WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite payload controllers

  1. Communication Satellite Payload Special Check out Equipment (SCOE) for Satellite Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Noman

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents Payload Special Check out Equipment (SCOE) for the test and measurement of communication satellite Payload at subsystem and system level. The main emphasis of this paper is to demonstrate the principle test equipment, instruments and the payload test matrix for an automatic test control. Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE)/ Special Check out Equipment (SCOE) requirements, functions and architecture for C-band and Ku-band payloads are presented in details along with their interface with satellite during different phases of satellite testing. It provides test setup, in a single rack cabinet that can easily be moved from payload assembly and integration environment to thermal vacuum chamber all the way to launch site (for pre-launch test and verification).

  2. Astronauts Gardner and Allen bringing Westar VI satellite into payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, left, and Joseph P. Allen IV work together with Dr. Anna L. Fisher (in the Discovery controlling the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm) to bring the Westar VI satellite into the Discovery's payload bay. Allen is on a mobile foot restraint, which is attached to the RMS end effector. Gardner uses the manned maneuvering unit (MMU) on the other side of the satellite. He is attempting to remove the stinger device from the now stabilized satellite.

  3. Optical transceivers for interconnections in satellite payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Mikko; Heikkinen, Veli; Juntunen, Eveliina; Kautio, Kari; Ollila, Jyrki; Sitomaniemi, Aila; Tanskanen, Antti

    2013-02-01

    The increasing data rates and processing on board satellites call for the use of photonic interconnects providing high-bitrate performance as well as valuable savings in mass and volume. Therefore, optical transmitter and receiver technology is developed for aerospace applications. The metal-ceramic-packaging with hermetic fiber pigtails enables robustness for the harsh spacecraft environment, while the 850-nm VCSEL-based transceiver technology meets the high bit-rate and low power requirements. The developed components include 6 Gbps SpaceFibre duplex transceivers for intra-satellite data links and 40 Gbps parallel optical transceivers for board-to-board interconnects. Also, integration concept of interchip optical interconnects for onboard processor ICs is presented.

  4. The EarthCARE satellite payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kotska; Perez-Albinana, Abelardo; Lemanczyk, Jerzy; Heliere, Arnaud; Wehr, Tobias; Eisinger, Michael; Lefebvre, Alain; Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Tomita, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    EarthCARE is ESA's third Earth Explorer Core Mission, with JAXA providing one instrument. The mission facilitates unique data product synergies, to improve understanding of atmospheric cloud-aerosol interactions and Earth radiative balance, towards enhancing climate and numerical weather prediction models. This paper will describe the payload, consisting of two active instruments: an ATmospheric LIDar (ATLID) and a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), and two passive instruments: a Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) and a Broad Band Radiometer (BBR). ATLID is a UV lidar providing atmospheric echoes, with a vertical resolution of 100 m, up to 40 km altitude. Using very high spectral resolution filtering the relative contributions of particle (aerosols) and Rayleigh (molecular) back scattering will be resolved, allowing cloud and aerosol optical depth to be deduced. Particle scatter co- and cross-polarisation measurements will provide information about the cloud and aerosol particles' physical characteristics. JAXA's 94.05 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar operates with a pulse width of 3.3 μm and repetition frequency 6100 to 7500 Hz. The 2.5 m aperture radar will retrieve data on clouds and precipitation. Doppler shift measurements in the backscatter signal will furthermore allow inference of the vertical motion of particles to an accuracy of about 1 m/s. MSI's 500 m pixel data will provide cloud and aerosol information and give context to the active instrument measurements for 3-D scene construction. Four solar channels and three thermal infrared channels cover 35 km on one side to 115 km on the other side of the other instrument's observations. BBR measures reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the scene. To reduce uncertainty in the radiance to flux conversion, three independent view angles are observed for each scene. The combined data allows more accurate flux calculations, which can be further improved using MSI data.

  5. Optimizing communication satellites payload configuration with exact approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathakis, Apostolos; Danoy, Grégoire; Bouvry, Pascal; Talbi, El-Ghazali; Morelli, Gianluigi

    2015-12-01

    The satellite communications market is competitive and rapidly evolving. The payload, which is in charge of applying frequency conversion and amplification to the signals received from Earth before their retransmission, is made of various components. These include reconfigurable switches that permit the re-routing of signals based on market demand or because of some hardware failure. In order to meet modern requirements, the size and the complexity of current communication payloads are increasing significantly. Consequently, the optimal payload configuration, which was previously done manually by the engineers with the use of computerized schematics, is now becoming a difficult and time consuming task. Efficient optimization techniques are therefore required to find the optimal set(s) of switch positions to optimize some operational objective(s). In order to tackle this challenging problem for the satellite industry, this work proposes two Integer Linear Programming (ILP) models. The first one is single-objective and focuses on the minimization of the length of the longest channel path, while the second one is bi-objective and additionally aims at minimizing the number of switch changes in the payload switch matrix. Experiments are conducted on a large set of instances of realistic payload sizes using the CPLEX® solver and two well-known exact multi-objective algorithms. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and limitations of the ILP approach on this real-world problem.

  6. Band-monitoring Payload for a CubeSat Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vagner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During changing sun activity, the ionosphere is responding accordingly and therefore it is interesting to observe the propagation behavior of shortwave bands. For the above mentioned purpose we have designed a band-monitoring payload for an experimental CubeSat satellite. The payload consists of a receiver, which is able to receive SSB modulated narrowband signals in 28 MHz uplink band, and a transmitter with FM modulation in UHF downlink band. The receiver frequency is selected to be at the center of radio amateur activity with low data rate digital modulations.

  7. Design of the Scientific Payload Complex for the International University Satellite 'Condor'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekhov, Oleg; Tse-Liang, Yeh; Jiang, Shyh-Biau; Zhdanov, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Some features of the development of payload complex for the international university small satellite "Condor" are presented in the paper. First the composition of the payload complex and its main components are presented shortly. It is followed by the information about amount of payload and housekeeping data to be transmitted to the ground control station. The rest of the paper describes in more detail the onboard computer (its structure and main components) and onboard software. The process of the integration testing of the onboard computer and NCU-SWIP, its results and further work are described at the end of the paper.

  8. Payload Service System for the Small Satellites of Double Star Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H. X.; Chen, X. M.

    Double Star Project (DSP) is a cooperative program between ESA and China, which plan to be launched in 2003. The main objective of the program is to explore the magnetosphere of the earth. Using two small satellites, one is in near polar orbit, another is in near equatorial orbit; compensate CLUSTER II 4 satellites, to form 6 points measurements and to detect the 3-D small-scale structures and spatial-temporal variations of magnetosphere. ESA will provide several experiment payloads, which are identical to that of CLUSTER II, include Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM), Active Spacecraft Potential Control experiment (ASPOC), Spatial- Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation experiment (STAFF), Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE), Hot Ion Analyzer (HIA) etc. China will provide the launcher, the satellite platform and several experiment payloads, include Heave Ion Detector (HID), High Energy Electron Detector (HEED), High Energy Proton Detector (HEPD), Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Detector etc. In order to reduce the cost, all the experiment payloads provided by ESA keep the same with that of CLUSTER II, include all interfaces even for data acquisition sequence. However the satellites and the interfaces of the payloads from China are different form CLUSTER II, so how to handle the data of the experiments became a challenge problem for the DSP. CSSAR designed a Payload Service System (PSS) to bridge the gap. PSS is a distributed system based on the 1553B data bus, it is consist of Bus Controller, Soiled State Recorder, High Rate Multiplexer, Remote Terminal, S-band Transmitter and Power Distributor. In Bus Controller the special interface designed to connect the ESA experiment payloads, which follow the same interface standard with CLUSTER II. All other payloads and instruments access the system via 1553B data bus. PSS acquire the science and housekeeping data of ESA experiments with the same sequence and period as they did in CLUSTER II, but the data will be

  9. Optical interconnects for satellite payloads: overview of the state-of-the-art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaeke, Michael; Debaes, Christof; Van Erps, Jürgen; Karppinen, Mikko; Tanskanen, Antti; Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-05-01

    The increased demand of broadband communication services like High Definition Television, Video On Demand, Triple Play, fuels the technologies to enhance the bandwidth of individual users towards service providers and hence the increase of aggregate bandwidths on terrestial networks. Optical solutions clearly leverage the bandwidth appetite easily whereas electrical interconnection schemes require an ever-increasing effort to counteract signal distortions at higher bitrates. Dense wavelength division multiplexing and all-optical signal regeneration and switching solve the bandwidth demands of network trunks. Fiber-to-the-home, and fiber-to-the-desk are trends towards providing individual users with greatly increased bandwidth. Operators in the satellite telecommunication sector face similar challenges fuelled by the same demands as for their terrestial counterparts. Moreover, the limited number of orbital positions for new satellites set the trend for an increase in payload datacommunication capacity using an ever-increasing number of complex multi-beam active antennas and a larger aggregate bandwidth. Only satellites with very large capacity, high computational density and flexible, transparent fully digital payload solutions achieve affordable communication prices. To keep pace with the bandwidth and flexibility requirements, designers have to come up with systems requiring a total digital througput of a few Tb/s resulting in a high power consuming satellite payload. An estimated 90 % of the total power consumption per chip is used for the off-chip communication lines. We have undertaken a study to assess the viability of optical datacommunication solutions to alleviate the demands regarding power consumption and aggregate bandwidth imposed on future satellite communication payloads. The review on optical interconnects given here is especially focussed on the demands of the satellite communication business and the particular environment in which the optics have

  10. Military Payloads Hosted on Commercial Satellites: How Can the Space and Missile Systems Center Increase the Number of Commercially Hosted Military Payload Contract Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    payloads: “A hosted payload allows users , such as the government, to add transponders or other equipment to a commercial satellite already scheduled for...decision, those cases are typically closed within a week.29 The empowerment of the commercial owner-operator’s program managers and embedding his or her...determine how to get the data to the end user .”65 This structure allows the commercial owner-operator to select the most efficient solution to meet the CHMP

  11. Three-dimensional visualization and control of electronic warfare (EW) payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Patricia; Tremper, David; Cortesi, Roger

    2008-04-01

    The proliferation of unmanned vehicles carrying tactical payloads in the battle-space has accelerated the need for user-friendly visualization with graphical interfaces to provide remote command and control. Often these platforms and payloads receive their control functions from command centers located half a world away via satellite communications. Operators require situational awareness tools capable of graphically presenting the remote battlefield asset positions and collected sensor data. Often these systems use 2D software mapping tools in conjunction with video for real time situational awareness. The Special Projects Group (SPG) in the Tactical Electronic Warfare Division of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory has been developing an operator control interface called the Jammer Control Station (JCS) to provide 3D battle-space visualization with built-in, remote EW payload command and control (C2) capabilities. The JCS interface presents the operator with graphic depictions of both the platforms' states and the RF environment. Text based messaging between the JCS and the EW payload reduces the impact of the system on the available bandwidth. This paper will discuss the use of the SIMDIS 3-D visualization tool as a real-time command and control interface for electronic warfare (EW) payloads.

  12. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Payload Development and Performance in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Shirley, Mark; Colaprete, Anthony; Osetinsky, Leonid

    2012-05-01

    The primary objective of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) was to confirm the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed region (PSR) at a lunar pole. LCROSS was classified as a NASA Class D mission. Its payload, the subject of this article, was designed, built, tested and operated to support a condensed schedule, risk tolerant mission approach, a new paradigm for NASA science missions. All nine science instruments, most of them ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS), successfully collected data during all in-flight calibration campaigns, and most importantly, during the final descent to the lunar surface on October 9, 2009, after 112 days in space. LCROSS demonstrated that COTS instruments and designs with simple interfaces, can provide high-quality science at low-cost and in short development time frames. Building upfront into the payload design, flexibility, redundancy where possible even with the science measurement approach, and large margins, played important roles for this new type of payload. The environmental and calibration approach adopted by the LCROSS team, compared to existing standard programs, is discussed. The description, capabilities, calibration and in-flight performance of each instrument are summarized. Finally, this paper goes into depth about specific areas where the instruments worked differently than expected and how the flexibility of the payload team, the knowledge of instrument priority and science trades, and proactive margin maintenance, led to a successful science measurement by the LCROSS payload's instrument complement.

  13. The SPectral Ocean Color (SPOC) Small Satellite Mission: From Payload to Ground Station Development and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, S.; Cotten, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    This work introduces the mission concept, technologies, and development status for the measuring SPectral Ocean Color (SPOC) small satellite mission, which will use a hyperspectral imager to map sensitive coastal regions and off coast water quality near the state of Georgia and beyond. SPOC is being developed by The University of Georgia's Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) with funds from NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP). The project is led by undergraduates from a wide range of backgrounds and supervised by a multidisciplinary team of Principal Investigators. Using optical components, electronics boards, a grating spectrometer, and a CMOS array the students will assemble and integrate the payload components and ensure their compatibility with the other subsystems. In-house development and assembly includes building the hyperspectral imager, as well integrating it into the satellite, and testing of the different subsystems of the satellite. The mission will collect spectral data along a 300 km swath using the grating spectrometer to diffract the incoming radiation into the 440-865 nm spectral range. The resulting images will be 75 km x 300 km in size, have a 120 m spatial resolution, and a spectral resolution of 2 nm, covering 100 spectral bands. The resulting dataset will allow for spectral analysis comparisons with some of NASA's legacy satellites. The work describes the timeline and current progress of the SPOC mission. Focus will be equally distributed to all the different systems of the satellite including their development, testing, and integration. Particular emphasis is given to Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS), command and data handling (CDH), payload, power generation, S-Band/X-Band transceivers, and the development of ground station capabilities (S-Band/X-Band).

  14. Neural network payload estimation for adaptive robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, M R; Johnson, M A; Rogers, S K

    1991-01-01

    A concept is proposed for utilizing artificial neural networks to enhance the high-speed tracking accuracy of robotic manipulators. Tracking accuracy is a function of the controller's ability to compensate for disturbances produced by dynamical interactions between the links. A model-based control algorithm uses a nominal model of those dynamical interactions to reduce the disturbances. The problem is how to provide accurate dynamics information to the controller in the presence of payload uncertainty and modeling error. Neural network payload estimation uses a series of artificial neural networks to recognize the payload variation associated with a degradation in tracking performance. The network outputs are combined with a knowledge of nominal dynamics to produce a computationally efficient direct form of adaptive control. The concept is validated through experimentation and analysis on the first three links of a PUMA-560 manipulator. A multilayer perceptron architecture with two hidden layers is used. Integration of the principles of neural network pattern recognition and model-based control produces a tracking algorithm with enhanced robustness to incomplete dynamic information. Tracking efficacy and applicability to robust control algorithms are discussed.

  15. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three......-axis magnetometer, three piezoelectric gyros, and four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. The operation of the spacecraft is fully autonomous. The data flow between the transducers and the onboard computer placed physically outside the satellite is provided by a radio link. The purpose...

  16. Advanced payload concepts and system architecture for emerging services in Indian National Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, E. P.; Rao, N. Prahlad; Sarkar, S.; Singh, D. K.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past two decades Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has developed and operationalized satellites to generate a large capacity of transponders for telecommunication service use in INSAT system. More powerful on-board transmitters are built to usher-in direct-to-home broadcast services. These have transformed the Satcom application scenario in the country. With the proliferation of satellite technology, a shift in the Indian market is witnessed today in terms of demand for new services like Broadband Internet, Interactive Multimedia, etc. While it is imperative to pay attention to market trends, ISRO is also committed towards taking the benefits of technological advancement to all round growth of our population, 70% of which dwell in rural areas. The initiatives already taken in space application related to telemedicine, tele-education and Village Resource Centres are required to be taken to a greater height of efficiency. These targets pose technological challenges to build a large capacity and cost-effective satellite system. This paper addresses advanced payload concepts and system architecture along with the trade-off analysis on design parameters in proposing a new generation satellite system capable of extending the reach of the Indian broadband structure to individual users, educational and medical institutions and enterprises for interactive services. This will be a strategic step in the evolution of INSAT system to employ advanced technology to touch every human face of our population.

  17. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...

  18. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  19. Mapping the Space Radiation Environment in LEO Orbit by the SATRAM Timepix Payload On Board the Proba-V Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Carlos; Polansky, Stepan; Sospisil, Stanislav; Owens, Alan; Mellab, Karim

    2016-08-01

    The compact spacecraft payload SATRAM is operating in LEO orbit since 2013 on board the Proba-V satellite from ESA and provides high-resolution wide-range radiation monitoring of the satellite environment. Equipped with the pixel detector Timepix, the technology demonstration payload determines the composition (particle types) and spectral characterization (stopping power) of the mixed radiation field with quantum imaging sensitivity, charged particle tracking, energy loss and directionality capability. With a polar orbit (sun synchronous, 98° inclination) and altitude of 820 km the space radiation field is continuously sampled over the entire planet every few days. Results are given in the form of spatial- and time- correlated maps of dose rate and particle flux. Comparison is made between quiescent and geomagnetic storm activity periods.

  20. ASPECT spectral imaging satellite proposal to AIDA/AIM CubeSat payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, Tomas; Näsilä, Antti; Tikka, Tuomas; Penttilä, Antti; Muinonen, Karri; Kestilä, Antti; Granvik, Mikael; Kallio, Esa

    2016-04-01

    ASPECT (Asteroid Spectral Imaging Mission) is a part of AIDA/AIM project and aims to study the composition of the Didymos binary asteroid and the effects of space weathering and shock metamorphism in order to gain understanding of the formation and evolution of the Solar System. The joint ESA/NASA AIDA (Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment) mission to binary asteroid Didymos consists of AIM (Asteroid Impact Mission, ESA) and DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test, NASA). DART is targeted to impact Didymos secondary component (Didymoon) and serve as a kinetic impactor to demonstrate deflection of potentially hazardous asteroids. AIM will serve as an observational spacecraft to evaluate the effects of the impact and resulting changes in the Didymos dynamic parameters. The AIM mission will also carry two CubeSat miniaturized satellites, released in Didymoon proximity. This arrangement opens up a possibility for secondary scientific experiments. ASPECT is one of the proposed CubeSat payloads. Whereas Didymos is a space-weathered binary asteroid, the DART impactor is expected to produce a crater and excavate fresh material from the secondary component (Didymoon). Spectral comparison of the mature surface to the freshly exposed material will allow to directly deter-mine space weathering effects. It will be also possible to study spectral shock effects within the impact crater. ASPECT will also demonstrate for the first time the joint spacecraft - CubeSat operations in asteroid proximity and miniature spectral imager operation in deep-space environment. Science objectives: 1. Study of the surface composition of the Didymos system. 2. Photometric observations (and modeling) under varying phase angle and distance. 3. Study of space weathering effects on asteroids (comparison of mature / freshly exposed material). 4. Study of shock effects (spectral properties of crater interior). 5. Observations during the DART impact. Engineering objectives: 1. Demonstration of Cube

  1. Attitude control of a small satellite using magnetic bearing momentum wheel

    OpenAIRE

    Terui, Fuyuto; Nakajima, Atsushi; 照井 冬人; 中島 厚

    1996-01-01

    An attitude controller for a 50 kg-class micro satellite which could be launched by H-2 rocket as a piggyback payload of a main satellite is considered. The survey of the proposals of the mission using a micro satellite from national institutes, universities and private companies shows that the development of a small, light and inexpensive three axis attitude controller is widely expected. One of the candidate configurations for such an attitude controller is bias momentum control using a mag...

  2. Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) Payload Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, S.C.; Brock, B.C.; Bullington, D.M.; Byrd, D.A.; Claassen, P.J.; Decker, M.L.; Henson, T.D.; Kay, R.R.; Kidner, R.E.; Lanes, C.E.; Little, C.; Marbach, K.D.; Rackley, N.G.; Rienstra, J.L.; Smith, B.W.; Taplin, R.B.; Weber, P.G.

    1999-07-07

    MTI is a comprehensive research and development project that includes up-front modeling and analysis, satellite system design, fabrication, assembly and testing, on-orbit operations, and experimentation and data analysis. The satellite is designed to collect radiometrically calibrated, medium resolution imagery in 15 spectral bands ranging from 0.45 to 10.70 pm. The payload portion of the satellite includes the imaging system components, associated electronics boxes, and payload support structure. The imaging system includes a three-mirror anastigmatic off-axis telescope, a single cryogenically cooled focal plane assembly, a mechanical cooler, and an onboard calibration system. Payload electronic subsystems include image digitizers, real-time image compressors, a solid state recorder, calibration source drivers, and cooler temperature and vibration controllers. The payload support structure mechanically integrates all payload components and provides a simple four point interface to the spacecraft bus. All payload components have been fabricated and tested, and integrated.

  3. A Strategy for Multiple Cooperative Spacecraft to Control the Translational Velocity of a Shared Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, David H.

    The scale of payloads that can be moved in space is effectively dictated by the propellant storage, maximum thrust, and thrust efficiency of the upper-stages on modern launch vehicles. These vehicles must control the payload at a single attachment point which leads to restrictive mass and symmetry constraints for the payload design. The research presented here examines an alternative strategy for performing velocity control on large payloads, such as future orbital construction projects and captured asteroids. Starting from a robotic manipulator perspective, an approach is developed to grasp, orient, and translate the payload with multiple cooperative spacecraft that are already in orbit. The approach makes use of a new combinatorial optimization algorithm, path planning with a three-dimensional visibility graph road-map method, and constrained model predictive control. All elements of the strategy are tested in multiple MATLAB simulations.

  4. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba at aft flight deck controls in JSC mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba, wearing flight suit, operates controls on the aft flight deck of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9. During the training session, Malerba adjusts a control on the A3 panel closed circuit television (CCTV). Onorbit station panels appear in front of Malerba and payload station controls behind him.

  5. Telemetry beacon for Polish payload on BRITE-PL-2 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Grzegorz; Stolarski, Marcin

    2013-10-01

    Small satellite missions are becoming more popular. To reduce costs of such projects COTS are used to build the spacecraft and amateur bands are utilized to communicate with it. Although using the hamradio frequencies is free of charge and requires only coordination procedures [1], it is good habit to include on satellite some service for radioamateur society in return. The BRITE-PL-2 Heweliusz [2] satellite - the second Polish satellite from BRITE constellation - will have an S-Band beacon transmitting Morse code signals.

  6. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal channels of Imager payload onboard INSAT-3D satellite using MODTRAN model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Pandya; D B Shah; H J Trivedi; S Panigrahy

    2011-02-01

    INSAT-3D is the new generation Indian satellite designed for improved Earth observations through two payloads – Imager and Sounder. Study was conducted with an aim of simulating satellite level signal over land in the infrared channels of the Imager payload using a radiative transfer model MODTRAN. Satellite level at-sensor radiance corresponding to all four infrared channels of INSAT-3D Imager payload is obtained using MODTRAN and sensitivity of at-sensor radiance was inferred as a function of input parameters namely, surface temperature, emissivity, view angle and atmospheric water vapour, which is helpful in understanding the signal simulation scheme needed for retrieving a very critical parameter namely, land surface temperature.

  7. Optimal design and experimental analyses of a new micro-vibration control payload-platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqing; Yang, Bintang; Zhao, Long; Sun, Xiaofen

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new payload-platform, for precision devices, which possesses the capability of isolating the complex space micro-vibration in low frequency range below 5 Hz. The novel payload-platform equipped with smart material actuators is investigated and designed through optimization strategy based on the minimum energy loss rate, for the aim of achieving high drive efficiency and reducing the effect of the magnetic circuit nonlinearity. Then, the dynamic model of the driving element is established by using the Lagrange method and the performance of the designed payload-platform is further discussed through the combination of the controlled auto regressive moving average (CARMA) model with modified generalized prediction control (MGPC) algorithm. Finally, an experimental prototype is developed and tested. The experimental results demonstrate that the payload-platform has an impressive potential of micro-vibration isolation.

  8. Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Conti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions will involve satellites with great autonomy and stringent pointing precision, requiring of the Attitude Control Systems (ACS with better performance than before, which is function of the control algorithms implemented on board computers. The difficulties for developing experimental ACS test is to obtain zero gravity and torque free conditions similar to the SCA operate in space. However, prototypes for control algorithms experimental verification are fundamental for space mission success. This paper presents the parameters estimation such as inertia matrix and position of mass centre of a Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator (SACSS, using algorithms based on least square regression and least square recursive methods. Simulations have shown that both methods have estimated the system parameters with small error. However, the least square recursive methods have performance more adequate for the SACSS objectives. The SACSS platform model will be used to do experimental verification of fundamental aspects of the satellite attitude dynamics and design of different attitude control algorithm.

  9. Fuzzy crane control with sensorless payload deflection feedback for vibration reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoczek, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    Different types of cranes are widely used for shifting cargoes in building sites, shipping yards, container terminals and many manufacturing segments where the problem of fast and precise transferring a payload suspended on the ropes with oscillations reduction is frequently important to enhance the productivity, efficiency and safety. The paper presents the fuzzy logic-based robust feedback anti-sway control system which can be applicable either with or without a sensor of sway angle of a payload. The discrete-time control approach is based on the fuzzy interpolation of the controllers and crane dynamic model's parameters with respect to the varying rope length and mass of a payload. The iterative procedure combining a pole placement method and interval analysis of closed-loop characteristic polynomial coefficients is proposed to design the robust control scheme. The sensorless anti-sway control application developed with using PAC system with RX3i controller was verified on the laboratory scaled overhead crane.

  10. Nonlinear tracking control of a 3-D overhead crane with friction and payload compensations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh-Huy Vo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear adaptive control of a 3D overhead crane is investigated. A dynamic model of the overhead crane was developed, where the crane system is assumed as a lumped mass model. Under the mutual effects of the sway motions of the payload and the hoisting motion, the nonlinear behavior of the crane system is considered. A nonlinear control model-based scheme was designed to achieve the three objectives: (i drive the crane system to the desired positions, (ii suppresses the vibrations of the payload, and (iii velocity tracking of hoisting motion. The nonlinear control scheme employs adaptation laws that estimate unknown system parameters, friction forces and the mass of the payload. The estimated values were used to compute control forces applied to the trolley of the crane. The asymptotic stability of the crane system is investigated by using the Lyapunov method. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is verified by numerical simulation results.

  11. Passive correlation ranging of a geostationary satellite using DVB-S payload signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Leonid; Shulga, Alexandr; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya; Bushuev, Felix; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola; Bezrukovs, Vladislavs; Moskalenko, Sergiy; Kulishenko, Vladislav; Balagura, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Passive correlation ranging (PaCoRa) for geostationary satellites is now considered as an alternate to tone-ranging (https://artes.esa.int/search/node/PaCoRa). The PaCoRa method has been employed in the Research Institute "Nikolaev astronomical observatory" since the first experiment in August 2011 with two stations spatially separated on 150 km. The PaCoRa has been considered as an independent method for tracking the future Ukrainian geostationary satellite "Lybid'. Now a radio engineering complex (RC) for passive ranging consists of five spatially separated stations of receiving digital satellite television and a data processing center located in Mykolaiv. The stations are located in Kyiv, Kharkiv, Mukacheve, Mykolaiv (Ukraine) and in Ventspils (Latvia). Each station has identical equipment. The equipment allows making synchronous recording of fragments of the DVB-S signal from the quadrature detector output of a satellite television receiver. The fragments are recorded every second. Synchronization of the stations is performed using GPS receivers. Samples of the complex signal obtained in this way are archived and are sent to the data processing center over the Internet. Here the time differences of arrival (TDOA) for pairs of the stations are determined as a result of correlation processing of received signals. The values of the TDOA that measured every second are used for orbit determination (OD) of the satellite. The results of orbit determination of the geostationary telecommunication satellite "Eutelsat-13B" (13º East) obtained during about four months of observations in 2015 are presented in the report. The TDOA and OD accuracies are also given. Single-measurement error (1 sigma) of the TDOA is equal about 8.7 ns for all pairs of the stations. Standard deviations and average values of the residuals between the observed TDOA and the TDOA computed using the orbit elements obtained from optical measurements are estimated for the pairs Kharkiv-Mykolaiv and

  12. Error tracking control for underactuated overhead cranes against arbitrary initial payload swing angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menghua; Ma, Xin; Rong, Xuewen; Tian, Xincheng; Li, Yibin

    2017-02-01

    This paper exploits an error tracking control method for overhead crane systems for which the error trajectories for the trolley and the payload swing can be pre-specified. The proposed method does not require that the initial payload swing angle remains zero, whereas this requirement is usually assumed in conventional methods. The significant feature of the proposed method is its superior control performance as well as its strong robustness over different or uncertain rope lengths, payload masses, desired positions, initial payload swing angles, and external disturbances. Owing to the same attenuation behavior, the desired error trajectory for the trolley for each traveling distance is not needed to be reset, which is easy to implement in practical applications. By converting the error tracking overhead crane dynamics to the objective system, we obtain the error tracking control law for arbitrary initial payload swing angles. Lyapunov techniques and LaSalle's invariance theorem are utilized to prove the convergence and stability of the closed-loop system. Simulation and experimental results are illustrated to validate the superior performance of the proposed error tracking control method.

  13. External Contamination Control of Attached Payloads on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Olsen, Randy L.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Schmidl, William D.; Wright, Bruce D.; Koontz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is an on-orbit platform for science utilization in low Earth orbit with multiple sites for external payloads with exposure to the natural and induced environments. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. This paper describes the external contamination control requirements and integration process for externally mounted payloads on the ISS. The external contamination control requirements are summarized and a description of the integration and verification process is detailed to guide payload developers in the certification process of attached payloads on the vehicle. A description of the required data certification deliverables covers the characterization of contamination sources. Such characterization includes identification, usage and operational data for each class of contamination source. Classes of external contamination sources covered are vacuum exposed materials, sources of leakage, vacuum venting and thrusters. ISS system level analyses are conducted by the ISS Space Environments Team to certify compliance with external contamination control requirements. This paper also addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on ISS.

  14. QuickDirect - Payload Control Software Template Package Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need to quickly, cost-effectively and reliably develop software to control science instruments deployed on spacecraft, QuickFlex proposes to create a...

  15. Re-Engineering the ISS Payload Operations Control Center During Increased Utilization and Critical Onboard Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Stephanie R. B.; Marsh, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in utilization and hours of payload operations being executed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), upgrading the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) ISS Payload Control Area (PCA) was essential to gaining efficiencies and assurance of current and future payload health and science return. PCA houses the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) responsible for the execution of all NASA payloads onboard the ISS. POIC Flight Controllers are responsible for the operation of voice, stowage, command, telemetry, video, power, thermal, and environmental control in support of ISS science experiments. The methodologies and execution of the PCA refurbishment were planned and performed within a four-month period in order to assure uninterrupted operation of ISS payloads and minimal impacts to payload operations teams. To vacate the PCA, three additional HOSC control rooms were reconfigured to handle ISS real-time operations, Backup Control Center (BCC) to Mission Control in Houston, simulations, and testing functions. This involved coordination and cooperation from teams of ISS operations controllers, multiple engineering and design disciplines, management, and construction companies performing an array of activities simultaneously and in sync delivering a final product with no issues that impacted the schedule. For each console operator discipline, studies of Information Technology (IT) tools and equipment layouts, ergonomics, and lines of sight were performed. Infusing some of the latest IT into the project was an essential goal in ensuring future growth and success of the ISS payload science returns. Engineering evaluations led to a state of the art Video Wall implementation and more efficient ethernet cabling distribution providing the latest products and the best solution for the POIC. These engineering innovations led to cost savings for the project. Constraints involved in the management of

  16. Payload Invariant Control via Neural Networks: Development and Experimental Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Pendulum ........ ....................... A-3 A.2. An Inverted Pendulum Control System ...... .............. A-4 ix Figure Page A.3. An ADALINE ...Tolat and Widrow use a computer simulation for the inverted pendulum problem. One Adaptive Linear Neuron ( ADALINE , see Figure A.3) is used for the neural... ADALINE [79] MURPHY’s basic components are four interconnected CMAC’ type neural networks, an autofocus camera, and a Rhino XR-3 manipulator [54

  17. Payload analysis and control of manipulators for human interactive environments

    OpenAIRE

    Arango Castro, Jaime Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Esta tesis doctoral presenta los resultados de simulaciones numéricas y algunos análisis experimentales de tres aspectos principales: el modelamiento dinámico de manipuladores de múltiples grados de libertad (GdL) (n > 2 GdL), el cálculo de la capacidad dinámica de carga asociada al manejo de dicha carga, y el análisis y diseño de controladores no lineales incluyendo el Control Adaptativo por Desfalsificación (CAD). Se desarrollaron análisis de dos (2) casos de estudio: el SCORBOT ER V PLUS ...

  18. An advanced OBP-based payload operating in an asynchronous network for future data relay satellites utilising CCSDS-standard data structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M.; Vernucci, A.

    1991-01-01

    A possible Data Relay Satellite System (DRSS) topology and network architecture is introduced. An asynchronous network concept, whereby each link (Inter-orbit, Inter-satellite, Feeder) is allowed to operate on its own clock, without causing loss of information, in conjunction with packet data structures, such as those specified by the CCSDS for advanced orbiting systems is discussed. A matching OBP payload architecture is described, highlighting the advantages provided by the OBP-based concept and then giving some indications on the OBP mass/power requirements.

  19. Satellite Attitude Control Using Only Electromagnetic Actuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    The primary purpose of this work was to develop control laws for three axis stabilization of a magnetic actuated satellite. This was achieved by a combination of linear and nonlinear system theory. In order to reach this goal new theoretical results were produced in both fields. The focus...... was that interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and a magnetic field generated by a set of coils in the satellite can be used for actuation. Magnetic torquing was found attractive for generation of control torques on small satellites, since magnetic control systems are relatively lightweight, require low power...... was stated as a continuous function of the state. A control law for magnetic actuated satellite was proposed. Complete comprehension of the nature of the satellite control problem required a new approach merging the nonlinear control theory with physics of the rigid body motion and an extension of earlier...

  20. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  1. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  2. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  3. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  4. Real-Time Payload Control and Monitoring on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Charles; Windrem, May; Givens, John J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    World Wide Web (W3) technologies such as the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and the Java object-oriented programming environment offer a powerful, yet relatively inexpensive, framework for distributed application software development. This paper describes the design of a real-time payload control and monitoring system that was developed with W3 technologies at NASA Ames Research Center. Based on Java Development Toolkit (JDK) 1.1, the system uses an event-driven "publish and subscribe" approach to inter-process communication and graphical user-interface construction. A C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) compatible inference engine provides the back-end intelligent data processing capability, while Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) provides the data management function. Preliminary evaluation shows acceptable performance for some classes of payloads, with Java's portability and multimedia support identified as the most significant benefit.

  5. Nonlinear tracking control of a 3-D overhead crane with friction and payload compensations

    OpenAIRE

    Anh-Huy Vo; Quoc-Toan Truong; Ha-Quang-Thinh Ngo; Quoc-Chi Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear adaptive control of a 3D overhead crane is investigated. A dynamic model of the overhead crane was developed, where the crane system is assumed as a lumped mass model. Under the mutual effects of the sway motions of the payload and the hoisting motion, the nonlinear behavior of the crane system is considered. A nonlinear control model-based scheme was designed to achieve the three objectives: (i) drive the crane system to the desired positions, (ii) suppresses the v...

  6. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  7. Control and Non-Payload Communications Generation 1 Prototype Radio Flight Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Young, Daniel P.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Ishac, Joseph A.; Walker, Steven H.; Griner, James H.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned aircraft (UA) represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the Government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized because of the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace System (UAS in the NAS). The desire and ability to fly UA is of increasing urgency. The application of UA to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UA to the NAS. Existing Federal Aviation Regulations, procedures, and technologies do not allow routine UA access to the NAS. Access to the NAS is hampered by challenges such as the lack of an onboard pilot to see and avoid other aircraft; the ability of a single pilot or operator to control multiple UA; the reliance on command and control (C2) links; the altitudes, speeds, and duration at which the aircraft fly; and the wide variation in UA size and performance. NASA is working with other Government agencies to provide solutions that reduce technical barriers and make access to the NAS routine. This goal will be accomplished through system-level integration of key concepts, technologies, or procedures and through demonstrations of these integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. This project provides an opportunity to transition the acquired empirical data and knowledge to the Federal Aviation Administration and other stakeholders to help them define the requirements for routine UA access to the NAS.Radio communications channels for UA are currently managed through exceptions and use either Department of Defense frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for safety and

  8. Adaptive Fuzzy Attitude Control of Flexible Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Ping; LIU Xiang-dong; CHEN Jia-bin

    2005-01-01

    The adaptive fuzzy control is applied in the attitude stabilization of flexible satellite. The detailed design procedure of the adaptive fuzzy control system is presented. Two T-S models are used as both controller and identifier. The parameters of the controller could be modified according to the information of the identifier. Simulation results show that the method can effectively cope with the uncertainty of flexible satellite by on-line learning and thus posses the good robustness. With the proposed method, the precise attitude control is accomplished.

  9. Digital frequency control of satellite frequency standards. [Defense Navigation Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    In the Frequency and Time Standard Development Program of the TIMATION System, a new miniaturized rubidium vapor frequency standard has been tested and analyzed for possible use on the TIMATION 3A launch, as part of the Defense Navigation Satellite Development Program. The design and construction of a digital frequency control was required to remotely control this rubidium vapor frequency standard as well as the quartz oscillator in current use. This control must be capable of accepting commands from a satellite telemetry system, verify that the correct commands have been sent and control the frequency to the requirements of the system. Several modifications must be performed to the rubidium vapor frequency standard to allow it to be compatible with the digital frequency control. These include the addition of a varactor to voltage tune the coarse range of the flywheel oscillator, and a modification to supply the C field current externally. The digital frequency control for the rubidium vapor frequency standard has been successfully tested in prototype form.

  10. Adaptive Control of Rigid Body Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thawar T. Arif

    2008-01-01

    The minimal controller synthesis (MCS) is an extension of the hyperstable model reference adaptive control algorithm. The aim of minimal controller synthesis is to achieve excellent closed-loop control despite the presence of plant parameter variations, external disturbances, dynamic coupling within the plant and plant nonlinearities. The minimal controller synthesis algorithm was successfully applied to the problem of decentralized adaptive schemes. The decentralized minimal controller synthesis adaptive control strategy for controlling the attitude of a rigid body satellite is adopted in this paper. A model reference adaptive control strategy which uses one single three-axis slew is proposed for the purpose of controlling the attitude of a rigid body satellite. The simulation results are excellent and show that the controlled system is robust against disturbances.

  11. The SATRAM Timepix spacecraft payload in open space on board the Proba-V satellite for wide range radiation monitoring in LEO orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Carlos; Polansky, Stepan; Vykydal, Zdenek; Pospisil, Stanislav; Owens, Alan; Kozacek, Zdenek; Mellab, Karim; Simcak, Marek

    2016-06-01

    The Space Application of Timepix based Radiation Monitor (SATRAM) is a spacecraft platform radiation monitor on board the Proba-V satellite launched in an 820 km altitude low Earth orbit in 2013. The is a technology demonstration payload is based on the Timepix chip equipped with a 300 μm silicon sensor with signal threshold of 8 keV/pixel to low-energy X-rays and all charged particles including minimum ionizing particles. For X-rays the energy working range is 10-30 keV. Event count rates can be up to 106 cnt/(cm2 s) for detailed event-by-event analysis or over 1011 cnt/(cm2 s) for particle-counting only measurements. The single quantum sensitivity (zero-dark current noise level) combined with per-pixel spectrometry and micro-scale pattern recognition analysis of single particle tracks enables the composition (particle type) and spectral characterization (energy loss) of mixed radiation fields to be determined. Timepix's pixel granularity and particle tracking capability also provides directional sensitivity for energetic charged particles. The payload detector response operates in wide dynamic range in terms of absorbed dose starting from single particle doses in the pGy level, particle count rate up to 106-10 /cm2/s and particle energy loss (threshold at 150 eV/μm). The flight model in orbit was successfully commissioned in 2013 and has been sampling the space radiation field in the satellite environment along its orbit at a rate of several frames per minute of varying exposure time. This article describes the design and operation of SATRAM together with an overview of the response and resolving power to the mixed radiation field including summary of the principal data products (dose rate, equivalent dose rate, particle-type count rate). The preliminary evaluation of response of the embedded Timepix detector to space radiation in the satellite environment is presented together with first results in the form of a detailed visualization of the mixed radiation

  12. Thermal control system of the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory Payload: design and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, G.; Terenzi, L.; Eccleston, P.; Bradshaw, T.; Crook, M.; Linder, M.; Hunt, T.; Winter, B.; Focardi, M.; Malaguti, G.; Micela, G.; Pace, E.; Tinetti, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is a space mission dedicated to investigate exoplanetary atmospheres by undertaking spectroscopy of transiting planets in a wide spectral region from the visible to the mid-InfraRed (IR). The high sensitivity and the long exposures required by the mission need an extremely stable thermo-mechanical platform. The instrument is passively cooled down to approximately 40 K, together with the telescope assembly, by a V-Groove based design that exploits the L2 orbit favourable thermal conditions. The visible and short-IR wavelength detectors are maintained at the operating temperature of 40 K by a dedicated radiator coupled to the cold space. The mid-IR channels, require a lower operating temperature and are cooled by an active refrigerator: a 28 K Neon Joule-Thomson (JT) cold end, fed by a mechanical compressor. Temperature stability is one of the challenging issues of the whole architecture: periodical perturbations must be controlled before they reach the sensitive units of the instrument. An efficient thermal control system is required: the design is based on a combination of passive and active solutions. In this paper we describe the thermal architecture of the payload with the main cryo-chain stages and their temperature control systems. The requirements that drive the design and the trade-offs needed to enable the EChO exciting science in a technically feasible payload design are discussed. Thermal modelling results and preliminary performance predictions in terms of steady state and transient conditions are also reported. This paper is presented on behalf of the EChO Consortium.

  13. Recovery of sounding rocket payloads by center-of-gravity position control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgarvey, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed to predict dynamic pressure at parachute deployment altitude. Inputs to the program are payload geometry, center-of-gravity position, velocity, and altitude at start of reentry. Payload is assumed to be trimmed, and potential and cross-flow drag theory is used to compute trim angle-of-attack and trim drag coefficient as a function of free-stream Mach number. The computations involve only simple geometric quantities and closed-form equations. Payload flight path is assumed to be vertical, and equations of motion of the payload are integrated from start of reentry to chute deployment altitude.

  14. Chaotic satellite attitude control by adaptive approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Jing; Zuo, Min; Liu, Zaiwen; Du, Junping

    2014-06-01

    In this article, chaos control of satellite attitude motion is considered. Adaptive control based on dynamic compensation is utilised to suppress the chaotic behaviour. Control approaches with three control inputs and with only one control input are proposed. Since the adaptive control employed is based on dynamic compensation, faithful model of the system is of no necessity. Sinusoidal disturbance and parameter uncertainties are considered to evaluate the robustness of the closed-loop system. Both of the approaches are confirmed by theoretical and numerical results.

  15. Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) Prototype Radio - Generation 2 Security Flight Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannicca, Dennis C.; Ishac, Joseph A.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), in cooperation with Rockwell Collins, is working to develop a prototype Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) radio platform as part of NASA Integrated Systems Research Program's (ISRP) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) project. A primary focus of the project is to work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and industry standards bodies to build and demonstrate a safe, secure, and efficient CNPC architecture that can be used by industry to evaluate the feasibility of deploying a system using these technologies in an operational capacity. GRC has been working in conjunction with these groups to assess threats, identify security requirements, and to develop a system of standards-based security controls that can be applied to the GRC prototype CNPC architecture as a demonstration platform. The proposed security controls were integrated into the GRC flight test system aboard our S-3B Viking surrogate aircraft and several network tests were conducted during a flight on November 15th, 2014 to determine whether the controls were working properly within the flight environment. The flight test was also the first to integrate Robust Header Compression (ROHC) as a means of reducing the additional overhead introduced by the security controls and Mobile IPv6. The effort demonstrated the complete end-to-end secure CNPC link in a relevant flight environment.

  16. Congestion control and routing over satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinhua

    Satellite networks and transmissions find their application in fields of computer communications, telephone communications, television broadcasting, transportation, space situational awareness systems and so on. This thesis mainly focuses on two networking issues affecting satellite networking: network congestion control and network routing optimization. Congestion, which leads to long queueing delays, packet losses or both, is a networking problem that has drawn the attention of many researchers. The goal of congestion control mechanisms is to ensure high bandwidth utilization while avoiding network congestion by regulating the rate at which traffic sources inject packets into a network. In this thesis, we propose a stable congestion controller using data-driven, safe switching control theory to improve the dynamic performance of satellite Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management (TCP/AQM) networks. First, the stable region of the Proportional-Integral (PI) parameters for a nominal model is explored. Then, a PI controller, whose parameters are adaptively tuned by switching among members of a given candidate set, using observed plant data, is presented and compared with some classical AQM policy examples, such as Random Early Detection (RED) and fixed PI control. A new cost detectable switching law with an interval cost function switching algorithm, which improves the performance and also saves the computational cost, is developed and compared with a law commonly used in the switching control literature. Finite-gain stability of the system is proved. A fuzzy logic PI controller is incorporated as a special candidate to achieve good performance at all nominal points with the available set of candidate controllers. Simulations are presented to validate the theory. An effocient routing algorithm plays a key role in optimizing network resources. In this thesis, we briefly analyze Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite networks, review the Cross Entropy (CE

  17. Satellite Formation Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    all cases tested, and the eccentricity-minimizing control law was able to maintain the position within 4.17 feet. More recently, Wedekind considered...three different formations, in-plane, in-track, and circular, was considered. Wedekind achieved favorable results for these three formations when the...and Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004. 23. Wedekind , James T. Characterizing and Controlling the Effects of Differential Drag on Satellite Formations

  18. Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) Prototype Radio - Generation 2 Security Architecture Lab Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannicca, Dennis C.; McKim, James H.; Stewart, David H.; Thadhani, Suresh K.; Young, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with Rockwell Collins, is working to develop a prototype Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) radio platform as part of NASA Integrated Systems Research Program's (ISRP) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) project. A primary focus of the project is to work with the FAA and industry standards bodies to build and demonstrate a safe, secure, and efficient CNPC architecture that can be used by industry to evaluate the feasibility of deploying a system using these technologies in an operational capacity. GRC has been working in conjunction with these groups to assess threats, identify security requirements, and to develop a system of standards-based security controls that can be applied to the current GRC prototype CNPC architecture as a demonstration platform. The security controls were integrated into a lab test bed mock-up of the Mobile IPv6 architecture currently being used for NASA flight testing, and a series of network tests were conducted to evaluate the security overhead of the controls compared to the baseline CNPC link without any security. The aim of testing was to evaluate the performance impact of the additional security control overhead when added to the Mobile IPv6 architecture in various modes of operation. The statistics collected included packet captures at points along the path to gauge packet size as the sample data traversed the CNPC network, round trip latency, jitter, and throughput. The effort involved a series of tests of the baseline link, a link with Robust Header Compression (ROHC) and without security controls, a link with security controls and without ROHC, and finally a link with both ROHC and security controls enabled. The effort demonstrated that ROHC is both desirable and necessary to offset the additional expected overhead of applying security controls to the CNPC link.

  19. Highly controllable near-surface swimming of magnetic Janus nanorods: application to payload capture and manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Lamar O; Carpenter, Jerome [Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Evans, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Hall, Adam R [Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC 27401 (United States); Shields, Adam; Superfine, Richard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ford, Kris; Millard, Michael, E-mail: rsuper@physics.unc.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2011-03-30

    Directed manipulation of nanomaterials has significant implications in the field of nanorobotics, nanobiotechnology, microfluidics and directed assembly. With the goal of highly controllable nanomaterial manipulation in mind, we present a technique for the near-surface manoeuvering of magnetic nanorod swimmers and its application to controlled micromanipulation. We fabricate magnetic Janus nanorods and show that the magnetic rotation of these nanorods near a floor results in predictable translational motion. The nanorod plane of rotation is nearly parallel to the floor, the angle between rod tilt and floor being expressed by {theta}, where 0{sup 0} < {theta} < 20{sup 0}. Orthogonal magnetic fields control in-plane motion arbitrarily. Our model for translation incorporates symmetry breaking through increased drag at the no-slip surface boundary. Using this method we demonstrate considerable rod steerability. Additionally, we approach, capture, and manipulate a polystyrene microbead as proof of principle. We attach Janus nanorods to the surfaces of cells and utilize these rods to manipulate individual cells, proving the ability to manoeuver payloads with a wide range of sizes.

  20. Small Satellite Passive Magnetic Attitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, David T.

    Passive Magnetic Attitude Control (PMAC) is capable of aligning a satellite within 5 degrees of the local magnetic field at low resource cost, making it ideal for a small satellite. However, simulation attempts to date have not been able to predict the attitude dynamics at a level sufficient for mission design. Also, some satellites have suffered from degraded performance due to an incomplete understanding of PMAC system design. This dissertation alleviates these issues by discussing the design, inputs, and validation of PMAC systems for small satellites. Design rules for a PMAC system are defined using the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat as an example. A Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) is defined for the attitude determination of a PMAC satellite without a rate gyro. After on-orbit calibration of the off-the-shelf magnetometer and photodiodes and an on-orbit fit to the satellite magnetic moment, the MEKF regularly achieves a three sigma attitude uncertainty of 4 degrees or less. CSSWE is found to settle to the magnetic field in seven days, verifying its attitude design requirement. A Helmholtz cage is constructed and used to characterize the CSSWE bar magnet and hysteresis rods both individually and in the flight configuration. Fitted parameters which govern the magnetic material behavior are used as input to a PMAC dynamics simulation. All components of this simulation are described and defined. Simulation-based dynamics analysis shows that certain initial conditions result in abnormally decreased settling times; these cases may be identified by their dynamic response. The simulation output is compared to the MEKF output; the true dynamics are well modeled and the predicted settling time is found to possess a 20 percent error, a significant improvement over prior simulation.

  1. Active-passive integrated vibration control for control moment gyros and its application to satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Zang, Yue; Li, Mou; Wang, Youyi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    The strategy of active-passive integrated vibration control on the truss enveloping control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) is presented and its characteristics of time domain and frequency domain are analyzed. Truss enveloping CMGs contains pyramid-type CMGs, which are enveloped by multiple struts. These struts can be employed to realize the active-passive integrated vibration control. In addition, the struts of the trusses can maintain the working space of CMGs. Firstly, the disturbance characteristics of CMGs are analyzed considering static and dynamic imbalances of the CMG's rotor; then, an active-passive integrated vibration isolation truss structure is developed based on its characteristics. This structure can restrain the CMG vibration as much as possible and reduce its influence on the photographic quality of optical payloads. Next, the dynamic model of the active-passive vibration isolation truss structure is established. The frequency domain analysis of this model shows that the active-passive integrated vibration control method can restrain the high-frequency vibration and also improve the characteristics of low-frequency vibration. Finally, the dynamic model for the whole satellite is built with this type of CMGs. The time domain simulations of satellite attitude control verify the attitude control improvements resulting from the CMGs vibration control strategy.

  2. Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Astronautics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In...yaw axes and provide magnetic damping on both the pitch and yaw axes. The satellite resem- bles a shuttlecock used in badminton (see Figure 2.2). The...Control Using Atmospheric Drag Guettler, David B., Captain, USAF Air Force Institute of Technology Graduate School of Engineering and Management (AFIT

  3. Results of in-flight operation of scientific payload on micro-satellite “Kolibri-2000”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Stanislav I.; Afanasyev, Yuri V.; Eismont, Natan A.; Grachev, Egor A.; Grigoryan, Oleg R.; Grushin, Valery A.; Lysakov, Dmitri S.; Nozdrachev, Mikhail N.

    2005-01-01

    The realization of Russian-Australian scientific—educational micro-satellite "Kolibri-2000" (weight of 20.5 kg, http://www.kolibri2000.ru 20 March, 2002), delivered into an orbit by "Progress M1-7", was the first item in the Program of Scientific—Educational Micro-Satellite (PSEMS' 2002-2007, http://iki.cosmos.ru/kollibri/mission1_e.htm) and designate the starting point of a series at perspective scientific—educational micro-satellites (SEMS, http://www.energia.ru/english/energia/sci-education/microsat/microsat-02.html). In the "Kolibri-2000" project, several schools equipped by School Center of Reception of the Information (SCRI), participated, including Russian schools (Obninsk http://ftschool.obninsk.org) and two Australian schools in Sydney, Knox Grammar School ( www.knox.nsw.edu.au) and Ravenswood School for Girls ( www.ravenswood.nsw.edu.au). The results of the "Kolibri-2000" first measurements on the orbit near the International Space Station will be submitted in this paper which include the ionosphere reaction during the April 2002 events, and address as understanding of the coupling and feedback in the Sun-Earth interaction.

  4. 星载光电振荡器(OEO)实现方法研究%Research on Optoelectronic Oscillator (OEO) Technology for Satellite Payloads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁栋; 谭庆贵; 蒋炜; 幺周石

    2015-01-01

    文章针对未来卫星领域对高频率、低相位噪声微波本振源发展需求,提出一种适应于星载应用的光电振荡器实现方法。首先介绍了光电振荡器应用背景、技术特点及发展现状。之后详细分析了星载光电振荡器的设计方法,给出了光电振荡器的振荡阀值、产生毫米波频率、幅度数学模型等,最后对光电振荡器的相位噪声性能进行详细分析。分析表明,利用光电振荡器能够产生超低相位噪声(-163dBc/Hz @10KHz)的微波本振信号,且光电振荡器的相位噪声和振荡频率无关,星载光电振荡器为未来卫星领域提供一种可行的微波本振信号生成方法。%An optoelectronic oscillator ( OEO) method for Satellite Payloads is analyzed,which is used to meet the de-mands of aerospace for high frequency and low phase noise signal. Firstly, the application background and technology char-acteristic of the OEO are introduced. Secondly,the principle,the oscillator threshold, the frequency and the amplitude of the OEO are discussed with mathematical method. Finally, the phase noise performance of the OEO is analyzed in detail. The result shows that the OEO can generate microwave signal with high performance( -163dBc/Hz @10KHz), and the phase noise of the microwave signal is independent of the oscillator frequency. The OEO can meet the demands of microwave signal generating for satellite payloads.

  5. Exploration Missions to Host Small Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, Jonathan; Pelfrey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The next-generation heavy launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS), will provide the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the exploration mission trajectory. We will describe the payload mission concept of operations, the payload capacity for the SLS, and the payload requirements. Exploration Mission 1, currently planned for launch in December 2017, will be the first mission to carry such payloads on the SLS.

  6. Satellite Laser Ranging Photon-Budget Calculations for a Single Satellite Cornercube Retroreflector: Attitude Control Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Satellite Laser Ranging Photon-Budget Calculations for a Single Satellite Cornercube Retroreflector: Attitude Control Tolerance Philip C...the SLR station, and the direction of the satellite from the SLR station. The required attitude control tolerance is to within 17◦ of the optimal... attitude control strategy determined in the present work. A pre-launch measurement of the re- flectance (diffraction) pattern of each retroreflector is

  7. Observer-based Satellite Attitude Control and Simulation Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子才; 马克茂

    2002-01-01

    Observer design method is applied to the realization of satellite attitude control law baaed on simplified control model. Exact mathematical model of the satellite attitude control system is also constructed, together with the observer-based control law, to conduct simulation research. The simulation results justify the effectiveness andfeasibility of the observer-based control method.

  8. NASA Unmanned Aircraft (UA) Control and Non-Payload Communication (CNPC) System Waveform Trade Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Carlos; Hammel, Bruce; Hammel, Allan; Moore, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS). To address this deficiency, NASA has established a project called UAS Integration in the NAS (UAS in the NAS), under the Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). This project provides an opportunity to transition concepts, technology, algorithms, and knowledge to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and other stakeholders to help them define the requirements, regulations, and issues for routine UAS access to the NAS. The safe, routine, and efficient integration of UAS into the NAS requires new radio frequency (RF) spectrum allocations and a new data communications system which is both secure and scalable with increasing UAS traffic without adversely impacting the Air Traffic Control (ATC) communication system. These data communications, referred to as Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC), whose purpose is to exchange information between the unmanned aircraft and the ground control station to ensure safe, reliable, and effective unmanned aircraft flight operation. A Communications Subproject within the UAS in the NAS Project has been established to address issues related to CNPC development, certification and fielding. The focus of the Communications Subproject is on validating and allocating new RF spectrum and data link communications to enable civil UAS integration into the NAS. The goal is to validate secure, robust data links within the allocated frequency spectrum for UAS. A vision, architectural concepts, and seed requirements for the future commercial UAS CNPC system have been developed by RTCA Special Committee 203 (SC-203) in the process

  9. Performance analysis of two-degree of freedom fractional order PID controllers for robotic manipulator with payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2015-09-01

    The robotic manipulators are multi-input multi-output (MIMO), coupled and highly nonlinear systems. The presence of external disturbances and time-varying parameters adversely affects the performance of these systems. Therefore, the controller designed for these systems should effectively deal with such complexities, and it is an intriguing task for control engineers. This paper presents two-degree of freedom fractional order proportional-integral-derivative (2-DOF FOPID) controller scheme for a two-link planar rigid robotic manipulator with payload for trajectory tracking task. The tuning of all controller parameters is done using cuckoo search algorithm (CSA). The performance of proposed 2-DOF FOPID controllers is compared with those of their integer order designs, i.e., 2-DOF PID controllers, and with the traditional PID controllers. In order to show effectiveness of proposed scheme, the robustness testing is carried out for model uncertainties, payload variations with time, external disturbance and random noise. Numerical simulation results indicate that the 2-DOF FOPID controllers are superior to their integer order counterparts and the traditional PID controllers.

  10. Earth Viewing Applications Laboratory (EVAL). Dedicated payload, standard test rack payload, sensor modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of strawman earth-viewing shuttle sortie payloads begun with the partial spacelab payload was analyzed. The payloads analyzed represent the two extremes of shuttle sortie application payloads: a full shuttle sortie payload dedicated to earth-viewing applications, and a small structure payload which can fly on a space available basis with another primary shuttle payload such as a free flying satellite. The intent of the dedicated mission analysis was to configure an ambitious, but feasible, payload; which, while rich in scientific return, would also stress the system and reveal any deficiences or problem areas in mission planning, support equipment, and operations. Conversely, the intent of the small structure payload was to demonstrate the ease with which a small, simple, flexible payload can be accommodated on shuttle flights.

  11. Flexible Satellite Attitude Control via Adaptive Fuzzy Linearization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Ping; LIU Xiang-dong; CHEN Jia-bin; LIU Xiao-he

    2005-01-01

    The adaptive fuzzy control is combined with input-output linearization control to constitute the hybrid controller. The control method is then applied to the attitude maneuver control of the flexible satellite.The basic control structure is given. The rules of the controller parameter selection, which guarantee the attitude stabilization of the satellite with parameter uncertainties, have been analyzed. Simulation results show that the precise attitude control is accomplished in spite of the uncertainty in the system.

  12. A preliminary investigation of the environmental Control and Life Support Subsystems (EC/LSS) for animal and plant experiment payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary study of the environmental control and life support subsystems (EC/LSS) necessary for an earth orbital spacecraft to conduct biological experiments is presented. The primary spacecraft models available for conducting these biological experiments are the space shuttle and modular space station. The experiments would be housed in a separate module that would be contained in either the shuttle payload bay or attached to the modular space station. This module would be manned only for experiment-related tasks, and would contain a separate EC/LSS for the crew and animals. Metabolic data were tabulated on various animals that are considered useful for a typical experiment program. The minimum payload for the 30-day space shuttle module was found to require about the equivalent of a one-man EC/LSS; however, the selected two-man shuttle assemblies will give a growth and contingency factor of about 50 percent. The maximum payloads for the space station mission will require at least a seven-man EC/LSS for the laboratory colony and a nine-man EC/LSS for the centrifuge colony. There is practically no room for growth or contingencies in these areas.

  13. Optimal Release Control of Companion Satellite System Using Electromagnetic Forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengwen Xu,Peng Shi; Yushan Zhao∗

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic forces generated by the inter⁃action of component satellites can be used to release companion satellites. Optimal release trajectories for companion satellite system using inter⁃electromagnetic forces were investigated. Firstly, nonlinear relative motion dynamic equations of a two⁃craft electromagnetic companion satellite system were derived in spatial polar coordinates. Then principles of electromagnetic satellite formation flying were introduced. Secondly, the characteristics of the electromagnetic companion satellites release were analyzed and optimal release trajectories of companion satellites using electromagnetic forces were obtained using Gauss pseudospectral method. Three performance criteria were chosen as minimum time, minimum acceleration of the separation distance and minimum control acceleration. Finally, three release examples including expansion along separation distance, rotation in orbital plane and stable formation reconfiguration were given to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Results indicated that the release trajectories can converge to optimal solutions effectively and the concept of release companion satellites using electromagnetic forces is practicable.

  14. Interface control procedures for university satellite programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez Lebbink, L.; Hamann, R.J.; Bouwmeester, J.; Brouwer, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    Now that more and more universities have joined the CubeSat community and have their own satellite in Earth orbit, it is expected that the planned successors will be of higher complexity. These successors within a university satellite programme will often house more technically ad-vanced subsystems

  15. Interface control procedures for university satellite programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez Lebbink, L.; Hamann, R.J.; Bouwmeester, J.; Brouwer, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    Now that more and more universities have joined the CubeSat community and have their own satellite in Earth orbit, it is expected that the planned successors will be of higher complexity. These successors within a university satellite programme will often house more technically ad-vanced subsystems

  16. 3-Axis magnetic control: flight results of the TANGO satellite in the PRISMA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasset, C.; Noteborn, R.; Bodin, P.; Larsson, R.; Jakobsson, B.

    2013-09-01

    PRISMA implements guidance, navigation and control strategies for advanced formation flying and rendezvous experiments. The project is funded by the Swedish National Space Board and run by OHB-Sweden in close cooperation with DLR, CNES and the Danish Technical University. The PRISMA test bed consists of a fully manoeuvrable MANGO satellite as well as a 3-axis controlled TANGO satellite without any Δ V capability. PRISMA was launched on the 15th of June 2010 on board DNEPR. The TANGO spacecraft is the reference satellite for the experiments performed by MANGO, either with a "cooperative" or "non-cooperative" behaviour. Small, light and low-cost were the keywords for the TANGO design. The attitude determination is based on Sun sensors and magnetometers, and the active attitude control uses magnetic torque rods only. In order to perform the attitude manoeuvres required to fulfil the mission objectives, using any additional gravity gradient boom to passively stabilize the spacecraft was not allowed. After a two-month commissioning phase, TANGO separated from MANGO on the 11th of August 2010. All operational modes have been successfully tested, and the pointing performance in flight is in accordance with expectations. The robust Sun Acquisition mode reduced the initial tip-off rate and placed TANGO into a safe attitude in TANGO points its GPS antenna towards zenith with sufficient accuracy to track as many GPS satellites as MANGO. At the same time, it points its solar panel towards the Sun, and all payload equipments can be switched on without any restriction. This paper gives an overview of the TANGO Attitude Control System design. It then presents the flight results in the different operating modes. Finally, it highlights the key elements at the origin of the successful 3-axis magnetic control strategy on the TANGO satellite.

  17. High Precision Control of Ship-Mounted Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohsen, Soltani; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2007-01-01

    The telecommunication on a modern merchandise ship is maintained by means of satellite communication. The task of the tracking system is to position the on-board antenna toward a chosen satellite. The control system is capable of rejecting the external disturbances which affect on the under......-actuated antenna and ensures that it remains locked on the satellite. In this paper, a nonlinear internal model controller (NIMC), which achieves asymptotic tracking for the nonlinear antenna system with nonlinear exogenous dynamics, is proposed. Computer simulations as well as practical tests verify...... the effectiveness of this method to cope with the external disturbances that are imposed to the satellite tracking antenna (STA)....

  18. High Precision Control of Ship-Mounted Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohsen, Soltani; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2007-01-01

    The telecommunication on a modern merchandise ship is maintained by means of satellite communication. The task of the tracking system is to position the on-board antenna toward a chosen satellite. The control system is capable of rejecting the external disturbances which affect on the under......-actuated antenna and ensures that it remains locked on the satellite. In this paper, a nonlinear internal model controller (NIMC), which achieves asymptotic tracking for the nonlinear antenna system with nonlinear exogenous dynamics, is proposed. Computer simulations as well as practical tests verify...... the effectiveness of this method to cope with the external disturbances that are imposed to the satellite tracking antenna (STA)....

  19. Satellite Attitude Control System Design considering the Fuel Slosh Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Gadelha de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the satellite attitude control system (ACS becomes more complex when the satellite structure has different type of components like, flexible solar panels, antennas, mechanical manipulators, and tanks with fuel. A crucial interaction can occur between the fuel slosh motion and the satellite rigid motion during translational and/or rotational manoeuvre since these interactions can change the satellite centre of mass position damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. Although, a well-designed controller can suppress such disturbances quickly, the controller error pointing may be limited by the minimum time necessary to suppress such disturbances thus affecting the satellite attitude acquisition. As a result, the design of the satellite controller needs to explore the limits between the conflicting requirements of performance and robustness. This paper investigates the effects of the interaction between the liquid motion (slosh and the satellite dynamics in order to predict what the damage to the controller performance and robustness is. The fuel slosh dynamics is modelled by a pendulum which parameters are identified using the Kalman filter technique. This information is used to design the satellite controller by the linear quadratic regulator (LQR and linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG methods to perform a planar manoeuvre assuming thrusters are actuators.

  20. An adaptive PID like controller using mix locally recurrent neural network for robotic manipulator with variable payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Kumar, Vikas; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2016-05-01

    Being complex, non-linear and coupled system, the robotic manipulator cannot be effectively controlled using classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. To enhance the effectiveness of the conventional PID controller for the nonlinear and uncertain systems, gains of the PID controller should be conservatively tuned and should adapt to the process parameter variations. In this work, a mix locally recurrent neural network (MLRNN) architecture is investigated to mimic a conventional PID controller which consists of at most three hidden nodes which act as proportional, integral and derivative node. The gains of the mix locally recurrent neural network based PID (MLRNNPID) controller scheme are initialized with a newly developed cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) based optimization method rather than assuming randomly. A sequential learning based least square algorithm is then investigated for the on-line adaptation of the gains of MLRNNPID controller. The performance of the proposed controller scheme is tested against the plant parameters uncertainties and external disturbances for both links of the two link robotic manipulator with variable payload (TL-RMWVP). The stability of the proposed controller is analyzed using Lyapunov stability criteria. A performance comparison is carried out among MLRNNPID controller, CSA optimized NNPID (OPTNNPID) controller and CSA optimized conventional PID (OPTPID) controller in order to establish the effectiveness of the MLRNNPID controller.

  1. OMV With Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    This 1986 artist's concept shows the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) towing a satellite. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  2. A Robust Controller Structure for Pico-Satellite Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Martin Nygaard; Green, Martin; Kristensen, Mads

    This paper describes the development of a robust controller structure for use in pico-satellite missions. The structure relies on unknown disturbance estimation and use of robust control theory to implement a system that is robust to both unmodeled disturbances and parameter uncertainties. As one...... possible application, a satellite mission with the purpose of monitoring shipping routes for oil spills has been considered. However, it is the aim of the control structure to be widely applicable and adaptable for a vide variety of pico-satellite missions. The robust control structure has been evaluated...

  3. DFH-3 Satellite Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenShufang

    2005-01-01

    The DFH-3 satellite platform is designed and developed by China Academy of Space Technology (CAST). It is a medium capability communications satellite platform. The platform adopts threeaxis attitude stabilization control system, having solar array output power of 1.7kW by the end of its design lifetime of 8 years. Its mass is 2100kg with payload capacity of 220kg.

  4. Sliding Mode Attitude Control for Magnetic Actuated Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic torquing is attractive as a control principle on small satellites. The actuation principle is to use the interaction between the earth's magnetic field and magnetic field generated by a coil set in the satellite. This control principle is inherently nonlinear, and difficult to use becaus...... the spacecraft attitude using only magnetic torquing is realized in the form of the sliding mode control. A three dimensional sliding manifold is proposed, and it is shown that the satellite motion on the sliding manifold is asymptotically stable......Magnetic torquing is attractive as a control principle on small satellites. The actuation principle is to use the interaction between the earth's magnetic field and magnetic field generated by a coil set in the satellite. This control principle is inherently nonlinear, and difficult to use because...... control torques can only be generated perpendicular to the local geomagnetic field vector. This has been a serious obstacle for using magnetorquer based control for three-axis attitude control. This paper deals with three-axis stabilization of a low earth orbit satellite. The problem of controlling...

  5. Guidance and Control System for a Satellite Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Jonathan Lamar; Cox, James; Mays, Paul Richard; Neidhoefer, James Christian; Ephrain, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A distributed guidance and control algorithm was developed for a constellation of satellites. The system repositions satellites as required, regulates satellites to desired orbits, and prevents collisions. 1. Optimal methods are used to compute nominal transfers from orbit to orbit. 2. Satellites are regulated to maintain the desired orbits once the transfers are complete. 3. A simulator is used to predict potential collisions or near-misses. 4. Each satellite computes perturbations to its controls so as to increase any unacceptable distances of nearest approach to other objects. a. The avoidance problem is recast in a distributed and locally-linear form to arrive at a tractable solution. b. Plant matrix values are approximated via simulation at each time step. c. The Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method is used to compute perturbations to the controls that will result in increased miss distances. 5. Once all danger is passed, the satellites return to their original orbits, all the while avoiding each other as above. 6. The delta-Vs are reasonable. The controller begins maneuvers as soon as practical to minimize delta-V. 7. Despite the inclusion of trajectory simulations within the control loop, the algorithm is sufficiently fast for available satellite computer hardware. 8. The required measurement accuracies are within the capabilities of modern inertial measurement devices and modern positioning devices.

  6. Orbit control of a stratospheric satellite with parameter uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Huo, Wei

    2016-12-01

    When a stratospheric satellite travels by prevailing winds in the stratosphere, its cross-track displacement needs to be controlled to keep a constant latitude orbital flight. To design the orbit control system, a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) model of the satellite is established based on the second Lagrangian formulation, it is proven that the input/output feedback linearization theory cannot be directly implemented for the orbit control with this model, thus three subsystem models are deduced from the 6-DOF model to develop a sequential nonlinear control strategy. The control strategy includes an adaptive controller for the balloon-tether subsystem with uncertain balloon parameters, a PD controller based on feedback linearization for the tether-sail subsystem, and a sliding mode controller for the sail-rudder subsystem with uncertain sail parameters. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is robust to uncertainties and satisfies high precision requirements for the orbit flight of the satellite.

  7. The first Spacelab mission. [payload management functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, R. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of Spacelab, an Orbiter-mounted NASA/ESA laboratory, is to include in the Space Transportation System (STS) a payload carrier with maximum flexibility to accommodate multidisciplinary scientific payloads. The major Spacelab configurations obtained by combination of two basic elements, the module and pallet, are described along with the anticipated program of experiments and payloads, and mission management general concept. The first Spacelab 7-day mission is scheduled for flight in the second half of 1980, with the primary objective being to verify system performance capabilities. Detailed attention is given to the payload mission management responsibilities for the first flight, including program control, science management, payload interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload integration, launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. The Spacelab configuration (including the long module and one pallet) and the overall schedule for this mission are presented.

  8. The first Spacelab mission. [payload management functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, R. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of Spacelab, an Orbiter-mounted NASA/ESA laboratory, is to include in the Space Transportation System (STS) a payload carrier with maximum flexibility to accommodate multidisciplinary scientific payloads. The major Spacelab configurations obtained by combination of two basic elements, the module and pallet, are described along with the anticipated program of experiments and payloads, and mission management general concept. The first Spacelab 7-day mission is scheduled for flight in the second half of 1980, with the primary objective being to verify system performance capabilities. Detailed attention is given to the payload mission management responsibilities for the first flight, including program control, science management, payload interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload integration, launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. The Spacelab configuration (including the long module and one pallet) and the overall schedule for this mission are presented.

  9. Control of sound transmission into payload fairings using distributed vibration absorbers and Helmholtz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Simon J.

    A new passive treatment to reduce sound transmission into payload fairing at low frequency is investigated. This new solution is composed of optimally damped vibration absorbers (DVA) and optimally damped Helmholtz resonators (HR). A fully coupled structural-acoustic model of a composite cylinder excited by an external plane wave is developed as a first approximation of the system. A modal expansion method is used to describe the behavior of the cylindrical shell and the acoustic cavity; the noise reduction devices are modeled as surface impedances. All the elements are then fully coupled using an impedance matching method. This model is then refined using the digitized mode shapes and natural frequencies obtained from a fairing finite element model. For both models, the noise transmission mechanisms are highlighted and the noise reduction mechanisms are explained. Procedures to design the structural and acoustic absorbers based on single degree of freedom system are modified for the multi-mode framework. The optimization of the overall treatment parameters namely location, tuning frequency, and damping of each device is also investigated using genetic algorithm. Noise reduction of up to 9dB from 50Hz to 160Hz using 4% of the cylinder mass for the DVA and 5% of the cavity volume for the HR can be achieved. The robustness of the treatment performance to changes in the excitation, system and devices characteristics is also addressed. The model is validated by experiments done outdoors on a 10-foot long, 8-foot diameter composite cylinder. The excitation level reached 136dB at the cylinder surface comparable to real launch acoustic environment. With HRs representing 2% of the cylinder volume, the noise transmission from 50Hz to 160Hz is reduced by 3dB and the addition of DVAs representing 6.5% of the cylinder mass enhances this performance to 4.3dB. Using the fairing model, a HR+DVA treatment is designed under flight constraints and is implemented in a real Boeing

  10. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  11. Control of satellite clusters in elliptic orbit with limited communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichka, David F; Belanger, Gene; Speyer, Jason L

    2004-05-01

    The cooperative control of satellite clusters in elliptical, low-Earth orbit is studied, with the goal of minimizing the necessary information passed among the individual satellites in the cluster. We investigate two possible control paradigms in this paper. The system is described using linearized equations of motion, allowing it to be expressed as a time-varying linear system. The control objective is to attain a required formation at a specified point along the orbit. A decentralized controller is used, in which each satellite maintains a local estimate of the overall state of the cluster. These estimates, along with any control information, are shared after any satellite executes a control action. The second paradigm is an extension of the first, in which state estimates are never shared, and only the control information is passed. In each case, less information being passed results in a higher computational burden on each satellite. Simulation results show cyclic errors, likely induced by higher-order terms in eccentricity and inclinations. The controller that shares state estimates performs much better than the controller that passes only control information.

  12. Incoherent correlator system for satellite orientation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Aristodemos; Young, Rupert C. D.; Chatwin, Christopher R.; Birch, Philip M.

    2002-03-01

    An incoherent correlator configuration is proposed and experimentally demonstrated that is capable of recognizing star patterns. The device may thus be employed for the orientation and navigation of a satellite or spacecraft. The correlator employs starlight directly and requires no laser or input spatial light modulator for operation. The filter is constructed form an array of mirrors that may be individually appropriately tilted so as recognize a particular star arrangement. The only other components of the system are a converging lens and CCD array detector. The device is capable of determining the pointing direction and rotation of a satellite or space vehicle. Experimental results employing the mirror array device illuminated with a point source early to simulate starlight are presented.

  13. Efficient mission control for the 48-satellite Globalstar Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan

    1994-11-01

    The Globalstar system is being developed by Globalstar, Limited Partnership and will utilize 48 satellites in low earth orbit (See Figure 1) to create a world-wide mobile communications system consistent with Vice President Gore's vision of a Global Information Infrastructure. As a large long term commercial system developed by a newly formed organization, Globalstar provides an excellent opportunity to explore innovative solutions for highly efficient satellite command and control. Design and operational concepts being developed are unencumbered by existing physical and organizational infrastructures. This program really is 'starting with a clean sheet of paper'. Globalstar operations challenges can appear enormous. Clearly, assigning even a single person around the clock to monitor and control each satellite is excessive for Globalstar (it would require a staff of 200] . Even with only a single contact per orbit per satellite, data acquisitions will start or stop every 45 seconds] Although essentially identical, over time the satellites will develop their own 'personalities'and will re quire different data calibrations and levels of support. This paper discusses the Globalstar system and challenges and presents engineering concepts, system design decisions, and operations concepts which address the combined needs and concerns of satellite, ground system, and operations teams. Lessons from past missions have been applied, organizational barriers broken, partnerships formed across the mission segments, and new operations concepts developed for satellite constellation management. Control center requirements were then developed from the operations concepts.

  14. A close examination of under-actuated attitude control subsystem design for future satellite missions' life extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quang M.; Barkana, Itzhak

    2014-12-01

    Satellite mission life, maintained and prolonged beyond its typical norm of their expectancy, are primarily dictated by the state of health of its Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA), especially for commercial GEO satellites since torquer bars are no longer applicable while thruster assistant is unacceptable due to pointing accuracy impact during jet firing. The RWA is the primary set of actuators (as compared to thrusters for orbit maintenance and maneuvering) mainly responsible for the satellite mission for accurately and precisely pointing its payloads to the right targets to conduct its mission operations. The RWA consisting of either a set of four in pyramid or three in orthogonal is the primary set of actuators to allow the satellite to achieve accurate and precise pointing of the satellite payloads towards the desired targets. Future space missions will be required to achieve much longer lives and are currently perceived by the GEO satellite community as an "expected norm" of 20 years or longer. Driven by customers' demands/goals and competitive market have challenged Attitude Control Subsystems (ACS) engineers to develop better ACS algorithms to address such an emerging need. There are two main directions to design satellite's under-actuated control subsystem: (1) Attitude Feedback with Zero Momentum Principle and (2) Attitude Control by Angular Velocity Tracking via Small Time Local Controllability concept. Successful applications of these control laws have been largely demonstrated via simulation for the rest to rest case. Limited accuracy and oscillatory behaviors are observed in three axes for non-zero wheel momentum while realistic loss of a wheel scenario (i.e., fully actuated to under-actuated) has not been closely examined! This study revisits the under-actuated control design with detailed set ups of multiple scenarios reflecting real life operating conditions which have put current under-actuated control laws mentioned earlier into a re-evaluation mode

  15. Model of load distribution for earth observation satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shumin; Du, Min; Li, Wei

    2017-03-01

    For the system of multiple types of EOS (Earth Observing Satellites), it is a vital issue to assure that each type of payloads carried by the group of EOS can be used efficiently and reasonably for in astronautics fields. Currently, most of researches on configuration of satellite and payloads focus on the scheduling for launched satellites. However, the assignments of payloads for un-launched satellites are bit researched, which are the same crucial as the scheduling of tasks. Moreover, the current models of satellite resources scheduling lack of more general characteristics. Referring the idea about roles-based access control (RBAC) of information system, this paper brings forward a model based on role-mining of RBAC to improve the generality and foresight of the method of assignments of satellite-payload. By this way, the assignment of satellite-payload can be mapped onto the problem of role-mining. A novel method will be introduced, based on the idea of biclique-combination in graph theory and evolutionary algorithm in intelligence computing, to address the role-mining problem of satellite-payload assignments. The simulation experiments are performed to verify the novel method. Finally, the work of this paper is concluded.

  16. Optimizing the Attitude Control of Small Satellite Constellations for Rapid Response Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) such as formation flight and constellations, are being recognized as important solutions to increase measurement samples over space and time. Given the increasingly accurate attitude control systems emerging in the commercial market, small spacecraft now have the ability to slew and point within few minutes of notice. In spite of hardware development in CubeSats at the payload (e.g. NASA InVEST) and subsystems (e.g. Blue Canyon Technologies), software development for tradespace analysis in constellation design (e.g. Goddard's TAT-C), planning and scheduling development in single spacecraft (e.g. GEO-CAPE) and aerial flight path optimizations for UAVs (e.g. NASA Sensor Web), there is a gap in open-source, open-access software tools for planning and scheduling distributed satellite operations in terms of pointing and observing targets. This paper will demonstrate results from a tool being developed for scheduling pointing operations of narrow field-of-view (FOV) sensors over mission lifetime to maximize metrics such as global coverage and revisit statistics. Past research has shown the need for at least fourteen satellites to cover the Earth globally everyday using a LandSat-like sensor. Increasing the FOV three times reduces the need to four satellites, however adds image distortion and BRDF complexities to the observed reflectance. If narrow FOV sensors on a small satellite constellation were commanded using robust algorithms to slew their sensor dynamically, they would be able to coordinately cover the global landmass much faster without compensating for spatial resolution or BRDF effects. Our algorithm to optimize constellation satellite pointing is based on a dynamic programming approach under the constraints of orbital mechanics and existing attitude control systems for small satellites. As a case study for our algorithm, we minimize the time required to cover the 17000 Landsat images with maximum signal to noise ratio fall

  17. Attitude Control Subsystem for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewston, Alan W.; Mitchell, Kent A.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-orbit operation of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The three ACTS control axes are defined, including the means for sensing attitude and determining the pointing errors. The desired pointing requirements for various modes of control as well as the disturbance torques that oppose the control are identified. Finally, the hardware actuators and control loops utilized to reduce the attitude error are described.

  18. Controlled motion in an elastic world. Research project: Manipulation strategies for massive space payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Wayne J.

    1992-01-01

    The flexibility of the drives and structures of controlled motion systems are presented as an obstacle to be overcome in the design of high performance motion systems, particularly manipulator arms. The task and the measure of performance to be applied determine the technology appropriate to overcome this obstacle. Included in the technologies proposed are control algorithms (feedback and feed forward), passive damping enhancement, operational strategies, and structural design. Modeling of the distributed, nonlinear system is difficult, and alternative approaches are discussed. The author presents personal perspectives on the history, status, and future directions in this area.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis; Ilie, Marcel; Schallhorn, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft components may be damaged due to airflow produced by Environmental Control Systems (ECS). There are uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict the flow field around a spacecraft from the ECS System. This paper describes an approach to estimate the uncertainty in using CFD to predict the airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft.

  20. Aerodynamic flight control to increase payload capability of future launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, John E., Jr.; Cheng, Y.-M.; Leleux, Todd; Bigelow, Scott; Hasbrook, William

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we provide some examples of French, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese launch vehicles that have utilized fins in their designs. Next, the aerodynamic design of the fins is considered in Section 3. Some comments on basic static stability and control theory are followed by a brief description of an aerodynamic characteristics prediction code that was used to estimate the characteristics of a modified NLS 1.5 Stage vehicle. Alternative fin designs are proposed and some estimated aerodynamic characteristics presented and discussed. Also included in Section 3 is a discussion of possible methods of enhancement of the aerodynamic efficiency of fins, such as vortex generators and jet flaps. We consider the construction of fins for launch vehicles in Section 4 and offer an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the use of composites for aerodynamic control surfaces on high speed vehicles. We also comment on the use of smart materials for launch vehicle fins. The dynamic stability and control of a launch vehicle that utilizes both thrust vector control (engine nozzle gimballing) and movable fins is the subject addressed in Section 5. We give a short derivation of equations of motion for a launch vehicle moving in a vertical plane above a spherical earth, discuss the use of a gravity-turn nominal trajectory, and give the form of the period equations linearized about such a nominal. We then consider feedback control of vehicle attitude using both engine gimballing and fin deflection. Conclusions are stated and recommendations made in Section 6. An appendix contains aerodynamic data in tabular and graphical formats.

  1. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  2. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional validation by test only mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions.Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations. This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions

  3. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional "validation by test only" mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics

  4. Communications payloads for geostationary platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Trends in communication satellites show increasing reuse of the frequency spectrum through multiple spot beams and orthogonal polarization, as well as consortia operation. Current reliance on orbital arc separation for frequency reuse may be inadequate for the projected traffic growth and the orbital slotting proposals before the ITU. This paper notes that cost advantages can accrue through common use of spacecraft subsystems and multiple users' platforms aboard a common geostationary platform. The rationale for such platforms is described and potential payloads are suggested.

  5. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  6. pH-Responsive PLGA Nanoparticle for Controlled Payload Delivery of Diclofenac Sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Shalil; Adhikari, Udhab; Rijal, Nava P; Bhattarai, Shanta R; Sankar, Jagannathan; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2016-08-02

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) based nanoparticles have gained increasing attention in delivery applications due to their capability for controlled drug release characteristics, biocompatibility, and tunable mechanical, as well as degradation, properties. However, thorough study is always required while evaluating potential toxicity of the particles from dose dumping, inconsistent release and drug-polymer interactions. In this research, we developed PLGA nanoparticles modified by chitosan (CS), a cationic and pH responsive polysaccharide that bears repetitive amine groups in its backbone. We used a model drug, diclofenac sodium (DS), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), to study the drug loading and release characteristics. PLGA nanoparticles were synthesized by double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The nanoparticles were evaluated based on their particle size, surface charge, entrapment efficacy, and effect of pH in drug release profile. About 390-420 nm of average diameters and uniform morphology of the particles were confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Chitosan coating over PLGA surface was confirmed by FTIR and DLS. Drug entrapment efficacy was up to 52%. Chitosan coated PLGA showed a pH responsive drug release in in vitro. The release was about 45% more at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.4. The results of our study indicated the development of chitosan coating over PLGA nanoparticle for pH dependent controlled release DS drug for therapeutic applications.

  7. pH-Responsive PLGA Nanoparticle for Controlled Payload Delivery of Diclofenac Sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalil Khanal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA based nanoparticles have gained increasing attention in delivery applications due to their capability for controlled drug release characteristics, biocompatibility, and tunable mechanical, as well as degradation, properties. However, thorough study is always required while evaluating potential toxicity of the particles from dose dumping, inconsistent release and drug-polymer interactions. In this research, we developed PLGA nanoparticles modified by chitosan (CS, a cationic and pH responsive polysaccharide that bears repetitive amine groups in its backbone. We used a model drug, diclofenac sodium (DS, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to study the drug loading and release characteristics. PLGA nanoparticles were synthesized by double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The nanoparticles were evaluated based on their particle size, surface charge, entrapment efficacy, and effect of pH in drug release profile. About 390–420 nm of average diameters and uniform morphology of the particles were confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM imaging and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurement. Chitosan coating over PLGA surface was confirmed by FTIR and DLS. Drug entrapment efficacy was up to 52%. Chitosan coated PLGA showed a pH responsive drug release in in vitro. The release was about 45% more at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.4. The results of our study indicated the development of chitosan coating over PLGA nanoparticle for pH dependent controlled release DS drug for therapeutic applications.

  8. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  9. Reliable Control of Ship-mounted Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    Motorized antenna is a key element in overseas satellite telecommunication. The control system directs the on-board antenna toward a chosen satellitewhile the high sea waves disturb the antenna. Certain faults (communication system malfunction or signal blocking) cause interruption in the communi......Motorized antenna is a key element in overseas satellite telecommunication. The control system directs the on-board antenna toward a chosen satellitewhile the high sea waves disturb the antenna. Certain faults (communication system malfunction or signal blocking) cause interruption...

  10. Game Theoretic Approach to Post-Docked Satellite Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Fitz-Coy, Norman G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction between two satellites after docking. In order to maintain the docked state with uncertainty in the motion of the target vehicle, a game theoretic controller with Stackelberg strategy to minimize the interaction between the satellites is considered. The small perturbation approximation leads to LQ differential game scheme, which is validated to address the docking interactions between a service vehicle and a target vehicle. The open-loop solution are compared with Nash strategy, and it is shown that less control efforts are obtained with Stackelberg strategy.

  11. Sliding mode control of electromagnetic tethered satellite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaj, Mohammad Amin Alandi; Assadian, Nima

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of tethered satellite formation actuated by electromagnetic dipoles and reaction wheels using the robust sliding mode control technique. Generating electromagnetic forces and moments by electric current coils provides an attractive control actuation alternative for tethered satellite system due to the advantages of no propellant consumption and no obligatory rotational motion. Based on a dumbbell model of tethered satellite in which the flexibility and mass of the tether is neglected, the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinate are derived. In this model, the J2 perturbation is taken into account. The far-field and mid-field models of electromagnetic forces and moments of two satellites on each other and the effect of the Earth's magnetic field are presented. A robust sliding mode controller is designed for precise trajectory tracking purposes and to deal with the electromagnetic force and moment uncertainties and external disturbances due to the Earth's gravitational and magnetic fields inaccuracy. Numerical simulation results are presented to validate the effectiveness of the developed controller and its superiority over the linear controller.

  12. Modular Countermine Payload for Small Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman Herman; Doug Few; Roelof Versteeg; Jean-Sebastien Valois; Jeff McMahill; Michael Licitra; Edward Henciak

    2010-04-01

    Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multi-mission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

  13. Modular countermine payload for small robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Herman; Few, Doug; Versteeg, Roelof; Valois, Jean-Sebastien; McMahill, Jeff; Licitra, Michael; Henciak, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multimission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

  14. Impact of Co-Site Interference on L/C-Band Spectrum for UAS Control and Non-Payload Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Bishop, William D.; Hoder, Douglas J.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide for the safe integration of unmanned aircraft systems into the National Airspace System, the control and non-payload communications (CNPC) link connecting the ground-based pilot with the unmanned aircraft must be highly reliable. A specific requirement is that it must operate using aviation safety radiofrequency spectrum. The 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) provided a potentially suitable allocation for LOS CNPC spectrum in C-Band at 5030-5091 MHz band which, when combined with a previous allocation in L-Band (960-1164 MHz) may satisfy the LOS spectrum requirement and provide for high reliability through dual-band redundancy. However, the LBand spectrum hosts a number of aeronautical navigation systems which require high-power transmitters on-board the aircraft. These high-power transmitters co-located with sensitive CNPC receivers operating in the same frequency band have the potential to create co-site interference, reducing the performance of the CNPC receivers and ultimately reducing the usability of the L-Band for CNPC. This paper examines the potential for co-site interference, as highlighted in recent flight tests, and discusses the impact on the UAS CNPC spectrum availability and requirements for further testing and analysis.

  15. Autonomous Satellite Command and Control Through the World Wide Web. Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The Automated Space System Experimental Testbed (ASSET) system is a simple yet comprehensive real-world operations network being developed. Phase 3 of the ASSET Project was January-December 1997 and is the subject of this report. This phase permitted SSDL and its project partners to expand the ASSET system in a variety of ways. These added capabilities included the advancement of ground station capabilities, the adaptation of spacecraft on-board software, and the expansion of capabilities of the ASSET management algorithms. Specific goals of Phase 3 were: (1) Extend Web-based goal-level commanding for both the payload PI and the spacecraft engineer. (2) Support prioritized handling of multiple (PIs) Principle Investigators as well as associated payload experimenters. (3) Expand the number and types of experiments supported by the ASSET system and its associated spacecraft. (4) Implement more advanced resource management, modeling and fault management capabilities that integrate the space and ground segments of the space system hardware. (5) Implement a beacon monitoring test. (6) Implement an experimental blackboard controller for space system management. (7) Further define typical ground station developments required for Internet-based remote control and for full system automation of the PI-to-spacecraft link. Each of those goals are examined. Significant sections of this report were also published as a conference paper. Several publications produced in support of this grant are included as attachments. Titles include: 1) Experimental Initiatives in Space System Operations; 2) The ASSET Client Interface: Balancing High Level Specification with Low Level Control; 3) Specifying Spacecraft Operations At The Product/Service Level; 4) The Design of a Highly Configurable, Reusable Operating System for Testbed Satellites; 5) Automated Health Operations For The Sapphire Spacecraft; 6) Engineering Data Summaries for Space Missions; and 7) Experiments In Automated Health

  16. Controlling chaos in a satellite power supply subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macau, E. E. N.; Ramos Turci, L. F.; Yoneyama, T.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, we show that chaos control techniques can be used to increase the region that can be efficiently used to supply the power requests for an artificial satellite. The core of a satellite power subsystem relies on its DC/DC converter. This is a very nonlinear system that presents a multitude of phenomena ranging from bifurcations, quasi-periodicity, chaos, coexistence of attractors, among others. The traditional power subsystem design techniques try to avoid these nonlinear phenomena so that it is possible to use linear system theory in small regions about the equilibrium points. Here, we show that chaos control can be used to efficiently extend the applicability region of the satellite power subsystem when it operates in regions of high nonlinearity.

  17. Advanced Attitude Control af Pico Sized Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper A.; Amini, Rouzbeh; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    accuracy of better than 5 degrees. Cost, size, weight and power requirements, on the other hand, impose selecting relative simple sensors and actuators which leads to an attitude control requirement of less than 1 degree. This precision is obtained by a combination of magnetorquers and momentum wheels...

  18. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice..., 2013 Vol. 78 No. 206. This new meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply...

  19. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products...

  20. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government and DoD contractors...

  1. Uplink Power Control For Earth/Satellite/Earth Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy

    1994-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem adjusts power radiated by uplink transmitter in Earth station/satellite relay station/ Earth station communication system. Adjustments made to compensate for anticipated changes in attenuation by rain. Raw input is a received downlink beacon singal, amplitude of which affected not only by rain fade but also by scintillation, attenuation in atmospheric gases, and diurnal effects.

  2. A Fault tolerant Control Supervisory System development Procedurefor Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard

    The paper presents a stepwise procedure to develop a fault tolerant control system for small satellites. The procedure is illustrated through implementation on the AAUSAT-II spacecraft. As it is shown the presented procedure requires expertise from several disciplines that are nevertheless...

  3. Attitude Control of a Satellite by using Digital Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adirelle C. Santana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article has discussed the development of a three-axis attitude digital controller for an artificial satellite using a digital signal processor. The main motivation of this study is the attitude control system of the satellite Multi-Mission Platform, developed by the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research for application in different sort of missions. The controller design was based on the theory of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator, synthesized from the linearized model of the motion of the satellite, i.e., the kinematics and dynamics of attitude. The attitude actuators considered in this study are pairs of cold gas jets powered by a pulse width/pulse frequency modulator. In the first stage of the project development, a system controller for continuous time was studied with the aim of testing the adequacy of the adopted control. The next steps had included an analysis of discretization techniques, the setting time of sampling rate, and the testing of the digital version of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator controller in the MATLAB/SIMULINK. To fulfill the study, the controller was implemented in a digital signal processor, specifically the Blackfin BF537 from Analog Devices, along with the pulse width/pulse frequency modulator. The validation tests used a scheme of co-simulation, where the model of the satellite was simulated in MATLAB/SIMULINK, while the controller and modulator were processed in the digital signal processor with a tool called Processor-In-the-Loop, which acted as a data communication link between both environments.function and required time to achieve a given mission accuracy are determined, and results are provided as illustration.

  4. Automatic charge control system for satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, B. M.; Cohen, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The SCATHA and the ATS-5 and 6 spacecraft provided insights to the problem of spacecraft charging at geosychronous altitudes. Reduction of the levels of both absolute and differential charging was indicated, by the emission of low energy neutral plasma. It is appropriate to complete the transition from experimental results to the development of a system that will sense the state-of-charge of a spacecraft, and, when a predetermined threshold is reached, will respond automatically to reduce it. A development program was initiated utilizing sensors comparable to the proton electrostatic analyzer, the surface potential monitor, and the transient pulse monitor that flew in SCATHA, and combine these outputs through a microprocessor controller to operate a rapid-start, low energy plasma source.

  5. An active attitude control system for a drag sail satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Willem Herman; Jordaan, Hendrik Willem

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the development and simulation results of a full ADCS subsystem for the deOrbitSail drag sail mission. The deOrbitSail satellite was developed as part of an European FP7 collaboration research project. The satellite was launched and commissioning started on 10th July 2015. Various new actuators and sensors designed for this mission will be presented. The deOrbitSail satellite is a 3U CubeSat to deploy a 4 by 4 m drag sail from an initial 650 km circular polar low earth orbit. With an active attitude control system it will be shown that by maximising the drag force, the expected de-orbiting period from the initial altitude will be less than 50 days. A future application of this technology will be the use of small drag sails as low-cost devices to de-orbit LEO satellites, when they have reached their end of life, without having to use expensive propulsion systems. Simulation and Hardware-in-Loop experiments proved the feasibility of the proposed attitude control system. A magnetic-only control approach using a Y-Thomson spin, is used to detumble the 3U Cubesat with stowed sail and subsequently to 3-axis stabilise the satellite to be ready for the final deployment phase. Minituarised torquer rods, a nano-sized momentum wheel, attitude sensor hardware (magnetometer, sun, earth) developed for this phase will be presented. The final phase will be to deploy and 3-axis stabilise the drag sail normal to the satellite's velocity vector, using a combined Y-momentum wheel and magnetic controller. The design and performance improvements when using a 2-axis translation stage to adjust the sail centre-of-pressure to satellite centre-of-mass offset, will also be discussed, although for launch risk reasons this stage was not included in the final flight configuration. To accurately determine the drag sail's attitude during the sunlit part of the orbit, an accurate wide field of view dual sensor to measure both the sun and nadir vector direction was developed for

  6. Collection of Stratospheric Samples using Balloon-Borne Payload System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sreejith, A. G.; Kumble, Sheshashayi; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Kj, Nirmal; Suresh, Ambily; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere at stratospheric altitudes contains dust particles from soil lifted by weather, volcanic dust, man-made aerosols, IDP (Interplanetary Dust Particles) - remnants of comets and asteroids, and even interstellar dust. Satellite observations suggest that approximately 100--300 tons of cosmic dust enter Earth's atmosphere every day. However, very little is known about the microbial life in the upper atmosphere, where conditions are very much similar to that on Mars and possibly on some exoplanets. Stratosphere provides a good opportunity to study the existence or survival of biological life in these conditions. Despite the importance of this topic to astrobiology, stratospheric microbial diversity/survival remains largely unexplored, probably due to significant difficulties in the access and ensuring the absence of contamination of the samples. To conduct a detailed study into this, we are developing the balloon-borne payload system SAMPLE (Stratospheric Altitude Microbiology Probe for Life Existence) to collect dust samples from stratosphere and bring them in an hygienic and uncontaminated manner to a suitable laboratory environment, where further study will be conducted to establish the possibility of microbial life in the upper atmosphere. This balloon-borne payload system will rise through the atmosphere till it reaches an altitude of about 25-30 km above sea level. The payload consists of detachable pre-sterilized sampling chambers designed to collect and contain the dust samples and get them back to the surface without contamination during the flight, a microprocessor and a controller which will determine the altitude of the payload system to actively monitor the opening and closing of the sample collection chambers. For contamination control, we will have two extra chambers, one of which will fly but not open, and one will remain closed on the ground. Other onboard devices include environmental sensors, GPS tracking devices, cameras to monitor

  7. Testing a satellite automatic nutation control system. [on synchronous meteorological satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrasiar, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Testing of a particular nutation control system for the synchronous meteorological satellite (SMS) is described. The test method and principles are applicable to nutation angle control for other satellites with similar requirements. During its ascent to synchronous orbit, a spacecraft like the SMS spins about its minimum-moment-of-inertia axis. An uncontrolled spacecraft in this state is unstable because torques due to fuel motion increase the nutation angle. However, the SMS is equipped with an automatic nutation control (ANC) system which will keep the nutation angle close to zero. Because correct operation of this system is critical to mission success, it was tested on an air-bearing table. The ANC system was mounted on the three-axis air-bearing table which was scaled to the SMS and equipped with appropriate sensors and thrusters. The table was spun up in an altitude chamber and nutation induced so that table motion simulated spacecraft motion. The ANC system was used to reduce the nutation angle. This dynamic test of the ANC system met all its objectives and provided confidence that the ANC system will control the SMS nutation angle.

  8. Autonomous Attitude Determination and Control System for the Ørsted Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Wisniewski, Rafal; Blanke, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system.......The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system....

  9. Reaction torque minimization techniques for articulated payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Kevin; Aleman, Roberto M.

    1988-01-01

    Articulated payloads on spacecraft, such as antenna telemetry systems and robotic elements, impart reaction torques back into the vehicle which can significantly affect the performance of other payloads. This paper discusses ways to minimize the reaction torques of articulated payloads through command-shaping algorithms and unique control implementations. The effects of reaction torques encountered on Landsat are presented and compared with simulated and measured data of prototype systems employing these improvements.

  10. Groebner Basis Solutions to Satellite Trajectory Control by Pole Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukelova, Z.; Krsek, P.; Smutny, V.; Pajdla, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellites play an important role, e.g., in telecommunication, navigation and weather monitoring. Controlling their trajectories is an important problem. In [1], an approach to the pole placement for the synthesis of a linear controller has been presented. It leads to solving five polynomial equations in nine unknown elements of the state space matrices of a compensator. This is an underconstrained system and therefore four of the unknown elements need to be considered as free parameters and set to some prior values to obtain a system of five equations in five unknowns. In [1], this system was solved for one chosen set of free parameters with the help of Dixon resultants. In this work, we study and present Groebner basis solutions to this problem of computation of a dynamic compensator for the satellite for different combinations of input free parameters. We show that the Groebner basis method for solving systems of polynomial equations leads to very simple solutions for all combinations of free parameters. These solutions require to perform only the Gauss-Jordan elimination of a small matrix and computation of roots of a single variable polynomial. The maximum degree of this polynomial is not greater than six in general but for most combinations of the input free parameters its degree is even lower. [1] B. Palancz. Application of Dixon resultant to satellite trajectory control by pole placement. Journal of Symbolic Computation, Volume 50, March 2013, Pages 79-99, Elsevier.

  11. Communications Technology Assessment for the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretmersky, Steven C.; Bishop, William D.; Dailey, Justin E.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is performing communications systems research for the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project. One of the goals of the communications element is to select and test a communications technology for the UAS Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) link. The GRC UAS Modeling and Simulation (M/S) Sub Team will evaluate the performance of several potential technologies for the CNPC link through detailed software simulations. In parallel, an industry partner will implement a technology in hardware to be used for flight testing. The task necessitated a technical assessment of existing Radio Frequency (RF) communications technologies to identify the best candidate systems for use as the UAS CNPC link. The assessment provides a basis for selecting the technologies for the M/S effort and the hardware radio design. The process developed for the technical assessments for the Future Communications Study1 (FCS) was used as an initial starting point for this assessment. The FCS is a joint Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Eurocontrol study on technologies for use as a future aeronautical communications link. The FCS technology assessment process methodology can be applied to the UAS CNPC link; however the findings of the FCS are not directly applicable because of different requirements between a CNPC link and a general aeronautical data link. Additional technologies were added to the potential technologies list from the State of the Art Unmanned Aircraft System Communication Assessment developed by NASA GRC2. This document investigates the state of the art of communications as related to UAS. A portion of the document examines potential communications systems for a UAS communication architecture. Like the FCS, the state of the art assessment surveyed existing communications technologies. It did not, however, perform a detailed assessment of the

  12. Attitude control for part actuator failure of agile small satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. R. Zhang; A. Rachid; Y. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The stability and singularity problem of agile small satellite (ASS) with actuator failure is discussed in this paper. Firstly, the three-axis stabilized controller of an ASS is designed, where micro control moment gyros (MCMG's) in pyramid configuration (PC) is used as the actuator. By using the same controller and steering law, the control results before and after one gyro fails are compared by simulation. The variation of singular momentum envelope before and after one gyro fails is also compared. The simulation results show that the failure intensively decreases the capacity of output torque, which leads to the emergence of more singular points and the rapid saturation of MCMG's. Finally, the parameters of system controller are changed to compare the control effect.

  13. Application of altitude control techniques for low altitude earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, K. G.; Herder, R. W.; Glass, A. B.; Cooley, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The applications sensors of many low altitude earth satellites designed for recording surface or atmospheric data require near zero orbital eccentricities for maximum usefulness. Coverage patterns and altitude profiles require specified values of orbit semimajor axis. Certain initial combinations of semimajor axis, eccentricity, and argument of perigee can produce a so called 'frozen orbit' and minimum altitude variation which enhances sensor coverage. This paper develops information on frozen orbits and minimum altitude variation for all inclinations, generalizing previous results. In the altitude regions where most of these satellites function (between 200 and 1000 kilometers) strong atmospheric drag effects influence the evolution of the initial orbits. Active orbital maneuver control techniques to correct evolution of orbit parameters while minimizing the frequency of maneuvers are presented. The paper presents the application of theoretical techniques for control of near frozen orbits and expands upon the methods useful for simultaneously targeting several inplane orbital parameters. The applications of these techniques are illustrated by performance results from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-3 and -5) missions and in preflight maneuver analysis and plans for the Seasat Oceanographic Satellite.

  14. A study of multiple access schemes in satellite control network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zijian; Wang, Zhonghai; Xiang, Xingyu; Wang, Gang; Chen, Genshe; Nguyen, Tien; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Satellite Control Networks (SCN) have provided launch control for space lift vehicles; tracking, telemetry and commanding (TTC) for on-orbit satellites; and, test support for space experiments since the 1960s. Currently, SCNs encounter a new challenge: how to maintain the high reliability of services when sharing the spectrum with emerging commercial services. To achieve this goal, the capability of multiple satellites reception is deserved as an update/modernization of SCN in the future. In this paper, we conducts an investigation of multiple access techniques in SCN scenario, e.g., frequency division multiple access (FDMA) and coded division multiple access (CDMA). First, we introduce two upgrade options of SCN based on FDMA and CDMA techniques. Correspondingly, we also provide their performance analysis, especially the system improvement in spectrum efficiency and interference mitigation. Finally, to determine the optimum upgrade option, this work uses CRISP, i.e., Cost, Risk, Installation, Supportability and Performance, as the baseline approach for a comprehensive trade study of these two options. Extensive numerical and simulation results are presented to illustrate the theoretical development.

  15. A Comparative Study of Actuator Configurations for Satellite Attitude Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Kristiansen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a controllability study of different actuator configurations consisting of magnetic torquers, reaction wheels and a gravity boom is presented. The theoretical analysis is performed with use of controllability gramians, and simulation results with the different configurations are presented and compared regarding settling time and power consumption to substantiate the theoretical analysis. A reference model is also introduced to show how the power consumption can he lowered to the same magnitude as when magnetic torquers are used, without degrading the satellite response significantly.

  16. Satellite Formation Control Using the Approximating Sequence Riccati Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf H. Owis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we develop a reliable algorithm to control the satellite formation using the Approximating Sequence of Riccati Equations(ASRE minimizing the fuel consumption and the deviation of the orbit from the nominal orbit. The nonlinear Clohessy -Wiltshire(CW equations of motions are used to describe the motion of the satellite formation about a virtual reference position maintained at the formation center. The nonlinear dynamics of the system will be factorized in such a way that the new factorized system is accessible. The problem is tackled using the Approximating Sequence Riccati Equations(ASRE method. The technique is based on Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR with fixed terminal state, which guarantees closed loop solution.

  17. On-orbit control of the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS)/HERMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of control functions for the CIS HERMES satellite are reviewed. Its mission, to demonstrate high power SHF (12 GHz) transmission is discussed. The satellite was controlled in geostationary orbit for nearly four years from the satellite control center in Ottawa, Canada. Highlights of these operations are outlined. The interactions between many of the automatic onboard control functions and control from the ground are described. Special emphasis is placed on the characteristics and performance of the three axis attitude control system.

  18. Guidance, Navigation, and Control System for Maneuverable Pico-Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pico-satellites are an emerging new class of spacecraft. Maneuverable pico-satellites require active guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) systems to perform...

  19. Efficient medium access control protocol for geostationary satellite systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽娜; 顾学迈

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient medium access control (MAC) protocol based on multifrequency-time division multiple access (MF-TDMA) for geostationary satellite systems deploying multiple spot-beams and onboard processing,which uses a method of random reservation access with movable boundaries to dynamically request the transmission slots and can transmit different types of traffic. The simulation results have shown that our designed MAC protocol can achieve a high bandwidth utilization, while providing the required quality of service (QoS) for each class of service.

  20. Anti-Satellite Weapons, Countermeasures, and Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    From Kosmos 1500 38 3-3. Imagery Obtained by Synthetic-Aperture Satellite Radar 40 Chapter 3 MILSATs, ASATs, and National Security THE ROLE AND...satellite capabil- ities, such as resolution. For example, Soviet oceanographic radar satellites of the Kosmos - 1500 class can obtain radar imagery with...surveillance satellite ( Kosmos 1500) equipped with a side-looking radar and in the same year placed two satellites (Venera 15 and Venera 16) equipped

  1. Detailed design package for design of a video system providing optimal visual information for controlling payload and experiment operations with television

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A detailed description of a video system for controlling space shuttle payloads and experiments is presented in the preliminary design review and critical design review, first and second engineering design reports respectively, and in the final report submitted jointly with the design package. The material contained in the four subsequent sections of the package contains system descriptions, design data, and specifications for the recommended 2-view system. Section 2 contains diagrams relating to the simulation test configuration of the 2-view system. Section 3 contains descriptions and drawings of the deliverable breadboard equipment. A description of the recommended system is contained in Section 4 with equipment specifications in Section 5.

  2. Controlling the Chaos Using Fuzzy Estimation in a Gyrostat Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guran, Ardeshir

    In this paper, we present a study of the dynamical behavior in a Kelvin type gyrostat satellite. We firstly obtain the Hamiltonian equations of our model by using Cardan angles as generalized coordinates. Then, we make this Hamiltonian dimensionless and calculate motion equations for this dimensionless system. The study of the Poincare's sections of this system shows us that chaotic motion regimes are present for specific parameter values. The main goal of this work is the finding of stabilizing orbits by using a control technique, the fuzzy control of Poincare map method, so that it can be applied to stabilize special periodic orbits in this system. Finally, we expect that the technique can be useful for a better understanding of control theory and their applications in gyrostat problems.

  3. TCP-ATCA: Improved Transmission Control Algorithm in Satellite Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Feng; Liu Hengna; Zhao Han

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive transmission control algorithm based on TCP (TCP-ATCA) is proposed to reduce the effects of long propagation de- lay and high link error rate of the satellite network on the performances. The flow control and the error recovery are differentiated by combined dynamic random early detection-explicit congestion notification (DRED-ECN) algorithm, and, moreover, the pertaining con- gestion control methods are used in TCP-ATCA to improve the throughput. By introducing the entire recovery algorithm, the unneces- sary congestion window decrease is reduced, and the throughput and fairness are improved. Simulation results show that, compared with TCP-Reno, TCP-ATCA provides a better throughput performance when the link capacity is higher (≥ 600 packet/s), and roughly the same when it is lower. At the same time, TCP-ATCA also increases fairness and reduces transmission delay.

  4. Novel architecture for data management and control for small satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, G.; Fossati, D.; Turri, M.

    1995-12-01

    The paper introduces an innovative architecture for the on-board units that are responsible to provide the data interface, control and processing capability normally allocated in separated electronics boxes in the data handling subsystem of the space system. A new solution for the attitude control of the space vehicle has been studied and developed and the utilization of this technological growth, in particular that concerns the GPS receiver, is matter for novel architecture. This new approach also involves in general the small satellite ground segment product as matter of a dedicated development approach. Small and medium satellites are considered an attractive solution for the low cost scientific experimentation, communication or remote sensing satellites. The functional and performance capability of the studied on-board units and ground segment are assessed in tight conjunction with the evolution of the European and the USA market. The design of these units has to be based on few and simple driving requirements, directly derived from the new modified scenario: (1) The limited budgets available for space system. (2) The quick mission data return, i.e., low development time by specific and tailored system development tools. The quick availability of data to scientists/user is requested without jeopardizing the maximum and guaranteed scientific or commercial return. The proposed system is then given thinking to an architecture based on a high degree of modularity (and reuse of existing library of modules) thus allowing to keep down costs and to speed up the time to market. The design ground rules are so established in order to cope with the following performance: (1) capability to adapt with few impacts the system interfaces, in particular for attitude sensors and actuators that are tightly mission dependent; (2) easy adaptation of on board computational performances and memory capacity (including mass memory storage capability); (3) definition of a hierarchical

  5. Outside users payload model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The outside users payload model which is a continuation of documents and replaces and supersedes the July 1984 edition is presented. The time period covered by this model is 1985 through 2000. The following sections are included: (1) definition of the scope of the model; (2) discussion of the methodology used; (3) overview of total demand; (4) summary of the estimated market segmentation by launch vehicle; (5) summary of the estimated market segmentation by user type; (6) details of the STS market forecast; (7) summary of transponder trends; (8) model overview by mission category; and (9) detailed mission models. All known non-NASA, non-DOD reimbursable payloads forecast to be flown by non-Soviet-block countries are included in this model with the exception of Spacelab payloads and small self contained payloads. Certain DOD-sponsored or cosponsored payloads are included if they are reimbursable launches.

  6. Payload isolation and stabilization by a Suspended Experiment Mount (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Wayne L.; Desanctis, Carmine E.; Nicaise, Placide D.; Schultz, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Many Space Shuttle and Space Station payloads can benefit from isolation from crew or attitude control system disturbances. Preliminary studies have been performed for a Suspended Experiment Mount (SEM) system that will provide isolation from accelerations and stabilize the viewing direction of a payload. The concept consists of a flexible suspension system and payload-mounted control moment gyros. The suspension system, which is rigidly locked for ascent and descent, isolates the payload from high frequency disturbances. The control moment gyros stabilize the payload orientation. The SEM will be useful for payloads that require a lower-g environment than a manned vehicle can provide, such as materials processing, and for payloads that require stabilization of pointing direction, but not large angle slewing, such as nadir-viewing earth observation or solar viewing payloads.

  7. Passivity Based Nonlinear Attitude Control of the Rømer Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quottrup, Michael Melholt; Krogh-Sørensen, J.; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2001-01-01

    This paper suggests nonlinear attitude control of the Danish satellite Rømer. This satellite will be designed to fulfil two scientific objectives: The observation of stellar oscillations and the detection and localisation of gamma-ray bursts. The satellite will be equipped with a tetrahedron...

  8. Passivity based nonlinear attitude control of the Rømer satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quottrup, Michael Melholt; Krogh-Sørensen, J.; Wisniewski, Rafal

    This paper suggests nonlinear attitude control of the Danish satellite Rømer. This satellite will be designed to fulfil two scientific objectives: The observation of stellar oscillations and the detection and localisation of gamma-ray bursts. The satellite will be equipped with a tetrahedron...

  9. Numerical Estimation of Sound Transmission Loss in Launch Vehicle Payload Fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandana, Pawan Kumar; Tiwari, Shashi Bhushan; Vukkadala, Kishore Nath

    2017-08-01

    Coupled acoustic-structural analysis of a typical launch vehicle composite payload faring is carried out, and results are validated with experimental data. Depending on the frequency range of interest, prediction of vibro-acoustic behavior of a structure is usually done using the finite element method, boundary element method or through statistical energy analysis. The present study focuses on low frequency dynamic behavior of a composite payload fairing structure using both coupled and uncoupled vibro-acoustic finite element models up to 710 Hz. A vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the fairing structure, air cavity, and satellite, is developed. The external sound pressure levels specified for the payload fairing's acoustic test are considered as external loads for the analysis. Analysis methodology is validated by comparing the interior noise levels with those obtained from full scale Acoustic tests conducted in a reverberation chamber. The present approach has application in the design and optimization of acoustic control mechanisms at lower frequencies.

  10. Numerical Estimation of Sound Transmission Loss in Launch Vehicle Payload Fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandana, Pawan Kumar; Tiwari, Shashi Bhushan; Vukkadala, Kishore Nath

    2016-06-01

    Coupled acoustic-structural analysis of a typical launch vehicle composite payload faring is carried out, and results are validated with experimental data. Depending on the frequency range of interest, prediction of vibro-acoustic behavior of a structure is usually done using the finite element method, boundary element method or through statistical energy analysis. The present study focuses on low frequency dynamic behavior of a composite payload fairing structure using both coupled and uncoupled vibro-acoustic finite element models up to 710 Hz. A vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the fairing structure, air cavity, and satellite, is developed. The external sound pressure levels specified for the payload fairing's acoustic test are considered as external loads for the analysis. Analysis methodology is validated by comparing the interior noise levels with those obtained from full scale Acoustic tests conducted in a reverberation chamber. The present approach has application in the design and optimization of acoustic control mechanisms at lower frequencies.

  11. Phase control system concepts and simulations. [solar power satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    A phase control system concept for a solar power satellite is proposed which partitions the system into three major levels. The first level of phase control consists of a reference phase distribution system implemented in the form of phase distribution tree structure. The major purpose of the tree structure is to electronically compensate for the phase shift due to the transition path lengths from the center of the spacetenna to each phase control center located in each subarray. In the reference system, this is accomplished using the master slave returnable timing system technique. The second level of phase control consists of the beam steering and microwave power generating system which houses the power transponders. This transponder consists of a set of phase conjugation multipliers driven by the reference phase distribution system output and the output of a pilot spread spectrum receiver which accepts the received pilot via a diplexer connected to a separate receive horn or the subarray itself. The output of the phase conjugation circuits serve as inputs to the third level of the phase control system. The third level of phase control is associated with maintaining an equal and constant phase shift through the microwave power amplifier devices while minimizing the associated phase noise effects on the generated power beam. This is accomplished by providing a phase locked loop around each high power amplifier.

  12. Balloonborne lidar payloads for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, O.; Aurilio, G.; Hurd, A. G.; Rappaport, S. A.; Reidy, W. P.; Rieder, R. J.; Bedo, D. E.; Swirbalus, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    A series of lidar experiments has been conducted using the Atmospheric Balloonborne Lidar Experiment payload (ABLE). These experiments included the measurement of atmospheric Rayleigh and Mie backscatter from near space (approximately 30 km) and Raman backscatter measurements of atmospheric constituents as a function of altitude. The ABLE payload consisted of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser transmitter, a 50 cm receiver telescope, and filtered photodetectors in various focal plane configurations. The payload for lidar pointing, thermal control, data handling, and remote control of the lidar system. Comparison of ABLE performance with that of a space lidar shows significant performance advantages and cost effectiveness for balloonborne lidar systems.

  13. A comparing design of satellite attitude control system based on reaction wheel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hao; GE Sheng-min; SHEN Yi

    2008-01-01

    The disturbance caused by the reaction wheel with a current controller greatly influences the accuracy and stability of the satellite attitude control system.To solve this problem,the idea of speed feedback compensation control reaction wheel is put forward.This paper introduces the comparison on design and performance of two satellite attitude control systems,which are separately based on the current control reaction wheel and the speed feedback compensation control reaction wheel.Analysis shows that the speed feedback compensation control flywheel system may effectively suppress the torque fluctuation.Simulation results indicate that the satellite attitude control system with the speed feedback compensation control flywheel has improved performance.

  14. Method of Time-Delay Calculating and Correcting to Control Spin-Stabilized Satellite Synchronously

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangTianshe; LiJisheng; HuangYongxuan

    2005-01-01

    The key to control Spin-Stabilized Satellites Synchronously is to determine the models for calculating and correcting of time-delay at the different situations. Based on the principle of Synchronous-Control mode, the methods of determining the models of calculating and correcting of time-delay are proposed. The methods have been proved to be effective in real satellite control engineering.

  15. Tethered satellite design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarini, G.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of the satellite to perform a variety of space operations to be accomplished from the shuttle is reviewed considering use of the satellite with man-in-loop and closed loop modes and deployment (toward or away from Earth, up to 100 km), stationkeeping, retrieval and control of the satellite. Scientific payloads are to be used to perform experiments and scientific investigation for applications such as magnetometry, electrodynamics, atmospheric science, chemical release, communications, plasmaphysics, dynamic environment, and power and thrust generation. The TSS-S will be reused for at least 3 missions after reconfiguration and refurbishment by changing the peculiar mission items such as thermal control, fixed boom for experiments, aerodynamic tail for yaw attitude control, external skin, experiments, and any other feature. The TSS-S is to be composed of three modules in order to allow independent integration of a single module and to facilitate the refurbishment and reconfiguration between flights. The three modules are service, auxiliary propulsion, and payload modules.

  16. On Optimization Control Parameters in an Adaptive Error-Control Scheme in Satellite Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Vojinović

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for optimization of control parameters of an adaptive GBN scheme in error-prone satellite channel. Method is based on the channel model with three state, where channel have the variable noise level.

  17. Attitude Control of a Satellite Simulator Using Reaction Wheels and a PID Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Rohe, and Welty in the development of AFIT’s second- generation satellite simulator, SimSat II [40]. Instead of building another dumbbell-style spherical...Nathan F. Welty . A Systems Engineering Approach to the Design of a Spacecraft Dynamics and Control Testbed. MS thesis, Air Force Institute of

  18. Space Station Freedom attached payloads and commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furio, N.; Pyfer, B.; Smith, R. B., Jr.; Hunt, S. R.; Suddeth, D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom (SSF) attaches external payloads to its main truss structure via Attached Payload Accommodation Equipment (APAE); this equipment also provides access to such SSF resources as electrical power, command/control, and data handling. In orbit, APAE payloads are installed and maintained by a teleoperated robot or by an astronaut in EVA. Commercialization of EPAE will be accomplished by private companies concerned with the development of materials processing, earth resources and ocean resources monitoring, telecommunications, and industrial services. Attention is given to APAE user-integration activity.

  19. Guidance and adaptive-robust attitude & orbit control of a small information satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, Ye.; Butyrin, S.; Somov, S.; Somova, T.; Testoyedov, N.; Rayevsky, V.; Titov, G.; Yakimov, Ye.; Ovchinnikov, A.; Mathylenko, M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a small information satellite which may be placed on an orbit with altitude from 600 up to 1000 km. The satellite attitude and orbit control system contains a strap-down inertial navigation system, cluster of four reaction wheels, magnetic driver and a correcting engine unit with eight electro-reaction engines. We study problems on design of algorithms for spatial guidance, in-flight identification and adaptive-robust control of the satellite motion on sun-synchronous orbit.

  20. EXPRESS Pallet Payload Interface Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Alan C.

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the EXPRESS Pallet Space Station payload interface requirements is shown. The topics include: 1) External Payload Sites; 2) EXPRESS Pallet with Six Payload Envelopes; 3) EXPRESS Pallet in Payload Bay Representative Layout; 4) EXPRESS Pallet Installation SSRMS positions pallet for PAS mating on S3 truss; 5) EXPRESS Pallet Major Components; 6) EXPRESS Pallet Adapter; 7) EXPRESS Pallet Center Location Payload Envelope; 8) Envelope Restriction for EXPRESS Pallet Corner Payload Locations; 9) EXPRESS Pallet-PAS Truss Configuration; and 10) EXPRESS Pallet Payload Services and Specifications.

  1. Optical payload isolation using the Miniature Vibration Isolation System (MVIS-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMickell, M. B.; Kreider, Thom; Hansen, Eric; Davis, Torey; Gonzalez, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Precision satellite payloads commonly require isolation from bus disturbance sources, such as reaction wheels, thrusters, stepper motors, cryo-coolers, solar array drives, thermal popping, and other moving devices. Since nearly every satellite essentially has a unique construction, custom isolation systems are usually designed to attenuate a wide bandwidth of disturbance frequencies. The disadvantage of these custom solutions is that they are not easily reusable or transferable and are generally not robust to changes in payload geometry and mass properties during the development. The MVIS-II isolation system is designed to provide vibration disturbance attenuation over a wide bandwidth, as well as being able to adapt to changes in payload mass properties and geometry, through active control of a smart material. MVIS-II is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Space Vehicle Directorate and Honeywell Defense and Space to validate miniature hybrid (passive/active) vibration isolation of sensitive optical payloads. The original flight experiment was intended to isolate a non-critical representative payload mass for demonstration purposes; however, the MVIS-II has been adapted to support the primary optical payload onboard the Tactical Satellite 2 (TacSat-2). Throughout the program MVIS-II has been able to adapt to changes in the payload geometry and mass properties with modification limited to support structures only. The MVIS-II system consists of a hexapod of hybrid struts, where each strut includes a patented passive 3-parameter DStrut n series with a novel hydraulically amplified piezoelectric actuator with integral load cell. Additionally, Honeywell's Flexible I/O controller electronics and software are used for command and control of the hardware. The passive D-Strut element provides a 40 dB/decade passive roll-off to attenuate mid-to-high frequency disturbances, while the active piezoelectric actuator is used for enhanced low

  2. Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Control Based on Magnetic Torquing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1995-01-01

    Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics.......Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics....

  3. Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Control Based on Magnetic Torquing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1995-01-01

    Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics.......Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics....

  4. Onboard Supervisor for the Ørsted Satellite Attitude Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S.A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Blanke, M.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing operational requirements for onboard autonomy in satellite control systems necessitates structural methods that support the design of a complete and reliable supervisory system.......The increasing operational requirements for onboard autonomy in satellite control systems necessitates structural methods that support the design of a complete and reliable supervisory system....

  5. On-Board and Ground-Based Complexes for Operating the Science Payload of the CORONAS-F Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. I.; Lisin, D. V.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Afanas'ev, A. N.; Osin, A. I.; Schwarz, J.

    To ensure reliable operation of the science payload of the CORONAS-F satellite and to exercise its flexible control in the course of realization of the research program, an on-board and a specialized ground-based control complexes (GCCs) were designed and manufactured at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN). A demand for such systems arose because the service facilities of the satellite basic platform were unable to satisfy the requirements of the unique scientific experiments, i.e., an efficient on-line control of the variety of scientific instruments, managing large amounts of scientific information, etc.

  6. Optical Payload for the STARE Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

    2011-03-13

    Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

  7. Model predictive control of attitude maneuver of a geostationary flexible satellite based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    TayyebTaher, M.; Esmaeilzadeh, S. Majid

    2017-07-01

    This article presents an application of Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to the attitude control of a geostationary flexible satellite. SIMO model has been used for the geostationary satellite, using the Lagrange equations. Flexibility is also included in the modelling equations. The state space equations are expressed in order to simplify the controller. Naturally there is no specific tuning rule to find the best parameters of an MPC controller which fits the desired controller. Being an intelligence method for optimizing problem, Genetic Algorithm has been used for optimizing the performance of MPC controller by tuning the controller parameter due to minimum rise time, settling time, overshoot of the target point of the flexible structure and its mode shape amplitudes to make large attitude maneuvers possible. The model included geosynchronous orbit environment and geostationary satellite parameters. The simulation results of the flexible satellite with attitude maneuver shows the efficiency of proposed optimization method in comparison with LQR optimal controller.

  8. Spaceflight payload design flight experience G-408

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgin, William W.; Looft, Fred J.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert; Dixon, Anthony G.; Roberti, Dino; Labonte, Robert; Moschini, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute's first payload of spaceflight experiments flew aboard Columbia, STS-40, during June of 1991 and culminated eight years of work by students and faculty. The Get Away Special (GAS) payload was installed on the GAS bridge assembly at the aft end of the cargo bay behind the Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) laboratory. The Experiments were turned on by astronaut signal after reaching orbit and then functioned for 72 hours. Environmental and experimental measurements were recorded on three cassette tapes which, together with zeolite crystals grown on orbit, formed the basis of subsequent analyses. The experiments were developed over a number of years by undergraduate students meeting their project requirements for graduation. The experiments included zeolite crystal growth, fluid behavior, and microgravity acceleration measurement in addition to environmental data acquisition. Preparation also included structural design, thermal design, payload integration, and experiment control. All of the experiments functioned on orbit and the payload system performed within design estimates.

  9. Miniature Reaction Wheel for Small Satellite Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to design, develop, demonstrate, and deliver a miniature, high torque, low-vibration reaction wheel for use on small satellites....

  10. Use of charging control guidelines for geosynchronous satellite design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    Several of the principle guidelines from the Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines Handbook are presented with illustrative examples. Use of the geomagnetic substorm specification to qualify satellite designs, the evaluation of satellite designs by using analytical modelling techniques, the use of selected materials and coatings to minimize charging, the tying of all conducting elements to a common ground, and the use of electrical filtering to protect circuits from discharge induced upsets are discussed. Discharge criteria and SCATHA data are excluded.

  11. Satellite de-orbiting via controlled solar radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Sanchez, Diogo Merguizo; de Almeida Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini; Smirnov, Georgi

    2016-06-01

    The goal of the present research was to study the use of solar radiation pressure to place a satellite in an orbit that makes it to re-enter the atmosphere of the Earth. This phase of the mission is usual, since the orbital space around the Earth is crowded and all satellites have to be discarded after the end of their lifetimes. The technique proposed here is based on a device that can increase and decrease the area-to-mass ratio of the satellite when it is intended to reduce its altitude until a re-entry point is reached. Equations that predict the evolution of the eccentricity and semi-major axis of the orbit of the satellite are derived and can be used to allow the evaluation of the time required for the decay of the satellite. Numerical simulations are made, and they show the time required for the decay as a function of the area-to-mass ratio and the evolution of the most important orbital elements. The results show maps that indicate regions of fast decays as a function of the area-to-mass ratio and the initial inclination of the orbit of the satellite. They also confirmed the applicability of the equations derived here. The numerical results showed the role played by the evection and the Sun-synchronous resonances in the de-orbiting time.

  12. System Design and In-orbit Verification of the HJ-1-C SAR Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Run-ning; Jiang Xiu-peng

    2014-01-01

    HJ-1-C is a SAR satellite owned by the Chinese Environment and Natural Disaster Monitoring constellation, and works together with the optical satellites HJ-1-A/B for monitoring environment and natural disasters. In this paper, the system design and characteristics of the first Chinese civil SAR satellite are described. In addition, the interface relation between SAR payload and platform is studied. Meanwhile, the data transmission capability, attitude, power, and temperature control that supp...

  13. A Trajectory Generation Approach for Payload Directed Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Corey A.; Yeh, Yoo-Hsiu

    2009-01-01

    Presently, flight systems designed to perform payload-centric maneuvers require preconstructed procedures and special hand-tuned guidance modes. To enable intelligent maneuvering via strong coupling between the goals of payload-directed flight and the autopilot functions, there exists a need to rethink traditional autopilot design and function. Research into payload directed flight examines sensor and payload-centric autopilot modes, architectures, and algorithms that provide layers of intelligent guidance, navigation and control for flight vehicles to achieve mission goals related to the payload sensors, taking into account various constraints such as the performance limitations of the aircraft, target tracking and estimation, obstacle avoidance, and constraint satisfaction. Payload directed flight requires a methodology for accurate trajectory planning that lets the system anticipate expected return from a suite of onboard sensors. This paper presents an extension to the existing techniques used in the literature to quickly and accurately plan flight trajectories that predict and optimize the expected return of onboard payload sensors.

  14. Performance of TCP Vegas, Bic and Reno Congestion Control Algorithms on Iridium Satellite Constellations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Nirmala

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite networking is different from wired or wireless networks. The behavior and the performance of TCP/IP in normal wireless network as well as in wired network are different from one another. The TCP/IP protocol was not designed to perform well over high-latency or noisy channels so its performance over satellite networks are totally different. Each satellite networks/constellations have different properties. The deployment height, motion, direction, link capacity – all differ from one satellite constellations to another. So, certainly the behavior of TCP/IP will considerably differ from one satellite constellations than another.The Performance of three different TCP Congestion algorithms, Vegas, Reno and Bic are taken for evaluation on the simulated satellite network Iridium and the performance of the three algorithms under the satellites constellation is measured using suitable metrics. It is observed that, irrespective of the high end to end delay, the behavior of TCP/IP under Satellite network is somewhat resembling a high latency wired network. TCP under satellite network is not like that of a mobile ADHOC network. The observation resulted that the overall performance of Vegas was good in Iridium constellations. These reasons should be explored for designing a better congestion control algorithm exclusively for Satellite Networks.

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF SATELLITE FORMATION WITH INITIAL UNCERTAINTY BY CONTROL LYAPUNOV FUNCTION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Navabi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, dynamics and control of satellite formation flying have been active areas of research. From the mission planning perspective, three main areas namely formation establishment, maintenance and reconfiguration have been discussed. In this paper, a study of formation establishment under initial uncertainty is presented. In this regard, dynamics of low Earth orbit satellite formation is discussed. Control Lyapunov function approach is adopted to bring a deputy satellite, with perturbed initial conditions into formation with a chief satellite. In order to take account of the initial orbit insertion error, uncertainty in initial conditions of the deputy satellite is considered. For a case study, a relatively small formation is adopted, with air-launched Pegasus as the launch vehicle. For several initial conditions, control function and required time to achieve a given mission accuracy are determined, and results are provided as illustration.

  16. New insights into the epigenetic control of satellite cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics finely tunes gene expression at a functionallevel without modifying the DNA sequence, therebycontributing to the complexity of genomic regulation.Satellite cells (SCs) are adult muscle stem cells thatare important for skeletal post-natal muscle growth,homeostasis and repair. The understanding of theepigenome of SCs at different stages and of themultiple layers of the post-transcriptional regulationof gene expression is constantly expanding. Dynamicinteractions between different epigenetic mechanismsregulate the appropriate timing of muscle-specific geneexpression and influence the lineage fate of SCs. Inthis review, we report and discuss the recent literatureabout the epigenetic control of SCs during the myogenicprocess from activation to proliferation and from theircommitment to a muscle cell fate to their differentiationand fusion to myotubes. We describe how the coordinatedactivities of the histone methyltransferasefamilies Polycomb group (PcG), which represses theexpression of developmentally regulated genes, andTrithorax group, which antagonizes the repressive activityof the PcG, regulate myogenesis by restricting geneexpression in a time-dependent manner during eachstep of the process. We discuss how histone acetylationand deacetylation occurs in specific loci throughoutSC differentiation to enable the time-dependent transcriptionof specific genes. Moreover, we describe themultiple roles of microRNA, an additional epigeneticmechanism, in regulating gene expression in SCs, byrepressing or enhancing gene transcription or translationduring each step of myogenesis. The importance ofthese epigenetic pathways in modulating SC activationand differentiation renders them as promising targetsfor disease interventions. Understanding the mostrecent findings regarding the epigenetic mechanismsthat regulate SC behavior is useful from the perspectiveof pharmacological manipulation for improving muscleregeneration and for promoting muscle homeostasisunder

  17. System Architecture of the BCU Payload on Tatiana-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Biau Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In conjunction with the international collaborative project of ESEMS (Experimental Scientific Education Micro Satellite whose goal is to develop an experimental scientific-education microsatellite with science payloads, a team consisting of professors and students from the National Central University (NCU has designed and fabricated a set of space flight instruments for space weather studies. The Block of Central University (BCU made payload has been flown successfully on board Tatiana-2. To our knowledge, the BCU payload is the very first successful satellite payload which has been developed from design and component selection to the completion of the flight module mainly by students and faculty on the NCU campus in Taiwan. This paper describes some details of the engineering effort in building the BCU payload, including sensing devices (ETP and MRM, data processing unit, and power supply. Samples of flight data acquired by BCU are also presented to show that all units of the BCU system and payload-spacecraft interfaces functioned well as expected. The flight data provides direct evidence that the NCU team is capable of developing spaceflight quality instruments for future satellite missions.

  18. System Architecture of the BCU Payload on Tatiana-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Biau Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In conjunction with the international collaborative project of ESEMS (Experimental Scientific Education Micro Satellite whose goal is to develop an experimental scientific-education microsatellite with science payloads, a team consisting of professors and students from the National Central University (NCU has designed and fabricated a set of space flight instruments for space weather studies. The Block of Central University (BCU made payload has been flown successfully on board Tatiana-2. To our knowledge, the BCU payload is the very first successful satellite payload which has been developed from design and component selection to the completion of the flight module mainly by students and faculty on the NCU campus in Taiwan. This paper describes some details of the engineering effort in building the BCU payload, including sensing devices (ETP and MRM, data processing unit, and power supply. Samples of flight data acquired by BCU are also presented to show that all units of the BCU system and payload-spacecraft interfaces functioned well as expected. The flight data provides direct evidence that the NCU team is capable of developing spaceflight quality instruments for future satellite missions.

  19. Cell Science-02 Payload Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah Diane

    2014-01-01

    The presentation provides an general overview of the Cell Science-02 science and payload operations to the NASA Payload Operations Integrated Working Group. The overview includes a description of the science objectives and specific aims, manifest status, and operations concept.

  20. Spacecraft flight control system design selection process for a geostationary communication satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Now, as we launch the Mars observer and the Cassini spacecraft, stability and control have become higher priorities. The flight control system design selection process is reviewed using as an example a geostationary communication satellite which is to have a life expectancy of 10 to 14 years. Disturbance torques including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques are assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torque can be determined. Then control torque options, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, nutation dampers, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, reactions control system (RCS), and RCS sizing, are considered. A flight control system design is then selected and preliminary stability criteria are met by the control gains selection.

  1. Testing command and control of the satellites in formation flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Popan; Gheorghe, Gh. Ion; Gabriel, Todoran

    2013-10-01

    The topics covered in the paper are mechatronic systems for determining the distance between the satellites and the design of the displacement system on air cushion table for satellites testing. INCDMTM has the capability to approach the collaboration within European Programms (ESA) of human exploration of outer space through mechatronic systems and accessories for telescopes, mechatronics systems used by the launchers, sensors and mechatronic systems for the robotic exploration programs of atmosphere and Mars. This research has a strong development component of industrial competitiveness many of the results of space research have direct applicability in industrial fabrication.

  2. Design of a video system providing optimal visual information for controlling payload and experiment operations with television

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted which included the design of a set of simplified simulation tasks, design of apparatus and breadboard TV equipment for task performance, and the implementation of a number of simulation tests. Performance measurements were made under controlled conditions and the results analyzed to permit evaluation of the relative merits (effectivity) of various TV systems. Burden factors were subsequently generated for each TV system to permit tradeoff evaluation of system characteristics against performance. For the general remote operation mission, the 2-view system is recommended. This system is characterized and the corresponding equipment specifications were generated.

  3. Aerospace Payload Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    PFRR 4/7/83 A10.901-2 SPE PAIUTE TOMAHAWK PFRR 10/26/81 A13.277 TRACER TAURUR ORION WFF 6/29/82 A20.123-1 BIME SONDA III NRR 9/8/82 A20.123-2 BIME... SONDA III NRR 9/13/82 A31.200 SES ASTROBEE F WSMR 3/1/83 A11.074 STATE NIKE HYDAC PFRR 6/15/83 A20.327-1 IMS SONDA III WFF 11/14/83 A20.327-2 IMS SONDA ...rocket payload. The instrumented payload, ( Sonda III) with an ion mass spectrometer and pulsed plasma probes was targeted to penetrate the ionospheric

  4. Integrated power and attitude control of a rigid satellite with onboard magnetic bearing suspended rigid flywheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonkyu

    2003-10-01

    A system of differential equations governing the translational and rotational motion of a system model consisting of a rigid satellite and multiple MB suspended rigid flywheels in general configuration is developed. Flywheel modules are contained in a housing rigidly mounted on the satellite and floated by an active MB suspension system, therefore each flywheel module has six degrees of freedom (DOF) as well as the satellite module. Equations of motion for the satellite and flywheels are naturally coupled and the satellite rotational motion and translational motion are coupled. A nonlinear state feedback tracking control law, which is globally asymptotically stable, is developed following a Lyapunov stability theory for integrated power and attitude control using the MB suspended flywheels. The stability, robustness, and tracking and disturbance rejection performance of the present control law with respect to initial attitude error, system modeling error, an imbalance disturbance, is demonstrated by case studies. The satellite departure motion equation derived from the definition of the angular velocity error and the system dynamics equations is presented. Application study of existing power tracking algorithm with this control law shows perfect power tracking for both power charging from and power delivery to the satellite operations and the power tracking can be performed simultaneously with and independent of the attitude control function.

  5. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  6. The TAOS/STEP Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, David; Hosken, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The Technology for Autonomous Operational Survivability / Space Test Experiments Platform (TAOS/STEP) satellite was launched on a Taurus booster from Vandenberg Air Force Base into a nearly circular, 105 degree inclined orbit on March 13, 1994. The purpose of this satellite is twofold: 1) to test a new concept in multiple procurements of fast-track modular satellites and 2) to test a suite of Air Force Phillips Laboratory payloads in space. The TAOS payloads include the Microcosm Autonomous N...

  7. Approaches to environmental verification of STS free-flier and pallet payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the environmental verification programs followed on an STS-launched free-flier payload, using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) as an example, and a pallet payload, using the Office of Space Sciences-1 (OSS-1) as an example. Differences are assessed and rationale given as to why the differing programs were used on the two example payloads. It is concluded that the differences between the programs are due to inherent differences in the payload configuration, their respective mission performance objectives and their operational scenarios rather than to any generic distinctions that differentiate between a free-flier and a pallet payload.

  8. Adaptive sliding mode control of tethered satellite deployment with input limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive sliding mode tension control method for the deployment of tethered satellite, where the input tension limitation is taken into account. The underactuated governing equations of the tethered satellites system are firstly derived based on Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the tether can only resist axial stretching, the tension input is modelled as input limitation. New adaptive sliding mode laws are addressed to guarantee the stability of the tethered satellite deployment with input disturbance, meanwhile to eliminate the effect of the limitation features of the tension input. Compared with the classic control strategy, the newly proposed adaptive sliding mode control law can deploy the satellite with smaller overshoot of the in-plane angle and implement the tension control reasonably and effectively in engineering practice. The numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  9. Design and simulation of satellite attitude control system based on Simulink and VR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gan, Qingbo; Kang, Jingshu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research satellite attitude control system design and visual simulation, the simulation framework of satellite dynamics and attitude control using Simulink were established. The design of satellite earth-oriented control system based on quaternion feedback was completed. The 3D scene based on VR was created and models in the scene were driven by simulation data of Simulink. By coordinate transformation. successful observing the scene in inertial coordinate system, orbit coordinate system and body coordinate system. The result shows that application of simulation method of Simulink combined with VR in the design of satellite attitude control system field, has the advantages of high confidence level, hard real-time property, multi-perspective and multi-coordinate system observing the scene, and improves the comprehensibility and accuracy of the design.

  10. Two way satellite communication for telemetrology and remote control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanebrekke, H.

    Low-data-rate satellite communication to fixed and floating buoys at sea, remote observation stations, and fishing vessels is studied. Particular attention is paid to Norwegian conditions, that is, high latitude and high mountains. Coverage and reliability measurements utilizing Inmarsat C and Prodat stations have been done along the coast of western and northern Norway, and on major roads in southern Norway. Good coverage is found in the coastal areas, with only 5 percent loss of messages when both the AOR and IOR satellites are used from the same location, whereas the land mobile experiments gave 40 percent to 70 percent loss, depending on the elevation angle. The possibility of using Inmarsat C or Prodat stations in the major fishing areas between Norway, Greenland, and Svalbard and in the Barents Sea are also being investigated. A method of data collection from ocean areas based on the fishing fleet is proposed.

  11. Orbit Control of Fly-around Satellite with Highly Eccentric Orbit Using Solar Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-gang, Hou; Chang-yin, Zhao; Ming-jiang, Zhang; Rong-yu, Sun

    2017-01-01

    The method of controlling highly eccentric accompanying flight orbit using the solar wing is proposed in this paper. The formation is maintained by controlling the orbit of the accompanying satellite (follower). The accompanying satellite rotates around its inertial principal axis with a constant angular velocity. The control on the accompanying satellite is divided into the in-plane control and out-of-plane control. The in-plane control is superior to the out-of-plane control. The out-of-plane control force is applied when the in-plane error is eliminated or the in-plane control force can not be supplied due to some geometrical factors. By the sliding mode control method, the magnitude and direction of the control force required by the in-plane orbit control are calculated. Then accordingly, the expression of the solar wing orientation with respect to the satellite body in the control process is derived, so that by adjusting the orientation of the solar wing, the required control force can be obtained. Finally, the verification on this method is performed by numerical simulations, including the orbit adjustment, error elimination, and the orbit maintenance. It is shown that this method can keep the error less than 5 m, and it is feasible for the space formation flight.

  12. PEGSAT - First Pegasus Payload

    OpenAIRE

    Pincus, Robert; Pownell, Jack; Rast, James

    1990-01-01

    Pegsat was designed, built and tested in slightly more than 6 months to meet the planned launch date for the first launch of the Pegasus vehicle. The primary objective of this multifunction spacecraft was to obtain environmental data from the Pegasus vehicle for use in designing future satellite busses. Taking full advantage of the opportunity, Pegsat also deployed a small Navy experimental satellite, and conducted scientific experiments over Northern Canada in support of the upcoming CRRES m...

  13. Pegsat - First Pegasus payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Robert; Pownell, Jack; Rast, James

    1990-01-01

    Pegsat was designed, built, and tested in slightly more than 6 months to meet the planned launch date for the first launch of the Pegasus vehicle. The primary objective of this multifunction spacecraft was to obtain environmental data from the Pegasus vehicle for use in designing future satellite busses. Taking full advantage of the opportunity, Pegsat also deployed a small Navy experimental satellite, and conducted scientific experiments over northern Canada in support of the upcoming CRRES mission.

  14. Amine Swingbed Payload Testing on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    One of NASA Johnson Space Center's test articles of the amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent system known as the CO2 And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed, or CAMRAS, was incorporated into a payload on the International Space Station (ISS). The intent of the payload is to demonstrate the spacecraft-environment viability of the core atmosphere revitalization technology baselined for the new Orion vehicle. In addition to the air blower, vacuum connection, and controls needed to run the CAMRAS, the payload incorporates a suite of sensors for scientific data gathering, a water save function, and an air save function. The water save function minimizes the atmospheric water vapor reaching the CAMRAS unit, thereby reducing ISS water losses that are otherwise acceptable, and even desirable, in the Orion environment. The air save function captures about half of the ullage air that would normally be vented overboard every time the cabin air-adsorbing and space vacuum-desorbing CAMRAS beds swap functions. The JSC team conducted 1000 hours of on-orbit Amine Swingbed Payload testing in 2013 and early 2014. This paper presents the basics of the payload's design and history, as well as a summary of the test results, including comparisons with prelaunch testing.

  15. Attitude dynamics of gyrostat-satellites under control by magnetic actuators at small perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshin, Anton V.

    2017-08-01

    The angular motion of gyrostat-satellites with one axial rotor is considered under control by magnetic actuators and at the action of small polyharmonic perturbations of the own dipole magnetic moment's components which are created proportionally to components of the angular velocity of the satellite. The attitude dynamics is investigated in conditions of the coincidence of the vector of magnetic induction of the external magnetic field and the initial angular momentum vector of the satellite. General and heteroclinic analytical solutions are obtained for dynamical parameters at the relative smallness of the magnetic torques. The chaotic regimes are examined on the base of the Melnikov method and Poincaré sections.

  16. Response Analysis Of Payload Fairing Due To Acoustic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annu Cherian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During flight missions launch vehicles are subjected to a severe dynamic pressure loading aero-acoustic and structure-borne excitations of various circumstances which can endanger the survivability of the payload and the vehicles electronic equipment and consequently the success of the mission. The purpose of the fairing is to protect the satellite from damage during launch until deployment in space. Both the structural and acoustic loads are significant during the first few minutes of a launch and have the potential to damage the payload. This paper describes the analysis of mechanical structure and the inner acoustic cavity of the payload fairing subjected to acoustic field. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of the fairing is analyzed using Statistical Energy Analysis SEA Model. The software VA One is used for the statistical energy analysis of launch vehicle payload fairing due to acoustic excitation.

  17. Linear Time Varying Approach to Satellite Attitude Control Using only Electromagnetic Actuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1997-01-01

    Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technological improvement of micro-electronics. Required pointing accuracy of small, inexpensive satellites is often relatively loose, within a couple of degrees. Application of cheap......, lightweight, and power efficient actuators is therefore crucial and viable. This paper discusses linear attitude control strategies for a low earth orbit satellite actuated by a set of mutually perpendicular electromagnetic coils. The principle is to use the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field...... and the magnetic field generated by the coils. A key challenge is the fact that the mechanical torque can only be produced in a plane perpendicular to the local geomagnetic field vector, therefore the satellite is not controllable when considered at fixed time. Availability of design methods for time varying...

  18. Linear Time Varying Approach to Satellite Attitude Control Using only Electromagnetic Actuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technological improvemant of micro-electronics. Required pointing accuracy of small, inexpensive satellites is often relatively loose, within a couple of degrees. Application of cheap......, lightweight, and power efficient actuators is therefore crucial and viable. This paper discusser linear attitude control strategies for a low earth orbit satellite actuated by a set of mutually perpendicular electromagnetic coils. The principle is to use the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field...... and the magnetic field generated by the coils. A key challenge is the fact that the mechanical torque can only be produced in a plane perpendicular to the local geomagnetic field vector, therefore the satellite is not controllable at fixed time. Avaliability of design methods for time varying systems is limited...

  19. Upper atomosphere and Thermal control of the Super Low Altitude Test Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Super Low Altitude Test Satellite (SLATS) is an engineering test satellite currently under development in JAXA in an attempt to open a new frontier of space utilization on extremely low earth orbits. The altitude of SLATS orbit is around200km altitude. In this altitude, rarefied aerodynamics and high-density atomic oxygen effect on the thermal design of SLATS. The thermal control of SLATS was introduced in this paper. And, the equilibrium temperature on the bumper of SLATS was estimated w...

  20. View of OMS burn from the payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    View of Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) burn from the payload bay. The closed cradles which held the communication satellites Columbia deployed are visible in the center of the frame. Parts of the spacecraft's wings can be seen on both the port and starboard sides can be seen. The vertical stabilizer is flanked by the twin OMS pods.

  1. Mechatronic Design, Dynamic Modeling and Results of a Satellite Flight Simulator for Experimental Validation of Satellite Attitude Determination and Control Schemes in 3-Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mendoza-Bárcenas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the integration and implementation of a satellite flight simulator based on an air bearing system, which was designed and instrumented in our laboratory to evaluate and to perform research in the field of Attitude Determination and Control Systems for satellites, using the hardware-in-the-loop technique. The satellite flight simulator considers two main blocks: an instrumented mobile platform and an external computer executing costume-made Matlab® software. The first block is an air bearing system containing an FPGA based on-board computer with capabilities to integrate digital architectures for data acquisition from inertial navigation sensors, control of actuators and communications data handling. The second block is an external personal computer, which runs in parallel Matlab® based algorithms for attitude determination and control. Both blocks are linked by means of radio modems. The paper also presents the analysis of the satellite flight simulator dynamics in order to obtain its movement equation which allows a better understanding of the satellite flight simulator behavior. In addition, the paper shows experimental results about the automated tracking of the satellite flight simulator based a virtual reality model developed in Matlab®. It also depicts two different versions of FPGA based on-board computers developed in-house to integrate embedded and polymorphic digital architectures for spacecrafts applications. Finally, the paper shows successful experimental results for an attitude control test using the satellite flight simulator based on a linear control law.

  2. Attitude-Tracking Control with Path Planning for Agile Satellite Using Double-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiling Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the issue of rapid attitude maneuver control of agile satellite, this paper presents an attitude-tracking control algorithm with path planning based on the improved genetic algorithm, adaptive backstepping control as well as sliding mode control. The satellite applies double gimbal control moment gyro as actuator and is subjected to the external disturbance and uncertain inertia properties. Firstly, considering the comprehensive mathematical model of the agile satellite and the double gimbal control moment gyro, an improved genetic algorithm is proposed to solve the attitude path-planning problem. The goal is to find an energy optimal path which satisfies certain maneuverability under the constraints of the input saturation, actuator saturation, slew rate limit and singularity measurement limit. Then, the adaptive backstepping control and sliding mode control are adopted in the design of the attitude-tracking controller to track accurately the desired path comprised of the satellite attitude quaternion and velocity. Finally, simulation results indicate the robustness and good tracking performance of the derived controller as well as its ability to avert the singularity of double gimbal control moment gyro.

  3. Singularity Avoidance Strategies For Satellite Mounted Manipulators Using Attitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    assumed that 6c = 0. This allows a stabilizing control law using only a feedforward velocity term. If Hie assumption is not made, the control law...configuration, a reasonable first choice is to let Cavg = 0. The resulting control law is r = -K2e2 (200) This is also the stabilizing control law that

  4. Precise Ground-In-the-Loop Orbit Control for Low Earth Observation Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbinger, C.; D'Amico, S.; Eineder, M.

    The growing interest in earth observation missions equipped with space-borne optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors drives the accuracy requirements with respect to orbit determination and control. Especially SAR interferometry with its capability to resolve the velocity of on-ground objects (e.g. for traffic monitoring, ocean currents and glacier monitoring) and to determine highly precise digital elevation models is of significant interest for scientific applications. These goals may be achieved using along-track and repeat-pass interferometry with a satellite formation, based on the precise orbit control of one satellite with respect to the osculating trajectory of the second satellite. Such a control concept will be realized by the German TerraSAR-X mission, with an expected launch in 2006, using a virtual formation, where a single satellite will be controlled in a tight manner with respect to a predefined osculating reference trajectory. This is very challenging, since common orbit disturbances, like for close twin formations, do not cancel out in this scenario. The predefined trajectory in the TerraSAR-X case could also be the orbit of a second satellite. The paper describes the generation of such a virtual reference orbit, discusses the ground-in-the-loop control concept and presents results from a long-term simulation.

  5. Cryogenic performance of the space infrared optical payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Tan, Fanjiao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Mingdong; Wang, Haipeng

    2016-10-01

    A model as well as the methodology is proposed to analyze the cryogenic performance of space infrared optical payload. And the model is established from two aspects: imaging quality and background radiation. On the basis of finite element analysis, the deformation of optical surface in cryogenic environment is characterized by Zernike polynomials, and then, the varying pattern of MTF of space cryogenic optical payload could be concluded accordingly. Then from the theory of thermal radiative transfer, the temperature distribution and the deformation of the optical payload under the action of inertial load and thermal load are analyzed based on the finite element method, and the spontaneous radiation and scattering properties of the optical surface and shielding factors between the opto-mechanical structure are considered to establish the radiation calculation model. Furthermore, the cryogenic radiation characteristics of the space infrared optical payload are obtained by the radiation calculation model. Finally, experiments are conducted using an actual off-axis TMA space infrared optical payload. And the results indicate that the background radiation of the space infrared optical payload is decreased by 79% while 33% for MTF at the thermal control temperature of 240K. In this circumstance, the system background radiation is effectively suppressed and the detection sensitivity of the optical payload is improved as well, while the imaging quality is acceptable. The model proposed in this paper can be applied to the analyzing cryogenic properties of space infrared optical payload, and providing theoretical guidance for the design and application of the space cryogenic optical payload.

  6. Drag-Free Motion Control of Satellite for High-Precision Gravity Field Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    , sensors, actuators and environmental disturbances to the required micro-Newton accuracy. A control system is designed to compensate the non-gravitational disturbances on the satellite in three axes using an H∞-design. Performance is validated against mission requirements. Keywords: Spacecraft Attitude......High precision mapping of the geoid and the Earth's gravity field are of importance to a wide range of ongoing studies in areas like ocean circulation, solid Earth physics and ice sheet dynamics. Using a satellite in orbit around the Earth gives the opportunity to map the Earth's gravity field in 3...... dimensions with much better accuracy and spatial resolution than ever accomplished. To reach the desired quality of measurements, the satellite must fly in a low Earth orbit where disturbances from atmospheric drag and the Earth's magnetic field will perturb the satellite's motion. These effects...

  7. Cibola flight experiment satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P.; Liddle, Doug; Paffett, John; Sweeting, Martin; Curiel, A.; Sun, Wei; Eves, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    In order to achieve an "economy of scale" with respect to payload capacity the major trend in telecommunications satellites is for larger and larger platforms. With these large platforms the level of integration between platform and payload is increasing leading to longer delivery schedules. The typical lifecycle for procurement of these large telecommunications satellites is now 3-6 years depending on the level of non-recurring engineering needed. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has designed a low-cost platform aimed at telecommunications and navigation applications. SSTL's Geostationary Minisatellite Platform (GMP) is a new entrant addressing the lower end of the market with payloads up to 250kg requiring less than 1.5 kW power. The British National Space Centre through the MOSAIC Small Satellite Initiative supported the development of GMP. The main design goals for GMP are low-cost for the complete mission including launch and operations and a platform allowing flexible payload accommodation. GMP is specifically designed to allow rapid development and deployment with schedules typically between 1 and 2 years from contract signature to flight readiness. GMP achieves these aims by a modular design where the level of integration between the platform and payload is low. The modular design decomposes the satellite into three major components - the propulsion bay, the avionics bay and the payload module. Both the propulsion and avionics bays are reusable, largely unchanged, and independent of the payload configuration. Such a design means that SSTL or a 3rd party manufacturer can manufacture the payload in parallel to the platform with integration taking place quite late in the schedule. In July 2003 SSTL signed a contract for ESA's first Galileo navigation satellite known as GSTBV2/A. The satellite is based on GMP and ESA plan to launch it into a MEO orbit late in 2005. The second flight of GMP is likely to be in 2006 carrying a geostationary payload

  8. Ares V: Shifting the Payload Design Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrall, Phil; Creech, Steve; Cockrell, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA is designing the Ares V heavy-lift cargo launch vehicle to send more crew and cargo to more places on the lunar surface than the 1960s-era Saturn V and to provide ongoing support for a permanent lunar outpost. This uncrewed cargo vehicle is designed to operate together with the Ares I crew vehicle (Figure 1). In addition to this role, however, its unmatched mass and volume capability represent a national asset for exploration, science, and commerce. The Ares V also enables or significantly enhances a large class of space missions not thought possible by scientists and engineers since the Saturn V program ended over 30 years ago. Compared to current systems, it will offer approximately five times the mass and volume to most orbits and locations. This should allow prospective mission planners to build robust payloads with margins that are three to five times the industry norm. The space inside the planned payload shroud has enough usable volume to launch the volumetric equivalent of approximately 10 Apollo Lunar Modules or approximately five equivalent Hubble Space Telescopes. This mass and volume capability to low-Earth orbit (LEO) enables a host of new scientific and observation platforms, such as telescopes, satellites, planetary and solar missions, as well as being able to provide the lift for future large in-space infrastructure missions, such as space based solar power and mining, Earth asteroid defense, propellant depots, etc. In addition, payload designers may also have the option of simplifying their designs or employing Ares V s payload as dumb mass to reduce technical and operational risk. The Ares V team is engaging the potential payload community now, two to three years before System Requirements Review (SRR), in order to better understand the additional requirements from the payload community that could be accommodated in the Ares V design in its conceptual phase. This paper will discuss the Ares V reference mission and capability, as well as its

  9. Spectrum management considerations of adaptive power control in satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitz, P.; Sullivan, T.

    1983-01-01

    Adaptive power control concepts for the compensation of rain attenuation are considered for uplinks and downlinks. The performance of example power-controlled and fixed-EIRP uplinks is compared in terms of C/Ns and C/Is. Provisional conclusions are drawn with regard to the efficacy of uplink and downlink power control orbit/spectrum utilization efficiency.

  10. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  11. A COMBINED ADMISSION CONTROL ALGORITHM WITH DA PROTOCOL FOR SATELLITE ATM NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Rong; Cao Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Admission control is an important strategy for Quality of Service (QoS) provisioning in Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. Based on a control-theory model of resources on-Demand Allocation (DA) protocol, the paper studies the effect of the protocol on the statistical characteristics of network traffic,and proposes a combined connection admission control algorithm with the DA protocol to achieve full utilization of link resources in satellite communication systems. The proposed algorithm is based on the cross-layer-design approach. Theoretical analysis and system simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can admit more connections within certain admission thresholds than one that does not take into account the DA protocol. Thus, the proposed algorithm can increase admission ratio of traffic sources for satellite ATM networks and improve satellite link utilization.

  12. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  13. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ze

    2017-02-23

    This article investigates the dynamic topology control problemof satellite cluster networks (SCNs) in Earth observation (EO) missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs). The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites' relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT) strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime.

  14. Enabling Science and Deep Space Exploration through Space Launch System (LSL) Secondary Payload Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jody; Pelfrey, Joseph; Norris, George

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated launch vehicle has completed its Critical Design Review (CDR). By reaching this milestone, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft are on the path to launch a new era of deep space exploration. NASA is making investments to expand science and exploration capability of the SLS by developing the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the mission trajectory. Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), currently planned for launch no earlier than July 2018, will be the first mission to carry such payloads on the SLS. The EM-1 launch will include thirteen 6U Cubesat small satellites that will be deployed beyond low earth orbit. By providing an earth-escape trajectory, opportunities are created for advancement of small satellite subsystems, including deep space communications and in-space propulsion. This SLS capability also creates low-cost options for addressing existing Agency strategic knowledge gaps and affordable science missions. A new approach to payload integration and mission assurance is needed to ensure safety of the vehicle, while also maintaining reasonable costs for the small payload developer teams. SLS EM-1 will provide the framework and serve as a test flight, not only for vehicle systems, but also payload accommodations, ground processing, and on-orbit operations. Through developing the requirements and integration processes for EM-1, NASA is outlining the framework for the evolved configuration of secondary payloads on SLS Block upgrades. The lessons learned from the EM-1 mission will be applied to processes and products developed for future block upgrades. In the heavy-lift configuration of SLS, payload accommodations will increase for secondary opportunities including small satellites larger than the traditional Cubesat class payload. The payload mission concept of operations, proposed payload capacity of SLS, and the payload requirements for launch and

  15. Chinese Surveying and Control Network for Earth-Orbit Satellites and Deep Space Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the surveying and control network(CSN) for earth-orbit satellite and spatial geodesy, and the relationship between the CSN for deep space celestial bodies and detectors, and deep space detection are briefly summarized, and so are the basic technical needs of the deep space surveying and control network(DSN). Then, the techniques, the constituents and the distributing of Chinese satellite CSN (CSCSN) and other radio observing establishments in China are introduced. Lastly, with the primary CSCSN and other observing establishments, some projects for China to rebuild a more perfect CSCSN, and to establish a DSN are analyzed and stated.

  16. A Piecewise Affine Hybrid Systems Approach to Fault Tolerant Satellite Formation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Bak, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a procedure for modelling satellite formations   including failure dynamics as a piecewise-affine hybrid system is   shown. The formulation enables recently developed methods and tools   for control and analysis of piecewise-affine systems to be applied   leading to synthesis of fault...... tolerant controllers and analysis of   the system behaviour given possible faults.  The method is   illustrated using a simple example involving two satellites trying   to reach a specific formation despite of actuator faults occurring....

  17. A Piecewise Affine Hybrid Systems Approach to Fault Tolerant Satellite Formation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Bak, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a procedure for modelling satellite formations   including failure dynamics as a piecewise-affine hybrid system is   shown. The formulation enables recently developed methods and tools   for control and analysis of piecewise-affine systems to be applied   leading to synthesis of fault...... tolerant controllers and analysis of   the system behaviour given possible faults.  The method is   illustrated using a simple example involving two satellites trying   to reach a specific formation despite of actuator faults occurring....

  18. Design Considerations for Miniaturized Control Moment Gyroscopes for Rapid Retargeting and Precision Pointing of Small Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Roithmayr, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design as well as characterization of a practical control moment gyroscope (CMG) based attitude control system (ACS) for small satellites in the 15-20 kg mass range performing rapid retargeting and precision pointing maneuvers. The paper focuses on the approach taken in the design of miniaturized CMGs while considering the constraints imposed by the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as the size of the satellite. It is shown that a hybrid mode is...

  19. Controlled assembly and plasmonic properties of asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jun Hee; Lim, Jonghui; Yoon, Sangwoon

    2012-08-28

    The assembly of noble metal nanoparticles offers an appealing means to control and enhance the plasmonic properties of nanostructures. However, making nanoassemblies with easily modifiable gap distances with high efficiency has been challenging. Here, we report a novel strategy to assemble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into Janus-type asymmetric core-satellite nanostructures. Markedly different desorption efficiency between large and small AuNPs in ethanol allows us to prepare the asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies in a dispersed colloidal state with near 100% purity. The resulting nanoassemblies have well-defined structures in which a core AuNP (51 nm) is covered by an average of 13 ± 3 satellite AuNPs (13 nm) with part of the core surfaces left unoccupied. Strong surface plasmon coupling is observed from these nanoassemblies as a result of the close proximity between the core and the satellites, which appears significantly red-shifted from the surface plasmon resonance frequencies of the constituting nanoparticles. The dependence of the surface plasmon coupling on a gap distance of less than 3 nm is systematically investigated by varying the length of the alkanedithiol linkers. The asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies also serve as an excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate with an enhancement factor of ~10(6). Finally, we demonstrate that the presented assembly method is extendible to the preparation of compositionally heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  20. Closed-Loop Control of Satellite Formations Using a Quasi-Rigid Body Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Christopher; Misra, Arun K.

    2011-04-01

    Satellites in formation work together to fulfill the role of a larger satellite. The purpose of this article is to develop a quasi-rigid body formulation for modeling and controlling such a formation as a single entity. In this article, a definition of a quasi-rigid body coordinate frame is presented, which, when attached to a formation, conveniently describes its orientation in space. Using this formulation, the equations of motion for a satellite formation are recast, and natural circular formations are expressed more succinctly. When the J 2 perturbation is considered, a correction factor on the formation's spin rate is introduced. The control of a satellite formation can effectively be separated into (1) a control torque to maintain the attitude and (2) control forces that maintain the rigidity of the formation. With this in mind, a nonlinear Lyapunov controller is derived using the formulation, which acts on the formation as a whole. Simulations validate this controller and illustrate its utility for maintaining circular formations, in particular, in the presence of gravitational perturbations.

  1. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the work for NASA are examined: the construction of multi-dimensional phase modulation trellis codes and a performance analysis of these codes. A complete list is contained of all the best trellis codes for use with phase modulation. LxMPSK signal constellations are included for M = 4, 8, and 16 and L = 1, 2, 3, and 4. Spectral efficiencies range from 1 bit/channel symbol (equivalent to rate 1/2 coded QPSK) to 3.75 bits/channel symbol (equivalent to 15/16 coded 16-PSK). The parity check polynomials, rotational invariance properties, free distance, path multiplicities, and coding gains are given for all codes. These codes are considered to be the best candidates for implementation of a high speed decoder for satellite transmission. The design of a hardware decoder for one of these codes, viz., the 16-state 3x8-PSK code with free distance 4.0 and coding gain 3.75 dB is discussed. An exhaustive simulation study of the multi-dimensional phase modulation trellis codes is contained. This study was motivated by the fact that coding gains quoted for almost all codes found in literature are in fact only asymptotic coding gains, i.e., the coding gain at very high signal to noise ratios (SNRs) or very low BER. These asymptotic coding gains can be obtained directly from a knowledge of the free distance of the code. On the other hand, real coding gains at BERs in the range of 10(exp -2) to 10(exp -6), where these codes are most likely to operate in a concatenated system, must be done by simulation.

  2. Nutation and precession control of the High Energy Solar Physics (HESP) satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, C. P.; Robertson, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    The High Energy Solar Physics (HESP) spacecraft is an intermediate class satellite proposed by NASA to study solar high-energy phenomena during the next cycle of high solar activity in the 1998 to 2005 time frame. The HESP spacecraft is a spinning satellite which points to the sun with stringent pointing requirements. The natural dynamics of a spinning satellite includes an undesirable effect: nutation, which is due to the presence of disturbances and offsets of the spin axis from the angular momentum vector. The proposed Attitude Control System (ACS) attenuates nutation with reaction wheels. Precessing the spacecraft to track the sun in the north-south and east-west directions is accomplished with the use of torques from magnetic torquer bars. In this paper, the basic dynamics of a spinning spacecraft are derived, control algorithms to meet HESP science requirements are discussed and simulation results to demonstrate feasibility of the ACS concept are presented.

  3. Closed-Loop Acoustic Control of Reverberant Room for Satellite Environmental Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Karl; Bianciardi, Fabio; Sabbatini, Danilo; Debille, Jan; Carrella, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The full satellite acoustic test is an important milestone in a satellite launch survivability verification campaign. This test is required to verify the satellite’s mechanical design against the high-level acoustic loads induced by the launch vehicle during the atmospheric flight. During the test, the satellite is subjected to a broadband diffuse acoustic field, reproducing the pressure levels observed during launch. The excitation is in most cases provided by a combination of horns for the low frequencies and noise generators for the higher frequencies. Acoustic control tests are commonly performed in reverberant rooms, controlling the sound pressure levels in third octave bands over the specified target spectrum. This paper discusses an automatic feedback control system for acoustic control of large reverberation rooms for satellite environmental testing. The acoustic control system consists of parallel third octave PI (Proportional Integral) feedback controllers that take the reverberation characteristics of the room into consideration. The drive output of the control system is shaped at every control step based on the comparison of the average third octave noise spectrum, measured from a number of microphones in the test room, with the target spectrum. Cross-over filters split the output drive into band- limited signals to feed each of the horns. The control system is realized in several steps. In the first phase, a dynamic process model is developed, including the non-linear characteristics of the horns and the reverberant properties of the room. The model is identified from dynamic experiments using system identification techniques. In the next phase, an adequate control strategy is designed which is capable of reaching the target spectrum in the required time period without overshoots. This control strategy is obtained from model-in-the-loop (MIL) simulations, evaluating the performance of various potential strategies. Finally, the proposed strategy is

  4. Adaptive FTC based on Control Allocation and Fault Accommodation for Satellite Reaction Wheels

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, P.; Blanke, Mogens; P. Castaldi; Mimmo, N.; S. Simani

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an active fault tolerant control scheme to cope with faults or failures affecting the flywheel spin rate sensors or satellite reaction wheel motors. The active fault tolerant control system consists of a fault detection and diagnosis module along with a control allocationand fault accommodation module directly exploiting the on-line fault estimates. The use of the nonlinear geometric approach and radial basis function neural networks allows to obtain a precise fault isolat...

  5. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  6. Autonomous Pointing Control of a Large Satellite Antenna Subject to Parametric Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunan; Liu, Yufei; Radice, Gianmarco; Tan, Shujun

    2017-01-01

    With the development of satellite mobile communications, large antennas are now widely used. The precise pointing of the antenna’s optical axis is essential for many space missions. This paper addresses the challenging problem of high-precision autonomous pointing control of a large satellite antenna. The pointing dynamics are firstly proposed. The proportional–derivative feedback and structural filter to perform pointing maneuvers and suppress antenna vibrations are then presented. An adaptive controller to estimate actual system frequencies in the presence of modal parameters uncertainty is proposed. In order to reduce periodic errors, the modified controllers, which include the proposed adaptive controller and an active disturbance rejection filter, are then developed. The system stability and robustness are analyzed and discussed in the frequency domain. Numerical results are finally provided, and the results have demonstrated that the proposed controllers have good autonomy and robustness. PMID:28287450

  7. Autonomous Pointing Control of a Large Satellite Antenna Subject to Parametric Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunan; Liu, Yufei; Radice, Gianmarco; Tan, Shujun

    2017-03-10

    With the development of satellite mobile communications, large antennas are now widely used. The precise pointing of the antenna's optical axis is essential for many space missions. This paper addresses the challenging problem of high-precision autonomous pointing control of a large satellite antenna. The pointing dynamics are firstly proposed. The proportional-derivative feedback and structural filter to perform pointing maneuvers and suppress antenna vibrations are then presented. An adaptive controller to estimate actual system frequencies in the presence of modal parameters uncertainty is proposed. In order to reduce periodic errors, the modified controllers, which include the proposed adaptive controller and an active disturbance rejection filter, are then developed. The system stability and robustness are analyzed and discussed in the frequency domain. Numerical results are finally provided, and the results have demonstrated that the proposed controllers have good autonomy and robustness.

  8. Autonomous Pointing Control of a Large Satellite Antenna Subject to Parametric Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunan Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of satellite mobile communications, large antennas are now widely used. The precise pointing of the antenna’s optical axis is essential for many space missions. This paper addresses the challenging problem of high-precision autonomous pointing control of a large satellite antenna. The pointing dynamics are firstly proposed. The proportional–derivative feedback and structural filter to perform pointing maneuvers and suppress antenna vibrations are then presented. An adaptive controller to estimate actual system frequencies in the presence of modal parameters uncertainty is proposed. In order to reduce periodic errors, the modified controllers, which include the proposed adaptive controller and an active disturbance rejection filter, are then developed. The system stability and robustness are analyzed and discussed in the frequency domain. Numerical results are finally provided, and the results have demonstrated that the proposed controllers have good autonomy and robustness.

  9. Multiagent Attitude Control System for Satellites Based in Momentum Wheels and Event-Driven Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juan L.; Moreno, Jose Sanchez

    2012-12-01

    Attitude control is a requirement always present in spacecraft design. Several kinds of actuators exist to accomplish this control, being momentum wheels one of the most employed. Usually satellites carry redundant momentum wheels to handle any possible single failure, but the controller remains as a single centralized element, posing problems in case of failures. In this work a decentralized agent-based event-driven algorithm for attitude control is presented as a possible solution. Several agents based in momentum wheels will interact among them to accomplish the satellite control. A simulation environment has been developed to analyze the behavior of this architecture. This environment has been made available through the web page http://www.dia.uned.es.

  10. A university-based distributed satellite mission control network for operating professional space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Christopher; Rasay, Mike

    2016-03-01

    For more than a decade, Santa Clara University's Robotic Systems Laboratory has operated a unique, distributed, internet-based command and control network for providing professional satellite mission control services for a variety of government and industry space missions. The system has been developed and is operated by students who become critical members of the mission teams throughout the development, test, and on-orbit phases of these missions. The mission control system also supports research in satellite control technology and hands-on student aerospace education. This system serves as a benchmark for its comprehensive nature, its student-centric nature, its ability to support NASA and industry space missions, and its longevity in providing a consistent level of professional services. This paper highlights the unique features of this program, reviews the network's design and the supported spacecraft missions, and describes the critical programmatic features of the program that support the control of professional space missions.

  11. Automatic phase control in solar power satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Kantak, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    Various approaches to the problem of generating, maintaining and distributing a coherent, reference phase signal over a large area are suggested, mathematically modeled and analyzed with respect to their ability to minimize: phase build-up, beam diffusion and beam steering phase jitter, cable length, and maximize power transfer efficiency. In addition, phase control configurations are suggested which alleviate the need for layout symmetry.

  12. Communication and Control in the Canadian North: The Role of Interactive Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaskakis, Gail G.

    In 1972 the Canadian government launched its first domestic communications satellite, Anik A, which relays direct broadcast television and telephone messages to northern communities. The impact of television on Inuit life has raised issues and concerns pertaining to native language broadcasting, media access and control, and cultural identity…

  13. Solar attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-08-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control, which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  14. Changing Safety Priorities from Payload Development to Onboard Payload Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, J.; Biemann, W.; Festa, F.

    2012-01-01

    Safety Analyses for Payload development phases are typically based o n well defined fixed configurations. From safety point of view the main focus during the development phase is on t he design features that will ensure inherent safe launch, on-board installation and usage of the payload in the planned configuration. The complete payload verification including the safety verification and the flight certification is based on that expected scenario. Once the payload is launched and installed on-orbit the focus moves to safe operations in constantly changing configurations over the life-time due t o upgrades, preventive, and corrective maintenance activities. A broader assessment and preparation for recovery procedures would help to streamline this aspect. It would also support the new extended ISS utilization scenario and the changes of the logistic fleet available to the ISS. The challenge to move the safety focus from payload development and design safety features to permanently modified configurations, different upload capabilities and extending life-cycles/time during the operations phase of the payloads can be supported by early definition of operational envelops and resulting safety approval of wider operational flexibility.

  15. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal power control and rain fade software test plan, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Power Control and Rain Fade Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software automatically controls the LET uplink power to compensate for signal fades. Besides power augmentation, the C&PM Software system is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, control of the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload, and data display. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Power Control and Rain Fade Software. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 is a programmer's guide to the Power Control and Rain Fade Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Power Control and Rain Fade Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Power Control and Rain Fade Test Plan provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software using a predetermined signal fade event. The Test Plan also provides a means to demonstrate the capability of the software.

  16. Dynamics and chaos control of asymmetric gyrostat satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanov, V. S.; Yudintsev, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    The motion of a free gyrostat consisting of a platform with a triaxial ellipsoid of inertia and a rotor with a slight asymmetry with respect to the axis of rotation is considered. Dimensionless equations of motion for a system with perturbations caused by the small asymmetries of the rotor are written in Andoyer-Deprit variables. These perturbations result in a chaotic layer in the separatrix vicinity. Heteroclinic and homoclinic trajectories are written in analytical form for gyrostats with different ratios of their moments of inertia. These trajectories are used to construct a modified Melnikov function, and to produce control that eliminates separatrix chaos. The Poincare sections and Melnikov function are constructed via numerical modeling that demonstrates the effectiveness of control.

  17. The geo-control system for station keeping and colocation of geostationary satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenbruck, O.; Eckstein, M. C.; Gonner, J.

    1993-01-01

    GeoControl is a compact but powerful and accurate software system for station keeping of single and colocated satellites, which has been developed at the German Space Operations Center. It includes four core modules for orbit determination (including maneuver estimation), maneuver planning, monitoring of proximities between colocated satellites, and interference and event prediction. A simple database containing state vector and maneuver information at selected epochs is maintained as a central interface between the modules. A menu driven shell utilizing form screens for data input serves as the central user interface. The software is written in Ada and FORTRAN and may be used on VAX workstations or mainframes under the VMS operating system.

  18. Satellite Dynamics and Control in a Quaternion Formulation (2nd edition)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Larsen, Martin Birkelund

    This lecture note treats modelling and attitude control design using a quaternion description of attitude for a rigid body in space. Dynamics and kinematics of a satellite is formulated as a non-linear model from Euler’s moment equations and a description of kinematics using the attitude quaternion...... to represent rotation. A general linearised model is derived such that the user can specify an arbitrary point of operation in angular velocity and wheel angular momentum, specifying the a inertia matrix for a rigid satellite. A set of Simulink® models that simulate the satellite’s nonlinear behaviour...

  19. Guidance, Navigation, and Control Techniques and Technologies for Active Satellite Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Hernando, Guillermo; Erb, Sven; Cropp, Alexander; Voirin, Thomas; Dubois-Matra, Olivier; Rinalducci, Antonio; Visentin, Gianfranco; Innocenti, Luisa; Raposo, Ana

    2013-09-01

    This paper shows an internal feasibility analysis to de- orbit a non-functional satellite of big dimensions by the Technical Directorate of the European Space Agency ESA. The paper focuses specifically on the design of the techniques and technologies for the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system of the spacecraft mission that will capture the satellite and ultimately will de-orbit it on a controlled re-entry.The paper explains the guidance strategies to launch, rendezvous, close-approach, and capture the target satellite. The guidance strategy uses chaser manoeuvres, hold points, and collision avoidance trajectories to ensure a safe capture. It also details the guidance profile to de-orbit it in a controlled re-entry.The paper continues with an analysis of the required sensing suite and the navigation algorithms to allow the homing, fly-around, and capture of the target satellite. The emphasis is placed around the design of a system to allow the rendezvous with an un-cooperative target, including the autonomous acquisition of both the orbital elements and the attitude of the target satellite.Analysing the capture phase, the paper provides a trade- off between two selected capture systems: the net and the tentacles. Both are studied from the point of view of the GNC system.The paper analyses as well the advanced algorithms proposed to control the final compound after the capture that will allow the controlled de-orbiting of the assembly in a safe place in the Earth.The paper ends proposing the continuation of this work with the extension to the analysis of the destruction process of the compound in consecutive segments starting from the entry gate to the rupture and break up.

  20. Analytical derivation and verification of zero-gyro control for the IUE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Tiffany; Croft, John

    1989-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite was launched January 26, 1978 into a geosynchronous orbit over South America. From its stationary position, the telescope maintains continuous communication with the control centers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and at the European Space Agency's (ESA's) Villagranca del Castillo Satellite Tracking Station in Spain. Since its launch in 1978, the satellite has gradually lost four of the original six gyroscopes in the Inertial Reference Assembly (IRA). In August 1985, the fourth of the original six gyros failed and a two-gyro system developed by NASA-GSFC was uplinked to the satellite and is currently in use. A one-gyro system also developed by NASA-GSFC is ready for use in case of another gyro failure. In the event that the sixth gyro should also fail, a zero-gyro system is being developed. The goal of this system is to provide interial target pointing without the use of gyroscopes. The satellite has sun sensors to provide attitude information about two of the three axes. It relies upon the exchange of reaction wheel momenta to determine angular position and rate of the third axis.

  1. Payload IVA training and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsees, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a training program for the intravehicular operation of space shuttle payloads is discussed. The priorities for the program are compliance with established training standards, and accommodating changes. Simulation devices are also reviewed.

  2. Experimental verification of chaotic control of an underactuated tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhaojun; Jin, Dongping

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies chaotic control of a tethered satellite system (TSS) driven only by a momentum-exchange device during its attitude adjustment. In dealing with such the underactuated system, an extended time-delay autosynchronization (ETDAS) is employed to stabilize the chaotic motion to a periodic motion. To obtain the control domains of the ETDAS method, a stability analysis of the controlled tethered satellite system in elliptical orbit is implemented. According to the principle of dynamic similarity, then, ground-based experiment setups are proposed and designed to emulate the in-plane motions of the TSS. Representative experiments are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ETDAS scheme in controlling the chaotic motion of the underactuated TSS.

  3. SPOT satellite family: Past, present, and future of the operations in the mission and control center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Pacholczyk

    1993-01-01

    SPOT sun-synchronous remote sensing satellites are operated by CNES since February 1986. Today, the SPOT mission and control center (CCM) operates SPOT1, SPOT2, and is ready to operate SPOT3. During these seven years, the way to operate changed and the CCM, initially designed for the control of one satellite, has been modified and upgraded to support these new operating modes. All these events have shown the performances and the limits of the system. A new generation of satellite (SPOT4) will continue the remote sensing mission during the second half of the 90's. Its design takes into account the experience of the first generation and supports several improvements. A new generation of control center (CMP) has been developed and improves the efficiency, quality, and reliability of the operations. The CMP is designed for operating two satellites at the same time during launching, in-orbit testing, and operating phases. It supports several automatic procedures and improves data retrieval and reporting.

  4. Search for an eventual control of Saturnian kilometric radiation by Titan satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Lecacheux, Alain; Rucker, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science Experiment (RPWS) revealed prominent arcs when the data are displayed in time-frequency coordinates, in the so-called dynamic spectra. We show that the Saturnian Kilometric Radiation (SKR) presents different kinds of characteristic appearances like arc structures. Those arcs may be classified in two sets: the 'vertex early arcs' (VEA) and the 'vertex late arcs' (VLA), and are observed in the frequency range between 80 kHz and 1 MHz. We investigate the probable control of the SKR arcs by the Titan satellite. We emphasis in this study on the arc observational parameters (e.g. the probability of occurrence, the local time and the gyro-frequency) and their eventual relations to the geometrical configuration between Saturn, Titan, and the observed (i.e. Cassini spacecraft). We follow in this analysis a similar method applied to the control of Jovian decametric emissions by the Io satellite. This method consists principally to observe, on one side, the arc curvatures and their corresponding maximum frequency, and on the other side the orbital phase of the Titan satellite around the planet. This leads us to provide a first attempt concerning the 'controls' of non-thermal Jovian and Saturnian radio emissions, respectively, by Io and Titan satellites.

  5. Tilted wheel satellite attitude control with air-bearing table experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inumoh, Lawrence O.; Forshaw, Jason L.; Horri, Nadjim M.

    2015-12-01

    Gyroscopic actuators for satellite control have attracted significant research interest over the years, but their viability for the control of small satellites has only recently started to become clear. Research on variable speed gyroscopic actuators has long been focused on single gimbal actuators; double gimbal actuators typically operate at constant wheel spin rate and allow tilt angle ranges far larger than the ranges needed to operate most satellite missions. This research examines a tilted wheel, a newly proposed type of inertial actuator that can generate torques in all three principal axes of a rigid satellite using a spinning wheel and a double tilt mechanism. The tilt mechanism tilts the angular momentum vector about two axes providing two degree of freedom control, while variation of the wheel speed provides the third. The equations of motion of the system lead to a singularity-free system during nominal operation avoiding the need for complex steering logic. This paper describes the hardware design of the tilted wheel and the experimental setup behind both standalone and spherical air-bearing tables used to test it. Experimental results from the air bearing table are provided with the results depicting the high performance capabilities of the proposed actuator in torque generation.

  6. Adaptive FTC based on Control Allocation and Fault Accommodation for Satellite Reaction Wheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Blanke, Mogens; Castaldi, P.;

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an active fault tolerant control scheme to cope with faults or failures affecting the flywheel spin rate sensors or satellite reaction wheel motors. The active fault tolerant control system consists of a fault detection and diagnosis module along with a control allocation...... estimation filters, which do not need a priori information about the internal model of the signal to be estimated. The adaptive control allocation and sensor fault accommodation can handle both temporal faults and failures. Simulation results illustrate the convincing fault correction and attitude control...

  7. The SPOT satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, J.-P.

    1981-03-01

    The background, objectives and data products of the French SPOT remote sensing satellite system are presented. The system, which was developed starting in 1978 with the subsequent participation of Sweden and Belgium, is based on a standard multimission platform with associated ground control station and a mission-specific payload, which includes two High-Resolution Visible range instruments allowing the acquisition of stereoscopic views from different orbits. Mission objectives include the definition of future remote sensing systems, the compilation of a cartographic and resources data base, the study of species discrimination and production forecasting based on frequent access and off-nadir viewing, the compilation of a stereoscopic data base, and platform and instrument qualification, for possible applications in cartography, geology and agriculture. Standard data products will be available at three levels of preprocessing: radiometric correction only, precision processing for vertical viewing, and cartographic quality processing.

  8. Education Payload Operation - Kit D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Kit D (EPO-Kit D) includes education items that will be used to support the live International Space Station (ISS) education downlinks and Education Payload Operation (EPO) demonstrations onboard the ISS. The main objective of EPO-Kit D supports the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goal of attracting students to study and seek careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

  9. Deploying process modeling and attitude control of a satellite with a large deployable antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Zhigang Xing; Gangtie Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and attitude control methods for a satellite with a large deployable antenna are studied in the present paper. Firstly, for reducing the model dimension, three dynamic models for the deploying process are developed, which are built with the methods of multi-rigid-body dynamics, hybrid coordinate and substructure. Then an attitude control method suitable for the deploying process is proposed, which can keep stability under any dynamical parameter variation. Subsequently, this attitude...

  10. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-02-01

    In the geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances caused by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control system with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. Roll/yaw control is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators. The design also includes an active nutation damping method.

  11. An integrated design of the payload for Chang'e 3 Lunar Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhouchangyi, Zhouchangyi

    Chang’e 3 detector is launched in China Xichang Satellite Launch Center on December 2, 2013. Its project task was a complete success. CE-3 detector achieved a soft landing and started its lunar exploration andinspection. It is composed of the lander and Rover (Yutu). This paper introduces an integrated designing payload of Chang’e 3 Lunar Rover. Chang’e 3 Lunar Rover is allocated with infrared imaging spectrometer,moon-measuring radar, Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer(APXS), panoramic camera and other payloads. The infrared spectrometer is used to analyse the infrared spectrum and take images of the patrolling areas, to analyse the mineral composition and distribution of the lunar surface, and to do a comprehensive study of the energy sources and mineral sources.The radar is used for inspecting the thickness and structure of the lunar soil on the patrolling path as well as probing the structure of the shallow lunar crust. The APXS will use the method of alpha-particle-induced X-ray fluorescence to study in detail the composition of soil in specific areas. The panoramic camera is for obtaining three-dimensional images of the lunar surface around the patrolling path, accomplishing the inspection of near landscapes and topographic analysis. Limited by the total weight, the Rover is equipped with a payload controller, through which an integrated design consisting of the power supply, data processing, electronic units, operating management and other functions of the payload is done, to realize the centralized power supply, centralized management, centralized data processing, centralized operating controlling and centralized interfaces with the integrated electronic system of the Rover.

  12. Spacecraft design project: High temperature superconducting infrared imaging satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The High Temperature Superconductor Infrared Imaging Satellite (HTSCIRIS) is designed to perform the space based infrared imaging and surveillance mission. The design of the satellite follows the black box approach. The payload is a stand alone unit, with the spacecraft bus designed to meet the requirements of the payload as listed in the statement of work. Specifications influencing the design of the spacecraft bus were originated by the Naval Research Lab. A description of the following systems is included: spacecraft configuration, orbital dynamics, radio frequency communication subsystem, electrical power system, propulsion, attitude control system, thermal control, and structural design. The issues of testing and cost analysis are also addressed. This design project was part of the course Advanced Spacecraft Design taught at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  13. A satellite digital controller or 'play that PID tune again, Sam'. [Position, Integral, Derivative feedback control algorithm for design strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem discussed is to design a digital controller for a typical satellite. The controlled plant is considered to be a rigid body acting in a plane. The controller is assumed to be a digital computer which, when combined with the proposed control algorithm, can be represented as a sampled-data system. The objective is to present a design strategy and technique for selecting numerical values for the control gains (assuming position, integral, and derivative feedback) and the sample rate. The technique is based on the parameter plane method and requires that the system be amenable to z-transform analysis.

  14. Dynamical modelling and control of a spacecraft-mounted manipulator capturing a spinning satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, Xavier; Jaar, Gilbert J.; Misra, Arun K.

    1995-01-01

    Issues associated with the modelling and control of a spacecraft-mounted manipulator capturing a spinning satellite are presented. The Lagrangian formulation is used to derive the dynamical equations of the system immediately following the capture. The formulation is carried out by writing Lagrange's equations for the individual bodies, and then assembling them to obtain the constrained dynamical equations of the system. The non-working constraint forces/torques are then eliminated by using the natural orthogonal complement which produces a set of independent dynamical equations. A control algorithm whose objective is to produce a set of feedback-linearized, homogeneous and uncoupled equations is designed and implemented. The initial conditions of the state variables needed to achieve smooth berthing of the satellite are computed, and the dynamics simulation of both the controlled and uncontrolled systems is carried out. The manipulator's structural flexibility is included in the dynamics simulation model.

  15. A modeling and simulation of control system of satellite tracking platform an- tenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaojun; GONG Lihong

    2012-01-01

    Based on the platform of mobile carrier satellite tracking has a wide range of applications. The paper adopts the advanced method of to step response identify, using the data obtained by the experiment model of high-speed acquisition, using the method of the least squares, finally the antenna control system model function was identified. Make use of integral separation algorithm, simu- link simulation and experiment analysis to set the control parameters of it. Stimulate the signal antenna control system under inter- fering. The experiment of the simulation experiment showed that the antenna control system model is stable with little error.

  16. Orbit and Attitude Control of Asymmetric Satellites in Polar Near-Circular Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the general problem about the orbit and attitude dynamic model is discussed. A feedback linearization control method is introduced for this model. Due to the asymmetric structure, the orbital properties of such satellites are the same as traditional symmetric ones, but the attitude properties are greatly different from the symmetric counterparts. With perturbations accumulate with time, the attitude angles increase periodically with time, but the orbital elements change much slower than the attitude angles. In the attitude dynamic model, chaos could appear. Traditional linear controllers can not compensate enough for asymmetric satellite when the mission is complex, especially in maneuver missions. Thus nonlinear control method is required to solve such problem in large scale. A feedback linearization method, one robust nonlinear control method, is introduced and applied to the asymmetric satellite in this paper. Some simulations are also given and the results show that feedback linearization controller not only stabilizes the system, but also exempt the chaos in the system.

  17. ESA'S Biomass Mission System And Payload Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcioni, M.; Bensi, P.; Fois, F.; Gabriele, A.; Heliere, F.; Lin, C. C.; Massotti, L.; Scipal, K.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Explorers are the backbone of the science and research element of ESA's Living Planet Programme, providing an important contribution to the understanding of the Earth system. Following the User Consultation Meeting held in Graz, Austria on 5-6 March 2013, the Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has recommended implementing Biomass as the 7th Earth Explorer Mission within the frame of the ESA Earth Observation Envelope Programme. This paper will give an overview of the satellite system and its payload. The system technical description presented here is based on the results of the work performed during parallel Phase A system studies by two industrial consortia led by EADS Astrium Ltd. and Thales Alenia Space Italy. Two implementation concepts (respectively A and B) are described and provide viable options capable of meeting the mission requirements.

  18. Adaptive digital beamforming for a CDMA mobile communications payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Samuel G.; Ruiz, Javier Benedicto

    1993-01-01

    reference signal highly correlated with the desired user signal and uncorrelated with the interferences. CDMA lends itself very easily to the generation of such a reference signal, thanks to the a priori knowledge of the user's signature sequence. First, the integration of an adaptive antenna in an asynchronous CDMA system is analyzed. The adaptive antenna system can provide increased interference rejection - much higher than that afforded by the code alone - and, since CDMA is mainly interference limited, any reduction in interference converts directly and linearly into an increase in capacity. Analyses and computer simulations are presented that show how an asynchronous CDMA system incorporating adaptive beamforming can provide at least as much capacity as a synchronous system. More importantly, the proposed concept allows the near-far effect to be mitigated without requiring a tight coordination of the users in terms of transmitted power control or network synchronization. The system is extremely robust to the near-far effect because the signals reaching the satellite from directions other than that of the desired user - which are likely to have different power levels - are adaptively canceled by the antenna. Finally, a payload architecture is presented that illustrates the practical implementation of this concept. This digital payload architecture demonstrates that with the advent of high performance CMOS digital processing, the on-board implementation of complex DSP techniques - in particular Digital Beamforming - has become possible, being most attractive for Mobile Satellite Communications.

  19. 14 CFR 415.7 - Payload determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload determination. 415.7 Section 415.7... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE General § 415.7 Payload determination. A payload determination is... determination. Either a launch license applicant or a payload owner or operator may request a review of its...

  20. 14 CFR 415.57 - Payload review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload review. 415.57 Section 415.57... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Payload Review and Determination § 415.57 Payload review. (a) Timing. A payload review may be conducted as part of a license application review or may be requested by a...

  1. Amine Swingbed Payload Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsch, Mary; Curley, Su

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been designed as a laboratory for demonstrating technologies in a microgravity environment, benefitting exploration programs by reducing the overall risk of implementing such technologies in new spacecraft. At the beginning of fiscal year 2010, the ISS program manager requested that the amine-based, pressure-swing carbon dioxide and humidity absorption technology (designed by Hamilton Sundstrand, baselined for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, and tested at the Johnson Space Center in relevant environments, including with humans, since 2005) be developed into a payload for ISS Utilization. In addition to evaluating the amine technology in a flight environment before the first launch of the Orion vehicle, the ISS program wanted to determine the capability of the amine technology to remove carbon dioxide from the ISS cabin environment at the metabolic rate of the full 6 ]person crew. Because the amine technology vents the absorbed carbon dioxide and water vapor to space vacuum (open loop), additional hardware needed to be developed to minimize the amount of air and water resources lost overboard. Additionally, the payload system would be launched on two separate Space Shuttle flights, with the heart of the payload-the swingbed unit itself-launching a full year before the remainder of the payload. This paper discusses the project management and challenges of developing the amine swingbed payload in order to accomplish the technology objectives of both the open -loop Orion application as well as the closed-loop ISS application.

  2. Design Considerations for Miniaturized Control Moment Gyroscopes for Rapid Retargeting and Precision Pointing of Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design as well as characterization of a practical control moment gyroscope (CMG) based attitude control system (ACS) for small satellites in the 15-20 kilogram mass range performing rapid retargeting and precision pointing maneuvers. The paper focuses on the approach taken in the design of miniaturized CMGs while considering the constraints imposed by the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as the size of the satellite. It is shown that a hybrid mode is more suitable for COTS based moment exchange actuators; a mode that uses the torque amplification of CMGs for rapid retargeting and direct torque capabilities of the flywheel motors for precision pointing. A simulation is provided to demonstrate on-orbit slew and pointing performance.

  3. Optimality of incompletely measurable active and passive attitude control systems. [for satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiehlen, W.; Popp, K.

    1973-01-01

    Passive attitude control systems and active systems with incomplete state measurements are only suboptimal systems in the sense of optimal control theory, since optimal systems require complete state measurements or state estimations. An optimal system, then, requires additional hardware (especially in the case of flexible spacecraft) which results in higher costs. Therefore, it is a real engineering problem to determine how much an optimal system exceeds the suboptimal system, or in other words, what is the suboptimal system's degree of optimality. The problem will be treated in three steps: (1) definition of the degree of optimality for linear, time-invariant systems; (2) a computation method using the quadratic cost functional; (3) application to a gravity-gradient stabilized three-body satellite and a spinning flexible satellite.

  4. CONTACT: An Air Force technical report on military satellite control technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weakley, Christopher K.

    1993-07-01

    This technical report focuses on Military Satellite Control Technologies and their application to the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN). This report is a compilation of articles that provide an overview of the AFSCN and the Advanced Technology Program, and discusses relevant technical issues and developments applicable to the AFSCN. Among the topics covered are articles on Future Technology Projections; Future AFSCN Topologies; Modeling of the AFSCN; Wide Area Communications Technology Evolution; Automating AFSCN Resource Scheduling; Health & Status Monitoring at Remote Tracking Stations; Software Metrics and Tools for Measuring AFSCN Software Performance; Human-Computer Interface Working Group; Trusted Systems Workshop; and the University Technical Interaction Program. In addition, Key Technology Area points of contact are listed in the report.

  5. Attitude Control Synthesis for Small Satellites Using Gradient Method. Part I - Nonlinear Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor-Viorel CHELARU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some aspects for synthesis of small satellites attitude control. Thesatellite nonlinear model presented here will be with six degrees of freedom. After movement equationlinearization the stability and command matrixes will be established and the controller will beobtained using gradient and gradient method. Two attitude control cases will be analysed: thereaction wheels and the micro thrusters. The results will be used in the project European Space MoonOrbit - ESMO founded by European Space Agency in which the University POLITEHNICA ofBucharest is involved.

  6. Attitude Control Synthesis for Small Satellites Using Gradient Method. Part II Linear Equations, Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian CHELARU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to continue paper [5] which presented the nonlinear equations of the movement for small satellite, this paper presents some aspects regarding the synthesis of the attitude control. Afterthe movement equation linearization, the stability and command matrixes will be established and by using the gradient methods controller we will obtain them. Two attitude control cases will beanalysed: the reaction wheels and the micro thrusters. The results will be used in the project European Space Moon Orbit - ESMO, founded by the European Space Agency in which the POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest is involved.

  7. Unity Module in the Payload Bay for STS-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity module inside the shuttle payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. Endeavour is scheduled to fly on mission STS-88, the first Space Shuttle flight for the assembly of the International Space Station, on December 3, 1998. The primary payload on the mission is the Unity connecting module, which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya Control Module already in orbit at that time.

  8. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Morton; G. J. Collatz; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate–fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burne...

  9. Wildland fire management. Volume 2: Wildland fire control 1985-1995. [satellite information system for California fire problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveker, D. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary design of a satellite plus computer earth resources information system is proposed for potential uses in fire prevention and control in the wildland fire community. Suggested are satellite characteristics, sensor characteristics, discrimination algorithms, data communication techniques, data processing requirements, display characteristics, and costs in achieving the integrated wildland fire information system.

  10. Semi-active Attitude Control and Off-line Attitude Determination for the SEETI-Express Student Micro-satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars

    This paper concerns the development of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) for the SSETI-Express micro-satellite mission. The mission is an educational project involving 14 universities and the European Space Agency (ESA). The satellite has been designed and built, by students...

  11. Semi-active Attitude Control and Off-line Attitude Determination for the SSETI-Express Student Micro-satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) for the SSETI-Express micro-satellite mission. The mission is an educational project involving 14 universities and the European Space Agency (ESA). The satellite has been designed and built, by students...

  12. Mapping Neglected Swimming Pools from Satellite Data for Urban Vector Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, C. M.; Melton, F. S.; Reisen, W. K.

    2010-12-01

    Neglected swimming pools provide suitable breeding habit for mosquitoes, can contain thousands of mosquito larvae, and present both a significant nuisance and public health risk due to their inherent proximity to urban and suburban populations. The rapid increase and sustained rate of foreclosures in California associated with the recent recession presents a challenge for vector control districts seeking to identify, treat, and monitor neglected pools. Commercial high resolution satellite imagery offers some promise for mapping potential neglected pools, and for mapping pools for which routine maintenance has been reestablished. We present progress on unsupervised classification techniques for mapping both neglected pools and clean pools using high resolution commercial satellite data and discuss the potential uses and limitations of this data source in support of vector control efforts. An unsupervised classification scheme that utilizes image segmentation, band thresholds, and a change detection approach was implemented for sample regions in Coachella Valley, CA and the greater Los Angeles area. Comparison with field data collected by vector control personal was used to assess the accuracy of the estimates. The results suggest that the current system may provide some utility for early detection, or cost effective and time efficient annual monitoring, but additional work is required to address spectral and spatial limitations of current commercial satellite sensors for this purpose.

  13. Expert System Software Assistant for Payload Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mark N.

    1997-01-01

    The broad objective of this expert system software based application was to demonstrate the enhancements and cost savings that can be achieved through expert system software utilization in a spacecraft ground control center. Spacelab provided a valuable proving ground for this advanced software technology; a technology that will be exploited and expanded for future ISS operations. Our specific focus was on demonstrating payload cadre command and control efficiency improvements through the use of "smart" software which monitors flight telemetry, provides enhanced schematic-based data visualization, and performs advanced engineering data analysis.

  14. Building a Local Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Architecture Using Hosted Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    collision are as follows. On February 10 at 1156 EST, Iridium lost contact with one of its satellites , Iridium 33. They contacted the Joint Space...Methods of attack include: ground system attacks , radio frequency (RF) jamming, laser systems capable of interfering with satellites , electromagnetic...payloads. Once the requirements were developed, modeling and simulation using Satellite Tool Kit (STK) was were employed to develop an optimal SSA

  15. High Accuracy Attitude Control System Design for Satellite with Flexible Appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the high accuracy attitude control of satellite with flexible appendages, attitude control system consisting of the controller and structural filter was designed. When the low order vibration frequency of flexible appendages is approximating the bandwidth of attitude control system, the vibration signal will enter the control system through measurement device to bring impact on the accuracy or even the stability. In order to reduce the impact of vibration of appendages on the attitude control system, the structural filter is designed in terms of rejecting the vibration of flexible appendages. Considering the potential problem of in-orbit frequency variation of the flexible appendages, the design method for the adaptive notch filter is proposed based on the in-orbit identification technology. Finally, the simulation results are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design techniques.

  16. PIMS-Universal Payload Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Ralph; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads and experiments, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center had a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and management of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to provide collaborative access to remote experimenters and International Partners. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground based electronic document configuration management and workflow system that was built to service that need. Functionally, PIMS provides the following document management related capabilities: 1. File access control, storage and retrieval from a central repository vault. 2. Collect supplemental data about files in the vault. 3. File exchange with a PMS GUI client, or any FTP connection. 4. Files placement into an FTP accessible dropbox for pickup by interfacing facilities, included files transmitted for spacecraft uplink. 5. Transmission of email messages to users notifying them of new version availability. 6. Polling of intermediate facility dropboxes for files that will automatically be processed by PIMS. 7. Provide an API that allows other POIC applications to access PIMS information. Functionally, PIMS provides the following Change Request processing capabilities: 1. Ability to create, view, manipulate, and query information about Operations Change Requests (OCRs). 2. Provides an adaptable workflow approval of OCRs with routing through developers, facility leads, POIC leads, reviewers, and implementers. Email messages can be sent to users either involving them in the workflow process or simply notifying them of OCR approval progress. All PIMS document management and OCR workflow controls are

  17. Real-time horizontality adjusting and control system of a large platform applied to satellite experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shi-sheng; ZHANG Shi-peng; WANG Rui

    2007-01-01

    In order to satisfy a satellite horizontality requirement in an experiment, it is indispensable to monitor and adjust the horizontality of a large platform loading the satellite under the condition of ultra-low temperature with real time. So the control system design and control strategy are described in detail to accomplish the horizontality monitoring and adjusting. The system adopts the industry control computer as the upper computer and the SIEMENS S7-300 PLC as the lower computer. The upper computer that bases on industry configuration software IFIX takes charge of monitoring the platform and puts forward the control strategy. PLC takes charge of receiving the adjusting instructions and controlling the legs moving to accomplish the horizontality adjusting. The horizontality adjusting strategy is emphasized and the concept of grads is introduced to establish a mathematics model of the platform inclined state, so the adjusting method is obtained. Accordingly the key question of the automatic horizontality adjusting is solved in this control system.

  18. Eigensensitivity in integrated design. [of earth-pointing satellite's control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Hou, Gene J.; Belvin, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    An application of eigensensitivity analysis to the control-structure integrated design process is presented with an emphasis placed on computational efficiency improvement of the overall design optimization process. The computational efficiency of eigenvalue/vector sensitivity analysis is demonstrated using the Earth Pointing Satellite in the context of a control-structure integrated design program. Results for a 2 percent design variable perturbation with and without the effects of the actuator mass show a 42 and 52 percent reduction in CPU time, respectively.

  19. Synchronization and Antisynchronization of a Planar Oscillation of Satellite in an Elliptic Orbit via Active Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the synchronization and antisynchronization behaviour of two identical planar oscillation of a satellite in elliptic orbit evolving from different initial conditions using the active control technique based on the Lyapunov stability theory and the Routh-Hurwitz criteria. The designed controller, with our own choice of the coefficient matrix of the error dynamics that satisfy the Lyapunov stability theory and the Routh-Hurwitz criteria, is found to be effective in the stabilization of the error states at the origin, thereby, achieving synchronization and antisynchronization between the states variables of two nonlinear dynamical systems under consideration. The results are validated by numerical simulations using mathematica.

  20. Antenna pointing system for satellite tracking based on Kalman filtering and model predictive control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, André L. G.; Ishihara, João Y.; Ferreira, Henrique C.; Borges, Renato A.; Borges, Geovany A.

    2016-12-01

    The present work proposes a new approach for an antenna pointing system for satellite tracking. Such a system uses the received signal to estimate the beam pointing deviation and then adjusts the antenna pointing. The present work has two contributions. First, the estimation is performed by a Kalman filter based conical scan technique. This technique uses the Kalman filter avoiding the batch estimator and applies a mathematical manipulation avoiding the linearization approximations. Secondly, a control technique based on the model predictive control together with an explicit state feedback solution are obtained in order to reduce the computational burden. Numerical examples illustrate the results.

  1. System Design and In-orbit Verification of the HJ-1-C SAR Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Run-ning

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available HJ-1-C is a SAR satellite owned by the Chinese Environment and Natural Disaster Monitoring constellation, and works together with the optical satellites HJ-1-A/B for monitoring environment and natural disasters. In this paper, the system design and characteristics of the first Chinese civil SAR satellite are described. In addition, the interface relation between SAR payload and platform is studied. Meanwhile, the data transmission capability, attitude, power, and temperature control that support SAR imaging are reviewed. Finally, the corresponding in-orbit verification results are presented.

  2. Graph-tree-based software control flow checking for COTS processors on pico-satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Mu; Wang Hao; Zheng Yangming; Jin Zhonghe

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a generic high-performance and low-time-overhead software control flow checking solution,graph-tree-based control flow checking (GTCFC) for space-borne commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) processors.A graph tree data structure with a topology similar to common trees is introduced to transform the control flow graphs of target programs.This together with design of IDs and signatures of its vertices and edges allows for an easy check of legality of actual branching during target program execution.As a result,the algorithm not only is capable of detecting all single and multiple branching errors with low latency and time overheads along with a linear-complexity space overhead,but also remains generic among arbitrary instruction sets and independent of any specific hardware.Tests of the algorithm using a COTS-processor-based on-board computer (OBC) of in-service ZDPS-1A pico-satellite products show that GTCFC can detect over 90% of the randomly injected and all-pattern-covering branching errors for different types of target programs,with performance and overheads consistent with the theoretical analysis; and beats well-established preeminent control flow checking algorithms in these dimensions.Furthermore,it is validated that GTCGC not only can be accommodated in pico-satellites conveniently with still sufficient system margins left,but also has the ability to minimize the risk of control flow errors being undetected in their space missions.Therefore,due to its effectiveness,efficiency,and compatibility,the GTCFC solution is ready for applications on COTS processors on pico-satellites in their real space missions.

  3. Robust optimal sun-pointing control of a large solar power satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunan; Zhang, Kaiming; Peng, Haijun; Wu, Zhigang; Radice, Gianmarco

    2016-10-01

    The robust optimal sun-pointing control strategy for a large geostationary solar power satellite (SPS) is addressed in this paper. The SPS is considered as a huge rigid body, and the sun-pointing dynamics are firstly proposed in the state space representation. The perturbation effects caused by gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure and microwave reaction are investigated. To perform sun-pointing maneuvers, a periodically time-varying robust optimal LQR controller is designed to assess the pointing accuracy and the control inputs. It should be noted that, to reduce the pointing errors, the disturbance rejection technique is combined into the proposed LQR controller. A recursive algorithm is then proposed to solve the optimal LQR control gain. Simulation results are finally provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed closed-loop system.

  4. Control of industrial robots for hardware-in-the-loop simulation of satellite docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ou; Zebenay, Melak; Boge, Toralf

    2011-06-01

    One of the most challenging and risky missions for spacecraft is to perform Rendezvous and Docking (RvD) autonomously in space. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, such a mission must be carefully designed and thoroughly verified before a real space mission can be launched. This paper describes the impact-contact dynamics simulation capability of a new, robotics-based, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) RvD simulation facility which uses two industrial robots to simulate 6-DOF dynamic maneuvering of two docking satellites. The facility is capable of physically simulating the final approaching within 25-meter range and the entire docking/capturing process in a satellite on-orbit servicing mission. The paper briefly discusses the difficulties of using industrial robots for HIL contact dynamics simulation and how these problems are solved. Admittance control strategy is proposed to control the robotic system to make the robot dynamically behave like the spacecraft during a physical interception. The control strategy works as an outer loop on the top of the existing control system of the industrial robot and hence, it does not require altering the joint control hardware and software which are inaccessible for an industrial robot. A simulation study has shown that the methodology can accurately simulate the impact-contact dynamics behavior of the spacecraft in a docking operation.

  5. NASA to launch second business communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The two stage Delta 3910 launch vehicle was chosen to place the second small business satellite (SBS-B) into a transfer orbit with an apogee of 36,619 kilometers and a perigee of 167 km, at an inclination of 27.7 degrees to Earth's equator. The firing and separation sequence and the inertial guidance system are described as well as the payload assist module. Facilities and services for tracking and control by NASA, COMSAT, Intelsat, and SBS are outlined and prelaunch operations are summarized.

  6. Autonomous Satellite Command and Control through the World Wide Web: Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert

    1998-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program (NMP) has identified a variety of revolutionary technologies that will support orders of magnitude improvements in the capabilities of spacecraft missions. This program's Autonomy team has focused on science and engineering automation technologies. In doing so, it has established a clear development roadmap specifying the experiments and demonstrations required to mature these technologies. The primary developmental thrusts of this roadmap are in the areas of remote agents, PI/operator interface, planning/scheduling fault management, and smart execution architectures. Phases 1 and 2 of the ASSET Project (previously known as the WebSat project) have focused on establishing World Wide Web-based commanding and telemetry services as an advanced means of interfacing a spacecraft system with the PI and operators. Current automated capabilities include Web-based command submission, limited contact scheduling, command list generation and transfer to the ground station, spacecraft support for demonstrations experiments, data transfer from the ground station back to the ASSET system, data archiving, and Web-based telemetry distribution. Phase 2 was finished in December 1996. During January-December 1997 work was commenced on Phase 3 of the ASSET Project. Phase 3 is the subject of this report. This phase permitted SSDL and its project partners to expand the ASSET system in a variety of ways. These added capabilities included the advancement of ground station capabilities, the adaptation of spacecraft on-board software, and the expansion of capabilities of the ASSET management algorithms. Specific goals of Phase 3 were: (1) Extend Web-based goal-level commanding for both the payload PI and the spacecraft engineer; (2) Support prioritized handling of multiple PIs as well as associated payload experimenters; (3) Expand the number and types of experiments supported by the ASSET system and its associated spacecraft; (4) Implement more advanced resource

  7. Smart Sensor Demonstration Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzel, John; Bracey, Andrew; Rawls, Stephen; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Figueroa, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Sensors are a critical element to any monitoring, control, and evaluation processes such as those needed to support ground based testing for rocket engine test. Sensor applications involve tens to thousands of sensors; their reliable performance is critical to achieving overall system goals. Many figures of merit are used to describe and evaluate sensor characteristics; for example, sensitivity and linearity. In addition, sensor selection must satisfy many trade-offs among system engineering (SE) requirements to best integrate sensors into complex systems [1]. These SE trades include the familiar constraints of power, signal conditioning, cabling, reliability, and mass, and now include considerations such as spectrum allocation and interference for wireless sensors. Our group at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) works in the broad area of integrated systems health management (ISHM). Core ISHM technologies include smart and intelligent sensors, anomaly detection, root cause analysis, prognosis, and interfaces to operators and other system elements [2]. Sensor technologies are the base fabric that feed data and health information to higher layers. Cost-effective operation of the complement of test stands benefits from technologies and methodologies that contribute to reductions in labor costs, improvements in efficiency, reductions in turn-around times, improved reliability, and other measures. ISHM is an active area of development at SSC because it offers the potential to achieve many of those operational goals [3-5].

  8. Fibromodulin: a master regulator of myostatin controlling progression of satellite cells through a myogenic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Ju; Jan, Arif Tasleem; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Ashraf, Jalaluddin Mohammad; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Kim, Yong-Woon; Park, So-Young; Choi, Inho

    2016-08-01

    Differentiation of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) involves interaction of the proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with MSCs to regulate their activity, and therefore phenotype. Herein, we report fibromodulin (FMOD), a member of the proteoglycan family participating in the assembly of ECM, as a novel regulator of myostatin (MSTN) during myoblast differentiation. In addition to having a pronounced effect on the expression of myogenic marker genes [myogenin (MYOG) and myosin light chain 2 (MYL2)], FMOD was found to maintain the transcriptional activity of MSTN Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation and in silico studies performed to investigate the interaction of FMOD helped confirm that it antagonizes MSTN function by distorting its folding and preventing its binding to activin receptor type IIB. Furthermore, in vivo studies revealed that FMOD plays an active role in healing by increasing satellite cell recruitment to sites of injury. Together, these findings disclose a hitherto unrecognized regulatory role for FMOD in MSCs and highlight new mechanisms whereby FMOD circumvents the inhibitory effects of MSTN and triggers myoblast differentiation. These findings offer a basis for the design of novel MSTN inhibitors that promote muscle regeneration after injury or for the development of pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of different muscle atrophies.-Lee, E. J., Jan, A. T., Baig, M. H., Ashraf, J. M., Nahm, S.-S., Kim, Y.-W., Park, S.-Y., Choi, I. Fibromodulin: a master regulator of myostatin controlling progression of satellite cells through a myogenic program.

  9. Recent Korean R&D in Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Kim, Jae Moung; Lee, Byung-Seub; Lee, Han; Ryoo, Jang-Soo

    The R&D in satellite communications in Korea has been driven mainly by KCC (Korea Communications Commission) but in a small scale compared to Korea space development program organized by MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology). Public and civilian satcom sector R&D has been led mainly by ETRI with small/medium companies contrary to rare investment in private sector while military sector R&D has been orchestrated by ADD with defense industry. By the COMS (Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite) experimental Ka-band payload, Korea pursues a space qualification of own technology for national infrastructure evolution as well as industrialization of space R&D results. Once COMS launched and space qualified in 2009, subsequent application experiments and new technology R&D like UHDTV will entail service and industry promotion. The payload technology is expected for the next Korean commercial satellites or for new OBP satellites. The COMS ground control system and GNSS ground station technologies are under development for COMS operation and enhanced GNSS services along with advent of Galileo respectively. Satellite broadband mobile VSAT based on DVB-S2/RCS (+M) and low profile tracking antennas have been developed for trains, ships, and planes. While APSI is developing GMR-1 based Thuraya handset functions, ETRI is designing IMT-Advanced satellite radio interface for satellite and terrestrial dual-mode handheld communication system like Japanese STICS, with universities' satellite OFDM researches. A 21GHz Ka-band higher-availability scalable HD broadcasting technology and SkyLife's hybrid satellite IPTV technology are being developed. In near term Korea will extend R&D programs to upgrade the space communication infrastructure for universal access to digital opportunity and safer daily life from disaster, and to promote space green IT industrialization, national security, and space resources sovereign. Japanese stakeholders are invited to establish

  10. Attitude Control of Satellite With Pulse-Width Pulse- Frequency (PWPF Modulator Using Generalized Incremental Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Chegeni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use generalized incremental predictive control (GIPC to stabilize attitude of satellite. We compare Generalized Predictive Control (GPC with GIPC algorithm and present that GIPC has better performance. The three-axis attitude control systems are activated in pulse mode. Consequently, a modulation of the torque command is compelling in order to avoid high non-linear control action. This work considers the Pulse-Width Pulse-Frequency modulator (PWPF is composed of a Schmitt trigger, a first order filter, and a feedback loop. PWPF modulator has several advantages over classical bang-bang controllers such as close to linear operation, high accuracy, and reduced propellant consumption

  11. Spacecraft design project: High latitude communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefson, Carl; Myers, Jack; Cloutier, Mike; Paluszek, Steve; Michael, Gerry; Hunter, Dan; Sakoda, Dan; Walters, Wes; Johnson, Dennis; Bauer, Terry

    1989-01-01

    The spacecraft design project was part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The project was intended to provide experience in the design of all major components of a satellite. Each member of the class was given primary responsibility for a subsystem or design support function. Support was requested from the Naval Research Laboratory to augment the Naval Postgraduate School faculty. Analysis and design of each subsystem was done to the extent possible within the constraints of an eleven week quarter and the design facilities (hardware and software) available. The project team chose to evaluate the design of a high latitude communications satellite as representative of the design issues and tradeoffs necessary for a wide range of satellites. The High-Latitude Communications Satellite (HILACS) will provide a continuous UHF communications link between stations located north of the region covered by geosynchronous communications satellites, i.e., the area above approximately 60 N latitude. HILACS will also provide a communications link to stations below 60 N via a relay Net Control Station (NCS), which is located with access to both the HILACS and geosynchronous communications satellites. The communications payload will operate only for that portion of the orbit necessary to provide specified coverage.

  12. A distributed model predictive control (MPC) fault reconfiguration strategy for formation flying satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, N. R.; Khorasani, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an active distributed (also referred to as semi-decentralised) fault recovery control scheme is proposed that employs inaccurate and unreliable fault information into a model-predictive-control-based design. The objective is to compensate for the identified actuator faults that are subject to uncertainties and detection time delays, in the attitude control subsystems of formation flying satellites. The proposed distributed fault recovery scheme is developed through a two-level hierarchical framework. In the first level, or the agent level, the fault is recovered locally to maintain as much as possible the design specifications, feasibility, and tracking performance of all the agents. In the second level, or the formation level, the recovery is carried out by enhancing the entire team performance. The fault recovery performance of our proposed distributed (semi-decentralised) scheme is compared with two other alternative schemes, namely the centralised and the decentralised fault recovery schemes. It is shown that the distributed (semi-decentralised) fault recovery scheme satisfies the recovery design specifications and also imposes lower fault compensation control effort cost and communication bandwidth requirements as compared to the centralised scheme. Our proposed distributed (semi-decentralised) scheme also outperforms the achievable performance capabilities of the decentralised scheme. Simulation results corresponding to a network of four precision formation flight satellites are also provided to demonstrate and illustrate the advantages of our proposed distributed (semi-decentralised) fault recovery strategy.

  13. Sequential release of nanoparticle payloads from ultrasonically burstable capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephen; Hu, Jennifer; Kearney, Cathal; Skaat, Hadas; Gu, Luo; Gentili, Marco; Vandenburgh, Herman; Mooney, David

    2016-01-01

    In many biomedical contexts ranging from chemotherapy to tissue engineering, it is beneficial to sequentially present bioactive payloads. Explicit control over the timing and dose of these presentations is highly desirable. Here, we present a capsule-based delivery system capable of rapidly releasing multiple payloads in response to ultrasonic signals. In vitro, these alginate capsules exhibited excellent payload retention for up to 1 week when unstimulated and delivered their entire payloads when ultrasonically stimulated for 10-100 s. Shorter exposures (10 s) were required to trigger delivery from capsules embedded in hydrogels placed in a tissue model and did not result in tissue heating or death of encapsulated cells. Different types of capsules were tuned to rupture in response to different ultrasonic stimuli, thus permitting the sequential, on-demand delivery of nanoparticle payloads. As a proof of concept, gold nanoparticles were decorated with bone morphogenetic protein-2 to demonstrate the potential bioactivity of nanoparticle payloads. These nanoparticles were not cytotoxic and induced an osteogenic response in mouse mesenchymal stem cells. This system may enable researchers and physicians to remotely regulate the timing, dose, and sequence of drug delivery on-demand, with a wide range of clinical applications ranging from tissue engineering to cancer treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sequential release of nanoparticle payloads from ultrasonically burstable capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephen; Hu, Jennifer; Kearney, Cathal; Skaat, Hadas; Gu, Luo; Gentili, Marco; Vandenburgh, Herman; Mooney, David

    2015-01-01

    In many biomedical contexts ranging from chemotherapy to tissue engineering, it is beneficial to sequentially present bioactive payloads. Explicit control over the timing and dose of these presentations is highly desirable. Here, we present a capsule-based delivery system capable of rapidly releasing multiple payloads in response to ultrasonic signals. In vitro, these alginate capsules exhibited excellent payload retention for up to 1 week when unstimulated and delivered their entire payloads when ultrasonically stimulated for 10 to 100 s. Shorter exposures (10 s) were required to trigger delivery from capsules embedded in hydrogels placed in a tissue model and did not result in tissue heating or death of encapsulated cells. Different types of capsules were tuned to rupture in response to different ultrasonic stimuli, thus permitting the sequential, on-demand delivery of nanoparticle payloads. As a proof of concept, gold nanoparticles were decorated with bone morphogenetic protein-2 to demonstrate the potential bioactivity of nanoparticle payloads. These nanoparticles were not cytotoxic and induced an osteogenic response in mouse mesenchymal stem cells. This system may enable researchers and physicians to remotely regulate the timing, dose, and sequence of drug delivery on-demand, with a wide range of clinical applications ranging from tissue engineering to cancer treatment. PMID:26496382

  15. Adaptive sliding mode controller based on super-twist observer for tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Sajjad; Poznyak, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the sliding mode control based on the super-twist observer is presented. The parameters of the controller as well as the observer are admitted to be time-varying and depending on available current measurements. In view of that, the considered controller is referred to as an adaptive one. It is shown that the deviations of the generated state estimates from real state values together with a distance of the closed-loop system trajectories to a desired sliding surface reach a μ-zone around the origin in finite time. The application of the suggested controller is illustrated for the orientation of a tethered satellite system in a required position.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of mini-satellite respinup by weak internal controllable torques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somov, Yevgeny, E-mail: e-somov@mail.ru [Samara State Technical University, Department for Guidance, Navigation and Control, 244 Molodogvardeyskaya Str., Samara 443100 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    Contemporary space engineering advanced new problem before theoretical mechanics and motion control theory: a spacecraft directed respinup by the weak restricted control internal forces. The paper presents some results on this problem, which is very actual for energy supply of information mini-satellites (for communication, geodesy, radio- and opto-electronic observation of the Earth et al.) with electro-reaction plasma thrusters and gyro moment cluster based on the reaction wheels or the control moment gyros. The solution achieved is based on the methods for synthesis of nonlinear robust control and on rigorous analytical proof for the required spacecraft rotation stability by Lyapunov function method. These results were verified by a computer simulation of strongly nonlinear oscillatory processes at respinuping of a flexible spacecraft.

  17. Validation of automated payload experiment tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Provancha, Anna; Chattam, David

    1995-01-01

    The System Management and Production Laboratory, Research Institute, The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), was tasked by the Microgravity Experiment Projects (MEP) Office of the Payload projects Office (PPO) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to conduct research in the current methods of written documentation control and retrieval. The goals of this research were to determine the logical interrelationships within selected NASA documentation, and to expand on a previously developed prototype system to deliver a distributable, electronic knowledge-based system. This computer application would then be used to provide a 'paperless' interface between the appropriate parties for the required NASA documentation.

  18. Controlling laser beam irradiation area using an optical duplicate system to improve satellite-ground laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomoko; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Fujikawa, Chiemi; Kodate, Kashiko

    2016-08-01

    To improve the quality of ground to satellite laser communications, we propose an optical duplicate system of the optical ground station. Our proposed approach can be used to control the beam irradiation area for a satellite position without changing the total power of the output beam and the mechanical drive unit; this is performed by controlling the input pattern of a liquid crystal filter inserted in the input plane of the optical duplicate system. Most of the power of the diffracted laser beam emitted from the ground is focused on the optical axis. By distributing the power to side lobes, it is possible to extend the coverage area for a satellite position. This system allows the laser beam irradiation area to be controlled by a sufficient degree by adjusting the threshold of the satellite reception level. We verify the efficacy of the system using wave optics numerical calculations.

  19. Nonprofit, payload process improvement through lean management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Melissa

    Organizations that are successful and competitive long-term have learned to efficiently utilize their resources, such as money, people, facilities, and time. Over the last half-century, there have been a variety of theories and techniques put forth on how to do this. One recent theory applied in the aerospace industry is Lean Management (LM), which emphasizes a customer focus and a rigorous elimination of activities that do not add value from the customer's perspective. LM has not, until now, been evaluated for small, nonprofit, one-off production organizations (NOPOs). Previous research on LM focused on for-profit companies and large-scale production organizations, producing relatively similar products repetitively (e.g. automobiles, commercial satellites, aircraft, and launch vehicles). One-off production organizations typically create one-of-a-kind products. The purpose of this research is to examine the applicability of LM to a NOPO. LM will improve resource utilization and thereby competitiveness, as well as exploring a new area of knowledge and research. The research methodology consists of conducting case studies, formal and informal interviews, observation and analysis in order to assess whether and how LM may be beneficial. The research focuses on one particular NOPO, BioServe Space Technologies (BST): a nonprofit, payload development organization. Additional NOPOs were interviewed in order to draw more generalized conclusions about LM benefits. The research demonstrates that LM is applicable to NOPOs, thus providing a tool to improve efficiency and competitiveness. Results from this research are guidelines for payload development organizations to implement LM, and highlighting potential LM weaknesses. A major conclusion is that LM needs some minor modifications to be applicable and useful to NOPOs, particularly in terms of value stream mapping. The LM implementation roadmap developed for NOPOs introduces customized metrics, as well as including standard

  20. Command Generation and Control of Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost Tethered Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The research completed for this NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship sought to enhance the current state-of-the-art dynamic models and control laws for Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost satellite systems by utilizing command generation, specifically Input Shaping. The precise control of tethered spacecraft with flexible appendages is extremely difficult. The complexity is magnified many times when the satellite must interact with other satellites as in a momentum exchange via a tether. The Momentum Exchange Electronic Reboost Tether (MXER) concept encapsulates all of these challenging tasks [l]. Input Shaping is a command generation technique that allows flexible spacecraft to move without inducing residual vibration [2], limit transient deflection [3] and utilize fuel-efficient actuation [4]. Input shaping is implemented by convolving a sequence of impulses, known as the input shaper, with a desired system command to produce a shaped input that is then used to drive the system. This process is demonstrated in Figure 1. The shaped command is then use to drive the system without residual vibration while meeting many other performance specifications. The completed work developed tether control algorithms for retrieval. A simple model of the tether response has been developed and command shaping was implemented to minimize unwanted dynamics. A model of a flexible electrodynamic tether has been developed to investigate the tether s response during reboost. Command shaping techniques have been developed to eliminate the tether oscillations and reduce the tether s deflection to pre-specified levels during reboost. Additionally, a model for the spin-up of a tethered system was developed. This model was used in determining the parameters for optimization the resulting angular velocity.

  1. Innovative approach for low-cost quick-access small payload missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Jan W., Jr.

    2000-11-01

    A significant part of the burgeoning commercial space industry is placing an unprecedented number of satellites into low earth orbit for a variety of new applications and services. By some estimates the commercial space industry now exceeds that of government space activities. Yet the two markets remain largely separate, with each deploying dedicated satellites and infrastructure for their respective missions. One commercial space firm, Final Analysis, has created a new program wherein either government, scientific or new technology payloads can be integrated on a commercial spacecraft on commercial satellites for a variety of mission scenarios at a fraction of the cost of a dedicated mission. NASA has recognized the advantage of this approach, and has awarded the Quick Ride program to provide frequent, low cost flight opportunities for small independent payloads aboard the Final Analysis constellation, and investigators are rapidly developing science programs that conform to the proposed payload accommodations envelope. Missions that were not feasible using dedicated launches are now receiving approval under the lower cost Quick Ride approach. Final Analysis has dedicated ten out of its thirty-eight satellites in support of the Quick Ride efforts. The benefit of this type of space access extend beyond NASA science programs. Commercial space firms can now gain valuable flight heritage for new technology and satellite product offerings. Further, emerging international space programs can now place a payload in orbit enabling the country to allocate its resources against the payload and mission requirements rather htan increased launch costs of a dedicated spacecraft. Finally, the low cost nature provides University-based research educational opportunities previously out of the reach of most space-related budgets. This paper will describe the motivation, benefits, technical features, and program costs of the Final Analysis secondary payload program. Payloads can be

  2. Flight results from the gravity-gradient-controlled RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The in-orbit dynamics of a large, flexible spacecraft has been modeled with a computer simulation, which was used for designing the control system, developing a deployment and gravity-gradient capture procedure, predicting the steady-state behavior, and designing a series of dynamics experiments for the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) satellite. This flexible body dynamics simulator permits three-dimensional, large-angle rotation of the total spacecraft and includes effects of orbit eccentricity, thermal bending, solar pressure, gravitational accelerations, and the damper system. Flight results are consistent with the simulator predictions and are presented for the deployment and capture phases, the steady-state mission, and the dynamics experiments.

  3. Monolithic sensors for low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we describe the characteristics and performances of a monolithic sensor designed for low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites, whose mechanics is based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum. The latter, developed for ground-based applications, exhibits unique features (compactness, lightness, scalability, low resonance frequency and high quality factor), consequence of the action of the gravitational force on its inertial mass. In this paper we introduce and discuss the general methodology used to extend the application of ground-based folded pendulums to space, also in total absence of gravity, still keeping all their peculiar features and characteristics.

  4. Control of the Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, L. A.; Levay, M.; Gilbreth, C. W.; Finch, M. L.; Bentley, R. D.; Firth, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite consists of two largely independent instruments: the Flat Crystal Spectrometer, a highly collimated scanning spectrometer mounted on a raster platform, and the Bent Crystal Spectrometer, a broadly collimated spectrometer providing high time-resolution (128 ms) spectra for the study of rapidly evolving phenomena. Each instrument is controlled by a microcomputer system built around an RCA 1802 microprocessor. This paper presents a discussion of the motivation for using a microprocessor in this application, and the design concepts that were implemented. The effectiveness of the approach as seen after several months of operation will also be discussed.

  5. Failure-tolerant control for small agile satellites using single-gimbal control moment gyros and magnetic torquers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Meng; Saburo Matunaga

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the attitude control problem of small agile satellites using single-gimbal control moment gyros (CMG) and magnetic torquers (MTQ).CMGs are regarded as effective torque generators for agile satellites because of their torque amplification capability.However,they are vulnerable to failure due to their complex inner mechanism.In this paper,different failure cases of CMGs are analyzed.A flexible failure-tolerant control strategy is developed by automatically redistributing the required control torque among the operating CMGs and MTQs,with a variable limiter to accommodate the actuator dynamics changes introduced by CMG failures.The performances of maneuvers about different directions under different failure cases are also discussed and examined.Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed strategy maintains certain agility in the cases of one or two CMGs failing.Moreover,a survival strategy with only one CMG left is also verified.Both sun-pointing stabilization and earth-pointing stabilization can be achieved in this case,which fulfill some basic mission requirements.

  6. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ze

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the dynamic topology control problem of satellite cluster networks (SCNs) in Earth observation (EO) missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs). The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites’ relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT) strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime. PMID:28241474

  7. The CODEX sounding rocket payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, B.; Shipley, A.; Cash, W.; Rogers, T.; Schultz, T.; McEntaffer, R.; Kaiser, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present the CODEX sounding rocket payload, a soft x-ray (0.1-1.0 keV) spectrometer designed to observe diffuse high-surface brightness astronomical sources. The payload is composed of two modules, each with a 3.25° x 3.25° field of view defined by a stack of wire grids that block light not coming to a 3.0 m focus and admit only nearly-collimated light onto an array of 67 diffraction gratings in an off-plane mount. After a 2.0 m throw, the spectrum is detected by offset large-format gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. CODEX will target the Vela supernova remnant later this year to measure the temperature and abundances and to determine the contributions of various soft x-ray emission mechanisms to the remnant's energy budget; resulting spectra will have resolution (E/▵E) ranging from 50 to 100 across the band. CODEX is the third-generation of similar payloads from the University of Colorado, with an increased bandpass, higher throughput, and a more robust mechanical structure than its predecessors.

  8. Adaptive Hierarchical Sliding Mode Control with Input Saturation for Attitude Regulation of Multi-satellite Tethered System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control for the attitude regulation of the multi-satellite inline tethered system, where the input saturation is taken into account. The governing equations for the attitude dynamics of the three-satellite inline tethered system are derived firstly by utilizing Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the attitude of the central satellite can be adjusted by using the simple exponential stabilization scheme, the decoupling of the central satellite and the terminal ones is presented, and in addition, the new adaptive sliding mode control law is applied to stabilize the attitude dynamics of the two terminal satellites based on the synchronization and partial contraction theory. In the adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control design, the input is modeled as saturated input due to the fact that the flywheel torque is bounded, and meanwhile, an adaptive update rate is introduced to eliminate the effect of the saturated input and the external perturbation. The proposed control scheme can be applied on the two-satellite system to achieve fixed-point rotation. Numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Adaptive Hierarchical Sliding Mode Control with Input Saturation for Attitude Regulation of Multi-satellite Tethered System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control for the attitude regulation of the multi-satellite inline tethered system, where the input saturation is taken into account. The governing equations for the attitude dynamics of the three-satellite inline tethered system are derived firstly by utilizing Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the attitude of the central satellite can be adjusted by using the simple exponential stabilization scheme, the decoupling of the central satellite and the terminal ones is presented, and in addition, the new adaptive sliding mode control law is applied to stabilize the attitude dynamics of the two terminal satellites based on the synchronization and partial contraction theory. In the adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control design, the input is modeled as saturated input due to the fact that the flywheel torque is bounded, and meanwhile, an adaptive update rate is introduced to eliminate the effect of the saturated input and the external perturbation. The proposed control scheme can be applied on the two-satellite system to achieve fixed-point rotation. Numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Shift control method for the local time at descending node based on sun-synchronous orbit satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yong'an; Feng Zuren; Sun Linyan; Tan Wei

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the shift factors of the descending node local time for sun-synchronous satellites and proposes a shift control method to keep the local time shift within an allowance range. It is found that the satellite orbit design and the orbit injection deviation are the causes for the initial shift velocity, whereas the atmospheric drag and the sun gravitational perturbation produce the shift acceleration. To deal with these shift factors, a shift control method is put forward, through such methods as orbit variation design, orbit altitude, and inclination keeping control. The simulation experiment and practical application have proved the effectiveness of this control method.

  11. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study. Phase B, appendix E: Attitude control system study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A study which consisted of a series of design analyses for an Attitude Control System (ACS) to be incorporated into the Re-usable Re-entry Satellite (RRS) was performed. The main thrust of the study was associated with defining the control laws and estimating the mass and power requirements of the ACS needed to meet the specified performance goals. The analyses concentrated on the different on-orbit control modes which start immediately after the separation of the RRS from the launch vehicle. The three distinct on-orbit modes considered for these analyses are as follows: (1) Mode 1 - A Gravity Gradient (GG) three-axis stabilized spacecraft with active magnetic control; (2) Mode 2 - A GG stabilized mode with a controlled yaw rotation rate ('rotisserie') using three-axis magnetic control and also incorporating a 10 N-m-s momentum wheel along the (Z) yaw axis; and (3) Mode 3 - A spin stabilized mode of operation with the spin about the pitch (Y) axis, incorporating a 20 N-m-s momentum wheel along the pitch (Y) axis and attitude control via thrusters. To investigate the capabilities of the different controllers in these various operational modes, a series of computer simulations and trade-off analyses have been made to evaluate the achievable performance levels, and the necessary mass and power requirements.

  12. Semi-active Attitude Control and Off-line Attitude Determination for the SSETI-Express Student Micro-satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Alminde, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) for the SSETI-Express micro-satellite mission. The mission is an educational project involving 14 universities and the European Space Agency (ESA). The satellite has been designed and built, by students, over a period of only 18 months. This paper emphasises on the trade-offs required to build an operational ADCS system within such a rapidly developing project.

  13. Investigation of a possible control by Saturn satellites of auroral kilometric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2013-09-01

    We attempt in this contribution to investigate the possible control of the Saturnian kilometric radiation by the planet's satellites. We use the observation of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. We consider the variation of the flux density versus the observation in time and frequency. The auroral kilometric emissions of Saturn are recorded in the frequency band from few kilohertz up to 1 MHz. The investigated period started from 01 Jan. 2004 to 31 Dec. 2007. We distinguish in this analysis between different Saturnian 'sources' which can be recognized by their spectral characteristics. We define two kinds of arc structures: the 'vertex early arcs' (VEA) and the 'vertex late arcs' (VLA). The arcs of the first group set open toward increasing time, while the arcs of the other one open towards decreasing time. A total of 556 arcs have been observed during the four investigated years, where 310 and 246 correspond, respectively, to the vertex early and late arcs. We show how the occurrence of arcs may be related to the position of the satellite around the planet Saturn. We emphasis in this analysis on the eventual control of the Saturnian kilometric radiation by Titan. Our results are compared with previous investigations performed by Daigne et al. (1982) and Kurth et al. (2006) using, respectively, Voyager and Cassini observations.

  14. Simultaneous state and actuator fault estimation for satellite attitude control systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Yao; Wang Rixin; Xu Minqiang; Li Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new nonlinear augmented observer is proposed and applied to satellite attitude control systems. The observer can estimate system state and actuator fault simultaneously. It can enhance the performances of rapidly-varying faults estimation. Only original system matrices are adopted in the parameter design. The considered faults can be unbounded, and the proposed augmented observer can estimate a large class of faults. Systems without disturbances and the fault whose finite times derivatives are zero piecewise are initially considered, followed by a discussion of a general situation where the system is subject to disturbances and the finite times derivatives of the faults are not null but bounded. For the considered nonlinear system, convergence conditions of the observer are provided and the stability analysis is performed using Lyapunov direct method. Then a feasible algorithm is explored to compute the observer parameters using linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed approach is illustrated by considering an example of a closed-loop satellite attitude control system. The simulation results show satisfactory perfor-mance in estimating states and actuator faults. It also shows that multiple faults can be estimated successfully.

  15. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 1: Integrated payload and mission planning process evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, T. P.; Davin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The integrated payload and mission planning process for STS payloads was defined, and discrete tasks which evaluate performance and support initial implementation of this process were conducted. The scope of activity was limited to NASA and NASA-related payload missions only. The integrated payload and mission planning process was defined in detail, including all related interfaces and scheduling requirements. Related to the payload mission planning process, a methodology for assessing early Spacelab mission manager assignment schedules was defined.

  16. ISS and Shuttle Payload Research Development and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Kyle A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's ISS and Spacecraft Processing Directorate (UB) is charged with the performance of payload development for research originating through NASA, ISS international partners, and the National Laboratory. The Payload Development sector of the Directorate takes biological research approved for on orbit experimentation from its infancy stage and finds a way to integrate and implement that research into a payload on either a Shuttle sortie or Space Station increment. From solicitation and selection, to definition, to verification, to integration and finally to operations and analysis, Payload Development is there every step of the way. My specific work as an intern this summer has consisted of investigating data received by separate flight and ground control Advanced Biological Research Systems (ABRS) units for Advanced Plant Experiments (APEX) and Cambium research. By correlation and analysis of this data and specific logbook information I have been working to explain changes in environmental conditions on both the flight and ground control unit. I have then, compiled all of that information into a form that can be presentable to the Principal Investigator (PI). This compilation allows that PI scientist to support their findings and add merit to their research. It also allows us, as the Payload Developers, to further inspect the ABRS unit and its performance

  17. Rectification of single and multiple frames of satellite scanner imagery using points and edges as control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paderes, F. C., Jr.; Mikhail, E. M.; Foerstner, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rectification of single and overlapping multiple scanner frames produced by such satellite-borne scanners as the LANDSAT MSS was carried out using a newly developed comprehensive parametric model. Tests with both simulated and real image data demonstrate conclusively that this model in general is superior to the widely used polynomial model, and that the simultaneous rectification of overlapping frames using least squares techniques yields a high accuracy than sngle frame rectification due to the inclusion of tie points between the image frames. Used to control, edges or lines, whic are much more likely to be found in images, can replace conventional control points and can easily be implemented into the least squares approach. An efficient algorithm for findng corresponding points in image paris was developed which can be used for determining tie points between image frames and thus increase the ecnomy of the whole rectification procedure.

  18. Analysis of broadcasting satellite service feeder link power control and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analyses of carrier to interference power ratios (C/Is) were performed in assessing 17.5 GHz feeder links using (1) fixed power and power control, and (2) orthogonal linear and orthogonal circular polarizations. The analysis methods and attenuation/depolarization data base were based on CCIR findings to the greatest possible extent. Feeder links using adaptive power control were found to neither cause or suffer significant C/I degradation relative to that for fixed power feeder links having similar or less stringent availability objectives. The C/Is for sharing between orthogonal linearly polarized feeder links were found to be significantly higher than those for circular polarization only in links to nominally colocated satellites from nominally colocated Earth stations in high attenuation environments.

  19. Guidance, Navigation, and Control System for Maneuverable Pico-Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A compact, low-power GN&C system is essential to the success of pico-satellite Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). Austin Satellite Design (ASD)...

  20. Laser Communication Experiments with Artemis Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, Sergii; Sodnik, Zoran; Kuzkov, Volodymyr

    2013-10-01

    In November 2001, the European Space Agency (ESA) established the world-first inter-satellite laser communication link between the geostationary ARTEMIS satellite and the low Earth orbiting (LEO) SPOT-4 Earth observation satellite, demonstrating data rates of 50 Mbps. In 2006, the Japanese Space Agency launched the KIRARI (OICETS) LEO satellite with a compatible laser communication terminal and bidirectional laser communication links (50 Mbps and 2 Mbps) were successfully realized between KIRARI and ARTEMIS. ESA is now developing the European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) system, which will use laser communication technology to transmit data between the Sentinel 1 and 2 satellites in LEO to two geostationary satellites (EDRS-A and EDRS-C) at data rates of 1.8 Gbps. As the data handling capabilities of state-of-the-art telecommunication satellites in GEO increase so is the demand for the feeder-link bandwidth to be transmitted from ground. This is why there is an increasing interest in developing high bandwidth ground-to-space laser communication systems working through atmosphere. In 2002, the Main Astronomical Observatory (MAO) started the development of its own laser communication system for its 0.7m AZT-2 telescope, located in Kyiv, Ukraine. The work was supported by the National Space Agency of Ukraine and by ESA. MAO developed a highly accurate computerized tracking system for AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package called LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication Experiments with Satellites). The LACES instrument includes a camera of the pointing and tracking subsystems, a receiver module, a laser transmitter module, a tip/tilt atmospheric turbulence compensation subsystem, a bit error rate tester module and other optical and electronic components. The principal subsystems are mounted on a platform, which is located at the Cassegrain focus of the AZT-2 telescope. All systems were tested with the laser communication payload on-board ARTEMIS and

  1. Feasibility of a Constellation of Miniature Satellites for Performing Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the requirements for a small constellation of satellites to perform measurements of the magnetic field of the Earth and a payload and boom design for such a mission is discussed. After studying communication, power and mass requirements it is found that it is feasible to develop...... a 10 x 10 x 30 cm(3) satellite with a mass of about 2.5 kg, which can fulfill such a mission. We also study the feasibility of controlling a constellation of such small satellites by means of air drag by extracting one or more flaps. It is found that it is indeed possible, but for best performance...

  2. SILEX ground segment control facilities and flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelenne, Benoit; Tolker-Nielsen, Toni; Guillen, Jean-Claude

    1999-04-01

    The European Space Agency is going to conduct an inter orbit link experiment which will connect a low Earth orbiting satellite and a Geostationary satellite via optical terminals. This experiment has been called SILEX (Semiconductor Inter satellite Link Experiment). Two payloads have been built. One called PASTEL (PASsager de TELecommunication) has been embarked on the French Earth observation satellite SPOT4 which has been launched successfully in March 1998. The future European experimental data relay satellite ARTEMIS (Advanced Relay and TEchnology MISsion), which will route the data to ground, will carry the OPALE terminal (Optical Payload Experiment). The European Space Agency is responsible for the operation of both terminals. Due to the complexity and experimental character of this new optical technology, the development, preparation and validation of the ground segment control facilities required a long series of technical and operational qualification tests. This paper is presenting the operations concept and the early results of the PASTEL in orbit operations.

  3. The Motion Planning of Overhead Crane Based on Suppressing Payload Residual Swing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hua-sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the overhead crane system is subject to under actuation system due to that overhead crane and payload are connected by flexibility wire rope. The payload generates residual swing when the overhead crane is accelerating/ decelerating the motions. This may cause trouble for the payload precise positioning and motion planning. Hence, an optimization input shaping control method is presented to reduce the under actuated overhead crane’s payload swing caused via the inertia force. The dynamic model of the overhead crane is proposed according to the physics structure of the crane. The input shaper based on the motion planning of the crane is used as the feed forward input to suppress payload residual swing. Simulation and experiment results indicate that the ZV input shaper and ZVD input shaper can reduce the payload swing of the overhead crane.

  4. General introduction on payloads, ground segment and data application of Fengyun 3A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng ZHANG; Jun YANG; Chaohua DONG; Naimeng LU; Zhongdong YANG; Jinmin SHI

    2009-01-01

    Fengyun 3 series are the second-generation polar-orbiting meteorological satellites of China. The first satellite of Fengyun 3 series, FY-3A, is a research and development satellite with 11 payloads onboard. FY-3A was launched successfully at 11 a.m. On May 27, 2008. Since the launch, FY-3A data have been applied to the services on the flood season and the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. In this paper, the platform, payloads, and ground segment designs are introduced. Some typical images during the on-orbit commission test are rendered. Improvements of FY-3A on Earth observations are summarized at the end by comparing them with FY-1D, the last satellite of Fengyun 1 series.

  5. Secondary Payload Opportunities on NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Enable Science and Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jody; Pelfrey, Joseph; Norris, George

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated launch vehicle has completed its Critical Design Review (CDR). With this milestone, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft are on the path to launch a new era of deep space exploration. This first launch of SLS and the Orion Spacecraft is planned no later than November 2018 and will fly along a trans-lunar trajectory, testing the performance of the SLS and Orion systems for future missions. NASA is making investments to expand the science and exploration capability of the SLS by developing the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the mission trajectory. Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will include thirteen 6U Cubesat small satellites to be deployed beyond low earth orbit. By providing an earth-escape trajectory, opportunities are created for the advancement of small satellite subsystems, including deep space communications and in-space propulsion. This SLS capability also creates low-cost options for addressing existing Agency strategic knowledge gaps and affordable science missions. A new approach to payload integration and mission assurance is needed to ensure safety of the vehicle, while also maintaining reasonable costs for the small payload developer teams. SLS EM-1 will provide the framework and serve as a test flight, not only for vehicle systems, but also payload accommodations, ground processing, and on-orbit operations. Through developing the requirements and integration processes for EM-1, NASA is outlining the framework for the evolved configuration of secondary payloads on SLS Block upgrades. The lessons learned from the EM-1 mission will be applied to processes and products developed for future block upgrades. In the heavy-lift configuration of SLS, payload accommodations will increase for secondary opportunities including small satellites larger than the traditional Cubesat class payload. The payload mission concept of operations, proposed payload

  6. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  7. Project Hermes 'Use of Smartphones for Receiving Telemetry and Commanding a Satellite'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaja, Rishabh (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    TCPIP protocols can be applied for satellite command, control, and data transfer. Project Hermes was an experiment set-up to test the use of the TCPIP protocol for communicating with a space bound payload. The idea was successfully demonstrated on high altitude balloon flights and on a sub-orbital sounding rocket launched from NASAs Wallops Flight Facility. TCPIP protocols can be applied for satellite command, control, and data transfer. Project Hermes was an experiment set-up to test the use of the TCPIP protocol for communicating with a space bound payload. The idea was successfully demonstrated on high altitude balloon flights and on a sub-orbital sounding rocket launched from NASAs Wallops Flight Facility.

  8. The Unity connecting module moves into payload bay of Endeavour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module is moved toward the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88 . The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  9. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the Unity connecting module to the payload canister for transfer to the launch pad. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  10. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers attach the overhead crane that will lift the Unity connecting module from its workstand to move the module to the payload canister. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  11. Computer Aided Safety Assessment(CASA) Tool for ISS Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Jason; Festa, Fabrizio

    2010-09-01

    In an effort to streamline the processes established by the partners of the International Space Station(ISS) to certify the safety of hardware and experiments destined for the Station, the European Space Agency’s(ESA) ISS System Safety Team is developing the Computer Aided Safety Assessment(CASA) tool suite. These software tools guide payload developers through the creation process of two types of standard payload hazard reports via a series of questions following a predetermined logic. The responses provided by the user are used by the CASA system to complete the majority of each hazard report requisite for payload flight safety reviews, employing consistent, approved descriptions of most hazards, hazard causes, controls and verification methods. Though some manual inputs will still be required to complete these reports, working with CASA will considerably reduce the amount of time necessary to review the documentation by agency safety authorities.

  12. Optimizing Mean Mission Duration for Multiple-Payload Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    problem. Integer programs are solved primarily 1-4 using branch-and-bound or branch-and-cut algorithms. Commercial IP solvers, like Xpress , apply these...mulation, the Xpress solver will be used. Moreover, heuristic solution methods will be developed. An elementary heuristic for the one-dimensional...search, genetic algorithms, etc. Heuristics begin with some initial point in the solution space and consist of two primary phases: performing a global

  13. Introduction to the Payloads and the Initial Observation Results of Chang'E-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Huixian; CHEN Xiaomin; OUYANG Ziyuan; ZOU Yongliao; WU Ji; DAI Shuwu; ZHAO Baochang; SHU Rong; CHANG Jin; WANG Huanyu; ZHANG Xiaohui; REN Qiongying

    2008-01-01

    Chang'E-1, the orbiter circling the moon 200km above the moon surface, is the first Chinese Lunar exploration satellite. The satellite was successfully launched on 24th October 2007.There are 8 kinds of scientific payloads onboard, including the stereo camera, the laser altimeter, the Sagnac-based interferometer image spectrometer, the Gamma ray spectrometer, the X-ray spectrometer, the microwave radiometer, the high energy particle detector, the solar wind plasma detector and a supporting payload data management system. Chang'E-1 opened her eyes to look at the moon and took the first batch of lunar pictures after her stereo camera was switched on in 20th November 2007.Henceforth all the instruments are successfully switched on one by one. After a period of parameter adjustment and initial check out, all scientific instruments are now in their normal operating phase.In this paper, the payloads and the initial observation results are introduced.

  14. The control of satellites with microgravity constraints: The COMET Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Walter; Freesland, Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The COMET attitude determination and control system, using inverse dynamics and a novel torque distribution/momentum management technique, has shown great flexibility, performance, and robustness. Three-axis control with two wheels is an inherent consequence of inverse dynamics control which allows for reduction in spacecraft weight and cost, or alternatively, provides a simple means of failure-redundancy for three-wheel spacecraft. The control system, without modification, has continued to perform well in spite of large changes in spacecraft mass properties and mission orbit altitude that have occurred during development. This flexibility has obviated imposition of early stringent ADACS design constraints and has greatly reduced commonly incurred ADACS modification costs and delay associated with program maturation.

  15. Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander, is busy at the pilots station during operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander, is busy at the pilots station during operations to deploy the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). His five crew mates (out of frame) were also on the flight deck, of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, during the busy deployment activities.

  16. Tactical Satellite 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. M.; Straight, S. D.; Lockwook, R. B.

    2008-08-01

    Tactical Satellite 3 is an Air Force Research Laboratory Science and Technology (S&T) initiative that explores the capability and technological maturity of small, low-cost satellites. It features a low cost "plug and play" modular bus and low cost militarily significant payloads - a Raytheon developed Hyperspectral imager and secondary payload data exfiltration provided by the Office of Naval Research. In addition to providing for ongoing innovation and demonstration in this important technology area, these S&T efforts also help mitigate technology risk and establish a potential concept of operations for future acquisitions. The key objectives are rapid launch and on-orbit checkout, theater commanding, and near-real time theater data integration. It will also feature a rapid development of the space vehicle and integrated payload and spacecraft bus by using components and processes developed by the satellite modular bus initiative. Planned for a late summer 2008 launch, the TacSat-3 spacecraft will collect and process images and then downlink processed data using a Common Data Link. An in-theater tactical ground station will have the capability to uplink tasking to spacecraft and will receive full data image. An international program, the United Kingdom Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) plan to participate in TacSat-3 experiments.

  17. Remote Advanced Payload Test Rig (RAPTR) Portable Payload Test System for the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, John; Freas, George, II

    2017-01-01

    The RAPTR was developed to test ISS payloads for NASA. RAPTR is a simulation of the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) interfaces of the ISS (MIL-STD 1553B, Ethernet and TAXI) and is designed to facilitate rapid testing and deployment of payload experiments to the ISS. The ISS Program's goal is to reduce the amount of time it takes a payload developer to build, test and fly a payload, including payload software. The RAPTR meets this need with its user oriented, visually rich interface. Additionally, the Analog and Discrete (A&D) signals of the following payload types may be tested with RAPTR: (1) EXPRESS Sub Rack Payloads; (2) ELC payloads; (3) External Columbus payloads; (4) External Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) payloads. The automated payload configuration setup and payload data inspection infrastructure is found nowhere else in ISS payload test systems. Testing can be done with minimal human intervention and setup, as the RAPTR automatically monitors parameters in the data headers that are sent to, and come from the experiment under test.

  18. ISS External Payload Accommodations (EXPRESS pallet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Harvey L.

    1996-01-01

    The 'expedite the process of experiments to Space Station' (EXPRESS) pallet which is attached to the DS3 truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS) via the payload attach structure is illustrated. The EXPRESS pallet constitutes the primary ISS external payload carrier. Each pallet carries six robotically replaceable payload adapters which are capable of containing one or more payloads. The following aspects of the EXPRESS program and pallet are illustrated: the concept drivers; the physical integration; the installation and in-orbit replacement; and the experiments to be implemented. The program status is summarized.

  19. Live From Space Station Outreach Payload Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Live from Space Station? Outreach Payload (LFSSOP) is a technologically challenging, exciting opportunity for university students to conduct significant research...

  20. Advanced planning for ISS payload ground processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kimberly A.

    2000-01-01

    Ground processing at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is the concluding phase of the payload/flight hardware development process and is the final opportunity to ensure safe and successful recognition of mission objectives. Planning for the ground processing of on-orbit flight hardware elements and payloads for the International Space Station is a responsibility taken seriously at KSC. Realizing that entering into this operational environment can be an enormous undertaking for a payload customer, KSC continually works to improve this process by instituting new/improved services for payload developer/owner, applying state-of-the-art technologies to the advanced planning process, and incorporating lessons learned for payload ground processing planning to ensure complete customer satisfaction. This paper will present an overview of the KSC advanced planning activities for ISS hardware/payload ground processing. It will focus on when and how KSC begins to interact with the payload developer/owner, how that interaction changes (and grows) throughout the planning process, and how KSC ensures that advanced planning is successfully implemented at the launch site. It will also briefly consider the type of advance planning conducted by the launch site that is transparent to the payload user but essential to the successful processing of the payload (i.e. resource allocation, executing documentation, etc.) .

  1. Study on Payload Effects on the Joint Motion Accuracy of Serial Mechanical Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Robotic manipulators have been widely used in many arenas, when the robotic arm performs positioning, a traditional controller (e.g., a proportional-integral-derivative, PID controller has the problem of not being able to compensate the payload variations. When the end-effector of the robotic arm grasps different payload masses as most applications require, the output of joint motion will vary under different payload masses, which will decrease the end-effector positioning accuracy of the robotic arm system. Based on the model reference adaptive control technique, the payload variation effect can be solved, therefore improving the positioning accuracy. This paper studies payload effects on the joint motion accuracy of serial mechanical mechanisms.

  2. Electric Propulsion for Low Earth Orbit Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Steven R.

    1997-01-01

    Electric propulsion was evaluated for orbit insertion, satellite positioning and de-orbit applications on big (hundreds of kilograms) and little (tens of kilograms) low earth orbit communication satellite constellations. A simple, constant circumferential thrusting method was used. This technique eliminates the complex guidance and control required when shading of the solar arrays must be considered. Power for propulsion was assumed to come from the existing payload power. Since the low masses of these satellites enable multiple spacecraft per launch, the ability to add spacecraft to a given launch was used as a figure of merit. When compared to chemical propulsion ammonia resistojets, ion, Hall, and pulsed plasma thrusters allowed an additional spacecraft per launch Typical orbit insertion and de-orbit times were found to range from a few days to a few months.

  3. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Using Multiple Navigation Signals as Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX is a remote control method that permits synchronization between a ground station atomic clock and Japanese quasi-zenith satellite system (QZSS crystal oscillators. To realize the RESSOX of the QZSS, the utilization of navigation signals of QZSS for feedback control is an important issue. Since QZSS transmits seven navigation signals (L1C/A, L1CP, L1CD, L2CM, L2CL, L5Q, and L5I, all combinations of these signals should be evaluated. First, the RESSOX algorithm will be introduced. Next, experimental performance will be demonstrated. If only a single signal is available, ionospheric delay should be input from external measurements. If multiple frequency signals are available, any combination, except for L2 and L5, gives good performance with synchronization error being within two nanoseconds that of RESSOX. The combination of L1CD and L5Q gives the best synchronization performance (synchronization error within 1.14 ns. Finally, in the discussion, comparisons of long-duration performance, computer simulation, and sampling number used in feedback control are considered. Although experimental results do not correspond to the simulation results, the tendencies are similar. For the overlapping Allan deviation of long duration, the stability of 1.23×10−14 at 100,160 s is obtained.

  4. ERROR-CONTROL CODING OF ADS-B MESSAGES FOR IRIDIUM SATELLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For modelling of ADS-B messages transmitting on the base of low-orbit satellite constellation Іrіdіum the model of a communication channel “Aircraft - Satellite - Ground Station” was built using MATLAB Sіmulіnk. This model allowed to investigate dependences of the Bit Error Rate on a type of  signal coding/decoding, ratio Eb/N0 and satellite repeater gain

  5. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control Systems Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control systems architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 x 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control systems architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an offset of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  6. Remote Advanced Payload Test Rig (RAPTR) Portable Payload Test System for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Melinda; Henderson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The RAPTR was developed to test ISS payloads for NASA. RAPTR is a simulation of the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) interfaces of the ISS (MIL-STD1553B, Ethernet and TAXI) and is designed for rapid testing and deployment of payload experiments to the ISS. The ISS's goal is to reduce the amount of time it takes for a payload developer to build, test and fly a payload, including payload software. The RAPTR meets this need with its user oriented, visually rich interface.

  7. Robust Fault-Tolerant Control for Satellite Attitude Stabilization Based on Active Disturbance Rejection Approach with Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Song; Shiyin Qin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a robust fault-tolerant control algorithm for satellite stabilization based on active disturbance rejection approach with artificial bee colony algorithm. The actuating mechanism of attitude control system consists of three working reaction flywheels and one spare reaction flywheel. The speed measurement of reaction flywheel is adopted for fault detection. If any reaction flywheel fault is detected, the corresponding fault flywheel is isolated and the spare reaction flywhe...

  8. A practical small satellite variable-speed control moment gyroscope for combined energy storage and attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, David J.; Lappas, Vaios J.; Prassinos, George

    2009-12-01

    A recent effort to develop single-gimbal variable-speed control moment gyroscopes (VSCMGs) for a combined energy storage and attitude control subsystem (ESACS) on small satellites has culminated in laboratory validation of the concept. A single actuator prototype comprised of a cutting-edge Carbon Fiber rotor and COTS motor/generator components has been developed, balanced, bench tested, and integrated onto a spherical air-bearing structure. This structure is used to demonstrate the primary capability of a VSCMG to act as a dynamo whilst simultaneously changing a spacecraft's orientation in a controlled fashion. As originally predicted, the actuator's flywheel spins up when energy is supplied (supported via a direct energy transfer power architecture), then spins down when the energy source is removed, porting the energy released to run a resistive load. The work presented gives an overview of the governing principles of the technology, addresses the underlying mission and design requirements, and presents the prototype design. Then, effectiveness of the prototype integrated on a three-axis test article is presented along with its associated test data. Finally, discussion of these results and identification of future research concludes the work. The benefits of this technology for future space missions are that system consolidation permits mass reduction, higher instantaneous peak power is available as compared to conventional secondary battery systems, state-of-charge measurement is readily available from wheel speed feedback, and torque amplification through gimballing permits efficient actuator control. The technology demonstrated is exciting and leaves the door open for future development via inclusion of magnetic levitation.

  9. Design of Satellite Attitude Control Algorithm Based on the SDRE Method Using Gas Jets and Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz C. G. de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental attitude control algorithm design using prototypes can minimize space mission costs by reducing the number of errors transmitted to the next phase of the project. The Space Mechanics and Control Division (DMC of INPE is constructing a 3D simulator to supply the conditions for implementing and testing satellite control hardware and software. Satellite large angle maneuver makes the plant highly nonlinear and if the parameters of the system are not well determined, the plant can also present some level of uncertainty. As a result, controller designed by a linear control technique can have its performance and robustness degraded. In this paper the standard LQR linear controller and the SDRE controller associated with an SDRE filter are applied to design a controller for a nonlinear plant. The plant is similar to the DMC 3D satellite simulator where the unstructured uncertainties of the system are represented by process and measurements noise. In the sequel the State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE method is used to design and test an attitude control algorithm based on gas jets and reaction wheel torques to perform large angle maneuver in three axes. The SDRE controller design takes into account the effects of the plant nonlinearities and system noise which represents uncertainty. The SDRE controller performance and robustness are tested during the transition phase from angular velocity reductions to normal mode of operation with stringent pointing accuracy using a switching control algorithm based on minimum system energy. This work serves to validate the numerical simulator model and to verify the functionality of the control algorithm designed by the SDRE method.

  10. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  11. A semi-automatic Parachute Separation System for Balloon Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, M. E.; Barsic, J. E.

    When operating stratospheric balloons with scientific payloads at the National Scientific Balloon Facility, the current practice for separating the payload from the parachute after descent requires the sending of manual commands over a UHF channel from the chase aircraft or the ground control site. While this procedure generally works well, there have been occasions when, due to shadowing of the receive antenna, unfavorable aircraft attitude or even lack of a chase aircraft, the command has not been received and the parachute has failed to separate. In these circumstances, the payload may be dragged, with the consequent danger of damage to expensive and sometimes irreplaceable scientific instrumentation. The NSBF has developed a system designed to automatically separate the parachute without the necessity for commanding after touchdown. The most important criterion for such a design is that it should be fail-safe; a free-fall of the payload would of course be a disaster. This design incorporates many safety features and underwent extensive evaluation and testing for several years before it was adopted operationally. It is currently used as a backup to the commanded release, activated only when a chase aircraft is not available, at night or in exceptionally poor visibility conditions. This paper describes the design, development, testing and operation of the system, which is known as the Semi-Automatic Parachute Release (SAPR).

  12. Odyssey, an optimized personal communications satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Roger J.

    Personal communications places severe demands on service providers and transmission facilities. Customers are not satisfied with the current levels of service and want improvements. Among the characteristics that users seek are: lower service rates, hand held convenience, acceptable time delays, ubiquitous service, high availability, reliability, and high quality. The space industry is developing commercial space systems for providing mobile communications to personal telephones. Provision of land mobile satellite service is fundamentally different from the fixed satellite service provided by geostationary satellites. In fixed service, the earth based antennas can depend on a clear path from user to satellite. Mobile users in a terrestrial environment commonly encounter blockage due to vegetation, terrain or buildings. Consequently, high elevation angles are of premium value. TRW studied the issues and concluded that a Medium Earth Orbit constellation is the best solution for Personal Communications Satellite Service. TRW has developed Odyssey, which uses twelve satellites in medium altitude orbit to provide personal communications satellite service. The Odyssey communications system projects a multibeam antenna pattern to the Earth. The attitude control system orients the satellites to ensure constant coverage of land mass and coastal areas. Pointing can be reprogrammed by ground control to ensure optimized coverage of the desired service areas. The payload architecture features non-processing, "bent pipe" transponders and matrix amplifiers to ensure dynamic power delivery to high demand areas. Circuit capacity is 3000 circuits per satellite. Each satellite weighs 1917 kg (4226 pounds) at launch and the solar arrays provide 3126 Watts of power. Satellites are launched in pairs on Ariane, Atlas, or other vehicles. Each satellite is placed in a circular orbit at an altitude of 10,354 km. There are three orbit planes inclined at 55° to the equatorial plane

  13. Flexible Low Cost Avionics for NanoSatellite Launch Vehicle Control and GPS Metric Tracking Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems LLC (Tyvak) will develop nano-launch vehicle avionics solutions based on the latest commercial electronics products...

  14. Design and analysis of palletized ISS Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoudas, Magdalini Z.; Boyle, David R.

    2000-01-01

    For development of commercial payloads integrated onto EXPRESS Pallet adapters, a wide variety of analysis tools are needed to properly assess the payload's mechanical, structural, and thermal characteristics. The simple transfer of solid model geometries from one of these analysis tools to another, though desired for effective concurrent engineering, can only occasionally be accomplished. The CSCE uses Pro/Engineer to develop the master payload geometry model. In that environment, MSC/NASTRAN and Pro/Mechanica achieve comparable accuracy in the structural analysis of relatively simple geometries; however, use of MSC/NASTRAN requires an additional model development step. For more complex geometries, MSC/NASTRAN offers significantly faster run times. .

  15. Autonomous rendezvous and proximate motion of satellites - A covariance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackison, Donald L.; Morenthaler, George W.

    1992-08-01

    The construction of large (10 exp 6 kg) spacecraft in orbit will, in order to meet the requirements of interplanetary launch windows and restrictions of launch facilities require the launch of several 100,000-kg payloads using the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), and their subsequent in-orbit assembly into a completed spacecraft. This assembly will require that the components rendezvous and dock within a reasonable time, taking into consideration launch window restrictions and the operating time limits on the component spacecraft. This will require that the rendezvous and docking operations be accomplished autonomously, without ground control. The trajectory and attitude control of a chase satellite to rendezvous with a target satellite are modeled using the Euler-Hill equations of relative orbital motion, and a linearized set of relative attitude parameters. The effect of uncertainties in the orbit dynamics and sensors, and the attitude dynamics and sensors are modeled using a linearized covariance analysis.

  16. Development and Validation of the On-Board Control Procedures Subsystem for the Herschel and Planck Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraguto, M.; Wittrock, T.; Barrenscheen, M.; Paakko, M.; Sipinen, V.; Pelttari, L.

    2009-05-01

    The On-Board Control Procedures (OBCP) subsystem of Herschel and Planck Satellites' Central Data Management Unit (CDMU) Application SW (ASW) provides means to control the spacecraft through small script-like programs written in a specific language called On-board Command Language (OCL). The implementation for Herschel and Planck satellites is an adaptation from previous experiences on instruments like Rosetta/OSIRIS, Venus Express/VMC and Dawn/FC, but it had also been adapted successfully for the GOCE satellite already. A thorough validation campaign has been conducted to qualify the H&P SW implementation for flight. The purpose of having on-board control procedures is to allow the ground operators to be able to prepare and up-link complex operations sequences (more complex than simple sequences of mission time-line telecommands) to be executed on-board during the mission operational phase. This is possible because the OBCPs run in a quite separate subsystem, so the creation of a new procedure does not require modification, uplink and re-validation of the whole on-board software. The OBCP subsystem allows these control procedures to be developed, tested on ground, and executed on the spacecraft.

  17. Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS), which is part of the JPL Phaeton early career employee hands-on training program, aims to demonstrate optical...

  18. Data Collection Satellite Application in Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durào, O.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural Instrumentation Research Center, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation; Space Programs Brazil launched in 1993 its first satellite partially built and entirely designed, integrated, tested and operated in the country. It was the SCD-1 satellite, a small (115 kg. and an octagonal prism with 80 cm. height and an external diameter of 100 cm.) with a payload transponder that receives data from ground platforms spread all over the country (including its sea shore). These data are then retransmitted to a receiving station at every satellite pass. Data collected and received are processed at Data Collection Mission Center for distribution via internet at most 30 min after the satellite pass. The ground platforms are called PCD's and differ in the parameters measured according to its purpose and location. Thus, they are able to measure temperature, rain level, wind direction, solar radiation, carbon monoxide as well as many others, beyond its own location. SCD- 1 had a nominal designed life of one year, but is still functioning. It is a LEO satellite with inclination of 25°. In 1998, the country launched SCD-2, with the same purpose, but in phase with SCD-1 . Other differences were a higher index of Brazilian made components and an active attitude control subsystem for the spin rate provided by the magnetic torque coils (these in accordance with a development strategy previously planned). In 1999 the country launched in cooperation with China a remote sensing satellite (mass of 1.4 ton.) called CBERS-1. This satellite is sun synchronous (98° inclination) and also carries a transponder for data collection/transmission as a secondary payload. Thus, the country has now three satellites with data collection/transmission capabilities, two in low inclination phased orbits and one in polar orbit, providing a nice coverage both geographical and temporal not only to its territory but also to other regions of the world.. At first there were not too many PCD

  19. Offshore Wind Payload Transfer Using Flexible Mobile Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus B. Kjelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an offshore-simulated loading and unloading of a payload from a floating platform to a fixed structure. The experiments are performed in a dry-lab, where a Stewart platform is used to simulate the motion of the vessel. A hydraulically actuated vehicle loader crane is used to perform the tasks of payload transfer. The crane includes a hydraulic winch where the wire force is measured by a load cell. A mathematical model of the winch is derived and is experimentally verified. The control strategies include a heave compensation and a constant tension mode. A motion reference unit is used to generate the reference motion of the moving platform. Experimental results show the wire force while performing the load cases. This paper shows the advantage of using a reference motion as a feed forward control reference, instead of only relying on the constant tension.

  20. Application of Genetic Control with Adaptive Scaling Scheme to Signal Acquisition in Global Navigation Satellite System Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a genetic-based control scheme that not only utilizes evolutionary characteristics to find the signal acquisition parameters, but also employs an adaptive scheme to control the search space and avoid the genetic control converging to local optimal value so as to acquire the desired signal precisely and rapidly. Simulations and experiment results show that the proposed method can improve the precision of signal parameters and take less signal acquisition time than traditional serial search methods for global navigation satellite system (GNSS signals.

  1. Development of the European Small Geostationary Satellite SGEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübberstedt, H.; Schneider, A.; Schuff, H.; Miesner, Th.; Winkler, A.

    2008-08-01

    The SGEO product portfolio, ranging from Satellite platform delivery up to in-orbit delivery of a turnkey system including satellite and ground control station, is designed for applications ranging from TV Broadcast to multimedia applications, Internet access, mobile or fixed services in a wide range of frequency bands. Furthermore, Data Relay missions such as the European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) as well as other institutional missions are targeted. Key design features of the SGEO platform are high flexibility and modularity in order to accommodate a very wide range of future missions, a short development time below two years and the objective to build the system based on ITAR free subsystems and components. The system will provide a long lifetime of up to 15 years in orbit operations with high reliability. SGEO is the first European satellite to perform all orbit control tasks solely by electrical propulsion (EP). This design provides high mass efficiency and the capability for direct injection into geostationary orbit without chemical propulsion (CP). Optionally, an Apogee Engine Module based on CP will provide the perigee raising manoeuvres in case of a launch into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). This approach allows an ideal choice out of a wide range of launcher candidates in dependence of the required payload capacity. SGEO will offer to the market a versatile and high performance satellite system with low investment risk for the customer and a short development time. This paper provides an overview of the SGEO system key features and the current status of the SGEO programme.

  2. Operational plans for life science payloads - From experiment selection through postflight reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccollum, G. W.; Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    Key features of operational plans developed in a study of the Space Shuttle era life science payloads program are presented. The data describes the overall acquisition, staging, and integration of payload elements, as well as program implementation methods and mission support requirements. Five configurations were selected as representative payloads: (a) carry-on laboratories - medical emphasis experiments, (b) mini-laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (c) seven-day dedicated laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (d) 30-day dedicated laboratories - Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) with selected life science experiments, and (e) Biomedical Experiments Scientific Satellite (BESS) - extended duration primate (Type I) and small vertebrate (Type II) missions. The recommended operational methods described in the paper are compared to the fundamental data which has been developed in the life science Spacelab Mission Simulation (SMS) test series. Areas assessed include crew training, experiment development and integration, testing, data-dissemination, organization interfaces, and principal investigator working relationships.

  3. Operational plans for life science payloads - From experiment selection through postflight reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccollum, G. W.; Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    Key features of operational plans developed in a study of the Space Shuttle era life science payloads program are presented. The data describes the overall acquisition, staging, and integration of payload elements, as well as program implementation methods and mission support requirements. Five configurations were selected as representative payloads: (a) carry-on laboratories - medical emphasis experiments, (b) mini-laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (c) seven-day dedicated laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (d) 30-day dedicated laboratories - Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) with selected life science experiments, and (e) Biomedical Experiments Scientific Satellite (BESS) - extended duration primate (Type I) and small vertebrate (Type II) missions. The recommended operational methods described in the paper are compared to the fundamental data which has been developed in the life science Spacelab Mission Simulation (SMS) test series. Areas assessed include crew training, experiment development and integration, testing, data-dissemination, organization interfaces, and principal investigator working relationships.

  4. A fault tolerant design for autonomous attitude control of the DSCS-III communication satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijevic, J.; Mettler, E.

    1983-01-01

    The first of a new series of satellites, which will provide the principal elements in the Defense Space Communications System (DSCS), was launched on Oct. 31, 1982. This satellite, DSCS-III, is part of a system which will consist of super-high frequency communications satellites in synchronous, equatorial orbits, continuously operating in four widely separate geographic regions. The DSCS-III is designed both to maintain critical communications in the presence of an electronic jamming threat and to survive nuclear radiation exposure. The results of the present investigation are to provide a basis for the design of a spacecraft tolerant of on-board failures, survivable against external threats, and capable of performing its mission autonomously for periods as long as six months.

  5. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Morton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate–fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burned area (BA, the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, 1997–2010 and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS, 1984–2009 BA products. For each US National Climate Assessment (NCA region, we analyzed the relationships between monthly BA and potential evaporation (PE derived from reanalysis climate data at 0.5° resolution. US fire activity increased over the past 25 yr, with statistically significant increases in MTBS BA for the entire US and the Southeast and Southwest NCA regions. Monthly PE was strongly correlated with US fire activity, yet the climate driver of PE varied regionally. Fire season temperature and shortwave radiation were the primary controls on PE and fire activity in Alaska, while water deficit (precipitation – PE was strongly correlated with fire activity in the Plains regions and Northwest US. BA and precipitation anomalies were negatively correlated in all regions, although fuel-limited ecosystems in the Southern Plains and Southwest exhibited positive correlations with longer lead times (6–12 months. Fire season PE increased from the 1980's–2000's, enhancing climate-driven fire risk in the southern and western US where PE–BA correlations were strongest. Spatial and temporal patterns of increasing fire season PE and BA during the 1990's–2000's highlight the potential sensitivity of US fire activity to climate change in coming decades. However, climate-fire relationships at the national scale are complex, based on the

  6. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Morton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate-fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burned area (BA, the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, 1997–2010 and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS, 1984–2009 BA products. For each US National Climate Assessment (NCA region, we analyzed the relationships between monthly BA and potential evaporation (PE derived from reanalysis climate data at 0.5° resolution. US fire activity increased over the past 25 yr, with statistically significant increases in MTBS BA for entire US and the Southeast and Southwest NCA regions. Monthly PE was strongly correlated with US fire activity, yet the climate driver of PE varied regionally. Fire season temperature and shortwave radiation were the primary controls on PE} and fire activity in the Alaska, while water deficit (precipitation – PE was strongly correlated with fire activity in the Plains regions and Northwest US. BA and precipitation anomalies were negatively correlated in all regions, although fuel-limited ecosystems in the Southern Plains and Southwest exhibited positive correlations with longer lead times (6–12 months. Fire season PE increased from the 1980s–2000s, enhancing climate-driven fire risk in the southern and western US where PE-BA correlations were strongest. Spatial and temporal patterns of increasing fire season PE and BA during the 1990s–2000s highlight the potential sensitivity of US fire activity to climate change in coming decades. However, climate-fire relationships at the national scale are complex, based on the diversity of

  7. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D. C.; Collatz, G. J.; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate-fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burned area (BA), the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED, 1997-2010) and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS, 1984-2009) BA products. For each US National Climate Assessment (NCA) region, we analyzed the relationships between monthly BA and potential evaporation (PE) derived from reanalysis climate data at 0.5° resolution. US fire activity increased over the past 25 yr, with statistically significant increases in MTBS BA for the entire US and the Southeast and Southwest NCA regions. Monthly PE was strongly correlated with US fire activity, yet the climate driver of PE varied regionally. Fire season temperature and shortwave radiation were the primary controls on PE and fire activity in Alaska, while water deficit (precipitation - PE) was strongly correlated with fire activity in the Plains regions and Northwest US. BA and precipitation anomalies were negatively correlated in all regions, although fuel-limited ecosystems in the Southern Plains and Southwest exhibited positive correlations with longer lead times (6-12 months). Fire season PE increased from the 1980's-2000's, enhancing climate-driven fire risk in the southern and western US where PE-BA correlations were strongest. Spatial and temporal patterns of increasing fire season PE and BA during the 1990's-2000's highlight the potential sensitivity of US fire activity to climate change in coming decades. However, climate-fire relationships at the national scale are complex, based on the diversity of fire types

  8. Robust Fault-Tolerant Control for Satellite Attitude Stabilization Based on Active Disturbance Rejection Approach with Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a robust fault-tolerant control algorithm for satellite stabilization based on active disturbance rejection approach with artificial bee colony algorithm. The actuating mechanism of attitude control system consists of three working reaction flywheels and one spare reaction flywheel. The speed measurement of reaction flywheel is adopted for fault detection. If any reaction flywheel fault is detected, the corresponding fault flywheel is isolated and the spare reaction flywheel is activated to counteract the fault effect and ensure that the satellite is working safely and reliably. The active disturbance rejection approach is employed to design the controller, which handles input information with tracking differentiator, estimates system uncertainties with extended state observer, and generates control variables by state feedback and compensation. The designed active disturbance rejection controller is robust to both internal dynamics and external disturbances. The bandwidth parameter of extended state observer is optimized by the artificial bee colony algorithm so as to improve the performance of attitude control system. A series of simulation experiment results demonstrate the performance superiorities of the proposed robust fault-tolerant control algorithm.

  9. The high altitude student platform (HASP) for student-built payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, T. Gregory; Wefel, John P.

    An outstanding issue with aerospace workforce development is what should be done at the university level to attract and prepare undergraduates for an aerospace career. One approach adopted by many institutions is to lead students through the design and development of small payloads (less than about 500 grams) that can be carried up to high altitude (around 30 km) by a latex sounding balloon. This approach has been very successful in helping students to integrate their content knowledge with practical skills and to understand the end-to-end process of aerospace project development. Sounding balloons, however, are usually constrained in flight duration (˜30 min above 24 km) and payload weight, limiting the kinds investigations that are possible. Student built picosatellites, such as CubeSats, can be placed in low Earth orbit removing the flight duration constraint, but the delays between satellite development and launch can be years. Here, we present the inexpensive high altitude student platform (HASP) that is designed to carry at least eight student payloads at a time to an altitude of about 36 km with flight durations of 15 20 h using a small zero-pressure polyethylene film balloon. This platform provides a flight capability greater than sounding balloons and can be used to flight-test compact satellites, prototypes and other small payloads designed and built by students. The HASP includes a standard mechanical, power and communication interface for the student payload to simplify integration and allows the payloads to be fully exercised. HASP is lightweight, has simple mission requirements providing flexibility in the launch schedule, will provide a flight test opportunity at the end of each academic year.

  10. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  11. Four Step to Control in the Use of Satellite Format Simulation%四层梯阶控制在卫星编队的应用仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘猛; 冯永新; 范增

    2012-01-01

    研究了四层阶梯控制在卫星编队的控制问题及仿真.利用卫星相对运动的线性方程组和轨道机动算法的基础上,结合卫星任务规划、行为决策、行为规划和操作控制的四层阶梯卫星编队结构,从而建立建立卫星编队绕飞半径的滤波控制.仿真结果表明了四层阶梯控制在卫星编队在上对运动过程中,缩小卫星之间相对距离变换范围,增强卫星编队的稳定性.%The satellite format control and emulation by four steps to control are studied in the thesis. Based on the research of the relative equations of linear equations and track the algorithms, combining satellite mission planning,decision-making,behavior planning and operation control of four step satellite formation structure, leading to the establishment of satellite formation flying around the radius of the filter control. The simulation results show that the cfour step control in satellite formation in relative motion process,reduce the satellite relative distance between the trasformation range,enhance the stability of satellite formation flying.

  12. Parallel satellite orbital situational problems solver for space missions design and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2016-11-01

    Solving different scientific problems for space applications demands implementation of observations, measurements or realization of active experiments during time intervals in which specific geometric and physical conditions are fulfilled. The solving of situational problems for determination of these time intervals when the satellite instruments work optimally is a very important part of all activities on every stage of preparation and realization of space missions. The elaboration of universal, flexible and robust approach for situation analysis, which is easily portable toward new satellite missions, is significant for reduction of missions' preparation times and costs. Every situation problem could be based on one or more situation conditions. Simultaneously solving different kinds of situation problems based on different number and types of situational conditions, each one of them satisfied on different segments of satellite orbit requires irregular calculations. Three formal approaches are presented. First one is related to situation problems description that allows achieving flexibility in situation problem assembling and presentation in computer memory. The second formal approach is connected with developing of situation problem solver organized as processor that executes specific code for every particular situational condition. The third formal approach is related to solver parallelization utilizing threads and dynamic scheduling based on "pool of threads" abstraction and ensures a good load balance. The developed situation problems solver is intended for incorporation in the frames of multi-physics multi-satellite space mission's design and simulation tools.

  13. Link Performance Analysis for a Proposed Future Architecture of the Air Force Satellite Control Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    data to update the known location of their spacecraft. This, of course , differs from the way STK and, in turn, the AFSCN LP obtains spacecraft...Dynamic System - A Divide and Conquer Approach. Espoo, Finland: IEEE. Cuevas, E. G., & Rehwinkel, C. A. SPOCS : A System to Measure Satellite Link

  14. Satellite-based Dust Source Identification over North Africa: Diurnal Cycle, Meteorological Controls, and Interannual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Tegen, Ina; Macke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. For a better representation of dust-related processes in numerical models and climate change projections the knowledge on the natural variability of dust source activity has to be improved. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for identifying active dust sources. The accuracy of dust source identification using such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. Here, a data set on the spatial (1°x1°) and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled by analyzing 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images since March 2006. The index is designed using radiances measured by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) on-board MSG at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm which are converted to brightness temperatures (BTs). To strengthen the dust signal, differences of BTs are used to compute RGB-composite images. This newly data set providing information on the diurnal cycle of dust emission has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of DSAs. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources become active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJs for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a regional modeling study. Four years of DSA observations indicate an interannual variability in

  15. An integrated Ka/Ku-band payload for personal, mobile and private business communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Edward J.; Keelty, J. Malcolm

    1991-01-01

    The Canadian Department of Communications has been studying options for a government-sponsored demonstration payload to be launched before the end of the century. A summary of the proposed system concepts and network architectures for providing an advanced private business network service at Ku-band and personal and mobile communications at Ka-band is presented. The system aspects addressed include coverage patterns, traffic capacity, and grade of service, multiple access options as well as special problems, such as Doppler in mobile applications. Earth terminal types and the advanced payload concept proposed in a feasibility study for the demonstration mission are described. This concept is a combined Ka-band/Ku-band payload which incorporates a number of advanced satellite technologies including a group demodulator to convert single-channel-per-carrier frequency division multiple access uplink signals to a time division multiplex downlink, on-board signal regeneration, and baseband switching to support packet switched data operation. The on-board processing capability of the payload provides a hubless VSAT architecture which permits single-hop full mesh interconnectivity. The Ka-band and Ku-band portions of the payload are fully integrated through an on-board switch, thereby providing the capability for fully integrated services, such as using the Ku-band VSAT terminals as gateway stations for the Ka-band personal and mobile communications services.

  16. HETE Satellite Power Subsystem

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The HETE (High-Energy Transient Experiment) satellite a joint project between MIT's Center for Space Research and AeroAstro. is a high-energy gamma-ray burst/X-Ray/UV observatory platform. HETE will be launched into a 550 km circular orbit with an inclination of 37.7°, and has a design lifetime of 18 months. This paper presents a description of the spacecraft's power subsystem, which collects, regulates, and distributes power to the experiment payload modules and to the various spacecraft sub...

  17. A Cubesat Payload for Exoplanet Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Iuzzolino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for undiscovered planets outside the solar system is a scientific topic that is rapidly spreading into the astrophysical and engineering communities. In this framework, the design of an innovative payload to detect exoplanets from a nano-sized space platform, like a 3U cubesat, is presented. The selected detection method is photometric transit, and the payload aims to detect flux decrements down to ~0.01% with a precision of 12 ppm. The payload design is also aimed at false positive recognition. The solution consists of a four-facets pyramid on the top of the payload, to allow for measurement redundancy and low-resolution spectral dispersion of the star images. The innovative concept is the use of a small and cheap platform for a relevant astronomical mission. The faintest observable target star has V-magnitude equal to 3.38. Despite missions aimed at ultra-precise photometry from microsatellites (e.g., MOST, BRITE, the transit of exoplanets orbiting very bright stars has not yet been surveyed photometrically from space, since any observation from a small/medium sized (30 cm optical aperture telescope would saturate the detector. This cubesat mission can provide these missing measurements. This work is set up as a demonstrative project to verify the feasibility of the payload concept.

  18. A Cubesat Payload for Exoplanet Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzolino, Marcella; Accardo, Domenico; Rufino, Giancarlo; Oliva, Ernesto; Tozzi, Andrea; Schipani, Pietro

    2017-03-02

    The search for undiscovered planets outside the solar system is a scientific topic that is rapidly spreading into the astrophysical and engineering communities. In this framework, the design of an innovative payload to detect exoplanets from a nano-sized space platform, like a 3U cubesat, is presented. The selected detection method is photometric transit, and the payload aims to detect flux decrements down to ~0.01% with a precision of 12 ppm. The payload design is also aimed at false positive recognition. The solution consists of a four-facets pyramid on the top of the payload, to allow for measurement redundancy and low-resolution spectral dispersion of the star images. The innovative concept is the use of a small and cheap platform for a relevant astronomical mission. The faintest observable target star has V-magnitude equal to 3.38. Despite missions aimed at ultra-precise photometry from microsatellites (e.g., MOST, BRITE), the transit of exoplanets orbiting very bright stars has not yet been surveyed photometrically from space, since any observation from a small/medium sized (30 cm optical aperture) telescope would saturate the detector. This cubesat mission can provide these missing measurements. This work is set up as a demonstrative project to verify the feasibility of the payload concept.

  19. A Cubesat Payload for Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzolino, M.; Accardo, D.; Rufino, G.; Oliva, E.; Tozzi, A.; Schipani, P.

    2017-03-01

    The search for undiscovered planets outside the solar system is a scientific topic that is rapidly spreading into the astrophysical and engineering communities. In this framework, the design of an innovative payload to detect exoplanets from a nano-sized space platform, like a 3U cubesat, is presented. The selected detection method is photometric transit, and the payload aims to detect flux decrements down to 0.01% with a precision of 12 ppm. The payload design is also aimed at false positive recognition. The solution consists of a four-facets pyramid on the top of the payload, to allow for measurement redundancy and low-resolution spectral dispersion of the star images. The innovative concept is the use of a small and cheap platform for a relevant astronomical mission. The faintest observable target star has V-magnitude equal to 3.38. Despite missions aimed at ultra-precise photometry from microsatellites (e.g., MOST, BRITE), the transit of exoplanets orbiting very bright stars has not yet been surveyed photometrically from space, since any observation from a small/medium sized (30 cm optical aperture) telescope would saturate the detector. This cubesat mission can provide these missing measurements. This work is set up as a demonstrative project to verify the feasibility of the payload concept.

  20. The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Paul; Runco, Susan; Fontanot, Carlos; Getteau, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) payload enables long-term experimentation of four, commercial-of-the-shelf (COTS) high definition video, cameras mounted on the exterior of the International Space Station. The payload enables testing of cameras in the space environment. The HDEV cameras transmit imagery continuously to an encoder that then sends the video signal via Ethernet through the space station for downlink. The encoder, cameras, and other electronics are enclosed in a box pressurized to approximately one atmosphere, containing dry nitrogen, to provide a level of protection to the electronics from the space environment. The encoded video format supports streaming live video of Earth for viewing online. Camera sensor types include charge-coupled device and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor. Received imagery data is analyzed on the ground to evaluate camera sensor performance. Since payload deployment, minimal degradation to imagery quality has been observed. The HDEV payload continues to operate by live streaming and analyzing imagery. Results from the experiment reduce risk in the selection of cameras that could be considered for future use on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. This paper discusses the payload development, end-to- end architecture, experiment operation, resulting image analysis, and future work.

  1. Close-up locker scene of material belonging to Payload specialist Neri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Close-up locker scene of materials belonging to Payload specialist Rodolfo Neri. Items include a Morelos satellite decal, the crest of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Neri's alma mater), and one of the plant experiments he monitored during the flight. The experiment at bottom frame is the Transportation of Nutrients in a Weightless Environment (TRANSPORT). A pair of scissors are on the locker and a pen floats above it.

  2. Astronauts Gardner and Allen during loading of Palapa B-2 in payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, in this frame, is the sole anchor for the top portion (and most of) the captured Palapa B-2 satellite. Astronaut Dale A. Gardner is on the other end as they load it into the payload bay. Note the difference between the two stinger devices stowed on the Challenger's port side (right side of frame). The one nearer the spacecraft's vertical stabilizer is spent. The one nearer the camera is still awaiting use.

  3. Performance Analysis of an Enhanced PRMA-HS Protocol for LEO Satellite Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Yong-ning; YAN Shao-hu; WU Shi-qi

    2005-01-01

    The packet reservation multiple access with hindering state (PRMA-HS) is a protocol suitable for LEO satellite mobile communication. Although working well with light system payload (amount of user terminals), the protocol imposes high channel congestion on system with heavy payload, thus degrades the system's quality of service. To controlling the channel congestion, a scheme of enhanced PRMA-HS protocol is proposed, which aims to reduce the collision of voice packets by adopting a mechanism of access control. Through theoretic analysis, the system's mathematic model is presented and the packet drop probability of the scheme is deduced. To testify the performance of the scheme, a simulation is performed and the results support our analysis.

  4. The benefits of China's efforts on gaseous pollutant control indicated by the bottom-up emissions and satellite observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of national policies of air pollution control, the emissions of SO2, NOX, CO and CO2 in China are estimated with a bottom-up method from 2000 to 2014, and vertical column densities (VCD) from satellite observation are used to evaluate the inter-annual trends and spatial distribution of emissions and the temporal and spatial patterns of ambient levels of gaseous pollutants across the country. In particular, an additional emission case named STD case, which combines the most recent issued emission standards for specific industrial sources, is developed for 2012-2014. The inter-annual trends in emissions and VCDs match well except for SO2, and the revised emissions in STD case improve the comparison, implying the benefits of emission control for most recent years. Satellite retrieval error, underestimation of emission reduction and improved atmospheric oxidization caused the differences between emissions and VCDs trend of SO2. Coal-fired power plants play key roles in SO2 and NOX emission reduction. As suggested by VCD and emission inventory, the control of CO in 11th five year plan (FYP) period was more effective than that in the 12th FYP period, while the SO2 appeared opposite. As the new control target added in 12th FYP, NOX emissions have been clearly decreased 4.3 Mt from 2011 to 2014, in contrast to the fast growth before 2011. The inter-annual trends in NO2 VCDs has the poorest correlation with vehicle ownership (R=0.796), due to the staged emission standard of vehicles. In developed regions, transportation has become the main pollutants emission source and we prove this by comparing VCDs of NO2 to VCDs of SO2. Moreover, air quality in mega cities has been evaluated based on satellite observation and emissions, and results indicate that Beijing suffered heavily from the emissions from Hebei and Tianjin, while the local emissions tend to dominate in Shanghai.

  5. TUBSAT-1, satellite technology for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginati, A.

    1988-01-01

    TUBSAT-1 (Technical University of Berlin Satellite) is an experimental low-cost satellite within the NASA Get Away Special (GAS) program. This project is being financed by the German BMFT (Federal Ministry for Research and Technology), mainly for student education. The dimensions and weight are determined by GAS requirements and the satellite will be ejected from the space shuttle into an approximately 300-km circular orbit. It is a sun/star oriented satellite with an additional spin stabilization mode. The first planned payload is to be used for observing flight paths of migratory birds from northern Europe to southern Africa and back.

  6. Simulation and Development of Improved Acoustic Damping Systems for Broadband Noise Attention in Payload Fairings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Nick

    2012-07-01

    RUAG Space specialise in payload fairings which must achieve set requirements for structural, jettisoning, mass and other functions and provide a safe acoustic environment for the satellite during launch. Protecting the satellite from acoustic induced vibration is achieved by a defined Noise Reduction spectrum performance, typically covering the 31 - 2000 Hz octave band frequency range. RUAG recently undertook an R&D program to optimise acoustic performance by i) understanding of the sound transmission mechanisms ii) modelling of fairing noise reduction iii) new acoustic treatments iv) reduction of sound leakage through vents v) combination of these elements in a possible future fairing design to assess the overall effectiveness at fairing system level.

  7. Approach to Spacelab Payload mission management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, H. G.; Lester, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The nucleus of the approach to Spacelab Payload mission management is the establishment of a single point of authority for the entire payload on a given mission. This single point mission manager will serve as a 'broker' between the individual experiments and the STS, negotiating agreements by two-part interaction. The payload mission manager, along with a small support team, will represent the users in negotiating use of STS accommodations. He will provide the support needed by each individual experimenter to meet the scientific, technological, and applications objectives of the mission with minimum cost and maximum efficiency. The investigator will assume complete responsibility for his experiment hardware definition and development and will take an active role in the integration and operation of his experiment.

  8. Mars MetNet Mission Payload Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Haukka, H.; Alexashkin, S.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.

    2012-09-01

    A new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is being developed in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission [1] is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide crucial scientific data about the Martian atmospheric phenomena.

  9. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  10. High Precision Orbit Determination of CHAMP Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qile; LIU Jingnan; GE Maorong

    2006-01-01

    The precision orbit determination of challenging minisatellite payload(CHAMP) satellite was done based on position and navigation data analyst(PANDA) software which is developed in Wuhan University, using the onboard GPS data of year 2002 from day 126 to 131. The orbit accuracy was assessed by analyzing the difference from GFZ post-processed science orbits (PSO), the GPS carrier and pseudo-range data residuals and the satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals.

  11. Multi-Band Multi-Tone Tunable Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer For Satellite Beacon Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone tunable millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a satellite beacon transmitter for radio wave propagation studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). In addition, the architecture for a compact beacon transmitter, which includes the multi-tone synthesizer, polarizer, horn antenna, and power/control electronics, has been investigated for a notional space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment payload on a small satellite. The above studies would enable the design of robust high throughput multi-Gbps data rate future space-to-ground satellite communication links.

  12. A Challenging Trio in Space 'Routine' Operations of the Swarm Satellite Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Frank-Jurgen; Clerigo, Ignacio; Albini, Giuseppe; Maleville, Laurent; Neto, Alessandro; Patterson, David; Nino, Ana Piris; Sieg, Detlef

    2016-08-01

    Swarm is the first ESA Earth Observation Mission with three satellites flying in a semi-controlled constellation. The trio is operated from ESA's satellite control centre ESOC in Darmstadt, Germany. The Swarm Flight Operations Segment consists of the typical elements of a satellite control system at ESOC, but had to be carefully tailored for this innovative mission. The main challenge was the multi-satellite system of Swarm, which necessitated the development of a Mission Control System with a multi-domain functionality, both in hardware and software and covering real-time and backup domains. This was driven by the need for extreme flexibility for constellation operations and parallel activities.The three months of commissioning in 2014 were characterized by a very tight and dynamically changing schedule of activities. All operational issues could be solved during that time, including the challenging orbit acquisition phase to achieve the final constellation.Although the formal spacecraft commissioning phase was concluded in spring 2014, the investigations for some payload instruments continue even today. The Electrical Field Instruments are for instance still being tested in order to characterize and improve science data quality. Various test phases also became necessary for the Accelerometers on the Swarm satellites. In order to improve the performance of the GPS Receivers for better scientific exploitation and to minimize the failures due to loss of synchronization, a number of parameter changes were commanded via on-board patches.Finally, to minimize the impact on operations, a new strategy had to be implemented to handle single/multi bit errors in the on-board mass Memories, defining when to ignore and when to restore the memory via a re-initialisation.The poster presentation summarizes the Swarm specific ground segment elements of the FOS and explains some of the extended payload commissioning operations, turning Swarm into a most demanding and challenging

  13. The Science Payload of the LOFT Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, Marco; den Herder, J.; van der Klis, M.;

    The scientific payload onboard the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing mission (LOFT, see presentation by P. Ray et al. at this meeting) is composed of two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m2 effective area in the primary energy range 2-30 keV, 1-deg collimated field of view) and the ...

  14. Versatile architectures for onboard payload signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, Karel Hubertus Gerardus

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a hardware fused-multiply-add floating point unit, called Sabrewing, which has properties that satisfy the needs for payload processing units. Sabrewing is BSD licensed and made in Europe such that it bypasses the export regulations of the USA. It combines floating-point and fix

  15. 14 CFR 1214.119 - Spacelab payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... flight (Ref. § 1214.119(d)(5)). (5) Shared-element flight (Ref. § 1214.119(d)(6)). (b) Definitions—(1... of customer-furnished Spacelab hardware. (l) Computation of sharing and pricing parameters—(1...) Definitions used in computations. (i) Lc=Chargeable payload length, m. The total length in the cargo...

  16. Smart and intelligent sensor payload project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Engineers working on the smart and intelligent sensor payload project include (l to r): Ed Conley (NASA), Mark Mitchell (Jacobs Technology), Luke Richards (NASA), Robert Drackett (Jacobs Technology), Mark Turowski (Jacobs Technology) , Richard Franzl (seated, Jacobs Technology), Greg McVay (Jacobs Technology), Brianne Guillot (Jacobs Technology), Jon Morris (Jacobs Technology), Stephen Rawls (NASA), John Schmalzel (NASA) and Andrew Bracey (NASA).

  17. Alternative trailer configurations for maximizing payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason D. Thompson; Dana Mitchell; John Klepac

    2017-01-01

    In order for harvesting contractors to stay ahead of increasing costs, it is imperative that they employ all options to maximize productivity and efficiency. Transportation can account for half the cost to deliver wood to a mill. Contractors seek to maximize truck payload to increase productivity. The Forest Operations Research Unit, Southern Research Station, USDA...

  18. Understanding satellite-based monthly-to-seasonal reservoir outflow estimation as a function of hydrologic controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnema, Matthew; Sikder, Safat; Miao, Yabin; Chen, Xiaodong; Hossain, Faisal; Ara Pervin, Ismat; Mahbubur Rahman, S. M.; Lee, Hyongki

    2016-05-01

    Growing population and increased demand for water is causing an increase in dam and reservoir construction in developing nations. When rivers cross international boundaries, the downstream stakeholders often have little knowledge of upstream reservoir operation practices. Satellite remote sensing in the form of radar altimetry and multisensor precipitation products can be used as a practical way to provide downstream stakeholders with the fundamentally elusive upstream information on reservoir outflow needed to make important and proactive water management decisions. This study uses a mass balance approach of three hydrologic controls to estimate reservoir outflow from satellite data at monthly and annual time scales: precipitation-induced inflow, evaporation, and reservoir storage change. Furthermore, this study explores the importance of each of these hydrologic controls to the accuracy of outflow estimation. The hydrologic controls found to be unimportant could potentially be neglected from similar future studies. Two reservoirs were examined in contrasting regions of the world, the Hungry Horse Reservoir in a mountainous region in northwest U.S. and the Kaptai Reservoir in a low-lying, forested region of Bangladesh. It was found that this mass balance method estimated the annual outflow of both reservoirs with reasonable skill. The estimation of monthly outflow from both reservoirs was however less accurate. The Kaptai basin exhibited a shift in basin behavior resulting in variable accuracy across the 9 year study period. Monthly outflow estimation from Hungry Horse Reservoir was compounded by snow accumulation and melt processes, reflected by relatively low accuracy in summer and fall, when snow processes control runoff. Furthermore, it was found that the important hydrologic controls for reservoir outflow estimation at the monthly time scale differs between the two reservoirs, with precipitation-induced inflow being the most important control for the Kaptai

  19. PRIMA: A new, competitive small satellite platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Claudio

    2000-03-01

    ASI, the Italian Space Agency, is going to finance a developing of a small satellite platforms production line called PRIMA (Piattaforma Riconfigurabile Italiana Multi-Applicativa) with Alenia Aerospazio partnership as Prime Contractor and sub-contractors preferably chosen within the Italian Space Industries. The main objective of the program is to develop a multi-mission, easily adaptable Platform for LEO orbits, allowing rapid, efficient and low cost bus for applicative and scientific missions. The Italian national space plan foresees for the enf of 2001 the build up of the Skymed/Cosmo constellation as applicative Earth observation program plus a number of small scientific spacecraft with a rate of 2 missions each three years. To fulfil these schedules, the PRIMA platform should complete its development and qualification program in order to be ready for the first unit (protoqualification flight) to interface the first payload (Science or Applicative). The intrinsic modularity of PRIMA should allow it to adapt itself to a large variety of missions in LEO orbits with minor modifications. The design will be conducted in order to get an advanced Platform able to meet a large set of missions, payloads and launcher specifications. The platform will be completed by a ground control centre adapted to the monitoring of PRIMA based satellites. PRIMA thus offers a very attractive alternative to large-scale missions in terms of costs and completion time. The paper will describe the technical aspects of PRIMA Platform, with particular emphasis put onto its flexibility and reconfigurability for different missions. The System and S/S architectures will also be presented and defined in view of selected mission cases. The AIV/AIT aspects will be discussed, with a discussion of the applicability of Globalstar™ approaches, facility and heritage. Finally, a brief overview of PRIMA first applications /SkyMed/COSMO and David) will be given.

  20. Nonlinear analysis and vibration suppression control for a rigid-flexible coupling satellite antenna system composed of laminated shell reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bin Di; Wen, Jian Min; Zhao, Yang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic modeling method for a rigid-flexible coupling satellite antenna system composed of laminated shell reflector is proposed undergoing a large overall motion. For the study of the characteristics of the reflector using laminated shell structure, the displacement field description of a point in a 3-noded shell element is acquired in conjunction with the length stretch, lateral bending and torsional deformation. Hence, a nonlinear dynamic model of the satellite antenna system is deduced based on Lagrange's equations. The complete expressions of nonlinear terms of elastic deformation and coupling terms between rigid motion and large deflection are considered in the dynamic equations, and the dynamic behavior of the rigid-flexible coupling system is analyzed using linear model and nonlinear model, respectively. In order to eliminate the system vibration, the PD with vibration force feedback control strategy is used to achieve its desired angles and velocity in a much shorter duration, and can further accomplish reduction of residual vibration. Then, the asymptotic stability of the system is proved based on the Lyapunov method. Through numerical computation, the results show that the linear model cannot capture the motion-induced coupling terms and geometric nonlinearity variations. However, the nonlinear model is suitable for dealing with large deformation rigid-flexible problem undergoing large overall motions. Hence, the satellite antenna pointing accuracy would be predicted based on the nonlinear model. Furthermore, the results also show that the proposed control strategy can suppress system vibration quickly. The above conclusions would have important academic significance and engineering value.

  1. A survey of load methodologies for shuttle orbiter payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. C.; Garba, J. A.; Salama, M.; Trubert, M.

    1981-01-01

    Loads methods currently being used to design planetary spacecraft to be launched on the shuttle orbiter are summarized. Experiences gained from expendable launch vehicle payloads are used to develop methodologies for the space shuttle orbiter payloads. The objectives for the development of a new methodology for the shuttle payloads are to reduce the cost and schedule for the payload load analysis by decoupling the payload analysis from the launch vehicle to the maximum extent possible. Methods are described for payload member load estimation or obtaining upper bounds for dynamic loads, as well as load prediction or calculating actual transient member load time histories.

  2. Amine Swingbed Payload Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The Amine Swingbed is an amine-based, vacuum-regenerated adsorption technology for removing carbon dioxide and humidity from a habitable spacecraft environment, and is the baseline technology for the Orion Program’s Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). It uses a pair of interleaved-layer beds filled with SA9T, the amine sorbent, and a linear multiball valve rotates 270° back and forth to control the flow of air and vacuum to adsorbing and desorbing beds. One bed adsorbs CO2 and H2O from cabin air while the other bed is exposed to vacuum for regeneration by venting the CO2 and H2O. The two beds are thermally linked, so no additional heating or cooling is required. The technology can be applied to habitable environments where recycling CO2 and H2O is not required such as short duration missions.

  3. The DeMi CubeSat: Wavefront Control with a MEMS Deformable Mirror in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Bendek, Eduardo; Marinan, Anne; Belikov, Ruslan; Merck, John; Cahoy, Kerri Lynn

    2017-01-01

    High-contrast imaging instruments on future space telescopes will require precise wavefront correction to detect small exoplanets near their host stars. High-actuator count microelectromechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirrors provide a compact form of wavefront control. The 6U DeMi CubeSat will demonstrate wavefront control with a MEMS deformable mirror over a yearlong mission. The payload includes both an internal laser source and a small telescope, with both focal plane and pupil plane sensing, for deformable mirror characterization. We detail the DeMi payload design, and describe future astrophysics enabled by high-actuator count deformable mirrors and small satellites.

  4. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  5. On-board Payload Data Processing from Earth to Space Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragni, M.; Abbattista, C.; Amoruso, L.; Cinquepalmi, L.; Bgongiari, F.; Errico, W.

    2013-09-01

    Matching the users application requirements with the more and more huge data streaming of the satellite missions is becoming very complex. But we need both of them. To face both the data management (memory availability) and their transmission (band availability) many recent R&D activities are studying the right way to move the data processing from the ground segment to the space segment by the development of the so-called On-board Payload Data Processing (OPDP). The space designer are trying to find new strategies to increase the on board computation capacity and its viability to overcome such limitations, memory and band, focusing the transmission of remote sensing information (not only data) towards their final use. Some typical applications which can benefit of the on board payload data processing include the automatic control of a satellites constellation which can modify its scheduled acquisitions directly on-board and according to the information extracted from the just acquired data, increasing, for example, the capability of monitoring a specific objective (such as oil spills, illegal traffic) with a greater versatility than a traditional ground segment workflow. The authors and their companies can count on a sound experience in design and development of open, modular and compact on-board processing systems. Actually they are involved in a program, the Space Payload Data Processing (SpacePDP) whose main objective is to develop an hardware and a software framework able to perform both the space mission standard tasks (sensors control, mass storage devices management, uplink and downlink) and the specific tasks required by each mission. SpacePDP is an Open and modular Payload Data Processing system, composed of Hardware and Software modules included a SDK. The whole system is characterised by flexible and customizable building blocks that form the system architectures and by a very easy way to be integrated in the missions by the SDK (a development

  6. Test of the Hipparcos payload in the Liege vacuum facility focal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamar, C.; Cucchiard, A.; Jamar, J.; Macau-Hercot, D.; Camus, J. P.; Dubet, D.; Macau, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The Liege thermal vacuum optical bench (FOCAL) was used to control the mechanical stability of the structure of the European Space Agency's HIPPARCOS astrometry payload. The payload is designed to measure angles of .001 arcsec between stars during 2.5 years and this accuracy can only be reached with the extreme stability of the device. The structure of the payload is made of carbon fiber; it is thermally stabilized with an accuracy of .01 degrees C. During the test, the payload is enclosed in a shell made of shrouds having a geometry close to the shading structure of the spacecraft. The shroud temperatures are defined by the conditions in orbit, e.g., the spacecraft is spinning in front of the Sun with a period of two hours and the temperature of the shrouds is cycled around the payload with a 2 hour period. In order to avoid disturbances by vibrations, the payload is put on an adapter interfaced with the optical bench and the seismic block; the shrouds are supported by a carrier with no direct interface with the table. This method avoids perturbances brought about by the cooling fluid of the shrouds.

  7. Pointing System for the Balloon-Borne Astronomical Payloads

    CERN Document Server

    Nirmal, K; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Suresh, Ambily; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle, or in areal photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  8. Pointing system for the balloon-borne astronomical payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, Kaipacheri; Sreejith, Aickara Gopinathan; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, Suresh; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-10-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 inertial measurement unit, and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle or in real photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  9. Assessment for Operator Confidence in Automated Space Situational Awareness and Satellite Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, J.; Voshell, M.; Sliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    The United States is highly dependent on space resources to support military, government, commercial, and research activities. Satellites operate at great distances, observation capacity is limited, and operator actions and observations can be significantly delayed. Safe operations require support systems that provide situational understanding, enhance decision making, and facilitate collaboration between human operators and system automation both in-the-loop, and on-the-loop. Joint cognitive systems engineering (JCSE) provides a rich set of methods for analyzing and informing the design of complex systems that include both human decision-makers and autonomous elements as coordinating teammates. While, JCSE-based systems can enhance a system analysts' understanding of both existing and new system processes, JCSE activities typically occur outside of traditional systems engineering (SE) methods, providing sparse guidance about how systems should be implemented. In contrast, the Joint Director's Laboratory (JDL) information fusion model and extensions, such as the Dual Node Network (DNN) technical architecture, provide the means to divide and conquer such engineering and implementation complexity, but are loosely coupled to specialized organizational contexts and needs. We previously describe how Dual Node Decision Wheels (DNDW) extend the DNN to integrate JCSE analysis and design with the practicalities of system engineering and implementation using the DNN. Insights from Rasmussen's JCSE Decision Ladders align system implementation with organizational structures and processes. In the current work, we present a novel approach to assessing system performance based on patterns occurring in operational decisions that are documented by JCSE processes as traces in a decision ladder. In this way, system assessment is closely tied not just to system design, but the design of the joint cognitive system that includes human operators, decision-makers, information systems, and

  10. ESPA Based Secondary Payload Orbit Maneuvering System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop/design an integrated propulsion, power, ACS, and separation module for secondary ESPA payloads. The standardized secondary payload...

  11. LISA Experience from GRACE-FO Optical Payload (LEGOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kirk

    arm-locking to be used on LISA. We will modify the LISA arm- locking controller for GRACE-FO mission parameters and perform a hardware-in-the- loop simulation. GRACE-FO is the planned follow-on to the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. In addition to the microwave link used to sense micron-level changes in the separation between a pair of satellites in a following orbit, GRACE-FO will include a 2-way laser link as a technology demonstrator package. LISA is a planned gravitational wave observatory consisting of three drag-free spacecraft arranged in an equilateral triangle with 5 million km separation in a heliocentric orbit. LISA will have three 2-way laser links to allow LISA to observe low frequency astrophysical and cosmological sources. Demonstration of inter-spacecraft interferometry using GRACE-FO has the potential to retire several of the highest-risk procedures for LISA and complements the drag-free performance technology demonstration of the LISA Pathfinder mission. Similarities between the GRACE-FO and LISA flight systems means we will not need to develop or deploy any new hardware to achieve this goal. Rather, we propose to develop algorithms that could be deployed on the existing GRACE-FO control and diagnostics system.

  12. Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS: an online service for near real-time satellite monitoring of volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Brenot

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions emit plumes of ash and gases in the atmosphere, potentially at very high altitudes. Ash rich plumes are hazardous for airplanes as ash is very abrasive and easily melts inside their engines. With more than 50 active volcanoes per year and the ever increasing number of commercial flights, the safety of airplanes is a real concern. Satellite measurements are ideal for monitoring global volcanic activity and, in combination with atmospheric dispersion models, to track and forecast volcanic plumes. Here we present the Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS, http://sacs.aeronomie.be, which is a free online service initiated by ESA for the near real-time (NRT satellite monitoring of volcanic plumes of SO2 and ash. It combines data from two UV-visible (OMI, GOME-2 and two infrared (AIRS, IASI spectrometers. This new multi-sensor warning system of volcanic plumes, running since April 2012, is based on the detection of SO2 and is optimised to avoid false alerts while at the same time limiting the number of notifications in case of large plumes. The system shows successful results with 95% of our notifications corresponding to true volcanic activity.

  13. The Science Payload of the LOFT Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, Marco; den Herder, J.; van der Klis, M.

    The scientific payload onboard the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing mission (LOFT, see presentation by P. Ray et al. at this meeting) is composed of two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m2 effective area in the primary energy range 2-30 keV, 1-deg collimated field of view) and the ......The scientific payload onboard the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing mission (LOFT, see presentation by P. Ray et al. at this meeting) is composed of two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m2 effective area in the primary energy range 2-30 keV, 1-deg collimated field of view...

  14. Improved Paintball Design and Alternative Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    wavelengths depending on the size and composition of the quantum dots (Bruchez et al., 1998). Cadmium selenide and lead selenide nanoparticles of 2-9 nm...markers. A Canon EOS Rebel modified with an X-Nite filter that blocks wavelengths below 750 nm was used to capture photographs in the near IR...Obscurant Payloads Carbon black was dispersed fairly well into vegetable oil. However, the carbon black settles out of solution within a few minutes

  15. VentureStar(tm) Payload Processing Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Susan

    1998-01-01

    The philosophy and the operations concept of the VentureStar(tm) payload processing system is presented. The goal of VentureStar(tm) operations is to provide low cost access to space. This is to be achieved through the design of the vehicle, and operability of the ground system. Specifically, this is to be accomplished through rapid turnaround cycles, increased launch rate, high system reliability and availability and reduced required operations personnel. This is presented in viewgraph format.

  16. Satellite assisted aerosol correlation in a sequestered CO2 leakage controlled site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.; Nakaema, Walter M.; de Medeiros, José A. G.; Moreira, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. For such task a mimetic sequestration site has been deployed in Florianopolis, Brazil, in order to verify the performance of monitoring plataforms to detect and quantify leakages of ground injected CO2, namely a Cavity Ring Down System (CRDS) - Los Gatos Research - an Eddy Covariance System (Campbell Scientific and Irgason) and meteorological tower for wind, humidity, precipitation and temperature monitoring onsite. The measurement strategy for detecting CO2 leakages can be very challenging since environmental and phytogenic influence can be very severe and play a role on determining if the values measured are unambiguous or not. One external factor to be considered is the amount of incoming solar radiation which will be the driving force for the whole experimental setup and following this reasoning the amount of aerosols in the atmospheric column can be a determinant factor influencing the experimental results. Thus the investigation of measured fluxes CO2 and its concentration with the aforementioned experimental instruments and their correlation with the aerosol data should be taken into account by means of satellite borne systems dedicated to measure aerosol vertical distribution and its optical properties, in this study we have selected CALIPSO and MODIS instrumentation to help on deriving the aerosol properties and CO2 measurements.

  17. Rheology of the Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Inferred from Satellite Radar Interferometry Data using an Inverse Control Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E.; Rignot, E.; Joughin, I.; Aubry, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet is surrounded by large floating ice shelves that spread under their own weight into the ocean. Ice shelf rigidity depends on ice temperature and fabrics, and is influenced by ice flow and the delicate balance between bottom and surface accumulation. Here, we use an inverse control method to infer the rigidity of the Ronne Ice Shelf that best matches observations of ice velocity from satellite radar interferometry. Ice rigidity, or flow law parameter B, is shown to vary between 300 and 900 kPa a(sup 1/3). Ice is softer along the side margins due to frictional heating, and harder along the outflow of large glaciers, which advect cold continental ice. Melting at the bottom surface of the ice shelf increases its rigidity, while freezing decreases it. Accurate numerical modelling of ice shelf flow must account for this spatial variability in mechanical characteristics.

  18. Rheology of the Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Inferred from Satellite Radar Interferometry Data using an Inverse Control Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E.; Rignot, E.; Joughin, I.; Aubry, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet is surrounded by large floating ice shelves that spread under their own weight into the ocean. Ice shelf rigidity depends on ice temperature and fabrics, and is influenced by ice flow and the delicate balance between bottom and surface accumulation. Here, we use an inverse control method to infer the rigidity of the Ronne Ice Shelf that best matches observations of ice velocity from satellite radar interferometry. Ice rigidity, or flow law parameter B, is shown to vary between 300 and 900 kPa a(sup 1/3). Ice is softer along the side margins due to frictional heating, and harder along the outflow of large glaciers, which advect cold continental ice. Melting at the bottom surface of the ice shelf increases its rigidity, while freezing decreases it. Accurate numerical modelling of ice shelf flow must account for this spatial variability in mechanical characteristics.

  19. Satellite communication antenna technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  20. Synchronized Position and Hold Reorient Experimental Satellites - International Space Station (SPHERES-ISS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Payload Systems Inc. (PSI) and the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL) propose an innovative research program entitled SPHERES-ISS that uses their satellite...

  1. Fractional order sliding mode control for tethered satellite deployment with disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Junjie; Zhu, Zheng H.; Wang, Wei; Li, Aijun; Wang, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a fractional order sliding mode control for the deployment of tethered space systems with the consideration of uncertainty of external disturbances and unmodeled system dynamics. The proposed fractional order sliding mode control consists of two sub-sliding manifolds that are defined separately for the actuated and unactuated states. This, in turn, generates a control scheme to make all states move toward to the desired states. The stability analysis of the proposed control law indicates not only all states converge to the desired states at equilibrium but also disturbances caused by the uncertainty can be suppressed satisfactorily. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the influences of fractional order and sub-sliding manifold of unactuated states on the performance of the proposed control law. The performance is compared with the sliding mode, PD and fractional order PD control laws for a baseline scenario of tether deployment. The proposed control law performs better than others in the settling time and the maximum pitch angle control in the presence of unwanted disturbances. Effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control law are demonstrated by computer simulations.

  2. Small satellite attitude control for sun-oriented operations utilizing a momentum bias with magnetic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott M.

    1995-03-01

    The feasibility of using a three axis control, momentum bias system with magnetic actuators for sun-oriented operations is explored. Relevant equations of motion are developed for a sun-oriented coordinate system and control laws are developed for initial spacecraft capture after launch vehicle separation; reorientation from Earth oriented to a sun oriented operations mode; sun-oriented attitude control; and momentum wheel control. Simulations demonstrating the stability and time responsiveness of the system are performed. Sensor noise input tests are performed to investigate the systems susceptibility to imperfect conditions. Cross product of inertia effects are also input to test for system instability.

  3. Exo-C: Mission and Science Payload Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Warfield, Keith; Unwin, Stephen C.; Exo-C Science; Technology Definition Team, Exo-C JPL Study Design Team

    2015-01-01

    We present NASA's Exoplanet Coronagraph (Exo-C) mission design and science payload completed as part of a probe-class concept study under consideration for launch following JWST. The payload consists of an unobscured Cassegrain telescope with a 1.4-m clear aperture, a barrel assembly, and an internal coronagraph instrument. The mission has a 3 year lifetime and is in a highly stable Earth-trailing orbit. The coronagraph instrument is mounted laterally on the anti-Sun side of the telescope, obviating the need for high incidence reflections and better isolating it from spacecraft disturbances. The instrument has both an Imaging Camera and an Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). The former obtains filter imaging with 1e-9 raw contrast from 2 - 20 λ/D in radius, while the IFS delivers the same contrast with spectral resolution of R = 70 from 450 to 1000 nm, but with a reduced outer working angle.The Exo-C science performance requirements are achieved with a specialized observatory design enabled by several new technologies. The telescope is designed for precision pointing and high stability to maintain a slowly evolving speckle pattern. Vibration isolation is achieved with two stages between the reaction wheels and the science payload. The solar arrays and high gain antenna are body-fixed, and a stiff barrel assembly is used as the telescope metering structure. Telescope pointing is updated at a high rate by monitoring the bright science target star with a low order wavefront sensor and driving a fine steering mirror for compensation. Active thermal control is used to minimize thermal drifts of the telescope, instrument, and barrel assemblies. Stability analyses via modeling of the structural, thermal, and optical performance of this configuration show that the proposed mission configuration would enable unprecedented exoplanet and circumstellar disk science with direct imaging.

  4. Attitude control system design and on-orbit performance analysis of nano-satellite--‘‘Tian Tuo 1’’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Dechao; Sheng Tao; Cao Lu; Chen Xiaoqian; Zhao Yong

    2014-01-01

    ‘‘Tian Tuo 1’’ (TT-1) nano-satellite is the first single-board nano-satellite that was suc-cessfully launched in China. The main objective of TT-1 is technology demonstration and scientific measurements. The satellite carries out the significant exploration of single-board architecture fea-sibility validation, and it is tailored to the low-cost philosophy by adopting numerous commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The satellite is featured with three-axis stabilization control capability. A pitch bias momentum wheel and three magnetic coils are adopted as control actuators. The sun sensors, magnetometers and a three-axis gyro are employed as the measurement sensors. The quaternion estimator (QUEST) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) method are adopted for the nano-satellite attitude determination. On-orbit data received by ground station is conducted to analysis the performance of attitude determination and control system (ADCS). The results show that the design of ADCS for TT-1 is suitable, robust and feasible.

  5. Satellite orbital conjunction reports assessing threatening encounters in space (SOCRATES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, T. S.; Alfano, S.

    2006-05-01

    While many satellite operators are aware of the possibility of a collision between their satellite and another object in earth orbit, most seem unaware of the frequency of near misses occurring each day. Until recently, no service existed to advise satellite operators of an impending conjunction of a satellite payload with another satellite, putting the responsibility for determining these occurrences squarely on the satellite operator's shoulders. This problem has been further confounded by the lack of a timely, comprehensive data set of satellite orbital element sets and computationally efficient tools to provide predictions using industry-standard software. As a result, hundreds of conjunctions within 1 km occur each week, with little or no intervention, putting billions of dollars of space hardware at risk, along with their associated missions. As a service to the satellite operator community, the Center for Space Standards & Innovation (CSSI) offers SOCRATES-Satellite Orbital Conjunction Reports Assessing Threatening Encounters in Space. Twice each day, CSSI runs a list of all satellite payloads on orbit against a list of all objects on orbit using the catalog of all unclassified NORAD two-line element sets to look for conjunctions over the next seven days. The runs are made using STK/CAT-Satellite Tool Kit's Conjunction Analysis Tools-together with the NORAD SGP4 propagator in STK. This paper will discuss how SOCRATES works and how it can help satellite operators avoid undesired close approaches through advanced mission planning.

  6. Attitude control system of the Delfi-n3Xt satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, J.; Choukroun, D.

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development of the attitude control algorithms that will be implemented on board of the Delfi-n3xt nanosatellite, which is to be launched in 2013. One of the mission objectives is to demonstrate Sun pointing and three axis stabilization. The attitude control modes and

  7. Real-time RMS active damping augmentation: Heavy and very light payload evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Flueckiger, Karl W.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1994-01-01

    Controls-Structures Integration Technology has been applied to the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to improve on-orbit performance. The objective was to actively damp undesired oscillatory motions of the RMS following routine payload maneuvering and Shuttle attitude control thruster firings. Simulation of active damping was conducted in the real-time, man-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The simulator was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on active damping performance from astronaut operators. Using a simulated three-axis accelerometer mounted on the RMS, 'sensed' vibration motions were used to generate joint motor commands that reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the RMS with heavy and light attached payloads was demonstrated in this study. Five astronaut operators examined the performance of active damping following operator commanded RMS maneuvers and Shuttle thruster firings. Noticeable improvements in the damping response of the RMS with the heavy, Hubble Space Telescope payload and the very light, astronaut in Manipulator Foot Restraint payload were observed. The potential of active damping to aid in precisely maneuvering payloads was deemed significant.

  8. A new vibration mechanism of balancing machine for satellite-borne spinning rotors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiuxiao; Wang Fei

    2014-01-01

    The centrifugal force and overturning moment generated by satellite-borne rotating pay-load have a significant impact on the stability of on-orbit satellite attitude, which must be controlled to the qualified range. For the satellite-borne rotors’ low working revs and large centroidal devia-tion and height, and that the horizontal vibration produced by centrifugal force is not of the same magnitude as the torsional vibration by overturning moment, the balancing machine’s measurement accuracy is low. Analysis shows that the mixture of horizontal vibration and torsional vibration of the vibrational mechanism contribute mainly to the machine’s performance, as well as the instabil-ity of vibration center position. A vibrational mechanism was put forward, in which the horizontal and torsional vibration get separated effectively by way of fixing the vibration center. From exper-imental results, the separation between the weak centrifugal force signal and the strong moment sig-nal was realized, errors caused by unstable vibration center are avoided, and the balancing machine based on this vibration structure is able to meet the requirements of dynamic balancing for the satel-lite’s rotating payloads in terms of accuracy and stability.

  9. A new vibration mechanism of balancing machine for satellite-borne spinning rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiuxiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The centrifugal force and overturning moment generated by satellite-borne rotating payload have a significant impact on the stability of on-orbit satellite attitude, which must be controlled to the qualified range. For the satellite-borne rotors’ low working revs and large centroidal deviation and height, and that the horizontal vibration produced by centrifugal force is not of the same magnitude as the torsional vibration by overturning moment, the balancing machine’s measurement accuracy is low. Analysis shows that the mixture of horizontal vibration and torsional vibration of the vibrational mechanism contribute mainly to the machine’s performance, as well as the instability of vibration center position. A vibrational mechanism was put forward, in which the horizontal and torsional vibration get separated effectively by way of fixing the vibration center. From experimental results, the separation between the weak centrifugal force signal and the strong moment signal was realized, errors caused by unstable vibration center are avoided, and the balancing machine based on this vibration structure is able to meet the requirements of dynamic balancing for the satellite’s rotating payloads in terms of accuracy and stability.

  10. Swing-attenuation for a quadrotor transporting a cable-suspended payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, M Eusebia; Mercado-Ravell, D Alberto; Lozano, Rogelio; García-Beltrán, C Daniel

    2017-02-13

    This paper presents the problem of safe and fast transportation of packages by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) kind quadrotor. A mathematical model and a control strategy for a special class of underactuated mechanical systems, composed of a quadrotor transporting a cable-suspended payload, are proposed. The Euler-Lagrange formulation is used to obtain the dynamic model of the system, where the integrated dynamics of the quadrotor, cable and payload are considered. An Interconnection and Damping Assignment-Passivity Based Control (IDA-PBC) is chosen because of its inherent robustness against parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. Two cases are considered to obtain two different control laws, in the first case, the designed control law depends on the swing angle of the payload, in the second case the control law does not depend on it. The control objective is to transport the payload from point to point, with swing reduction along trajectory. Experimental results using monocular vision based navigation are shown to evaluate the proposed control law.

  11. Demonstration of a Plug and Play Approach to Satellite Thermal Control System Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mainstream is proposing a methodology to reduce the development time and cost, and improve the reliability of future thermal control systems for the next decade of...

  12. Finite-Time Control for Attitude Tracking Maneuver of Rigid Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finite-time control for attitude tracking maneuver of a rigid spacecraft is investigated. External disturbance, unknown inertia parameters are addressed. As stepping stone, a sliding mode controller is designed. It requires the upper bound of the lumped uncertainty including disturbance and inertia matrix. However, this upper bound may not be easily obtained. Therefore, an adaptive sliding mode control law is then proposed to release that drawback. Adaptive technique is applied to estimate that bound. It is proved that the closed-loop attitude tracking system is finite-time stable. The tracking errors of the attitude and the angular velocity are asymptotically stabilized. Moreover, the upper bound on the lumped uncertainty can be exactly estimated in finite time. The attitude tracking performance with application of the control scheme is evaluated through a numerical example.

  13. Smartphone qualification & linux-based tools for CubeSat computing payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, C. P.; Yeomans, B.; Iacopino, C.; Frame, T. E.; Schofield, A.; Kenyon, S.; Sweeting, M. N.

    Modern computers are now far in advance of satellite systems and leveraging of these technologies for space applications could lead to cheaper and more capable spacecraft. Together with NASA AMES's PhoneSat, the STRaND-1 nanosatellite team has been developing and designing new ways to include smart-phone technologies to the popular CubeSat platform whilst mitigating numerous risks. Surrey Space Centre (SSC) and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) have led in qualifying state-of-the-art COTS technologies and capabilities - contributing to numerous low-cost satellite missions. The focus of this paper is to answer if 1) modern smart-phone software is compatible for fast and low-cost development as required by CubeSats, and 2) if the components utilised are robust to the space environment. The STRaND-1 smart-phone payload software explored in this paper is united using various open-source Linux tools and generic interfaces found in terrestrial systems. A major result from our developments is that many existing software and hardware processes are more than sufficient to provide autonomous and operational payload object-to-object and file-based management solutions. The paper will provide methodologies on the software chains and tools used for the STRaND-1 smartphone computing platform, the hardware built with space qualification results (thermal, thermal vacuum, and TID radiation), and how they can be implemented in future missions.

  14. E-sail test payload of ESTCube-1 nanosatellite

    CERN Document Server

    Envall, Jouni; Toivanen, Petri; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Ilbis, Erik; Kalde, Jaanus; Averin, Matis; Kuuste, Henri; Laizans, Kaspars; Allik, Viljo; Rauhala, Timo; Seppänen, Henri; Kiprich, Sergiy; Ukkonen, Jukka; Haeggström, Edward; Kalvas, Taneli; Tarvainen, Olli; Kauppinen, Janne; Nuottajärvi, Antti; Koivisto, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    The scientific mission of ESTCube-1, launched in May 2013, is to measure the Electric solar wind sail (E-sail) force in orbit. The experiment is planned to push forward the development of E-sail, a propulsion method recently invented at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. E-sail is based on extracting momentum from the solar wind plasma flow by using long thin electrically charged tethers. ESTCube-1 is equipped with one such tether, together with hardware capable of deploying and charging it. At the orbital altitude of ESTCube-1 (660--680~km) there is no solar wind present. Instead, ESTCube-1 shall observe the interaction between the charged tether and the ionospheric plasma. The ESTCube-1 payload uses a 10-meter, partly two-filament E-sail tether and a motorized reel on which it is stored. The tether shall be deployed from a spinning satellite with the help of centrifugal force. An additional mass is added at the tip of the tether to assist with the deployment. During E-sail experiment the tether shall be ...

  15. Benefits of hosted payload architectures for improved GEO SSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallado, D.; Lowe, J.; Anderson, J.

    2011-09-01

    Maintaining a precise catalog of objects in and near the GEO belt is difficult for a variety of reasons. Optical Hosted Payloads (HP) on commercial satellites have been suggested as a solution to provide accurate, persistent catalog updates to augment existing data or even relieve schedule burden on traditional tracking systems. However, significant questions remain about what architecture requirements are necessary for stable orbit determination solutions, accuracy improvements over traditional tracking systems, and optimal catalog coverage. System trades are performed using COTS software to determine the influence of number, frequency, and accuracy of observations on orbit solution stability and uncertainty. System configurations are also evaluated against catalog coverage metrics such as number and percent of objects observed, number of tracks per day, and revisit times. Initial results show that some assumed configurations can produce stable, accurate orbit solutions for most of the catalog in and near GEO. Fusing observations from HP sensors with traditional ground data may yield dramatic improvements in positional uncertainty of one to two orders of magnitude, often with multiple observations each day.

  16. Laser altimeter of CE-1 payloads system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The design and operation of the Laser Altimeter of CE-1 Payloads System are presented in this paper.The paper includes the design of the system and spacecraft-level laser,the description of the emitting-system and receiving system,and the testing of the laser altimeter.The CE-1 laser altimeter is the first Chinese deep-space probe using a laser.It has one beam and operates at 1 Hz,with a nominal accuracy of 5 m.The laser altimeter has operated successfully in lunar orbit since November 28,2007.It has obtained 9120 thousand data values about the lunar altitude.

  17. Mars MetNet Mission Payload Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, H.; Harri, A.-M.; Alexashkin, S.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.

    2012-04-01

    A new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is being developed in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The main idea behind the MetNet landing vehicles is to use a state-of-the-art inflatable entry and descent system instead of rigid heat shields and parachutes as earlier semi-hard landing devices have used. This way the ratio of the payload mass to the overall mass is optimized and more mass and volume resources are spared for the science payload. The vehicle decelerates its entry speed using the inflatable structure and final landing sequence includes a cone headed body penetrating the Martian soil. It is planned to deploy several tens of MNLs on the Martian surface operating at least partly at the same time to allow meteorological network science. The payload of the two MNL precursor models includes the following instruments: Atmospheric instruments: - Pressure device (MetBaro): mass 100g, measurement range 0..1015 hPa. - Humidity device (MetHumi): mass 15g, measurement range 0..100%RH. - Temperature sensors (MetTemp): mass 2g each, measurement range -110C..+30C. Optical devices: - Panoramic camera (PanCam): mass 100g, FOV 4 lenses mounted at 90 deg - Solar irradiance sensor (MetSIS) with optical wireless system (OWLS) for data transfer: mass 115g (MetSIS) and 7g (OWLS module), wavelength range 190..1100nm. MetSIS equipped with 28 optical detectors, two temperature sensors and two solar incidence angle detectors. - Dust sensor (DS): mass 42g, resolution: 10 particles / cm3. Composition and structure device: - Magnetometer (MOURA): mass 80g, measurement range: ±30uT. MetNet Mission payload instruments are specially designed to operate in very low power conditions. MNL flexible solar panels provides a total of

  18. 基于Simulink仿真的用户星天线控制系统分析%Analysis of Simulink-based antenna control system on user satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙甲禄; 闫剑虹

    2012-01-01

    To meet the need of the antenna pointing accuracy of data relay satellite system, the antenna pointing control concept is described, and the establishment process of the link between the user satellite and data relay satellite is analyzed. A scheme for satelite-borne autonomous control is designed, A mathematic simulation of the antenna pointing control system is conducted under the Simulink circumstance. The tracking performance of the antenna control system on the user satellite is verified by the analysis of the simulation results.%为满足中继卫星系统对天线指向精度的要求,首先描述了天线指向控制概念,对用户星与中继卫星星间链路的建立过程进行了分析,并且设计了星上自主控制方案,在Simulink环境下对所设计的天线指向控制系统进行了数学仿真,最后通过对仿真结果的分析验证了用户星天线控制系统的跟踪性能.

  19. Domestic Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  20. Attitude and vibration control of a satellite containing flexible solar arrays by using reaction wheels, and piezoelectric transducers as sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Ijar M.; Rade, Domingos A.; Goes, Luiz C. S.; de Paula Sales, Thiago

    2017-10-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide insight into control-structure interaction for satellites comprising flexible appendages and internal moving components. The physical model considered herein aiming to attend such purpose is a rigid-flexible satellite consisting of a rigid platform containing two rotating flexible solar panels. The solar panels rotation is assumed to be in a sun-synchronous configuration mode. The panels contain surface-bonded piezoelectric patches that can be used either as sensors for the elastic displacements or as actuators to counteract the vibration motion. It is assumed that in the normal mode operation the satellite platform points towards the Earth while the solar arrays rotate so as to follow the Sun. The vehicle moves in a low Earth polar orbit. The technique used to obtain the mathematical model combines the Lagrangian formulation with the Finite Elements Method used to describe the dynamics of the solar panel. The gravity-gradient torque as well as the torque due to the interaction of the Earth magnetic field and the satellite internal residual magnetic moment is included as environmental perturbations. The actuators are three reaction wheels for attitude control and piezoelectric actuators to control the flexible motion of the solar arrays. Computer simulations are performed using the MATLAB® software package. The following on-orbit satellite operating configurations are object of analysis: i) Satellite pointing towards the Earth (Earth acquisition maneuver) by considering the initial conditions in the elastic displacement equal to zero, aiming the assessment of the flexible modes excitation by the referred maneuver; ii) the satellite pointing towards the Earth with the assumption of an initial condition different from zero for the flexible motion such that the attitude alterations are checked against the elastic motion disturbance; and iii) attitude acquisition accomplished by taking into account initial conditions

  1. Measurements by Mail: Satellite-Controlled Balloons for Making Real-Time Atmospheric Observations Anywhere on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    While most of the atmosphere is only a few tens of kilometers overhead, gaining access to this critical region of the earth system is notoriously difficult. Aircraft have been highly successful as atmospheric research platforms but their use can be limited by high costs, complex logistics, and need for ground-support infrastructure. While small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) carry far fewer instruments, they promise to overcome some of these limitations, especially if regulatory and air safety issues can be resolved. Here we describe five years of development on a new type of unmanned platform that can be flown with far fewer restrictions than current UAS. This altitude-controlled balloon can be mailed to collaborators almost anywhere in the world, launched within hours, and flown remotely from our laboratory via satellite link. It can be commanded to perform soundings, track atmospheric layers, or navigate divergent wind fields over periods ranging from days to potentially weeks; meteorological and chemical observations from the balloon are processed on the ground and distributed via the internet in near real time. These controlled balloons have been used in several recent atmospheric research campaigns and are now providing new possibilities for long-distance collaboration, low-cost deployments, and research in previously inaccessible parts of the lower atmosphere.

  2. Evaluation and modeling of autonomous attitude thrust control for the Geostation Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcey, W.; Minnie, C. R.; Defazio, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 experienced a series of orbital perturbations from autonomous attitude control thrusting before perigee raising maneuvers. These perturbations influenced differential correction orbital state solutions determined by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS). The maneuvers induced significant variations in the converged state vector for solutions using increasingly longer tracking data spans. These solutions were used for planning perigee maneuvers as well as initial estimates for orbit solutions used to evaluate the effectiveness of the perigee raising maneuvers. This paper discusses models for the incorporation of attitude thrust effects into the orbit determination process. Results from definitive attitude solutions are modeled as impulsive thrusts in orbit determination solutions created for GOES-8 mission support. Due to the attitude orientation of GOES-8, analysis results are presented that attempt to absorb the effects of attitude thrusting by including a solution for the coefficient of reflectivity, C(R). Models to represent the attitude maneuvers are tested against orbit determination solutions generated during real-time support of the GOES-8 mission. The modeling techniques discussed in this investigation offer benefits to the remaining missions in the GOES NEXT series. Similar missions with large autonomous attitude control thrusting, such as the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft and the INTELSAT series, may also benefit from these results.

  3. Explosive vapor detection payload for small robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Phil J.; Pettit, Michael; Wetzel, John P.; Haas, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Detection of explosive hazards is a critical component of enabling and improving operational mobility and protection of US Forces. The Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) developed by the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) is addressing this challenge for dismounted soldiers. Under the AMDS program, ARA has developed a vapor sampling system that enhances the detection of explosive residues using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors. The Explosives Hazard Trace Detection (EHTD) payload is designed for plug-and-play installation and operation on small robotic platforms, addressing critical Army needs for more safely detecting concealed or exposed explosives in areas such as culverts, walls and vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development, robotic integration and performance of the explosive vapor sampling system, which consists of a sampling "head," a vapor transport tube and an extendable "boom." The sampling head and transport tube are integrated with the boom, allowing samples to be collected from targeted surfaces up to 7-ft away from the robotic platform. During sample collection, an IR lamp in the sampling head is used to heat a suspected object/surface and the vapors are drawn through the heated vapor transport tube to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection. The EHTD payload is capable of quickly (less than 30 seconds) detecting explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX at nanogram levels on common surfaces (brick, concrete, wood, glass, etc.).

  4. A global network for the control of snail-borne disease using satellite surveillance and geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, J B; Bergquist, N R; Huh, O K; Bavia, M E; Bernardi, M; El Bahy, M M; Fuentes, M V; Kristensen, T K; McCarroll, J C; Yilma, J M; Zhou, X N

    2001-04-27

    At a team residency sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation in Bellagio, Italy, 10-14 April 2000 an organizational plan was conceived to create a global network of collaborating health workers and earth scientists dedicated to the development of computer-based models that can be used for improved control programs for schistosomiasis and other snail-borne diseases of medical and veterinary importance. The models will be assembled using GIS methods, global climate model data, sensor data from earth observing satellites, disease prevalence data, the distribution and abundance of snail hosts, and digital maps of key environmental factors that affect development and propagation of snail-borne disease agents. A work plan was developed for research collaboration and data sharing, recruitment of new contributing researchers, and means of access of other medical scientists and national control program managers to GIS models that may be used for more effective control of snail-borne disease. Agreement was reached on the use of compatible GIS formats, software, methods and data resources, including the definition of a 'minimum medical database' to enable seamless incorporation of results from each regional GIS project into a global model. The collaboration plan calls for linking a 'central resource group' at the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, Louisiana State University and the Danish Bilharziasis Laboratory with regional GIS networks to be initiated in Eastern Africa, Southern Africa, West Africa, Latin America and Southern Asia. An Internet site, www.gnosisGIS.org, (GIS Network On Snail-borne Infections with special reference to Schistosomiasis), has been initiated to allow interaction of team members as a 'virtual research group'. When completed, the site will point users to a toolbox of common resources resident on computers at member organizations, provide assistance on routine use of GIS health maps in selected national disease control

  5. The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of Endeavour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The first U.S. element of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. The mission is expected to last nearly 12 days, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 14.

  6. A logic-gated nanorobot for targeted transport of molecular payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Shawn M; Bachelet, Ido; Church, George M

    2012-02-17

    We describe an autonomous DNA nanorobot capable of transporting molecular payloads to cells, sensing cell surface inputs for conditional, triggered activation, and reconfiguring its structure for payload delivery. The device can be loaded with a variety of materials in a highly organized fashion and is controlled by an aptamer-encoded logic gate, enabling it to respond to a wide array of cues. We implemented several different logical AND gates and demonstrate their efficacy in selective regulation of nanorobot function. As a proof of principle, nanorobots loaded with combinations of antibody fragments were used in two different types of cell-signaling stimulation in tissue culture. Our prototype could inspire new designs with different selectivities and biologically active payloads for cell-targeting tasks.

  7. An Overview Of Operational Satellites Built By China:Communications Satellites (Part 2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong He

    2009-01-01

    @@ INNOVATIVE GENERATION: THE DFH-4 PLATFORM AND SATELLITES The DFH-4 platform is the third generation of China-built large geostationary satellite platform with large output power,payload capacity and long service lifetime.Its overall performance ranks with other international advanced satellite platforms.This platform can be used for many services such as high capacity broadcast communication,direct TV broadcasting,digital audio broadcasting and broadband multimedia,which are badly needed for national economic construction and markets both at home and abroad.The platform also has effective technologies that can ensure the security of information transmission.

  8. Complexity in Climatic Controls on Plant Species Distribution: Satellite Data Reveal Unique Climate for Giant Sequoia in the California Sierra Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Eric Kindseth

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTComplexity in Climatic Controls on Plant Species Distribution: Satellite Data Reveal Unique Climate for Giant Sequoia in the California Sierra NevadabyEric Kindseth WallerDoctor of Philosophy in Environmental Science, Policy, and ManagementUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Dennis D. Baldocchi, ChairA better understanding of the environmental controls on current plant species distribution is essential if the impacts of such diverse challenges as invasive species, changing fir...

  9. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is intended to provide investigators in several biological disciplines with a relatively inexpensive method to access space for up to 60 days with eventual recovery on Earth. The RRS will permit totally intact, relatively soft, recovery of the vehicle, system refurbishment, and reflight with new and varied payloads. The RRS is to be capable of three reflights per year over a 10-year program lifetime. The RRS vehicle will have a large and readily accessible volume near the vehicle center of gravity for the Payload Module (PM) containing the experiment hardware. The vehicle is configured to permit the experimenter late access to the PM prior to launch and rapid access following recovery. The RRS will operate in one of two modes: (1) as a free-flying spacecraft in orbit, and will be allowed to drift in attitude to provide an acceleration environment of less than 10(exp -5) g. the acceleration environment during orbital trim maneuvers will be less than 10(exp -3) g; and (2) as an artificial gravity system which spins at controlled rates to provide an artificial gravity of up to 1.5 Earth g. The RRS system will be designed to be rugged, easily maintained, and economically refurbishable for the next flight. Some systems may be designed to be replaced rather than refurbished, if cost effective and capable of meeting the specified turnaround time. The minimum time between recovery and reflight will be approximately 60 days. The PMs will be designed to be relatively autonomous, with experiments that require few commands and limited telemetry. Mass data storage will be accommodated in the PM. The hardware development and implementation phase is currently expected to start in 1991 with a first launch in late 1993.

  10. Operating project for the Renardieres Power Laboratory: System structure. Acquisition and control satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnet, D. (GIXI, 91 - Les Ulis (France))

    The principles and the construction of the new operating system for the Power Test Laboratory are presented. Emphasis is laid on the similarity between the project and Architecture 3 type remote operation systems, the electromagnetic disturbance and high safety level aspects and the utilization of microcomputers. After a presentation of the basic principles, modularity, standartization, safety, surroundings and maintenance, the article offers an explanation of the checking system structure, constituted by a central core and a network of industrial computers (SAC). These latter are described from the point of view of operations (remote-signalling, remote-control, remote-measurements, subsidiary functions), equipment structure (central processing unit, input and output boards) and reflections on the software (design, implementation, etc.).

  11. Vibration and acoustic environments for payload/cargo integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R. E.; Coody, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Shuttle orbiter launch vibration and acoustic environments for cargo bay/payload interfaces are predicted. Data acquired during Shuttle flight tests are compared with the preflight estimates. Vibration response data for payload attachment locations are presented, along with acoustic data in the form of noise-level spectra measured at various locations in the cargo bay and space averages of the noise levels. It is shown that the payload-bay vibration and acoustic environments are generally less severe than predicted.

  12. A combined data and power management infrastructure for small satellites

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 the need for a suitable onboard computer design arose for the small satellite project at the Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, Germany. It had to meet the constraints imposed by the small satellite (a 130 kg CubeSat) with its full featured ACS, diverse payloads and full CCSDS telecommand and telemetry standard compliance. The design of the Onboard Computer system lead to a functional merging between onboard computer components and the satellite's Power Control and Distribution Unit, resulting in a very innovative solution – the so-called Combined Data and Power Management Infrastructure. The technical implementation of such a design was achieved with the support of an international industry partner consortium consisting of Astrium GmbH, Aeroflex Colorado Springs Inc., 4Links Ltd., Aeroflex Gaisler AB, Vectronic Aerospace GmbH and HEMA Kabeltechnik GmbH & Co. KG. At end of the flight unit's development the consortium decided to provide a single consistent documentation of the d...

  13. Mission-Aware Payloads for Unmanned Platforms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sentix and Brigham Young University propose the research and development of embedded payload intelligence for inflight optimization of surveillance, reconnaissance,...

  14. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  15. Innovative power management, attitude determination and control tile for CubeSat standard NanoSatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Anwar; Mughal, M. Rizwan; Ali, Haider; Reyneri, Leonardo

    2014-03-01

    Electric power supply (EPS) and attitude determination and control subsystem (ADCS) are the most essential elements of any aerospace mission. Efficient EPS and precise ADCS are the core of any spacecraft mission. So keeping in mind their importance, they have been integrated and developed on a single tile called CubePMT module. Modular power management tiles (PMTs) are already available in the market but they are less efficient, heavier in weight, consume more power and contain less number of subsystems. Commercial of the shelf (COTS) components have been used for CubePMT implementation which are low cost and easily available from the market. CubePMT is developed on the design approach of AraMiS architecture: a project developed at Politecnico di Torino that provides low cost and higher performance space missions with dimensions larger than CubeSats. The feature of AraMiS design approach is its modularity. These modules can be reused for multiple missions which helps in significant reduction of the overall budget, development and testing time. One has just to reassemble the required subsystems to achieve the targeted specific mission.

  16. Development of in-orbit refocusing mechanism for SpaceEye-1 electro-optical payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minwoo; Kim, Jongun; Chang, Jin-Soo; Kang, Myung-Seok

    2016-09-01

    SpaceEye-1 earth observation satellite, developed by Satrec Initiative Co. Ltd., is a 300 kg scale spacecraft with high resolution electro-optical payload (EOS-D) which performs 1 m GSD, 12 km swath in low earth orbit. Metering structure of EOS-D is manufactured with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Due to the moisture emission from CFRP metering structure, this spaceborne electro-optical payload undergoes shrinkage after orbit insertion. The shrinkage of metering structure causes change of the distance between primary and secondary mirror. In order to compensate the moisture shrinkage effect, two types of thermal refocusing mechanism were developed, analyzed and applied to EOS-D. Thermal analysis simulating in-orbit thermal condition and thermo-elastic displacement analysis was conducted to calculate the performance of refocusing mechanism. For each EOS-D telescope, analytical refocusing range (displacement change between primary and secondary mirror) was 2.5 um and 3.6 um. Thus, the refocusing mechanism can compensate the dimensional instability of metering structure caused by moisture emission. Furthermore, modal, static and wavefront error analysis was conducted in order to evaluate natural frequency, structural stability and optical performance. As a result, it can be concluded that the refocusing system of EOS-D payload can perform its function in orbit.

  17. Basic Electronic Design for Proposed NMSU Hitchhiker Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the bas'c hardware design developed by the EE 499 class during the spring semester of the 1999-2000 academic year. This design covers the electrical components to supply power to the experiments, the computer software and interfaces to control the experiments, and the ground data processing to provide an operator interface. This document is a follow-on to the Payload Mission description document and the System Requirements document developed during the EE 498 class during the fall semester. The design activities are broken down by functional area within the structure. For each area, we give the requirements that need to be met and the design to meet the requirements. For each of these areas, a prototype selection of hardware and/or software was done by the class and the components assembled as part of the class to verify that they worked as intended.

  18. Vibration Isolation Design for the Micro-X Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danowski, M. E.; Heine, S. N. T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Goldfinger, D.; Wikus, P.; McCammon, D.; Oakley, P.

    2016-08-01

    Micro-X is a NASA-funded sounding rocket-borne X-ray imaging spectrometer designed to enable high precision measurements of extended astrophysical systems. To perform high energy resolution measurements and capture unprecedented spectra of supernova remnants and galaxy clusters, Micro-X must maintain tight temperature control. One of the biggest challenges in payload design is to prevent heating of the detectors due to the vibrational loads on the rocket skin during launch. Several stages of vibration damping systems are implemented to prevent energy transmission from the rocket skin to the detector stage, each stage more rigid than the last. We describe recent redesign efforts to improve this vibration isolation by tuning the resonant frequencies of the various stages to minimize heating prior to the projected launch in 2016.

  19. Overview of the New Horizons Science Payload

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, H A; Tapley, M B; Young, L A; Stern, S A

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons mission was launched on 2006 January 19, and the spacecraft is heading for a flyby encounter with the Pluto system in the summer of 2015. The challenges associated with sending a spacecraft to Pluto in less than 10 years and performing an ambitious suite of scientific investigations at such large heliocentric distances (> 32 AU) are formidable and required the development of lightweight, low power, and highly sensitive instruments. This paper provides an overview of the New Horizons science payload, which is comprised of seven instruments. Alice provides spatially resolved ultraviolet spectroscopy. The Ralph instrument has two components: the Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), which performs panchromatic and color imaging, and the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which provides near-infrared spectroscopic mapping capabilities. The Radio Experiment (REX) is a component of the New Horizons telecommunications system that provides both occultation and radiometry capabilities. ...

  20. A highly integrated payload suite for Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M.; Kraft, S.; Steiger, R.; Varlet, F.; Voigt, D.; Falkner, P.; Peacock, A.

    The four Galilean moons have always held a public and scientific fascination due to their diverse and dynamic nature. Amongst the moons, Europa holds a special place for its potential liquid water ocean, beneath its icy crust. This prospect of water places Europa on a par with Mars in terms of its viability for harbouring life. The first hints of Europa's icy surface came from early telescopic observations, which noted an unusually high albedo. Ground based spectroscopy then demonstrated absorption features of relatively pure water ice. Imagery from Pioneer, Voyager, and more recently Galileo confirm this, with the kilometre scale resolution of Galileo showing what appear to be ice flows. The lack of cratering, pointing to a geologically recent surface, furthermore suggests that liquid water could well exist today. The Galileo Europa Mission (GEM) provided much more extensive data during its 8 close orbits, including limited areas of extremely high resolution imaging (6 m), and radio science that confirmed the differentiated nature of Europa. However, many fundamental questions remain that can best be answered by a dedicated orbiter. For example: - Does a liquid water ocean exist? What it its extent vertically and laterally? - What is the composition of the crust? - What are the geological processes operating? The importance of these most basic questions have inspired mission proposals from all of the major space agencies. In Europe, ESA have performed a study into a mission called the "Jupiter Minisat Explorer" in order to identify the key technologies that would have to be developed [1]. The key technological challenges are caused by the harsh Jovian radiation environment, the lack of solar energy available and the thermal problems of such a cold environment. Last, but not least, a payload must be designed that satisfies these requirements and is both low power and low mass. All of these factors dictate the use of a Highly Integrated Payload Suite (HIPS). Such a

  1. Radio imaging of launch vehicles and payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Harrison E.

    1988-01-01

    The detection and tracing of rockets and payloads by microwave or millimeter-wave passive radio temperature measurements is analytically studied using radio astronomical techniques. Radio image reconstruction is performed by spatial filtering of multiple, simultaneous, equally-spaced radio brightness measurements. Both Wiener filtering for complex images and matched filtering for separated, point targets are considered. Output SNR is found to improve as receiver integration time increases, but blurring due to image motion places a limit on receiver integration time with fixed spatial filters. Little difference is found between an antenna with tapered illumination and low sidelobes and a maximum gain antenna with high sidelobes for interpolation. Several numerical examples are presented in order to give a preliminary indication of the magnitudes of system parameters.

  2. Exploring Mars: The Ares Payload Service (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Justin; Lusignan, Bruce

    1999-08-01

    In last year's Mars Society convention we introduced the results of five years of studies of space launch capability for the second millennium. We concluded that Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) vehicles such as the Delta Clipper X33, and X34 cannot make it to orbit from the Earth's surface. Whether taking off vertically or horizontally or landing vertically or horizontally, the rocket equations, the performance of available fuels, and the realities of the weight and strength of materials leave no margin for payload. The promised savings from SSTO systems are illusory. However, a configuration that is able to deliver useful payload to orbit is the Single step to Orbit, SsTO, a rocket plane that is released fully fueled, from 35,000 to 40,000 feet altitude. Three approaches have been proposed. The Hot'l and Molnya Corporation designs carry the fueled rocket plane to altitude on the back of a carrier aircraft. In this design the carrier aircraft is Russia's Antonov 225 the world's largest cargo plane. The rocket plane is a modified version of the Buran, Russia's own space shuttle. Another configuration is Kelly Aviation's concept in which the fully fueled rocket plane is towed to altitude by the cargo plane and then released. A third approach is based on the early "X" planes, which were dropped from the belly of the carrier plane. While the rocket equations indicate that these three concepts can deliver useful payloads, the Stanford review found significant advantages to the approach of Pioneer Rocket, in which the rocket plane flies up to the carrier plane with conventional jet engines, docks, and then loads on the oxidizer for the flight to orbit. This architecture has more reasonable abort modes in case of system failure in either aircraft and can deliver a larger final payload to orbit for a given sized carrier. The Stanford recommendation is that the carrier aircraft be the Antonov 225. A design based on this was presented in a report last year. Refinements to the

  3. Electronic timer for sounding rocket payload use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    An electronic timer has been developed for sounding rocket use. The timer uses CMOS technology for low power consumption and has a battery back-up to keep the timing circuit active in case of a dropout on the payload power bus. Time-event decoding is done by programming EPROM's which enable a +28 volt dc sourcing output. There are 32 discrete outputs which can provide +28 volt dc into a minimum load impedance of 150 ohms. Inputs are designed to operate on standard CMOS voltage levels, but they can withstand +28 volts dc without damage. The timer can be started by either 'G' or lift-off switch closure or umbilical release at lift-off.

  4. The EJSM Jupiter Europa Orbiter: Planning Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Clark, K.; Greeley, R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Boldt, J.; Tan-Wang, G.; Lock, R.; van Houten, T.; Ludwinski, J.

    2008-09-01

    In the decade since the first return of Europa data by the Galileo spacecraft, the scientific understanding of Europa has greatly matured leading to the formulation of sophisticated new science objectives to be addressed through the acquisition of new data. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is one component of the proposed multi-spacecraft Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) designed to obtain data in support of these new science objectives. The JEO planning payload, while notional, is used to quantify engineering aspects of the mission and spacecraft design, and operational scenarios required to obtain the data necessary to meet the science objectives. The instruments were defined to understand the viability of an approach to meet the measurement objectives, perform in the radiation environment and meet the planetary protection requirements. The actual instrument suite would ultimately be the result of an Announcement of Opportunity (AO) selection process carried out by NASA.

  5. ISS Microgravity Research Payload Training Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Geveden, Rex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Discipline has multiple categories of science payloads that are being planned and currently under development to operate on various ISS on-orbit increments. The current program includes six subdisciplines; Materials Science, Fluids Physics, Combustion Science, Fundamental Physics, Cellular Biology and Macromolecular Biotechnology. All of these experiment payloads will require the astronaut various degrees of crew interaction and science observation. With the current programs planning to build various facility class science racks, the crew will need to be trained on basic core operations as well as science background. In addition, many disciplines will use the Express Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to utilize the accommodations provided by these facilities for smaller and less complex type hardware. The Microgravity disciplines will be responsible to have a training program designed to maximize the experiment and hardware throughput as well as being prepared for various contingencies both with anomalies as well as unexpected experiment observations. The crewmembers will need various levels of training from simple tasks as power on and activate to extensive training on hardware mode change out to observing the cell growth of various types of tissue cultures. Sample replacement will be required for furnaces and combustion type modules. The Fundamental Physics program will need crew EVA support to provide module change out of experiment. Training will take place various research centers and hardware development locations. It is expected that onboard training through various methods and video/digital technology as well as limited telecommunication interaction. Since hardware will be designed to operate from a few weeks to multiple research increments, flexibility must be planned in the training approach and procedure skills to optimize the output as well as the equipment maintainability. Early increment lessons learned

  6. Supporting Development of Satellite's Guidance Navigation and Control Software: A Product Line Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David; Stark, Michael; Leake, Stephen; White, Michael; Morisio, Maurizio; Travassos, Guilherme H.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch (FSB) is developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Flight Software (FSW) product line. The demand for increasingly more complex flight software in less time while maintaining the same level of quality has motivated us to look for better FSW development strategies. The GNC FSW product line has been planned to address the core GNC FSW functionality very similar on many recent low/near Earth missions in the last ten years. Unfortunately these missions have not accomplished significant drops in development cost since a systematic approach towards reuse has not been adopted. In addition, new demands are continually being placed upon the FSW which means the FSB must become more adept at providing GNC FSW functionality's core so it can accommodate additional requirements. These domain features together with engineering concepts are influencing the specification, description and evaluation of FSW product line. Domain engineering is the foundation for emerging product line software development approaches. A product line is 'A family of products designed to take advantage of their common aspects and predicted variabilities'. In our product line approach, domain engineering includes the engineering activities needed to produce reusable artifacts for a domain. Application engineering refers to developing an application in the domain starting from reusable artifacts. The focus of this paper is regarding the software process, lessons learned and on how the GNC FSW product line manages variability. Existing domain engineering approaches do not enforce any specific notation for domain analysis or commonality and variability analysis. Usually, natural language text is the preferred tool. The advantage is the flexibility and adapt ability of natural language. However, one has to be ready to accept also its well-known drawbacks, such as ambiguity, inconsistency, and contradictions. While most domain analysis

  7. Controls on slow-moving landslides revealed by satellite and airborne InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Fielding, Eric J.

    2017-04-01

    Landslides display a wide variety of behaviors ranging from slow persistent motion to rapid acceleration and catastrophic failure. Given the variety of possible behaviors, improvements to our understanding of landslide mechanics are critical for accurate predictions of landslide dynamics. To better constrain the mechanisms that control landslide motion, we use recent SAR data collected by Copernicus Sentinel-1A/B, NASA UAVSAR, JAXA ALOS-2, and DLR TerraSAR-X to quantify the time-dependent kinematics of over 200 slow-moving landslides in the Central and Northern California Coast Ranges. These landslides are ideally suited for InSAR investigations due to their size (up to 5 km in length and 0.5 km in width), persistent downslope motion with low velocities (m/yr), and sparse vegetation. We quantify the seasonal and multi-year changes in velocity driven by changes in precipitation and find that landslide velocity varies over both timescales. Over seasonal timescales, each landslide displays a period of acceleration that occurs within weeks of the onset of seasonal rainfall suggesting that motion is governed by precipitation-induced changes in pore-water pressure. We also examine the effects of multi-year climate variations (i.e., recent historic California drought and the possible wet period that began in late 2016) on the activity of landslides. We find that the drought has led to a decrease in annual displacement over the past several years and predict that a resurgence in annual displacement will occur with an increase in annual rainfall. Lastly, we use UAVSAR data acquired at 4 different look directions to quantify 3D surface displacement of multiple landslides and invert for their subsurface geometry (i.e. basal slip surface) using recently developed 3D mass conservation techniques. The application of NASA's UAVSAR data represents a major advance from previous InSAR studies on landslides in this region and provides one of the first 3D dataset that contains

  8. Supporting Development of Satellite's Guidance Navigation and Control Software: A Product Line Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David; Stark, Michael; Leake, Stephen; White, Michael; Morisio, Maurizio; Travassos, Guilherme H.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch (FSB) is developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Flight Software (FSW) product line. The demand for increasingly more complex flight software in less time while maintaining the same level of quality has motivated us to look for better FSW development strategies. The GNC FSW product line has been planned to address the core GNC FSW functionality very similar on many recent low/near Earth missions in the last ten years. Unfortunately these missions have not accomplished significant drops in development cost since a systematic approach towards reuse has not been adopted. In addition, new demands are continually being placed upon the FSW which means the FSB must become more adept at providing GNC FSW functionality's core so it can accommodate additional requirements. These domain features together with engineering concepts are influencing the specification, description and evaluation of FSW product line. Domain engineering is the foundation for emerging product line software development approaches. A product line is 'A family of products designed to take advantage of their common aspects and predicted variabilities'. In our product line approach, domain engineering includes the engineering activities needed to produce reusable artifacts for a domain. Application engineering refers to developing an application in the domain starting from reusable artifacts. The focus of this paper is regarding the software process, lessons learned and on how the GNC FSW product line manages variability. Existing domain engineering approaches do not enforce any specific notation for domain analysis or commonality and variability analysis. Usually, natural language text is the preferred tool. The advantage is the flexibility and adapt ability of natural language. However, one has to be ready to accept also its well-known drawbacks, such as ambiguity, inconsistency, and contradictions. While most domain analysis

  9. The Use of a Satellite Communications System for Command and Control of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Surrogate Unmanned Aerial System Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Charles T.; Jones, Frank; Hutchinson, Brian; Joyce, Claude; Nelson, Skip; Melum, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has transformed a Cirrus Design SR22 general aviation (GA) aircraft into an Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Surrogate research aircraft which has served for several years as a platform for unmanned systems research and development. The aircraft is manned with a Safety Pilot and a Research Systems Operator (RSO) that allows for flight operations almost any-where in the national airspace system (NAS) without the need for a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA). The UAS Surrogate can be remotely controlled from a modular, transportable ground control station (GCS) like a true UAS. Ground control of the aircraft is accomplished by the use of data links that allow the two-way passage of the required data to control the aircraft and provide the GCS with situational awareness. The original UAS Surrogate data-link system was composed of redundant very high frequency (VHF) data radio modems with a maximum range of approximately 40 nautical miles. A new requirement was developed to extend this range beyond visual range (BVR). This new requirement led to the development of a satellite communications system that provided the means to command and control the UAS Surrogate at ranges beyond the limits of the VHF data links. The system makes use of the Globalstar low earth orbit (LEO) satellite communications system. This paper will provide details of the development, implementation, and flight testing of the satellite data communications system on the UAS Surrogate research aircraft.

  10. Solid State Digital Propulsion "Cluster Thrusters" For Small Satellites Using High Performance Electrically Controlled Extinguishable Solid Propellants (ECESP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawka, Wayne N.; Katzakian, Arthur; Grix, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Electrically controlled extinguishable solid propellants (ESCSP) are capable of multiple ignitions, extinguishments and throttle control by the application of electrical power. Both core and end burning no moving parts ECESP grains/motors to three inches in diameter have now been tested. Ongoing research has led to a newer family of even higher performance ECESP providing up to 10% higher performance, manufacturing ease, and significantly higher electrical conduction. The high conductivity was not found to be desirable for larger motors; however it is ideal for downward scaling to micro and pico- propulsion applications with a web thickness of less than 0.125 inch/ diameter. As a solid solution propellant, this ECESP is molecularly uniform, having no granular structure. Because of this homogeneity and workable viscosity it can be directly cast into thin layers or vacuum cast into complex geometries. Both coaxial and grain stacks have been demonstrated. Combining individual propellant coaxial grains and/or grain stacks together form three-dimensional arrays yield modular cluster thrusters. Adoption of fabless manufacturing methods and standards from the electronics industry will provide custom, highly reproducible micro-propulsion arrays and clusters at low costs. These stack and cluster thruster designs provide a small footprint saving spacecraft surface area for solar panels and/or experiments. The simplicity of these thrusters will enable their broad use on micro-pico satellites for primary propulsion, ACS and formation flying applications. Larger spacecraft may find uses for ECESP thrusters on extended booms, on-orbit refueling, pneumatic actuators, and gas generators.

  11. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, microscopically visible granules that cluster around centrosomes. These structures, which contain numerous proteins directly involved in centrosome maintenance, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis, have traditionally been viewed as vehicles for protein trafficking...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  12. Probing orographic controls in the Himalayas during the monsoon using satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Barros

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The linkages between the space-time variability of observed clouds, rainfall, large-circulation patterns and topography in northern India and the Himalayas were investigated using remote sensing data. The research purpose was to test the hypothesis that cloudiness patterns are dynamic tracers of rainstorms, and therefore their temporal and spatial evolution can be used as a proxy of the spatial and temporal organization of precipitation and precipitation processes in the Himalayan range during the monsoon. The results suggest that the space-time distribution of precipitation, the spatial variability of the diurnal cycle of convective activity, and the terrain (landform and altitudinal gradients are intertwined at spatial scales ranging from the order of a few kms (1–5km up to the continental-scale. Furthermore, this relationship is equally strong in the time domain with respect to the onset and intra-seasonal variability of the monsoon. Infrared and microwave imagery of cloud fields were analyzed to characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of mesoscale convective weather systems and short-lived convection in Northern India, the Himalayan range, and in the Tibetan Plateau during three monsoon seasons (1999, 2000 and 2001. The life cycle of convective systems suggests landform and orographic controls consistent with a convergence zone constrained to the valley of the Ganges and the Himalayan range, bounded in the west by the Aravalli range and the Garhwal mountains and in the East by the Khasi Hills and the Bay of Bengal, which we call the Northern India Convergence Zone (NICZ. The NICZ exhibits strong night-time activity along the south-facing slopes of the Himalayan range, which is characterized by the development of short-lived convection (1–3h aligned with protruding ridges between 1:00 and 3:00 AM. The intra-annual and inter-annual variability of convective activity in the NICZ were assessed with respect to large-scale synoptic

  13. MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) on board TARANIS satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth; Hébert, Philippe; Le Mer-Dachard, Fanny; Ravel, Karen; Gaillac, Stéphanie

    2017-04-01

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of Radiations from lightNings and Sprites) is a CNES micro satellite. Its main objective is to study impulsive transfers of energy between the Earth atmosphere and the space environment. It will be sun-synchronous at an altitude of 700 km. It will be launched from end-2018 for at least 2 years. Its payload is composed of several electromagnetic instruments in different wavelengths (from gamma-rays to radio waves including optical). TARANIS instruments are currently in calibration and qualification phase. The purpose of this poster is to present the MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) scientific objectives and the sensor design, to show the performances of this instrument using the recent characterization, and at last to promote its products. The MicroCameras, developed by Sodern, are dedicated to the spatial description of TLEs and their parent lightning. They are able to differentiate sprite and lightning thanks to two narrow bands ([757-767 nm] and [772-782 nm]) that provide simultaneous pairs of images of an Event. Simulation results of the differentiation method will be shown. After calibration and tests, the MicroCameras are now delivered to CNES for integration on the payload. The Photometers, developed by Bertin Technologies, will provide temporal measurements and spectral characteristics of TLEs and lightning. There are key instrument because of their capability to detect on-board TLEs and then switch all the instruments of the scientific payload in their high resolution acquisition mode. Photometers use four spectral bands in the [170-260 nm], [332-342 nm], [757-767 nm] and [600-900 nm] and have the same field of view as cameras. The on-board TLE detection algorithm remote-controlled parameters have been tuned before launch using the electronic board and simulated or real events waveforms. The Photometers are now in the calibration and test phase. They will be delivered for integration in mid-2017.

  14. Satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  15. System Critical Design Audit (CDA). Books 1, 2 and 3; [Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI Lewis Spacecraft Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) Lewis Spacecraft Program is evaluated. Spacecraft integration, test, launch, and spacecraft bus are discussed. Payloads and technology demonstrations are presented. Mission data management system and ground segment are also addressed.

  16. PRIMA Platform capability for satellite missions in LEO and MEO (SAR, Optical, GNSS, TLC, etc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, T.; L'Abbate, M.

    2016-12-01

    PRIMA (Piattaforma Riconfigurabile Italiana Multi Applicativa) is a multi-mission 3-axis stabilized Platform developed by Thales Alenia Space Italia under ASI contract.PRIMA is designed to operate for a wide variety of applications from LEO, MEO up to GEO and for different classes of satellites Platform Family. It has an extensive heritage in flight heritage (LEO and MEO Satellites already fully operational) in which it has successfully demonstrated the flexibility of use, low management costs and the ability to adapt to changing operational conditions.The flexibility and modularity of PRIMA provides unique capability to satisfy different Payload design and mission requirements, thanks to the utilization of recurrent adaptable modules (Service Module-SVM, Propulsion Module-PPM, Payload Module-PLM) to obtain mission dependent configuration. PRIMA product line development is continuously progressing, and is based on state of art technology, modular architecture and an Integrated Avionics. The aim is to maintain and extent multi-mission capabilities to operate in different environments (LEO to GEO) with different payloads (SAR, Optical, GNSS, TLC, etc.). The design is compatible with a wide range of European and US equipment suppliers, thus maximising cooperation opportunity. Evolution activities are mainly focused on the following areas: Structure: to enable Spacecraft configurations for multiple launch; Thermal Control: to guarantee thermal limits for new missions, more demanding in terms of environment and payload; Electrical: to cope with higher power demand (e.g. electrical propulsion, wide range of payloads, etc.) considering orbital environment (e.g. lighting condition); Avionics : AOCS solutions optimized on mission (LEO observation driven by agility and pointing, agility not a driver for GEO). Use of sensors and actuators tailored for specific mission and related environments. Optimised Propulsion control. Data Handling, SW and FDIR mission customization

  17. CHINA LAUNCHES 2 SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT SATELLITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China placed 2 scientific experiment satellites into preset orbits atop a LM-4B launch vehicle on Sept. 9, 2004. A LM-4B blasted off at 7:14 am from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province. Sources from the Xi'an Satellite Monitor and Control Center said that one satellite,

  18. IMIS desktop & smartphone software solutions for monitoring spacecrafts' payload from anywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, J.; Queyrut, O.; Airaud, J.

    In the past years, the demand for satellite remote operations has increased guided by on one hand, the will to reduce operations cost (on-call operators out of business hours), and on the other hand, the development of cooperation space missions resulting in a world wide distribution of engineers and science team members. Only a few off-the-shelf solutions exist to fulfill the need of remote payload monitoring, and they mainly use proprietary devices. The recent advent of mobile technologies (laptops, smartphones and tablets) as well as the worldwide deployment of broadband networks (3G, Wi-Fi hotspots), has opened up a technical window that brings new options. As part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, the French space agency) has developed a new software solution for monitoring spacecraft payloads. The Instrument Monitoring Interactive Software (IMIS) offers state-of-the-art operational features for payload monitoring, and can be accessed remotely. It was conceived as a generic tool that can be used for heterogeneous payloads and missions. IMIS was designed as a classical client/server architecture. The server is hosted at CNES and acts as a data provider while two different kinds of clients are available depending on the level of mobility required. The first one is a rich client application, built on Eclipse framework, which can be installed on usual operating systems and communicates with the server through the Internet. The second one is a smartphone application for any Android platform, connected to the server thanks to the mobile broadband network or a Wi-Fi connection. This second client is mainly devoted to on-call operations and thus only contains a subset of the IMIS functionalities. This paper describes the operational context, including security aspects, that led IMIS development, presents the selected software architecture and details the various features of both clients: the desktop and the sm

  19. KuaFu Mission: The scientific payload of KuaFu-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Schwenn, R.; Donovan, E.; Xia, L.-D.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Kuafu Team

    The KuaFu mission would consist an L1 satellite KuaFu-A and a polar satellite pair KuaFu B1 B2 The mission is designed to explore the whole cause-and-result chain in solar-terrestrial space The two KuaFu-Bs will have the same payload sets and fly on the same polar orbit plane but with a phase difference of half period The preferred perigee is 1 8 Re and the apogee is 7 Re This orbit design will support a 24 times 7 full-covered observation on the northern auroral oval by the onboard aurora cameras The suggested payloads consist of a Far Ultraviolet Auroral Monitoring Camera UVAMC a FUV Imaging Spectrometer FUVSI a Wide Field Auroral Imager WFAI a Fluxgate Magnetometer FGM a High Energy Charged Particle Experiment HECPE an Imaging energetic electron and proton instrument IEPS a Neutral Atom Imager on KuaFu NAIK a Fast Plasma Pitch Angle Instrument FPI an Ion Mass Spectrometer IMS FPI and IMS were suggested to merge and a Tri-Band Beacon TBB

  20. ESA payloads and experiments on the Foton-12 mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, P; Demets, R; Verga, A

    2000-02-01

    The international Foton-12 mission in September 1999 was a milestone in terms of payload mass, complexity and scientific diversity. ESA's contribution amounted to an unprecedented 240 kg--almost half of Foton's total payload. The Agency's 11 experiments covered fluid physics, biology, radiation dosimetry, materials science and meteoritics. This article describes the mission from an ESA perspective and highlights the initial results.

  1. The External Payload Carrier - A Suborbital Research Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallhorn, Paul; Tatro, Charles; Kutter, Bernard; Szatkowski, Gerald; Stopnitzky, Benny; Bulk, Tim; Pitchford, Brian

    2011-01-01

    High altitude, suborbital research payloads are typically restricted to small packages (in terms of both volume and mass) due to the delivery platform employed. Sounding rockets that normally provide these services have payload capacities which severely limit the size and scope of the research to be performed. A new research platform is currently in the early development phase for large (both volume and mass) payload microgravity suborbital payloads seeking access to these regimes. The EXternal Payload Carrier (XPC) utilizes an open solid rocket motor position on the Atlas V vehicle and aerodynamically mimics the outer contour of a solid rocket motor. This presentation will detail the current state of the design and capability of XPC for potential future users.

  2. Shuttle performance enhancements using an OMS payload bay kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Kevin C.; Mallini, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    The study focuses on the use of an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) payload bay kit (PBK) designed to utilize OMS tanks identical to those currently employed in the Orbiter OMS pods. Emphasis is placed on payload deployment capability and payload servicing/reboost capability augmentation from the point of view of payload mass, maximum deployment altitudes, and initial retrieval and final deployment altitudes. The deployment, servicing, and reboost requirements of the Hubble Space Telescope and Advanced X-ray and Astrophysics Facility are analyzed in order to show the benefits an OMS PBK can provide for these missions. It is shown that OMS PBKs can provide the required capability enhancement necessary to support deployment, reboost, and servicing of payloads requiring altitudes greater than 325 nautical miles.

  3. Low-cost approach for a software-defined radio based ground station receiver for CCSDS standard compliant S-band satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, M. A.; Butt, B. M.; Klinkner, S.

    2016-10-01

    A major concern of a university satellite mission is to download the payload and the telemetry data from a satellite. While the ground station antennas are in general easy and with limited afford to procure, the receiving unit is most certainly not. The flexible and low-cost software-defined radio (SDR) transceiver "BladeRF" is used to receive the QPSK modulated and CCSDS compliant coded data of a satellite in the HAM radio S-band. The control software is based on the Open Source program GNU Radio, which also is used to perform CCSDS post processing of the binary bit stream. The test results show a good performance of the receiving system.

  4. Nanosar-case study of synthetic aperture radar for nano-satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, S.; Oever, M. van den; Mahapatra, P.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Gill, E.; Meijer, R.J.; Verhoeven, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-satellites have a cost advantage due to their low mass and usage of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies. However, the low mass also restricts the functionality of a nano-satellite's payload. Typically, this would imply instruments with very low to low resolution and accuracy, essentially

  5. Nanosar-case study of synthetic aperture radar for nano-satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, S.; Oever, M. van den; Mahapatra, P.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Gill, E.; Meijer, R.J.; Verhoeven, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-satellites have a cost advantage due to their low mass and usage of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies. However, the low mass also restricts the functionality of a nano-satellite's payload. Typically, this would imply instruments with very low to low resolution and accuracy, essentially ruli

  6. The Athena Mars Rover Science Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyes, S. W.; Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Carr, M.; Christensen, P.; DesMarais, D.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Haskin, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor missions that will be launched in April of 2001 will include a highly capable rover that is a successor to the Mars Pathfinder mission's Sojourner rover. The design goals for this rover are a total traverse distance of at least 10 km and a total lifetime of at least one Earth year. The rover's job will be to explore a site in Mars' ancient terrain, searching for materials likely to preserve a record of ancient martian water, climate, and possibly biology. The rover will collect rock and soil samples, and will store them for return to Earth by a subsequent Mars Surveyor mission in 2005. The Athena Mars rover science payload is the suite of scientific instruments and sample collection tools that will be used to perform this job. The specific science objectives that NASA has identified for the '01 rover payload are to: (1) Provide color stereo imaging of martian surface environments, and remotely-sensed point discrimination of mineralogical composition. (2) Determine the elemental and mineralogical composition of martian surface materials. (3) Determine the fine-scale textural properties of these materials. (4) Collect and store samples. The Athena payload has been designed to meet these objectives. The focus of the design is on field operations: making sure the rover can locate, characterize, and collect scientifically important samples in a dusty, dirty, real-world environment. The topography, morphology, and mineralogy of the scene around the rover will be revealed by Pancam/Mini-TES, an integrated imager and IR spectrometer. Pancam views the surface around the rover in stereo and color. It uses two high-resolution cameras that are identical in most respects to the rover's navigation cameras. The detectors are low-power, low-mass active pixel sensors with on-chip 12-bit analog-to-digital conversion. Filters provide 8-12 color spectral bandpasses over the spectral region from 0.4 to 1.1 micron Narrow-angle optics provide an angular resolution of 0

  7. The Athena Mars Rover Science Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyes, S. W.; Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Carr, M.; Christensen, P.; DesMarais, D.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Haskin, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor missions that will be launched in April of 2001 will include a highly capable rover that is a successor to the Mars Pathfinder mission's Sojourner rover. The design goals for this rover are a total traverse distance of at least 10 km and a total lifetime of at least one Earth year. The rover's job will be to explore a site in Mars' ancient terrain, searching for materials likely to preserve a record of ancient martian water, climate, and possibly biology. The rover will collect rock and soil samples, and will store them for return to Earth by a subsequent Mars Surveyor mission in 2005. The Athena Mars rover science payload is the suite of scientific instruments and sample collection tools that will be used to perform this job. The specific science objectives that NASA has identified for the '01 rover payload are to: (1) Provide color stereo imaging of martian surface environments, and remotely-sensed point discrimination of mineralogical composition. (2) Determine the elemental and mineralogical composition of martian surface materials. (3) Determine the fine-scale textural properties of these materials. (4) Collect and store samples. The Athena payload has been designed to meet these objectives. The focus of the design is on field operations: making sure the rover can locate, characterize, and collect scientifically important samples in a dusty, dirty, real-world environment. The topography, morphology, and mineralogy of the scene around the rover will be revealed by Pancam/Mini-TES, an integrated imager and IR spectrometer. Pancam views the surface around the rover in stereo and color. It uses two high-resolution cameras that are identical in most respects to the rover's navigation cameras. The detectors are low-power, low-mass active pixel sensors with on-chip 12-bit analog-to-digital conversion. Filters provide 8-12 color spectral bandpasses over the spectral region from 0.4 to 1.1 micron Narrow-angle optics provide an angular resolution of 0

  8. Adaptive beamforming in a CDMA mobile satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Samuel G.

    1993-01-01

    Code-Division Multiple-Access (CDMA) stands out as a strong contender for the choice of multiple access scheme in these future mobile communication systems. This is due to a variety of reasons such as the excellent performance in multipath environments, high scope for frequency reuse and graceful degradation near saturation. However, the capacity of CDMA is limited by the self-interference between the transmissions of the different users in the network. Moreover, the disparity between the received power levels gives rise to the near-far problem, this is, weak signals are severely degraded by the transmissions from other users. In this paper, the use of time-reference adaptive digital beamforming on board the satellite is proposed as a means to overcome the problems associated with CDMA. This technique enables a high number of independently steered beams to be generated from a single phased array antenna, which automatically track the desired user signal and null the unwanted interference sources. Since CDMA is interference limited, the interference protection provided by the antenna converts directly and linearly into an increase in capacity. Furthermore, the proposed concept allows the near-far effect to be mitigated without requiring a tight coordination of the users in terms of power control. A payload architecture will be presented that illustrates the practical implementation of this concept. This digital payload architecture shows that with the advent of high performance CMOS digital processing, the on-board implementation of complex DSP techniques -in particular digital beamforming- has become possible, being most attractive for Mobile Satellite Communications.

  9. GMES Sentinel 3: mission overview and aspects of the Calval Plan for its optical payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieke, Jens; Goryl, Philippe; Donlon, Craig; Berruti, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    The European Union-ESA Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme decided to develop the Sentinels as first series of operational satellites in order to meet specific Earth observation user needs. The series of Sentinel-3 satellites will provide global, frequent and near-realtime ocean, ice and land monitoring. It continues Envisat's altimetry, the multispectral, medium-resolution visible and infrared ocean and land-surface observations of ERS, Envisat and Spot, and includes enhancements to meet the operational revisit requirements and to facilitate new products and evolution of services. The first launch is expected in 2013. In this paper an outline of the Sentinel-3 satellite and optical payload is presented. Dedicated calibration and validation activities regarding the sea and land surface temperature radiometer (SLSTR) and ocean and land colour radiometer (OLCI) are then reviewed. Calibration and validation (calval) activities are based on the heritage gained from ENVISAT MERIS and AATSR experience and cover pre-launch, in-orbit commissioning and operational measures for the Sentinel 3 satellites.

  10. Control system of satellite TV antenna of strapdown shipborne%捷联式船载卫星电视天线控制系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦爱民; 闫英敏; 闫建生; 靳英卫

    2011-01-01

    With the progress of the society and the improvements of information technology, people need more TV programmes through satellite networks while moving. A strapdown shipborne satellite TV antenna control system based on DSP is introduced. The architectures of the software and hardware of the control system are given, and the functions of different components are described in detail. The stabilization and the automatic tracking are realized in this antenna control system for satellite television.%随着社会的进步和信息化技术的提高,人们对移动中通过卫星网路接收卫星电视节目的需求越来越大.介绍了基于DSP的捷联式船载卫星电视天线控制系统,阐述了系统软硬件的结构及各部分的功能,实现了船载卫星电视天线的稳定与自动跟踪卫星.

  11. Preliminary design of pseudo satellites: Basic methods and feasibility criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    Analytical models of weight and energy balances, aerodynamic models, and solar irradiance models to perform pseudo-satellite preliminary design are presented. Feasibility criteria are determined in accordance with the aim of preliminary design dependent on mission scenario and type of payload.

  12. MicroRNA-133 Controls Brown Adipose Determination in Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells by Targeting Prdm16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Hang; Pasut, Alessandra; Soleimani, Vahab D

    2013-01-01

    (satellite cells) have long been considered uniformly determined toward the myogenic lineage. Here, we report that adult satellite cells give rise to brown adipocytes and that microRNA-133 regulates the choice between myogenic and brown adipose determination by targeting the 3'UTR of Prdm16. Antagonism...... are downregulated in mice exposed to cold, resulting in de novo generation of satellite cell-derived brown adipocytes. Therefore, microRNA-133 represents an important therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity....... of microRNA-133 during muscle regeneration increases uncoupled respiration, glucose uptake, and thermogenesis in local treated muscle and augments whole-body energy expenditure, improves glucose tolerance, and impedes the development of diet-induced obesity. Finally, we demonstrate that miR-133 levels...

  13. Analysis and Optimization of SSO Satellite Thermal Control Subsystem%太阳同步轨道卫星热控分系统分析及优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文瑞; 黄海

    2012-01-01

    定义地心日照轨道坐标系,并在此坐标系下简化卫星与地球相对位置的复杂计算,以及卫星轨道外热流分析过程中相关角度的计算,使轨道外热流的分析仿真更加快速、简洁。以正六棱柱形卫星为例,建立热网络模型,对其表面在一圈轨道内所受的轨道外热流进行仿真,并结合仿真结果计算进出地影区时卫星内部的温度。在此基础上,建立以热控分系统多层隔热材料质量最小化为目标的优化问题;在满足高低温工况卫星内部温度在-10~+35℃范围内的约束下,对多层隔热材料厚度和散热窗大小进行了优化。%An Earth-original sunshine orbital coordinate system is defined.In this coordinate system,the complex computation of the relative position between satellite and the Earth can be bypassed,so the calculations of related angles in satellite orbital heat flux analysis become simple,and the satellite thermal analysis can be quickly accomplished.A thermal network model of a six-prism shaped satellite is built.The orbital heat flux on the surfaces of the satellite is simulated and applied in the model to obtain the satellite internal temperature at the start and end of eclipse period.Based on the model,an optimization of thermal control system to minimize multi-layer insulations mass in limitation of the satellite internal temperatures between-10℃ and +35℃ in both cold and hot cases is established.Multi-layer insulations thickness and radiator window area are optimized.

  14. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Top space experts from around the world have collaborated to produce this comprehensive, authoritative, and clearly illustrated reference guide to the fast growing, multi-billion dollar field of satellite applications and space communications. This handbook, done under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, addresses not only system technologies but also examines market dynamics, technical standards and regulatory constraints. The handbook is a completely multi-disciplinary reference book that covers, in an in-depth fashion, the fields of satellite telecommunications, Earth observation, remote sensing, satellite navigation, geographical information systems, and geosynchronous meteorological systems. It covers current practices and designs as well as advanced concepts and future systems. It provides a comparative analysis of the common technologies and design elements for satellite application bus structures, thermal controls, power systems, stabilization techniques, telemetry, com...

  15. Instruments of RT-2 Experiment onboard CORONASPHOTON and their test and evaluation II: RT-2/CZT payload

    CERN Document Server

    Kotoch, Tilak B; Debnath, D; Malkar, J P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Madhav, Vaibhav P; Sreekumar, S; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; 10.1007/s10686-010-9189-y

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors are high sensitivity and high resolution devices for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopic studies. The new series of CZT detector modules (OMS40G256) manufactured by Orbotech Medical Solutions (OMS), Israel, are used in the RT-2/CZT payload onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The CZT detectors, sensitive in the energy range of 20 keV to 150 keV, are used to image solar flares in hard X-rays. Since these modules are essentially manufactured for commercial applications, we have carried out a series of comprehensive tests on these modules so that they can be confidently used in space-borne systems. These tests lead us to select the best three pieces of the 'Gold' modules for the RT-2/CZT payload. This paper presents the characterization of CZT modules and the criteria followed for selecting the ones for the RT-2/CZT payload. The RT-2/CZT payload carries, along with three CZT modules, a high spatial resolution CMOS detector for high resolution imaging of transient X-ray ev...

  16. Preliminary Scientific Results of Chang'E-1 Lunar Orbiter: Based on Payloads Detection Data in the First Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Ziyuan; YANG Jianfeng; ZHANG Wenxi; WANG Jianyu; MOU Lingli; CHANG Jin; ZHANG Liyan; WANG Huanyu; LI Yongquan; ZHANG Xiaohui; ZHENG Yongchun; JIANG Jingshan; WANG Shijin; BIAN Wei; LI Chunlai; SUN Huixian; ZOU Yongliao; LIU Jianzhong; LIU Jianjun; ZHAO Baochang; REN Xin

    2008-01-01

    Chang'E-1 lunar Orbiter was launched by Long March 3A rocket from Xichang Satellite Launch Center at 18:05 BT (Beijing Time) Oct. 24, 2007. It is the first step of its ambitious three-stage moon program, a new milestone in the Chinese space exploration history. The primary science objectives of Chang'E-1 lunar orbiter are to obtain three-Dimension (3D) stereo images of the lunar surface, to analyze the distribution and abundance of elements on the surface, to investigate the thickness of lunar soil, evaluate helium-3 resources and other characteristics, and to detect the space environment around the moon. To achieve the above four mission objectives, eight sets of scientific instruments are chosen as the payloads of the lunar orbiter, including a CCD stereo camera (CCD), a Sagnac-based interferometer spectrometer (IIM), a Laser Altimeter (LAM), a Microwave Radiometer (MRM), a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS), an X-ray spectrometer (XRS), a High-Energy Particle Detector (HPD), and two Solar Wind Ion Detectors (SWID). The detected data of the payloads show that all payloads work well. This paper introduces the status of payloads in the first phase and preliminary scientific results.

  17. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  18. Payload Operations Center (POC) for the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Center (POC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is the world's primary science command post for the International Space Station (ISS), the most ambitious space research facility in human history. The Payload Operations team is responsible for managing all science research experiments aboard the Station. The center is also home for coordination of the mission-plarning work of variety of international sources, all science payload deliveries and retrieval, and payload training and safety programs for the Station crew and all ground personnel. Within the POC, critical payload information from the ISS is displayed on a dedicated workstation, reading both S-band (low data rate) and Ku-band (high data rate) signals from a variety of experiments and procedures operated by the ISS crew and their colleagues on Earth. The POC is the focal point for incorporating research and experiment requirements from all international partners into an integrated ISS payload mission plan. This photograph is an overall view of the MSFC Payload Operations Center displaying the flags of the countries participating the ISS. The flags at the left portray The United States, Canada, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, and Sweden. The flags at the right portray The Russian Federation, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway.

  19. Payload Operations Center (POC) for the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Center (POC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is the world's primary science command post for the International Space Station (ISS), the most ambitious space research facility in human history. The Payload Operations team is responsible for managing all science research experiments aboard the Station. The center is also home for coordination of the mission-plarning work of variety of international sources, all science payload deliveries and retrieval, and payload training and safety programs for the Station crew and all ground personnel. Within the POC, critical payload information from the ISS is displayed on a dedicated workstation, reading both S-band (low data rate) and Ku-band (high data rate) signals from a variety of experiments and procedures operated by the ISS crew and their colleagues on Earth. The POC is the focal point for incorporating research and experiment requirements from all international partners into an integrated ISS payload mission plan. This photograph is an overall view of the MSFC Payload Operations Center displaying the flags of the countries participating the ISS. The flags at the left portray The United States, Canada, France, Switzerland, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, and Sweden. The flags at the right portray The Russian Federation, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway.

  20. Multiple Payload Ejector for Education, Science and Technology Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechworth, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The education research community no longer has a means of being manifested on Space Shuttle flights, and small orbital payload carriers must be flown as secondary payloads on ELV flights, as their launch schedule, secondary payload volume and mass permits. This has resulted in a backlog of small payloads, schedule and cost problems, and an inability for the small payloads community to achieve routine, low-cost access to orbit. This paper will discuss Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility funded effort to leverage its core competencies in small payloads, sounding rockets, balloons and range services to develop a low cost, multiple payload ejector (MPE) carrier for orbital experiments. The goal of the MPE is to provide a low-cost carrier intended primarily for educational flight research experiments. MPE can also be used by academia and industry for science, technology development and Exploration experiments. The MPE carrier will take advantage of the DARPAI NASA partnership to perform flight testing of DARPA s Falcon small, demonstration launch vehicle. The Falcon is similar to MPE fiom the standpoint of focusing on a low-cost, responsive system. Therefore, MPE and Falcon complement each other for the desired long-term goal of providing the small payloads community with a low-cost ride to orbit. The readiness dates of Falcon and MPE are complementary, also. MPE is being developed and readied for flight within 18 months by a small design team. Currently, MPE is preparing for Critical Design Review in fall 2005, payloads are being manifested on the first mission, and the carrier will be ready for flight on the first Falcon demonstration flight in summer, 2006. The MPE and attached experiments can weigh up to 900 lb. to be compatible with Falcon demonstration vehicle lift capabilities fiom Wallops, and will be delivered to the Falcon demonstration orbit - 100 nautical mile circular altitude.