnl, with n greater than or equal to 2) satellites, of helium-like iron (Fe XXV) and titanium (Ti XXI). The satellite to resonance line ratios are very sensitive to the electron temperature and are used as an electron temperature diagnostic. The ion temperature is deduced from the Doppler width of the 1s - 2p resonance lines. The measurements have been performed with high resolution Bragg crystal spectrometers on the PLT (Princeton Large Torus) and PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamaks. The details of the experimental arrangement and line evaluation are described, and the ion and electron temperature results are compared with those obtained from independent diagnostic techniques, such as the analysis of charge-exchange neutrals and measurements of the electron cyclotron radiation. The obtained experimental results permit a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions.

  6. Role of Plasma Temperature and Residence Time in Stagnation Plasma Synthesis of c-BN Nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    critical compressive stress model based off of sub- plantation , which in the energy range of thin film technology, ions loose energy by nuclear...interstitial positions. Lower energy species, however, stick to the outer surface and form sp 2 bonded sites. A thermal spike is seen for a very short ...temperature of 350°C, which produced ~98% c- BN. Uchida et al. 14 used a substrate at room temperature during an IVD process. The substrate was rotated

  7. Measurement of the Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation Rate in a Dense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Shurter, R. P.; Goodwin, P. M.; Benage, J. F., Jr.

    2008-11-01

    Current theoretical approaches to temperature relaxation, which can be categorized as binary-collision and many-body approaches, disagree. Existing experimental evidence infers a lower relaxation rate compared to the binary-collision approach, but is insufficient to determine which approach is correct. We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature relaxation rate between ions and electrons in a dense, strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (Te 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps time-scale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with an ion-ion coupling parameter γii 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines).

  8. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  9. Gas Temperature Measurements of Fluctuating Coal - MHD Plasmas Using Modified Line Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleman, Bradley Carl

    The technique of modified line reversal is investigated and developed to allow accurate measurements on fluctuating coal fired magnetohydrodynamic plasmas and flows. Generalized modified line reversal equations applicable to any geometry and optical system are developed and presented. The generalized equations are specialized to the two most common optical systems, focussed and collimated, employed for modified line reversal measurements. Approximations introduced by specializing to the specific optical systems are investigated. Vignetting of the optical system images is shown to introduce large biases in the temperature measurement for certain optical configurations commonly applied. It is shown that symmetric optical systems are unacceptable for line reversal measurements. The errors introduced by non-simultaneous measurement of the required line reversal parameters due to rapidly fluctuating plasma characteristics are characterized. Line reversal signal and temperature measurements made on a coal fired MHD plasma are used to quantify the error in the temperature measurement due to non-simultaneous sampling of the measured line reversal parameters. A simple modified line reversal system based on interference filters and photodiodes that employs spatial separation to obtain the required line reversal parameters is described. Gas temperatures measured with devices using both the spatial and temporal separation techniques are compared. Modified line reversal temperature measurements are compared to theoretically predicted temperatures as well as CARS and high velocity thermocouple temperature measurements.

  10. The dust-acoustic mode in two-temperature electron plasmas with charging effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhong Xijuan; Chen Hui; Liu Nianhua; Liu Sanqiu

    2016-04-01

    Dust charging in an unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma with two-temperature electrons was investigated based on the orbital motion limited theory, where the two-temperature electrons and ions are modelled by the Maxwellian distributions. Then by taking into account the effects of two-temperature electron and the associated charging fluctuations, the dispersion peculiarities of dust-acoustic waves are studied based on dust fluid dynamics. The present results show that the effect will introduce a dissipation on the mode, and the dispersion and the dissipation depend on the temperature ratio and number density ratio of hot and cold electrons.

  11. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio

  12. Near room-temperature direct encapsulation of organic photovoltaics by plasma-based deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Alberto; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Kippelen, Bernard; Creatore, Mariadriana; Graham, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used for the deposition of environmental barriers directly onto organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) at near room temperature (30 °C). To study the effect of the ALD process on the organic materials forming the device, the precursor diffusion and intermixing at the interface during the growth of different plasma-assisted ALD inorganic barriers (i.e. Al2O3 and TiO2) onto the organic photoactive layer (P3HT:ICBA) was investigated. Depth profile x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the composition of the organic/inorganic interface to investigate the infiltration of the plasma-assisted ALD precursors into the photoactive layer as a function of the precursor dimension, the process temperature, and organic layer morphology. The free volume in the photoactive layer accessible to the ALD precursor was characterized by means of ellipsometric porosimetry (EP) and spectroscopic ellipsometry as a function of temperature. The organic layer is shown to exhibit free volume broadening at high temperatures, increasing the infiltration depth of the ALD precursor into the photoactive layer. Furthermore, based on previous investigations, the intrinsic permeation properties of the inorganic layers deposited by plasma-assisted ALD were predicted from the nano-porosity content as measured by EP and found to be in the 10-6 gm-2 d-1 range. Insight from our studies was used to design and fabricate multilayer barriers synthesized at near-room temperature by plasma-assisted ALD in combination with plasma-enhanced CVD onto organic photovoltaic (OPVs) devices. Encapsulated OPVs displayed shelf-lifetimes up to 1400 h at ambient conditions.

  13. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge based with regard to low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify and quantify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand the mechanism by which atmospheric pressure plasmas (APP) modify surfaces and how these modifications depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish this. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of representative biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic biomolecule changes. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) accompanied these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is the significant radical-induced deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example at atmospheric pressure, endotoxic biomolecule film inactivation may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at

  14. Coastal Geostationary Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Products from NOAA GOES and Japanese MTSAT-1R satellites, coastal United States, 2000 - present (NCEI Accession 0108128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA's Office of Satellite and Data Distribution (OSDPD) generates geostationary sea surface temperature (SST) products. These products are derived from NOAA's...

  15. Low-temperature plasma needle effects on cultured metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael; Brubaker, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Cook, Ian; Czesak, Nicholas; Hipkins, Garret

    2015-11-01

    The Penn State Low-Temperature Plasma group is presently investigating the applications of low-temperature plasma for biomedical applications, including the effects on MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells. A plasma needle system has been designed and constructed that consists of a 22-gauge stainless steel syringe needle, which acts as the high-voltage electrode, covered with PEEK tubing as the dielectric with a ring ground electrode on the outside. The system is driven by a low-frequency AC voltage amplifier, with typical operating conditions of 2-5 kV peak voltage at 5 kHz. Helium is used as the working fluid and produces a plasma jet with ~ cm's visible extent. Cultured breast cancer cells were provided by our collaborator and exposed to the plasma needle for varying doses and detachment of cells was observed. The effects are attributed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and transport through the cell culture medium. Plasma needle characterization and the results of the breast cancer experiments will be presented.

  16. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeppe; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity scaling, which is proportional to the ion acoustic speed times the square root of the filament particle density times the sum of the electron and ion temperature perturbations. Only for small blobs the cross field convection does not follow this scaling. The influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the cross-field blob convection is shown not to depend strongly on the dynamical ion temperature field. The blob dynamics of constant finite and dynamical ion temperature blobs is similar. When the blob size is on the order of 10 times the ion Larmor radius the blobs stay coherent and decelerate slowly compared to larger blobs which dissipate faster due to fragmentation and turbulent mixing.

  17. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.Z. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon-CS90046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Xu, H.Y. [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Mianyang, Sichuan 621907 (China); Li, C.; Fu, B.Q. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. Blisters are observed on the surface exposed at different temperatures, ranging from 493 K to 1273 K. The blister density and D retention decrease with the increasing exposure temperature. The formation of blisters at high temperatures is attributed to the high flux of D plasma. At 943 K, with the increasing fluence, there is trend to the saturation of D retention and blister density. The defects caused by plasma exposure have an important effect on the D trapping and blistering behavior. The formation of blisters has a strong relationship with slipping system of tungsten.

  18. Colloidal Plasmas : Effect of nonthermal ion distribution and dust temperature on nonlinear dust acoustic solitary waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarsem Singh Gill; Harvinder Kaur

    2000-11-01

    The effects of nonthermal ion distribution and finite dust temperature are incorporated in the investigation of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma. Sagdeev pseudopotential method which takes into account the full nonlinearity of plasma equations, is used here to study solitary wave solutions. Possibility of co-existence of refractive and compressive solitons as a function of Mach number, dust temperature and concentration of nonthermal ions, is considered. For the fixed value of nonthermal ions, it is found that the effect of increase in dust temperature is to reduce the range of co-existence of compressive and refractive solitons. Particular concentration of nonthermal ions results in disappearance of refractive solitons while the decrease in dust temperature, at this concentration restores the lost refractive solitons.

  19. X-ray spectra of high temperature tungsten plasma calculated with collisional radiative model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Zhang Hong; Cheng Xin-Lu

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten is regarded as an important candidate of plasma facing material in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER),so the determination and modeling of spectra of tungsten plasma,especially the spectra at high temperature were intensely focused on recently.In this work,using the atomic structure code of Cowan,a collisional radiative model (CRM) based on the spin-orbit-split-arrays is developed.Based on this model,the charge state distribution of tungsten ions is determined and the soft X-ray spectra from high charged ions of tungsten at different temperatures are calculated.The results show that both the average ionization charge and line positions are well agreed with others calculations and measurements with discrepancies of less than 0.63% and 1.26%,respectively.The spectra at higher temperatures are also reported and the relationship between ion abundance and temperature is predicted in this work.

  20. Electrical properties of bilayer graphene synthesized using surface wave microwave plasma techniques at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kato, Hiromitsu; Okigawa, Yuki; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Bilayer graphene was synthesized at low temperature using surface wave microwave plasma techniques where poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) and methane (CH4) were used as carbon sources. Temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements were carried out in a helium atmosphere. Sheet resistance, sheet carrier density and mobility showed weak temperature dependence for graphene from PMMA, and the highest carrier mobility is 740 cm2 V-1 s-1. For graphene from CH4, tunneling of the domain boundary limited carrier transport. The difference in average domain size was determined by Raman signal maps. In addition, residuals of PMMA were detected on graphene from PMMA. The low sheet resistances of graphene synthesized at a temperature of 280 °C using plasma techniques were explained by the PMMA related residuals rather than the domain sizes.

  1. Rotating structures in low temperature magnetized plasmas - Insight from particle simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre eBoeuf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The EXB configuration of various low temperature plasma devices is often responsible for the formation of rotating structures and instabilities leading to anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. In these devices, electrons are strongly magnetized while ions are weakly or not magnetized and this leads to specific physical phenomena that are not present in fusion plasmas where both electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. In this paper we describe basic phenomena involving rotating plasma structures in simple configurations of low temperature EXB plasma devices on the basis of PIC-MCC (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions simulations. We focus on three examples: rotating electron vortices and rotating spokes in cylindrical magnetrons, and azimuthal electron-cyclotron drift instability in Hall thrusters. The simulations are not intended to give definite answers to the many physics issues related to low temperature EXB plasma devices but are used to illustrate and discuss some of the basic questions that need further studies.

  2. Ion temperature measurement using an ion sensitive probe in the LHD divertor plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. E-mail: ezumi@ec.nagano-nct.ac.jp; Masuzaki, S.; Ohno, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Takamura, S

    2003-03-01

    The first reliable measurement of ion temperature in the divertor plasma of the Large Helical Device has been done by using an ion sensitive probe. The satisfactory current-voltage characteristics of the ion collector for evaluating the ion temperature were obtained at the outer part of the divertor leg. Furthermore, simultaneous ion and electron temperature measurements were successfully done in this part. The results show that the ion temperature is higher than the electron temperature in the part. There is a possibility that the profiles of the evaluated ion temperature which shows relatively higher than the electron temperature at the outside of divertor leg are qualitatively explained by particle's orbits around the edge and divertor region.

  3. Electronic ground state OH(X) radical in a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Che A.; Clark, Shane M.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2016-10-01

    The wide applicability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biomedicine stems from the presence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species generated in these plasma jets. Knowing the absolute concentration of these reactive species is of utmost importance as it is critical, along with the particle flux obtained from the plasma feed gas flow rate to ensure that the correct dosage is applied during applications. In this study, we investigate and report the ground state OH(X) number density acquired using cavity ringdown spectroscopy, along the propagation axis (z-axis) of a cold atmospheric pressure helium plasma plume. The jet was generated by a repetitively pulsed mono-polar square wave of duration 1 μs running at a frequency of 9.9 kHz. The voltage supplied was 6.5 kV with the helium flow rate fixed at 3.6 standard liters per minute. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are simulated from the second positive system of nitrogen, N 2(C3πu-B3πg) , with the rotational temperature being spatially constant at 300 K along the propagation axis of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet while the vibrational temperature is 3620 K at the beginning of the plume and is observed to decrease downstream. The OH(A) emission intensity obtained via optical emission spectroscopy was observed to decrease downstream of the plasma jet. The OH(X) number density along the propagation axis was initially 2.2 × 1013 molecules cm-3 before increasing to a peak value of 2.4 × 1013 molecules cm-3, from which the number density was observed to decrease to 2.2 × 1013 molecules cm-3 downstream of the plasma jet. The total OH(A, X) in the plasma jet remained relatively constant along the propagation axis of the plasma jet before falling off at the tip of the jet. The increase in vibrational temperature downstream and the simultaneous measurements of both the excited state OH(A) and the ground state OH(X) reported in this study provide insights into the formation and consumption of this

  4. Enhancement in electron and ion temperatures due to solar flares as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sharma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The observations on the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures (Te and Ti measured by the RPA payload aboard the SROSS-C2 satellite have been used to study the effect of solar flares on ionospheric heating. The data on solar flare has been obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC Boulder, Colorado (USA. It has been found that the electron and ion temperatures have a consistent enhancement during the solar flares on the dayside Earth's ionosphere. The estimated enhancement for the average electron temperature is from 1.3 to 1.9 times whereas for ion temperature it is from 1.2 to 1.4 times to the normal days average temperature. The enhancement of ionospheric temperatures due to solar flares is correlated with the diurnal variation of normal days' ionospheric temperatures. The solar flare does not have any significant effect on the nightside ionosphere. A comparison with the temperature obtained from the IRI-95 model also shows a similar enhancement.

  5. Plasma Wind Tunnel Testing of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics: Experiments And Numerical Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Di Maso, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The thesis is focused on the aerothermodynamic and oxidation behaviour of ultra-high-temperature Ceramic (UHTC) for aerospace applications. UHTC are very high temperature resistant (>2000K) materials, with good chemical inertness and mechanical properties. These materials could be used for next generation aerospace and hypersonic vehicles. The arc jet plasma wind tunnel available at the Department of Aerospace Engineering of Naples (DIAS) is able to reproduce specific total enthalpies and sta...

  6. Particle Simulation Code for the Electron Temperature Gradient Instability in Tokamak Toroidal Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGuangde; DONGJiaqi

    2003-01-01

    A numerical simulation code has been established with particle simulation method in order to study the gyro-kinetic equations for the electrostatic electron temperature gradient modes in toroidal plasmas. The flowchart is given as well for the code. The fourth-order adaptive step-size scheme is adopted, that saves computer time and is simple. The calculation code is useful for the research of the electron temperature gradient instability.

  7. Effect of low-temperature plasma treatment on tailorability and thermal properties of wool fabrics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Goud; J S Udakhe

    2011-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge type of plasma reactor was used for the low-temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of the wool fabrics. Air was used as the non-polymerizing gas for the plasma treatment at different time intervals. Low-stress mechanical properties of the treated and untreated wool fabrics were evaluated using Siro-fast technique which revealed that the tensile, bending, compression, shear, dimensional stability and surface properties were altered after the LTP treatment. Other properties such as thermal conductivity, thermal resistance and pilling propensity were also evaluated. The surface topographical changes of the wool fibres after LTP treatment were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The changes in these properties are supposed to be related closely to the interfibre and interyarn frictional force and increased surface area of the fibres induced by the etching effect of plasma.

  8. Study of Inactivation Factors in Low Temperature Surface-wave Plasma Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjai Kumar; Xu, Lei; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    In this study we investigated the low temperature surface-wave plasma sterilization of directly and indirectly exposed Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with a large-volume microwave plasma device. The air-simulated gas mixture was used to produce the plasma. The water vapor addition to the gas mixture improved the sterilization efficiency significantly. The effect of ultraviolet photons produced along with plasma to inactivate the spores was studied using a separate chamber, which was evacuated to less than one mTorr and was observed that spores were sterilized within 60 min. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed no significant changes in the actual size of the spores with that of untreated spores despite the survival curve shown that the spores were inactivated.

  9. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Uhm, Han S.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 1018 cm-3 within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3×1018 cm-3 occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  10. Dust-ion-acoustic Gardner double layers in a dusty plasma with two-temperature electrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Masud; I Tasnim; A A Mamun

    2015-01-01

    The properties of dust-ion-acoustic Gardner double layers (DIA GDLs) in an unmagnetized dusty plasma, whose constituents are negatively-charged stationary dust, inertial ions, and Boltzmann electrons of two distinct temperatures, are rigorously investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method: Gardner approach. The standard Gardner equation is derived, and its double layer (DL) solution is obtained. It has been shown that the properties of the DIA GDLs are significantly modified by some plasma parameters (viz. = e1/e2, e1 = e10/i0, and e2 = e20/i0, where e1 (e2) is the cold (hot) electron temperature, e10 (e20) is the cold (hot) electron number density at equilibrium, and i0 is the ion number density at equilibrium). The implications of our investigation in understanding the basic features of nonlinear electrostatic perturbations observed in many space plasma systems and laboratory devices are briefly discussed.

  11. Degradation of nitenpyram pesticide in aqueous solution by low-temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S P; Jiang, Y Y; Cao, X H; Dong, Y W; Dong, M; Xu, J

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the new technique of plasma wastewater treatment, the degradation behaviour ofnitenpyram (NTP) pesticide was investigated in a low-temperature plasma formed during a dielectric barrier discharge process. The reactor was a radial flow sedimentation tank centred around the water inlet. We studied the effect of pesticide concentration and input power of the dielectric barrier discharge, together with the effect of external factors on the degradation of nitenpyram pesticide wastewater such as conductivity and the use of various of catalysts, and the reaction products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The results showed that NTP could be effectively removed from aqueous solution by low-temperature plasma. Increasing the input power could improve the efficiency of degradation, conforming to a first-order kinetic model. Use of a suitable catalyst clearly improved the degradation process, as also did low conductivity. The pH of NTP was reduced with discharge time.

  12. Observation of Multiple Reconnections during Self-organization Process of High Temperature Fusion Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. K.; Tobias, B.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Munsat, T.; Donné, A. J. H.; Spakman, G. W.; Textor Team

    2011-10-01

    Images of a high resolution 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic shows evidence of multiple magnetic reconnection processes during the internal disruption of a high temperature tokamak plasmas. The disruption induces magnetic self-organization of the toroidal plasma being accompanied by successive or simultaneous multiple layer reconnection. The degree of asymmetric deformation of the internal magnetic structure (m/n=1/1 mode) prior to temperature crash influences the outcome of the disruptive behavior. The observation is critical for the building block of first principle theoretical modeling of the sawtooth oscillation in current driven toroidal plasmas and the understandings can be applied to the impulsive disruptive behavior in flares of the solar, accretion disk and stellar coronae, Earth magnetospheric storms, and controlled fusion. Work supported by the NRF of Korea, the US DOE, the NWO of the Netherlands, and the EURATOM-FOM association.

  13. Research of partition function on optical properties and temperature diagnosis of air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dechuan; Gao, Guoqiang; Wei, Wenfu; Hu, Haixing; Li, Chunmao; Wu, Guangning

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between partition function, particle density, refractive index, and temperature for atmospheric plasma is calculated based on thermodynamics and chemical equilibrium. Taking into account the contribution of hydrogen-like levels to the atomic partition function, a compact method to calculate the atomic partition function is first used with the Eindhoven model to deduce the plasma's refractive index. Results calculated by the new approach and two other traditional simplified methods are compared and analyzed. For a better understanding on the temperature measurement accuracy deduced by different partition function disposal approaches, moiré deflectometry is employed as the experimental scheme to acquire the refractive index-position curve. Finally, applicability of different partition function disposal approaches are discussed, and results indicate that the optical properties deduced in this paper are well suited for the refractive index-based plasma diagnosis.

  14. Effect of low temperature plasma treatment on dimensional stability of wool fabrics. Yomo orimono no sunpo fuanteisei ni oyobosu teion plasma shori no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, T.; Wakita, T. (Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Design); Hosotani, T. (Unitika Research Laboratories Inc., Osaka (Japan))

    1991-07-10

    This report describes the effect of low temperature plasma treatment, which has been developed for fabric processing, on wool fabrics. In the experiment, wool fabrics were treated by low temperature plasma using O{sub 2}, Ar, CH{sub 4}, CHF{sub 3}, and CF{sub 4}. Low temperature plasma treatment did not influence moisture regain of wool fabrics, but influenced hygral expansion. There was no difference in the area of low humidity, however, dimensional change was restricted by half in the area of high humidity. Low temperature plasma treatment also improved felt shrinkage caused by home laundering. Moreover, it was found that friction coefficient of wool fabrics increased remarkably after low temperature plasma treatment. Therefore, the subsequent reactive silicone elastmer softening agent was used for finishing process after low temperature plasma treatment. As a result, wool fabrics hardened by low temperature plasma treatment regained their soft condition and washing resistant shrinkage percentage was also improved. Thus this treatment was proved to be used practically. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Long-Term Record of Arctic and Antarctic Sea and Ice Surface Temperatures from Thermal Infrared Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Cristina; Dybkjær, Gorm; Eastwood, Steinar; Tonboe, Rasmus; Høyer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 µm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  16. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  17. Reconnection and electron temperature anisotropy in sub-proton scale plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, C.T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent behavior at sub-proton scales in magnetized plasmas is important for a full understanding of the energetics of astrophysical flows such as the solar wind. We study the formation of electron temperature anisotropy due to reconnection in the turbulent decay of sub-proton scale fluctuations u

  18. Mechanism for orientation dependence of blisters on W surface exposed to D plasma at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G. N.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-01-01

    The orientation dependence of blister formation induced by D plasma exposure at low temperature (about 523 K) on rolled tungsten and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) W samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Severe blistering was observed on grains

  19. Temperature and Nitric Oxide Generation in a Pulsed Arc Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.NAMIHIRA; S.SAKAI; M.MATSUDA; D.WANG; T.KIYAN; H.AKIYAMA; K.OKAMOTO; K.TODA

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is increasingly being used in medical treatments of high blood pressure,acute respiratory distress syndrome and other illnesses related to the lungs.Currently a NO inhalation system consists of a gas cylinder of N2 mixed with a high concentration of NO.This arrangement is potentially risky due to the possibility of an accidental leak of NO from the cylinder.The presence of NO in the air leads to the formation of nitric dioxide (NO2),which is toxic to the lungs.Therefore,an on-site generator of NO would be highly desirable for medical doctors to use with patients with lung disease.To develop the NO inhalation system without a gas cylinder,which would include a high concentration of NO,NAMIHIRA et al have recently reported on the production of NO from room air using a pulsed arc discharge.In the present work,the temperature of the pulsed arc discharge plasma used to generate NO was measured to optimize the discharge condition.The results of the temperature measurements showed the temperature of the pulsed arc discharge plasma reached about 10,000 K immediately after discharge initiation and gradually decreased over tens of microseconds.In addition,it was found that NO was formed in a discharge plasma having temperatures higher than 9,000 K and a smaller input energy into the discharge plasma generates NO more efficiently than a larger one.

  20. Physiological and transcriptional response of Bacillus cereus treated with low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims - This study was conducted to investigate the inactivation kinetics of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells upon exposure to low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma and to reveal the mode of inactivation by transcriptome profiling. Methods and Results - Exponentially growing B. cereus cells were

  1. Scenarios of transition to chaos competition in low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriu, D. G. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, 11 Carol I Blvd., RO-700506 Iasi (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Dynamics of a fireball created in front of a positively biased electrode immersed into low-temperature plasma was experimentally investigated. By analyzing the time series of the oscillations of the current collected by the electrode, several successive scenarios of transitions to chaos were identified: by intermittencies, by cascade of sub-harmonic bifurcations and by quasi-periodicity (Ruelle-Takens scenario)

  2. Ion temperature gradient driven mode in presence of transverse velocity shear in magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sheared poloidal flow on the toroidal branch of the ion temperature gradient driven mode of magnetized nonuniform plasma is studied. A novel "nonmodal" calculation is used to analyze the problem. It is shown that the transverse shear flow considerably reduced the growth...

  3. Mechanism for orientation dependence of blisters on W surface exposed to D plasma at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G. N.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-01-01

    The orientation dependence of blister formation induced by D plasma exposure at low temperature (about 523 K) on rolled tungsten and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) W samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Severe blistering was observed on grains wi

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Anisotropy of ion temperature in a reversed-field-pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K.; Hörling, P.; Fall, T.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Brunsell, P.; Hokin, S.; Tennfors, E.; Sallander, J.; Drake, J. R.; Inoue, N.; Morikawa, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Yoshida, Z.

    1997-03-01

    Anomalous heating of ions has been observed in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasma. Ions are heated primarily in the parallel direction (with respect to the magnetic field), resulting in an appreciable anisotropy of the ion temperature. This observation suggests that the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations are dissipated primarily by the ion viscosity.

  5. Research on the denitration mechanism of fly ash catalysts modified by low-temperature plasma technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jie Nie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There are three different fly ashes mixed with bentonite respectively as raw material to preparation of denitration catalyst. Then the catalyst combined with the low temperature plasma for denitration. The different mixing ratio, drying temperature and drying time of catalyst preparation were studied. The denitration mechanism of fly ash catalyst modified with different gases (O2, N2, Ar, and hydrocarbon gas by low-temperature plasma technology was studied. The compositions of fly ash were detected by element analysis, ICP analysis, Boehm analysis, and Infrared spectral analysis which affected the denitration performance of fly ash catalyst. And we discussed the effect of denitration performance with different types of fly ash and plasma power. The results shown that: fly ash mixed with bentonite for 2:1, drying temperature is 100°C and drying time is 30 min are the optimal preparation conditions; The denitration performance is best of the catalyst which produced by circulating fluidized bed when the plasma power is 30 W. And Oxygen can be used as the modification gas for preparing the fly-ash catalyst. There are more basic functional groups on the surface of fly ash catalyst modified with oxygen atmosphere and the N=O plays a main role.

  6. Low Hydrogen Content Silicon Nitride Films Deposited at Room Temperature with an ECR Plasma Source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isai, Gratiela I.; Holleman, Jisk; Wallinga, Hans; Woerlee, Pierre H.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon nitride layers with very low hydrogen content (less than 1 atomic percent) were deposited at near room temperature, from N2 and SiH4, with a multipolar electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The influences of pressure and nitrogen flow rate on physical and electrical properties were studied in

  7. Laser diagnostics on atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas, including cryoplasmas, in environments around room and cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Noritaka; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Yasui, Ryoma; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Cryoplasmas, the plasma gas temperature (T g) of which can be controlled continuously below room temperature, show various unique and advantageous properties depending on T g. Recently, the T g dependence of plasma chemistry related to metastable helium (Hem) has been revealed in helium cryoplasmas. However, T g was only estimated by thermal calculation from the temperature outside the plasmas. In this study, for better evaluation of T g, near-infrared laser heterodyne interferometry (NIR-LHI) measurements were conducted in atmospheric pressure helium pulsed discharge plasmas at around room and cryogenic ambient temperatures (T a). The maximum difference between T g and T a was evaluated as 47 K at T a  =  300 K with 282 mW power consumption. To further investigate the T g dependence of plasma chemical reactions related to Hem, laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) was performed on the same discharge plasmas to measure the Hem density and lifetime. The Hem lifetime was longer at lower T g, i.e. the lifetime at T g  =  145 K (9.6 µs) was seven times longer than that at T g  =  386 K (1.4 µs). By comparing the results with the numerically simulated rates of Hem quenching reactions taking T g into account, the mechanism of the Hem quenching reaction was revealed to vary with T g even though the main quenching reaction was a three-body collision at all T g. In this manner, the combination of NIR-LHI with LAS led directly to the T g dependence of Hem quenching reactions.

  8. Persistent Longitudinal Variations of Plasma Density and DC Electric Fields in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Observed with Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Liebrecht, C.; Bromund, K.; Roddy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous measurements using in situ probes on consecutive orbits of the C/N0FS satellite reveal that the plasma density is persistently organized by longitude, in both day and night conditions and at all locations within the satellite orbit, defined by its perigee and apogee of 401 km and 867 km, respectively, and its inclination of 13 degrees. Typical variations are a factor of 2 or 3 compared to mean values. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts in the low latitude ionosphere also reveal that their amplitudes are also strongly organized by longitude in a similar fashion. The drift variations with longitude are particularly pronounced in the meridional component perpendicular to the magnetic field although they are also present in the zonal component as well. The longitudes of the peak meridional drift and density values are significantly out of phase with respect to each other. Time constants for the plasma accumulation at higher altitudes with respect to the vertical drift velocity must be taken into account in order to properly interpret the detailed comparisons of the phase relationship of the plasma density and plasma velocity variations. Although for a given period corresponding to that of several days, typically one longitude region dominates the structuring of the plasma density and plasma drift data, there is also evidence for variations organized about multiple longitudes at the same time. Statistical averages will be shown that suggest a tidal "wave 4" structuring is present in both the plasma drift and plasma density data. We interpret the apparent association of the modulation of the E x B drifts with longitude as well as that of the ambient plasma density as a manifestation of tidal forces at work in the low latitude upper atmosphere. The observations demonstrate how the high duty cycle of the C/NOFS observations and its unique orbit expose fundamental processes at work in the low latitude

  9. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  10. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  11. Surface modification of chromatography adsorbents by low temperature low pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpanaei, A; Winther-Jensen, B; Theodosiou, E; Kingshott, P; Hobley, T J; Thomas, O R T

    2010-10-29

    In this study we show how low temperature glow discharge plasma can be used to prepare bi-layered chromatography adsorbents with non-adsorptive exteriors. The commercial strong anion exchange expanded bed chromatography matrix, Q HyperZ, was treated with plasmas in one of two general ways. Using a purpose-designed rotating reactor, plasmas were employed to either: (i) remove anion exchange ligands at or close to the exterior surface of Q HyperZ, and replace them with polar oxygen containing functions ('plasma etching and oxidation'); or (ii) bury the same surface exposed ligands beneath thin polymer coatings ('plasma polymerization coating') using appropriate monomers (vinyl acetate, vinyl pyrrolidone, safrole) and argon as the carrier gas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (first ∼10 nm depth) of Q HyperZ before and after the various plasma treatments confirmed that substantial changes to the elemental composition of Q HyperZ's exterior had been inflicted in all cases. The atomic percent changes in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, yttrium and zirconium observed after being exposed to air plasma etching were entirely consistent with: the removal of pendant Q (trimethylammonium) functions; increased exposure of the underlying yttrium-stabilised zirconia shell; and introduction of hydroxyl and carbonyl functions. Following plasma polymerization treatments (with all three monomers tested), the increased atomic percent levels of carbon and parallel drops in nitrogen, yttrium and zirconium provided clear evidence that thin polymer coats had been created at the exteriors of Q HyperZ adsorbent particles. No changes in adsorbent size and surface morphology, nor any evidence of plasma-induced damage could be discerned from scanning electron micrographs, light micrographs and measurements of particle size distributions following 3 h exposure to air (220 V; 35.8 W L(-1)) or 'vinyl acetate/argon' (170 V; 16.5 W L(-1)) plasmas. Losses in bulk chloride exchange capacity

  12. Measurement of ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs by using an improved ion sensitive probe system and statistical analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, K; Tanaka, H; Ohno, N; Ezumi, N; Tsuji, Y; Kajita, S

    2012-02-01

    We have measured ion temperature as well as electron temperature in plasma blobs observed in a linear plasma device by using an improved ion sensitive probe. Current-voltage characteristics of the ion sensitive probe inside and outside plasma blobs were re-constructed with a conditional sampling method. It is clearly found that both ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs decrease more slowly in a cross-field direction than those in a bulk plasma without plasma blobs.

  13. Measurement of ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs by using an improved ion sensitive probe system and statistical analysis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, K.; Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.; Tsuji, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    We have measured ion temperature as well as electron temperature in plasma blobs observed in a linear plasma device by using an improved ion sensitive probe. Current-voltage characteristics of the ion sensitive probe inside and outside plasma blobs were re-constructed with a conditional sampling method. It is clearly found that both ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs decrease more slowly in a cross-field direction than those in a bulk plasma without plasma blobs.

  14. Analysis of multi-temporal landsat satellite images for monitoring land surface temperature of municipal solid waste disposal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Mahendrarajah, Prathees; Shaker, Ahmed; Faisal, Kamil; Luong, Robin; Al-Ahmad, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    This studypresents a remote sensing application of using time series Landsat satellite images for monitoring the Trail Road and Nepean municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal sites in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Currently, the Trail Road landfill is in operation; however, during the 1960s and 1980s, the city relied heavily on the Nepean landfill. More than 400 Landsat satellite images were acquired from the US Geological Survey (USGS) data archive between 1984 and 2011. Atmospheric correction was conducted on the Landsat images in order to derive the landfill sites' land surface temperature (LST). The findings unveil that the average LST of the landfill was always higher than the immediate surrounding vegetation and air temperature by 4 to 10 °C and 5 to 11.5 °C, respectively. During the summer, higher differences of LST between the landfill and its immediate surrounding vegetation were apparent, while minima were mostly found in fall. Furthermore, there was no significant temperature difference between the Nepean landfill (closed) and the Trail Road landfill (active) from 1984 to 2007. Nevertheless, the LST of the Trail Road landfill was much higher than the Nepean by 15 to 20 °C after 2007. This is mainly due to the construction and dumping activities (which were found to be active within the past few years) associated with the expansion of the Trail Road landfill. The study demonstrates that the use of the Landsat data archive can provide additional and viable information for the aid of MSW disposal site monitoring.

  15. The Effect of Temperature on the Spectral Emission of Plasma Induced in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Charfi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical modeling investigation of the spectral emission of laser-induced plasma in MgCl2-NaCl aqueous solution has been presented. A model based on equilibrium equations has been developed for the computation of the plasma composition and excited levels population. Physical interpretation is presented to comment on firstly the evolution of atomic species number densities, and secondly on the population of the excited species emitting MgII and NaI resonant lines for temperatures ranging from 3000 K to 20 000 K. It is shown that MgII line reach a maximum of population on the issuing level, at norm temperature of 13800 K. Whereas, NaI line presents two norm temperatures, evaluated at 3300 K and 11700 K. This splitting of the NaI norm temperature is explained by the low-ionization potential and weak concentration of the sodium atom in this aqueous solution. Thus, the proposed model can be useful to predict the optimal plasma temperature for the detection of given chemical element, which is not easy to reveal experimentally.

  16. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with two-temperature nonthermal ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Jian Zhou; Hong-Yan Wang; Kai-Biao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    By using reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma (containing a negatively charged dust fluid, Boltzmann distributed electrons and two-temperature nonthermal ions) is investigated. The effects of two-temperature nonthermal ions on the basic properties of small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust-acoustic waves are examined. It is found that two-temperature nonthermal ions affect the basic properties of the dust-acoustic solitary waves. It is also observed that only compressive solitary waves exist in this system.

  17. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments of polyamide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yiu Wan Joanne

    Polyamides have found widespread application in various industrial sectors, for example, they are used in apparel, home furnishings and similar uses. However, the requirements for high quality performance products are continually increasing and these promote a variety of surface treatments for polymer modification. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments are ideally suited for polyamide modification because they can change the physical and chemical properties of the material without affecting its bulk features. This project aimed to study the modification of polyamides by UV excimer laser irradiation and low temperature plasma treatment. The morphological changes in the resulting samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The chemical modifications were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). Change in degree of crystallinity was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). After high-fluence laser irradiation, topographical results showed that ripples of micrometer size form on the fibre surface. By contrast, sub-micrometer size structures form on the polyamide surface when the applied laser energy is well below its ablation threshold. After high-fluence laser irradiation, chemical studies showed that the surface oxygen content of polyamide is reduced. A reverse result is obtained with low-fluence treatment. The DSC result showed no significant change in degree of crystallinity in either high-fluence or low-fluence treated samples. The same modifications in polyamide surfaces were studied after low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen, argon or tetrafluoromethane gas. The most significant result was that the surface oxygen content of polyamide increased after oxygen and argon plasma treatments. Both treatments induced many hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxylic acid (-COOH

  18. Ion-acoustic solitary waves in ion-beam plasma with multiple-electron-temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmakar, B.; Das, G.C.; Singh, Kh.I.

    1988-08-01

    The solitary wave solution has been studied in an ion-beam plasma with multiple-electron-temperatures stemmed through the derivation of a modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The evolution of solitons shows that the existence and the behaviour depend effectively on the ion-beam as well as on the multiple-electron-temperatures. It has been shown that the solitons might be large amplitude waves with the addition of a small percentage of ion-beam concentration or by the increase of electron-temperatures. The present investigators believe and conclude that the solitons should also show experimentally these fascinating properties but one has to be careful about the range of the physical parameters in ion-beam plasma.

  19. [Plasma temperature calculation and coupling mechanism analysis of laser-double wire hybrid welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Ying

    2013-04-01

    The plasma radiation of laser-double wire hybrid welding was collected by using fiber spectrometer, the coupling mechanism of arc with laser was studied through high-speed photography during welding process, and the temperature of hybrid plasma was calculated by using the method of Boltzmann plot. The results indicated that with laser hybrid, luminance was enhanced; radiation intensity became stronger; arc was attracted to the laser point; cross section contracted and arc was more stable. The laser power, welding current and arc-arc distance are important factors that have great influence on electron temperature. Increase in the laser power, amplification of welding current and reduction of arc-arc distance can all result in the rise of temperature.

  20. A comparison among optical emission spectroscopic methods of determining electron temperature in low pressure argon plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Tian-Ye; Cao Jin-Xiang; Liu Lei; Liu Jin-Ying; Wang Yan; Wang Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this article, four kinds of optical emission spectroscopic methods of determining electron temperature are used to investigate the relationship between electron temperature and pressure in the cylindrical plasmas of dc glow discharges at low pressures in laboratory by measuring the relative intensities of ArI lines at various pressures. These methods are developed respectively on the basis of the Fermi-Dirac model, corona model, and two kinds of electron collision cross section models according to the kinetic analysis. Their theoretical bases and the conditions to which they are applicable are reviewed, and their calculation results and fitting errors are compared with each other. The investigation has indicated that the electron temperatures obtained by the four methods become consistent with each other when the pressure increases in the low pressure argon plasmas.

  1. Dusty plasma in a glow discharge in helium in temperature range of 5–300 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoilov, I. S.; Baev, V. P.; Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: timofeevalvl@gmail.com; Amirov, R. Kh.; Kirillin, A. V.; Nikolaev, V. S.; Bedran, Z. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Dusty plasma structures in glow discharge in helium in the temperature range of 5–300 K are investigated experimentally. We have described the experimental setup that makes it possible to continuously vary the temperature regime. The method for experimental data processing has been described. We have measured interparticle distances in the temperature range of 9–295 K and compared them with the Debye radius. We indicate the ranges of variations in experimental parameters in which plasma–dust structures are formed and various types of their behavior are manifested (rotation, vibrations of structures, formation of vertical linear chains, etc.). The applicability of the Yukawa potential to the description of the structural properties of a dusty plasma in the experimental conditions is discussed.

  2. Electron number density and temperature measurements in laser produced brass plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, A. A.; Mostafa, N. Y.; Abdel-Aal, M. S.; Shaban, H. A.

    2010-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used for brass plasma diagnostic using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated, including repetition rate, number of laser shots on sample, and laser energy. The plasma temperatures and the electron number densities were determined from the emission spectra of LIBS. Cu and Zn spectral lines were used for excitation temperature calculation using Saha-Boltzmann distribution as well as line pair ratio. It was found that, the excitation temperature calculated by using Saha-Boltzmann distribution and line pair ratio methods are not the same. The electron number density has been evaluated from the Stark broadening of Hα transition at 656.27 nm and the calculated electron number density is agreement with literature.

  3. Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

  4. Plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride mask layers grown by low-temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in SF{sub 6} based plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perros, Alexander; Bosund, Markus; Sajavaara, Timo; Laitinen, Mikko; Sainiemi, Lauri; Huhtio, Teppo; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Jyvaeskylae,Finland (Finland); Department of Micro and Nanosciences, School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited by low-temperature, 200 deg. C, plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) was investigated for reactive ion etch (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etch (ICP-RIE) systems using various mixtures of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} under different etch conditions. During RIE, the film exhibits good mask properties with etch rates below 10r nm/min. For ICP-RIE processes, the film exhibits exceptionally low etch rates in the subnanometer region with lower platen power. The AlN film's removal occurred through physical mechanisms; consequently, rf power and chamber pressure were the most significant parameters in PEALD AlN film removal because the film was inert to the SF{sub x}{sup +} and O{sup +} chemistries. The etch experiments showed the film to be a resilient masking material. This makes it an attractive candidate for use as an etch mask in demanding SF{sub 6} based plasma etch applications, such as through-wafer etching, or when oxide films are not suitable.

  5. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  6. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6-2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5-2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1-1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150-170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330-880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  7. 13th TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. BARNES

    2000-07-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau} > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K{sub i}. This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0} {approx} 2 kG, {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e} {approx} 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {le} T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T{sub e}. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce}.

  8. Low-temperature low-damage sterilization based on UV radiation through plasma immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, J.; Moisan, M.; Kéroack, D.; Boudam, M. K.

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduces a new type of high-frequency (HF) sustained discharge where the HF field applicator is a planar transmission line that allows us to fill with plasma a long chamber of rectangular cross-section (typically 1 m × 15 cm × 5 cm). Peculiar interesting features of this plasma source are a low gas temperature (typically below 40 °C in the 1 Torr range in argon), broadband impedance matching with no need for retuning, stability and reproducibility of the discharge (non-resonant behaviour). This type of plasma source could be useful for web processing; nonetheless, it is applied here to plasma sterilization, taking advantage of its low gas temperature to inactivate microorganisms on polymer-made medical devices to avoid damaging them. The predominant biocide species are the UV photons emitted by the discharge whereas most plasma sterilization techniques call for reactive species such as O atoms and OH molecules, which induce significant erosion damage on polymers. Polystyrene microspheres are actually observed to be erosion-free under the current plasma sterilization conditions (scanning electron micrographs have been examined). Moreover, inactivation is quite fast: 106 B. atrophaeus spores deposited on a Petri dish are inactivated in less than 1 min. Correlation of the UV radiation with the spore inactivation rate is examined by (i) considering the emitted light intensity integrated over the 112-180 nm vacuum UV (VUV) range with a photomultiplier; (ii) looking with an optical spectrometer at the emission spectrum over the 200-400 nm UV range; (iii) using absorption spectroscopy to determine the role of the VUV argon resonant lines (105 and 107 nm) on spore inactivation. It is found that the test-reference spores are mainly inactivated by VUV photons (112-180 nm) that are primarily emitted by impurities present in the argon plasma.

  9. Effect of temperature on the pathogenesis, accumulation of viral and satellite RNAs and on plant proteome in peanut stunt virus and satellite RNA-infected plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra eObrępalska-Stęplowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is an important environmental factor influencing plant development in natural and diseased conditions. The growth rate of plants grown at 27°C is more rapid than for plants grown at 21°C. Thus, temperature affects the rate of pathogenesis progression in individual plants. We have analyzed the effect of temperature conditions (either 21°C or 27°C during the day on the accumulation rate of the virus and satellite RNA (satRNA in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected by peanut stunt virus (PSV with and without its satRNA, at four time points. In addition, we extracted proteins from PSV and PSV+satRNA-infected plants harvested at 21 dpi, when disease symptoms began to appear on plants grown at 21°C and were well developed on those grown at 27°C, to assess the proteome profile in infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants grown at these two temperatures, using 2D-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry approaches. The accumulation rate of the viral RNAs and satRNA was more rapid at 27°C at the beginning of the infection and then rapidly decreased in PSV-infected plants. At 21 dpi, PSV and satRNA accumulation was higher at 21°C and had a tendency to increase further. In all studied plants grown at 27°C, we observed a significant drop in the identified proteins participating in photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism at the proteome level, in comparison to plants maintained at 21°C. On the other hand, the proteins involved in protein metabolic processes were all more abundant in plants grown at 27°C. This was especially evident when PSV-infected plants were analyzed, where increase in abundance of proteins involved in protein synthesis, degradation, and folding was revealed. In mock-inoculated and PSV-infected plants we found an increase in abundance of the majority of stress-related differently-regulated proteins and those associated with protein metabolism. In contrast, in PSV+satRNA-infected plants the shift in the

  10. Spectral measurements of electron temperature in nonequilibrium highly ionized He plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, O. V.; Chinnov, V. F.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Ageev, A. G.

    2016-11-01

    It has been experimentally shown that highly ionized He arc plasma does not achieve local thermodynamic equilibrium expected for plasmas with electron concentrations above 1 × 1016 cm-3 like argon plasma. We have found that the reason for this deviation is strong nonisotropy of plasma. Triple electron recombination with temperatures of 2.5-3 eV is almost absent. Charged particles move from the arc (r = 1 mm) to chamber walls due to ambipolar diffusion creating ionization nonequilibrium over the excited states rendering Boltzmann distribution and Saha equation inapplicable for determining electron temperature. A method for determining electron temperature is suggested that is based on using the relative intensities of the atomic and ion lines. Its advantage lies in an energy gap between these lines’ states over 50 eV that reduces the influence of nonequilibrium on the result. This influence can be taken into account if the ionization energies of emitting states of atom and ion have close values. The suggested method can be expanded for any media including those with dimensional nonisotropy that have both atomic and ion lines in their emission spectra.

  11. Inactivation of Gram-positive biofilms by low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, F.; Robert, H.; Merbahi, N.; Fontagné-Faucher, C.; Yousfi, M.; Romain, C. E.; Eichwald, O.; Rondel, C.; Gabriel, B.

    2012-08-01

    This work is devoted to the evaluation of the efficiency of a new low-temperature plasma jet driven in ambient air by a dc-corona discharge to inactivate adherent cells and biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria. The selected microorganisms were lactic acid bacteria, a Weissella confusa strain which has the particularity to excrete a polysaccharide polymer (dextran) when sucrose is present. Both adherent cells and biofilms were treated with the low-temperature plasma jet for different exposure times. The antimicrobial efficiency of the plasma was tested against adherent cells and 48 h-old biofilms grown with or without sucrose. Bacterial survival was estimated using both colony-forming unit counts and fluorescence-based assays for bacterial cell viability. The experiments show the ability of the low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure to inactivate the bacteria. An increased resistance of bacteria embedded within biofilms is clearly observed. The resistance is also significantly higher with biofilm in the presence of sucrose, which indicates that dextran could play a protective role.

  12. Performance improvement of ZnO film by room-temperature oxygen plasma pretreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; XIA Yi-ben; WANG Lin-jun; LIU Jian-min; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min

    2006-01-01

    The room-temperature oxygen plasma treatment before depositing ZnO films on nanocrystalline diamond substrates was studied. The nanocrystalline diamond substrates were pretreated in oxygen plasma at 50 W for 30 min at room temperature and then ZnO films were sputtered on diamond substrates at 400 W. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that the c-axis orientation of ZnO film increases evidently after oxygen plasma pretreatment. The AFM and SEM measurements also show that the high c-axis orientation of ZnO film and the average surface roughness is less than 5 nm. The resistivity of ZnO films increases nearly two orders of magnitude to 1.04×108 Ω·cm. As a result,room-temperature oxygen plasma pretreatment is indeed a simple and effective way to improve the performance of ZnO film used in SAW devices by ameliorating the combination between diamond film and ZnO film and also complementing the absence of oxygen atoms in ZnO film.

  13. Low temperature plasma vapor treatment of thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Tang, X. L.; Chen, B. T.; Qiu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the novel methods of depositing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish by plasma polymerization are provided. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide by using the self-made equipment of plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials. On the deposition of PNIPAAm onto Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) melt-blown nonwovens in atmospheric pressure plasma, water permeability was significantly modified at around LCST. Due to the LCST is close to the temperature of human body, it has advantage on application of PBT melt-blown nonwovens.

  14. Parametric decays in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with relativistic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Rodrigo A.; Munoz, Victor [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Asenjo, Felipe A. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Alejandro Valdivia, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnologia, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-08-15

    The nonlinear evolution of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave in an electron-positron plasma propagating along a constant background magnetic field is considered, by studying its parametric decays. Relativistic effects, of the particle motion in the wave field and of the plasma temperature, are included to obtain the dispersion relation of the decays. The exact dispersion relation of the pump wave has been previously calculated within the context of a relativistic fluid theory and presents two branches: an electromagnetic and an Alfven one. We investigate the parametric decays for the pump wave in these two branches, including the anomalous dispersion zone of the Alfven branch where the group velocity is negative. We solve the nonlinear dispersion relation for different pump wave amplitudes and plasma temperatures, finding various resonant and nonresonant wave couplings. We are able to identify these couplings and study their behavior as we modify the plasma parameters. Some of these couplings are suppressed for larger amplitudes or temperatures. We also find two kinds of modulational instabilities, one involving two sideband daughter waves and another involving a forward-propagating electroacoustic mode and a sideband daughter wave.

  15. Surface temperature: A key parameter to control the propanethiol plasma polymer chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiry, Damien, E-mail: damien.thiry@umons.ac.be; Aparicio, Francisco J. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Laha, Priya; Terryn, Herman [Research Group Electrochemical and Surface Engineering (SURF), Department of Materials and Chemistry (MACH), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons, Belgium and Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the influence of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the chemical composition of propanethiol plasma polymers was investigated for a given set of plasma conditions. In a first study, a decrease in the atomic sulfur content (at. %S) with the deposition time (t{sub d}) was observed. This behavior is explained by the heating of the growing film during deposition process, limiting the incorporation of stable sulfur-based molecules produced in the plasma. Experiments carried out by controlling the substrate temperature support this hypothesis. On the other hand, an empirical law relating the T{sub s} and the at. %S was established. This allows for the formation of gradient layer presenting a heterogeneous chemical composition along the thickness, as determined by depth profile analysis combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and C{sub 60} ion gun sputtering. The experimental data fit with the one predicted from our empiric description. The whole set of our results provide new insights in the relationship between the substrate temperature and the sulfur content in sulfur-based plasma polymers, essential for future developments.

  16. Synthesis of silicon carbide in a nitrogen plasma torch: rotational temperature determination and material analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Camacho, J; Castell, R [Universidad Simon BolIvar, Departamento de Fisica, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Castro, A; Manrique, M [Universidad Simon BolIvar, Departamento de Ciencias de los Materiales, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: jgruiz@usb.ve

    2008-09-07

    Experiments on silicon carbide synthesis were performed using a dc nitrogen plasma torch. Measurements of rotational temperature of nitrogen molecules by emission spectroscopy were performed, based on the band (0, 1) of the first negative system of nitrogen N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) for the R branch. Three different plasma torch powers were studied in order to optimize the production of silicon carbide with our experimental set-up. The synthesized products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  17. Synthesis of silicon carbide in a nitrogen plasma torch: rotational temperature determination and material analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camacho, J.; Castell, R.; Castro, A.; Manrique, M.

    2008-09-01

    Experiments on silicon carbide synthesis were performed using a dc nitrogen plasma torch. Measurements of rotational temperature of nitrogen molecules by emission spectroscopy were performed, based on the band (0, 1) of the first negative system of nitrogen N_2^+ (B\\,{}^2\\Sigma_u^+ \\to X\\,{}^2\\Sigma _g^+) for the R branch. Three different plasma torch powers were studied in order to optimize the production of silicon carbide with our experimental set-up. The synthesized products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  18. Kinetic effect of high energy ions on the temperature profile in the boundary plasma region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N., E-mail: ezumi@nagano-nct.ac.jp [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Hayashi, Y.; Todoroki, K. [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Importance of ion dynamics in the boundary region has been discussed with experimental results of ion temperature (T{sub i}) measurements in linear plasma devices and its analytical model. Radial profiles of T{sub i} have been measured by using an ion sensitive probe in the linear devices CTP-HC and NAGDIS-II. The experiments indicate that T{sub i} is growing radially. Analytical ion-mean-energy profiles based on the ion Larmor motion are qualitatively consistent with the experimental T{sub i} profiles. These results clarify that the higher energy ions exist in the outside region of plasma flux tube.

  19. Determining the Concentrations and Temperatures of Products in a CF_4/CHF_3/N_2 Plasma via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2017-06-01

    Plasmas used for the manufacturing of semiconductor devices are similar in pressure and temperature to those used in the laboratory for the study of astrophysical species in the submillimeter (SMM) spectral region. The methods and technology developed in the SMM for these laboratory studies are directly applicable for diagnostic measurements in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Many of the molecular neutrals, radicals, and ions present in processing plasmas have been studied and their spectra have been cataloged or are in the literature. In this work, a continuous wave, intensity calibrated SMM absorption spectrometer was developed as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. A major advantage of intensity calibrated rotational absorption spectroscopy is its ability to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species from first principles without altering the plasma environment. An important part of this work was the design of the optical components which couple 500-750 GHz radiation through a commercial inductively coupled plasma chamber. The measurement of transmission spectra was simultaneously fit for background and absorption signal. The measured absorption was used to calculate absolute densities and temperatures of polar species. Measurements for CHF_3, CF_2, FCN, HCN, and CN made in a CF_4/CHF_3/N_2 plasma will be presented. Temperature equilibrium among species will be shown and the common temperature is leveraged to obtain accurate density measurements for simultaneously observed species. The densities and temperatures of plasma species are studied as a function of plasma parameters, including flow rate, pressure, and discharge power.

  20. Electronic temperature measurement on the deca II plasma using the Bremsstrahlung; Mesure de la temperature electronique du plasma de deca II par etude du rayonnement de freinage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-01

    The electronic temperature of the DECA II machine's plasma is determined by studying the Bremsstrahlung. Two types of detectors are used for this measurement, a set scintillator-photo-multiplicator and a photoelectric effect detector with a massive silver target. The method used is the classical 'absorbent method', The absorbents used are thin formvar foils whose thickness is between 600 and 12 500 angstrom. The measurements done in two different working conditions of the DECA II machine have given: Te {approx_equal} 200 eV in the first case and Te {approx_equal} 70 eV in the second case. (author) [French] Nous avons determine la temperature electronique du plasma de la machine DECA II par l'etude du rayonnement de freinage. Pour cette mesure nous avons utilise deux types de detecteurs: des ensembles scintillateur-photomultiplicateur et un detecteur a effet photoelectrique a cible massive en argent. La methode utilisee pour cette mesure est la classique methode des absorbants. Nous avons utilise des feuilles de format tres mince (de 600 a 12 500 angstrom) comme absorbant. Les mesures faites dans deux regimes de travail differents de la machine DECA II nous ont conduit a: Te {approx_equal} 200 eV dans un cas et Te {approx_equal} eV dans l'autre cas. (auteur)

  1. GHRSST Level 2P Eastern Pacific Regional Skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) Imager on the GOES-11 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) operated by the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) support weather...

  2. GHRSST Level 2P West Atlantic Regional Skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) Imager on the GOES-12 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) operated by the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) support weather...

  3. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic instabilities in weakly collisional, high beta plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations with Coulomb collisions modeled through the Langevin equation (corresponding to the Fokker-Planck one). The expansion drives a parallel or perpendicular temperature anisotropy (depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field). For the chosen parameters the Coulomb collisions are important with respect to the driver but are not strong enough to keep the system stable with respect to instabilities driven by the proton temperature anisotropy. In the case of the parallel temperature anisotropy the dominant oblique fire hose instability efficiently reduces the anisotropy in a quasilinear manner. In the case of the perpendicular temperature anisotropy the dominant mirror instability generates coherent compressive structures which scatter protons and reduce the temperature anisotropy. For both the cases the instabilities generate temporarily enough wave energy so that the ...

  4. Two-dimensional Hybrid Simulations of Kinetic Plasma Turbulence: Current and Vorticity vs Proton Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Proton temperature anisotropies between the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field are usually observed in the solar wind plasma. Here, we employ a high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulation in order to investigate the relation between spatial properties of the proton temperature and the peaks in the current density and in the flow vorticity. Our results indicate that, although regions where the proton temperature is enhanced and temperature anisotropies are larger correspond approximately to regions where many thin current sheets form, no firm quantitative evidence supports the idea of a direct causality between the two phenomena. On the other hand, quite a clear correlation between the behavior of the proton temperature and the out-of-plane vorticity is obtained.

  5. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, S; Loarer, T; Pocheau, C; Roche, H; Gauthier, E; Aumeunier, M-H; Le Niliot, C; Rigollet, F; Courtois, X; Jouve, M; Balorin, C; Moncada, V

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ∼ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ∼ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  6. Validation of JAXA/MODIS Sea Surface Temperature in Water around Taiwan Using the Terra and Aqua Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-An Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The research vessel-based Conductivity Temperature Depth profiler (CTD provides underwater measurements of the bulk sea surface temperature (SST at the depths of shallower than 5 m. The CTD observations of the seas around Taiwan provide useful data for comparison with SST of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers aboard Aqua and Terra satellites archived by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. We produce a high-resolution (1 km MODIS SST by using Multi-Channel SST (MCSST algorithm. There were 1516 cloud-free match-up data pairs of MODIS SST and in situ measurements during the period from 2003 - 2005. The difference of the root mean square error (RMSE of satellite observations from each platform during the day and at night was: _ in Aqua daytime, _ in Aqua nighttime, _ in Terra daytime, and _ in Terra nighttime. The total analysis of MODIS-derived SST shows good agreement with a bias of _ and RMSE of _ The analyses indicate that the bias of Aqua daytime was always positive throughout the year and the large RMSE should be attributed to the large positive bias _ under diurnal warming. It was also found that the bias of Terra daytime was usually negative with a mean bias of _ its large RMSE should be treated with care because of low solar radiation in the morning.

  7. The multifractal structure of satellite sea surface temperature maps can be used to obtain global maps of streamlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turiel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Earth observation satellites provide information about many relevant variables of the ocean-climate system, such as temperature, moisture, aerosols, etc. However, to retrieve the velocity field, which is the most relevant dynamical variable, is still a technological challenge, specially in the case of oceans. New processing techniques, emerged from the theory of turbulent flows, have come to assist us in this task. In this paper, we show that multifractal techniques applied to new Sea Surface Temperature satellite products opens the way to build maps of ocean currents with unprecedented accuracy. With the application of singularity analysis, we show that global ocean circulation patterns can be retrieved in a daily basis. We compare these results with high-quality altimetry-derived geostrophic velocities, finding a quite good correspondence of the observed patterns both qualitatively and quantitatively; and this is done for the first time on a global basis, even for less active areas. The implications of this findings from the perspective both of theory and of operational applications are discussed.

  8. Temperature measurement of a dust particle in a RF plasma GEC reference cell

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    The thermal motion of a dust particle levitated in a plasma chamber is similar to that described by Brownian motion in many ways. The primary differences between a dust particle in a plasma system and a free Brownian particle is that in addition to the random collisions between the dust particle and the neutral gas atoms, there are electric field fluctuations, dust charge fluctuations, and correlated motions from the unwanted continuous signals originating within the plasma system itself. This last contribution does not include random motion and is therefore separable from the random motion in a normal temperature measurement. In this paper, we discuss how to separate random and coherent motion of a dust particle confined in a glass box in a Gaseous Electronic Conference radio frequency reference cell employing experimentally determined dust particle fluctuation data analyzed using the mean square displacement technique.

  9. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, C [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ramdutt, D [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Brault, P [GREMI-CNRS Laboratory, University of Orleans, BP 6744, F-45067, Orleans (France); Caillard, A [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bulla, D [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Boswell, R [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Rabat, H [GREMI-CNRS Laboratory, University of Orleans, BP 6744, F-45067, Orleans (France); Dicks, A [School of Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2007-05-15

    A low energy ({approx}30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm{sup -2}, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm{sup -2}) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm{sup -2}). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  10. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, C.; Ramdutt, D.; Brault, P.; Caillard, A.; Bulla, D.; Boswell, R.; Rabat, H.; Dicks, A.

    2007-05-01

    A low energy (~30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm-2, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm-2) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm-2). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  11. Ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves in two temperature electrons superthermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation properties of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén (IAKA) solitary and rogue waves have been investigated in two temperature electrons magnetized superthermal plasma in the presence of dust impurity. A nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) describing the evolution of solitary waves. The effect of various plasma parameters on the characteristics of the IAKA solitary waves is studied. The dynamics of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (IAKARWs) are also studied by transforming the KdV equation into nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The characteristics of rogue wave profile under the influence of various plasma parameters (κc, μc, σ , θ) are examined numerically by using the data of Saturn's magnetosphere (Schippers et al. 2008; Sakai et al. 2013).

  12. Low-Temperature Plasma Induced Grafting of 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl Phosphorylcholine onto Poly(tetrafluoroethylene)Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yunhui; WANG Fen; HE Xiangpeng

    2009-01-01

    Modification of poly(tetrafluoroethylene)(PTFE)films with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcho-line(MPC)was performed by low-temperature plasma treatment and grafting polymerization. Surface properties of PTFE were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared(ATR-FTIR)spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), and static contact angle. The results show that MPC has been grafted onto PTFE film surface successfully. Contact angle for the modified PTFE films in the water decreased from 108°to 58.25°, while surface energy increased from 17.52 mN/m to 45.47 mN/m. The effects of plasma treatment time, monomer concentration and grafting time on degree of grafting were determined. In the meanwhile, blood compati-bility of the PTFE films was studied by checking thrombogenic time of blood plasma.

  13. Thermodynamic Properties of Gaseous Plasmas in the Limit of Extremely Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Limiting structure of thermodynamic functions of gaseous plasmas is under consideration in the limit of zero temperature and density. Remarkable tendency, which was claimed previously (Iosilevskiy and Gryaznov, 1985) is carried to extreme. Both equations of state, thermal and caloric ones obtain in this limit identical stepped structure ("ionization stairs") for plasma of any single element when this limit (T -> 0, n -> 0) is carried out at fixed value of chemical potential for electrons (or atoms). The same stepped structure is valid for plasma of mixtures or compounds. This structure appears within a fixed (negative) range of chemical potential of electrons bounded below by value of major ionization potential of element and above by the value depending on sublimation energy of substance. Binding energies of all possible bound complexes (atomic, molecular, ionic and clusters) in its ground state are the only quantities that manifest itself in meaningful details of this limiting picture as location and value ...

  14. Inactivation of Escherichia Coli Using Remote Low Temperature Glow Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Miao; CHEN Jierong; CHEN Chua

    2008-01-01

    Low-temperature plasma is distinguished as a developing approach for sterilization which can deal with and overcome those problems such as thermal sensitivity and destruction by heat,formation of toxic by-products,higher costs and inefficiency in performances,caused by conventional methods.In this study,an experimental investigation was undertaken to characterize the effects of the operational parameters,such as treating time,discharge power and gas flow rate,of remote glow discharge air plasma.The results show that the inactivation of Escherichia coli can reach above 99.99% in less than 60 seconds and the optimal operational conditions for treating time,discharge power and gas flow rate were:40 s,80 W and 60 cm3/min,respectively.The contribution of UV radiation during plasma germ deactivation is very limited.

  15. On the fundamental relation of laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature measurements in filamentary plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Foest, Rüdiger

    2015-07-01

    Recently, laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD) had been successfully employed as a temperature measurement method to reveal the heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric plasma jet. Based on the theory of the temperature measurements using LSD, in this work, three approaches for an application of the method are introduced: (i) a hyperbolic-like model of refractive index is applied which allows an analytical theory for the evaluation of the deflection angle to be developed, (ii) a Gaussian shape model for the filament temperature is implemented which is analyzed numerically and (iii) an experimental calibration of the laser deflection with a gas mixture of helium and argon is performed. Thus, these approaches demonstrate that a universal relation between the relative maximum temperature of the filament core (T1/T0) and a the maximum deflection angle δ1 of the laser beam can be written as T1/T0=(1 - δ1/δ0)-1, where δ0 is a parameter that is defined by the configuration of the experiment and by the assumed model for the shape of the temperature profile. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  16. Modelling dengue fever risk in the State of Yucatan, Mexico using regional-scale satellite-derived sea surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureano-Rosario, Abdiel E; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Gomez-Carro, Salvador; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Muller-Karger, Frank E

    2017-08-01

    Accurately predicting vector-borne diseases, such as dengue fever, is essential for communities worldwide. Changes in environmental parameters such as precipitation, air temperature, and humidity are known to influence dengue fever dynamics. Furthermore, previous studies have shown how oceanographic variables, such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related sea surface temperature from the Pacific Ocean, influences dengue fever in the Americas. However, literature is lacking on the use of regional-scale satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) to assess its relationship with dengue fever in coastal areas. Data on confirmed dengue cases, demographics, precipitation, and air temperature were collected. Incidence of weekly dengue cases was examined. Stepwise multiple regression analyses (AIC model selection) were used to assess which environmental variables best explained increased dengue incidence rates. SST, minimum air temperature, precipitation, and humidity substantially explained 42% of the observed variation (r(2)=0.42). Infectious diseases are characterized by the influence of past cases on current cases and results show that previous dengue cases alone explained 89% of the variation. Ordinary least-squares analyses showed a positive trend of 0.20±0.03°C in SST from 2006 to 2015. An important element of this study is to help develop strategic recommendations for public health officials in Mexico by providing a simple early warning capability for dengue incidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Jeremy J., E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS-3, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  18. Temperature measurement of plasma-assisted flames: comparison between optical emission spectroscopy and 2-color laser induced fluorescence techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate thermometry of highly reactive environments, such as plasma-assisted combustion, is challenging. With the help of conical laminar premixed methane-air flames, this study compares two thermometry techniques for the temperature determination in a combustion front enhanced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) plasma discharges. Based on emission spectroscopic analysis, the results show that the rotational temperature of CH(A) gives a reasonable estimate for the adiabatic flame temperature, only for lean and stoichiometric conditions. The rotational temperature of N2(C) is found to significantly underestimate the flame temperature. The 2-color OH-PLIF technique gives correct values of the flame temperature.

  19. Novel fragmentation model for pulverized coal particles gasification in low temperature air thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Rastko D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New system for start-up and flame support based on coal gasification by low temperature air thermal plasma is planned to supplement current heavy oil system in Serbian thermal power plants in order to decrease air pollutions emission and operational costs. Locally introduced plasma thermal energy heats up and ignites entrained coal particles, thus starting chain process which releases heat energy from gasified coal particles inside burner channel. Important stages during particle combustion, such as particle devolatilisation and char combustion, are described with satisfying accuracy in existing commercial CFD codes that are extensively used as powerful tool for pulverized coal combustion and gasification modeling. However, during plasma coal gasification, high plasma temperature induces strong thermal stresses inside interacting coal particles. These stresses lead to “thermal shock” and extensive particle fragmentation during which coal particles with initial size of 50-100 m disintegrate into fragments of at most 5-10 m. This intensifies volatile release by a factor 3-4 and substantially accelerates the oxidation of combustible matter. Particle fragmentation, due to its small size and thus limited influence on combustion process is commonly neglected in modelling. The main focus of this work is to suggest novel approach to pulverized coal gasification under high temperature conditions and to implement it into commercial comprehensive code ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. Proposed model was validated against experimental data obtained in newly built pilot scale D.C plasma burner test facility. Newly developed model showed very good agreement with experimental results with relative error less than 10%, while the standard built-in gasification model had error up to 25%.

  20. Multi-Temporal Evaluation of Soil Moisture and Land Surface Temperature Dynamics Using in Situ and Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Pablos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture (SM is an important component of the Earth’s surface water balance and by extension the energy balance, regulating the land surface temperature (LST and evapotranspiration (ET. Nowadays, there are two missions dedicated to monitoring the Earth’s surface SM using L-band radiometers: ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP. LST is remotely sensed using thermal infrared (TIR sensors on-board satellites, such as NASA’s Terra/Aqua MODIS or ESA & EUMETSAT’s MSG SEVIRI. This study provides an assessment of SM and LST dynamics at daily and seasonal scales, using 4 years (2011–2014 of in situ and satellite observations over the central part of the river Duero basin in Spain. Specifically, the agreement of instantaneous SM with a variety of LST-derived parameters is analyzed to better understand the fundamental link of the SM–LST relationship through ET and thermal inertia. Ground-based SM and LST measurements from the REMEDHUS network are compared to SMOS SM and MODIS LST spaceborne observations. ET is obtained from the HidroMORE regional hydrological model. At the daily scale, a strong anticorrelation is observed between in situ SM and maximum LST (R ≈ − 0.6 to −0.8, and between SMOS SM and MODIS LST Terra/Aqua day (R ≈ − 0.7. At the seasonal scale, results show a stronger anticorrelation in autumn, spring and summer (in situ R ≈ − 0.5 to −0.7; satellite R ≈ − 0.4 to −0.7 indicating SM–LST coupling, than in winter (in situ R ≈ +0.3; satellite R ≈ − 0.3 indicating SM–LST decoupling. These different behaviors evidence changes from water-limited to energy-limited moisture flux across seasons, which are confirmed by the observed ET evolution. In water-limited periods, SM is extracted from the soil through ET until critical SM is reached. A method to estimate the soil critical SM is proposed. For REMEDHUS, the critical SM is estimated to be ∼0

  1. A stable, unbiased, long-term satellite based data record of sea surface temperature from ESA's Climate Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Nick; Good, Simon; Merchant, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The study of climate change demands long-term, stable observational records of climate variables such as sea surface temperature (SST). ESA's Climate Change Initiative was set up to unlock the potential of satellite data records for this purpose. As part of this initiative, 13 projects were established to develop the data records for different essential climate variables - aerosol, cloud, fire, greenhouse gases, glaciers, ice sheets, land cover, ocean colour, ozone, sea ice, sea level, soil moisture and SST. In this presentation we describe the development work that has taken place in the SST project and present new prototype data products that are available now for users to trial. The SST project began in 2010 and has now produced two prototype products. The first is a long-term product (covering mid-1991 - 2010 currently, but with a view to update this in the future), which prioritises length of data record and stability over other considerations. It is based on data from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) and Advanced Very-High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series of satellite instruments. The product aims to combine the favourable stability and bias characteristics of ATSR data with the geographical coverage achieved with the AVHRR series. Following an algorithm selection process, an optimal estimation approach to retrieving SST from the satellite measurements from both sensors was adopted. The retrievals do not depend on in situ data and so this data record represents an independent assessment of SST change. In situ data are, however, being used to validate the resulting data. The second data product demonstrates the coverage that can be achieved using the modern satellite observing system including, for example, geostationary satellite data. Six months worth of data have been processed for this demonstration product. The prototype SST products will be released in April to users to trial in their work. The long term product will be available as

  2. Effects of ipsapirone on plasma cortisol and body temperature in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, H Y; Maes, M

    1995-10-01

    Major depressed patients have been reported to exhibit significantly attenuated hypothermic responses to ipsapirone, a serotonin (5-HT)-1A partial agonist, compared to normal controls. This study further investigated the cortisol and temperature responses to ipsapirone (0.5 mg/kg orally) and placebo in 20 normal volunteers and 12 major depressed patients. Both plasma cortisol and temperature were measured every 30 min before ipsapirone or placebo administration until 180 min post administration. Ipsapirone administration produced a significant increase in plasma cortisol levels as well as hypothermia. Major depressed patients showed significantly blunted ipsapirone-induced cortisol responses compared to normal controls. No significant differences in ipsapirone-induced hypothermic responses were found between major depressed patients and normal controls.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray diagnostics of high-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, W.

    1986-10-02

    This report describes recent progress and plans for calendar year 1987 in the Johns Hopkins University program to develop and improve spectroscopic diagnostics for the high temperature plasmas used in magnetic fusion research. An EUV spectrograph which provides time resolved spectra along fifteen chords of a plasma device has been completed and evaluation on DIII-D will began in late 1986. Other instrumentation work includes the evaluation of a sensitive detector for ion temperature/velocity distribution determinations and a feasibility study of Zeeman polarimetry for determining magnetic fields. A comprehensive data set taken on the TEXT tokamak is undergoing analysis as a means of improving the ionic parameters used in diagnostic studies and to expand the capabilities of existing instruments. Potential new advanced in spectroscopic technology are being monitored to determine if they provide advantages for fusion research.

  4. Extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray diagnostics of high-temperature plasmas. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, W.

    1986-10-02

    This report describes recent progress and plans for calendar year 1987 in the Johns Hopkins University program to develop and improve spectroscopic diagnostics for the high temperature plasmas used in magnetic fusion research. An EUV spectrograph which provides time resolved spectra along fifteen chords of a plasma device has been completed and evaluation on DIII-D will began in late 1986. Other instrumentation work includes the evaluation of a sensitive detector for ion temperature/velocity distribution determinations and a feasibility study of Zeeman polarimetry for determining magnetic fields. A comprehensive data set taken on the TEXT tokamak is undergoing analysis as a means of improving the ionic parameters used in diagnostic studies and to expand the capabilities of existing instruments. Potential new advanced in spectroscopic technology are being monitored to determine if they provide advantages for fusion research.

  5. The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompl, Rene; Jamitzky, Ferdinand; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Steffes, Bernd; Bunk, Wolfram; Morfill, Gregor Eugen [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Munich Schwabing Hospital, Munich (Germany); Georgi, Matthias; Ramrath, Katrin; Stolz, Wilhelm [Clinic for Dermatology, Allergology and Environmental Medicine, Munich Schwabing Hospital, Munich (Germany); Stark, Robert W [Center for Nanoscience and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Urayama, Takuya; Fujii, Shuitsu [ADTEC Plasma Technology Co. Ltd, Fukuyama (Japan)], E-mail: tshimizu@mpe.mpg.de

    2009-11-15

    Research on low-temperature atmospheric plasma sources (LTAPS) has grown strongly over the last few years, in part driven by possible medical 'in vivo' applications. LTAPS offer new technology for medicine and biomedical engineering. Important application examples include in situ production of reactive molecules and ions, delivery at the molecular level, contact-free and self-sterilizing devices. An important issue is the efficient bactericidal effect of LTAPS, which has already been studied widely in vitro. In spite of the many investigations, details of the plasma effect on bacteria are still largely unknown. To contribute to a better understanding of the sterilization process, we investigated the morphological changes of bacteria using atomic force microscopy before and after plasma treatment at high resolution. We examined both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at different plasma exposure times. Additionally, the effect of UV radiation as one agent in the plasma was investigated separately. Our results suggest that several sterilizing mechanisms exist and they proceed at different timescales.

  6. Detection of significant differences between absorption spectra of neutral helium and low temperature photoionized helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, spectral investigations of photoionized He plasmas were performed. The photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of helium stream, with intense pulses from laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The EUV source was based on a double-stream Xe/Ne gas-puff target irradiated with 10 ns/10 J Nd:YAG laser pulses. The most intense emission from the source spanned a relatively narrow spectral region below 20 nm, however, spectrally integrated intensity at longer wavelengths was also significant. The EUV radiation was focused onto a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulse. The long-wavelength part of the EUV radiation was used for backlighting of the photoionized plasmas to obtain absorption spectra. Both emission and absorption spectra in the EUV range were investigated. Significant differences between absorption spectra acquired for neutral helium and low temperature photoionized plasmas were demonstrated for the first time. Strong increase of intensities and spectral widths of absorption lines, together with a red shift of the K-edge, was shown.

  7. Modelling deuterium release from tungsten after high flux high temperature deuterium plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, Petr; Matveev, Dmitry; Bakaeva, Anastasiia; Terentyev, Dmitry; Zhurkin, Evgeny E.; Van Oost, Guido; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten is a primary candidate for plasma facing materials for future fusion devices. An important safety concern in the design of plasma facing components is the retention of hydrogen isotopes. Available experimental data is vast and scattered, and a consistent physical model of retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten is still missing. In this work we propose a model of non-equilibrium hydrogen isotopes trapping under fusion relevant plasma exposure conditions. The model is coupled to a diffusion-trapping simulation tool and is used to interpret recent experiments involving high plasma flux exposures. From the computational analysis performed, it is concluded that high flux high temperature exposures (T = 1000 K, flux = 1024 D/m2/s and fluence of 1026 D/m2) result in generation of sub-surface damage and bulk diffusion, so that the retention is driven by both sub-surface plasma-induced defects (bubbles) and trapping at natural defects. On the basis of the non-equilibrium trapping model we have estimated the amount of H stored in the sub-surface region to be ∼10-5 at-1, while the bulk retention is about 4 × 10-7 at-1, calculated by assuming the sub-surface layer thickness of about 10 μm and adjusting the trap concentration to comply with the experimental results for the integral retention.

  8. Influence of metallic vapours on thermodynamic and transport properties of two-temperature air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua; Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-09-01

    The metallic vapours (i.e., copper, iron, and silver in this paper) resulting from walls and/or electrode surfaces can significantly affect the characteristics of air plasma. Different from the previous works assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, this paper investigates the influence of metallic vapours on two-temperature (2 T) air plasma. The 2 T compositions of air contaminated by Cu, Fe, and Ag are first determined based on Saha's and Guldberg-Waage's laws. The thermodynamic properties (including mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat) are then calculated according to their definitions. After determining the collision integrals for each pair of species in air-metal mixtures using the newly published methods and source data, the transport coefficients (including electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) are calculated for air-Cu, air-Fe, and air-Ag plasmas with different non-equilibrium degree θ (Te/Th). The influences of metallic contamination as well as non-equilibrium degree are discussed. It is found that copper, iron, and silver exist mainly in the form of Cu2, FeO, and AgO at low temperatures. Generally, the metallic vapours increase mass density at most temperatures, reduce the specific enthalpy and specific heat in the whole temperature range, and affect the transport properties remarkably from 5000 K to 20 000 K. The effect arising from the type of metals is little except for silver at certain temperatures. Besides, the departure from thermal equilibrium results in the delay of dissociation and ionization reactions, leading to the shift of thermodynamic and transport properties towards a higher temperature.

  9. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi, E-mail: wuyic51@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui [Electric Power Research Institute of State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xian (China)

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF{sub 6} is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF{sub 6}. This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N{sub 2} mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N{sub 2} on properties for SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasmas.

  10. Oxidation of Inconel 625 superalloy upon treatment with oxygen or hydrogen plasma at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesel, Alenka; Drenik, Aleksander; Elersic, Kristina; Mozetic, Miran; Kovac, Janez [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gyergyek, Tomaz [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Stockel, Jan; Varju, Jozef; Panek, Radomir [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Ze Slovankou 3, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Balat-Pichelin, Marianne, E-mail: marianne.balat@promes.cnrs.fr [PROMES-CNRS Laboratory, 7 rue du four solaire, 66120 Font Romeu Odeillo (France)

    2014-06-01

    Initial stages of Inconel 625 superalloy (Ni{sub 60}Cr{sub 30}Mo{sub 10}Ni{sub 4}Nb{sub 1}) oxidation upon short treatment with gaseous plasma at different temperatures up to about 1600 K were studied. Samples were treated for different periods up to a minute by oxygen or hydrogen plasma created with a microwave discharge in the standing-wave mode at a pressure of 40 Pa and a power 500 W. Simultaneous heating of the samples was realized by focusing concentrated solar radiation from a 5 kW solar furnace directly onto the samples. The morphological changes upon treatment were monitored using scanning electron microscopy, compositional depth profiling was performed using Auger electron spectroscopy, while structural changes were determined by X-ray diffraction. The treatment in oxygen plasma caused formation of metal oxide clusters of three dimensional crystallites initially rich in nickel oxide with the increasing chromium oxide content as the temperature was increasing. At about 1100 K iron and niobium oxides prevailed on the surface causing a drop of the material emissivity at 5 μm. Simultaneously the NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} compound started growing at the interface between the oxide film and bulk alloy and the compound persisted up to temperatures close to the Inconel melting point. Intensive migration of minority alloying elements such as Fe and Ti was observed at 1600 K forming mixed surface oxides of sub-micrometer dimensions. The treatment in hydrogen plasma with small admixture of water vapor did not cause much modification unless the temperature was close to the melting point. At such conditions aluminum segregated on the surface and formed well-defined Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals.

  11. Retrieval of sea surface air temperature from satellite data over Indian Ocean: An empirical approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    the surface air temperature and surface humidity is analysed by fitting a polynomial between the two for different regions of the Indian Ocean in different seasons. Taking into account the variation in surface air temperatures, the Indian Ocean is split in 14...

  12. Chronic effects of temperature on mortality in the Southeastern USA using satellite-based exposure metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liuhua; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Yan; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kosheleva, Anna; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Climate change may affect human health, particularly for elderly individuals who are vulnerable to temperature changes. While many studies have investigated the acute effects of heat, only a few have dealt with the chronic ones. We have examined the effects of seasonal temperatures on survival of the elderly in the Southeastern USA, where a large fraction of subpopulation resides. We found that both seasonal mean temperature and its standard deviation (SD) affected long-term survival among the 13 million Medicare beneficiaries (aged 65+) in this region during 2000-2013. A 1 °C increase in summer mean temperature corresponded to an increase of 2.5% in death rate. Whereas, 1 °C increase in winter mean temperature was associated with a decrease of 1.5%. Increases in seasonal temperature SD also influence mortality. We decomposed seasonal mean temperature and its temperature SD into long-term geographic contrasts between ZIP codes and annual anomalies within ZIP code. Effect modifications by different subgroups were also examined to find out whether certain individuals are more vulnerable. Our findings will be critical to future efforts assessing health risks related to the future climate change.

  13. Comparison of satellite and airborne sensor data on sea surface temperature and suspended solid distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Saito, K.; Hayakawa, S.; Narigasawa, K.

    1992-07-01

    Sea surface temperature and suspended solid were observed simultaneously by LANDSAT TM, NOAA AVHRR and airborne MSS. The authors compared the following items through the data, i.e., 1) Sea surface temperature, 2) Suspended solid in the sea water, 3) Monitoring ability on ocean environment. It was found that distribution patterns of sea surface temperature and suspended solid in the Ariake Sea obtained from LANDSAT TM are similar with those from airborne MSS in a scale of 1:300,000. Sea surface temperature estimated from NOAA AVHRR data indicates a fact of an ocean environment of the Ariake Sea and the around sea area. It is concluded that the TM data can be used for the monitoring of sea environment. The NOAA AVHRR data is useful for the estimation of sea surface temperature with the airborne MSS data.

  14. Operational and theoretical temperature considerations in a Penning surface plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faircloth, D. C., E-mail: dan.faircloth@stfc.ac.uk; Lawrie, S. R. [ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pereira Da Costa, H. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dudnikov, V. [Muons Inc. United States of America (United States)

    2015-04-08

    A fully detailed 3D thermal model of the ISIS Penning surface plasma source is developed in ANSYS. The proportion of discharge power applied to the anode and cathode is varied until the simulation matches the operational temperature observations. The range of possible thermal contact resistances are modelled, which gives an estimation that between 67% and 85% of the discharge power goes to the cathode. Transient models show the electrode surface temperature rise during the discharge pulse for a range of duty cycles. The implications of these measurements are discussed and a mechanism for governing cesium coverage proposed. The requirements for the design of a high current long pulse source are stated.

  15. Enhanced Fullerene Yield in Plasma-Aerosol Reactor at Cryogenic Boundary Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Jouravlev, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate remarkably enhanced yield of C60 fullerenes in an aerosol discharge chamber due to the additional presence of a strong spatial temperature gradient. The role of the temperature gradients in the increased yield of C60 and fullerene-like structures is discussed. The reaction is not fully reversible and carbon soot matter is formed as a secondary product in the form of carbon aerosol particles. The increasing concentration of C60 was easily recognized from the characteristic UV-spectra. The result of this paper will be useful for improvement of fullerene synthesis technology and for application to constructing new types of aerosol-plasma reactors.

  16. Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K. (LLNL); (UAB)

    2012-10-23

    We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

  17. Thermodynamic diagrams for high temperature plasmas of air, air-carbon, carbon-hydrogen mixtures, and argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kroepelin, H; Hoffmann, K-U

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic Diagrams for High Temperature Plasmas of Air, Air-Carbon, Carbon-Hydrogen Mixtures, and Argon provides information relating to the properties of equilibrium gas plasmas formed from hydrocarbons, from air without argon, from pure argon, and from mixtures of air and carbon at various compositions, temperatures and pressures. The data are presented in graphical rather than tabular form to provide a clearer picture of the plasma processes investigated. This book is composed of four chapters, and begins with the introduction to the characteristics of plasmas, with emphasis on their th

  18. Structural materialization of stainless steel molds and dies by the low temperature high density plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a mold substrate material for injection molding and as a die for mold-stamping and direct stamping processes. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical elements at present. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness of 1400 Hv within its thickness of 40 μm without any formation of nitrides after 14.4 ks plasma nitriding at 693 K. This nitrogen solid-solution treated stainless steel had thermal resistivity even at the mold-stamping conditions up to 900 K.

  19. Cleaning of SiC surfaces by low temperature ECR microwave hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Lingqin; Zhu Qiaozhi; Gao Mingchao [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China); Qin Fuwen [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China); Wang Dejun, E-mail: dwang121@dlut.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China)

    2011-09-15

    N-type 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) surfaces were cleaned by low temperature hydrogen plasma in electronic cyclotron resonance (ECR) microware plasma system. The effects of the hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the structure, chemical and electronic properties of surfaces were characterized by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The RHEED results indicate that the structures of the films are strongly dependent on the treatment temperature and time. Significant improvements in quality of 4H-SiC films can be obtained with the temperature ranging from 200 deg. C to 700 deg. C for an appropriate treatment period. The XPS results show that the surface oxygen is greatly reduced and the carbon contamination is completely removed from the 4H-SiC surfaces. The hydrogenated SiC surfaces exhibit an unprecedented stability against oxidation in the air. The surface Fermi level moves toward the conduction band in 4H-SiC after the treatment indicating an unpinning Fermi level with the density of surfaces states as low as 8.09 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}.

  20. Low-temperature plasma nitriding of sintered PIM 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Aecio Fernando; Scheuer, Cristiano Jose; Joanidis, Ioanis Labhardt; Cardoso, Rodrigo Perito; Mafra, Marcio; Klein, Aloisio Nelmo; Brunatto, Silvio Francisco, E-mail: brunatto@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Grupo de Tecnologia de Fabricacao Assistida pro Plasma e Metalurgia do Po

    2014-08-15

    This work reports experimental results on sintered PIM 316L stainless steel low-temperature plasma nitriding. The effect of treatment temperature and time on process kinetics, microstructure and surface characteristics of the nitrided samples were investigated. Nitriding was carried out at temperatures of 350, 380, 410 and 440 °C , and times of 4, 8 and 16 h, using a gas mixture composed by 60% N2 + 20% H2 + 20% Ar, at a gas flow rate of 5.00 X 10{sup 6} Nm{sup 3-1}, and a pressure of 800 Pa. The treated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and microhardness measurements. Results indicate that low-temperature plasma nitriding is a diffusion controlled process. The calculated activation energy for nitrided layer growth was 111.4 kJmol{sup -1}. Apparently precipitation-free layers were produced in this study. It was also observed that the higher the treatment temperature and time the higher is the obtained surface hardness. Hardness up to 1343 HV{sub 0.025} was verified for samples nitrided at 440 °C. Finally, the characterization of the treated surface indicates the formation of cracks, which were observed in regions adjacent to the original pores after the treatment. (author)

  1. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32°C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30°C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32°C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14°C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32°C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase. PMID:16665545

  2. Geo-spatial distribution of cloud cover and influence of cloud induced attenuation and noise temperature on satellite signal propagation over Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Joseph Sunday

    2017-05-01

    The study of the influence of cloud cover on satellite propagation links is becoming more demanding due to the requirement of larger bandwidth for different satellite applications. Cloud attenuation is one of the major factors to consider for optimum performance of Ka/V and other higher frequency bands. In this paper, the geo-spatial distribution of cloud coverage over some chosen stations in Nigeria has been considered. The substantial scale spatial dispersion of cloud cover based on synoptic meteorological data and the possible impact on satellite communication links at higher frequency bands was also investigated. The investigation was based on 5 years (2008-2012) achieved cloud cover data collected by the Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET) Federal Ministry of Aviation, Oshodi Lagos over four synoptic hours of the day covering day and night. The performances of satellite signals as they traverse through the cloud and cloud noise temperature at different seasons and over different hours of days at Ku/W-bands frequency are also examined. The overall result shows that the additional total atmospheric noise temperature due to the clear air effect and the noise temperature from the cloud reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the satellite receiver systems, leading to more signal loss and if not adequately taken care of may lead to significant outage. The present results will be useful for Earth-space link budgeting, especially for the proposed multi-sensors communication satellite systems in Nigeria.

  3. Low temperature alters plasma membrane lipid composition and ATPase activity of pineapple fruit during blackheart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) plays central role in triggering primary responses to chilling injury and sustaining cellular homeostasis. Characterising response of membrane lipids to low temperature can provide important information for identifying early causal factors contributing to chilling injury. To this end, PM lipid composition and ATPase activity were assessed in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) in relation to the effect of low temperature on the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury. Chilling temperature at 10 °C induced blackheart development in concurrence with increase in electrolyte leakage. PM ATPase activity was decreased after 1 week at low temperature, followed by a further decrease after 2 weeks. The enzyme activity was not changed during 25 °C storage. Loss of total PM phospholipids was found during postharvest senescence, but more reduction was shown from storage at 10 °C. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant PM phospholipid species. Low temperature increased the level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the level of phosphatidylinositol. Both phospholipid species were not changed during storage at 25 °C. Postharvest storage at both temperatures decreased the levels of C18:3 and C16:1, and increased level of C18:1. Low temperature decreased the level of C18:2 and increased the level of C14:0. Exogenous application of phosphatidic acid was found to inhibit the PM ATPase activity of pineapple fruit in vitro. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of plasma membrane at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in blackheart development of pineapple fruit.

  4. Improving snow process modeling with satellite-based estimation of near-surface-air-temperature lapse rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Sun, Litao; Shrestha, Maheswor; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Kun; Lu, Hui; Chen, Deliang

    2016-10-01

    In distributed hydrological modeling, surface air temperature (Tair) is of great importance in simulating cold region processes, while the near-surface-air-temperature lapse rate (NLR) is crucial to prepare Tair (when interpolating Tair from site observations to model grids). In this study, a distributed biosphere hydrological model with improved snow physics (WEB-DHM-S) was rigorously evaluated in a typical cold, large river basin (e.g., the upper Yellow River basin), given a mean monthly NLRs. Based on the validated model, we have examined the influence of the NLR on the simulated snow processes and streamflows. We found that the NLR has a large effect on the simulated streamflows, with a maximum difference of greater than 24% among the various scenarios for NLRs considered. To supplement the insufficient number of monitoring sites for near-surface-air-temperature at developing/undeveloped mountain regions, the nighttime Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer land surface temperature is used as an alternative to derive the approximate NLR at a finer spatial scale (e.g., at different elevation bands, different land covers, different aspects, and different snow conditions). Using satellite-based estimation of NLR, the modeling of snow processes has been greatly refined. Results show that both the determination of rainfall/snowfall and the snowpack process were significantly improved, contributing to a reduced summer evapotranspiration and thus an improved streamflow simulation.

  5. Impact of temperature on childhood pneumonia estimated from satellite remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Liu, Yang; Ma, Zongwei; Li, Shenghui; Hu, Wenbiao; Tong, Shilu

    2014-07-01

    The effect of temperature on childhood pneumonia in subtropical regions is largely unknown so far. This study examined the impact of temperature on childhood pneumonia in Brisbane, Australia. A quasi-Poisson generalized linear model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to quantify the main effect of temperature on emergency department visits (EDVs) for childhood pneumonia in Brisbane from 2001 to 2010. The model residuals were checked to identify added effects due to heat waves or cold spells. Both high and low temperatures were associated with an increase in EDVs for childhood pneumonia. Children aged 2-5 years, and female children were particularly vulnerable to the impacts of heat and cold, and Indigenous children were sensitive to heat. Heat waves and cold spells had significant added effects on childhood pneumonia, and the magnitude of these effects increased with intensity and duration. There were changes over time in both the main and added effects of temperature on childhood pneumonia. Children, especially those female and Indigenous, should be particularly protected from extreme temperatures. Future development of early warning systems should take the change over time in the impact of temperature on children's health into account.

  6. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Kewitz, T.; Šperka, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2012-10-01

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  7. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D. [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Kewitz, T. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Sperka, J. [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  8. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from INSAT 3D satellite radiances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Krishnamoorthy; Deo Kumar; C Balaji

    2016-03-01

    In this study, retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles of atmosphere from INSAT 3D-observed radiances has been accomplished. As the first step, a fast forward radiative transfer model using an Artificial neural network has been developed and it was proven to be highly effective, giving a correlationcoefficient of 0.97. In order to develop this, a diverse set of physics-based clear sky profiles of pressure (P), temperature (T) and specific humidity (q) has been developed. The developed database was further used for geophysical retrieval experiments in two different frameworks, namely, an ANN and Bayesianestimation. The neural network retrievals were performed for three different cases, viz., temperature only retrieval, humidity only retrieval and combined retrieval. The temperature/humidity only ANN retrievals were found superior to combined retrieval using an ANN. Furthermore, Bayesian estimation showed superior results when compared with the combined ANN retrievals.

  9. Low temperature testing and neutron irradiation of a swept charge device on board the HXMT satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Sa; CHEN Tian-Xiang; LI Cheng-Kui; HUO Jia; LI Zheng-Wei; LI Wei; HU Wei; ZHANG Yi; LU Bo; ZHU Yue; LIU Yan; CHEN Yong; WU Di; SUN Qing-Rong; ZHANG Zi-Liang; XU Yu-Peng; YANG Yan-Ji; CUI Wei-Wei; LI Mao-Shun; LIU Xiao-Yan; WANG Juan; HAN Da-Wei

    2012-01-01

    We present the low temperature testing of an SCD detector,investigating its performance such as readout noise,energy resolution at 5.9 keV and dark current.The SCD's performance is closely related to temperature,and the temperature range of -80 ℃ to -50 ℃ is the best choice,where the FWHM at 5.9 keV is about 130 eV.The influence of the neutron irradiation from an electrostatic accelerator with fluence up to 1 × 109 cm-2 has been examined.We find the SCD is not vulnerable to neutron irradiation.The detailed operations of the SCD and the test results of low temperature are reported,and the results of neutron irradiation are discussed.

  10. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  11. Analysing the Effects of Different Land Cover Types on Land Surface Temperature Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şekertekin, A.; Kutoglu, Ş. H.; Kaya, S.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring Land Surface Temperature (LST) via remote sensing images is one of the most important contributions to climatology. LST is an important parameter governing the energy balance on the Earth and it also helps us to understand the behavior of urban heat islands. There are lots of algorithms to obtain LST by remote sensing techniques. The most commonly used algorithms are split-window algorithm, temperature/emissivity separation method, mono-window algorithm and single channel method. In this research, mono window algorithm was implemented to Landsat 5 TM image acquired on 28.08.2011. Besides, meteorological data such as humidity and temperature are used in the algorithm. Moreover, high resolution Geoeye-1 and Worldview-2 images acquired on 29.08.2011 and 12.07.2013 respectively were used to investigate the relationships between LST and land cover type. As a result of the analyses, area with vegetation cover has approximately 5 ºC lower temperatures than the city center and arid land., LST values change about 10 ºC in the city center because of different surface properties such as reinforced concrete construction, green zones and sandbank. The temperature around some places in thermal power plant region (ÇATES and ZETES) Çatalağzı, is about 5 ºC higher than city center. Sandbank and agricultural areas have highest temperature due to the land cover structure.

  12. ANALYSING THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT LAND COVER TYPES ON LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE USING SATELLITE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Şekertekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring Land Surface Temperature (LST via remote sensing images is one of the most important contributions to climatology. LST is an important parameter governing the energy balance on the Earth and it also helps us to understand the behavior of urban heat islands. There are lots of algorithms to obtain LST by remote sensing techniques. The most commonly used algorithms are split-window algorithm, temperature/emissivity separation method, mono-window algorithm and single channel method. In this research, mono window algorithm was implemented to Landsat 5 TM image acquired on 28.08.2011. Besides, meteorological data such as humidity and temperature are used in the algorithm. Moreover, high resolution Geoeye-1 and Worldview-2 images acquired on 29.08.2011 and 12.07.2013 respectively were used to investigate the relationships between LST and land cover type. As a result of the analyses, area with vegetation cover has approximately 5 ºC lower temperatures than the city center and arid land., LST values change about 10 ºC in the city center because of different surface properties such as reinforced concrete construction, green zones and sandbank. The temperature around some places in thermal power plant region (ÇATES and ZETES Çatalağzı, is about 5 ºC higher than city center. Sandbank and agricultural areas have highest temperature due to the land cover structure.

  13. Wind-driven changes of surface current, temperature, and chlorophyll observed by satellites north of New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenac, Marie-Hélène; Léger, Fabien; Messié, Monique; Dutrieux, Pierre; Menkes, Christophe; Eldin, Gérard

    2016-04-01

    Satellite observations of wind, sea level and derived currents, sea surface temperature (SST), and chlorophyll are used to expand our understanding of the physical and biological variability of the ocean surface north of New Guinea. Based on scarce cruise and mooring data, previous studies differentiated a trade wind situation (austral winter) when the New Guinea Coastal Current (NGCC) flows northwestward and a northwest monsoon situation (austral summer) when a coastal upwelling develops and the NGCC reverses. This circulation pattern is confirmed by satellite observations, except in Vitiaz Strait where the surface northwestward flow persists. We find that intraseasonal and seasonal time scale variations explain most of the variance north of New Guinea. SST and chlorophyll variabilities are mainly driven by two processes: penetration of Solomon Sea waters and coastal upwelling. In the trade wind situation, the NGCC transports cold Solomon Sea waters through Vitiaz Strait in a narrow vein hugging the coast. Coastal upwelling is generated in westerly wind situations (westerly wind event, northwest monsoon). Highly productive coastal waters are advected toward the equator and, during some westerly wind events, toward the eastern part of the warm pool. During El Niño, coastal upwelling events and northward penetration of Solomon Sea waters combine to influence SST and chlorophyll anomalies.

  14. Low temperature high density plasma nitriding of stainless steel molds for stamping of oxide glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a die for mold- and direct-stamping processes of optical oxide glasses. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical oxide-glass elements. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness over 1400 HV within its thickness of 50 μm without any formation of nitrides after plasma nitriding at 693 K for 14.4 ks. This plasma-nitrided mold was utilized for mold-stamping of two colored oxide glass plates at 833 K; these plates were successfully deformed and joined into a single glass plate by this stamping without adhesion or galling of oxide glasses onto the nitrided mold surface.

  15. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.

    This research follows a multifaceted approach, from theory to practice, to the investigation and development of novel helium plasmas, sample introduction systems, and diagnostic techniques for atomic and mass spectrometries. During the period January 1994 - December 1994, four major sets of challenging research programs were addressed that each included a number of discrete but complementary projects: (1) The first program is concerned with fundamental and analytical investigations of novel atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPS) that are suitable for the atomization-excitation-ionization of elements, especially those possessing high excitation and ionization energies, for the purpose of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity of analytical measurements. (2) The second program includes simulation and computer modeling of He ICPS. The aim is to ease the hunt for new helium plasmas by predicting their structure and fundamental and analytical properties, without incurring the enormous cost for extensive experimental studies. (3) The third program involves spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of plasma discharges to instantly visualize their prevailing structures, to quantify key fundamental properties, and to verify predictions by mathematical models. (4) The fourth program entails investigation of new, low-cost sample introduction systems that consume micro- to nanoliter quantity of sample solution in plasma spectrometries. A portion of this research involves development and applications of novel diagnostic techniques suitable for probing key fundamental properties of aerosol prior to and after injection into high-temperature plasmas. These efforts, still in progress, collectively offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, material science, biomedicine and nutrition.

  16. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Investigation the cause of plasma treatment for low temperature annealed dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Shungo; Komatsu, Yuta; Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) require annealing of TiO2photoelectrodes at 450 C to 550 C. However, such high-temperature annealing is unfavorable because it limits the use of materials that cannot withstand high temperatures, such as plastic substrates. In our previous paper, a low temperature annealing technique of TiO2 photoelectrodes using ultraviolet light and dielectric barrier discharge treatments was proposed to reduce the annealing temperature from 450 C to 150 C for a TiO2 paste containing an organic binder. Here, we investigated the cause of plasma treatment via the Nyquist diagram (Cole-Cole plot) of DSSCs. The Nyquist diagram was masured with a frequency response analyzer (NF Corporation, FRA5022) under 100 mW/cm2 illumination of a calibrated xenon lamp (Hamamatsu L2274, 150W). The lifetime of the electrons, the effective electron diffusion coefficient, and the electron diffusion length of TiO2 photoelectrodes were determined by analyzing the Nyquist diagrams. As a result of analyzing the Nyquist diagrams, it was shown that plasma treatment can reduce the electron transport resistance and promote the necking of Hot UV annealed TiO2 nanoparticles. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows.

  18. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredice, F., E-mail: faustob@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas, P.O. Box 3 C. P.1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina); Pacheco Martinez, P. [Grupo de Espectroscopía Óptica de Emisión y Láser, Universidad del Atlántico, Barranquilla (Colombia); Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M. [Laboratorio de Fotofísica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-186, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λ{sub jl}I{sub j}/g{sub j}A{sub jl}), where I{sub j} is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, g{sub j} is the statistical weight of the level j, λ{sub jl} is the wavelength of the considered line and A{sub jl} is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants B{sub i}, and δ{sub i}, we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of I{sub n}(t)/I{sub n}(t{sub 0}), where I{sub n}(t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and I{sub n}(t{sub 0}) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants B{sub i} and δ{sub i} and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal

  19. Electrical transport properties of graphene nanowalls grown at low temperature using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rong; Ahktar, Meysam; Alruqi, Adel; Dharmasena, Ruchira; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Thantirige, Rukshan M.; Sumanasekera, Gamini U.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we report the electrical transport properties of uniform and vertically oriented graphene (graphene nanowalls) directly synthesized on multiple substrates including glass, Si/SiO2 wafers, and copper foils using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane (CH4) as the precursor at relatively low temperatures. The temperature for optimum growth was established with the aid of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. This approach offers means for low-cost graphene nanowalls growth on an arbitrary substrate with the added advantage of transfer-free device fabrication. The temperature dependence of the electrical transport properties (resistivity and thermopower) were studied in the temperature range, 30-300 K and analyzed with a combination of 2D-variable range hopping (VRH) and thermally activated (TA) conduction mechanisms. An anomalous temperature dependence of the thermopower was observed for all the samples and explained with a combination of a diffusion term having a linear temperature dependence plus a term with an inverse temperature dependence.

  20. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiao-Yuan; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Wen Yi-Zhi; Yu Chang-Xuan; Liu Wan-Dong; Wan Bao-Nian; Gao Xiang; N. C. Luhmann; C. W. Domier; Jian Wang; Z. G. Xia; Zuowei Shen

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number kg is calculated to be about 1.58 cm-1, or keps ≈0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation.

  1. Extension of operational regime in high-temperature plasmas and effect of ECRH on ion thermal transport in the LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Nagaoka, K.; Murakami, S.; Osakabe, M.; Nakano, H.; Ida, K.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Kubo, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Tanaka, K.; Seki, R.; Takeiri, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Maeta, S.; Nakata, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Tsuchiya, H.; Tokuzawa, T.; Goto, M.; Oishi, T.; Morita, S.; Suzuki, C.; Emoto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Makino, R.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Saito, K.; Kamio, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Mutoh, T.; Kaneko, O.; Morisaki, T.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    A simultaneous high ion temperature (T i) and high electron temperature (T e) regime was successfully extended due to an optimized heating scenario in the LHD. Such high-temperature plasmas were realized by the simultaneous formation of an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) and an ion ITB by the combination of high power NBI and ECRH. Although the ion thermal confinement was degraded in the plasma core with an increase of T e/T i by the on-axis ECRH, it was found that the ion thermal confinement was improved at the plasma edge. The normalized ion thermal diffusivity {χ\\text{i}}/T\\text{i}1.5 at the plasma edge was reduced by 70%. The improvement of the ion thermal confinement at the edge led to an increase in T i in the entire plasma region, even though the core transport was degraded.

  2. Online diagnosis of electron excitation temperature in CH4+H2 discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure by optical emission spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI JinHua; XU ZhenFeng; ZHANG JiaLiang; NIE QiuYue; XU GenHui; REN LongLiang

    2008-01-01

    Methane coupling under low temperature plasmas at atmospheric pressure is a green process by use of renewable sources of energy.In this study,CH4+H2 dis-charge plasma was on-line diagnosed by optical emission spectra so as to char-acterize the discharge system and to do spade work for the optimization of the technical parameters for future commercial production of methane coupling under plasmas.The study was focused on a calculation method for the online diagnosis of the electron excitation temperature in CH4+H2 discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure.The diagnostic method is easy,efficient and fairly precise.A serious er-ror in a literature was corrected during the reasoning of its series of equations formerly used to calculate electron temperatures in plasmas.

  3. Online diagnosis of electron excitation temperature in CH4+H2 discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure by optical emission spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Methane coupling under low temperature plasmas at atmospheric pressure is a green process by use of renewable sources of energy. In this study, CH4+H2 dis- charge plasma was on-line diagnosed by optical emission spectra so as to char- acterize the discharge system and to do spade work for the optimization of the technical parameters for future commercial production of methane coupling under plasmas. The study was focused on a calculation method for the online diagnosis of the electron excitation temperature in CH4+H2 discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure. The diagnostic method is easy, efficient and fairly precise. A serious er- ror in a literature was corrected during the reasoning of its series of equations formerly used to calculate electron temperatures in plasmas.

  4. The neutral atmosphere temperature experiment. [for thermospheric nitrogen measurement on AEROS satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, N. W.; Pelz, D. T.; Niemann, H. B.; Carignan, G. R.; Caldwell, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The AEROS Neutral Atmosphere Temperature Experiment (NATE) is designed to measure the kinetic temperature of molecular nitrogen in the thermosphere. A quadrupole mass spectrometer tuned to N2 measures the N2 density variation in a small spherical antechamber having a knife-edged orifice which is exposed to the atmosphere at the outer surface of the spacecraft. The changing density of N2 due to the spinning motion of the spacecraft permits determination of the velocity distribution of the N2 from which the temperature is calculated. An alternate mode of operation of the instrument allows measurement of the other gases in the atmosphere as well as N2 permitting determination of the neutral particle composition of the atmosphere.

  5. Large-scale drifts observed on electron temperature measurements on JET plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbaud, Thomas; Alper, Barry; Beausang, Kieran; Beurskens, Marc; Flanagan, Joanne; Kempenaars, Mark; Sirinelli, Antoine; Maslov, Mikhail; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2012-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2009, electron temperature (Te) measurements of more than 15000 plasmas produced in the Joint European Torus (JET) have been carefully reviewed using the two main diagnostics available over this time period: Michelson interferometer and Thomson scattering systems. Long term stability of JET Te is experimentaly observed by defining the ECE TS ratio as the ratio of central Te measured by Michelson and LIDAR. This paper, based on a careful review of Te measurement from 15 years of JET plasmas, concludes that JET Te exhibits a 15-20% effective uncertainty mostly made of large-scale temporal drifts, and an overall uncertainty of 16-22%. Variations of 18 plasma parameters are checked in another data set, made of a "reference data set" made of ohmic pulses as similar as possible between 1998 and 2009. Time drifts of ECE TS ratios appear to be mostly disconnected from the variations observed on these 18 plasma parameters, except for the very low amplitude variations of the field which are well correl...

  6. Paradigm Changes in High Temperature Plasma Physics Research and Implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon K. Park

    2008-02-22

    Significant high temperature plasma research in both the magnetic and inertial confinement regimes led to the official launching of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project which is aimed at challenging controlled fusion power for human kind. In particular, such an endeavor originated from the fruitful research outcomes from the world wide magnetic confinement devices (primarily based on the Tokamak approach) mainly in advanced countries (US, EU, and Japan). In recent years, all new steady state capable Tokamak devices are operated and/or constructed in Asian countries and incidentally, the majority of the ITER consortium consists of Asian countries. This provides an opportunity to revisit the unresolved essential physics issues and/or extend the understanding of the transient physics to the required steady state operation so that ITER can benefit from these efforts. The core physics of a magnetically confined hot plasma has two essential components; plasma stability and cross-field energy transport physics. Complete understanding of these two areas is critical for the successful operation of ITER and perhaps, Demo reactor construction. In order to have stable high beta plasmas with a sufficiently long confinement time, the physics of an abrupt disruption and sudden deterioration of the energy transport must be understood and conquered. Physics issues associated with transient harmful MHD behavior and turbulence based energy transport are extremely complicated and theoretical understanding needs a clear validation and verification with a new research approach such as a multi-dimensional visualization.

  7. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Pure Titanium by using Hollow Cathode RF-DC Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windajanti, J. M.; S, D. J. Djoko H.; Abdurrouf

    2017-05-01

    Pure titanium is widely used for the structures and mechanical parts due to its high strength, low density, and high corrosion resistance. Unfortunately, titanium products suffer from low hardness and low wear resistance. Titanium’s surface can be modified by nitriding process to overcome such problems, which is commonly conducted at high temperature. Here, we report the low-temperature plasma nitriding process, where pure titanium was utilized by high-density RF-DC plasma combined with hollow cathode device. To this end, a pure titanium plate was set inside a hollow tube placed on the cathode plate. After heating to 450 °C, a pre-sputtering process was conducted for 1 hour to remove the oxide layer and activate the surface for nitriding. Plasma nitriding using N2/H2 gasses was performed in 4 and 8 hours with the RF voltage of 250 V, DC bias of -500 to -600 V, and gas pressure of 75 to 30 Pa. To study the nitriding mechanism as well as the role of hollow cathode, the nitrided specimen was characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD, and micro-hardness equipment. The TiN compound was obtained with the diffusion zone of nitrogen until 5 μm thickness for 4 hours nitriding process, and 8 μm for 8 hours process. The average hardness also increased from 300 HV in the untreated specimen to 624 HV and 792 HV for 4 and 8 hours nitriding, respectively.

  8. ANALISA SPEKTROSKOPI EMISI UNTUK PENENTUAN TEMPERATUR ELEKTRONIK PADA PLASMA NON-TERMIK NITROGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nur

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Suatu metoda baru telah dikembangkan untuk penentuan temperatur elektronik dari plasma non-termik nitrogen dengan menggunakan spektroskopi emisi. Metoda ini telah dipakai untuk plasma non-termik nitrogen yang diproduksi dalam lucutan pijar korona densitas tinggi. Dengan mengasumsikan bahwa fungsi distribusi energi dari elektron adalah distribusi  maxwellian dan penggunaan data tampang lintang efektif dari sistem positif kedua, 2s+, (C3Pu®B3Pg dari N2 dan sistem negatif pertama, 1s– (B2S+u®X2S+g  dari N2+, hubungan antara energi rerata elektron dengan perbandingan intensitas 1s–(0-0 dan intensitas 2s+(2-5 dapat diselesaikan ecara teoretik. Spektrum emisi dari molekul nitrogen tereksitasi, (C3Pu®B3Pg dari N2 dan molekul terionisasi, 1s– (B2S+u®X2S+g dari N2+, secara eksperimen diperoleh dari spektroskopi emisi. Melalui identifikasi dan analisa spektru-spektrum tersebut, perbandingan intensitas 1s–(0-0 dan intensitas 2s+(2-5 diperoleh secara eksperimen. Metoda ini telah diterapkan untuk menentukan energi rerata elektron atau temperatur elektronik dari plasma non termik nitrogen dalam lucutan pijar korona dengan densitas dari 2,4 x 1020 cm-3 sampai 9,2 x 1020 cm-3

  9. Improved-confinement plasmas at high temperature and high beta in the MST RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, B. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ahn, J. W. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Almagri, A. F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; Kaufman, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2009-01-01

    We have increased substantially the electron and ion temperatures, the electron density, and the total beta in plasmas with improved energy confinement in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). The improved confinement is achieved with a well-established current profile control technique for reduction of magnetic tearing and reconnection. A sustained ion temperature > 1 keV is achieved with intensified reconnection-based ion heating followed immediately by current profile control. In the same plasmas, the electron temperature reaches 2 keV, and the electron thermal diffusivity drops to about 2 m(2) s(-1). The global energy confinement time is 12 ms. This and the reported temperatures are the largest values yet achieved in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). These results were attained at a density similar to 10(19) m(-3). By combining pellet injection with current profile control, the density has been quadrupled, and total beta has nearly doubled to a record value of about 26%. The Mercier criterion is exceeded in the plasma core, and both pressure-driven interchange and pressure-driven tearing modes are calculated to be linearly unstable, yet energy confinement is still improved. Transient momentum injection with biased probes reveals that global momentum transport is reduced with current profile control. Magnetic reconnection events drive rapid momentum transport related to large Maxwell and Reynolds stresses. Ion heating during reconnection events occurs globally, locally, or not at all, depending on which tearing modes are involved in the reconnection. To potentially augment inductive current profile control, we are conducting initial tests of current drive with lower-hybrid and electron-Bernstein waves.

  10. Fluid Simulation of the Ion Temperature Effects on a Collisional Magnetized Sheath of a Dusty Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Driouch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of magnetized dusty plasma sheath with finite ion temperature are studied using a fluid model. Hot electrons, fluid ions, neutral particles and cold fluid dust grains are taken into account in this system. Considering the cross section for collisions between the dust and neutrals has a power law dependence on the dust flow velocity, the fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures. A significant change is observed in the quantities characterizing the sheath with respect to the cold ion assumption. In addition, the result reveals that the effect of ion temperature is more obvious on the dust dynamics in collisional sheath with constant cross section.

  11. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  12. Large amplitude ion-acoustic rarefactive and compressive solitons and double layers in a dusty plasma with finite ion temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S. L.; Tiwari, R. S.; Mishra, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons and double layers are studied using Sagdeev's pseudo potential technique in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma consisting of hot and cold Maxwellian electrons, warm adiabatic ions, and heavily charged massive dust grains. It is found that for the selected set of plasma parameters, the system can support both solitons and double layers in the presence of negative as well as positive dust in the plasma. Further we have also investigated the ranges of parameters for simultaneous existence of both rarefactive and compressive supersonic solitons. The effects of dust concentration and ion temperature on the amplitude and Mach number of the double layer have also been studied. Our findings may be helpful in understanding the formation of non-linear structures, specially the solitons and double layers in space plasma, such as: in interstellar clouds, circumstellar clouds, planetary rings, comets, cometary tails, asteroid zones, auroral plasma, magnetospheric plasma, pulsars, and other astronomical environments and laboratory plasmas.

  13. Satellite and Ground Signatures of Kinetic and Inertial Scale ULF Alfven Waves Propagating in Warm Plasma in Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.

    2015-12-01

    Results from a 3D global numerical model of Alfven wave propagation in a warm multi-species plasma in Earth's magnetosphere are presented. The model uses spherical coordinates, accounts for a non-dipole magnetic field, vertical structure of the ionosphere, and an air gap below the ionosphere. A realistic density model is used. Below the exobase altitude (2000 km) the densities and the temperatures of electrons, ions, and neutrals are obtained from the IRI and MSIS models. Above the exobase, ballistic (originating from the ionosphere and returning to ionosphere) and trapped (bouncing between two reflection points above the ionosphere) electron populations are considered similar to [Pierrard and Stegen (2008), JGR, v.113, A10209]. Plasma parameters at the exobase provided by the IRI are the boundary conditions for the ballistic electrons while the [Carpenter and Anderson (1992), JGR, v.97, p.1097] model of equatorial electron density defines parameters of the trapped electron population. In the simulations that are presented, Alfven waves with frequencies from 1 Hz to 0.01 Hz and finite azimuthal wavenumbers are excited in the magnetosphere and compared with Van Allen Probes data and ground-based observations from the CARISMA array of ground magnetometers. When short perpendicular scale waves reflect form the ionosphere, compressional Alfven waves are observed to propagate across the geomagnetic field in the ionospheric waveguide [e.g., Lysak (1999), JGR, v.104, p.10017]. Signals produced by the waves on the ground are discussed. The wave model is also applied to interpret recent Van Allen Probes observations of kinetic scale ULF waves that are associated with radiation belt electron dynamics and energetic particle injections.

  14. Effects of Satellite Spectral Resolution and Atmospheric Water Vapor on Retrieval of Near-Ground Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-28

    alternate low-level water vapor profile was considered. This " dry " water vapor profile (dashed in Fig. I) was specified to be equal to the "basic...the dry water vapor profile for the night situation. As expected, the unresolvable perturbations of surface temperature were smaller for the dry

  15. Contribution of Modis Satellite Image to Estimate the Daily Air Temperature in the Casablanca City, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Hicham; Rhinane, Hassan; Bensalmia, Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Air temperature is considered to be an essential variable for the study and analysis of meteorological regimes and chronics. However, the implementation of a daily monitoring of this variable is very difficult to achieve. It requires sufficient of measurements stations density, meteorological parks and favourable logistics. The present work aims to establish relationship between day and night land surface temperatures from MODIS data and the daily measurements of air temperature acquired between [2011-20112] and provided by the Department of National Meteorology [DMN] of Casablanca, Morocco. The results of the statistical analysis show significant interdependence during night observations with correlation coefficient of R2=0.921 and Root Mean Square Error RMSE=1.503 for Tmin while the physical magnitude estimated from daytime MODIS observation shows a relatively coarse error with R2=0.775 and RMSE=2.037 for Tmax. A method based on Gaussian process regression was applied to compute the spatial distribution of air temperature from MODIS throughout the city of Casablanca.

  16. CONTRIBUTION OF MODIS SATELLITE IMAGE TO ESTIMATE THE DAILY AIR TEMPERATURE IN THE CASABLANCA CITY, MOROCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Air temperature is considered to be an essential variable for the study and analysis of meteorological regimes and chronics. However, the implementation of a daily monitoring of this variable is very difficult to achieve. It requires sufficient of measurements stations density, meteorological parks and favourable logistics. The present work aims to establish relationship between day and night land surface temperatures from MODIS data and the daily measurements of air temperature acquired between [2011-20112] and provided by the Department of National Meteorology [DMN] of Casablanca, Morocco. The results of the statistical analysis show significant interdependence during night observations with correlation coefficient of R2=0.921 and Root Mean Square Error RMSE=1.503 for Tmin while the physical magnitude estimated from daytime MODIS observation shows a relatively coarse error with R2=0.775 and RMSE=2.037 for Tmax. A method based on Gaussian process regression was applied to compute the spatial distribution of air temperature from MODIS throughout the city of Casablanca.

  17. Monitoring sea level and sea surface temperature trends from ERS satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Beckley, B.

    2002-01-01

    over this period. In the Indian Ocean and particularly the Pacific Ocean the trends in both sea level and temperature are still dominated by the large changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation. In terms of contribution to the total global sea level change, the contribution of the central...

  18. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    and the Baltic Sea. The aim is to evaluate their potential use and demonstrate their applicability within the context of offshore wind energy; for the quantication of the wind resources and for the identication of diurnal warming of the sea surface temperature. Space-borne observations of wind are obtained from...

  19. Temperature effect on hydrocarbon deposition on molybdenum mirrors under ITER-relevant long-term plasma operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.; Litnovsky, A.; Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Westerhout, J.; Zoethout, E.

    2009-01-01

    Optical diagnostics in ITER will rely on mirrors near the plasma and the deterioration of the reflectivity is a concern. The effect of temperature on the deposition efficiency of hydrocarbons under long-term operation conditions similar to ITER was investigated in the linear plasma generator

  20. Temperature effect on hydrocarbon deposition on molybdenum mirrors under ITER-relevant long-term plasma operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.; Litnovsky, A.; Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Westerhout, J.; Zoethout, E.

    2009-01-01

    Optical diagnostics in ITER will rely on mirrors near the plasma and the deterioration of the reflectivity is a concern. The effect of temperature on the deposition efficiency of hydrocarbons under long-term operation conditions similar to ITER was investigated in the linear plasma generator Pilot-P

  1. Measurements of ion temperature and plasma hydrogenic composition by collective Thomson scattering in neutral beam heated discharges at TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Salewski, Mirko; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2013-01-01

    A method is developed to perform plasma composition and ion temperature measurements across the plasma minor radius in TEXTOR based on ion cyclotron structures in collective Thomson scattering spectra. By gradually moving the scattering volume, we obtain measurements across the outer midplane...

  2. Effect of Temperature Sensitivity and Plasticizer Diffusive Transport on Performance of Layered Solid Propellants under Electrothermal Plasma Injection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bourham, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    .... The plasma jet velocity 2 inches from the source exit was found to be about 1300 m/s. Following characterization of the plasma-flow field, a set of experiments was conducted on JA-2 solid propellant with controlled bed temperature...

  3. Modeling of the Flow, Temperature and Concentration Fields in an Arc Plasma Reactor with Argon-Nitrogen Atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fudolig, Agustin M; Nogami, Hiroshi; Yagi, Jun-ichiro

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical formulation was developed for describing the flow behavior, temperature profile and concentration fields in pure or mixed argon and nitrogen arc plasmas impinging on a metal target inside a reactor...

  4. Low temperature plasma equipment applied on surgical hemostasis and wound healings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kenji; Ikehara, Sanae; Sakakita, Hajime; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2017-01-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) coagulation equipment, which avoids causing burn injuries to patients, has been introducing into minimally invasive surgery. The mechanism by which this equipment stops bleeding is to directly occupy the injury with the formed blood clots, and different from the mechanism of the common electrical hemostatic devices that cauterize the tissues around the bleeding to stem the blood flow. A noteworthy point is that LTP treatment with our equipment is not confined only to the blood coagulation system, but it has significant effects on the other blood components to form clots with or without hemolysis, and that there is a plasma current threshold that determines whether the treatment makes stable clots. In this review, we introduce the clinical benefits of LTP current and describe the clot formation it facilitates. PMID:28163378

  5. Surface XPS-investigations of tobacco leaves treated with low-temperature plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The tobacco leaves were treated with low-temperature plasma in Ar, N2, O2, and air atmospheres at different powers (60-130 W). The surface-elemental components, their relative contents, and the functional groups of the surface components of the tobacco leaves were determined using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The experimental results showed that the percentage of the elements C, N, and O had changed considerably and a large number of polar functional groups containing oxygen atoms were incorporated into the components on the tobacco surfaces.The measurements of the surface contact angle showed that the surface contact angle of the modified tobacco leaves was 0 degree, whereas it was 110 degrees before the plasma treatment. These results indicate that the wettability of the modified tobacco leaves improved dramatically. This work may be significant for future researches on the surface modification of the tobacco leaves.

  6. Mechanism for orientation dependence of blisters on W surface exposed to D plasma at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-08-01

    The orientation dependence of blister formation induced by D plasma exposure at low temperature (about 523 K) on rolled tungsten and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) W samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Severe blistering was observed on grains with surface normal directions close to [111], while the [001] surfaces are the most resistant to blister formation. Cavities induced by D2 gas were observed beneath [111], [110] and [001] surfaces, independently on whether blisters were observed on the surface or not. The [111] surface is more prone to blister formation, because it is easily plastically deformed by the D2 gas pressure. Some blister edges and steps were perpendicular to [110] directions, which may be induced by the slipping of dislocations on {110} planes. The blister morphology induced by D plasma can be well explained by the blister model based on plastic deformation mechanism.

  7. Modified Korteweg-de Vries solitons at supercritical densities in two-electron temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Verheest, Frank; Hereman, Willy A

    2016-01-01

    The supercritical composition of a plasma model with cold positive ions in the presence of a two-temperature electron population is investigated, initially by a reductive perturbation approach, under the combined requirements that there be neither quadratic nor cubic nonlinearities in the evolution equation. This leads to a unique choice for the set of compositional parameters and a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation (mKdV) with a quartic nonlinear term. The conclusions about its one-soliton solution and integrability will also be valid for more complicated plasma compositions. Only three polynomial conservation laws can be obtained. The mKdV equation with quartic nonlinearity is not completely integrable, thus precluding the existence of multi-soliton solutions. Next, the full Sagdeev pseudopotential method has been applied and this allows for a detailed comparison with the reductive perturbation results. This comparison shows that the mKdV solitons have slightly larger amplitudes and widths than those obta...

  8. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  9. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  10. Parton energy loss and momentum broadening at NLO in high temperature QCD plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a perturbative-kinetic approach to jet propagation, energy loss, and momentum broadening in a high temperature quark-gluon plasma. The leading-order kinetic equations describe the interactions between energetic jet-particles and a non-abelian plasma, consisting of on-shell thermal excitations and soft gluonic fields. These interactions include 22 scatterings, collinear bremsstrahlung, and drag and momentum diffusion. We show how the contribution from the soft gluonic fields can be factorized into a set of Wilson line correlators on the light cone. We review recent field-theoretical developments, rooted in the causal properties of these correlators, which simplify the calculation of the appropriate Wilson lines in thermal field theory. With these simplifications lattice measurements of transverse momentum broadening have become possible, and the kinetic equations describing parton transport have been extended to next-to-leading order in the coupling g.

  11. Effect of temperature on deposition layer formation in HBr/N2/fluorocarbon-based plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Taku; Yokogawa, Kenetsu; Mori, Masahito

    2017-06-01

    The effects of wafer temperature on etching rate and surface composition were investigated to clarify the surface reaction mechanism under HBr/N2/fluorocarbon-based gas plasma for developing a process for three-dimensional NAND flash devices. The etching rates of both polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) and SiO2 were found to increase at a wafer temperature of 20 °C as compared with those at 60 °C. Comparing the gas combination of fluorocarbon/N2 and HBr/N2 mixtures, the temperature dependence of SiO2 etching rates was considered to relevant to the sticking probability of fluorocarbon polymers. To determine the cause of the temperature dependence of the poly-Si etching rate, surface composition was evaluated by thermal-desorption-spectroscopy and laser-sputtered-neutral-mass-spectrometry analyses. Ammonium bromide was confirmed in the deposition film at a wafer temperature of 20 °C. The observed increase in poly-Si etching rate at lower temperatures was possibly caused by increased amounts of nitrogen, hydrogen, and bromine fixed to the surface with the formation of ammonium bromide.

  12. Influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics and the optical emission of laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Haslinger, M.J.; Hinterreiter, A.; Kolmhofer, P.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Heitz, J. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the influence of sample temperature on the dynamics and optical emission of laser induced plasma for various solid materials. Bulk aluminum alloy, silicon wafer, and metallurgical slag samples are heated to temperature T{sub S} ≤ 500 °C and ablated in air by Nd:YAG laser pulses (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration approx. 7 ns). The plasma dynamics is investigated by fast time-resolved photography. For laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the optical emission of plasma is measured by Echelle spectrometers in combination with intensified CCD cameras. For all sample materials the temporal evolution of plume size and broadband plasma emission vary systematically with T{sub S}. The size and brightness of expanding plumes increase at higher T{sub S} while the mean intensity remains independent of temperature. The intensity of emission lines increases with temperature for all samples. Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with T{sub S}. We apply the calibration-free LIBS method to determine the concentration of major oxides in slag and find good agreement to reference data up to T{sub S} = 450 °C. The LIBS analysis of multi-component materials at high temperature is of interest for technical applications, e.g. in industrial production processes. - Highlights: • Size and emission of laser-induced plasma increase with sample temperature Ts. • Mean optical intensity of plasma is independent of Ts. • Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with Ts. • Major oxides in steel slag are quantified up to Ts = 450 °C. • Industrial steel slags are analyzed by calibration-free LIBS method.

  13. [Plasma temperature of white-eye hexagonal pattern in dielectric barrier discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Li-fang; Fu, Hong-yan

    2015-01-01

    By using the water-electrode discharge experimental setup, the white-eye hexagonal pattern is firstly observed and investigated in the dielectric barrier discharge with the mixture of argon and air whose content can be varied whenever necessary, and the study shows that the white-eye cell is an interleaving of three different hexagonal sub-structures: the spot, the ring, and the halo. The white-eye hexagonal pattern has the excellent discharge stability and sustainability during the experiment. Pictures recorded by ordinary camera with long exposure time in the same argon content condition show that the spot, the ring, and the halo of the white-eye hexagonal pattern have different brightness, which may prove that their plasma states are different. And, it is worth noting that there are obvious differences not only on the brightness but also on the color of the white-eye cell in conditions of different argon content, which shows that its plasma state also changed with the variation of the argon content. The white-eye hexagonal pattern is observed at a lower applied voltage so that the temperature of the water electrodes almost keeps unchanged during the whole experiment, which is advantageous for the long term stable measurement. The plasma state will not be affected by the temperature of the electrodes during the continuous discharge. Based on the above phenomena, plasma temperatures of the spot, the ring, and the halo in white-eye hexagonal pattern including molecule vibrational temperature and variations of electron density at different argon content are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The emission spectra of the N2 second positive band(C3Πu-->B3Πg)are measured, and the molecule vibrational temperature of the spot, the ring, and the halo of the white-eye hexagonal pattern are calculated by the emission intensities. Furthermore, emission spectra of Ar I (2P2-->1S5)is collected and the changes of its width with different argon

  14. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  15. Agriculture pest and disease risk maps considering MSG satellite data and land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, J. R.; Damásio, C. V.; Sousa, A. M. O.; Bugalho, L.; Pessanha, L.; Quaresma, P.

    2015-06-01

    Pest risk maps for agricultural use are usually constructed from data obtained from in-situ meteorological weather stations, which are relatively sparsely distributed and are often quite expensive to install and difficult to maintain. This leads to the creation of maps with relatively low spatial resolution, which are very much dependent on interpolation methodologies. Considering that agricultural applications typically require a more detailed scale analysis than has traditionally been available, remote sensing technology can offer better monitoring at increasing spatial and temporal resolutions, thereby, improving pest management results and reducing costs. This article uses ground temperature, or land surface temperature (LST), data distributed by EUMETSAT/LSASAF (with a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 km (nadir resolution) and a revisiting time of 15 min) to generate one of the most commonly used parameters in pest modeling and monitoring: "thermal integral over air temperature (accumulated degree-days)". The results show a clear association between the accumulated LST values over a threshold and the accumulated values computed from meteorological stations over the same threshold (specific to a particular tomato pest). The results are very promising and enable the production of risk maps for agricultural pests with a degree of spatial and temporal detail that is difficult to achieve using in-situ meteorological stations.

  16. Linking Satellite Derived Land Surface Temperature with Cholera: A Case Study for South Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaach, H. S. V.; Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    A sudden onset of cholera in South Sudan, in April 2014 in Northern Bari in Juba town resulted in more than 400 cholera cases after four weeks of initial outbreak with a case of fatality rate of CFR 5.4%. The total number of reported cholera cases for the period of April to July, 2014 were 5,141 including 114 deaths. With the limited efficacy of cholera vaccines, it is necessary to develop mechanisms to predict cholera occurrence and thereafter devise intervention strategies for mitigating impacts of the disease. Hydroclimatic processes, primarily precipitation and air temperature are related to epidemic and episodic outbreak of cholera. However, due to coarse resolution of both datasets, it is not possible to precisely locate the geographical location of disease. Here, using Land Surface Temperature (LST) from MODIS sensors, we have developed an algorithm to identify regions susceptible for cholera. Conditions for occurrence of cholera were detectable at least one month in advance in South Sudan and were statistically sensitive to hydroclimatic anomalies of land surface and air temperature, and precipitation. Our results indicate significant spatial and temporal averaging required to infer usable information from LST over South Sudan. Preliminary results that geographically location of cholera outbreak was identifiable within 1km resolution of the LST data.

  17. Comparison between MODIS and AIRS/AMSU satellite-derived surface skin temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-R. Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface skin temperatures of the Version 5 Level 3 products of MODIS and AIRS/AMSU have been compared in terms of monthly anomaly trends and climatology over the globe during the period from September 2002 to August 2011. The MODIS temperatures in the 50° N–50° S region tend to systematically be ~1.7 K colder over land and ~0.5 K warmer over ocean than the AIRS/AMSU temperatures. Over high latitude ocean the MODIS values are ~5.5 K warmer than the AIRS/AMSU. The discrepancies between the annual averages of the two sensors are as much as ~12 K in the sea ice regions. Both MODIS and AIRS/AMSU show cooling trends from −0.05 ± 0.06 to −0.14 ± 0.07 K (9 yr−1 over the globe, but warming trends (0.02 ± 0.12–0.15 ± 0.19 K (9 yr−1 in the high latitude regions. The disagreement between the two sensors results mainly from the differences in ice/snow emissivity between MODIS infrared and AMSU microwave, and also in their observational local times.

  18. Microwave diagnostic for the determination of the electron temperature of a low density shock-heated argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C. P.; Exberger, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The diffraction, defocusing and beam bending effects of microwaves transmitted through a bounded shock-heated argon plasma with low electron density are investigated with the purpose of developing an accurate method for electron temperature (Te) determination. This report describes the evaluation technique and presents results for an argon plasma with pressure between 3 and 10 torr, and T2 between 5500 and 9500 K. The electron temperature values obtained have a range of uncertainty between -20% and +10% only. The electron temperature is equal or lower by approximately 1000 K in comparison to the heavy particle temperature (T2).

  19. Surface Modification of Commercially Pure Titanium by Plasma Nitrocarburizing at Different Temperatures and Duration Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Setyo Darmawan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of potential metals to be used in biomechanical applications is the commercially pure (cp titanium. This material requires a process to improve the mechanical properties of the surface, because it is relatively soft. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of plasma nitro carburizing process to cp titanium surface hardness. In this study, cp titanium plasma nitro carburizing process is conducted at different temperatures, i.e., at 350°C for 3, 4, and 5 h, and at 450°C for 2, 3, and 4 h, respectively. Hardness tests are then performed on each specimen. The depth of penetration in the hardness test is also recorded; the microstructure captures are also taken using an optical microscope. The results show that the longer processing time, the higher the hardness value. In higher temperature, the hardness values correspond to the increasing temperature. In terms of the depth direction, there is a reduction in hardness value compared to the raw material.

  20. Nano Structured Plasma Spray Coating for Wear and High Temperature Corrosion Resistance Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D.; Shukla, A. K.; Roy, H.

    2014-04-01

    The nano structured coating is a major challenge today to improve the different mechanical properties, wear and high temperature corrosion resistance behaviour of different industrial alloys. This paper is a review on synthesis of nano powder, plasma spraying methods, techniques of nano structured coating by plasma spray method, mechanical properties, tribological properties and high temperature corrosion behaviour of nano structured coating. Nano structured coatings of ceramic powders/composites are being developed for wide variety of applications like boiler, turbine and aerospace industries, which requires the resistance against wear, corrosion, erosion etc. The nano sized powders are subjected to agglomeration by spray drying, after which nano structured coating can be successfully applied over the substrate. Nano structured coating shows improved mechanical wear resistance and high temperature corrosion resistance. The significant improvement of wear and corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to formation of semi molten nano zones in case of nano structured coatings. The future scope of application of nano structured coating has also been highlighted in this paper.

  1. Oblique ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in two temperature superthermal electrons magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, A., E-mail: anurajrajput@gmail.com; Ryu, C. M., E-mail: ryu201@postech.ac.kr [POSTECH, Hyoja-Dong San 31, KyungBuk, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bains, A. S., E-mail: bainsphysics@yahoo.co.in [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, 264209 Weihai (China)

    2014-12-15

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermal electrons modelled by kappa-type distributions. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries equation is derived, which further gives the solutions with a special type of cnoidal elliptical functions. Both compressive and rarefactive structures are found for these cnoidal waves. Nonlinear periodic cnoidal waves are explained in terms of plasma parameters depicting the Sagdeev potential and the phase curves. It is found that the density ratio of hot electrons to ions μ significantly modifies compressive/refractive wave structures. Furthermore, the combined effects of superthermality of cold and hot electrons κ{sub c},κ{sub h}, cold to hot electron temperature ratio σ, angle of propagation and ion cyclotron frequency ω{sub ci} have been studied in detail to analyze the height and width of compressive/refractive cnoidal waves. The findings in the present study could have important implications in understanding the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature superthermal electrons are present.

  2. Brightness temperature - obtaining the physical properties of a non-equipartition plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhrina, E. E.

    2017-06-01

    The limit on the intrinsic brightness temperature, attributed to `Compton catastrophe', has been established being 1012 K. Somewhat lower limit of the order of 1011.5 K is implied if we assume that the radiating plasma is in equipartition with the magnetic field - the idea that explained why the observed cores of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) sustained the limit lower than the `Compton catastrophe'. Recent observations with unprecedented high resolution by the RadioAstron have revealed systematic exceed in the observed brightness temperature. We propose means of estimating the degree of the non-equipartition regime in AGN cores. Coupled with the core-shift measurements, the method allows us to independently estimate the magnetic field strength and the particle number density at the core. We show that the ratio of magnetic energy to radiating plasma energy is of the order of 10-5, which means the flow in the core is dominated by the particle energy. We show that the magnetic field obtained by the brightness temperature measurements may be underestimated. We propose for the relativistic jets with small viewing angles the non-uniform magnetohydrodynamic model and obtain the expression for the magnetic field amplitude about two orders higher than that for the uniform model. These magnetic field amplitudes are consistent with the limiting magnetic field suggested by the `magnetically arrested disc' model.

  3. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  4. Fatigue improvement in low temperature plasma nitrided Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farokhzadeh, K.; Edrisy, A., E-mail: edrisy@uwindsor.ca

    2015-01-03

    In this study a low temperature (600 °C) treatment was utilized to improve the fatigue performance of plasma nitrided Ti–6Al–4V alloy by optimization of microstructure. In order to study the fatigue properties, rotation bending tests were conducted, the S–N curves were constructed, and the results were compared with those obtained by an elevated temperature treatment (900 °C) as well as conventional gas/plasma nitriding treatments reported in literature. The plasma nitrided alloy at 600 °C showed an endurance limit of 552 MPa which was higher than those achieved by conventional nitriding treatments performed at 750–1100 °C. In contrast, plasma nitriding at 900 °C resulted in the reduction of fatigue life by at least two orders of magnitude compared to the 600 °C treatment, accompanied by a 13% reduction of tensile strength and a 78% reduction of ductility. The deterioration of mechanical properties after the elevated temperature treatment was attributed to the formation of a thick compound layer (∼6 µm) on the surface followed by an α-Case (∼20 µm) and phase transformation in the bulk microstructure from fully equiaxed to bimodal with coarse grains (∼5 times higher average grain size value). The microstructure developed at 600 °C consisted of a thin compound layer (<2 µm) and a deep nitrogen diffusion zone (∼45 µm) while the bulk microstructure was maintained with only 40% grain growth. The micromechanisms of fatigue failures were identified by examination of the fracture surfaces under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that fatigue failure in the plasma nitrided alloy initiated from the surface in the low cycle region (N≤10{sup 5} cycles) and propagated in a ductile manner leading to the final rupture. No failures were observed in the high cycle region (N>10{sup 5} cycles) and the nitrided alloy endured cyclic loading until the tests were stopped at 10{sup 7} cycles. The thin morphology of the compound layer in this

  5. Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran; Mason, Nigel; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2007-06-01

    Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts and Institute of Physics, Belgrade. Each Symposium has sought to highlight a key topic of plasma research and the 5th EU - Japan symposium explored the role of Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas since these are key elements of plasma processing. Other aspects of technologies for manufacturing integrated circuits were also considered. Unlike bio-medicine and perhaps politics, in plasma processing free radicals are `good radicals' but their kinetics are difficult to understand since there remains little data on their collisions with electrons and ions. One of the goals of the symposium was to facilitate communication between experimentalists and theorists in binary collision physics with plasma modellers and practitioners of plasma processing in order to optimize efforts to provide much needed data for both molecules and radicals of practical importance. The non-equilibrium nature of plasmas is critical in the efficient manufacturing of high resolution structures by anisotropic plasma etching on Si wafers since they allow separate control of the directionality and energy of ions and provide a high level of separation between the mean energies of electrons and ions. As nanotechnologies become practical, plasma processing may play a key role, not only in manufacturing of integrated circuits, but also for self-organization of massively parallel manufacturing of nanostructures. In this Symposium the key issues that are hindering the development of such new, higher resolution technologies were discussed and some possible solutions were proposed. In particular, damage control, fast neutral etching, processes at surface and modeling of profiles were addressed in several of the lectures. A wide range of topics are covered in this book including atomic and molecular collision physics - primarily focused towards formation and analysis of radicals, basic swarm data and breakdown kinetics, basic kinetics of RF and DC

  6. Kinetics of metastable atoms and non-Maxwellian electrons in two-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical and analytical solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation in two-temperature steady-state helium plasma are studied in a broad range of conditions T(a) = 5,000-20,000 K, T(e) = 10,000-20,000 K; N(a) = 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 18th per cu cm. The WKB analytical solution is found to be satisfactory in most situations. The deviation of the electron distribution from Maxwellian and a possibility of raising of the tail of the distribution in presence of sources of fast electrons is also discussed.

  7. GROWTH PROCESS OF LOW-TEMPERATURE PLASMA-NITRIDING LAYER ON AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.W.Yu; L.Wang; X.L.Xu; J.B.Qiang

    2004-01-01

    The growth process of low-temperature plasma-nitriding layer was investigated by scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and X-ray diffraction(XRD).The layer is composed of expanded fcc phase(γN),whose lattice parameter of the layer increases with process time resulting from increasing the nitrogen content.The layer hardness increases gradually with nitrogen content.The high slip band density on the layer surface observed in situ by SEM shows that the surface yield occurs when supersaturated nitrogen content in the layer attains to some value,which is also responsible for the increase in layer hardness.

  8. Influence of ionic temperature on the acoustic dressed soliton in plasma with Maxwellian positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shewy, E. K.; Abdo, N. F.; Yousef, M. Saleh

    2016-08-01

    The dressed solitary ion waves in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma composed warm fluid of ion and Boltzmann distributed electrons and positrons are studied. For nonlinear ion acoustic waves, a reductive perturbation method is applied to deduce the KdV equation in terms of first order potential. When soliton amplitude is enlarged, the shape of the wave sidetracks from KdV equation. To improve the soliton shape, the perturbed KdV equation is obtained. The effects of ionic temperature on the electrostatic dressed soliton structures are also discussed.

  9. [One case of low temperature plasma resection in the neonatal congenital cyst of tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangfang; Ma, Jian; Wu, Jingcai

    2015-09-01

    Our department treated one case of neonatal congenital cyst of tongue in March 23, 2015. The clinical manifestation of the case is mainly laryngeal stridor after birth 10d, and when infants were associated with progressive dysphagia. Electrolaryngoscope examination showed the goitre look like the cyst of tongue. Laryngeal CT scanning showed tongue lesions, consider the possibility of large cyst. Bilateral thyroid gland showed good, and no obvious abnormality was found in the cervical ultrasonography. The children was transferred to the ear-nose-throat department for excision of cyst of tongue by low-temperature plasma knife, and postoperative pathology confirmed the diagnosis of cyst of tongue.

  10. Temperature dependence of the Kondo resonance and its satellites in CeCu_2Si_2

    OpenAIRE

    Reinert, F.; Ehm, D.; Schmidt, S; Nicolay, G.; H"ufner, S.; Kroha, J.; Trovarelli, O.; Geibel, C.

    2001-01-01

    We present high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy studies on the Kondo resonance of the strongly-correlated Ce system CeCu$_2$Si$_2$. Exploiting the thermal broadening of the Fermi edge we analyze position, spectral weight, and temperature dependence of the low-energy 4f spectral features, whose major weight lies above the Fermi level $E_F$. We also present theoretical predictions based on the single-impurity Anderson model using an extended non-crossing approximation (NCA), including all...

  11. Activation of electroplated-Cu surface via plasma pretreatment for low temperature Cu-Sn bonding in 3D interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junqiang; Wang, Qian; Liu, Ziyu; Wu, Zijian; Cai, Jian; Wang, Dejun

    2016-10-01

    The pretreatment with Ar mixed 5% H2 plasma was applied to improve surface properties of electroplated Cu for low temperature Cu-Sn bonding in 3D interconnection. Measurement results revealed that the Ar(5% H2) plasma effectively increased the surface activity by reducing oxygen content of the Cu surface. Lower surface roughness obtained by optimizing the pretreatment condition could help to suppress oxygen adsorption. Relationships between surface energy and surface oxygen content, surface oxygen content and surface roughness were also established. Evaluation of low temperature (200 °C) Cu-Sn bonding with optimal plasma pretreatment exhibited a defect-free interface and high shear strength.

  12. High-temperature thermo-mechanical behavior of functionally graded materials produced by plasma sprayed coating: Experimental and modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Park, Chang Hyun; Kim, Gon-Ho; Baik, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in aerospace industries to protect exterior surfaces from harsh environments. In this study, functionally graded materials (FGMs) were investigated with the aim to optimize their high temperature resistance and strength characteristics. NiCrAlY bond coats were deposited on Inconel-617 superalloy substrate specimens by the low vacuum plasma spraying technique. Functionally graded Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with gradually varying amounts of YSZ (20%-100%) were fabricated from composite powders by vacuum plasma spraying. Heat shield performance tests were conducted using a high- temperature plasma torch. The temperature distributions were measured using thermocouples at the interfaces of the FGM layers during the tests. A model for predicting the temperature at the bond coating-substrate interface was established. The temperature distributions simulated using the finite element method agreed well with the experimental results.

  13. Spectroscopic diagnostics of electron temperature and energy conversion efficiency of laser-sustained plasma in flowing argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, J.; Krier, H.; Chen, X.

    1988-08-01

    Laser sustained plasmas are often formed during laser materials interaction. The University's 10 kW CW CO2 laser has been used to study argon plasmas for the application to laser supported propulsion and laser materials processing. The spectroscopic diagnostic method has been applied to study laser-sustained plasmas in 1 atmosphere pure argon gas flow with an f/7 on-axis laser focusing scheme. High flow speeds of 2 to 10 m/sec are achieved. Plasma electron temperatures distributions are determined from the 415.8 nm Ar1 line and its adjacent continuum intensities. Plasma core temperatures as high as 20,000 K are reported. The total absorption of the incident laser power and the radiation loss by the plasma are calculated from the temperature distribution. Results indicated that up to 86 percent of the incident laser power can be absorbed and nearly 60 percent of the incident laser power can be retained by the flowing argon gas to provide thrust. Further research is called for in the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique for diagnostics of the downstream mixing zone and the plasma outer region. Experiments over a wider range of operating conditions, as well as multiple plasma testings, are required to find the optimum operating scheme.

  14. Long-Term Variability of Satellite Lake Surface Water Temperatures in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierach, M. M.; Matsumoto, K.; Holt, B.; McKinney, P. J.; Tokos, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Lakes are the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth that approximately 37 million people depend upon for fresh drinking water, food, flood and drought mitigation, and natural resources that support industry, jobs, shipping and tourism. Recent reports have stated (e.g., the National Climate Assessment) that climate change can impact and exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes, including changes in the range and distribution of certain fish species, increased invasive species and harmful algal blooms, declining beach health, and lengthened commercial navigation season. In this study, we will examine the impact of climate change on the Laurentian Great Lakes through investigation of long-term lake surface water temperatures (LSWT). We will use the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate: Lake Surface Water Temperature & Ice Cover (ARC-Lake) product over the period 1995-2012 to investigate individual and interlake variability. Specifically, we will quantify the seasonal amplitude of LSWTs, the first and last appearances of the 4°C isotherm (i.e., an important identifier of the seasonal evolution of the lakes denoting winter and summer stratification), and interpret these quantities in the context of global interannual climate variability such as ENSO.

  15. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating by Plasma Spraying Using Metal-Metal Clad Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Lan, Hao; Yu, Shouquan; Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2017-08-01

    NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray technology using clad powders as the feedstock. Its tribological properties at variable temperature were evaluated using a ball-on-disk high-temperature tribometer in air. The results showed that compared with NiCr, the NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating exhibited better lubrication effect and higher wear resistance at all test temperatures, especially above 600 °C. At 800 °C, NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating showed the lowest friction coefficient of about 0.2 and its corresponding wear rate reached 2.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm. Characterizations of NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating revealed that at temperatures below 400 °C, Ag was smeared and spread onto the wear surface, reducing the friction and wear. At temperature above 500 °C, the Ag2MoO4 lubrication film formed by tribo-oxidation significantly improved the coating's lubrication effect and wear resistance.

  16. Optimum temperature on corrosion resistance for plasma ion nitrided 316L stainless steel in sea water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the optimum plasma ion nitriding temperature on corrosion resistance in natural sea water for plasma ion nitrided 316L stainless steel. Plasma ion nitriding was conducted at different temperatures of 350, 400, 450, and 500 °C with a mixture of 75% of nitrogen and 25% of hydrogen during 10 h. In conclusion of anodic polarization test, a wide passive potential region and a high corrosion potential were observed at a plasma ion nitriding temperature of 450 °C. Moreover, relatively less damage depth and clean surface micrographs were observed at 450 °C as results of observation of three-dimensional (3D) microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) after polarization experiments. In addition, higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density were indicated at plasma ion nitrided samples than the value of untreated substrate after Tafel analysis. Hence, plasma ion nitrided at 450 °C in sea water solution represented optimum corrosion resistance among the all the plasma ion nitriding temperature parameters.

  17. A New Temperature-Vegetation Triangle Algorithm with Variable Edges (TAVE for Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of spatially-variable actual evapotranspiration (AET is a critical challenge to regional water resources management. We propose a new remote sensing method, the Triangle Algorithm with Variable Edges (TAVE, to generate daily AET estimates based on satellite-derived land surface temperature and the vegetation index NDVI. The TAVE captures heterogeneity in AET across elevation zones and permits variability in determining local values of wet and dry end-member classes (known as edges. Compared to traditional triangle methods, TAVE introduces three unique features: (i the discretization of the domain as overlapping elevation zones; (ii a variable wet edge that is a function of elevation zone; and (iii variable values of a combined-effect parameter (that accounts for aerodynamic and surface resistance, vapor pressure gradient, and soil moisture availability along both wet and dry edges. With these features, TAVE effectively addresses the combined influence of terrain and water stress on semi-arid environment AET estimates. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in one of the driest countries in the world—Jordan, and compare it to a traditional triangle method (TA and a global AET product (MOD16 over different land use types. In irrigated agricultural lands, TAVE matched the results of the single crop coefficient model (−3%, in contrast to substantial overestimation by TA (+234% and underestimation by MOD16 (−50%. In forested (non-irrigated, water consuming regions, TA and MOD16 produced AET average deviations 15.5 times and −3.5 times of those based on TAVE. As TAVE has a simple structure and low data requirements, it provides an efficient means to satisfy the increasing need for evapotranspiration estimation in data-scarce semi-arid regions. This study constitutes a much needed step towards the satellite-based quantification of agricultural water consumption in Jordan.

  18. Simulation of whistler waves excited in the presence of a cold plasma cloud - Implications for the CRRES mission. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation model is constructed to study the excitation of whistler waves in the presence of a cold plasma cloud for conditions representative of those after the release of lithium in the inner plasma sheet during the Combined Release and Radiation Effect Satellite mission. The results indicate that a standing-wave pattern with discrete wave frequencies is formed within the cloud. The magnetic wave amplitude inside the cloud, which is limited by quasi-linear diffusion, is of the order of several nanoteslas. Assuming a magnetospheric loss cone of 5 deg, the observed pitch angle diffusion produced by the whistler waves is sufficient to put the electrons on strong diffusion.

  19. Homogenised daily lake surface water temperature data generated from multiple satellite sensors: A long-term case study of a large sub-Alpine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareeth, Sajid; Salmaso, Nico; Adrian, Rita; Neteler, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Availability of remotely sensed multi-spectral images since the 1980’s, which cover three decades of voluminous data could help researchers to study the changing dynamics of bio-physical characteristics of land and water. In this study, we introduce a new methodology to develop homogenised Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT) from multiple polar orbiting satellites. Precisely, we developed homogenised 1 km daily LSWT maps covering the last 30 years (1986 to 2015) combining data from 13 satellites. We used a split-window technique to derive LSWT from brightness temperatures and a modified diurnal temperature cycle model to homogenise data which were acquired between 8:00 to 17:00 UTC. Gaps in the temporal LSWT data due to the presence of clouds were filled by applying Harmonic ANalysis of Time Series (HANTS). The satellite derived LSWT maps were validated based on long-term monthly in-situ bulk temperature measurements in Lake Garda, the largest lake in Italy. We found the satellite derived homogenised LSWT being significantly correlated to in-situ data. The new LSWT time series showed a significant annual rate of increase of 0.020 °C yr-1 (*P summer.

  20. Temperature of the Source Plasma in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    CERN Document Server

    Reames, Donald V

    2015-01-01

    Scattering, during interplanetary transport in large, "gradual" solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, can cause element abundance enhancements or suppressions that depend upon the mass-to-charge ratio A/Q of the ions as an increasing power law early in events and a decreasing power law of the residual ions later. Since the Q values for the ions depend upon the source plasma temperature T, best fits to the power-law dependence of enhancements vs. A/Q provide a fundamentally new method to determine the most probable value of T for these events. We find that fits to the times of increasing and decreasing powers give similar values of T, most commonly (69%) in the range of 0.8-1.6 MK, consistent with the acceleration of ambient coronal plasma by shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, 24% of the SEP events studied showed plasma of 2.5-3.2 MK, typical of that previously determined for the smaller impulsive SEP events; these particles may be reaccelerated preferentially by qu...