WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite mission goce

  1. Precise orbit determination for the GOCE satellite using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, H.; Jäggi, A.; Švehla, D.; Beutler, G.; Hugentobler, U.; Visser, P.

    Apart from the gradiometer as the core instrument, the first ESA Earth Explorer Core Mission GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) will carry a 12-channel GPS receiver dedicated for precise orbit determination (POD) of the satellite. The EGG-C (European GOCE Gravity-Consortium), led by the Technical University in Munich, is building the GOCE HPF (High-level Processing Facility) dedicated to the Level 1b to Level 2 data processing. One of the tasks of this facility is the computation of the Precise Science Orbit (PSO) for GOCE. The PSO includes a reduced-dynamic and a kinematic orbit solution. The baseline for the PSO is a zero-difference procedure using GPS satellite orbits, clocks, and Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) from CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe), one of the IGS (International GNSS Service) Analysis Centers. The scheme for reduced-dynamic and kinematic orbit determination is based on experiences gained from CHAMP and GRACE POD and is realized in one processing flow. Particular emphasis is put on maximum consistency in the analysis of day boundary overlapping orbital arcs, as well as on the higher data sampling rate with respect to CHAMP and GRACE and on differences originating from different GPS antenna configurations. We focus on the description of the procedure used for the two different orbit determinations and on the validation of the procedure using real data from the two GRACE satellites as well as simulated GOCE data.

  2. Simulation of free fall and resonances in the GOCE mission

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bezděk; J. Klokočník; J. Kostelecký; R. Floberghagen; C. Gruber

    2009-01-01

    Abstract GOCE, ESA's first Earth gravity mission, is currently to be launched early in 2009 into a sun-synchronous orbit. Using the full-scale numerical propagator, we investigated the satellite's free fall from the initial injection altitude of 280km down to the first measurement phase altitude (at 264km). During this decay phase the satellite will pass below the 16:1 resonance (268.4km). The effect of this resonance, together with the uncertainty in the solar activity prediction,...

  3. Shallow-earth rheology from glacial isostasy and satellite gravity: a sensitivity analysis for GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotman, H.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, satellite gravity missions have been launched that probe the earth's long- to mediumwavelength (1000 - 500 km) gravity field. The upcoming ESA satellite gravity mission GOCE is predicted to measure the gravity field with an accuracy of a few centimeters at spatial scales of 100 km.

  4. Simulation of free fall and resonances in the GOCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezděk, Aleš; Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, Jan; Floberghagen, Rune; Gruber, Christian

    2009-07-01

    GOCE, ESA's first Earth gravity mission, is currently to be launched early in 2009 into a sun-synchronous orbit. Using the full-scale numerical propagator, we investigated the satellite's free fall from the initial injection altitude of 280 km down to the first measurement phase altitude (at 264 km). During this decay phase the satellite will pass below the 16:1 resonance (268.4 km). The effect of this resonance, together with the uncertainty in the solar activity prediction, has a distinct impact on the evolution of the orbital elements. Then, to maintain a near-constant and extremely low altitude for the measurement operational phases, the satellite will use an ion thruster to compensate for the atmospheric drag. In order to obtain the groundtrack grid dense enough for a proper sampling of the gravitational field, ESA set constraints for a minimum groundtrack repeat period. We studied suitable repeat cycles (resonant orbits) in the vicinity of 16:1 resonance; we found that they differ greatly in stability towards small perturbations of the satellite's mean altitude and in temporal evolution of the groundtrack coverage. The results obtained from the usual analytical treatment of orbital resonances were refined by more realistic numerical simulations. Finally, we formulated suggestions that might be useful in GOCE orbit planning.

  5. Validation of GOCE Satellite Gravity Gradient Observations by Orbital Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P.

    The upcoming European Space Agency ESA Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circular Explorer GOCE mission foreseen to be launched in 2007 will carry a highly sensitive gradiometer consisting of 3 orthogonal pairs of ultra-sensitive accelerometers A challenging calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the gradiometer not only before launch by a series of on-ground tests but also after launch by making use of on-board cold-gas thrusters to provoke a long series of gradiometer shaking events which will provide observations for its calibration This calibration can be checked by a combined analysis of GPS Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking SST and Satellite Gravity Gradient SGG observations An assessment has been made of how well SGG calibration parameters can be estimated in a combined orbit and gravity field estimation from these observations

  6. GOCE and Future Gravity Missions for Geothermal Energy Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorutti, Alberto; Braitenberg, Carla; Pivetta, Tommaso; Mariani, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    Geothermal energy is a valuable renewable energy source the exploitation of which contributes to the worldwide reduction of consumption of fossil fuels oil and gas. The exploitation of geothermal energy is facilitated where the thermal gradient is higher than average leading to increased surface heat flow. Apart from the hydrologic circulation properties which depend on rock fractures and are important due to the heat transportation from the hotter layers to the surface, essential properties that increase the thermal gradient are crustal thinning and radiogenic heat producing rocks. Crustal thickness and rock composition form the link to the exploration with the satellite derived gravity field, because both induce subsurface mass changes that generate observable gravity anomalies. The recognition of gravity as a useful investigation tool for geothermal energy lead to a cooperation with ESA and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) that included the GOCE derived gravity field in the online geothermal energy investigation tool of the IRENA database. The relation between the gravity field products as the free air gravity anomaly, the Bouguer and isostatic anomalies and the heat flow values is though not straightforward and has not a unique relationship. It is complicated by the fact that it depends on the geodynamical context, on the geologic context and the age of the crustal rocks. Globally the geological context and geodynamical history of an area is known close to everywhere, so that a specific known relationship between gravity and geothermal potential can be applied. In this study we show the results of a systematic analysis of the problem, including some simulations of the key factors. The study relies on the data of GOCE and the resolution and accuracy of this satellite. We also give conclusions on the improved exploration power of a gravity mission with higher spatial resolution and reduced data error, as could be achieved in principle by flying

  7. GPS-derived orbits for the GOCE satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bock, H.; Jäggi, A.; Meyer, U.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Van den IJssel, J.A.A.; Van Helleputte, T.; Heinze, M.; Hugentobler, U.

    2011-01-01

    The first ESA (European Space Agency) Earth explorer core mission GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) was launched on 17 March 2009 into a sun-synchronous dusk–dawn orbit with an exceptionally low initial altitude of about 280 km. The onboard 12-channel dual-frequency GP

  8. Accelerometers for the GOCE Mission: on-ground verification and in-orbit early results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Marque, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    The six accelerometers of the ESA GOCE mission have been developed by ONERA under contract with ThalesAleniaSpace France as Prime Contractor of the Gradiometer. These instruments are based on a principle similar to the ones flying from several years on board the CHAMP and the twin GRACE satellites but with some technological evolution to improve their resolution by 2 orders of magnitude in order to guarantee a level of noise acceleration lower than 2E-12 ms-2 Hz-1/2 as required by the GOCE mission scientific performance. Their contribution to the mission is double by providing the Satellite with the linear accelerations as input to the continuous drag compensation system and with the scientific data measurements to be on-ground processed. The presentation will first shortly describe the accelerometer together with a summary of on-ground test plan philosophy and results, including free fall tests in the Bremen drop tower. Then, if available at that time, the first and preliminary results of the in orbit performance of the accelerometers will be presented and compared. Such instrument can also contribute to improve the performance of some new geodetic mission by measuring more accurately the non gravitational forces acting on the satellites, as corner-stone instrument in some gradiometer arms or as sensor for drag compensation system of low orbit spacecrafts.

  9. Simulation of free fall and resonances in the forthcoming GOCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdek, A.; Klokocnik, J.; Kostelecky, J.; Floberghagen, R.; Gruber, Ch.

    2009-04-01

    GOCE, ESA's first Earth gravity mission, is currently to be launched early in 2009 into a sun-synchronous orbit. Using the full-scale numerical propagator, we investigated the satellite's free fall from the initial injection altitude of 280 km down to the first measurement phase altitude. During this decay phase the satellite will pass below the 16:1 resonance (268.4 km). The effect of this resonance, together with the uncertainty in the solar activity prediction, has a distinct impact on the evolution of the orbital elements. Then, to maintain a near-constant and extremely low altitude for the measurement operational phases, the satellite will use an ion thruster to compensate for the atmospheric drag. In order to obtain the groundtrack grid dense enough for a proper sampling of the gravitational field, ESA set constraints for a minimum groundtrack repeat period. We studied suitable repeat cycles (resonant orbits) in the vicinity of 16:1 resonance; we found that they differ greatly in stability towards small perturbations of the satellite's mean altitude and in temporal evolution of the groundtrack coverage. The results obtained from the usual analytical treatment of orbital resonances were refined by more realistic numerical simulations. Finally, we formulated suggestions that might be useful in GOCE orbit planning.

  10. A GOCE only gravity model GOSG01S and the validation of GOCE related satellite gravity models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We compile the GOCE-only satellite model GOSG01S complete to spherical harmonic degree of 220 using Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG data and the Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST observations along the GOCE orbit based on applying a least-squares analysis. The diagonal components (Vxx, Vyy, Vzz of the gravitational gradient tensor are used to form the system of observation equations with the band-pass ARMA filter. The point-wise acceleration observations (ax, ay, az along the orbit are used to form the system of observation equations up to the maximum spherical harmonic degree/order 130. The analysis of spectral accuracy characteristics of the newly derived gravitational model GOSG01S and the existing models GOTIM04S, GODIR04S, GOSPW04S and JYY_GOCE02S based on their comparison with the ultra-high degree model EIGEN-6C2 reveals a significant consistency at the spectral window approximately between 80 and 190 due to the same period SGG data used to compile these models. The GOCE related satellite gravity models GOSG01S, GOTIM05S, GODIR05S, GOTIM04S, GODIR04S, GOSPW04S, JYY_GOCE02S, EIGEN-6C2 and EGM2008 are also validated by using GPS-leveling data in China and USA. According to the truncation at degree 200, the statistic results show that all GGMs have very similar differences at GPS-leveling points in USA, and all GOCE related gravity models have better performance than EGM2008 in China. This suggests that all these models provide much more information on the gravity field than EGM2008 in areas with low terrestrial gravity coverage. And STDs of height anomaly differences in China for the selected truncation degrees show that GOCE has improved the accuracy of the global models beyond degree 90 and the accuracies of the models improve from 24 cm to 16 cm. STDs of geoid height differences in USA show that GOSG01S model has best consistency comparing with GPS-leveling data for the frequency band of the degree between 20 and 160.

  11. Orbital rotations of a satellite. Case study: GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, O.; Grafarend, E. W.

    Considering a satellite orbit as a space curve in terms of Differential Geometry, we succeeded to merge orbital rotation and curvature/torsion by means of Cartan connection. Here we transform the Frenet frame of reference of the space curve to the Kepler frame of reference ("along track", "cross track", "quasi-radial") of the satellite orbit by means of Meusnier's Lemma. As a case study, we identify the spectrum of orbital rotation frequencies relative to a GOCE satellite configuration. In particular, we identify more than one rotational period. For a moving frame of reference of type Frenet, periods in the range of the time of revolution of the satellite as well as half the time of revolution appear, whereas even periods of a third the revolution time become visible for the Kepler frame of reference. We describe moving frame rotations with respect to the quasi-inertial frame of reference, namely the angular velocities around the base vectors, by means of curvature measures. This allows to calculate frame rotations by geometric orbit information only (GPS track), i.e. apart from gradiometer measurements. Among other things, we identify the angular velocity relative to the second base vector becoming strictly zero in case of the Frenet frame of reference.

  12. Gravity field models derived from the second degree radial derivatives of the GOCE mission: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Marchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The GOCE satellite mission is one of the main achievements of the satellite geodesy for the Earth’s gravitational field recovery. Three different approaches have been developed for the estimation of harmonic coefficients from gradiometry data measured on board of GOCE-satellite. In this paper a special version of the space-wise method based on the second method of Neumann for fast determination of the harmonic coefficients Cnm, Snm of the Earth’s gravitational potential is given based on the radial gravity gradients of the EGG_TRF_2 product, except of two polar gaps filled by radial gradients from the EGM2008 gravity model. In the pre-processing stage GOCE-based second degree radial derivatives were averaged to the regular grid through Kalman static filter with additional Gaussean smoothing of residual radial derivatives. All computations are made by iterations. As the first step the determination of the preliminary NULP-01S model up to degree/order 220 derived from the Gaussean grid of the GOCE radial derivatives with respect to the WGS-84 reference field was developed based only one of the radial gradients EGG_TRF_2 in the EFRF-frame. In the second iteration the same algorithm is applied to build the NULP-02S gravity field model up to degree/order 250 using the same Gaussean grid with respect to the NULP-01S reference field. The NULP-02S model was verified by means of applying various approaches for the construction of the gridded gravity anomalies and geoid heights in the Black sea area using processing of datasets from six altimetry satellite missions. Comparison of different models with GNSS-levelling data in the USA area demonstrates the independent verification of achieved accuracy of the constructed NULP-02S Earth’s gravity field model.

  13. GOCE Data for Ocean Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija

    As the most advanced gravity space mission to date, The Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mapped global variations in the gravity field with remarkable detail and accuracy. Variations are mapped by observing second order derivatives (gradients) of the Earth...... gravitational potential. The results are Earth geopotential models and the geoid. An important use of GOCE is in oceanography, where an improved understanding of Earth’s gravitational field contributes to an improved description of the ocean circulation. The GOCE gradients, having a spatially dense data...... MDT and GOCINA project MDT is made. The results presented here are based on only 18 months of GOCE data, and they show that GOCE data provides better estimation of the MDT and ocean’s geostrophic circulation in GOCINA region than any previously obtained using only satellite observations. However...

  14. Satellite altimetry and GOCE contribution to the pre-definition of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) Vertical Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergos, Georgios S.; Grebenitcharsky, Rossen S.; Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Al-Kherayef, Othman; Al-Muslmani, Bandar

    2017-04-01

    The availability of a unified and well-established national vertical system and frame is of outmost importance in support of everyday geodetic, surveying and engineering applications. Vertical reference system (VRS) modernization and unification has gained increased importance especially during the last years due to the advent of gravity-field dedicated missions and GOCE in particular, since it is the first time that an unprecedented in accuracy dataset of gravity field functionals has become available at a global scale. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia VRS is outdated and exhibits significant tilts and biases, so that during the last couple of years an extensive effort has been put forth in order to: re-measure by traditional levelling the entire network, establish new benchmarks (BMs), perform high-quality absolute and relative gravity observations and construct new tide-gauge (TG) stations in both the Arab and Red Seas. The Current work focuses on the combined analysis of the existing, recently collected, terrestrial observations with satellite altimetry data and the latest GOCE-based Earth Geopotential Models (EGMs) in order to provide a pre-definition of the KSA VRS. To that respect, a 30-year satellite altimetry time-series is constructed for each TG station in order to derive both the Mean Sea Level (MSL) as well as the sea level trends. This information is analyzed, through Wavelet (WL) Multi-resolution Analysis (MRA), with the TG sea level records in order to determine annual, semi-annual and secular trends of the Red and Arab Sea variations. Finally, the so-derived trends and MSL are combined with local gravity observations at the TG BMs, levelling offsets between the TGs and the network BMs, levelling observations between the network BMs themselves and GOCE-based EGM-derived geoid heights and potential values. The validation of GOCE contribution and of the satellite altimetry derived MSL and trends is based on a simultaneous adjustment of the entire KSA

  15. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, J.; Knudsen, P.

    2013-12-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products. GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations, and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Recently, the second version of the GOCE User Toolbox (GUT) was developed to enhance the exploitation of GOCE level 2 data with ERS ENVISAT altimetry. The developments of GUT focused on the following issues: Data Extraction, Generation, Filtering, and Data Save and Restore Without any doubt the development of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for oceanography. The results of the preliminary analysis carried out in this phase of the GUTS project have already demonstrated a significant advance in the ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features compared with earlier satellite only solutions. Calculation of the geostrophic surface currents from the MDT reveals improvements for all of the ocean's major current systems.

  16. Gravitacijske satelitske misije : Satellite gravity missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medžida Mulić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sila teže se smatra osnovnom fizikalnom silom u prirodi. Savremene satelitske misije: CHAMP, GRACE i GOCE omogućile su dobivanje globalnih modela polja sile teže s veoma visokom tačnošću, kao i njegovih prostornih i temporalnih varijacija. U ovom radu istaknuti su ciljevi, karakteristike i rezultati navedenih misija, te iznesena očekivanja u budućnosti, kao i njihov značaj i doprinos za geodetsku praksu kao i istraživanja u oblasti geodezije, geofizike i hidrologije. : Gravity is considered as the basic physical force in the nature. Modern satellite missions: CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE allowed modeling of the global gravity field with very high accuracy, as well as its spatial and temporal variations. This paper describes the main objectives, characteristics, the latest results of these missions, as well as the expectations of the future observations, and their importance and contributions for the surveying and geodetic practice, and scientific achievements as well, in geodesy, geophysics and hydrology.

  17. Acceleration Noise Considerations for Drag-free Satellite Geodesy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. H.; Conklin, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The GRACE mission, which launched in 2002, opened a new era of satellite geodesy by providing monthly mass variation solutions with spatial resolution of less than 200 km. GRACE proved the usefulness of a low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking formation. Analysis of the GRACE data showed that the K-Band ranging system, which is used to measure the range between the two satellites, is the limiting factor for the precision of the solution. Consequently, the GRACE-FO mission, schedule for launch in 2017, will continue the work of GRACE, but will also test a new, higher precision laser ranging interferometer compared with the K-Band ranging system. Beyond GRACE-FO, drag-free systems are being considered for satellite geodesy missions. GOCE tested a drag-free attitude control system with a gravity gradiometer and showed improvements in the acceleration noise compensation compared to the electrostatic accelerometers used in GRACE. However, a full drag-free control system with a gravitational reference sensor has not yet been applied to satellite geodesy missions. More recently, this type of drag-free system was used in LISA Pathfinder, launched in 2016, with an acceleration noise performance two orders of magnitude better than that of GOCE. We explore the effects of drag-free performance in satellite geodesy missions similar to GRACE-FO by applying three different residual acceleration noises from actual space missions: GRACE, GOCE and LISA Pathfinder. Our solutions are limited to degree 60 spherical harmonic coefficients with biweekly time resolution. Our analysis shows that a drag-free system with acceleration noise performance comparable to GOCE and LISA-Pathfinder would greatly improve the accuracy of gravity solutions. In addition to these results, we also present the covariance shaping process used in the estimation. In the future, we plan to use actual acceleration noise data measured using the UF torsion pendulum. This apparatus is a ground facility at

  18. Distributed fault slip model for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake from GNSS and GRACE/GOCE satellite gravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, Martin Johann; Hooper, Andrew; Broerse, Taco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411299344; Bouman, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission (launched 2002) and the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission (March 2009 to November 2013) collected spaceborne gravity data for the preseismic and postseismic periods of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. I

  19. Distributed fault slip model for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake from GNSS and GRACE/GOCE satellite gravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, Martin Johann; Hooper, Andrew; Broerse, Taco; Bouman, Johannes

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission (launched 2002) and the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission (March 2009 to November 2013) collected spaceborne gravity data for the preseismic and postseismic periods of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

  20. Distributed fault slip model for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake from GNSS and GRACE/GOCE satellite gravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, Martin Johann; Hooper, Andrew; Broerse, Taco; Bouman, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission (launched 2002) and the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission (March 2009 to November 2013) collected spaceborne gravity data for the preseismic and postseismic periods of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. I

  1. On the joint inversion of SGG and SST data from the GOCE mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ditmar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth’s gravity field from satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST data and satellite gravity gradiometry (SGG data is considered. As long as the functional model related to SST data contains nuisance parameters (e.g. unknown initial state vectors, assembling of the corresponding normal matrix must be supplied with the back-substitution operation, so that the nuisance parameters are excluded from consideration. The traditional back-substitution algorithm, however, may result in large round-off errors. Hence an alternative approach, back-substitution at the level of the design matrix, is implemented. Both a stand-alone inversion of either type of data and a joint inversion of both types are considered. The conclusion drawn is that the joint inversion results in a much better model of the Earth’s gravity field than a standalone inversion. Furthermore, two numerical techniques for solving the joint system of normal equations are compared: (i the Cholesky method based on an explicit computation of the normal matrix, and (ii the pre-conditioned conjugate gradient method (PCCG, for which an explicit computation of the entire normal matrix is not needed. The comparison shows that the PCCG method is much faster than the Cholesky method.Key words. Earth’s gravity field, GOCE, satellite-tosatellite tracking, satellite gravity gradiometry, backsubstitution

  2. Modeling tectonic heat flow and source rock maturity in the Rub' Al-Khali Basin (Saudi Arabia), with the help of GOCE satellite gravity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul Fattah, R.; Meekes, S.; Bouman, J.; Ebbing, J.; Haagmans, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D basin modeling study was carried out to reconstruct the regional heat flow and source rock maturity in the Rub'al-Khali basin. Gravity gradient data from the GOCE satellite were used to model deep structures, such as the Moho interface. Tectonic heat flow was modeled using the GOCE-based Moho i

  3. Enhanced Mean Dynamic Topography And Ocean Circulation Estimation Using Goce Preliminary Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Bingham, Rory; Andersen, Ole Baltazar;

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Ocean Circulation Experiment - GOCE satellite mission measure the Earth gravity field with unprecedented accuracy leading to substantial improvements in the modelling of the ocean circulation and transport. In this study of the performance of GOCE, the new preliminary gravity mode...

  4. Improving GOCE cross-track gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemes, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The GOCE gravity gradiometer measured highly accurate gravity gradients along the orbit during GOCE's mission lifetime from March 17, 2009, to November 11, 2013. These measurements contain unique information on the gravity field at a spatial resolution of 80 km half wavelength, which is not provided to the same accuracy level by any other satellite mission now and in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the gravity gradient in cross-track direction is heavily perturbed in the regions around the geomagnetic poles. We show in this paper that the perturbing effect can be modeled accurately as a quadratic function of the non-gravitational acceleration of the satellite in cross-track direction. Most importantly, we can remove the perturbation from the cross-track gravity gradient to a great extent, which significantly improves the accuracy of the latter and offers opportunities for better scientific exploitation of the GOCE gravity gradient data set.

  5. GOCE in orbita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bernardini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available GOCE in orbitGOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer is finally in orbit. On March 17th after a few slight problems during the preparatory phases, the mission was successfully launched from the Plesetsk cosmodrome. This article features a focus on one of GOCE's more sophisticated instruments - the Electrostatic gravity Gradiometer or EGG - explained in detail using an image gallery.

  6. Errors of Mean Dynamic Topography and Geostrophic Current Estimates in China's Marginal Seas from GOCE and Satellite Altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Feng, Guiping; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2014-01-01

    and geostrophic current estimates from satellite gravimetry and altimetry are investigated and evaluated in China's marginal seas. The cumulative error in MDT from GOCE is reduced from 22.75 to 9.89 cm when compared to the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity field model ITG-Grace2010 results...

  7. Explaining the thick crust in Paraná basin, Brazil, with satellite GOCE gravity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizia; Braitenberg, Carla; Ussami, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Seismologic observations in the last decades have shown that the crustal thickness in Paraná basin locally is over 40 km thick, which is a greater value than expected by the simple isostatic model considering the topographic load. The goal of this work is to explain this apparent discrepancy by modeling the internal crustal density anomalies through the gravity field. We use the latest Earth Gravity Model derived from the observations of the GOCE satellite mission, to retrieve the gravity anomaly and correct it for topographic effects, thus obtaining the Bouguer field. We then model the gravity effect of known stratigraphic units and of the seismological crustal thickness. The large Paraná basin comprises over 3500 m of Paleozoic sedimentary sequence with density between 2400 and 2600 kg/m3. During the Early Cretaceous the same basin was affected by a large amount of igneous activity with a volume of over 0.1 Mkm3. The flood basalt volcanism is known as the Serra Geral Formation, and has a maximum thickness of 1500 m. The stratigraphic units of the basin are topped by post-volcanic deposits of the Bauru Group, of about 300 m thickness, located in the northern part of the basin. The density and thickness of the sedimentary sequence are constrained by sonic logs of drill-holes and exploration seismic. We use the crustal thickness estimated from the newest seismological results for South America to calculate its gravity effect. Further we model the isostatic crustal thickness variation, allowing the comparison between a seismological Moho, an isostatic Moho, and a gravity-based Moho. We find that there is a clear positive Bouguer residual anomaly located in the northern and southern part of the Paraná basin, indicating the presence of a hidden mass, not considered up to now. We propose a model that explains this mass as magmatic rock, probably gabbro in lower crust, with density contrast of 200 kg/m3 and thickness of more than 10 km, thus demonstrating that the

  8. Nonlinear Diffusion Filtering of the GOCE-Based Satellite-Only Mean Dynamic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunderlik, Robert; Mikula, Karol

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents nonlinear diffusion filtering of the GOCE-based satellite-only mean dynamic topography (MDT). Our approach is based on a numerical solution to the nonlinear diffusion equation defined on the discretized Earth’s surface using the regularized surface Perona-Malik Model. For its numerical discretization we use a surface finite volume method. A key idea is that the diffusivity coefficient depends on the edge detector. It allows effectively reduce the stripping noise while preserve important gradients in filtered data. Numerical experiments present nonlinear filtering of the geopotential evaluated from the GO_CONS_GCF_2_ DIR_R5 model on the DTU13 mean sea surface. After filtering the geopotential is transformed into the MDT.

  9. Enhanced Mean Dynamic Topography And Ocean Circulation Estimation Using Goce Preliminary Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Bingham, Rory; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Ocean Circulation Experiment - GOCE satellite mission measure the Earth gravity field with unprecedented accuracy leading to substantial improvements in the modelling of the ocean circulation and transport. In this study of the performance of GOCE, the new preliminary gravity models...... have been combined with the recent DNSC08MSS mean sea surface model to construct a global GOCE satellite-only mean dynamic topography model. At a first glance, the GOCE MDT display the well known features related to the major ocean current systems. A closer look, however, reveals that the improved...... gravity provided by the GOCE mission has enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundary of those features. A computation of MDT slopes clearly displays the improvements in the description of the current systems. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf Stream is very well defined and the Labrador...

  10. GOCE: Its principles and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R.; Gruber, T.; Albertella, W.; Yi, A.

    2012-12-01

    GOCE is the first satellite mission with a gravity gradiometer. It is very successful in delivering the global geoid and gravity anomaly field with rather high spatial resolution. The gradiometer measurements are based on the principle of differential accelerometry. It is the centre piece of a sensor system comprising in addition GPS, star tracking, angular control by magnetic torquing, drag free control in flight direction by ion thrusting and calibration via shaking with cold gas thrusters. Gravity field sensitivity is enhanced by the satellite's extremely low orbit altitude of only 265 km. GOCE science and application is primarily about "dynamic topography". In geophysics dynamic topography is referred to as that part of surface deformation which is not in isostatic balance but supported by vertical stresses at the base of the lithosphere. Gravity and geoid anomalies reflect the gravitational effect of dynamic topography. In oceanography dynamic topography is the deviation of the actual mean ocean surface, as measured by satellite altimetry, from the geoid which is the hypothetical ocean surface at rest. The uses of mean dynamic ocean topography range from ocean circulation studies via mass and heat transport in the oceans to the unification of height systems and levelling by GPS. Full exploitation of GOCE requires its combination with GRACE and with satellite laser ranging and GPS. The considered measurements and techniques must all refer consistently to the same set of geodetic standards such as those defined by the IERS.

  11. Global gravity field models from the GPS positions of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezděk, A.; Sebera, J.; Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our work is to generate Earth's gravity field models from the GPS positions of low Earth orbiters. We will present our inversion method and numerical results based on the real-world data of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites. The presented inversion method is based on Newton's second law of motion, which relates the observed acceleration of the satellite with the forces acting on it. The vector of the observed acceleration is obtained through a numerical second-derivative filter applied to the time series of the kinematic positions. Forces other than those due to the geopotential are either modelled (lunisolar perturbations, tides) or provided by the onboard measurements (nongravitational perturbations). Then the observation equations are formulated using the gradient of the spherical harmonic expansion of the geopotential. From this linear system the harmonic coefficients are directly obtained. We do not use any a priori gravity field model. Although the basic scheme of the acceleration approach is straightforward, the implementation details play a crucial role in obtaining reasonable results. The numerical derivative of noisy data (here the GPS positions) strongly amplifies the high frequency noise and creates autocorrelation in the observation errors. We successfully solve both of these problems by using the generalized least squares method, which defines a linear transformation of the observation equations. In the transformed variables the errors become uncorrelated, so the ordinary least squares estimation may be used to find the regression parameters with correct estimates of their uncertainties. The digital filter of the second derivative is an approximation to the analytical operation. We will show how different the results might be depending on the particular choice of the parameters defining the filter. Another problem is the correlation of the errors in the GPS positions. Here we use the tools from time series analysis. The systematic behaviour

  12. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  13. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...

  14. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Although the first satellite observations of the Earth’s magnetic field were already taken more than 50 years ago, continuous geomagnetic measurements from space are only available since 1999. The unprecedented time-space coverage of this recent data set opened revolutionary new possibilities...... for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...... exploration of Earth’s magnetic field with satellites....

  15. A global mean dynamic topography and ocean circulation estimation using a preliminary GOCE gravity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Bingham, R.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth’s gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. In doing so, it promises to significantly advance our ability to determine the ocean’s general circulation. In this study......, an initial gravity model from GOCE, based on just 2 months of data, is combined with the recent DTU10MSS mean sea surface to construct a global mean dynamic topography (MDT) model. The GOCE MDT clearly displays the gross features of the ocean’s steady-state circulation. More significantly, the improved...... gravity model provided by the GOCE mission has enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features compared with earlier satellite only solutions. Calculation of the geostrophic surface currents from the MDT reveals improvements for all of the ocean’s major current systems. In the North...

  16. Fast and Robust Method for the Computation of Spherical Harmonic Coefficients from SST Data of GOCE Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, F.; Idres, M.; Kahlouche, S.

    2010-12-01

    A method is presented for the fast and robust computation of the spherical harmonic coefficients of the terrestrial gravitational field from precise kinematic orbit of GOCE satellite. To reduce the influence of outliers in the kinematic orbit, Huber's M-estimation is applied. The computational aspect of this method is studied with great importance by investigating the Newton's procedure which converges faster than the iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm. The processing strategy of the orbit data is based on satellite accelerations, which are derived from GPS position time-series by Newton's interpolation. The gradient of the gravitational potential with respect to rectangular coordinates is expressed using the Cunningham-Metris method. The Newton's law of motion performs the equality between satellite accelerations and the gradient of the gravitational potential in an inertial frame system. Numerical results using simulated data are realized in order to test the robustness and the computational efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. GOCE Activities in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, R.; Visser, P.; Selig, A.; Ambrosius, B.

    2004-06-01

    Dutch groups and persons have been participating in GOCE activities from the early days of the project till now and are planning to stay involved until the goals of the mission will be realised. The activities, that actually go back all the way to the first ideas of the ARISTOTELES mission, have been evolving over many aspects of the mission, from instrument simulation via data processing to user applications. The groups now involved can rely on a long lasting expertise in the respective fields of interest: space geodesy, orbital mechanics, space research and technology, oceanography and geodynamics. In the context of GOCE, but also in related fields, the participating Dutch groups have established both national and international cooperation and reputation. A Dutch GOCE User Community is being established and this paper will present the ongoing and planned GOCE activities within this community. In this overview we will deal with issues of organisation, science projects, cooperation and an outlook to the future after GOCE.

  18. Quasi-Stationary SST Estimation in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea Using Marine Gravity, GOCE/GRACE Gravity Information and Recent Altimetry Missions Through the Multiple Input/Multiple Output System Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andritsanos, Vassilios D.; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2016-08-01

    The Multiple Input / Multiple Output System (MIMOS) Theory is used in the spectral combination of marine and satellite data for Quasi-stationary Sea Surface Topography (QSST) estimation. 15 years (2000 - 2015) of altimetric data from ERS2, GEOSAT FOLLOW-ON, ENVISAT and SARAL / Altika satellites are optimally combined with in situ marine gravity observations. The repeated character of the altimetric missions provides more than one sample of Sea Surface Height (SSH) data sets, and the approximation of the input signal and output error power spectral densities is feasible using this successive information. The assimilation of low frequency global gravity information from GOCE/GRACE satellites is considered in data reductions. The geodynamically active area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea is chosen as test area and the evolution of yearly SST is presented.

  19. A global mean ocean circulation estimation using goce gravity models - the DTU12MDT mean dynamic topography model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Ocean Circulation Experiment - GOCE satellite mission measure the Earth gravity field with unprecedented accuracy leading to substantial improvements in the modelling of the ocean circulation and transport. In this study of the performance of GOCE, a newer gravity model have been...... have been improved significantly compared to results obtained using pre-GOCE gravity field models. The results of this study show that geostrophic surface currents associated with the mean circulation have been further improved and that currents having speeds down to 5 cm/s have been recovered....

  20. Ravens satellite mission concept study

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, Eric F

    2011-01-01

    The concept for Ravens satellite mission was proposed in response to a CSA AO for potential Canadian mission contributions to the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. Ravens was conceived of to fill an important gap in the ILWS program: global imaging. Ravens will build on the heritage of world-class global imaging carried out in Canada. It would do much more than provide global observations to complete the system level capabilities of ILWS. Ravens would be comprised of two satellites on elliptical polar orbits, relatively phased on those orbits to provide the first-ever continuous (ie., 24 hours per day 7 days per week) global imaging of the northern hemisphere auroral and polar cap regions. This would provide the first-ever unbroken sequences of global images of the auroral response during long duration geomagnetic processes like storms and steady magnetospheric convection events. Ravens could track the spatio-temporal evolution of the global electron and proton auroral distribution, and would o...

  1. Updated Hungarian Gravity Field Solution Based on Fifth Generation GOCE Gravity Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Gyula; Foldvary, Lorant

    2015-03-01

    With the completion of the ESA's GOCE satellite's mission fifth generation gravity field models are available from the ESA's GOCE High Processing Facility. Our contribution is an updated gravity field solution for Hungary using the latest DIR R05 GOCE gravity field model. The solution methodology is least squares gravity field parameter estimation using Spherical Radial Base Functions (SRBF). Regional datasets include deflections of the vertical (DOV), gravity anomalies and quasigeoid heights by GPS/levelling. The GOCE DIR R05 model has been combined with the EGM20008 model and has been evaluated in comparison with the EGM2008 and EIGEN-6C3stat models to assess the performance of our regional gravity field solution.

  2. Performance analysis of satellite constellations for the next generation of gravity missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, J.; Flechtner, F.; Löcher, A.; Kusche, J.

    2011-12-01

    The GOCE and GRACE gravity missions have dramatically improved the knowledge of the Earth's static and time-variable gravity field due to their highly precise on-board instrumentation. This resulted in new information about the mass distribution and transport within or around the Earth system to be used in solid Earth geophysics, oceanography and sea level studies, hydrology, ice mass budget investigations and geodesy. GFZ Potsdam and IGG Bonn, with partners from German industry and universities, have conducted several studies in order to develop a concept for a future gravity mission based on low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, but realized with laser metrology. In our poster we summarize the performance of different mission scenarios through full-scale simulations and their capacity to reach the science objectives.

  3. Spectral assessment of isostatic gravity models against CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE satellite-only and combined gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoulis, Dimitrios; Patlakis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    The availability of digital elevation databases representing the topographic and bathymetric relief with global homogeneous coverage and increasing resolution permits the computation of crust-related Earth gravity models, the so-called topographic/isostatic Earth gravity models (henceforth T/I models). Although expressing the spherical harmonic content of the topographic masses, the interpretation purpose of T/I models has not been given the attention it deserves, apart from the fact that they express some degree of compensation to the observed spectrum of the topographic heights, depending on the kind of the applied compensation mechanism. The present contribution attempts to improve the interpretation aspects of T/I Earth gravity models. To this end, a rigorous spectral assessment is performed to a standard Airy/Heiskanen T/I model against different CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), Gravity field and steadystate Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite-only, and combined gravity models. Different correlation bandwidths emerge for these four groups of satellite-based gravity models. The band-limited forward computation of the models using these bandwidths reproduces nicely the main features of the applied T/I model.

  4. GOCE Exploitation for Moho Modeling and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampierto, D.

    2011-07-01

    New ESA missions dedicated to the observation of the Earth from space, like the gravity-gradiometry mission GOCE and the radar altimetry mission CRYOSAT 2, foster research, among other subjects, also on inverse gravimetric problems and on the description of the nature and the geographical location of gravimetric signals. In this framework the GEMMA project (GOCE Exploitation for Moho Modeling and Applications), funded by the European Space Agency and Politecnico di Milano, aims at estimating the boundary between Earth's crust and mantle (the so called Mohorovičić discontinuity or Moho) from GOCE data in key regions of the world. In the project a solution based on a simple two layer model in spherical approximation is proposed. This inversion problem based on the linearization of the Newton's gravitational law around an approximate mean Moho surface will be solved by exploiting Wiener-Kolmogorov theory in the frequency domain where the depth of the Moho discontinuity will be treated as a random signal with a zero mean and its own covariance function. The algorithm can be applied in a numerically efficient way by using the Fast Fourier Transform. As for the gravity observations, we will consider grids of the anomalous gravitational potential and its second radial derivative at satellite altitude. In particular this will require first of all to elaborate GOCE data to obtain a local grid of the gravitational potential field and its second radial derivative and after that to separate the gravimetric signal due to the considered discontinuity from the gravitational effects of other geological structures present into the observations. The first problem can be solved by applying the so called space- wise approach to GOCE observations, while the second one can be achieved by considering a priori models and geophysical information by means of an appropriate Bayesan technique. Moreover other data such as ground gravity anomalies or seismic profiles can be combined, in an

  5. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Honecker, Johanna

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved...... gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from...

  6. GOCE gradiometer validation by GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.

    The upcoming European Space Agency (ESA) Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) mission, foreseen to be launched in 2007 (status: July 2006) will carry a highly sensitive gradiometer, consisting of three orthogonal pairs of ultra-sensitive accelerometers. A challenging calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the gradiometer not only pre-launch by a series of on-ground tests, but also after launch by making use of on-board cold-gas thrusters to provoke a long series of gradiometer shaking events which will provide observations for its calibration. In addition, a number of quick-look post-launch methods has been designed and will be implemented that aim at validating the calibration of the gradiometer instrument and at the same time support the operations of the satellite. These methods are based on (1) comparison with the best available global gravity field models, (2) upward continuation of high-precision ground-based gravity field data over certain geographical areas, and (3) use of GPS Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) observations. The focus of this paper is on the third method. An assessment has been made of how well the gradiometer observations can be validated by a combination with GPS tracking observations of GOCE. It was found by a detailed simulation study that the most important parameters, the scale factors of the diagonal gravity gradient components, can be determined with an accuracy better than 0.004, provided a nominal behavior of the gradiometer and GPS instruments.

  7. Efficient and rapid accuracy estimation of the Earth's gravitational field from next-generation GOCE Follow-On by the analytical method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wei; Hsu Hou-Tse; Zhong Min; Liu Cheng-Shu; Yun Mei-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Firstly,a new analytical error model of the cumulative geoid height using the three-dimensional diagonal tensors of satellite gravity gradiometry (SGG) is introduced based on the variance-covariance matrix principle.Secondly,a study for the requirements demonstration on the next-generation GOCE Follow-On satellite gravity gradiometry system is developed using different satellite orbital altitudes and measurement accuracies of satellite gravity gradiometer by the new analytical error model of SGG.The research results show that it is preferable to design satellite orbital altitudes of 300 km-400 km and choose the measurement accuracies of 10 13/s2-10-15/s2 from satellite gravity gradiometer.Finally,the complementarity of the four-stage satellite gravity missions,including past CHAMP,current GRACE,and GOCE,and next-generation GOCE Follow-On,is contrastively demonstrated for precisely recovering the Earth's full-frequency gravitational field with high spatial resolution.

  8. Efficient GOCE satellite gravity field recovery based on least-squares using QR decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, O.; Austen, G.; Kusche, J.

    2007-01-01

    We develop and apply an efficient strategy for Earth gravity field recovery from satellite gravity gradiometry data. Our approach is based upon the Paige-Saunders iterative least-squares method using QR decomposition (LSQR). We modify the original algorithm for space-geodetic applications: firstly,

  9. Antarctic outlet glacier mass change resolved at basin scale from satellite gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Fuchs, M.; Ivins, E.; Van der Wal, W.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Horwath, M.

    2014-01-01

    The orbit and instrumental measurement of the Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission offer the highest ever resolution capabilities for mapping Earth's gravity field from space. However, past analysis predicted that GOCE would not detect changes in ice

  10. Antarctic outlet glacier mass change resolved at basin scale from satellite gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Fuchs, M.; Ivins, E.; Van der Wal, W.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Horwath, M.

    2014-01-01

    The orbit and instrumental measurement of the Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission offer the highest ever resolution capabilities for mapping Earth's gravity field from space. However, past analysis predicted that GOCE would not detect changes in ice she

  11. Topographic/isostatic evaluation of new-generation GOCE gravity field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, C.; Kuhn, M.; Featherstone, W. E.; GöTtl, F.

    2012-05-01

    We use gravity implied by the Earth's rock-equivalent topography (RET) and modeled isostatic compensation masses to evaluate the new global gravity field models (GGMs) from European Space Agency (ESA)'s Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite gravimetry mission. The topography is now reasonably well-known over most of the Earth's landmasses, and also where conventional GGM evaluation is prohibitive due to the lack (or unavailability) of ground-truth gravity data. We construct a spherical harmonic representation of Earth's RET to derive band-limited topography-implied gravity, and test the somewhat simplistic Airy/Heiskanen and Pratt/Hayford hypotheses of isostatic compensation, but which did not improve the agreement between gravity from the uncompensated RET and GOCE. The third-generation GOCE GGMs (based on 12 months of space gravimetry) resolve the Earth's gravity field effectively up to spherical harmonic degree ˜200-220 (˜90-100 km resolution). Such scales could not be resolved from satellites before GOCE. From the three different GOCE processing philosophies currently in use by ESA, the time-wise and direct approaches exhibit the highest sensitivity to short-scale gravity recovery, being better than the space-wise approach. Our topography-implied gravity comparisons bring evidence of improvements from GOCE to gravity field knowledge over the Himalayas, Africa, the Andes, Papua New Guinea and Antarctic regions. In attenuated form, GOCE captures topography-implied gravity signals up to degree ˜250 (˜80 km resolution), suggesting that other signals (originating, e.g., from the crust-mantle boundary and buried loads) are captured as well, which might now improve our knowledge on the Earth's lithosphere structure at previously unresolved spatial scales.

  12. A Least Squares Collocation Approach with GOCE gravity gradients for regional Moho-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieser, Daniel; Mayer-Guerr, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    The depth of the Moho discontinuity is commonly derived by either seismic observations, gravity measurements or combinations of both. In this study, we aim to use the gravity gradient measurements of the GOCE satellite mission in a Least Squares Collocation (LSC) approach for the estimation of the Moho depth on regional scale. Due to its mission configuration and measurement setup, GOCE is able to contribute valuable information in particular in the medium wavelengths of the gravity field spectrum, which is also of special interest for the crust-mantle boundary. In contrast to other studies we use the full information of the gradient tensor in all three dimensions. The problem outline is formulated as isostatically compensated topography according to the Airy-Heiskanen model. By using a topography model in spherical harmonics representation the topographic influences can be reduced from the gradient observations. Under the assumption of constant mantle and crustal densities, surface densities are directly derived by LSC on regional scale, which in turn are converted in Moho depths. First investigations proofed the ability of this method to resolve the gravity inversion problem already with a small amount of GOCE data and comparisons with other seismic and gravitmetric Moho models for the European region show promising results. With the recently reprocessed GOCE gradients, an improved data set shall be used for the derivation of the Moho depth. In this contribution the processing strategy will be introduced and the most recent developments and results using the currently available GOCE data shall be presented.

  13. GOCE-based evaluation of the Hellenic Vertical Datum within the GOCE+++ project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziavos, Ilias N.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Grigoriadis, Vassilios N.; Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Tzanou, Eleni A.

    2017-04-01

    With the end of the GOCE mission, the latest Release5 (R5) Global Geopotential Models (GGMs), employing also the lower orbit satellite data, offer unprecedented geoid height accuracy at the 1-1.5 cm level for spherical harmonic expansions to d/o 230-240. In that sense, GOCE-based GGMs can provide a powerful tool in studies towards the modeling of Local Vertical Datum (LVD) distortions, the unification of LVDs at a country-wide scale and their referral to a World Height System (WHS) as realized by the International Height Reference System. Within the present study, the focus is put on the Hellenic LVD which is known to be of insufficient accuracy, containing biases between neighboring benchmarks (BMs) and lacking a connection between mainland Greece and the Greek islands and isles. The latest GOCE and GOCE/GRACE GGMs are employed in order first to study the distortions of the Hellenic LVD, as well as that of some of the major islands like Crete, Evoia, Rhodes, Corfu, etc. The identified distortions are then modeled using simple deterministic parametric surfaces in order to provide some reasoning on their nature, spatial pattern and possible origin. Finally, a determination of the geopotential value WoLVD for the Greek LVD is carried out, along with separate estimations for more than 85 Greek islands having available GPS/Leveling observations on BMs. The estimation of the mean offset of the Hellenic LVD was used to provide a direct link between the mainland and islands LVDs within the Greek territory, as well as with the IAG conventional value recently proposed as a Wo for a global WHS.

  14. Teamwork Reasoning and Multi-Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Stacy C.; Plaunt, Christian (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA is rapidly moving towards the use of spatially distributed multiple satellites operating in near Earth orbit and Deep Space. Effective operation of such multi-satellite constellations raises many key research issues. In particular, the satellites will be required to cooperate with each other as a team that must achieve common objectives with a high degree of autonomy from ground based operations. The multi-agent research community has made considerable progress in investigating the challenges of realizing such teamwork. In this report, we discuss some of the teamwork issues that will be faced by multi-satellite operations. The basis of the discussion is a particular proposed mission, the Magnetospheric MultiScale mission to explore Earth's magnetosphere. We describe this mission and then consider how multi-agent technologies might be applied in the design and operation of these missions. We consider the potential benefits of these technologies as well as the research challenges that will be raised in applying them to NASA multi-satellite missions. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  15. Comparison of Selected Geopotential Models in Terms of the GOCE Orbit Determination Using Simulated GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobojć, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    This work contains a comparative study of the performance of six geopotential models in an orbit estimation process of the satellite of the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission. For testing, such models as ULUX_CHAMP2013S, ITG-GRACE 2010S, EIGEN-51C, EIGEN5S, EGM2008, EGM96, were adopted. Different sets of pseudo-range simulations along reference GOCE satellite orbital arcs were obtained using real orbits of the Global Positioning System satellites. These sets were the basic observation data used in the adjustment. The centimeter-accuracy Precise Science Orbit (PSO) for the GOCE satellite provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) was adopted as the GOCE reference orbit. Comparing various variants of the orbital solutions, the relative accuracy of geopotential models in an orbital aspect is determined. Full geopotential models were used in the adjustment process. The solutions were also determined taking into account truncated geopotential models. In such case, an accuracy of the solutions was slightly enhanced. Different arc lengths were taken for the computation.

  16. Application of Gravity Gradients in the Process of GOCE Orbit Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobojć Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE mission satellite orbit using gravity gradient observations was investigated. The orbit improvement is performed by a dedicated software package, called the Orbital Computation System (OCS, which is based on the classical least squares method. The corrections to the initial satellite state vector components are estimated in an iterative process, using dynamic models describing gravitational perturbations. An important component implemented in the OCS package is the 8th order Cowell numerical integration procedure, which directly generates the satellite orbit. Taking into account the real and simulated GOCE gravity gradients, different variants of the solution of the orbit improvement process were obtained. The improved orbits were compared to the GOCE reference orbits (Precise Science Orbits for the GOCE satellite provided by the European Space Agency using the root mean squares (RMS of the differences between the satellite positions in these orbits. The comparison between the improved orbits and the reference orbits was performed with respect to the inertial reference frame (IRF at J2000.0 epoch. The RMS values for the solutions based on the real gravity gradient measurements are at a level of hundreds of kilometers and more. This means that orbit improvement using the real gravity gradients is ineffective. However, all solutions using simulated gravity gradients have RMS values below the threshold determined by the RMS values for the computed orbits (without the improvement. The most promising results were achieved when short orbital arcs with lengths up to tens of minutes were improved. For these short arcs, the RMS values reach the level of centimeters, which is close to the accuracy of the Precise Science Orbit for the GOCE satellite. Additional research has provided requirements for efficient orbit improvement in terms of the accuracy and

  17. Noise variance estimation and optimal weight determination for GOCE gravity recovery­

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kusche

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of level 2 data processing for the GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady–State Ocean Circulation Explorer satellite mission different streams of level 1b data will be merged in a single solution providing the Earth’s gravity field, but also state-vector parameters and other quantities. A proper weighting of orbit tracking data, gravity gradiometry data and certain a priori information, usually considered as ‘solution constraints’, can be expected as crucial for the solution quality. But the a priori stochastic models, based on pre–mission assessment of the expected instrument behaviour, may be over–optimistic or even too pessimistic since they refer to an unprecedented mission with scientific payload never tested in space. One way to derive an optimal weighting scheme on a statistically sound basis while simultaneously validating the stochastic noise levels of the data is by including variance component estimation as a part of the level 1b to level 2 data analysis process. The idea is that by applying Monte-Carlo techniques this method can be extended to a large-scale problem like GOCE data analysis, using software modules that already exist or are currently under development. The proposed method has been tested using simulated GOCE orbit trajectories as well as gravity gradiometry data corrupted by colored random noise.Key words. GOCE, gravity field modelling, combination solutions, weight estimation, variance component estimation

  18. Precise Orbit Determination of the GOCE Re-Entry Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gini, Francesco; Otten, Michiel; Springer, Tim; Enderle, Werner; Lemmens, Stijn; Flohrer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    During the last days of the GOCE mission, after the GOCE spacecraft ran out of fuel, it slowly decayed before finally re-entering the atmosphere on the 11th November 2013. As an integrated part of the AOCS, GOCE carried a GPS receiver that was in operations during the re-entry phase. This feature provided a unique opportunity for Precise Orbit Determination (POD) analysis. As part of the activities carried out by the Navigation Support Office (HSO-GN) at ESOC, precise ephemerides of the GOCE satellite have been reconstructed for the entire re-entry phase based on the available GPS observations of the onboard LAGRANGE receiver. All the data available from the moment the thruster was switched off on the 21st of October 2013 to the last available telemetry downlink on the 10th November 2013 have been processed, for a total of 21 daily arcs. For this period a dedicated processing sequence has been defined and implemented within the ESA/ESOC NAvigation Package for Earth Observation Satellites (NAPEOS) software. The computed results show a post-fit RMS of the GPS undifferenced carrier phase residuals (ionospheric-free linear combination) between 6 and 14 mm for the first 16 days which then progressively increases up to about 80 mm for the last available days. An orbit comparison with the Precise Science Orbits (PSO) generated at the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland) shows an average difference around 9 cm for the first 8 daily arcs and progressively increasing up to 17 cm for the following days. During this reentry phase (21st of October - 10th November 2013) a substantial drop in the GOCE altitude is observed, starting from about 230 km to 130 km where the last GPS measurements were taken. During this orbital decay an increment of a factor of 100 in the aerodynamic acceleration profile is observed. In order to limit the mis-modelling of the non-gravitational forces (radiation pressure and aerodynamic effects) the newly developed

  19. The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, G.; Habing, H. J.; Van Duinen, R.; Aumann, H. H.; Beichman, C. A.; Baud, B.; Beintema, D. A.; Boggess, N.; Clegg, P. E.; De Jong, T.

    1984-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) consists of a spacecraft and a liquid helium cryostat that contains a cooled IR telescope. The telescope's focal plane assembly is cooled to less than 3 K, and contains 62 IR detectors in the survey array which are arranged so that every source crossing the field of view can be seen by at least two detectors in each of four wavelength bands. The satellite was launched into a 900 km-altitude near-polar orbit, and its cryogenic helium supply was exhausted on November 22, 1983. By mission's end, 72 percent of the sky had been observed with three or more hours-confirming scans, and 95 percent with two or more hours-confirming scans. About 2000 stars detected at 12 and 25 microns early in the mission, and identified in the SAO (1966) catalog, have a positional uncertainty ellipse whose axes are 45 x 9 arcsec for an hours-confirmed source.

  20. Mean Upper-Ocean Circulation of the Southern Hemisphere Oceans Based on Goce Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, V. V.; Bingham, R. J.; Vianna, M. L.; Phillips, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Gravity and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission launched in 2009 is to improve the previous estimates of the global ocean circulation structures determined from Mean Dynamic Topographies (MDTs). Recently published studies suggest that the GOCE-based MDTs and their respective mean geostrophic circulation fields (MGCs) are superior to those obtained from GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment)-only data. These studies focus mostly on the circulation of the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans with emphasis on the strong western boundary current systems. In contrast, no detailed assessment has yet been made to determine the impact of the GOCE models in the southern hemisphere (SH) upper-ocean circulation especially in the subtropical region. It is generally recognized that the SH circulation is still not well established even at large scales, and the new GOCE and GRACE products can contribute to increase our understanding of the dominant currents in these regions, which may have even greater impact on the global climate than the NH counterparts. In the present work, we compute five global GOCE-derived MDTs with a 0.25 x 0.25 degree spatial grid based on three GOCE geoid models (TIM3, GOCO02S, GOCO3S) and three mean sea surfaces (CLS01, CLS11, DTU10) using the standard spectral approach (MSS minus Geoid). These MDTs do not have the well-known large-amplitude striation-type noise that plagued all of the GRACE-only MDTs with he same resolution, but still present commission errors which are filptered out with Singular Spectrum Analysis methods. Additionally, the MGCs were calculated by use of a Anderssen-Hegland averaging scheme for estimation of derivatives, which is able to filter out the well-known high amplitude noise caused by standard finite-difference methods. Comparisons with previous GRACE-only MGCs show that GOCE permits retrieval of currents with much higher intensities (e.g. the Agulhas

  1. An initial investigation of the GOCE error variance-covariance matrices in the context of the GOCE user toolbox project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Rory J.; Tscherning, Christian; Knudsen, Per

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the full error variance-covariance matrices for the GOCE gravity field models is an important feature of the GOCE mission. Potentially, it will allow users to evaluate the accuracy of a geoid or mean dynamic topography (MDT) derived from the gravity field model at any particular...... location, design optimal filters to remove errors from the surfaces, and rigorously assimilate a geoid/MDT into ocean models, or otherwise combine the GOCE gravity field with other data. Here we present an initial investigation into the error characteristics of the GOCE gravity field models...

  2. Quality of GOCE accelerometer data and analysis with ionospheric dynamics during geomagnetically active days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinem Ince, Elmas; Fomichev, Victor; Floberghagen, Rune; Schlicht, Anja; Martynenko, Oleg; Pagiatakis, Spiros

    2016-07-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) was launched in March, 2009 and completed its mission with great success in November, 2011. GOCE data processing is challenging and not all the disturbances are removed from the gravitational field observations. The disturbances observed in GOCE Vyy gradients around magnetic poles are investigated by using external datasets. It is found that the amplitude of these disturbances increase during geomagnetically active days and can reach up to 5 times the expected noise level of the gradiometer. ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and Wind satellites measured electric field and interplanetary magnetic field components have shown that the disturbances observed in the polar regions agree with the increased solar activity. Moreover, equivalent ionospheric currents computed along ascending satellite tracks over North America and Greenland have shown a noticeable correlation with the cross-track and vertical currents and the pointing flux (ExB) components in the satellite cross track direction. Lastly, Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) electric field and neutral wind simulations have shown a strong correlation of the enhancement in the ionospheric dynamics during geomagnetically active days and disturbances measured by the GOCE accelerometers over high latitudes. This may be a result of imperfect instrumentation and in-flight calibration of the GOCE accelerometers for an increased geomagnetic activity or a real disturbance on the accelerometers. We use above listed external datasets to understand the causes of the disturbances observed in gravity gradients and reduce/ eliminate them by using response analyses in frequency domain. Based on our test transfer functions, improvement is possible in the quality of the gradients. Moreover, this research also confirms that the accelerometer measurements can be useful to understand the ionospheric dynamics and space weather forecasting.

  3. Comparison and validation of combined GRACE/GOCE models of the Earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate global models of the Earth's gravity field are needed in various applications: in geodesy - to facilitate the production of a unified global height system; in oceanography - as a source of information about the reference equipotential surface (geoid); in geophysics - to draw conclusions about the structure and composition of the Earth's interiors, etc. A global and (nearly) homogeneous set of gravimetric measurements is being provided by the dedicated satellite mission Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In particular, Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) data acquired by this mission are characterized by an unprecedented accuracy/resolution: according to the mission objectives, they must ensure global geoid modeling with an accuracy of 1 - 2 cm at the spatial scale of 100 km (spherical harmonic degree 200). A number of new models of the Earth's gravity field have been compiled on the basis of GOCE data in the course of the last 1 - 2 years. The best of them take into account also the data from the satellite gravimetry mission Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE), which offers an unbeatable accuracy in the range of relatively low degrees. Such combined models contain state-of-the-art information about the Earth's gravity field up to degree 200 - 250. In the present study, we compare and validate such models, including GOCO02, EIGEN-6S, and a model compiled in-house. In addition, the EGM2008 model produced in the pre-GOCE era is considered as a reference. The validation is based on the ability of the models to: (i) predict GRACE K-Band Ranging (KBR) and GOCE SGG data (not used in the production of the models under consideration), and (ii) synthesize a mean dynamic topography model, which is compared with the CNES-CLS09 model derived from in situ oceanographic data. The results of the analysis demonstrate that the GOCE SGG data lead not only to significant improvements over continental areas with a poor coverage with

  4. Polar gravity fields from GOCE and airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Yidiz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Airborne gravity, together with high-quality surface data and ocean satellite altimetric gravity, may supplement GOCE to make consistent, accurate high resolution global gravity field models. In the polar regions, the special challenge of the GOCE polar gap make the error characteristics...... of combination models especially sensitive to the correct merging of satellite and surface data. We outline comparisons of GOCE to recent airborne gravity surveys in both the Arctic and the Antarctic. The comparison is done to new 8-month GOCE solutions, as well as to a collocation prediction from GOCE gradients...... in Antarctica. It is shown how the enhanced gravity field solutions improve the determination of ocean dynamic topography in both the Arctic and in across the Drake Passage. For the interior of Antarctica, major airborne gravity programs are currently being carried out, and there is an urgent need...

  5. Gradients from GOCE reveal gravity changes before Pisagua Mw=8.2 and Iquique Mw=7.7 large megathrust earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, O; Nacif, S.; S. Spagnotto; A. Folguera; Gimenez, M.; Chlieh, Mohamed; C. Braitenberg

    2015-01-01

    Considerable improvements in the measurement of the Earth gravity field from GOCE satellite mission have provided global gravity field models with homogeneous coverage, high precision and good spatial resolution. In particular, the vertical gravity gradient (Tzz), in comparison to the classic Bouguer anomaly, defines more accurately superficial mass heterogeneities. Moreover, the correction of these satellite-derived data from the effect of Earth topographic masses by means of new techniques ...

  6. An oceanographer’s guide to GOCE and the geoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Hughes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A review is given of the geodetic concepts necessary for oceanographers to make use of satellite gravity data to define the geoid, and to interpret the resulting product. The geoid is defined, with particular attention to subtleties related to the representation of the permanent tide, and the way in which the geoid is represented in ocean models. The usual spherical harmonic description of the gravitational field is described, together with the concepts required to calculate a geoid from the spherical harmonic coefficients. A brief description is given of the measurement system in the GOCE satellite mission, scheduled for launch shortly, followed by a description of a reference ellipsoid with respect to which the geoid may be calculated. Finally, a recipe is given for calculation of the geoid relative to any chosen ellipsoid, given a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and defining constants.

  7. Mission Design of the Dutch-Chinese FAST Micro-Satellite Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maessen, D.C.; Guo, J.; Gill, E.; Laan, E.; Moon, S.; Zheng, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    The paper treats the mission design for the Dutch-Chinese FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) mission. The space segment of the 2.5 year mission consists out of two formation flying micro-satellites. During the mission, new technologies will be demonstrated and, usi

  8. Mission Design of the Dutch-Chinese FAST Micro-Satellite Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maessen, D.C.; Guo, J.; Gill, E.; Laan, E.; Moon, S.; Zheng, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    The paper treats the mission design for the Dutch-Chinese FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) mission. The space segment of the 2.5 year mission consists out of two formation flying micro-satellites. During the mission, new technologies will be demonstrated and, usi

  9. Calibration and validation of individual GOCE accelerometers by precise orbit determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.N.A.M.; Van den IJssel, J.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) carries a gradiometer consisting of three pairs of accelerometers in an orthogonal triad. Precise GOCE science orbit solutions (PSO), which are based on satellite-to-satellite tracking observations by the Global

  10. Impact of GOCE on Regional Geoid Modelling: Finnish Territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Timo; Bilker-Koivula, Mirjam; Poutanen, Markku

    2016-08-01

    In the Dragon 3 project 10519 "Case study on heterogeneous geoid/quasigeoid based on space borne and terrestrial data combination with special consideration of GOCE mission data impact" we combined the latest GOCE models with the terrestrial gravity data of Finland and surrounding areas to calculate a quasi-geoid model for Finland. Altogether 249 geoid models with different modifications were calculated using the GOCE DIR5 models up to spherical harmonic degree and order 240 and 300 and the EIGEN-6C4 up to degree and order 1000 and 2190.The calculated quasi-geoid models were compared against the ground truth in Finland with two independent GPS-levelling datasets. The best GOCE- only models gave standard deviations of 2.8 cm, 2.6 cm (DIR5 d/o 240) and 2.7 cm, 2.3 cm (DIR5 d/o 300) in Finnish territory for NLS-FIN and EUVN-DA datasets, respectively. For the high resolution model EIGEN-6C4 (which includes the full cycle of the GOCE data), the results were 2.4 cm, 1.8 cm (d/o 1000) and 2.5 cm, 1.7 (d/o 2190). The sub-2-centimetre (and near 2 cm with GOCE-only) accuracy is an improvement over the previous and current Finnish geoid models, thus leading to a conclusion of the great impact of the GOCE- mission on regional geoid modelling.

  11. GOCE in ocean modelling - Point mass method applied on GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija

    2009-01-01

    This presentation is an introduction to my Ph.D project. The main objective of the study is to improve the methodology for combining GOCE gravity field models with satellite altimetry to derive optimal dynamic ocean topography models for oceanography. Here a method for geoid determination using...

  12. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : High energy universe – Satellite missions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinod Krishan

    2000-11-01

    A variety of satellite missions to observe the high energy universe are currently operating and some more with more versatility and capability are on the anvil. In this paper, after giving a brief introduction to the constituents of the high energy universe and the related plasma physical problems, general as well as specific features of the current and future x-ray and gamma-ray satellite missions are described.

  13. LARES succesfully launched in orbit: satellite and mission description

    CERN Document Server

    Paolozzi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On February 13th 2012, the LARES satellite of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) was launched into orbit with the qualification flight of the new VEGA launcher of the European Space Agency (ESA). The payload was released very accurately in the nominal orbit. The name LARES means LAser RElativity Satellite and summarises the objective of the mission and some characteristics of the satellite. It is, in fact, a mission designed to test Einstein's General Relativity Theory (specifically 'frame dragging' and Lense-Thirring effect). The satellite is passive and covered with optical retroreflectors that send back laser pulses to the emitting ground station. This allows accurate positioning of the satellite, which is important for measuring the very small deviations from Galilei-Newton's laws. In 2008, ASI selected the prime industrial contractor for the LARES system with a heavy involvement of the universities in all phases of the programme, from the design to the construction and testing of the satellite and separation...

  14. A university-based distributed satellite mission control network for operating professional space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Christopher; Rasay, Mike

    2016-03-01

    For more than a decade, Santa Clara University's Robotic Systems Laboratory has operated a unique, distributed, internet-based command and control network for providing professional satellite mission control services for a variety of government and industry space missions. The system has been developed and is operated by students who become critical members of the mission teams throughout the development, test, and on-orbit phases of these missions. The mission control system also supports research in satellite control technology and hands-on student aerospace education. This system serves as a benchmark for its comprehensive nature, its student-centric nature, its ability to support NASA and industry space missions, and its longevity in providing a consistent level of professional services. This paper highlights the unique features of this program, reviews the network's design and the supported spacecraft missions, and describes the critical programmatic features of the program that support the control of professional space missions.

  15. U.S. rainfall satellite missions in flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) received a reprieve in September when the agency decided to continue the mission until at least fiscal year 2009 and possibly until 2012. Earlier agency plans had called for discontinuing TRMM this year while the satellite still had enough fuel for a controlled re-entry.Despite the TRMM reprieve, however, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is already preparing for TRMM's replacement, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission.

  16. LCROSS: A High Return, Small Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Early in 2006, the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) held a competition for NASA Centers to propose innovative ideas for a secondary payload mission to launch with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to the Moon. The successful proposal could cost no more than $80 million dollars (less was preferred), would have to be ready to launch with the LRO in 31 months, could weigh no more than 1000 kg (fuelled), and would be designated a risk-tolerant "Class D" mission. In effect, NASA was offering a fixed-price contract to the winning NASA team to stay within a cost and schedule cap by accepting an unusually elevated risk position. To address this Announcement of Opportunity to develop a cost-and-schedule-capped secondary payload mission to fly with LRO, NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in Moffett Field, CA, USA embarked on a brainstorming effort termed "Blue Ice" in which a small team was asked to explore a number of mission scenarios that might have a good chance for success and still fit within the stated programmatic constraints. From this work, ARC developed and submitted six of the nineteen mission proposals received by ESMD from throughout the Agency, one of which was LCROSS - a collaborative effort between ARC and its industrial partner, Northrop-Grumman (NG) in Redondo Beach, CA, USA.

  17. A Wavelet-Based Assessment of Topographic-Isostatic Reductions for GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombein, Thomas; Luo, Xiaoguang; Seitz, Kurt; Heck, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    Gravity gradient measurements from ESA's satellite mission Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) contain significant high- and mid-frequency signal components, which are primarily caused by the attraction of the Earth's topographic and isostatic masses. In order to mitigate the resulting numerical instability of a harmonic downward continuation, the observed gradients can be smoothed with respect to topographic-isostatic effects using a remove-compute-restore technique. For this reason, topographic-isostatic reductions are calculated by forward modeling that employs the advanced Rock-Water-Ice methodology. The basis of this approach is a three-layer decomposition of the topography with variable density values and a modified Airy-Heiskanen isostatic concept incorporating a depth model of the Mohorovičić discontinuity. Moreover, tesseroid bodies are utilized for mass discretization and arranged on an ellipsoidal reference surface. To evaluate the degree of smoothing via topographic-isostatic reduction of GOCE gravity gradients, a wavelet-based assessment is presented in this paper and compared with statistical inferences in the space domain. Using the Morlet wavelet, continuous wavelet transforms are applied to measured GOCE gravity gradients before and after reducing topographic-isostatic signals. By analyzing a representative data set in the Himalayan region, an employment of the reductions leads to significantly smoothed gradients. In addition, smoothing effects that are invisible in the space domain can be detected in wavelet scalograms, making a wavelet-based spectral analysis a powerful tool.

  18. LCROSS Lunar Impactor - Lessons Learned from a Small Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) launched with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) on June 18, 2009. While the science function of the LCROSS mission was to determine the presence of water-ice in a permanently-shadowed crater on the moon, the operational purpose was to be a pioneer for future low-cost, risk-tolerant small satellite NASA missions. Recent strategic changes at the Agency level have only furthered the importance of small satellite missions. NASA Ames Research Center and its industry partner, Northrop-Grumman, initiated this spacecraft project two-years after its co-manifest mission had started, with less than one-fifth the budget. With a $79M total cost cap (including operations and reserves) and 31-months until launch, LCROSS needed a game-changing approach to be successful. At the LCROSS Confirmation Review, the ESMD Associate Administrator asked the Project team to keep a close record of lessons learned through the course of the mission and share their findings with the Agency at the end of the mission. This paper summarizes the Project, the mission, its risk position, and some of the more notable lessons learned.

  19. Nano-Satellite Secondary Spacecraft on Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesh, Andrew T.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2012-01-01

    NanoSat technology has opened Earth orbit to extremely low-cost science missions through a common interface that provides greater launch accessibility. They have also been used on interplanetary missions, but these missions have used one-off components and architectures so that the return on investment has been limited. A natural question is the role that CubeSat-derived NanoSats could play to increase the science return of deep space missions. We do not consider single instrument nano-satellites as likely to complete entire Discovery-class missions alone,but believe that nano-satellites could augment larger missions to significantly increase science return. The key advantages offered by these mini-spacecrafts over previous planetary probes is the common availability of advanced subsystems that open the door to a large variety of science experiments, including new guidance, navigation and control capabilities. In this paper, multiple NanoSat science applications are investigated, primarily for high risk/high return science areas. We also address the significant challenges and questions that remain as obstacles to the use of nano-satellites in deep space missions. Finally, we provide some thoughts on a development roadmap toward interplanetary usage of NanoSpacecraft.

  20. Sensor Calibration in Support for NOAA's Satellite Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sensor calibration, including its definition, purpose, traceability options, methodology, complexity, and importance, is examined in this paper in the context of supporting NOAA's satellite mission. Common understanding of sensor calibration is essential for the effective communication among sensor vendors,calibration scientists, satellite operators, program managers, and remote sensing data users, who must cooperate to ensure that a nation's strategic investment in a sophisticated operational environmental satellite system serves the nation's interest and enhances the human lives around the world. Examples of calibration activities at NOAA/NESDIS/ORA are selected to further illustrate these concepts and to demonstrate the lessons learned from the past experience.

  1. Single pass Doppler positioning for Search and Rescue satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. E.; Vonbun, F. O.; Lynn, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of beacon location experiments involving the NASA Nimbus-6 and the Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) Oscar-6 and Oscar-7 spacecraft. The purpose of these experiments is to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the geographical location of a low power VHF 'distress beacon' via satellite. Doppler data collected during satellite passes is reduced in a mini-computer by means of a simple algorithm resulting in the simultaneous recovery of the unknown receiver coordinates and the unknown Doppler bias frequency. Results indicate point positioning to within a few kilometers - which is within the required accuracies for the positioning of downed aircraft for Search/Rescue missions.

  2. Efficient mission control for the 48-satellite Globalstar Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan

    1994-11-01

    The Globalstar system is being developed by Globalstar, Limited Partnership and will utilize 48 satellites in low earth orbit (See Figure 1) to create a world-wide mobile communications system consistent with Vice President Gore's vision of a Global Information Infrastructure. As a large long term commercial system developed by a newly formed organization, Globalstar provides an excellent opportunity to explore innovative solutions for highly efficient satellite command and control. Design and operational concepts being developed are unencumbered by existing physical and organizational infrastructures. This program really is 'starting with a clean sheet of paper'. Globalstar operations challenges can appear enormous. Clearly, assigning even a single person around the clock to monitor and control each satellite is excessive for Globalstar (it would require a staff of 200] . Even with only a single contact per orbit per satellite, data acquisitions will start or stop every 45 seconds] Although essentially identical, over time the satellites will develop their own 'personalities'and will re quire different data calibrations and levels of support. This paper discusses the Globalstar system and challenges and presents engineering concepts, system design decisions, and operations concepts which address the combined needs and concerns of satellite, ground system, and operations teams. Lessons from past missions have been applied, organizational barriers broken, partnerships formed across the mission segments, and new operations concepts developed for satellite constellation management. Control center requirements were then developed from the operations concepts.

  3. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  4. Level-2 product generation for the Swarm satellite constellation mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Poul Erik Holmdahl; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Olsen, Nils

    In order to take advantage of the unique constellation aspect of ESA's Swarm constellation mission, considerably advanced data analysis tools have been developed. The Swarm ESL/SCARF (Satellite Constellation Application and Research Facility), a consortium of several research institutions, derives...

  5. Level-2 product generation for the Swarm satellite constellation mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Poul Erik Holmdahl; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Olsen, Nils

    In order to take advantage of the unique constellation aspect of ESA's Swarm constellation mission, considerably advanced data analysis tools have been developed. The Swarm ESL/SCARF (Satellite Constellation Application and Research Facility), a consortium of several research institutions, derives...

  6. El Goce Otro

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina María Roldán C.

    2006-01-01

    Con sus aportes sobre la sexualidad femenina, Lacan arroja una luz sobre ese dominio que Freud llamaba el continente negro del psicoanálisis. Siguiendo este haz dejado por Lacan, Carmen Gallano, en su libro La alteridad femenina, nos introduce en el mundo del amor y el goce femeninos, mostrando la disimetría que ambos aspectos guardan con respecto a la posición masculina.

  7. Lunar Orbit Stability for Small Satellite Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dono, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The irregular nature of the lunar gravity field will severely affect the orbit lifetime and behavior of future lunar small satellite missions. These spacecraft need stable orbits that do not require large deltaV budgets for station-keeping maneuvers. The initial classical elements of any lunar orbit are critical to address its stability and to comply with mission requirements. This publication identifies stable regions according to different initial conditions at the time of lunar orbit insertion (LOI). High fidelity numerical simulations with two different gravity models were performed. We focus in low altitude orbits where the dominant force in orbit propagation is the existence of unevenly distributed lunar mass concentrations. These orbits follow a periodic oscillation in some of the classical elements that is particularly useful for mission design. A set of orbital maintenance strategies for various mission concepts is presented.

  8. Mission design for the infrared astronomical satellite /IRAS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, S. A.; Mclaughlin, W. I.; Pouw, A.

    1979-01-01

    IRAS, a joint United States, Netherlands, United Kingdom astronomical satellite, is scheduled to be launched early in 1981 with the purpose of completing an all-sky survey in the infrared wavelengths from 8 to 120 microns and to observe objects of special interest. The mission design is driven by thermal constraints primarily determined by the Sun and Earth; the orbit and survey strategy must be chosen so as to satisfy the mission requirements before the cryogenic system is depleted of its liquid helium. Computer graphics help the designer choose valid survey strategies and evaluate resulting sky coverage.

  9. Impact Of GOCE On The Nordic Gravity Field Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yidiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    GOCE level-2 Tzz and Txx gravity gradients at satellite altitude are used in combination as input data to predict surface free air gravity anomalies over the Nordic region using Least Square Collocation. We test the performance of using covariance functions created separately from Tzz gradients a...... Surface model, both the NKG-2004 quasi-geoid model of the Nordic and Baltic Area and the one obtained using second generation GOCE spherical harmonic coefficients based on time-wise method can successfully reproduce the higher level of the Baltic Sea relative to the Atlantic Ocean....

  10. The Next Landsat Satellite: The Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rons, James R.; Dwyer, John L.; Barsi, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat program is one of the longest running satellite programs for Earth observations from space. The program was initiated by the launch of Landsat 1 in 1972. Since then a series of six more Landsat satellites were launched and at least one of those satellites has been in operations at all times to continuously collect images of the global land surface. The Department of Interior (DOI) U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) preserves data collected by all of the Landsat satellites at their Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This 40-year data archive provides an unmatched record of the Earth's land surface that has undergone dramatic changes in recent decades due to the increasing pressure of a growing population and advancing technologies. EROS provides the ability for anyone to search the archive and order digital Landsat images over the internet for free. The Landsat data are a public resource for observing, characterizing, monitoring, trending, and predicting land use change over time providing an invaluable tool for those addressing the profound consequences of those changes to society. The most recent launch of a Landsat satellite occurred in 1999 when Landsat 7 was placed in orbit. While Landsat 7 remains in operation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the DOI/ USGS are building its successor satellite system currently called the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). NASA has the lead for building and launching the satellite that will carry two Earth-viewing instruments, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). The OLI will take images that measure the amount of sunlight reflected by the land surface at nine wavelengths of light with three of those wavelengths beyond the range of human vision. T1RS will collect coincident images that measure light emitted by the land surface as a function of surface temperature at two longer wavelengths well beyond the

  11. A Battery Certification Testbed for Small Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Zachary; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Luna, Ali Guarneros; Goebel, Kai; Poll, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A battery pack consisting of standard cylindrical 18650 lithium-ion cells has been chosen for small satellite missions based on previous flight heritage and compliance with NASA battery safety requirements. However, for batteries that transit through the International Space Station (ISS), additional certification tests are required for individual cells as well as the battery packs. In this manuscript, we discuss the development of generalized testbeds for testing and certifying different types of batteries critical to small satellite missions. Test procedures developed and executed for this certification effort include: a detailed physical inspection before and after experiments; electrical cycling characterization at the cell and pack levels; battery-pack overcharge, over-discharge, external short testing; battery-pack vacuum leak and vibration testing. The overall goals of these certification procedures are to conform to requirements set forth by the agency and identify unique safety hazards. The testbeds, procedures, and experimental results are discussed for batteries chosen for small satellite missions to be launched from the ISS.

  12. The next Landsat satellite; the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, James R.; Dwyer, John L.; Barsi, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Interior United States Geological Survey (USGS) are developing the successor mission to Landsat 7 that is currently known as the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). NASA is responsible for building and launching the LDCM satellite observatory. USGS is building the ground system and will assume responsibility for satellite operations and for collecting, archiving, and distributing data following launch. The observatory will consist of a spacecraft in low-Earth orbit with a two-sensor payload. One sensor, the Operational Land Imager (OLI), will collect image data for nine shortwave spectral bands over a 185 km swath with a 30 m spatial resolution for all bands except a 15 m panchromatic band. The other instrument, the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), will collect image data for two thermal bands with a 100 m resolution over a 185 km swath. Both sensors offer technical advancements over earlier Landsat instruments. OLI and TIRS will coincidently collect data and the observatory will transmit the data to the ground system where it will be archived, processed to Level 1 data products containing well calibrated and co-registered OLI and TIRS data, and made available for free distribution to the general public. The LDCM development is on schedule for a December 2012 launch. The USGS intends to rename the satellite "Landsat 8" following launch. By either name a successful mission will fulfill a mandate for Landsat data continuity. The mission will extend the almost 40-year Landsat data archive with images sufficiently consistent with data from the earlier missions to allow long-term studies of regional and global land cover change.

  13. An ocean modelling and assimilation guide to using GOCE geoid products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Haines

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the procedures and challenges that must be considered when using geoid data derived from the Gravity and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE mission in order to constrain the circulation and water mass representation in an ocean general circulation model. It covers the combination of the geoid information with time-mean sea level information derived from satellite altimeter data, to construct a mean dynamic topography (MDT, and considers how this complements the time-varying sea level anomaly, also available from the satellite altimeter. We particularly consider the compatibility of these different fields in their spatial scale content, their temporal representation, and in their error covariances. These considerations are very important when the resulting data are to be used to estimate ocean circulation and its corresponding errors.

    We describe the further steps needed for assimilating the resulting dynamic topography information into an ocean circulation model using three different operational forecasting and data assimilation systems. We look at methods used for assimilating altimeter anomaly data in the absence of a suitable geoid, and then discuss different approaches which have been tried for assimilating the additional geoid information. We review the problems that have been encountered and the lessons learned in order the help future users. Finally we present some results from the use of GRACE geoid information in the operational oceanography community and discuss the future potential gains that may be obtained from a new GOCE geoid.

  14. An Oceanographer's Guide to GOCE and the Geoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Hughes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A review is given of the geodetic concepts necessary for oceanographers to make use of satellite gravity data to define the geoid, and to interpret the resulting product. The geoid is defined, with particular attention to subtleties related to the representation of the permanent tide, and the way in which the geoid is represented in ocean models. The usual spherical harmonic description of the gravitational field is described, together with the concepts required to calculate a geoid from the spherical harmonic coefficients. A brief description is given of the measurement system in the GOCE satellite mission, scheduled for launch shortly. Finally, a recipe is given for calculation of the ocean dynamic topography, given a map of sea surface height above a reference ellipsoid, a set of spherical harmonic coefficients for the gravitational field, and defining constants.

  15. Semi-empirical thermosphere model evaluation at low altitude with GOCE densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Sean; Arnold, Daniel; Jäggi, Adrian; Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia

    2017-02-01

    Aims: The quality of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) International Reference Atmosphere models NRLMSISE-00, JB2008, and DTM2013 in the 150-300 km altitude range has never been thoroughly evaluated due to a lack of good density data. This study aims at providing the model accuracies thanks to the recent high-resolution high-accuracy Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) density dataset. The evaluation was performed on yearly, monthly, and daily time scales, which are important for different applications such as mission design, mission operation, or re-entry predictions. Methods: The accuracy of the models was evaluated by comparing to the GOCE density observations of the Science Mission (1 November 2009-20 October 2013) and new density data at the lowest altitudes derived for the last weeks before the re-entry (22 October-8 November 2013) according to a metric, which consists of computing mean, standard deviation and root mean square (RMS) of the observed-to-model ratios, and correlation. Mean statistics are then calculated over the three time scales. Results: The range of model biases, standard deviations, and correlations becomes larger when the time interval decreases, and this study provides COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA) model statistics in the altitude range of 275-170 km. DTM2013 is the least biased and most accurate model on all time scales, essentially thanks to the database, notably containing two years of GOCE densities, to which it was fitted. NRLMSISE-00 performs worst, with considerable bias of about 20% in 2009 and 2013, and systematically higher standard deviations (lower correlations) than JB2008 and DTM2013. The performance of JB2008 is presently only slightly behind DTM2013, thanks to the new release 4_2g solar activity proxies. However, it still presents some weakness under the lowest solar activity conditions in 2009 and 2010. Comparison to Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload (CHAMP) density

  16. Drag-free Small Satellite Platforms for Future Geodesy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. W.; Hong, S.; Nguyen, A.; Serra, P.; Balakrishnan, K.; Buchman, S.; De Bra, D. B.; Hultgren, E.; Zoellner, A.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous satellite geodesy measurements lasting into the foreseeable future are critical for the understanding of our changing planet. It is therefore imperative that we explore ways to reduce costs, while maintaining science return. Small satellite platforms represent a promising path forward if ways can be found to reduce the size, weight, and power of the necessary instrumentation. One key enabling technology is a precision small-scale drag-free system under development at the University of Florida and Stanford University. A drag-free satellite (a) contains and shields a free-floating test mass from all non-gravitational forces, and (b) precisely measures the position of the test mass inside the satellite. A feedback control system commands thrusters to fly the 'tender' spacecraft with respect to the test mass. Thus, both test mass and spacecraft follow a pure geodesic in spacetime. By tracking the relative positions of low Earth orbiting drag-free satellites, using laser interferometry for example, the detailed shape of geodesics, and through analysis, the higher order harmonics of the Earth's geopotential can be determined. Drag-free systems can be orders of magnitude more accurate that accelerometer-based systems because they fundamentally operate at extremely low acceleration levels, and are therefore not limited by dynamic range like accelerometers. Since no test mass suspension force is required, larger gaps between the test mass and satellite are possible, which reduces the level of unwanted disturbing forces produced by the satellite itself. The small satellite platform also enables cost-effective constellations, which can increase the temporal resolution of gravity field maps by more-frequently observing given locations on the Earth. Mixed-orbit constellations can also markedly enhance observational strength, decorrelate gravity coefficient estimates, and help address the fundamental aliasing problem that exists with previous missions. The

  17. PoPSat: The Polar Precipitation Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Matthias J.; Agten, Dries; Arago-Higueras, Nadia; Borderies, Mary; Diaz-Schümmer, Carlos; Jamali, Maryam; Jimenez-Lluva, David; Kiefer, Joshua; Larsson, Anna; Lopez-Gilabert, Lola; Mione, Michele; Mould, Toby JD; Pavesi, Sara; Roth, Georg; Tomicic, Maja

    2017-04-01

    The terrestrial water cycle is one of many unique regulatory systems on planet Earth. It is directly responsible for sustaining biological life on land and human populations by ensuring sustained crop yields. However, this delicate balanced system continues to be influenced significantly by a changing climate, which has had drastic impacts particularly on the polar regions. Precipitation is a key process in the weather and climate system, due to its storage, transport and release of latent heat in the atmosphere. It has been extensively investigated in low latitudes, in which detailed models have been established for weather prediction. However, a gap has been left in higher latitudes above 65°, which show the strongest response to climate changes and where increasing precipitations have been foreseen in the future. In order to establish a global perspective of atmospheric processes, space observation of high-latitude areas is crucial to produce globally consistent data. The increasing demand for those data has driven a critical need to devise a mission which fills the gaps in current climate models. The authors propose the Polar Precipitation Satellite (PoPSat), an innovative satellite mission to provide enhanced observation of light and medium precipitation, focusing on snowfall and light rain in high latitudes. PoPSat is the first mission aimed to provide high resolution 3D structural information about snow and light precipitation systems and cloud structure in the covered areas. The satellite is equipped with a dual band (Ka and W band) phased-array radar. These antennas provide a horizontal resolution of 2 km and 4 km respectively which will exceed all other observations made to date at high-latitudes, while providing the additional capability to monitor snowfall. The data gathered will be compatible and complementary with measurements made during previous missions. PoPSat has been designed to fly on a sun-synchronous, dawn-dusk orbit at 460 km. This orbit

  18. Adaptive filtering of GOCE-derived gravity gradients of the disturbing potential in the context of the space-wise approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piretzidis, Dimitrios; Sideris, Michael G.

    2017-09-01

    Filtering and signal processing techniques have been widely used in the processing of satellite gravity observations to reduce measurement noise and correlation errors. The parameters and types of filters used depend on the statistical and spectral properties of the signal under investigation. Filtering is usually applied in a non-real-time environment. The present work focuses on the implementation of an adaptive filtering technique to process satellite gravity gradiometry data for gravity field modeling. Adaptive filtering algorithms are commonly used in communication systems, noise and echo cancellation, and biomedical applications. Two independent studies have been performed to introduce adaptive signal processing techniques and test the performance of the least mean-squared (LMS) adaptive algorithm for filtering satellite measurements obtained by the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) mission. In the first study, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed in order to gain insights about the implementation of the LMS algorithm on data with spectral behavior close to that of real GOCE data. In the second study, the LMS algorithm is implemented on real GOCE data. Experiments are also performed to determine suitable filtering parameters. Only the four accurate components of the full GOCE gravity gradient tensor of the disturbing potential are used. The characteristics of the filtered gravity gradients are examined in the time and spectral domain. The obtained filtered GOCE gravity gradients show an agreement of 63-84 mEötvös (depending on the gravity gradient component), in terms of RMS error, when compared to the gravity gradients derived from the EGM2008 geopotential model. Spectral-domain analysis of the filtered gradients shows that the adaptive filters slightly suppress frequencies in the bandwidth of approximately 10-30 mHz. The limitations of the adaptive LMS algorithm are also discussed. The tested filtering algorithm can be

  19. Adaptive filtering of GOCE-derived gravity gradients of the disturbing potential in the context of the space-wise approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piretzidis, Dimitrios; Sideris, Michael G.

    2017-03-01

    Filtering and signal processing techniques have been widely used in the processing of satellite gravity observations to reduce measurement noise and correlation errors. The parameters and types of filters used depend on the statistical and spectral properties of the signal under investigation. Filtering is usually applied in a non-real-time environment. The present work focuses on the implementation of an adaptive filtering technique to process satellite gravity gradiometry data for gravity field modeling. Adaptive filtering algorithms are commonly used in communication systems, noise and echo cancellation, and biomedical applications. Two independent studies have been performed to introduce adaptive signal processing techniques and test the performance of the least mean-squared (LMS) adaptive algorithm for filtering satellite measurements obtained by the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) mission. In the first study, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed in order to gain insights about the implementation of the LMS algorithm on data with spectral behavior close to that of real GOCE data. In the second study, the LMS algorithm is implemented on real GOCE data. Experiments are also performed to determine suitable filtering parameters. Only the four accurate components of the full GOCE gravity gradient tensor of the disturbing potential are used. The characteristics of the filtered gravity gradients are examined in the time and spectral domain. The obtained filtered GOCE gravity gradients show an agreement of 63-84 mEötvös (depending on the gravity gradient component), in terms of RMS error, when compared to the gravity gradients derived from the EGM2008 geopotential model. Spectral-domain analysis of the filtered gradients shows that the adaptive filters slightly suppress frequencies in the bandwidth of approximately 10-30 mHz. The limitations of the adaptive LMS algorithm are also discussed. The tested filtering algorithm can be

  20. Global gravity field recovery from the ARISTOTELES satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.

    1994-02-01

    One of the primary objectives of the future ARISTOTELES satellite mission is to map Earth's gravity field with high resolution and accuracy. In order to achieve this objective, the ARISTOTELES satellite will be equipped with a gravity gradiometer and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Global gravity field error analyses have been performed for several combinations of gradiometer and GPS observations. These analyses indicated that the bandwidth limitation of the gradiometer prevents a stable high-accuracy, high-resolution gravity solution if no additional information is available. However, with the addition of high-accuracy GPS observations, a stable gravity field solution can be obtained. A combination of the measurements acquired by the high-quality GPS receiver and the bandwidth-limited gradiometer on board ARISTOTELES will yield a global gravity field model with a resolution of less than 100 km and with an accuracy of better than 5 mGal for gravity anomalies and 10 cm for geoid undulations.

  1. Observatory crustal magnetic biases during CHAMP satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanac, G.; Mandea, M.; Bandić, M.; Subašić, S.

    2015-01-01

    Taking advantage of nine years of CHAMP satellite mission (June 2000-August 2009), we investigate the temporal evolution of the observatory monthly crustal magnetic biases. To determine biases we compute X (northward), Y (eastward) and Z (vertically downward) monthly means from 42 observatory one-minute or hourly values, and compare them to synthetic monthly means obtained from a GRIMM3 core field model (V. Lesur, personal communication, 2014). Both short period variations and long term trends in the monthly bias time series are analyzed. A comparison with biases based on MAGSAT and Ørsted satellite data, related to the 1979.92 and 1992.92 epochs is performed. Generally, the larger biases averaged over nine years and the larger differences between biases based on different models are found in Z component. This can be the signature of the induced magnetic fields. Although annual trends in most bias series are observed, no clear evidence that the constant crustal field changed significantly over the studied period is found. Time series of monthly biases exhibit distinct oscillatory pattern in the whole time span, which we assign to the external field contributions. The amplitudes of these variations are linked with the phase of the solar cycle, being significantly larger in the period 2000-2005 than in the period 2006-2009. Clear semi-annual variations are evident in all components, with extremes in spring and fall months of each year. Common external field pattern is found for European monthly biases. A dependence of the bias monthly variations on geomagnetic latitudes is not found for the non-European observatories. The results from this study represent a base to further exploit the observatory and repeat stations magnetic biases together with the data from the new satellite mission SWARM.

  2. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and Drifters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean’s current systems. There are still important signals to be recovered and is...... surface currents from drifters. This is done to analyse correlations and to derive resolution capacities associated with the ocean circulation and to derive requirements to future gravity missions.......The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean’s current systems. There are still important signals to be recovered...

  3. The Dutch GOCE National User Group-Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, R.; Visser, P.; Selig, A.; Ambrodius, B.

    2004-06-01

    Dutch groups and persons have been participating in GOCE activities from the early days of the project till now and are planning to stay involved until the goals of the mission will be realized. The activities, that actually go back all the way to the first ideas of the ARISTOTELES mission, have been evolving over many aspects of the mission, from instrument simulation via data processing to user applications. The groups now involved can rely on a long lasting expertise in the respective fields of interest: space geodesy, orbital mechanics, space research and technology, oceanography and geodynamics. In the context of GOCE, but also in related fields, the participating Dutch groups have established both national and international cooperation and reputation.

  4. Tether de-orbiting of satellites at end of mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, Juan R.; Sánchez-Torres, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The accumulation of space debris around the Earth has become critical for Space security. The BETs project, financed by the European Commission through its FP7-Space program, is focusing on preventing generation of new debris by de-orbiting satellites at end of mission. The de-orbiting system considered, involving an electrodynamic bare tape-tether, uses no propellant and no power supply, while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. As an example, preliminary results are here presented on a specific orbit/satellite case: 1300 km altitude and 65 degrees inclination, and 500 kg mass. Design tether dimensions are 8 km length, 1.5 cm width, and 0.05 mm thickness; subsystem masses are limited to twice tether mass. Simple calculations, using orbit-averaging, solar mid-cycle phase, and ionospheric and geomagnetic field models, yield 2.6 months time for de-orbiting down to 200 km, with a probability of about 1 percent of debris cutting the tape. References: Sanmartin, J.R., Lorenzini, E.C., and Martinez-Sanchez, M., Electrodynamic Tether Applications and Constraints, J. Space. Rockets 47, 442-456, 2010. Sanmartin, J.R. et al., A universal system to de-orbit satellites at end of life, Journal of Space Technology and Science, to appear.

  5. Multi-agent robotic systems and applications for satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Miguel A.

    A revolution in the space sector is happening. It is expected that in the next decade there will be more satellites launched than in the previous sixty years of space exploration. Major challenges are associated with this growth of space assets such as the autonomy and management of large groups of satellites, in particular with small satellites. There are two main objectives for this work. First, a flexible and distributed software architecture is presented to expand the possibilities of spacecraft autonomy and in particular autonomous motion in attitude and position. The approach taken is based on the concept of distributed software agents, also referred to as multi-agent robotic system. Agents are defined as software programs that are social, reactive and proactive to autonomously maximize the chances of achieving the set goals. Part of the work is to demonstrate that a multi-agent robotic system is a feasible approach for different problems of autonomy such as satellite attitude determination and control and autonomous rendezvous and docking. The second main objective is to develop a method to optimize multi-satellite configurations in space, also known as satellite constellations. This automated method generates new optimal mega-constellations designs for Earth observations and fast revisit times on large ground areas. The optimal satellite constellation can be used by researchers as the baseline for new missions. The first contribution of this work is the development of a new multi-agent robotic system for distributing the attitude determination and control subsystem for HiakaSat. The multi-agent robotic system is implemented and tested on the satellite hardware-in-the-loop testbed that simulates a representative space environment. The results show that the newly proposed system for this particular case achieves an equivalent control performance when compared to the monolithic implementation. In terms on computational efficiency it is found that the multi

  6. Mission Status for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, George R.; TESS Science Team

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. TESS will monitor ~ 200,000 pre-selected bright stars in the solar neighborhood for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances.TESS stars will typically be 30 — 100 times brighter than those surveyed by the Kepler satellite; thus, TESS planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. For the first time it will be possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars.An additional data product from the TESS mission will be full frame images (FFI) with a cadence of 30 minutes. These FFI will provide precise photometric information for every object within the 2300 square degree instantaneous field of view of the TESS cameras. In total, more than 30 million stars and galaxies brighter than magnitude I=16 will be precisely photometered during the two-year prime mission. In principle, the lunar-resonant TESS orbit could provide opportunities for an extended mission lasting more than a decade.The baselined long duration survey by TESS of regions surrounding the North and South Ecliptic Poles will provide prime exoplanet targets for characterization with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future.TESS will issue data releases every 4 months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets, as well as commensal survey candidates from the FFI. A NASA Guest Investigator program is planned for TESS. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the nearest and brightest main-sequence stars hosting transiting exoplanets

  7. Moho Density Contrast in Central Eurasia from GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eshagh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth’s inner structure. Since large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys, products from the Earth’s satellite observation systems have more often been used for this purpose in recent years. In this study we use the gravity-gradient data derived from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE, the elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and other global datasets to determine the Moho density contrast at the study area which comprises most of the Eurasian plate (including parts of surrounding continental and oceanic tectonic plates. A regional Moho recovery is realized by solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s (VMM inverse problem of isostasy and a seismic crustal model is applied to constrain the gravimetric solution. Our results reveal that the Moho density contrast reaches minima along the mid-oceanic rift zones and maxima under the continental crust. This spatial pattern closely agrees with that seen in the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model as well as in the KTH1.0 gravimetric-seismic Moho model. However, these results differ considerably from some previously published gravimetric studies. In particular, we demonstrate that there is no significant spatial correlation between the Moho density contrast and Moho deepening under major orogens of Himalaya and Tibet. In fact, the Moho density contrast under most of the continental crustal structure is typically much more uniform.

  8. A Class for Teachers Featuring a NASA Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, R.; Hawkins, I.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the NASA IDEA (Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy) program, the UC Berkeley Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA) received a grant to develop a self-contained teacher professional development class featuring NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite mission. This class was offered in collaboration with the Physics/Astronomy Department and the Education Department of San Francisco State University during 1994, and in collaboration with the UCB Graduate School of Education in 1995 as an extension course. The class served as the foundation for the Science Education Program at CEA, providing valuable lessons and experience through a full year of intense collaboration with 50 teachers from the diverse school districts of the San Francisco Bay Area teaching in the 3rd--12th grade range. The underlying theme of the class focused on how scientists carry out research using a NASA satellite mission. Emphasis was given to problem-solving techniques, with specific examples taken from the pre- and post-launch stages of the EUVE mission. The two, semester-long classes were hosted by the CEA, so the teachers spent an average of 4 hours/week during 17 weeks immersed in astrophysics, collaborating with astronomers, and working with colleagues from the Lawrence Hall of Science and the Graduate School of Education. The teachers were taught the computer skills and space astrophysics concepts needed to perform hands-on analysis and interpretation of the EUVE satellite data and the optical identification program. As a final project, groups of teachers developed lesson plans based on NASA and other resources that they posted on the World Wide Web using html. This project's model treats teachers as professionals, and allows them to collaborate with scientists and to hone their curriculum development skills, an important aspect of their professional growth. We will summarize class highlights and showcase teacher-developed lesson plans. A detailed evaluation

  9. Swarm magnetic and GOCE gravity gradient grids for lithospheric modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    We explore how Swarm magnetic gradient and GOCE gravity gradient data can improve modelling of the Earth’s lithosphere and thereby contribute to a better understanding of Earth’s dynamic processes. We study the use of gradient grids to provide improved information about the lithosphere and upper...... mantle in the well-surveyed North-East Atlantic Margin. In particular, we present the computation of magnetic and gravity gradient grids at satellite altitude (roughly 450 km and 250 km above the Earth for Swarm and GOCE respectively). It is shown that regional solutions based on a tesseroid approach may...... contain more signal content than global models do. The patchwork of regional grids is presented as well as the subsequent error reduction through iterative downward and upward continuation using the Poisson integral equation. The promises and pitfalls are discussed of using grids at mean satellite...

  10. The German joint research project "concepts for future gravity satellite missions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubelt, Tilo; Sneeuw, Nico; Fichter, Walter; Müller, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Within the German joint research project "concepts for future gravity satellite missions", funded by the Geotechnologies programme of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, options and concepts for future satellite missions for precise (time-variable) gravity field recovery are investigated. The project team is composed of members from science and industry, bringing together experts in geodesy, satellite systems, metrology, sensor technology and control systems. The majority of team members already contributed to former gravity missions. The composition of the team guarantees that not only geodetic aspects and objectives are investigated, but also technological and financial constraints are considered. Conversely, satellite, sensor and system concepts are developed and improved in a direct exchange with geodetic and scientific claims. The project aims to develop concepts for both near and mid-term future satellite missions, taking into account e.g. advanced satellite formations and constellations, improved orbit design, innovative metrology and sensor systems and advances in satellite systems.

  11. The infrared astronomical satellite AKARI: overview, highlights of the mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2008-07-01

    The AKARI, Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, is a 68.5 cm cooled telescope with two focal-plane instruments providing continuous sky scan at six wavelength bands in mid- and far-infrared. The instruments also have capabilities of imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2-180 μm in the pointing observations occasionally inserted into the continuous survey. AKARI was launched on 21st Feb. 2006, and has performed the all-sky survey as well as 5380 pointing observations until the liquid helium exhaustion on 26th Aug. 2007. The all sky survey covers more than 90 percent of the entire sky with higher spatial resolutions and sensitivities than the IRAS. First version of the infrared source catalogue will be released in 2009. Here we report the overview of the mission, highlights on the scientific results as well as the performance of the focal-plane instruments. We also present the observation plan with the near infrared camera during the post-helium mission phase started in June 2008.

  12. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 mission flight experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, C. H.; McIntosh, R. J.; Rowe, J. N.; Defazio, R. L.; Galal, K. F.

    1995-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 spacecraft was launched on April 13, 1994, at 06:04:02 coordinated universal time (UTC), with separation from the Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle occurring at 06:33:05 UTC. The launch was followed by a series of complex, intense operations to maneuver the spacecraft into its geosynchronous mission orbit. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) was responsible for GOES-8 attitude, orbit maneuver, orbit determination, and station acquisition support during the ascent phase. This paper summarizes the efforts of the FDF support teams and highlights some of the unique challenges the launch team faced during critical GOES-8 mission support. FDF operations experience discussed includes: (1) The abort of apogee maneuver firing-1 (AMF-1), cancellation of AMF-3, and the subsequent replans of the maneuver profile; (2) The unexpectedly large temperature dependence of the digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) and its effect on GOES-8 attitude targeting in support of perigee raising maneuvers; (3) The significant effect of attitude control thrusting on GOES-8 orbit determination solutions; (4) Adjustment of the trim tab to minimize torque due to solar radiation pressure; and (5) Postlaunch analysis performed to estimate the GOES-8 separation attitude. The paper also discusses some key FDF GOES-8 lessons learned to be considered for the GOES-J launch which is currently scheduled for May 19, 1995.

  13. Future Satellite Gravimetry and Earth Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flury, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    Currently, a first generation of dedicated satellite missions for the precise mapping of the Earth’s gravity field is in orbit (CHAMP, GRACE, and soon GOCE). The gravity data from these satellite missions provide us with very new information on the dynamics of planet Earth. In particular, on the mass distribution in the Earth’s interior, the entire water cycle (ocean circulation, ice mass balance, continental water masses, and atmosphere), and on changes in the mass distribution. The results are fascinating, but still rough with respect to spatial and temporal resolution. Technical progress in satellite-to-satellite tracking and in gravity gradiometry will allow more detailed results in the future. In this special issue, Earth scientists develop visions of future applications based on follow-on high-precision satellite gravimetry missions.

  14. Formation flying within a constellation of nano-satellites the QB50 mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.K.A.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Bouwmeester, J.; Zandbergen, B.; Reinhard, R.

    2010-01-01

    QB50 is a mission establishing an international network of 50 nano-satellites for multi-point, in-situ measurements in the lower thermosphere and re-entry research. As part of the QB50 mission, the Delft University of Technology intends to contribute two nano-satellites both being equipped with a hi

  15. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    and used as starting point for analysis based on image processing. On obtained maps, locations of known subduction zones were represented with characteristic elongated patterns and cross-sections. Cross sections of well-known subduction zones were used as input patterns for pattern recognition method....... Few pattern recognition methods were tested on all 6 gravity gradient tensor components represented as global scale maps with resolution of 100km (corresponds to the resolution of the GOCE satellite data). By adjusting pattern recognition methods’ features and optimizing various input patterns......, the best method was applied. That is a combination of methods based on SURF (Speeded Up Robust Features) and MSER (Maximally Stable Extremal Regions) algorithms provided in MATLAB’s Computer Vision System Toolbox. Based on 6 gravity gradient components, the global gradient anomaly maps were produced...

  16. GOCE level 2 gravity gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Fiorot, S.; Fuchs, M.; Gruber, T.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Tscherning, C.C.; Veicherts, M.; Visser, P.N.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Two of the GOCE Level 2 products are the gravity gradients (GGs) in the Gradiometer Reference Frame (GRF) and the GGs in the Local North-Oriented Frame (LNOF). The GRF is an instrument frame and the GGs are derived from the L1b GGs. The L1b to L2 GG processing involves corrections for temporal gravi

  17. View of a pallet configured to support 51-A satellite-retrieval mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A high angle view of a Spacelab type pallet configured to support NASA's 51-A satellite-retrieval mission. At left are two capture devices called 'stingers' used to enter the communications satellites at the nozzle of the spent engine. Center are circular areas for clamping down and securing the satellites for the remainder of the trip.

  18. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, Jérôme; Knudsen, Per

    2016-07-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products. GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations, and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid earth studies. Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has: - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox, - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients, anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies. - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  19. New evidence about the subduction of the Copiapó ridge beneath South America, and its connection with the Chilean-Pampean flat slab, tracked by satellite GOCE and EGM2008 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Gimenez, Mario; Folguera, Andres; Spagnotto, Silvana; Bustos, Emilce; Baez, Walter; Braitenberg, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Satellite-only gravity measurements and those integrated with terrestrial observations provide global gravity field models of unprecedented precision and spatial resolution, allowing the analysis of the lithospheric structure. We used the model EGM2008 (Earth Gravitational Model) to calculate the gravity anomaly and the vertical gravity gradient in the South Central Andes region, correcting these quantities by the topographic effect. Both quantities show a spatial relationship between the projected subduction of the Copiapó aseismic ridge (located at about 27°-30° S), its potential deformational effects in the overriding plate, and the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament. This volcanic lineament constitutes a projection of the volcanic arc toward the retroarc zone, whose origin and development were not clearly understood. The analysis of the gravity anomalies, at the extrapolated zone of the Copiapó ridge beneath the continent, shows a change in the general NNE-trend of the Andean structures to an ENE-direction coincident with the area of the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament. This anomalous pattern over the upper plate is interpreted to be linked with the subduction of the Copiapó ridge. We explore the relation between deformational effects and volcanism at the northern Chilean-Pampean flat slab and the collision of the Copiapó ridge, on the basis of the Moho geometry and elastic thicknesses calculated from the new satellite GOCE data. Neotectonic deformations interpreted in previous works associated with volcanic eruptions along the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament is interpreted as caused by crustal doming, imprinted by the subduction of the Copiapó ridge, evidenced by crustal thickening at the sites of ridge inception along the trench. Finally, we propose that the Copiapó ridge could have controlled the northern edge of the Chilean-Pampean flat slab, due to higher buoyancy, similarly to the control

  20. Con GOCE per portare nello spazio un po’ di Made in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Carlucci

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available GOCE brings 'Made in Europe' to SpaceSurveyor's dream of an instrument capable of accurately measuring the Earth's gravimetry. Such a tool has been realised through the GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer. The ESA satellite ready to launch from Plesetsk russian cosmodrome was also realised. The launch already suffered a couple of delays due to problems with the launcher. ESA will be ready by the next available window to put the satellite in orbit which is the 27th of October.

  1. A mission-oriented orbit design method of remote sensing satellite for region monitoring mission based on evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Yao, Huang

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing satellites play an increasingly prominent role in environmental monitoring and disaster rescue. Taking advantage of almost the same sunshine condition to same place and global coverage, most of these satellites are operated on the sun-synchronous orbit. However, it brings some problems inevitably, the most significant one is that the temporal resolution of sun-synchronous orbit satellite can't satisfy the demand of specific region monitoring mission. To overcome the disadvantages, two methods are exploited: the first one is to build satellite constellation which contains multiple sunsynchronous satellites, just like the CHARTER mechanism has done; the second is to design non-predetermined orbit based on the concrete mission demand. An effective method for remote sensing satellite orbit design based on multiobjective evolution algorithm is presented in this paper. Orbit design problem is converted into a multi-objective optimization problem, and a fast and elitist multi-objective genetic algorithm is utilized to solve this problem. Firstly, the demand of the mission is transformed into multiple objective functions, and the six orbit elements of the satellite are taken as genes in design space, then a simulate evolution process is performed. An optimal resolution can be obtained after specified generation via evolution operation (selection, crossover, and mutation). To examine validity of the proposed method, a case study is introduced: Orbit design of an optical satellite for regional disaster monitoring, the mission demand include both minimizing the average revisit time internal of two objectives. The simulation result shows that the solution for this mission obtained by our method meet the demand the users' demand. We can draw a conclusion that the method presented in this paper is efficient for remote sensing orbit design.

  2. Analysis of the Illapel Mw = 8.3 Thrust Earthquake Rupture Zone Using GOCE-Derived Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Pesce, Agustina; Gimenez, Mario; Folguera, Andres; Soler, Santiago; Chen, Wenjin

    2016-08-01

    Satellite gravimetry has proven to be a useful tool to identify mass anomalies along a subduction interface, interpreted as heterogeneities related to the rupture process during megathrust earthquakes. In the last years, different works, reinforced with data derived from satellite gravity missions as GRACE and now GOCE, have analyzed not only the static component of the Earth gravity field, but also its temporal variations and relation to the seismic cycle. In particular, during the last decade, the Chilean margin has been affected by three megathrust earthquakes (with Mw >8): Maule 2010 Mw = 8.8, Pisagua 2014 Mw = 8.2 and recently the Mw = 8.3 Illapel event. Then, the recently completed GOCE mission (November 2009 to November 2013) offered a unique opportunity to study the Maule February 2010 and Pisagua April 2014 events by means of gravity gradients, directly measured at satellite height altitudes, which allowed mapping density heterogeneities with greater detail than the gravity anomaly which has been used in most studies up to now. In the present work, we use the last GOCE model (GO_CONS_GCF_2_DIR_R5), the one of higher spatial resolution (N = 300, λ/2 ≈ 66 km) derived from satellite-only data. The methodology used is the same as that to study the previous events, with the addition that now we derived a relation between the associated depths of a causative mass with a determined degree of the spherical harmonic expansion. This allowed to "decompose" the gravimetric signal, by cutting off the degree/order of the harmonic expansion, as depth increases. From this analysis, we found that prominent oceanic features such as the Challenger fracture zone and the Juan Fernandez ridge played a key role in latitudinal seismic segmentation for the Illapel earthquake rupture zone, acting as barriers/attenuators to the seismic energy release. We compared the slip model from Tilmann et al. (Geophysical Research Letters 43: 574-583. doi:10.1002/2015GL066963, 2016) for the

  3. Analysis of the Illapel Mw = 8.3 Thrust Earthquake Rupture Zone Using GOCE-Derived Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Pesce, Agustina; Gimenez, Mario; Folguera, Andres; Soler, Santiago; Chen, Wenjin

    2017-01-01

    Satellite gravimetry has proven to be a useful tool to identify mass anomalies along a subduction interface, interpreted as heterogeneities related to the rupture process during megathrust earthquakes. In the last years, different works, reinforced with data derived from satellite gravity missions as GRACE and now GOCE, have analyzed not only the static component of the Earth gravity field, but also its temporal variations and relation to the seismic cycle. In particular, during the last decade, the Chilean margin has been affected by three megathrust earthquakes (with Mw >8): Maule 2010 Mw = 8.8, Pisagua 2014 Mw = 8.2 and recently the Mw = 8.3 Illapel event. Then, the recently completed GOCE mission (November 2009 to November 2013) offered a unique opportunity to study the Maule February 2010 and Pisagua April 2014 events by means of gravity gradients, directly measured at satellite height altitudes, which allowed mapping density heterogeneities with greater detail than the gravity anomaly which has been used in most studies up to now. In the present work, we use the last GOCE model (GO_CONS_GCF_2_DIR_R5), the one of higher spatial resolution ( N = 300, λ/2 ≈ 66 km) derived from satellite-only data. The methodology used is the same as that to study the previous events, with the addition that now we derived a relation between the associated depths of a causative mass with a determined degree of the spherical harmonic expansion. This allowed to "decompose" the gravimetric signal, by cutting off the degree/order of the harmonic expansion, as depth increases. From this analysis, we found that prominent oceanic features such as the Challenger fracture zone and the Juan Fernandez ridge played a key role in latitudinal seismic segmentation for the Illapel earthquake rupture zone, acting as barriers/attenuators to the seismic energy release. We compared the slip model from Tilmann et al. (Geophysical Research Letters 43: 574-583. doi:10.1002/2015GL066963, 2016) for the

  4. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and Drifters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean’s current systems. There are still important signals to be recovered...... and issues related to errors in the models have been identified.In this study, a series of newer gravity models including observations from GRACE and GOCE are compared with the DTU15MSS mean sea surface to analyse resolution capacities and to identify issues caused by errors in the models. The comparisons...... are carried out in regional analyses using Fourier techniques to derive the spectral characteristics as well as anisotropic patterns to identify differences and to quantify quality measures associated with the models. In addition, regional analyses are carried out using in-situ observations of the geostrophic...

  5. Swarm satellite mission scheduling & planning using Hybrid Dynamic Mutation Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zixuan; Guo, Jian; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-08-01

    Space missions have traditionally been controlled by operators from a mission control center. Given the increasing number of satellites for some space missions, generating a command list for multiple satellites can be time-consuming and inefficient. Developing multi-satellite, onboard mission scheduling & planning techniques is, therefore, a key research field for future space mission operations. In this paper, an improved Genetic Algorithm (GA) using a new mutation strategy is proposed as a mission scheduling algorithm. This new mutation strategy, called Hybrid Dynamic Mutation (HDM), combines the advantages of both dynamic mutation strategy and adaptive mutation strategy, overcoming weaknesses such as early convergence and long computing time, which helps standard GA to be more efficient and accurate in dealing with complex missions. HDM-GA shows excellent performance in solving both unconstrained and constrained test functions. The experiments of using HDM-GA to simulate a multi-satellite, mission scheduling problem demonstrates that both the computation time and success rate mission requirements can be met. The results of a comparative test between HDM-GA and three other mutation strategies also show that HDM has outstanding performance in terms of speed and reliability.

  6. On the capability of Swarm for surface mass variation monitoring: Quantitative assessment based on orbit information from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Oliver; Weigelt, Matthias; Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Jäggi, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for geophysical and environmental studies. In the context of global climate change, mass balance of the Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets gained particular attention. Because GRACE has outlived its predicted lifetime by several years already, it is very likely that a gap between GRACE and its successor GRACE follow-on (supposed to be launched in 2017, at the earliest) occurs. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to bridge this potential gap, i.e., to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in case of a gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the characteristics for such an endeavor: (i) low, near-circular and near-polar orbits, (ii) precise positioning with high-quality GNSS receivers, (iii) on-board accelerometers to measure the influence of non-gravitational forces. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. Indeed and as data analysis from CHAMP has been shown, the detection of annual signals and trends from orbit analysis is possible for long-wavelength features of the gravity field, although the accuracy associated with the inter-satellite GRACE measurements cannot be reached. We assess the capability of the (non-dedicated) mission Swarm for mass variation detection in a real-case environment (opposed to simulation studies). For this purpose, we "approximate" the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE+GOCE constellations. In a first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GNSS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE+GOCE

  7. Preprocessing of gravity gradients at the GOCE high-level processing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Rispens, S.; Gruber, T.; Koop, R.; Schrama, E.; Visser, P.; Tscherning, C.C.; Veicherts, M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the products derived from the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) observations are the gravity gradients. These gravity gradients are provided in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and are calibrated in-flight using satellite shaking and star sensor data. To

  8. Preprocessing of gravity gradients at the GOCE high-level processing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Rispens, S.; Gruber, T.; Koop, R.; Schrama, E.; Visser, P.; Tscherning, C.C.; Veicherts, M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the products derived from the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) observations are the gravity gradients. These gravity gradients are provided in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and are calibrated in-flight using satellite shaking and star sensor data. To us

  9. Estimating the North Atlantic mean dynamic topography and geostrophic currents with GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Rory J.; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    be derived from them. Because the high degree commission errors of all of the GOCE models are lower than those from the best satellite only GRACE solution, all of the derived GOCE MDTs are much less noisy than the GRACE MDT They therefore require less severe filtering and, as a consequence, the strength...... of the currents calculated from them are in better agreement with those from an in-situ drifter based estimate. Where the comparison is possible, the reduction in MDT noise from the first to second releases is also clear. However, given that some filtering is still required, this translates into only a small...

  10. Mission-constrained design drivers and technical solutions for the MAGIA satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Giorgio; Stipa, M.; Silvi, D.; Coltellacci, S.; Curti, G.; Colonna, G.; Formica, T.; Casali, V.; Fossati, T.; Di Matteo, F.; Zelli, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Ansalone, L.; di Salvo, A.

    2011-10-01

    The Mission MAGIA (Missione Altimetrica Geofisica GeochImica lunAre) was proposed in the framework of the "Bando per Piccole Missioni" of ASI (Italian Space Agency) in 2007. The mission was selected for a phase A study by ASI on February 7th 2008. The tight budget allocation, combined with quite ambitious scientific objectives, set challenging requirements for the satellite design. The paper gives a fast overview of the payloads complement and of the mission-constrained design drivers, including cost minimization, risk reduction, and AIT flexibility. The spacecraft architecture is then outlined, along with an overview of the key subsystems and trade-offs. Some details are given of a Moon gravitometric experiment based on a mother-daughter satellite configuration with the daughter being a subsatellite released from the MAGIA satellite and intended to circle the Moon at a very low altitude. Budgets are appended at the end of the paper showing the key study results.

  11. Status of the Third Miniature Sensor Technology Integration Satellite Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, David; Hurtz, Rick; McClelland, Jim; Cellarius, Mark; Meyers, AI

    1994-01-01

    The MSTI-3 satellite is the third in a series established to test, in realistic scenarios, miniature spacecraft and sensor technologies for missile detection and tracking on low-cost, low-earth orbit technology demonstration satellites. Cooperative demonstrations are planned to combine MSTI-provided target track file information, with interceptor technology tests, to fully demonstrate technologies associated with theater missile defense (TMO) targeting. The program is sponsored by the Ballist...

  12. High resolution dynamic ocean topography in the Southern Ocean from GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertella, A.; Savcenko, R.; Janjić, T.; Rummel, R.; Bosch, W.; Schröter, J.

    2012-08-01

    A mean dynamic ocean topography (MDT) has been computed using a high resolution GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gravity model and a new mean sea surface obtained from a combination of satellite altimetry covering the period 1992 October till 2010 April. The considered gravity model is GO-CONS-GCF-2-TIM-R3, which computes geoid using 12 months of GOCE gravity field data. The GOCE gravity data allow for more detailed and accurate estimates of MDT. This is illustrated in the Southern Ocean where the commission error is reduced from 20 to 5 cm compared to the MDT computed using the GRACE gravity field model ITG-Grace2010. As a result of the more detailed and accurate MDT, the calculation of geostrophic velocities from the MDT is now possible with higher accuracy and spatial resolution, and the error estimate is about 7 cm s-1 for the Southern Ocean.

  13. A satellite constellation optimization for a regional GNSS remote sensing mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavili Kilaneh, Narin; Mashhadi Hossainali, Masoud

    2017-04-01

    Due to the recent advances in the Global Navigation Satellite System Remote sensing (GNSS¬R) applications, optimization of a satellite orbit to investigate the Earth's properties seems significant. The comparison of the GNSS direct and reflected signals received by a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite introduces a new technique to remotely sense the Earth. Several GNSS¬R missions including Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) have been proposed for different applications such as the ocean wind speed and height monitoring. The geometric optimization of the satellite orbit before starting the mission is a key step for every space mission. Since satellite constellation design varies depending on the application, we have focused on the required geometric criteria for oceanography applications in a specified region. Here, the total number of specular points, their spatial distribution and the accuracy of their position are assumed to be sufficient for oceanography applications. Gleason's method is used to determine the position of specular points. We considered the 2-D lattice and 3-D lattice theory of flower constellation to survey whether a circular orbit or an elliptical one is suitable to improve the solution. Genetic algorithm is implemented to solve the problem. To check the visibility condition between the LEO and GPS satellites, the satellite initial state is propagated by a variable step size numerical integration method. Constellation orbit parameters achieved by optimization provide a better resolution and precession for the specular points in the study area of this research.

  14. Air Density And Wind Retrieval Using GOCE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Fritsche, B.; Visser, P.; Van Den IJssel, J.; Encarnacao, J. Teixeira; Kern, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the GOCE+ Theme 3 project, ion thruster activation data from GOCE telemetry has been combined with the accelerometer and star camera data products, to derive a new set of data products on thermosphere neutral density and wind speed. These products can be seen as an ex- tension of the successful accelerometer-derived thermosphere density data sets from CHAMP and GRACE. It is the first time that such data, spanning multiple years, is available at a fixed and very low altitude and at a near constant orientation of the orbit plane with respect to the Sun. The data processing is based on an analysis of the aerodynamic accelerations acting on the satellite, and makes use of data from all instruments onboard the satellite. The following steps are involved: 1) estimation of the bias in the gradiometer common-mode accelerations using GPS tracking data, 2) conversion of ion thruster activation data to accelerations, 3) modelling of radiation pressure accelerations based on orbit and attitude information, 4) removal of radiation pressure and ion thruster accelerations from the common-mode acceleration data, to arrive at the observed aerodynamic accelerations, 5) iterative adjustment of wind direction and density inputs of an aerodynamic model of the satellite, until the modelled aerodynamic accelerations match the observations. The resulting density and wind observations are made available in the form of time series and grids. These data can be applied in investigations of solar-terrestrial physics, as well as for the improvement and validation of models used in space operations.

  15. Perspectives &advanced projects for small satellite missions at Carlo Gavazzi Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, G.; Sabatini, P.

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents the Planned and on-going programs in Carlo Gavazzi Space (CGS) for the next five years. Thanks to the success of the first MITA platform mission, CGS has acquired a consolidated experience in Satellite System Design and of Prime Contractor in Satellite programmes. After four years from launch of first MITA platform from Plesetsk (CSI) several mission concept and satellite program have started and are under developing. The common elements to these program is the low mission cost and short development plan. The first ASI Scientific Small Mission using the MITA platform, AGILE is a Gamma Ray detector aimed to identify Gamma Ray Bursts. The Payload has been developed with the contribution of a large group of Italian Research Centres and Institutes, Carlo Gavazzi Space is also responsible for the overall mission as leader of an Italian Consortium. In the frame of ASI's Earth Observation Programmes, Carlo Gavazzi Space has also successfully concluded the Phase B/C of the HypSEO (HyperSpectral Earth Observer) mission. The Desertsat satellite, devoted to the study of the sand dunes movements and to the assessment of the desertification process, is a joint collaboration with ASI and Egypt. Desertsat is equipped with an Multispectral imager. PALAMEDE, whose peculiar characteristics are two: the first is to use components and technologies not space qualified and therefore by far cheaper than those normally used for space systems, the second is that it is entirely realised by the students of Politecnico.

  16. Satellite-On-A-Chip Feasibility for Distributed Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-10

    measure variations in magnetic fields 3 Copyright © 2006 ASME around a spacecraft, perform visual inspection of a spacecraft exterior for signs of damage...Table 5. SpaceChip System Specifications Simple low-resolution Earth observation mission, imagenative problem of low efficiency solar cells on

  17. Advanced Ionospheric Probe scientific mission onboard FORMOSAT-5 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zai-Wun Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Ionospheric Probe (AIP is a piggyback science payload developed by National Central University for FORMOSAT-5 satellite to explore space weather/climate and seismic precursors associated with strong earthquakes. The AIP is an all-in-one plasma sensor that measures ionospheric plasma concentrations, velocities, and temperatures in a time-sharing way and is capable of measuring ionospheric plasma irregularities at a sample rate up to 8192 Hz over a wide range of spatial scales. Electroformed gold grids used in the AIP in theory construct planar electric potential surfaces better than woven grids. Moreover, a plasma injection test performed in the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber has verified that no significant hysteresis is found in current-voltage curves measured by the AIP. It indicates that the AIP can make an accurate measurement of the ionospheric plasma parameters in space. Finally, Ionospheric Plasma and Electrodynamics Instrument (IPEI observations onboard the ROCSAT-1 satellite are applied to show that the scientific objectives of ionospheric space weather/climate and seismo-ionospheric precursors (SIPs of the FORMOSAT-5/AIP can be fulfilled. The observations reveal that ion parameter global distributions are helpful in studying the formation and variation in temperature crests and troughs in the 2200 - 2300 local time sector, as well as SIPs in the density and the velocity over the epicenter area, which are anticipated for the FORMOSAT-5 satellite orbit.

  18. GOCE observations for Mineral exploration in Africa and across continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla

    2014-05-01

    The gravity anomaly field over the whole Earth obtained by the GOCE satellite is a revolutionary tool to reveal geologic information on a continental scale for the large areas where conventional gravity measurements have yet to be made (e.g. Alvarez et al., 2012). It is, however, necessary to isolate the near-surface geologic signal from the contributions of thickness variations in the crust and lithosphere and the isostatic compensation of surface relief (e.g. Mariani et al., 2013) . Here Africa is studied with particular emphasis on selected geological features which are expected to appear as density inhomogeneities. These include cratons and fold belts in the Precambrian basement, the overlying sedimentary basins and magmatism, as well as the continental margins. Regression analysis between gravity and topography shows coefficients that are consistently positive for the free air gravity anomaly and negative for the Bouguer gravity anomaly (Braitenberg et al., 2013; 2014). The error and scatter on the regression is smallest in oceanic areas, where it is a possible tool for identifying changes in crustal type. The regression analysis allows the large gradient in the Bouguer anomaly signal across continental margins to be removed. After subtracting the predicted effect of known topography from the original Bouguer anomaly field, the residual field shows a continent-wide pattern of anomalies that can be attributed to regional geological structures. A few of these are highlighted, such as those representing Karoo magmatism, the Kibalian foldbelt, the Zimbabwe Craton, the Cameroon and Tibesti volcanic deposits, the Benue Trough and the Luangwa Rift. A reconstruction of the pre-break up position of Africa, South and North America is made for the residual GOCE gravity field obtaining today's gravity field of the plates forming West Gondwana. The reconstruction allows the positive and negative anomalies to be compared across the continental fragments, and so helps

  19. Space Network IP Services (SNIS): An Architecture for Supporting Low Earth Orbiting IP Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Network (SN) supports a variety of missions using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which includes ground stations in White Sands, New Mexico and Guam. A Space Network IP Services (SNIS) architecture is being developed to support future users with requirements for end-to-end Internet Protocol (IP) communications. This architecture will support all IP protocols, including Mobile IP, over TDRSS Single Access, Multiple Access, and Demand Access Radio Frequency (RF) links. This paper will describe this architecture and how it can enable Low Earth Orbiting IP satellite missions.

  20. Simulation Studies of Satellite Laser CO2 Mission Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Stephan Randy; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric CO2 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to ASCENDS as recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey. Compared to passive sensors, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages that hold promise to advance CO2 measurement capability in the next decade. Although the precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency, analysis of possible instrument technology indicates that such sensors are more than feasible. Radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors, and a simple retrieval approach complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudodata" CO2. Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined, and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo-measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  1. Arctic sea level change over the past 2 decades from GRACE gradiometry and multi-mission satellite altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. B.; Stenseng, L.; Sørensen, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    gradiometer observations from the ESA GOCE mission, we are now able to derive a mean dynamic topography of the Arctic Ocean with unprecedented accuracy to constrain the Arctic Ocean circulation controlling sea level variations in the Arctic. We present both a new estimation of the mean ocean circulation......The Arctic is still an extremely challenging region for theuse of remote sensing for sea level studies. Despite the availability of 20 years of altimetry, only very limited sea level observations exist in the interior of the Arctic Ocean. However, with Cryosat-2 SAR altimetry the situation...... is changing and through development of tailored retrackers dealing with presence of sea ice within the radar footprint, we can now develop sea surface height and its variation in most of the Arctic Ocean. We have processed 3 years of Cryosat-2 data quantified as either Lead or Ocean data within the Cryosat-2...

  2. On High-Frequency Topography-Implied Gravity Signals for a Height System Unification Using GOCE-Based Global Geopotential Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombein, Thomas; Seitz, Kurt; Heck, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    National height reference systems have conventionally been linked to the local mean sea level, observed at individual tide gauges. Due to variations in the sea surface topography, the reference levels of these systems are inconsistent, causing height datum offsets of up to ±1-2 m. For the unification of height systems, a satellite-based method is presented that utilizes global geopotential models (GGMs) derived from ESA's satellite mission Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In this context, height datum offsets are estimated within a least squares adjustment by comparing the GGM information with measured GNSS/leveling data. While the GNSS/leveling data comprises the full spectral information, GOCE GGMs are restricted to long wavelengths according to the maximum degree of their spherical harmonic representation. To provide accurate height datum offsets, it is indispensable to account for the remaining signal above this maximum degree, known as the omission error of the GGM. Therefore, a combination of the GOCE information with the high-resolution Earth Gravitational Model 2008 (EGM2008) is performed. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the benefit, when high-frequency topography-implied gravity signals are additionally used to reduce the remaining omission error of EGM2008. In terms of a spectral extension, a new method is proposed that does not rely on an assumed spectral consistency of topographic heights and implied gravity as is the case for the residual terrain modeling (RTM) technique. In the first step of this new approach, gravity forward modeling based on tesseroid mass bodies is performed according to the Rock-Water-Ice (RWI) approach. In a second step, the resulting full spectral RWI-based topographic potential values are reduced by the effect of the topographic gravity field model RWI_TOPO_2015, thus, removing the long to medium wavelengths. By using the latest GOCE GGMs, the impact of topography

  3. Construction of Earth's gravitational field model from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic principle of spectral combination method is discussed, and the general expressions of the spectral weight and spectral combination of the united-processing of various types of gravimetric data are shown. What's more, based on degree error RMS of potential coefficients, the detailed expressions of spectral combination formulae and the corresponding spectral weights in the Earth's gravitational field model(EGM determination using GOCE + GRACE and CHAMP + GRACE + GOCE are derived. The fundamental situation that ulux-champ2013s, tongji-GRACE01, go-cons-gcf-2-tim-r5 constructed respectively by CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE data and go-cons-gcf-2-dir-r5 constructed by syncretic processing of GRACE, GOCE and LAGEOS data are explained briefly, the degree error RMS, cumulative geoid height error and cumulative gravity anomaly error of these models are calculated. A syncretic model constructed from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE data, which is expressed by champ + grace + goce, is obtained based on spectral combination method. Experimentation results show that the precision of CHAMP data model is the lowest in satellite-only models, so it is not needed in the determination of syncretic models. The GRACE data model can improve the GOCE data model in medium-long wavelength, so the overall precision of syncretic model can be improved. Consequently, as many types of gravimetric data as possible should be combined together in the data processing in order to strengthen the quality and reliability with widening scope and improve the precision and spatial resolution of the computational results.

  4. Indian remote sensing satellites: Planned missions and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, M. G.; Jayaraman, V.; Rao, Mukund

    1996-02-01

    To cater the enhanced user demands, Indian Space Research Organisation is stepping a giant leap forward towards development of the state-of-the-art second generation Indian Remote Sensing Satellites, IRS-1C/1D following the successful design, launch and in-orbit performance of the first generation satellites, IRS-1A/1B. Characterised by improved spatial resolution, extended spectral bands, stereo-viewing and more frequent revisit capability, IRS-1C/1D are expected for launch during the timeframe of 1995-96/8. The IRS-1C and ID, which are identical, will have three major payloads. The Linear Imaging Spectral Scanner (LISS-III) in four spectral bands covering from 0.52 to 1.70 microns will have a spatial resolution of 23m along with a swath of 142 km in the visible and NIR spectral bands and a spatial resolution of 70m along with a swath of 148 km in the SWIR spectral band. The Panchromatic Camera (PAN) with a spectral band of 0.50 to 0.75 microns will have a spatial resolution of information on water stress, pest infestation and vegetation indices to arrive at better agricultural management practices, besides providing enhanced capabilities for arriving solutions for micro-level resource development and generation of digital terrain models. Having marked by the successful launch of IRS-P2 in 1994 through the indigenous development flight of PSLV, India is now poised to launch IRS-P3 satellite with unique payloads in the timeframe of 1995-1996 The IRS-P3 will carry three operational payloads viz., Wide Field Sensor (WiFS), Modular Opto-electronic Scanner (MOS) imaging spectrometer and an X-ray Astronomy payload. These payload mix of sensors will provide further capabilities for application studies related to vegetation dynamics, oceanography and X-ray astronomy. With the launch of these payloads, India will provide more effective and assured data services to the user community beyond the 90's.

  5. Japanese Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission status and application of satellite-based global rainfall map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachi, Misako; Shimizu, Shuji; Kubota, Takuji; Yoshida, Naofumi; Oki, Riko; Kojima, Masahiro; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    As accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates improves and observation frequency increases, application of those data to societal benefit areas, such as weather forecasts and flood predictions, is expected, in addition to research of precipitation climatology to analyze precipitation systems. There is, however, limitation on single satellite observation in coverage and frequency. Currently, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is scheduled under international collaboration to fulfill various user requirements that cannot be achieved by the single satellite, like the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). The GPM mission is an international mission to achieve high-accurate and high-frequent rainfall observation over a global area. GPM is composed of a TRMM-like non-sun-synchronous orbit satellite (GPM core satellite) and constellation of satellites carrying microwave radiometer instruments. The GPM core satellite carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which is being developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and microwave radiometer provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Development of DPR instrument is in good progress for scheduled launch in 2013, and DPR Critical Design Review has completed in July - September 2009. Constellation satellites, which carry a microwave imager and/or sounder, are planned to be launched around 2013 by each partner agency for its own purpose, and will contribute to extending coverage and increasing frequency. JAXA's future mission, the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W) satellite will be one of constellation satellites. The first generation of GCOM-W satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2011, and it carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), which is being developed based on the experience of the AMSR-E on EOS Aqua satellite

  6. Monte Carlo Analysis as a Trajectory Design Driver for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Craig; Parker, Joel; Dichmann, Don; Lebois, Ryan; Lutz, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be injected into a highly eccentric Earth orbit and fly 3.5 phasing loops followed by a lunar flyby to enter a mission orbit with lunar 2:1 resonance. Through the phasing loops and mission orbit, the trajectory is significantly affected by lunar and solar gravity. We have developed a trajectory design to achieve the mission orbit and meet mission constraints, including eclipse avoidance and a 30-year geostationary orbit avoidance requirement. A parallelized Monte Carlo simulation was performed to validate the trajectory after injecting common perturbations, including launch dispersions, orbit determination errors, and maneuver execution errors. The Monte Carlo analysis helped identify mission risks and is used in the trajectory selection process.

  7. Parallel satellite orbital situational problems solver for space missions design and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2016-11-01

    Solving different scientific problems for space applications demands implementation of observations, measurements or realization of active experiments during time intervals in which specific geometric and physical conditions are fulfilled. The solving of situational problems for determination of these time intervals when the satellite instruments work optimally is a very important part of all activities on every stage of preparation and realization of space missions. The elaboration of universal, flexible and robust approach for situation analysis, which is easily portable toward new satellite missions, is significant for reduction of missions' preparation times and costs. Every situation problem could be based on one or more situation conditions. Simultaneously solving different kinds of situation problems based on different number and types of situational conditions, each one of them satisfied on different segments of satellite orbit requires irregular calculations. Three formal approaches are presented. First one is related to situation problems description that allows achieving flexibility in situation problem assembling and presentation in computer memory. The second formal approach is connected with developing of situation problem solver organized as processor that executes specific code for every particular situational condition. The third formal approach is related to solver parallelization utilizing threads and dynamic scheduling based on "pool of threads" abstraction and ensures a good load balance. The developed situation problems solver is intended for incorporation in the frames of multi-physics multi-satellite space mission's design and simulation tools.

  8. Status of the fast mission: Micro-satellite formation flying for technology, science and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Maessen, D.C.; Gill, E.K.A.; Moon, S.G.; Zheng, G.

    2009-01-01

    FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) is a cooperative Dutch Chinese formation flying mission led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands and Tsinghua University in China. It is expected to be the first international micro-satellite formation f

  9. Status of the fast mission: Micro-satellite formation flying for technology, science and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Maessen, D.C.; Gill, E.K.A.; Moon, S.G.; Zheng, G.

    2009-01-01

    FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) is a cooperative Dutch Chinese formation flying mission led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands and Tsinghua University in China. It is expected to be the first international micro-satellite formation

  10. Status of the fast mission: Micro-satellite formation flying for technology, science and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Maessen, D.C.; Gill, E.K.A.; Moon, S.G.; Zheng, G.

    2009-01-01

    FAST (Formation for Atmospheric Science and Technology demonstration) is a cooperative Dutch Chinese formation flying mission led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands and Tsinghua University in China. It is expected to be the first international micro-satellite formation f

  11. Versatile Satellite Architecture and Technology: A New Architecture for Low Cost Satellite Missions for Solar-Terrestrial Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T. A.; Chakrabarti, S.; Polidan, R.; Jaeger, T.; Hill, L.

    2011-12-01

    Early in the 20th century, automobiles appeared as extraordinary vehicles - and now they are part of life everywhere. Late in the 20th century, internet and portable phones appeared as innovations - and now omni-present requirements. At mid-century, the first satellites were launched into space - and now 50 years later - "making a satellite" remains in the domain of highly infrequent events. Why do all universities and companies not have their own satellites? Why is the work force capable of doing so remarkably small? Why do highly focused science objectives that require just a glimpse from space never get a chance to fly? Historically, there have been two primary impediments to place an experiment in orbit - high launch costs and the high cost of spacecraft systems and related processes. The first problem appears to have been addressed through the availability of several low-cost (< $10M) commercial launch opportunities. The Versatile Satellite Architecture and Technology (VerSAT) will address the second. Today's space missions are often large, complex and require development times typically a decade from conception to execution. In present risk-averse scenario, the huge expense of these one-of-a-kind mission architecture can only be justified if the technology required to make orders of magnitude gains is flight-proven at the time mission conception. VerSAT will complement these expensive missions which are "too large to fail" and the CUBESATs. A number of Geospace science experiments that could immediately take advantage of VerSAT have been identified. They range from the study of fundamental questions of the "ignorosphere" from a single satellite lasting a few days - a region of space that was probed once about 40 years ago, to a constellation of satellites which will disentangle the space and time ambiguity of the variability of ionospheric structures and their link to the storms in the Sun to long-term studies of the Sun-Earth system. VerSAT is a true

  12. Conceptual Design of a Communications Relay Satellite for a Lunar Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Christopher W.

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, NASA solicited proposals for a robotic exploration of the lunar surface. Submissions were requested for a lunar sample return mission from the South Pole-Aitken Basin. The basin is of interest because it is thought to contain some of the oldest accessible rocks on the lunar surface. A mission is under study that will land a spacecraft in the basin, collect a sample of rock fragments, and return the sample to Earth. Because the Aitken Basin is on the far side of the Moon, the lander will require a communications relay satellite (CRS) to maintain contact with the Earth during its surface operation. Design of the CRS's orbit is therefore critical. This paper describes a mission design which includes potential transfer and mission orbits, required changes in velocity, orbital parameters, and mission dates. Several different low lunar polar orbits are examined to compare their availability to the lander versus the distance over which they must communicate. In addition, polar orbits are compared to a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 point, which would permit continuous communication at a cost of increased fuel requirements and longer transmission distances. This thesis also examines some general parameters of the spacecraft systems for the mission under study. Mission requirements for the lander dictate the eventual choice of mission orbit. This mission could be the first step in a period of renewed lunar exploration and eventual human landings.

  13. Launch mission summary and terminal countdown, Delta 153 Satellite Business Systems satellite (SBS-A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the launch vehicle, spacecraft, and mission is contained. Information relative to launch windows, vehicle telemetry coverage, realtime data flow, telemetry coverage by station, selected trajectory information, and a brief sequence of flight events is also included.

  14. Regional gravity field modelling from GOCE observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss a regional recovery of gravity disturbances at the mean geocentric sphere approximating the Earth over the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients. For this purpose, we derive integral formulas which allow converting the gravity disturbances onto the disturbing gravitational gradients in the local north-oriented frame (LNOF). The derived formulas are free of singularities in case of r ≠ R . We then investigate three numerical approaches for solving their inverses. In the initial approach, the integral formulas are firstly modified for solving individually the near- and distant-zone contributions. While the effect of the near-zone gravitational gradients is solved as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant-zone gravitational gradients is computed by numerical integration from the global gravitational model (GGM) TIM-r4. In the second approach, we further elaborate the first scenario by reducing measured gravitational gradients for gravitational effects of topographic masses. In the third approach, we apply additional modification by reducing gravitational gradients for the reference GGM. In all approaches we determine the gravity disturbances from each of the four accurately measured gravitational gradients separately as well as from their combination. Our regional gravitational field solutions are based on the GOCE EGG_TRF_2 gravitational gradients collected within the period from November 1 2009 until January 11 2010. Obtained results are compared with EGM2008, DIR-r1, TIM-r1 and SPW-r1. The best fit, in terms of RMS (2.9 mGal), is achieved for EGM2008 while using the third approach which combine all four well-measured gravitational gradients. This is explained by the fact that a-priori information about the Earth's gravitational field up to the degree and order 180 was used.

  15. Initial Satellite Formation Flight Results from the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Trevor; Ottenstein, Neil; Palmer, Eric; Farahmand, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the results that have been obtained to date concerning MMS formation flying. The MMS spacecraft spin at a rate of 3.1 RPM, with spin axis roughly aligned with Ecliptic North. Several booms are used to deploy instruments: two 5 m magnetometer booms in the spin plane, two rigid booms of length 12.5 m along the positive and negative spin axes, and four flexible wire booms of length 60 m in the spin plane. Minimizing flexible motion of the wire booms requires that reorientation of the spacecraft spin axis be kept to a minimum: this is limited to attitude maneuvers to counteract the effects of gravity-gradient and apparent solar motion. Orbital maneuvers must therefore be carried out in essentially the nominal science attitude. These burns make use of a set of monopropellant hydrazine thrusters: two (of thrust 4.5 N) along the spin axis in each direction, and eight (of thrust 18 N) in the spin plane; the latter are pulsed at the spin rate to produce a net delta-v. An on-board accelerometer-based controller is used to accurately generate a commanded delta-v. Navigation makes use of a weak-signal GPS-based system: this allows signals to be received even when MMS is flying above the GPS orbits, producing a highly accurate determination of the four MMS orbits. This data is downlinked to the MMS Mission Operations Center (MOC) and used by the MOC Flight Dynamics Operations Area (FDOA) for maneuver design. These commands are then uplinked to the spacecraft and executed autonomously using the controller, with the ground monitoring the burns in real time.

  16. Implementation and Test of the Automatic Flight Dynamics Operations for Geostationary Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangwook; Lee, Young-Ran; Hwang, Yoola; Javier Santiago Noguero Galilea

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes the Flight Dynamics Automation (FDA) system for COMS Flight Dynamics System (FDS) and its test result in terms of the performance of the automation jobs. FDA controls the flight dynamics functions such as orbit determination, orbit prediction, event prediction, and fuel accounting. The designed FDA is independent from the specific characteristics which are defined by spacecraft manufacturer or specific satellite missions. Therefore, FDA could easily links its autonomous job control functions to any satellite mission control system with some interface modification. By adding autonomous system along with flight dynamics system, it decreases the operator’s tedious and repeated jobs but increase the usability and reliability of the system. Therefore, FDA is used to improve the completeness of whole mission control system’s quality. The FDA is applied to the real flight dynamics system of a geostationary satellite, COMS and the experimental test is performed. The experimental result shows the stability and reliability of the mission control operations through the automatic job control.

  17. GOCE observations and geophysical constraints to better understand the lithosphere and geodynamical processes under the Paraná-Etendeka region: preliminary results of PERLA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizia; Braitenberg, Carla

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the considerable progress made by the modern geodetic satellite mission GOCE, one of the challenges of the European Space Agency (ESA) is to improve knowledge of physical properties and geodynamic processes of the lithosphere and the Earth deep interior, and their relationship to Earth-surface changes. In this context we propose a study that aims to understand the two pieces of lithosphere underlying the Paraná-Etendeka conjugate margins (Brazil, and Angola-Namibia). It is essential to collect the geological and geophysical information about the thickness and the density of sedimentary layers, crustal thickness and mantle inhomogeneities. Our methodology integrates the geophysical database with the GOCE data, product of the innovative gravity satellite mission, that was concluded November 2013. Crustal thickness was obtained from all available seismological datasets. The density-depth relation of the shallow layers is modeled by geophysical data collected from literature and from the on-shore and off-shore drilling programs. Several compaction laws are used to estimate the density of each layer. This information is necessary to reduce the observations considering the gravity effect of all intracrustal known layers, to resolve the deep crustal structures (e.g. Moho and intracrustal bodies). A positive gravity anomaly is expected due to the magmatic activity of the Paraná-Etendeka province. The smaller-scale and shallow gravity anomaly should be due to the occurrence of the volcanic activity close to the alkaline-carbonatite complexes, while the large-scale anomaly is expected from the underplating of a wide denser body at the depth of the crustal mantle boundary. In the present work some preliminary results of the inversion of the residual gravity anomaly in terms of densities in the middle and shallow lithosphere under the Paraná-Etendeka region will be presented and interpreted.

  18. Upward continuation of Dome-C airborne gravity and comparison with GOCE gradients at orbit altitude in east Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2017-01-01

    An airborne gravity campaign was carried out at the Dome-C survey area in East Antarctica between the 17th and 22nd of January 2013, in order to provide data for an experiment to validate GOCE satellite gravity gradients. After typical filtering for airborne gravity data, the cross-over error...

  19. Trajectory Design to Mitigate Risk on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichmann, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will employ a highly eccentric Earth orbit, in 2:1 lunar resonance, reached with a lunar flyby preceded by 3.5 phasing loops. The TESS mission has limited propellant and several orbit constraints. Based on analysis and simulation, we have designed the phasing loops to reduce delta-V and to mitigate risk due to maneuver execution errors. We have automated the trajectory design process and use distributed processing to generate and to optimize nominal trajectories, check constraint satisfaction, and finally model the effects of maneuver errors to identify trajectories that best meet the mission requirements.

  20. GOCE Data for Local Geoid Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Knudsen, Per; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2014-01-01

    field in regional areas. Subsequently, the calculated geoid is used together with measurements of sea surface height in a calculation of the Mean Dynamic Topography.In regional geoid recovery from GOCE gradients, two methods are used, one of them being Least-Squares Collocation (LSC). The second method...... GOCE gradient data are used with the RPM method, an improvement inthe gravitational field determination is achieved. The enhanced geoid by the RPM methodis then used for the improvement of the MDT in the North Atlantic region....

  1. Novel low cost standardized Nano-Satellite structure bus for LEO missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anubhav, T.; Sarwesh, P.; Narayan, V.; Varma, P. A.; Prasad, R. A.; Loganathan, M.; Rao, D. N.; Sriram, S.; Venkatesh, M.

    This paper focuses on SRMSAT STRUCTURE BUS which is a standardized Nano-Satellite structure bus. It provides a standard platform for a wide variety of missions in LEO and can be realized in a very short developmental period. The bus was designed and developed for SRMSAT, the SRM University (Sri Ramaswamy Memorial University) student Nano-Satellite, by the undergraduate students and faculty of SRM University in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). The bus can support payloads up to a mass of 20kg. SRMSAT STRUCTURE BUS has a mass of around 6 kg and dimensions 280mm × 280mm × 280mm with an available volume of 11000 cc. Vibration Testing of the bus has been performed upto 6.7 gRMS. This makes the satellite capable of being launched by any launch vehicle in the world. An innovative PCB mounting design has been introduced in this structure bus which facilitates mounting of a maximum 7 PCB trays independently, each tray capable of holding a 250 mm2 PCB. Structural analysis of SRMSAT STRUCTURE BUS was done using NX Nastran. The boundary conditions for each analysis were defined based on the loading conditions as specified by the launcher, PSLV (Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle). Optimization of each individual component was performed by maintaining a minimum threshold between the local frequencies of the component and global frequencies of the entire satellite. Static, Modal, Harmonic and Random Vibration analysis of the structure bus was performed. This paper also describes the methodology followed in the static and dynamic analysis of the structure bus to finalize the design. The results have been tested and validated at ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore with around 90% accuracy and the structure has been certified as a standard structure bus for Nano-satellite missions. In terms of expandability, this structure bus is capable of accommodating deployable solar panels. Also, the payload mounting is not only restricted to th- bottom deck but can

  2. Satellite Constellations for Space Weather and Ionospheric Studies: Overview of the COSMIC and COSMIC-2 Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, W. S.; Pedatella, N. M.; Weiss, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements from constellations of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites are proving highly useful for ionospheric science and space weather studies. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), a joint US/Taiwan mission launched in April 2006, is a six micro-satellite constellation carrying Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) receivers. COSMIC has collected a large amount of useful data from these scientific payloads and is still currently collecting up to 1,000 RO measurement events per day on average. The GPS RO dual-frequency L-band phase and amplitude measurements can be used to observe absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation on lines of sight between the LEO and GPS satellites, and electron density profiles via the RO method. The large number and complete global and local time coverage of COSMIC data are allowing scientists to observe ionospheric and plasmaspheric phenomena that are difficult to see with other instruments. The success of COSMIC has prompted U.S. agencies and Taiwan to execute a COSMIC follow-on mission (called COSMIC-2) that will put twelve satellites with GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) RO payloads into orbit on two launches in the 2017-20 time frame. The first launch in 2017 will place six satellites in a 520-km altitude 24 deg inclination orbit, which is ideal for low latitude ionospheric research and space weather forecasting. The planned second launch (not currently funded) places six additional satellites in a 750 km 72 deg inclination orbit to provide global coverage and increased sampling density. COSMIC-2 will make use of an advanced radio occultation receiver with an innovative beam-forming antenna design, and is expected to produce at least 10,000 high-quality atmospheric and ionospheric profiles per day from GPS and GLONASS signals to support operational weather prediction, climate monitoring, and space weather forecasting. Each COSMIC-2 spacecraft

  3. Understanding data noise in gravity field recovery on the basis of inter-satellite ranging measurements acquired by the satellite gravimetry mission GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditmar, P.; Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Hashemi Farahani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral analysis of data noise is performed in the context of gravity field recovery from inter-satellite ranging measurements acquired by the satellite gravimetry mission GRACE. The motivation of the study is two-fold: (i) to promote a further improvement of GRACE data processing techniques and

  4. GRACE Mission Design: Impact of Uncertainties in Disturbance Environment and Satellite Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Seywald, Hans; Qu, Min

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) primary mission will be performed by making measurements of the inter-satellite range change between two co-planar, low altitude, near-polar orbiting satellites. Understanding the uncertainties in the disturbance environment, particularly the aerodynamic drag and torques, is critical in several mission areas. These include an accurate estimate of the spacecraft orbital lifetime, evaluation of spacecraft attitude control requirements, and estimation of the orbital maintenance maneuver frequency necessitated by differences in the drag forces acting on both satellites. The FREEMOL simulation software has been developed and utilized to analyze and suggest design modifications to the GRACE spacecraft. Aerodynamic accommodation bounding analyses were performed and worst-case envelopes were obtained for the aerodynamic torques and the differential ballistic coefficients between the leading and trailing GRACE spacecraft. These analyses demonstrate how spacecraft aerodynamic design and analysis can benefit from a better understanding of spacecraft surface accommodation properties, and the implications for mission design constraints such as formation spacing control.

  5. SPOT satellite family: Past, present, and future of the operations in the mission and control center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Pacholczyk

    1993-01-01

    SPOT sun-synchronous remote sensing satellites are operated by CNES since February 1986. Today, the SPOT mission and control center (CCM) operates SPOT1, SPOT2, and is ready to operate SPOT3. During these seven years, the way to operate changed and the CCM, initially designed for the control of one satellite, has been modified and upgraded to support these new operating modes. All these events have shown the performances and the limits of the system. A new generation of satellite (SPOT4) will continue the remote sensing mission during the second half of the 90's. Its design takes into account the experience of the first generation and supports several improvements. A new generation of control center (CMP) has been developed and improves the efficiency, quality, and reliability of the operations. The CMP is designed for operating two satellites at the same time during launching, in-orbit testing, and operating phases. It supports several automatic procedures and improves data retrieval and reporting.

  6. Improved Traceability of a Small Satellite Mission Concept to Requirements Using Model Based System Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) has recently been gaining significant support as a means to improve the "traditional" document-based systems engineering (DBSE) approach to engineering complex systems. In the spacecraft design domain, there are many perceived and propose benefits of an MBSE approach, but little analysis has been presented to determine the tangible benefits of such an approach (e.g. time and cost saved, increased product quality). This paper presents direct examples of how developing a small satellite system model can improve traceability of the mission concept to its requirements. A comparison of the processes and approaches for MBSE and DBSE is made using the NASA Ames Research Center SporeSat CubeSat mission as a case study. A model of the SporeSat mission is built using the Systems Modeling Language standard and No Magic's MagicDraw modeling tool. The model incorporates mission concept and requirement information from the mission's original DBSE design efforts. Active dependency relationships are modeled to demonstrate the completeness and consistency of the requirements to the mission concept. Anecdotal information and process-duration metrics are presented for both the MBSE and original DBSE design efforts of SporeSat.

  7. Towards the Development of a Global, Satellite-based, Terrestrial Snow Mission Planning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Bart; Kumar, Sujay; Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Nag, Sreeja

    2017-01-01

    A global, satellite-based, terrestrial snow mission planning tool is proposed to help inform experimental mission design with relevance to snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). The idea leverages the capabilities of NASAs Land Information System (LIS) and the Tradespace Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT C) to harness the information content of Earth science mission data across a suite of hypothetical sensor designs, orbital configurations, data assimilation algorithms, and optimization and uncertainty techniques, including cost estimates and risk assessments of each hypothetical orbital configuration.One objective the proposed observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is to assess the complementary or perhaps contradictory information content derived from the simultaneous collection of passive microwave (radiometer), active microwave (radar), and LIDAR observations from space-based platforms. The integrated system will enable a true end-to-end OSSE that can help quantify the value of observations based on their utility towards both scientific research and applications as well as to better guide future mission design. Science and mission planning questions addressed as part of this concept include:1. What observational records are needed (in space and time) to maximize terrestrial snow experimental utility?2. How might observations be coordinated (in space and time) to maximize utility? 3. What is the additional utility associated with an additional observation?4. How can future mission costs being minimized while ensuring Science requirements are fulfilled?

  8. Iodine Propulsion Advantages for Low Cost Mission Applications and the Iodine Satellite (ISAT) Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Schumacher, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Science and Technology Office is continuously exploring technology options to increase performance or reduce cost and risk to future NASA missions including science and exploration. Electric propulsion is a prevalent technology known to reduce mission costs by reduction in launch costs and spacecraft mass through increased post launch propulsion performance. The exploration of alternative propellants for electric propulsion continues to be of interest to the community. Iodine testing has demonstrated comparable performance to xenon. However, iodine has a higher storage density resulting in higher ?V capability for volume constrained systems. Iodine's unique properties also allow for unpressurized storage yet sublimation with minimal power requirements to produce required gas flow rates. These characteristics make iodine an ideal propellant for secondary spacecraft. A range of mission have been evaluated with a focus on low-cost applications. Results highlight the potential for significant cost reduction over state of the art. Based on the potential, NASA has been developing the iodine Satellite for a near-term iodine Hall propulsion technology demonstration. Mission applications and progress of the iodine Satellite project are presented.

  9. PRIMA Platform capability for satellite missions in LEO and MEO (SAR, Optical, GNSS, TLC, etc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, T.; L'Abbate, M.

    2016-12-01

    PRIMA (Piattaforma Riconfigurabile Italiana Multi Applicativa) is a multi-mission 3-axis stabilized Platform developed by Thales Alenia Space Italia under ASI contract.PRIMA is designed to operate for a wide variety of applications from LEO, MEO up to GEO and for different classes of satellites Platform Family. It has an extensive heritage in flight heritage (LEO and MEO Satellites already fully operational) in which it has successfully demonstrated the flexibility of use, low management costs and the ability to adapt to changing operational conditions.The flexibility and modularity of PRIMA provides unique capability to satisfy different Payload design and mission requirements, thanks to the utilization of recurrent adaptable modules (Service Module-SVM, Propulsion Module-PPM, Payload Module-PLM) to obtain mission dependent configuration. PRIMA product line development is continuously progressing, and is based on state of art technology, modular architecture and an Integrated Avionics. The aim is to maintain and extent multi-mission capabilities to operate in different environments (LEO to GEO) with different payloads (SAR, Optical, GNSS, TLC, etc.). The design is compatible with a wide range of European and US equipment suppliers, thus maximising cooperation opportunity. Evolution activities are mainly focused on the following areas: Structure: to enable Spacecraft configurations for multiple launch; Thermal Control: to guarantee thermal limits for new missions, more demanding in terms of environment and payload; Electrical: to cope with higher power demand (e.g. electrical propulsion, wide range of payloads, etc.) considering orbital environment (e.g. lighting condition); Avionics : AOCS solutions optimized on mission (LEO observation driven by agility and pointing, agility not a driver for GEO). Use of sensors and actuators tailored for specific mission and related environments. Optimised Propulsion control. Data Handling, SW and FDIR mission customization

  10. Quakes and tsunamis detected by GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Doornbos, Eelco; Bruinsma, Sean; Hebert, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    The aerodynamic accelerations measured by GOCE are used to calculate air density variations and air velocity estimates along GOCE orbit track. The detection of infrasonic waves generated by seismic surface waves and gravity waves generated by tsunamis are presented for earthquakes and tsunamis generated by the great Tohoku quake (11/03/2011). For the seismic/infrasonic waves, a wave propagation modelling is presented and synthetic data are compared to GOCE measurements. The travel time and amplitude discrepancies are discussed in terms of lateral velocity variations in the solid Earth and the atmosphere. For the tsunami/gravity waves, a plane wave analysis is performed and relations between vertical velocity, cross-track velocity and density variations are deduced. From theoretical relations between air density, and vertical and horizontal velocities inside the gravity wave, we demonstrate that the measured perturbations are consistent with a gravity wave generated by the tsunami, and provide a way to estimate the propagation azimuth of the gravity wave. By using these relations, an indicator of gravity wave presence is constructed. It will allow to scan the GOCE data set to search for gravity wave crossings. This study demonstrates that very low earth orbit spacecraft with high-resolution accelerometers are able to detect atmospheric waves generated by the tectonic activity. Such spacecraft may supply additional data to tsunami alert systems in order to validate some tsunami alerts.

  11. Quakes and tsunamis detected by GOCE (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2013-12-01

    The aerodynamic accelerations measured by GOCE are used to calculate air density variations and air velocity estimates along GOCE orbit track. The detection of infrasonic waves generated by seismic surface waves and gravity waves generated by tsunamis are presented for earthquakes and tsunamis generated in Tohoku (11/03/2011) and Samoa (29/09/2009) regions. For the seismic/infrasonic waves, a wave propagation modelling is presented and synthetic data are compared to GOCE measurements. The travel time and amplitude discrepancies are discussed in terms of lateral velocity variations in the solid Earth and the atmosphere. For the tsunami/gravity waves, a plane wave analysis is performed and relations between vertical velocity, cross-track velocity and density variations are deduced. By using these relations, an indicator of gravity wave presence is constructed. It allows scanning of the GOCE data to search for gravity wave crossings. Simulations of the gravity wave crossing space/time ranges, using models of tsunami and gravity wave propagation, demonstrate that the observed gravity waves coincide with model-predicted tsunami generated gravity waves for the Tohoku event. This study demonstrates that very low earth orbit spacecraft with high-resolution accelerometers are able to detect atmospheric waves generated by the tectonic activity. Such spacecraft may supply additional data to tsunami alert systems in order to validate some tsunami alerts.

  12. Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM): Exploration Of The Jovian System And Its Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Olivier; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.; Blanc, M.; Dougherty, M.; Bunce, E.; Lebreton, J.; Prockter, L.; Senske, D.; EJSM Joint Science Definition Team

    2009-09-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) Determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and (2) Characterize the processes that are operating within the Jupiter system. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede, and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA (future contributions by JAXA and Russia are also possible). The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. EJSM would directly address themes concerning the origin and evolution of satellite systems and water-rich environments in icy satellites. The potential habitability of the ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede would be investigated, by characterizing the geophysical, compositional, geological, and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also investigate Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and their satellites would be better known. Most important, EJSM would shed new light on the potential for the emergence of life in the celestial neighborhood and beyond. The EJSM architecture provides opportunities for coordinated synergistic observations by JEO and JGO of the Jupiter and Ganymede magnetospheres, the volcanoes and torus of Io, the atmosphere of Jupiter, and comparative planetology of icy satellites. Each spacecraft would conduct both synergistic dual-spacecraft investigations and "stand-alone” measurements.

  13. Mutual evaluation of global gravity models (EGM2008 and GOCE) and terrestrial data in Amazon Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, E. P.; Braitenberg, C.; Molina, E. C.

    2013-11-01

    The gravity observations of the satellite GOCE have a global homogeneous coverage and precision. This data set constitutes an independent new tool to control the quality of terrestrial gravity data. Terrestrial data reach higher resolution and precision, but can be affected by errors due to factors such as different vertical geodetic datums, wrong position in latitude and longitude, geodynamic effects and gravimeter drift, which tends to accumulate over long distances. Terrestrial data recover gravity signals at shorter wavelengths compared to the GOCE satellite, but the average gravity anomaly values can be compared to the GOCE derived values which are bandlimited to lower frequencies. We consider the area of the Amazon Craton, and in particular the Solimões, Amazon and Parnaiba Basins, and part of the Tocantins and São Francisco Provinces in Brazil, to estimate the systematic errors in terrestrial gravity data. We calculate the average terrestrial gravity anomaly by spatial averages applying Gaussian, inverse distance and simple averages, which allows to compare the long- and medium-wavelength part of the terrestrial gravity anomalies with the gravity field derived from GOCE. We also consider the combined satellite-terrestrial model EGM2008 up to degree and order 250 (i.e. maximum expansion from satellite GOCE). The results show that the systematic errors range from about -28.1 to 25.2 mGal with a standard deviation value of 6.4 mGal. The mean value over the study area is about zero, obtaining 0.27 mGal difference between the Gaussian average of the terrestrial gravity data and the gravity data from the GOCE satellite-only model and is smaller than the commission error associated to the geopotential model. Also, we verified that 64.8 per cent of the study area does not present systematic errors, as their difference is within the commission error of 5.1 mGal of the GOCE model in the harmonic expansion up to degree 250. The comparison of the terrestrial data with

  14. Pi-Sat: A Low Cost Small Satellite and Distributed Spacecraft Mission System Test Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Current technology and budget trends indicate a shift in satellite architectures from large, expensive single satellite missions, to small, low cost distributed spacecraft missions. At the center of this shift is the SmallSatCubesat architecture. The primary goal of the Pi-Sat project is to create a low cost, and easy to use Distributed Spacecraft Mission (DSM) test bed to facilitate the research and development of next-generation DSM technologies and concepts. This test bed also serves as a realistic software development platform for Small Satellite and Cubesat architectures. The Pi-Sat is based on the popular $35 Raspberry Pi single board computer featuring a 700Mhz ARM processor, 512MB of RAM, a flash memory card, and a wealth of IO options. The Raspberry Pi runs the Linux operating system and can easily run Code 582s Core Flight System flight software architecture. The low cost and high availability of the Raspberry Pi make it an ideal platform for a Distributed Spacecraft Mission and Cubesat software development. The Pi-Sat models currently include a Pi-Sat 1U Cube, a Pi-Sat Wireless Node, and a Pi-Sat Cubesat processor card.The Pi-Sat project takes advantage of many popular trends in the Maker community including low cost electronics, 3d printing, and rapid prototyping in order to provide a realistic platform for flight software testing, training, and technology development. The Pi-Sat has also provided fantastic hands on training opportunities for NASA summer interns and Pathways students.

  15. Sentinel Convoy: Synergetic Earth Observation with Satellites Flying in Formation with European Operational Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Amanda; Silvestrin, Pierluigi; Fernandez, Diego

    2016-08-01

    The successful launch of Sentinel-1A, Sentinel-1B, Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-3A signify the beginning of the dedicated space segment for the Copernicus Programme, which is the result of the partnership between the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA). These Sentinels are the first of a long-term operational series of Earth Observation (EO) satellites to be launched by Europe that will complement the already well-established series of meteorological missions.For the first time, these missions will provide a continuous and long term European capability for systematic observations of the Earth surface, its oceans and atmosphere to unprecedented accuracies, resolutions, and temporal coverage. If additional cost- effective missions could be flown together with these operational missions (including operational meteorological satellite series such as MetOp (Second Generation - SG) then the possibilities for meeting new Earth science and application objectives could be far- reaching e.g. fulfilling observational gaps, synergistic measurements of Earth system processes, etc. To explore this potential, the ESA initiated three exploratory paper studies (known as the EO-Convoy studies). The aim of these studies is two fold: Firstly, to identify scientific and operational objectives and needs that would benefit from additional in-orbit support. Secondly, to identify and develop a number of cost- effective mission concepts that would meet these objectives and needs. Each EO Convoy study is dedicated to a specific theme, namely: Study 1 - Ocean and Ice Applications, Study 2 - Land Applications and Study 3 - Atmospheric Applications.This paper will present the results of the EO-Convoy studies including an overview of the user needs and derived convoy concept descriptions. This paper shall focus on the resulting science benefits. Example convoy concepts to be presented include a passive C-band SAR flying with Sentinel-1 and possible free flying thermal

  16. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) is sensitive to soil moisture and sea surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 201l. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record -- provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica--parameters such as surface temperature.

  17. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Barret, D; Basa, S; Boër, M; Casse, F; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Klotz, A; Limousin, O; Manchanda, R; Mandrou, P; Mereghetti, S; Mochkovitch, R; Paltani, S; Paul, J; Petitjean, P; Pons, R; Ricker, G; Skinner, G K

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A "Phase A study" of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the "Myriade" family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB ...

  18. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanne, S.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Basa, S.; Boer, M.; Casse, F.; Cordier, B.; Daigne, F.; Klotz, A.; Limousin, O.; Manchanda, R.; Mandrou, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Mochkovitch, R.; Paltani, S.; Paul, J.; Petitjean, P.; Pons, R.; Ricker, G.; Skinner, G.

    2006-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB)—at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds—are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore, in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space-borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground-based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A “Phase A study” of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the “Myriade” family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB detection and localization with 10 arcmin precision in the 4 50 keV energy band, together with a soft X-ray camera for onboard position refinement to 1 arcmin. The ground-based optical robotic telescopes will detect the GRB prompt/early afterglow emission and localize the event to arcsec accuracy, for spectroscopic follow-up observations.

  19. Report of the Joint Scientific Mission Definition Team for an infrared astronomical satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The joint effort is reported of scientists and engineers from the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States working as a team for the purpose of exploring the possibility of a cooperative venture. The proposed mission builds upon experience gained from the successful Astronomical Netherlands Satellite (ANS). This satellite will be in a polar orbit at an altitude of 900 km. It will carry an 0.6 m diameter telescope cooled with helium to a temperature near 10K. An array of approximately 100 detectors will be used to measure the infrared flux in four wavelength bands centered at 10, 20, 50, and 100 microns. Sources will be located on the sky with positional accuracy of 1/2 arcminute. The instrument should be able to investigate the structure of extended sources with angular scales up to 1.0 deg. The entire sky will be surveyed and the full lifetime of the mission of about one year will be necessary to complete the survey. Special observational programs will also be incorporated into the mission.

  20. On The Accuracy Of Current Mean Sea Surface Models For The Use With Goce Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Rio, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    The mean sea surface (MSS) is a fundamental parameter in geodesy and physical oceanography and knowledge about the error on the MSS is fundamental for the interpretation of GOCE geoid model for the study of large scale ocean circulation. The MSS is the sum of the geoid height G and the temporal...... mean of the ocean mean dynamic topography (MDT) like MSS = G + MDT, where the MDT is the quantity bridging the geoid and the MSS and the quantity constraining large scale ocean circulation. In order to evaluate the accurate of satellite derived ocean currents from the difference between the MSS...... and the new and future GOCE geoids it is of fundamental importance to know the error on the MSS. In this presentation, preliminary results investigating the various contributions to MSS model differences as well as quantifying the various contributions to the total MSS error are characterized and the error...

  1. Dynamical effects of General Relativity on the satellite-to-satellite range and range-rate in the GRACE mission

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the impact of the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) on the satellite-to-satellite range \\rho and range-rate \\dot\\rho of the twin GRACE A/B spacecrafts through their dynamical equations of motion. The present-day accuracies in measuring such observables are \\sigma_\\rho <= 1-10 micron, \\sigma_\\dot\\rho <= 1 micron s^-1. Studies for a follow-on of such a mission points toward a range-rate accuracy of the order of \\sigma_\\dot\\rho = 1 nm s^-1 or better. We also compute the dynamical range and range-rate perturbations caused by the first six zonal harmonic coefficients J_L, L=2,3,4,5,6,7$ of the classical multipolar expansion of the terrestrial gravitational potential in order to evaluate their aliasing impact on the relativistic effects. Conversely, we also quantitatively assessed the possible a-priori \\virg{imprinting} of GTR itself, not solved-for in all the GRACE-based Earth's gravity models produced so far, on the estimated values of the low degree zonals of the geopotential. T...

  2. Mean Sea Surface (mss) Model Determination for Malaysian Seas Using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Musa, T. A.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, A. H.; Tugi, A.; Yazid, N. M.; Abdullah, N. M.; Wahab, M. I. A.

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of satellite altimeter technology has generated many evolutions to oceanographic and geophysical studies. A multi-mission satellite altimeter consists with TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2, ERS-2, Envisat-1, CryoSat-2 and Saral are extracted in this study and has been processed using Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS) for the period of January 2005 to December 2015 to produce the sea surface height (hereinafter referred to SSH). The monthly climatology data from SSH is generated and averaged to understand the variation of SSH during monsoon season. Then, SSH data are required to determine the localised and new mean sea surface (MSS). The differences between Localised MSS and DTU13 MSS Global Model is plotted with root mean square error value is 2.217 metres. The localised MSS is important towards several applications for instance, as a reference for sea level variation, bathymetry prediction and derivation of mean dynamic topography.

  3. MEAN SEA SURFACE (MSS MODEL DETERMINATION FOR MALAYSIAN SEAS USING MULTI-MISSION SATELLITE ALTIMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Z. Yahaya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of satellite altimeter technology has generated many evolutions to oceanographic and geophysical studies. A multi-mission satellite altimeter consists with TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2, ERS-2, Envisat-1, CryoSat-2 and Saral are extracted in this study and has been processed using Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS for the period of January 2005 to December 2015 to produce the sea surface height (hereinafter referred to SSH. The monthly climatology data from SSH is generated and averaged to understand the variation of SSH during monsoon season. Then, SSH data are required to determine the localised and new mean sea surface (MSS. The differences between Localised MSS and DTU13 MSS Global Model is plotted with root mean square error value is 2.217 metres. The localised MSS is important towards several applications for instance, as a reference for sea level variation, bathymetry prediction and derivation of mean dynamic topography.

  4. Electromagnetic panel deployment and retraction using the geomagnetic field in LEO satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takaya; Sugawara, Yoshiki; Satou, Yasutaka

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, spacecraft are installed with large-area structures that are extended and deployed post-launch. These extensible structures have been applied in several missions for power generation, thermal radiation, and solar propulsion. Here, we propose a deployment and retraction method using the electromagnetic force generated when the geomagnetic field interacts with electric current flowing on extensible panels. The panels are installed on a satellite in low Earth orbit. Specifically, electrical wires placed on the extensible panels generate magnetic moments, which interfere with the geomagnetic field. The resulting repulsive and retraction forces enable panel deployment and retraction. In the proposed method, a satellite realizes structural deployment using simple electrical wires. Furthermore, the satellite can achieve not only deployment but also retraction for avoiding damage from space debris and for agile attitude maneuvers. Moreover, because the proposed method realizes quasi-static deployment and the retraction of panels by electromagnetic forces, low impulsive force is exerted on fragile panels. The electrical wires can also be used to detect the panel deployment and retraction and generate a large magnetic moment for attitude control. The proposed method was assessed in numerical simulations based on multibody dynamics. Simulation results shows that a small cubic satellite with a wire current of 25 AT deployed 4 panels (20 cm × 20 cm) in 500 s and retracted 4 panels in 100 s.

  5. Control of the Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, L. A.; Levay, M.; Gilbreth, C. W.; Finch, M. L.; Bentley, R. D.; Firth, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite consists of two largely independent instruments: the Flat Crystal Spectrometer, a highly collimated scanning spectrometer mounted on a raster platform, and the Bent Crystal Spectrometer, a broadly collimated spectrometer providing high time-resolution (128 ms) spectra for the study of rapidly evolving phenomena. Each instrument is controlled by a microcomputer system built around an RCA 1802 microprocessor. This paper presents a discussion of the motivation for using a microprocessor in this application, and the design concepts that were implemented. The effectiveness of the approach as seen after several months of operation will also be discussed.

  6. 20 Years Experience with using Low Cost Launch Opportunities for 20 Small Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerman, Maarten; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    To realise the full potential of modern low cost mini-micro-nano-satellite missions, regular and affordable launch opportunities are required. It is simply not economic to launch individual satellites of 5-300kg on single dedicated launchers costing typically 15-20M per launch. Whilst there have been periodic 'piggy-back' launches of small satellites on US launchers since the 1960's, these have been infrequent and often experienced significant delays due the vagaries of the main (paying!) payload. In 1989, Arianespace provided a critical catalyst to the microsatellite community when it imaginatively developed the ASAP platform on Ariane-4 providing, for the first time, a standard interface and affordable launch contracts for small payloads up to 50kg. During the 1990's, some 20 small satellites have been successfully launched on the Ariane-4 ASAP ring for international customers carrying out a range of operational, technology demonstration and training missions. However, most of these microsatellite missions seek low Earth orbit and especially sun-synchronous orbits, but the number of primary missions into these orbit has declined since 1996 and with it the availability of useful low cost launch opportunities for microsatellites. Whilst Ariane-5 has an enhanced capacity ASAP, it has yet to be widely used due both to the infrequent launches, higher costs, and the GTO orbit required by the majority of customers. China, Japan and India have also provided occasional secondary launches for small payloads, but not yet on a regular basis. Fortunately, the growing interest and demand for microsatellite missions coincided with the emergence of regular, low cost launch opportunities from the former Soviet Union (FSU) - both as secondary 'piggy-back' missions or as multiple microsatellite payloads on converted military ICBMs. Indeed, the FSU now supplies the only affordable means of launching minisatellites (200-500kg) into LEO as dedicated missions on converted missiles as

  7. CLAIRE: a Canadian Small Satellite Mission for Measurement of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, James; Grant, Cordell; Germain, Stephane; Durak, Berke; McKeever, Jason; Latendresse, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    CLAIRE, a Canadian mission operated by GHGSat Inc. of Montreal, is the world's first satellite designed to measure greenhouse gas emissions from single targeted industrial facilities. Claire was launched earlier this year into a 500 km polar sun-synchronous orbit selected to provide an acceptable balance between return frequency and spatial resolution. Extensive simulations of oil & gas facilities, power plants, hydro reservoirs and even animal feedlots were used to predict the mission performance. The principal goal is to measure the emission rates of carbon dioxide and methane from selected targets with greater precision and lower cost than ground-based alternatives. CLAIRE will measure sources having surface areas less than 10 x 10 km2 with a spatial resolution better than 50 m, thereby providing industrial site operators and government regulators with the information they need to understand, manage and ultimately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions more economically. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer, coupled with a 2D InGaAs focal plane array operating in the short-wave infrared with a spectral resolution of about 0.1 nm. The patented, high étendue, instrument design provides signal to noise ratios that permit quantification of emission rates with accuracies adequate for most regulatory reporting thresholds. The very high spatial resolution of the density maps produced by the CLAIRE mission resolves plume shapes and emitter locations so that advanced dispersion models can derive accurate emission rates of multiple sources within the field of view. The satellite bus, provided by the University of Toronto's Space Flight Laboratory, is based on the well-characterized NEMO architecture, including hardware that has significant spaceflight heritage. The mission is currently undergoing initial test and validation measurements in preparation for commercial operation later this year.

  8. Evaluating Cloud and Precipitation Processes in Numerical Models using Current and Potential Future Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Tao, W. K.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Tanelli, S.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Petersen, W. A.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud, aerosol and precipitation processes play a fundamental role in the water and energy cycle. It is critical to accurately represent these microphysical processes in numerical models if we are to better predict cloud and precipitation properties on weather through climate timescales. Much has been learned about cloud properties and precipitation characteristics from NASA satellite missions such as TRMM, CloudSat, and more recently GPM. Furthermore, data from these missions have been successfully utilized in evaluating the microphysical schemes in cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and global models. However, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. These uncertainties can be attributed, at least in part, to the fact that microphysical processes cannot be directly observed or measured, but instead have to be inferred from those cloud properties that can be measured. Evaluation of microphysical parameterizations are becoming increasingly important as enhanced computational capabilities are facilitating the use of more sophisticated schemes in CRMs, and as future global models are being run on what has traditionally been regarded as cloud-resolving scales using CRM microphysical schemes. In this talk we will demonstrate how TRMM, CloudSat and GPM data have been used to evaluate different aspects of current CRM microphysical schemes, providing examples of where these approaches have been successful. We will also highlight CRM microphysical processes that have not been well evaluated and suggest approaches for addressing such issues. Finally, we will introduce a potential NASA satellite mission, the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CAPPM), which would facilitate the development and evaluation of different microphysical-dynamical feedbacks in numerical models.

  9. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HISat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in LEO, will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HiSat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaDX), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. This paper discusses the development of the R3S experiment as made possible by use of the HiSat architecture. The system design and operational modes of the experiment are described, as well as the experiment interfaces to the HiSat satellite via the user defined adapter (UDA) provided by NovaWurks. This paper outlines the steps taken by the project to execute the R3S mission in the 4 months of design, build, and test. Finally, description of the engineering process is provided, including the use of facilitated rapid/concurrent engineering sessions, the associated documentation, and the review process employed.

  10. The GOCE User Toolbox (GUT) and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, R. J.; Benveniste, J.; Knudsen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox (GUT) is an integrated suite of tools for the analysis and use of GOCE Level 2 gravity products. GUT supports applications in geodesy, oceanography and solid earth physics. The accompanying GUT tutorial provides information and guidance on how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications within each of these domains. An important motivation for the development of GUT has been the desire that users should be able to exploit the GOCE gravity products to calculate derived products relevant to their particular domains without necessarily needing to understand the technicalities of particular geodetic concepts and algorithms. As such, GUT is also suitable for use as an aid to the teaching of geophysics. A comprehensive and up-to-date set of a-priori data and models are supplied with the toolbox, together with a range of pre-defined workflows, allowing the user to immediately calculate useful geophysical quantities. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT Install Guide. GUT is cross-platform and may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux workstations and Macs. GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and, besides some bug-fixes, the capability to calculate the simple Bouguer anomaly was added. Recently, GUT version 3 has been released. Through a collaborative effort between the relevant scientific communities, this version has built on earlier releases by further extending the functionality of the toolbox within the fields of geodesy, oceanography and solid earth physics. Additions include the ability to work directly with gravity gradients, anisotropic diffusive filtering, and the computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies. The interface between the user and the toolbox has also been greatly improved and GUT version 3 now includes an attractive and intuitive Graphical User Interface. An associated GUT VCM tool for analysing the GOCE variance covariance matrices is also available.

  11. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods is that gradie......In this study, the GOCE (Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer) gradiometry data were used to study geologic structures and mass variations within the lithosphere in areas of known subduction zones. The advantage of gravity gradiometry over other gravity methods...... is that gradients are extremely sensitive to localized density contrasts within regional geological settings, which makes it ideally suited for detecting subduction zones. Second order gravity gradients of disturbing potential were extracted from global geopotential model, the fifth release GOCE model ‘EGM_TIM_RL05......’. In order to remove the signal which mainly corresponds to the gravity signal of the lower mantle, long wavelength part of the gravity signal was removed up to degree and order 60. Because the areas with notable topography differences coincide with subduction zones, topography correction was also performed...

  12. Los modos de goce en la posmodernidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulma López Arranz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene por objeto fundamentar que existe una clínica de los malestares que es propia del posmodernismo, donde la primacía del vale todo muestra lo más descarnado de la pulsión de muerte. La globalización, el desarrollo científico y tecnológico,la evolución de las comunicaciones y los mercados producen cambios culturales con consecuencias profundas sobre la modalidad de goce del sujeto. Las características de los vínculos se rigen por la precariedad, inestabilidad y vulnerabilidad. La violencia tiñe la relación imaginaria con el otro, la pacificación simbólica no opera y en ese escenario de labilidad vincular vemos con asombro el surgimiento de nuevos modos de maltrato y violencia insensata. La tecnología, en sus avances, nos proporciona un modelo de comunicación inmediata, fugaz, asegurando un nuevo valor de cambio: la información. Los efectos del discurso capitalista dejan al sujeto alienado en goces autoeróticos: el vodka eyeballing, el Chily Wily, el Tampax on the rock, el hikikomori son solo algunos de los ejemplos extremos de esta nueva modalidad de goce.

  13. 3-Axis magnetic control: flight results of the TANGO satellite in the PRISMA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasset, C.; Noteborn, R.; Bodin, P.; Larsson, R.; Jakobsson, B.

    2013-09-01

    PRISMA implements guidance, navigation and control strategies for advanced formation flying and rendezvous experiments. The project is funded by the Swedish National Space Board and run by OHB-Sweden in close cooperation with DLR, CNES and the Danish Technical University. The PRISMA test bed consists of a fully manoeuvrable MANGO satellite as well as a 3-axis controlled TANGO satellite without any Δ V capability. PRISMA was launched on the 15th of June 2010 on board DNEPR. The TANGO spacecraft is the reference satellite for the experiments performed by MANGO, either with a "cooperative" or "non-cooperative" behaviour. Small, light and low-cost were the keywords for the TANGO design. The attitude determination is based on Sun sensors and magnetometers, and the active attitude control uses magnetic torque rods only. In order to perform the attitude manoeuvres required to fulfil the mission objectives, using any additional gravity gradient boom to passively stabilize the spacecraft was not allowed. After a two-month commissioning phase, TANGO separated from MANGO on the 11th of August 2010. All operational modes have been successfully tested, and the pointing performance in flight is in accordance with expectations. The robust Sun Acquisition mode reduced the initial tip-off rate and placed TANGO into a safe attitude in TANGO points its GPS antenna towards zenith with sufficient accuracy to track as many GPS satellites as MANGO. At the same time, it points its solar panel towards the Sun, and all payload equipments can be switched on without any restriction. This paper gives an overview of the TANGO Attitude Control System design. It then presents the flight results in the different operating modes. Finally, it highlights the key elements at the origin of the successful 3-axis magnetic control strategy on the TANGO satellite.

  14. Paraná-Etendeka lithosphere modeling according to GOCE observations and geophysical constraints: improvement of PERLA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizia; Braitenberg, Carla

    2015-04-01

    One of the challenges of the European Space Agency (ESA) is to improve knowledge of physical properties and geodynamic processes of the lithosphere and the Earth's deep interior, and their relationship to the Earth-surface changes. PERLA project is a part of the challenge of ESA's Living Planet program to investigate the Solid Earth, and in particular the lithosphere of the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province (LIP). At the present stage the study is focusing on the upper mantle, the source of the magma. The aim is to motivate the asymmetry of the shallow volcanic effusion of the Early Cretaceous tholeiitic magmatism, that in Paraná is wide, thick and represented by the basaltic layer of Serra Geral Formation, while in Etendeka it is rare and spanned. Viceversa the alkaline magmatism shows similar effusions along the region with dyke swarms and associated alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite complexes from Early Creataceous to Paleogene age. ESA's Living Planet program offers a suite of scientific satellites, the Earth Explorers, and in this context PERLA adopts the newest GOCE satellite mission products. The Marussi tensor field and especially its vertical component show a positive anomaly along the coastline sector of both the western and eastern Atlantic Ocean. Positive anomalies are also related to the deeper Moho under the northern part of Paraná basin, in South America (SAM) and the Etendeka continental part. Here we aim to define the detail of masses between crust and upper mantle by modeling the Marussi Tensor components and the invariants. The invariants are easier to understand because they are independent of the reference system. The forward model uses Tesseroids. The density model is compared with recent seismologic models, and is performed according to the results provided by the physical laws governing rock densities and seismic velocity of lithosphere in function of temperature and pressure combined with laboratory measurements of a great number of

  15. Design of a satellite end-to-end mission performance simulator for imaging spectrometers and its application to the ESA's FLEX/Sentinel-3 tandem mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, Jorge; Sabater, Neus; Tenjo, Carolina; Acarreta, Juan R.; Manzano, María.; Rivera, Juan P.; Jurado, Pedro; Franco, Raffaella; Alonso, Luis; Moreno, Jose

    2015-09-01

    The performance analysis of a satellite mission requires specific tools that can simulate the behavior of the platform; its payload; and the acquisition of scientific data from synthetic scenes. These software tools, called End-to-End Mission Performance Simulators (E2ES), are promoted by the European Space Agency (ESA) with the goal of consolidating the instrument and mission requirements as well as optimizing the implemented data processing algorithms. Nevertheless, most developed E2ES are designed for a specific satellite mission and can hardly be adapted to other satellite missions. In the frame of ESA's FLEX mission activities, an E2ES is being developed based on a generic architecture for passive optical missions. FLEX E2ES implements a state-of-the-art synthetic scene generator that is coupled with dedicated algorithms that model the platform and instrument characteristics. This work will describe the flexibility of the FLEX E2ES to simulate complex synthetic scenes with a variety of land cover classes, topography and cloud cover that are observed separately by each instrument (FLORIS, OLCI and SLSTR). The implemented algorithms allows modelling the sensor behavior, i.e. the spectral/spatial resampling of the input scene; the geometry of acquisition; the sensor noises and non-uniformity effects (e.g. stray-light, spectral smile and radiometric noise); and the full retrieval scheme up to Level-2 products. It is expected that the design methodology implemented in FLEX E2ES can be used as baseline for other imaging spectrometer missions and will be further expanded towards a generic E2ES software tool.

  16. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  17. Improvement of global and regional mean sea level derived from satellite altimetry multi missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, M.; Faugere, Y.; Larnicol, G.; Picot, N.; Cazenave, A.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    With the satellite altimetry missions, the global mean sea level (GMSL) has been calculated on a continual basis since January 1993. 'Verification' phases, during which the satellites follow each other in close succession (Topex/Poseidon--Jason-1, then Jason-1--Jason-2), help to link up these different missions by precisely determining any bias between them. Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2 are also used, after being adjusted on these reference missions, in order to compute Mean Sea Level at high latitudes (higher than 66°N and S), and also to improve spatial resolution by combining all these missions together. The global mean sea level (MSL) deduced from TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 provide a global rate of 3.2 mm from 1993 to 2010 applying the post glacial rebound (MSL aviso website http://www.jason.oceanobs.com/msl). Besides, the regional sea level trends bring out an inhomogeneous repartition of the ocean elevation with local MSL slopes ranging from + 8 mm/yr to - 8 mm/year. A study published in 2009 [Ablain et al., 2009] has shown that the global MSL trend unceratainty was estimated at +/-0.6 mm/year with a confidence interval of 90%. The main sources of errors at global and regional scales are due to the orbit calculation and the wet troposphere correction. But others sea-level components have also a significant impact on the long-term stability of MSL as for instance the stability of instrumental parameters and the atmospheric corrections. Thanks to recent studies performed in the frame of the SALP project (supported by CNES) and Sea-level Climate Change Initiative project (supported by ESA), strong improvements have been provided for the estimation of the global and regional MSL trends. In this paper, we propose to describe them; they concern the orbit calculation thanks to new gravity fields, the atmospheric corrections thanks to ERA-interim reanalyses, the wet troposphere corrections thanks to the stability improvement, and also empirical corrections

  18. Geoid Determination Using GOCE-Based Models in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkan Işık, Mustafa; Erol, Bihter

    2016-04-01

    The maintenance of the vertical datum in tectonically active regions such as Turkey become more of an issue. The distortions in the vertical datum due to geodynamic phenomena necessitate the realization of geoid based vertical datum. The height modernization studies for transition to a "geoid based vertical datum definition" providing practical use of GNSS technologies to obtain orthometric heights in Turkey has accelerated rapidly in recent years and hence in the content of these efforts on-going projects contribute to improvement of quality and quantity of terrestrial gravity dataset as well as selection of the optimal computation algorithm to reach a precise geoid model in the territory. In this manner the assessment of the different methodologies with varying input parameters and referred models is obviously essential to in order to clarify the advantages of the algorithms in terms of providing an optimal combination of different data sets in regional geoid modeling. The performance of recently published GOCE-GRACE gravity field models show significant improvements in the medium frequency. This study investigates the contribution of the recently released Geopotential models with the contribution of GOCE and GRACE missions to the gravimetric geoid modeling specifically from Least squares modification of Stokes' (LSMS) formula point of view in Turkey territory. The algorithm developed by Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) that adopt the least squares modification of Stokes' kernel in order for providing an optimum combination of spherical harmonic expansion model and terrestrial gravity data and hence claims to optimize the drawbacks, may stem from the handicaps (such as low accuracy, sparse distribution etc.) of the terrestrial gravity data in the results. The additive corrective terms in order to account for downward continuation effect, atmospheric effect and ellipsoidal effect are proposed as the superiorities of this algorithm comparing to the conventional

  19. Effects of space weather on GOCE electrostatic gravity gradiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, E. Sinem; Pagiatakis, Spiros D.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the presence of residual nongravitational signatures in gravitational gradients measured by GOCE electrostatic gravity gradiometer. These signatures are observed over the magnetic poles during geomagnetically active days and can contaminate the trace of the gravitational gradient tensor by up to three to five times the expected noise level of the instrument (˜ 11 mE). We investigate these anomalies in the gradiometer measurements along many satellite tracks and examine possible causes using external datasets, such as interplanetary electric field measurements from the ACE (advanced composition explorer) and WIND spacecraft, and Poynting vector (flux) estimated from equivalent ionospheric currents derived from spherical elementary current systems over North America and Greenland. We show that the variations in the east-west and vertical electrical currents and Poynting vector components at the satellite position are highly correlated with the disturbances observed in the gradiometer measurements. The results presented in this paper reveal that the disturbances are due to intense ionospheric current variations that are enhanced by increased solar activity that causes a very dynamic drag environment. Moreover, successful modelling and removal of a high percentage of these disturbances are possible using external geomagnetic field observations.

  20. Effects of space weather on GOCE electrostatic gravity gradiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, E. Sinem; Pagiatakis, Spiros D.

    2016-07-01

    We examine the presence of residual nongravitational signatures in gravitational gradients measured by GOCE electrostatic gravity gradiometer. These signatures are observed over the magnetic poles during geomagnetically active days and can contaminate the trace of the gravitational gradient tensor by up to three to five times the expected noise level of the instrument (˜ 11 mE). We investigate these anomalies in the gradiometer measurements along many satellite tracks and examine possible causes using external datasets, such as interplanetary electric field measurements from the ACE (advanced composition explorer) and WIND spacecraft, and Poynting vector (flux) estimated from equivalent ionospheric currents derived from spherical elementary current systems over North America and Greenland. We show that the variations in the east-west and vertical electrical currents and Poynting vector components at the satellite position are highly correlated with the disturbances observed in the gradiometer measurements. The results presented in this paper reveal that the disturbances are due to intense ionospheric current variations that are enhanced by increased solar activity that causes a very dynamic drag environment. Moreover, successful modelling and removal of a high percentage of these disturbances are possible using external geomagnetic field observations.

  1. Medium-scale gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Massarweh, Lotfi; Doornbos, Eelco

    2016-08-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) in the thermosphere. Air density and crosswind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis is performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. A new GW marker (called Cf3) is introduced here to characterize GWs activity under low, medium, and high solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar damping effect on GW activity. Most GW signal is found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength of around 1000 km. The level of GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The correlation between air density variability and GW marker allows to identify most of the large-amplitude perturbations below 67° latitudes as due to GWs. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and crosswinds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results is verified in the time domain with a global mapping of high-frequency air density perturbations along the GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles and an extension to lower latitudes favored by low solar activity conditions. These results are consistent with previous Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) data analysis and with general circulation models.

  2. Investigation of ice particle habits to be used for ice cloud remote sensing for the GCOM-C satellite mission

    OpenAIRE

    H. Letu; Ishimoto, H.; J. Riedi; T. Y. Nakajima; L. C.-Labonnote; A. J. Baran; T. M. Nagao; M. Skiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Various ice particle habits are investigated in conjunction with inferring the optical properties of ice cloud for the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate (GCOM-C) satellite program. A database of the single-scattering properties of five ice particle habits, namely, plates, columns, droxtals, bullet-rosettes, and Voronoi, is developed. The database is based on the specification of the Second Generation Global Imager (SGLI) sensor onboard the GCOM-C satellite, which is ...

  3. A Collision Avoidance Strategy for a Potential Natural Satellite Around the Asteroid Bennu for the OSIRIS-REx Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiku, Alinda; Carpenter, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The cadence of proximity operations for the OSIRIS-REx mission may have an extra induced challenge given the potential of the detection of a natural satellite orbiting the asteroid Bennu. Current ground radar observations for object detection orbiting Bennu show no found objects within bounds of specific size and rotation rates. If a natural satellite is detected during approach, a different proximity operation cadence will need to be implemented as well as a collision avoidance strategy for mission success. A collision avoidance strategy will be analyzed using the Wald Sequential Probability Ratio Test.

  4. Estimating water storage changes and sink terms in Volta Basin from satellite missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner G. FERREIRA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The insufficiency of distributed in situ hydrological measurements is a major challenge for hydrological studies in many regions of the world. Satellite missions such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM can be used to improve our understanding of water resources beyond surface water in poorly gauged basins. In this study we combined GRACE and TRMM to investigate monthly estimates of evaporation plus runoff (sink terms using the water balance equation for the period from January 2005 to December 2010 within the Volta Basin. These estimates have been validated by comparison with time series of sink terms (evaporation plus surface and subsurface runoff from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS. The results, for the period under consideration, show strong agreement between both time series, with a root mean square error (RMSE of 20.2 mm/month (0.67 mm/d and a correlation coefficient of 0.85. This illustrates the ability of GRACE to predict hydrological quantities, e.g. evaporation, in the Volta Basin. The water storage change data from GRACE and precipitation data from TRMM all show qualitative agreement, with evidence of basin saturation at approximately 73 mm in the equivalent water column at the annual and semi-annual time scales.

  5. Glacier changes in the Karakoram region mapped by multi-mission satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rankl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers in the Karakoram region are known to show stable and advancing terminus positions or surging behavior, which contrasts the worldwide retreat of many mountain glaciers. The present study uses Landsat imagery to derive an updated and extended glacier inventory. Surging and advancing glaciers and their annual termini position changes are mapped in addition. Out of 1334 glaciers, 134 show advancing or surging behavior, with a marked increase since 2000. The length distribution of surging glaciers differs significantly from non-surging glaciers. More than 50% of the advancing/surging glaciers are shorter than 10 km. Besides a regional spatial coverage of ice dynamics, high-resolution SAR data allows to investigate very small and comparably fast flowing glaciers (up to 1.8 m day−1. Such data enables mapping of temporal changes of ice dynamics of individual small surging or advancing glaciers. In a further case study, glacier volume changes of three glaciers around Braldu Glacier are quantified during a surge event comparing digital elevation models from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and the new TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement (TanDEM-X Mission. We recommend regular acquisitions of high resolution (bi-static SAR satellite data and further exploitation of the archives in order to generate an improved database for monitoring changes, and to at least partially compensate for the lack of in-situ and long-term climatological measurements in the Karakoram region.

  6. On The Accuracy Of Current Mean Sea Surface Models For The Use With Goce Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Rio, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    The mean sea surface (MSS) is a fundamental parameter in geodesy and physical oceanography and knowledge about the error on the MSS is fundamental for the interpretation of GOCE geoid model for the study of large scale ocean circulation. The MSS is the sum of the geoid height G and the temporal...... mean of the ocean mean dynamic topography (MDT) like MSS = G + MDT, where the MDT is the quantity bridging the geoid and the MSS and the quantity constraining large scale ocean circulation. In order to evaluate the accurate of satellite derived ocean currents from the difference between the MSS...

  7. Spaceborne observations of a changing Earth - Contribution from ESÁ s operating and approved satellite missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    , managerial and regulatory activities (i.e. weather forecasting, deforestation, flooding, etc.) essential to the safe exploitation of global resources, conservation of sustainable ecosystems, and the compliance with numerous international treaties and conventions, depend absolutely on continuity of satellite missions to maximise socio-economic and environmental benefits. This presentation will highlight some of the multidisciplinary Earth science achievements and operational applications using ESA satellite missions. It will also address some of the key scientific challenges and need for operational monitoring services in the years to come. It capitalizes on the knowledge and awareness outlined in "The Changing Earth - New scientific challenges for ESÁs Living Planet Programme" issued in 2006 together with updated views and approved plans expressed during ESÁs Earth Sciences Advisory Committee (ESAC) meetings and agreed at the recent User Consultation meeting in January 2009.

  8. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Baker, D. F.; Mountain, M.; Henderson, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions) generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1 degree x 1 degree, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50 percent, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 micron candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 micron wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada). Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from 40 percent to 75 percent across our four instrument design cases, and from 65 percent to 85 percent for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty

  9. A regional CO2 observing system simulation experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1° latitude × 1° longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1° × 1°, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50%, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 μm candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 μm wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada. Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from ∼40% to ∼75% across our four instrument design cases, and from ∼65% to ∼85% for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty reductions at various scales are

  10. Design Concepts for a Small Space-Based GEO Relay Satellite for Missions Between Low Earth and near Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, Joseph D.; Oleson, Steven; Schier, James

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the Small Space-Based Geosynchronous Earth orbiting (GEO) satellite is to provide a space link to the user mission spacecraft for relaying data through ground networks to user Mission Control Centers. The Small Space Based Satellite (SSBS) will provide services comparable to those of a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) for the same type of links. The SSBS services will keep the user burden the same or lower than for TDRS and will support the same or higher data rates than those currently supported by TDRS. At present, TDRSS provides links and coverage below GEO; however, SSBS links and coverage capability to above GEO missions are being considered for the future, especially for Human Space Flight Missions (HSF). There is also a rising need for the capability to support high data rate links (exceeding 1 Gbps) for imaging applications. The communication payload on the SSBS will provide S/Ka-band single access links to the mission and a Ku-band link to the ground, with an optical communication payload as an option. To design the communication payload, various link budgets were analyzed and many possible operational scenarios examined. To reduce user burden, using a larger-sized antenna than is currently in use by TDRS was considered. Because of the SSBS design size, it was found that a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket could deliver three SSBSs to GEO. This will greatly reduce the launch costs per satellite. Using electric propulsion was also evaluated versus using chemical propulsion; the power system size and time to orbit for various power systems were also considered. This paper will describe how the SSBS will meet future service requirements, concept of operations, and the design to meet NASA users' needs for below and above GEO missions. These users' needs not only address the observational mission requirements but also possible HSF missions to the year 2030. We will provide the trade-off analysis of the communication payload design in terms of

  11. Signature of range observable in non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity and the measurements with satellite-satellite tracking missions. Theoretical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Li-E

    2014-01-01

    Having great accuracy in the range and range rate measurements, the operating GRACE mission and the planed GRACE Follow On mission can in principle be employed to place strong constraints on certain relativistic gravity theories. In this paper, we work out in details the range observable in the non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity for these Satellite-Satellite Tracking measurements. We find out that an characteristic time accumulating signal appears in the range observable in the non-dynamical Chern-Simons gravity, which has no analogy found in the standard metric theories of gravity. The magnitude of this Chern-Simons range signal will reach to a few times of $(\\frac{\\dot{\\theta}}{100r})meters$ for each free flight of these SST missions, here $\\dot{\\theta}$ measures the length scale of the theory and $r$ denotes the orbital radius of the SST mission. Therefore, with the 12 years data from the GRACE mission and the proper data analysis methods, one expects that the mass scale of the non-dynamical CS gr...

  12. The SPectral Ocean Color (SPOC) Small Satellite Mission: From Payload to Ground Station Development and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, S.; Cotten, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    This work introduces the mission concept, technologies, and development status for the measuring SPectral Ocean Color (SPOC) small satellite mission, which will use a hyperspectral imager to map sensitive coastal regions and off coast water quality near the state of Georgia and beyond. SPOC is being developed by The University of Georgia's Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) with funds from NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP). The project is led by undergraduates from a wide range of backgrounds and supervised by a multidisciplinary team of Principal Investigators. Using optical components, electronics boards, a grating spectrometer, and a CMOS array the students will assemble and integrate the payload components and ensure their compatibility with the other subsystems. In-house development and assembly includes building the hyperspectral imager, as well integrating it into the satellite, and testing of the different subsystems of the satellite. The mission will collect spectral data along a 300 km swath using the grating spectrometer to diffract the incoming radiation into the 440-865 nm spectral range. The resulting images will be 75 km x 300 km in size, have a 120 m spatial resolution, and a spectral resolution of 2 nm, covering 100 spectral bands. The resulting dataset will allow for spectral analysis comparisons with some of NASA's legacy satellites. The work describes the timeline and current progress of the SPOC mission. Focus will be equally distributed to all the different systems of the satellite including their development, testing, and integration. Particular emphasis is given to Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS), command and data handling (CDH), payload, power generation, S-Band/X-Band transceivers, and the development of ground station capabilities (S-Band/X-Band).

  13. Hail detection algorithm for the Global Precipitation Measuring mission core satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Kamil; Battaglia, Alessandro; Lang, Timothy J.; Tanelli, Simone; Cecil, Daniel J.; Tridon, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    By exploiting an abundant number of extreme storms observed simultaneously by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite's suite of sensors and by the ground-based S-band Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over continental US, proxies for the identification of hail are developed based on the GPM core satellite observables. The full capabilities of the GPM observatory are tested by analyzing more than twenty observables and adopting the hydrometeor classification based on ground-based polarimetric measurements as truth. The proxies have been tested using the Critical Success Index (CSI) as a verification measure. The hail detection algorithm based on the mean Ku reflectivity in the mixed-phase layer performs the best, out of all considered proxies (CSI of 45%). Outside the Dual frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) swath, the Polarization Corrected Temperature at 18.7 GHz shows the greatest potential for hail detection among all GMI channels (CSI of 26% at a threshold value of 261 K). When dual variable proxies are considered, the combination involving the mixed-phase reflectivity values at both Ku and Ka-bands outperforms all the other proxies, with a CSI of 49%. The best-performing radar-radiometer algorithm is based on the mixed-phase reflectivity at Ku-band and on the brightness temperature (TB) at 10.7 GHz (CSI of 46%). When only radiometric data are available, the algorithm based on the TBs at 36.6 and 166 GHz is the most efficient, with a CSI of 27.5%.

  14. GOCE++ Dynamical Coastal Topography and tide gauge unification using altimetry and GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per; Nielsen, Karina; Hughes, Christopher; Kern, Michael; Gravelle, Mederic; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Bingham, rory; Woppelmann, guy

    2017-04-01

    Within GOCE ++ the use of ocean levelling is taken as a novel approach to the study of height system unification across the oceans taking the recent development in geoid accuracy through GOCE data into account. The suggested investigation involves the use of measurements and modelling to estimate Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT) of the ocean along a coastline, which contributes/requires reconciling altimetry, tide gauge and vertical land motion. Close to the coast the determination of the MDT is problematic due to i.e., the altimeter footprint, land motion or parameterization/modelling of coastal currents. The objective of this activity is to perform a consolidated and improved understanding and modelling of coastal processes and physics responsible for sea level changes on various temporal/spatial scales. The study presents the following elements Develop an approach to estimate a consistent DT at tide gauges, coastal areas, and open ocean; Validate the approach in well-surveyed areas where DT can be determined at tide gauges; Determine a consistent MDT using GOCE with consistent error covariance fields; improving altimetry (SAR) along the coast for MSS/MDT improvement and finally connecting the global set of tide gauges and investigate trends

  15. Post-Decadal White Paper: A Dual-Satellite Dark-Energy/Microlensing NASA-ESA Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A confluence of scientific, financial, and political factors imply that launching two simpler, more narrowly defined dark-energy/microlensing satellites will lead to faster, cheaper, better (and more secure) science than the present EUCLID and WFIRST designs. The two satellites, one led by ESA and the other by NASA, would be explicitly designed to perform complementary functions of a single, dual-satellite dark-energy/microlensing ``mission''. One would be a purely optical wide-field camera, with large format and small pixels, optimized for weak-lensing, which because of its simple design, could be launched by ESA on relatively short timescales. The second would be a purely infrared satellite with marginally-sampled or under-sampled pixels, launched by NASA. Because of budget constraints, this would be launched several years later. The two would complement one another in 3 dark energy experiments (weak lensing, baryon oscillations, supernovae) and also in microlensing planet searches. Signed international agr...

  16. Exploration of the Jovian System by EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission): Origin of Jupiter and Evolution of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho; Fujimoto, Masaki; Takashima, Takeshi; Yano, Hajime; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Kimura, Jun; Okada, Tatsuaki; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Funase, Ryu; Mori, Osamu; Morimoto, Mutsuko; Ikoma, Masahiro; Naganuma, Takeshi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Hussmann, Hauke; Kurita, Kei; Working Group, Jupiter

    EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission) is a planned Jovian system mission with three spacecraft aiming at coordinated observations of the Jovian satellites especially Europa and the magnetosphere, atmosphere and interior of Jupiter. It was formerly called "Laplace" mission. In October 2007, it was selected as one of future ESA scientific missions Cosmic Vision (2015-2025). From the beginning, Japanese group is participating in the discussion process of the mission. JAXA will take a role on the magnetosphere spinner JMO (Jupiter Magnetosphere Orbiter). On the other hand, ESA will take charge of JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) and NASA will be responsible for JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter). In February 2009, EJSM is prioritized as the first candidate of outer planet flagship mission and mission study continues in the course of Cosmic Vision. The expected launch time of EJSM will be expected in 2020. Currently we are seeking a possibility to combine JMO with a proposed solar sail mission of JAXA for Jupiter and one of Trojan asteroids.

  17. Gradients from GOCE reveal gravity changes before Pisagua Mw = 8.2 and Iquique Mw = 7.7 large megathrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Nacif, Silvina; Spagnotto, Silvana; Folguera, Andres; Gimenez, Mario; Chlieh, Mohamed; Braitenberg, Carla

    2015-12-01

    Considerable improvements in the measurement of the Earth gravity field from GOCE satellite mission have provided global gravity field models with homogeneous coverage, high precision and good spatial resolution. In particular, the vertical gravity gradient (Tzz), in comparison to the classic Bouguer anomaly, defines more accurately superficial mass heterogeneities. Moreover, the correction of these satellite-derived data from the effect of Earth topographic masses by means of new techniques taking into account the Earth curvature, improves results in regional analyses. In a recent work we found a correlation between Tzz and slip distribution for the 2010 Maule Mw = 8.8 earthquake. In the present work, we derive the vertical gravity gradient from the last GOCE only model, corrected by the topographic effect and also by the sediments on depocenters of the offshore region at the Peru-Chile margin, in order to study a spatial relationship between different lobes of the gravity derived signal and the seismic sources of large megathrust earthquakes. In particular, we analyze this relation for the slip models of the 1996 Mw = 7.7 Nazca, 2001 Mw = 8.4 Arequipa, 2007 Mw = 8.0 Pisco events and for the slip models of the 2014 Mw = 8.2 Pisagua and Mw = 7.7 Iquique earthquakes from Schurr et al. (2014), including the previously analyzed 2010 Mw = 8.8 Maule event. Then we find a good correlation between vertical gravity gradients and main rupture zones, correlation that becomes even stronger as the event magnitude increases. Besides this, a gravity fall in the gravity gradient was noticed over the area of the main slip patches at least for the two years before 2014 Mw = 8.2 Pisagua and Mw = 7.7 Iquique earthquakes. Additionally, we found temporal variations of the gravity field after 2010 Mw = 8.8 Maule event, related to the main patches of the slip distribution, and coseismic deformation. Therefore, we analyzed vertical gravity gradient field variations as an indirect measure

  18. Promoting space research and applications in developing countries through small satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, M.

    The high vantage-point of space offers very direct and tangible benefits to developing countries when carefully focused upon their real and particular communications and Earth observation needs. However, until recently, access to space has been effectively restricted to only those countries prepared to invest enormous sums in complex facilities and expensive satellites and launchers: this has placed individual participation in space beyond the sensible grasp of developing countries. However, during the last decade, highly capable and yet inexpensive small satellites have been developed which provide an opportunity for developing countries realistically to acquire and operate their own independent space assets - customized to their particular national needs. Over the last 22 years, the Surrey Space Centre has pioneered, developed and launched 23 nano-micro-minisatellite missions, and has worked in partnership with 12 developing countries to enable them to take their first independent steps into space. Surrey has developed a comprehensive and in-depth space technology know-how transfer and 'hands-on' training programme that uses a collaborative project comprising the design, construction, launch and operation of a microsatellite to acquire an indigenous space capability and create the nucleus of a national space agency and space industry. Using low cost small satellite projects as a focus, developing countries are able to initiate a long term, affordable and sustainable national space programme specifically tailored to their requirements, that is able to access the benefits derived from Earth observation for land use and national security; improved communications services; catalyzing scientific research and indigenous high-technology supporting industries. Perhaps even more important is the long-term benefit to the country provided by stimulating educational and career opportunities for your scientists and engineers and retaining them inside the country rather the

  19. Satellite formation design in orbits of high eccentricity for missions with performance criteria specified over a region of interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Christopher William Thomas

    Several methods are presented for the design of satellite formations for science missions in high-eccentricity reference orbits with quantifiable performance criteria specified throughout only a portion the orbit, called the Region of Interest (RoI). A modified form of the traditional average along-track drift minimization condition is introduced to account for the fact that performance criteria are only specified within the RoI, and a robust formation design algorithm (FDA) is defined to improve performance in the presence of formation initialization errors. Initial differential mean orbital elements are taken as the design variables and the Gim-Alfriend state transition matrix (G-A STM) is used for relative motion propagation. Using mean elements and the G-A STM allows for explicit inclusion of J2 perturbation effects in the design process. The methods are applied to the complete formation design problem of the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission and results are verified using the NASA General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). Since satellite formations in high-eccentricity orbits will spend long times at high altitude, third-body perturbations are an important design consideration as well. A detailed analytical analysis of third-body perturbation effects on satellite formations is also performed and averaged dynamics are derived for the particular case of the lunar perturbation. Numerical results of the lunar perturbation analysis are obtained for the example application of the MMS mission and verified in GMAT.

  20. CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, N.; Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Fischer, D.; Fischer, J.; Kremic, T.; Agrawal, A.; Andreae, M.; Bierbaum, R.; Blakeslee, R.; Boerner, A.; Bowles, N.; Christian, H.; Dunion, J.; Horvath, A.; Huang, X.; Khain, A.; Kinne, S.; Lemos, M.-C.; Penner, J.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. Knowledge of these interactions is foundational to our understanding of weather and climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Decadal Survey (NRC 2007) indicate that the uncertainty in how clouds adjust to aerosol perturbations dominates the uncertainty in the overall quantification of the radiative forcing attributable to human activities. The Clouds, Hazards, and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER) mission concept responds to the IPCC and Decadal Survey concerns by studying the activation of CCN and their interactions with clouds and storms. CHASER proposes to revolutionize our understanding of the interactions of aerosols with clouds by making the first global measurements of the fundamental physical entity linking them: activated cloud condensation nuclei. The CHASER mission was conceptualized to measure all quantities necessary for determining the interactions of aerosols with clouds and storms. Measurements by current satellites allow the determination of crude profiles of cloud particle size but not of the activated CCN that seed them. CHASER uses a new technique (Freud et al. 2011; Rosenfeld et al. 2012) and high-heritage instruments to produce the first global maps of activated CCN and the properties of the clouds associated with them. CHASER measures the CCN concentration and cloud thermodynamic forcing simultaneously, allowing their effects to be distinguished. Changes in the behavior of a group of weather systems in which only one of the quantities varies (a partial derivative of the intensity with the desirable quantity) allow the determination of each effect statistically. The high uncertainties of current climate predictions limit their much-needed use in decision-making. CHASER mitigates this

  1. Sensitivity and foreground modelling for large-scale CMB B-mode polarization satellite missions

    CERN Document Server

    Remazeilles, M; Eriksen, H K K; Wehus, I K

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of large-scale B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are a fundamental goal of current and future CMB experiments. However, because of the much higher instrumental sensitivity, CMB experiments will be more sensitive to any imperfect modelling of the Galactic foreground polarization in the estimation of the primordial B-mode signal. We compare the sensitivity to B-modes for different concepts of CMB satellite missions (LiteBIRD, COrE, COrE+, PRISM, EPIC, PIXIE) in the presence of Galactic foregrounds that are either correctly or incorrectly modelled. We quantify the impact on the tensor-to-scalar parameter of imperfect foreground modelling in the component separation process. Using Bayesian parametric fitting and Gibbs sampling, we perform the separation of the CMB and the Galactic foreground B-mode polarization. The resulting CMB B-mode power spectrum is used to compute the likelihood distribution of the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We focus the analysis to the very large angula...

  2. Status of the fifth generation GOCE time-wise Earth gravity field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Guerr, Torsten; Brockmann, Jan Martin; Krasbutter, Ina; Höck, Eduard; Zehentner, Norbert; Pail, Roland; Schuh, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Since the launch of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite in 2009, four releases of the so called time-wise gravity field models were computed within the ESA funded High-level Processing Facility (HPF). The observations are the gravity gradients measured by the gradiometer and the satellite orbit determined via GPS. These gravity field models were released as a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and a corresponding full variance covariance matrix. As a lot of effort is put into the modeling of the original observation errors, these covariance matrix realistically presents the errors of the gravity field models. The fifth generation called TIM5 is in preparation. The new solution will consider the GOCE data from the complete lifetime. This includes also data from lower orbit phases, which provides higher sensitivity, especially for the detailed structures of the gravity field. To account for the higher sensitivity the complete data set has been reprocessed. The preprocessing was needed as the spatial resolution is increased from maximum degree/order 250 to degree/order 280 in terms of spherical harmonic coefficients. This means additional 16,000 parameters were estimated. Within this presentation first results of the new model TIM5 are presented.

  3. Propulsion System Testing for the Iodine Satellite (iSAT) Demonstration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2015-01-01

    CUBESATS are relatively new spacecraft platforms that are typically deployed from a launch vehicle as a secondary payload, providing low-cost access to space for a wide range of end-users. These satellites are comprised of building blocks having dimensions of 10x10x10 cm cu and a mass of 1.33 kg (a 1-U size). While providing low-cost access to space, a major operational limitation is the lack of a propulsion system that can fit within a CubeSat and is capable of executing high delta v maneuvers. This makes it difficult to use CubeSats on missions requiring certain types of maneuvers (i.e. formation flying, spacecraft rendezvous). Recently, work has been performed investigating the use of iodine as a propellant for Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) 2 that could subsequently be used to provide a high specific impulse path to CubeSat propulsion. 3, 4 Iodine stores as a dense solid at very low pressures, making it acceptable as a propellant on a secondary payload. It has exceptionally high ?Isp (density times specific impulse), making it an enabling technology for small satellite near-term applications and providing the potential for systems-level advantages over mid-term high power electric propulsion options. Iodine flow can also be thermally regulated, subliming at relatively low temperature (less than 100 C) to yield I2 vapor at or below 50 torr. At low power, the measured performance of an iodine-fed HET is very similar to that of a state-of-the-art xenon-fed thruster. Just as importantly, the current-voltage discharge characteristics of low power iodine-fed and xenon-fed thrusters are remarkably similar, potentially reducing development and qualifications costs by making it possible to use an already-qualified xenon-HET PPU in an iodine-fed system. Finally, a cold surface can be installed in a vacuum test chamber on which expended iodine propellant can deposit. In addition, the temperature doesn't have to be extremely cold to maintain a low vapor pressure in the

  4. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions with Climate Data Record Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 2011. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record-provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica-parameters such as surface temperature.

  5. A method to develop mission critical data processing systems for satellite based instruments. The spinning mode case

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzarotto, Francesco; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Pacciani, Luigi; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Modern satellite based experiments are often very complex real-time systems, composed by flight and ground segments, that have challenging resource related constraints, in terms of size, weight, power, requirements for real-time response, fault tolerance, and specialized input/output hardware-software, and they must be certified to high levels of assurance. Hardware-software data processing systems have to be responsive to system degradation and to changes in the data acquisition modes, and actions have to be taken to change the organization of the mission operations. A big research & develop effort in a team composed by scientists and technologists can lead to produce software systems able to optimize the hardware to reach very high levels of performance or to pull degraded hardware to maintain satisfactory features. We'll show real-life examples describing a system, processing the data of a X-Ray detector on satellite-based mission in spinning mode.

  6. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  7. A close examination of under-actuated attitude control subsystem design for future satellite missions' life extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quang M.; Barkana, Itzhak

    2014-12-01

    Satellite mission life, maintained and prolonged beyond its typical norm of their expectancy, are primarily dictated by the state of health of its Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA), especially for commercial GEO satellites since torquer bars are no longer applicable while thruster assistant is unacceptable due to pointing accuracy impact during jet firing. The RWA is the primary set of actuators (as compared to thrusters for orbit maintenance and maneuvering) mainly responsible for the satellite mission for accurately and precisely pointing its payloads to the right targets to conduct its mission operations. The RWA consisting of either a set of four in pyramid or three in orthogonal is the primary set of actuators to allow the satellite to achieve accurate and precise pointing of the satellite payloads towards the desired targets. Future space missions will be required to achieve much longer lives and are currently perceived by the GEO satellite community as an "expected norm" of 20 years or longer. Driven by customers' demands/goals and competitive market have challenged Attitude Control Subsystems (ACS) engineers to develop better ACS algorithms to address such an emerging need. There are two main directions to design satellite's under-actuated control subsystem: (1) Attitude Feedback with Zero Momentum Principle and (2) Attitude Control by Angular Velocity Tracking via Small Time Local Controllability concept. Successful applications of these control laws have been largely demonstrated via simulation for the rest to rest case. Limited accuracy and oscillatory behaviors are observed in three axes for non-zero wheel momentum while realistic loss of a wheel scenario (i.e., fully actuated to under-actuated) has not been closely examined! This study revisits the under-actuated control design with detailed set ups of multiple scenarios reflecting real life operating conditions which have put current under-actuated control laws mentioned earlier into a re-evaluation mode

  8. The MICROSTAR electrostatic accelerometer for the GRASP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Francoise; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Perrot, Eddy

    2015-04-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept dedicated to the enhancement of all the space geodetic techniques, and promising revolutionary improvements to the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The integration of an ultra sensitive accelerometer at the Center of mass of the satellite can provide not only improvement of the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by the accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the surface of the satellite but also by the possibility to calibrate with an accuracy better than 100 µm the change in the position of the Satellite Center of Mass as it is performed in the GRACE mission and to determine the precise motion of the antennas assuming some rigid structure between them and the accelerometer as it is done between the star sensor, the optical cube assembly of satellite laser ranging system and the accelerometer in the GRACE-Follow On mission. The proposed accelerometer is miniaturized version of the electrostatic accelerometers developed for the Earth gravity missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and GRACE-FO. He has 3 sensitive axes thanks to a cubic proof-mass and provides the 3 linear accelerations and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes. He is called MICROSTAR and its foreseen performance is a linear acceleration noise lower than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz.

  9. Utilizing low-cost 3U single-sensor satellites for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance mission capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Philip M.; Knuth, Andrew A.; Garrison-Darrin, Margaret A.

    2012-06-01

    Leveraging low cost launch carriers for small satellites with the functionality required for DoD and intelligence missions realizes a hidden potential capability. The Multi-Mission Bus Demonstration (MBD) is a Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) program to demonstrate military operational relevance in a 3U CubeSat form factor. The MBD spacecraft caters to mission versatility and responsive launch capabilities with a standardized bus and interchangeable payload interface design. MBD embraced the challenge of building two space vehicles on an extremely aggressive timeline and demanding budget, causing the development team to evaluate every step of the process to maximize efforts with minimal manpower and cost. MBD is providing a classified DoD payload capability that is truly operationally relevant and may revolutionize the mission area. As a single instrument or payload satellite, also called a SensorSat, MBD is a spacecraft of realizable ISR benefits including effective remote sensing, simplified engineering design and program requirements, and reduced time to launch, all yielding an appealing cost per unit. The SensorSat has potential to detect sufficient information that will act as a complementary component to tactical commanders in heightening battlefield awareness. Recent advancements in technology has put capabilities such as precision navigation, communication intelligence, signal intelligence, tactical warning, environmental intelligence, and a wide variety of ground imaging, at the tip of culmination in a small, economical package. This paper reviews the high functionality of the MBD spacecraft in the miniaturized footprint of 10 cm by 10 cm by 30cm which allows the mission to leverage inexpensive launch opportunities.

  10. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions with Climate Data Record Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) is sensitive to soil moisture and sea surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 201 I. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record-provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica-parameters such as surface temperature.

  11. The Delta low-inclination satellite concept, an opportunity to enhance the science return of the Swarm mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, Gauthier; Leger, Jean-Michel; Olsen, Nils;

    of these data, however, would be possible if a fourth “Delta” satellite were to be launched soon enough to join the constellation at a similar altitude but much lower inclination orbit (such as 60°). Such a satellite would provide less geographical coverage but a much faster mapping of all local times over...... and investigation efforts are now hampered by the still limited local time coverage provided by this constellation. This affects our ability to accurately characterize time changes in the ionospheric and magnetospheric field contributions, and to model the electrical conductivity of the Earth’s mantle. It also...... these latitudes. In this presentation we will present the rational for such a Delta mission and discuss the benefit it would bring....

  12. Interest of the MICROSTAR Accelerometer to improve the GRASP Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, E.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Liorzou, F.; Huynh, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept proposed by JPL to improve the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). By taking advantage of the new testing possibilities offer by the catapult facility at the ZARM drop tower, the ONERA's space accelerometer team proposes an up-dated version, called MICROSTAR, of its ultra sensitive electrostatic accelerometers which have contributed to the success of the last Earth's gravity missions GRACE and GOCE. Built around a cubic proof-mass, it provides the 3 linear accelerations with a resolution better than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes with 5´10-10 rad.s-2/Hz1/2 resolution. Integrated at the centre of mass of the satellite, MICROSTAR improves the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the satellite. It offers also the possibility to calibrate the change in the position of the satellite center of mass with an accuracy better than 100 μm as demonstrated in the GRACE mission. Assuming a sufficiently rigid structure between the antennas and the accelerometer, its data can participate to reach the mission objective of 1 mm precision for the TRF position.

  13. Life Science Research in Outer Space: New Platform Technologies for Low-Cost, Autonomous Small Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Parra, Macarena P.; Niesel, David; McGinnis, Michael; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Nicholson, Wayne; Mancinelli, Rocco; Piccini, Matthew E.; Beasley, Christopher C.; Timucin, Linda R.; Ricks, Robert D.; McIntyre, Michael J.; Squires, David; Yost, Bruce D.; Hines, John W.

    2009-01-01

    We develop integrated instruments and platforms suitable for economical, frequent space access for autonomous life science experiments and processes in outer space. The technologies represented by three of our recent free-flyer small-satellite missions are the basis of a rapidly growing toolbox of miniaturized biologically/biochemically-oriented instrumentation now enabling a new generation of in-situ space experiments. Autonomous small satellites ( 1 50 kg) are less expensive to develop and build than fullsize spacecraft and not subject to the comparatively high costs and scheduling challenges of human-tended experimentation on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, and comparable platforms. A growing number of commercial, government, military, and civilian space launches now carry small secondary science payloads at far lower cost than dedicated missions; the number of opportunities is particularly large for so-called cube-sat and multicube satellites in the 1 10 kg range. The recent explosion in nano-, micro-, and miniature technologies, spanning fields from telecommunications to materials to bio/chemical analysis, enables development of remarkably capable autonomous miniaturized instruments to accomplish remote biological experimentation. High-throughput drug discovery, point-of-care medical diagnostics, and genetic analysis are applications driving rapid progress in autonomous bioanalytical technology. Three of our recent missions exemplify the development of miniaturized analytical payload instrumentation: GeneSat-1 (launched: December 2006), PharmaSat (launched: May 2009), and O/OREOS (organism/organics exposure to orbital stresses; scheduled launch: May 2010). We will highlight the overall architecture and integration of fluidic, optical, sensor, thermal, and electronic technologies and subsystems to support and monitor the growth of microorganisms in culture in these small autonomous space satellites, including real-time tracking of their culture

  14. Relative humidity distribution from SAPHIR experiment on board Megha-Tropiques satellite mission: Comparison with global radiosonde and other satellite and reanalysis data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Basha, Ghouse; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Jayaraman, A.

    2013-09-01

    For better understanding the life cycle of the convective systems and their interactions with the environment, a joint Indo-French satellite mission named Megha-Tropiques has been launched in October 2011 in a low-inclination (20°) orbit. In the present study, we show the first results on the comparison of relative humidity (RH) obtained using a six-channel microwave sounder, covering from surface to 100 hPa, from one of the payloads SAPHIR (Sounder for Atmospheric Profiling of Humidity in the Inter-tropical Regions). The RH observations from SAPHIR illustrated the numerous scales of variability in the atmosphere both vertically and horizontally. As a part of its validation, we compare SAPHIR RH with simultaneous observations from a network of radiosondes distributed across the world (±30° latitude), other satellites (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer, Constellation Observation System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC)), and various reanalysis (National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis (ERA)-Interim, Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA)) products. Being at a low inclination, SAPHIR is able to show better global coverage when compared to any other existing satellites in the tropical region where some important weather processes take place. A very good correlation is noticed with the RH obtained from a global radiosonde network particularly in the altitude range corresponding to 850-250 hPa, thus providing a valuable data set for investigating the convective processes. In the case of satellite data sets, SAPHIR RH is well comparable with COSMIC RH. Among the reanalysis products, NCEP shows less difference with SAPHIR followed by ERA-Interim, and the MERRA products show large differences in the middle and upper troposphere.

  15. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HiSat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Soto, Hector L.; Stewart, Victor A.; Jones, Mark L.; Kowalski, Matthew C.; Ben Shabat, Adam; Gough, Kerry M.; Stavely, Rebecca L.; Shim, Alex C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HISat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. Currently, airline professionals are the second largest demographic of radiation workers and to date their radiation exposure is undocumented in the USA. The NAIRAS model seeks to fill this information gap. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. The R3S mission collects total dose and radiation spectrum measurements using a Teledyne µDosimeter and a Liulin-6SA2 LED spectrometer. These two radiation sensors provide a cross correlated radiometric measurement in combination with the Honeywell HMR2300 Smart Digital Magnetometer. The magnetometer assesses the Earth's magnetic field in the LEO environment and allows radiation dose to be mapped as a function of the Earth's magnetic shielding. R3S is also unique in that the radiation sensors will be exposed on the outer surface of the spacecraft, possibly making this the first measurements of the LEO radiation environment with bare sensors. Viability of R3S as an extremely fast turnaround mission is due, in part, to the nature of the robust, well-defined interfaces of the conformal satellite HiSat Architecture. The HiSat architecture, which was developed with the support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Phoenix Program, enabled the R3S system to advance from the first concept to delivery of preliminary design review (PDR) level documents in

  16. GOCE++ Dynamical Coastal Topography and tide gauge unification using altimetry and GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Nielsen, Karina

    points in the ocean. However, close to the coast the determination of the MDT is problematic due to i.e., the altimeter footprint, land motion or parameterization/modelling of coastal currents. The objective of this activity is to perform a consolidated and improved understanding and modelling of coastal......ESA has recently released a study on the potential of ocean levelling as a novel approach to the study of height system unification taking the recent development in geoid accuracy trough GOCE data into account. The suggested investigation involves the use of measurements and modelling to estimate...... Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT) of the ocean along a coastline which contributes/requires reconciling altimetry, tide gauge and vertical land motion. The fundamental use of the MDT computed using altimetry, ocean models or through the use of tide gauges has values of between -2 and +1 meters at different...

  17. Innovative Applications of DoD Propulsion Technology for Low-Cost Satellite Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing to leverage the Missile Defense Agency investments in high-performance propulsion systems for low-cost space missions with large Dv requirements,...

  18. Innovative Applications of DOD Propulsion Technology for Low-Cost Satellite Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing to leverage the Missile Defense Agency investments in high-performance propulsion systems for low-cost space missions with large Dv requirements,...

  19. A GOCE-only global gravity field model by the space-wise approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliaccio, Federica; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Gatti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The global gravity field model computed by the spacewise approach is one of three official solutions delivered by ESA from the analysis of the GOCE data. The model consists of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and the corresponding error covariance matrix. The main idea behind this approach...... is to exploit the spatial correlation of the gravity field to estimate grids of potential and its second order radial derivatives at mean satellite altitude; from these grids, spherical harmonic coefficients are then derived by numerical integration. The filtering strategy includes also a Wiener filter along...... the orbit to reduce the noise variance and correlation before gridding the data. In the first release of the space-wise approach, based on a period of about two months, some prior information coming from existing gravity field models entered into the solution especially at low degrees and low orders...

  20. The coastal mean dynamic topography in Norway observed by CryoSat-2 and GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idžanović, Martina; Ophaug, Vegard; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2017-01-01

    highly reliant on the geoid. Using new regional geoid models as well as CryoSat-2 data, we determine three geodetic coastal MDT models in Norway and validate them against independent tide-gauge observations and the operational coastal ocean model NorKyst800. The CryoSat-2 MDTs agree on the ∼3–5 cm level...... with both tide-gauge geodetic and ocean MDTs along the Norwegian coast. In addition, we compute geostrophic surface currents to help identifying errors in the geoid models. We find that even though the regional geoid models are all based on the latest satellite gravity data as provided by GOCE...... terrestrial gravity information provided by aregional geoid model. We also find that the border of the geographical mode mask of CryoSat-2 coincides with the Norwegian Coastal Current, making it challenging to distinguish between artifacts in the CryoSat-2observations during mode switch and ocean signal....

  1. Matching Lithosphere velocity changes to the GOCE gravity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Authors: Carla Braitenberg, Patrizia Mariani, Alberto Pastorutti Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste Via Weiss 1, 34100 Trieste Seismic tomography models result in 3D velocity models of lithosphere and sublithospheric mantle, which are due to mineralogic compositional changes and variations in the thermal gradient. The assignment of density is non-univocal and can lead to inverted density changes with respect to velocity changes, depending on composition and temperature. Velocity changes due to temperature result in a proportional density change, whereas changes due to compositional changes and age of the lithosphere can lead to density changes of inverted sign. The relation between velocity and density implies changes in the lithosphere rigidity. We analyze the GOCE gradient fields and the velocity models jointly, making simulations on thermal and compositional density changes, using the velocity models as constraint on lithosphere geometry. The correlations are enhanced by applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field and the tomography models which places today's observed fields at the Gondwana pre-breakup position. We find that the lithosphere geometry is a controlling factor on the overlying geologic elements, defining the regions where rifting and collision alternate and repeat through time. The study is carried out globally, with focus on the conjugate margins of the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105---- Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological implications from complete Gondwana GOCE-products reconstructions and link to lithospheric roots. Proceedings of 5th

  2. Propagation of Rainfall Products uncertainties in hydrological applications : Studies in the framework of the Megha-Tropiques Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, M.; Roca, R.

    2012-04-01

    The use of satellite based rainfall in research or operational Hydrological application is becoming more and more frequent. This is specially true in the Tropics where ground based gages (or radar) network are generally scarce and generally degrading. The new French-Indian satellite Mission Megha-Tropiques (MT) dedicated to the water and energy budget in the tropical atmosphere will contribute to a better monitoring of rainfall in the inter-tropical zone. As part of this mission, research is developed on the use of MT rainfall products for hydrological research or operational application such as flood monitoring. A key issue for such applications is how to account for rainfall products biases and uncertainties, and how to propagate them in the end user models ? Another important question is how to chose the best space-time resolution for the rainfall forcing, given that both model performances and rain-product uncertainties are resolution dependent. This talk will present on going investigations and perspectives on this subject, with examples from the Megha_tropiques Ground validation sites. Several sensitivity studies have been carried out in the Oueme Basin in Benin, West Africa, one the instrumented basin that will be used for MT products direct and hydrological validation.

  3. An ocean modelling and assimilation guide to using GOCE geoid products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haines, K.; Johannessen, J. A.; Knudsen, Per

    2011-01-01

    We review the procedures and challenges that must be considered when using geoid data derived from the Gravity and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission in order to constrain the circulation and water mass representation in an ocean general circulation model. It covers...... the compatibility of these different fields in their spatial scale content, their temporal representation, and in their error covariances. These considerations are very important when the resulting data are to be used to estimate ocean circulation and its corresponding errors. We describe the further steps needed...... for assimilating the resulting dynamic topography information into an ocean circulation model using three different operational forecasting and data assimilation systems. We look at methods used for assimilating altimeter anomaly data in the absence of a suitable geoid, and then discuss different approaches which...

  4. Hybrid Atom Electrostatic System for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The subject of this poster comes within the framework of new concepts identification and development for future satellite gravity missions, in continuation of previously launched space missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and ongoing and prospective studies like NGGM, GRACE 2 or E-GRASP. We were here more focused on the inertial sensors that complete the payload of such satellites. The clearly identified instruments for space accelerometry are based on the electrostatic technology developed for many years by ONERA and that offer a high level of performance and a high degree of maturity for space applications. On the other hand, a new generation of sensors based on cold atom interferometry (AI) is emerging and seems very promising in this context. These atomic instruments have already demonstrated on ground impressive results, especially with the development of state-of-the-art gravimeters, and should reach their full potential only in space, where the microgravity environment allows long interaction times. Each of these two types of instruments presents their own advantages which are, for the electrostatic sensors (ES), their demonstrated short term sensitivity and their high TRL, and for AI, amongst others, the absolute nature of the measurement and therefore no need for calibration processes. These two technologies seem in some aspects very complementary and a hybrid sensor bringing together all their assets could be the opportunity to take a big step in this context of gravity space missions. We present here the first experimental association on ground of an electrostatic accelerometer and an atomic accelerometer and underline the interest of calibrating the ES instrument with the AI. Some technical methods using the ES proof-mass as the Raman Mirror seem very promising to remove rotation effects of the satellite on the AI signal. We propose a roadmap to explore further in details and more rigorously this attractive hybridization scheme in order to assess its potential

  5. Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) Mission: Science from Geostationary Orbit on-board a Commercial Communications Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastes, R.; Deaver, T.; Krywonos, A.; Lankton, M. R.; McClintock, W. E.; Pang, R.

    2011-12-01

    Geostationary orbits are ideal for many science investigations of the Earth system on global scales. These orbits allow continuous observations of the same geographic region, enabling spatial and temporal changes to be distinguished and eliminating the ambiguity inherent to observations from low Earth orbit (LEO). Just as observations from geostationary orbit have revolutionized our understanding of changes in the troposphere, they will dramatically improve our understanding of the space environment at higher altitudes. However, geostationary orbits are infrequently used for science missions because of high costs. Geostationary satellites are large, typically weighing tons. Consequently, devoting an entire satellite to a science mission requires a large financial commitment, both for the spacecraft itself and for sufficient science instrumentation to justify a dedicated spacecraft. Furthermore, the small number of geostationary satellites produced for scientific missions increases the costs of each satellite. For these reasons, it is attractive to consider flying scientific instruments on satellites operated by commercial companies, some of whom have fleets of ~40 satellites. However, scientists' lack of understanding of the capabilities of commercial spacecraft as well as commercial companies' concerns about risks to their primary mission have impeded the cooperation necessary for the shared use of a spacecraft. Working with a commercial partner, the GOLD mission has successfully overcome these issues. Our experience indicates that there are numerous benefits to flying on commercial communications satellites (e.g., it is possible to downlink large amounts of data) and the costs are low if the experimental requirements adequately match the capabilities and available resources of the host spacecraft. Consequently, affordable access to geostationary orbit aboard a communications satellite now appears possible for science payloads.

  6. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  7. The GALILEO GALILEI small-satellite mission with FEEP thrusters (G G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Catastini, G. [Pisa, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica. Gruppo di Meccanica Spaziale

    1997-09-01

    The Equivalence Principle, formulated by Einstein generalizing Galileo`s and Newton`s work, is a fundamental principle of modern physics. As such it should be tested as accurately as possible. Its most direct consequence, namely the Universality of Free Fall, can be tested in space, in a low Earth orbit, the crucial advantage being that the driving signal is about three orders of magnitude stronger than on Earth. GALILEO GALILEI (G G) is a small space mission designed for such a high-accuracy test. At the time of print, G G has been selected by ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) as a candidate for the next small Italian mission. Ground tests of the proposed apparatus now indicate that an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 17} is within the reach of this small mission.

  8. The GALILEO GALILEI small-satellite mission with FEEP thrusters (GG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Catastini, G.

    1997-10-01

    The Equivalence Principle, formulated by Einstein generalizing Galileo's and Newton's work, is a fundamental principle of modern physics. As such it should be tested as accurately as possible. Its most direct consequence, namely the universality of free fall, can be tested in space in a low Earth orbit, the crucial advantage being that the driving signal is about three orders of magnitude stronger than on Earth. GALILEO GALILEI (GG) is a small space mission designed for such a high-accuracy test. GG has been selected by ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) as a candidate for the next small Italian mission. Ground tests of the proposed apparatus now indicate that an accuracy of 1 part in 1017 is within the reach of this small mission.

  9. Satellite Formation Flight Results from Phase 1 of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Trevor; Ottenstein, Neil; Palmer, Eric; Godine, Dominic

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the underlying dynamics of formation flying in a high-eccentricity orbit such as that of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The GPS-based results used for MMS navigation are summarized, as well as the procedures that are used to design the maneuvers used to place the spacecraft into a tetrahedron formation and then maintain it. The details of how to carry out these maneuvers are then discussed. Finally, the numerical results that have been obtained concerning formation flying for the MMS mission to date (e.g. tetrahedron sizes flown, maneuver execution error, fuel usage, etc.) are presented in detail.

  10. Aircraft data collection in support of NASA's earth observing satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA's Earth observing missions have been providing global information on soil moisture, vegetation, and precipitation that is crucial for hydrological and agricultural applications. For example, accurate soil moisture information is a key component in land surface and agricultural models used for w...

  11. How can present and future satellite missions support scientific studies that address ocean acidification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Joseph; Vandemark, Douglas; Jonsson, Bror; Balch, William; Chakraborty, Sumit; Lohrenz, Steven; Chapron, Bertrand; Hales, Burke; Mannino, Antonio; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Reul, Nicolas; Signorini, Sergio; Wanninkhof, Rik; Yates, Kimberly K.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based observations offer unique capabilities for studying spatial and temporal dynamics of the upper ocean inorganic carbon cycle and, in turn, supporting research tied to ocean acidification (OA). Satellite sensors measuring sea surface temperature, color, salinity, wind, waves, currents, and sea level enable a fuller understanding of a range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena that drive regional OA dynamics as well as the potentially varied impacts of carbon cycle change on a broad range of ecosystems. Here, we update and expand on previous work that addresses the benefits of space-based assets for OA and carbonate system studies. Carbonate chemistry and the key processes controlling surface ocean OA variability are reviewed. Synthesis of present satellite data streams and their utility in this arena are discussed, as are opportunities on the horizon for using new satellite sensors with increased spectral, temporal, and/or spatial resolution. We outline applications that include the ability to track the biochemically dynamic nature of water masses, to map coral reefs at higher resolution, to discern functional phytoplankton groups and their relationships to acid perturbations, and to track processes that contribute to acid variation near the land-ocean interface.

  12. Continuation of the mission NINA: Nina-2 experiment on MITA satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolino, Marco

    NINA-2 is a silicon detector cosmic ray telescope to be launched on board the Italian satellite MITA by the end of 1999. Its physics objectives are to study - for a period of at least 3 years - the cosmic ray component for nuclei from Hydrogen to Iron in the energy range between 10 and 200 MeV/n. Furthermore, the segmented nature of the silicon strip detector will allow the detection outside the containment of particles up to 1 GeV/n. As the satellite will be placed in 87.3 degrees sun-synchronous polar orbit around the Earth, it will be able to detect particle of solar and galactic nature, studying long and short term transient phenomena such as solar modulation effects - as we move toward solar maximum - and the composition of solar flares. The interaction of the Sun with Earth's magnetosphere will also be observed. The characteristics of MITA on board computer system allowed a very fast hardware and software integration between the scientific payload and the satellite, optimising the device observational capabilities.

  13. Towards an Autonomous Turbidimeter Network for Multi-Mission Ocean Colour Satellite Data Validation Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogliotti, A. I.; Nechad, B.; Ruddick, K. G.; Gossn, J. I.

    2016-08-01

    Satellite-based optical sensors such as MODIS/Aqua, Sentinel-2, Sentinel-3, Landsat-8, Pléiades, SABIA/Mar, PROBA-V , etc. can be used to map turbidity and suspended particulate matter in coastal, estuarine and inland waters as support for water quality monitoring, sediment transport applications such as dredging and fisheries science. However, data quality is a critical problem and in situ data must be gathered from a wide range of test sites in order to provide validation for the diverse range of conditions that can be encountered all over the world. In this context, a network to validate satellite turbidity products called TURBINET is proposed with the goal to establish a long-term (autonomous) international network of collaboration and data-sharing. Joint measurements of turbidity, reflectance and in-water side/back-scattering have been performed in Belgium and Argentina in 2015. Instrument comparisons showed that comparable values could be retrieved using different sensors and field measurements were used to validate a Pléiades high resolution image (2m). The results presented in this work demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of setting up a network to validate satellite turbidity products.

  14. A Nano-satellite Mission to Study Charged Particle Precipitation from the Van Allen Radiation Belts caused due to Seismo-Electromagnetic Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Sivadas, Nithin; Kannapan, Deepti; Yalamarthy, Ananth Saran; Dhiman, Ankit; Bhagoji, Arjun; Shankar, Athreya; Prasad, Nitin; Ramachandran, Harishankar; Koilpillai, R David

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, several attempts have been made to study the effects of seismo-electromagnetic emissions - an earthquake precursor, on the ionosphere and the radiation belts. The IIT Madras nano-satellite (IITMSAT) mission is designed to make sensitive measurements of charged particle fluxes in a Low Earth Orbit to study the nature of charged particle precipitation from the Van Allen radiation belts caused due to such emissions. With the Space-based Proton Electron Energy Detector on-board a single nano-satellite, the mission will attempt to gather statistically significant data to verify possible correlations with seismo-electromagnetic emissions before major earthquakes.

  15. Design of a Low-Cost Single-Board Computer System for Use In Low-Earth Orbit Small Satellite Missions

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, Dino

    1996-01-01

    A single-board computer system created specifically to meet the demands of a new generation of small satellite missions is being designed, built and tested by students at the University of New Hampshire. The Satellite Single-Board Computer (SSBC) is an Intel 80C186 based system that is qualified for explicit use in low-earth orbit missions. The SSBC serves as a low-cost, high-quality alternative to commercially available systems which are usually very costly and designed for much harsher spac...

  16. A CubeSat Mission for Mapping Spot Beams of Geostationary Communications Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    spot beam mapping CubeSats. The Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment ( DICE ) mission, Launched in 2011 was tasked with “mapping geomagnetic storm...ADCS components, computing hardware, power hardware, wire harnessing, and any structural or thermal mitigation components. Future work with position...drawnow % force draw so that there is something to maximize on the next line... set(jFrame,’Maximized’,true) % maximize it via the javahandle

  17. Use of GOCE L2 Gravity Gradients for full resolution Geoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Tscherning, Carl Christian; Knudsen, Per

    The objective of this study is to develop methodology to use GOCE gravity gradients for enhanced geoid modelling and ocean circulation modelling. In specific regions with a rough gravity field, the resolution of the geoid may be enhanced substantially if GOCE gradiometer data are used in addition...... of the GOCE spherical harmonic coefficient model (EGMs) since in such areas the GOCE gradients contain more information than the EGM itself. Hence, the use of gradients may lead to improve the resolution of e.g. the marine geoid which in turn will improve the estimation of the ocean circulation...

  18. The 4th Release of GOCE Gravity Field Models - Overview and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Rummel, Reiner

    2013-04-01

    New GOCE gravity field models based on about 2 years of completely reprocessed gradiometer data have been recently released to the user community. They were obtained based on different processing strategies and reflect the state-of-the-art of GOCE gravity field models. With the improved gravity gradients resulting from a number of updates implemented in the level 1B processor and with the additional data set the performance of the resulting GOCE based models could be significantly improved as compared to the previous solutions. The paper provides an overview of the available GOCE models and presents the results of their validation by different means.

  19. The coastal mean dynamic topography in Norway observed by CryoSat-2 and GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idžanović, Martina; Ophaug, Vegard; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2017-06-01

    New-generation synthetic aperture radar altimetry, as implemented on CryoSat-2, observes sea surface heights in coastal areas that were previously not monitored by conventional altimetry. Therefore, CryoSat-2 is expected to improve the coastal mean dynamic topography (MDT). However, the MDT remains highly reliant on the geoid. Using new regional geoid models as well as CryoSat-2 data, we determine three geodetic coastal MDT models in Norway and validate them against independent tide-gauge observations and the operational coastal ocean model NorKyst800. The CryoSat-2 MDTs agree on the ˜3-5 cm level with both tide-gauge geodetic and ocean MDTs along the Norwegian coast. In addition, we compute geostrophic surface currents to help identifying errors in the geoid models. We find that even though the regional geoid models are all based on the latest satellite gravity data as provided by GOCE, the resulting circulation patterns differ. We demonstrate that some of these differences are due to erroneous or lack of marine gravity data. This suggests that there is significant MDT signal at spatial scales beyond GOCE, and that the geodetic approach to MDT determination benefits from the additional terrestrial gravity information provided by a regional geoid model. We also find that the border of the geographical mode mask of CryoSat-2 coincides with the Norwegian Coastal Current, making it challenging to distinguish between artifacts in the CryoSat-2 observations during mode switch and ocean signal.

  20. Exploration of tectonic structures with GOCE in Africa and across-continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla

    2015-03-01

    The gravity anomaly field over the whole Earth obtained by the GOCE satellite is a revolutionary tool to reveal geologic information on a continental scale for the large areas where conventional gravity measurements have yet to be made. It is, however, necessary to isolate the near-surface geologic signal from the contributions of thickness variations in the crust and lithosphere and the isostatic compensation of surface relief. Here Africa is studied with particular emphasis on selected geological features which are expected to appear as density inhomogeneities. These include cratons and fold belts in the Precambrian basement, the overlying sedimentary basins and magmatism, as well as the continental margins. Regression analysis between gravity and topography shows coefficients that are consistently positive for the free air gravity anomaly and negative for the Bouguer gravity anomaly. The error and scatter on the regression are smallest in oceanic areas, where it is a possible tool for identifying changes in crustal type. The regression analysis allows the large gradient in the Bouguer anomaly signal across continental margins to be removed. After subtracting the predicted effect of known topography from the original Bouguer anomaly field, the residual field shows a continent-wide pattern of anomalies that could be attributed to regional geological structures. A few of these are highlighted, such as those representing Karoo magmatism, the Kibalian foldbelt, the Zimbabwe Craton, the Cameroon and Tibesti volcanic deposits, the Benue Trough and the Luangwa Rift. A reconstruction of the pre-break up position of Africa and South America (the plates forming West Gondwana) is made for the residual GOCE gravity field. The reconstruction allows the positive and negative anomalies to be compared across the continental fragments, and so helps identify common geologic units that extend across both the now-separate continents.

  1. MPI Parallel Algorithm in Satellite Gravity Field Model Inversion on the Basis of Least Square Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Hao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the intensive computing tasks and high memory demand problem in satellite gravity field model inversion on the basis of huge amounts of satellite gravity observations, the parallel algorithm for high truncated order and degree satellite gravity field model inversion with least square method on the basis of MPI was introduced. After analyzing the time and space complexity of each step in the solving flow, the parallel I/O, block-organized storage and block-organized computation algorithm on the basis of MPI are introduced to design the parallel algorithm for building design matrix, establishing and solving normal equation, and the simulation results indicate that the parallel efficiency of building design matrix, establishing and solving normal equation can reach to 95%, 68%and 63% respectively. In addition, on the basis of GOCE simulated orbits and radial disturbance gravity gradient data(518 400 epochs in total, two earth gravity models truncated to degree and order 120, 240 are inversed, and the relative computation time and memory demand are only about 40 minutes and 7 hours, 290 MB and 1.57 GB respectively. Eventually, a simulation numerical calculation for earth gravity field model inversion with the simulation data, which has the equivalent noise level with GRACE and GOCE mission, is conducted. The accuracy of inversion model has a good consistent with current released model, and the combined mode can complement the spectral information of each individual mission, which indicates that the parallel algorithm in this paper can be applied to inverse the high truncated degree and order earth gravity model efficiently and stably.

  2. Digital-beamforming array antenna technologies for future ocean-observing satellite missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, Oleg A.; Ivashina, Marianna V.; Cappellin, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Existing passive microwave radiometers that are used for ocean observations are limited in spatial resolution and geographic coverage, due to the limitations of traditional antenna technologies using mechanically-scanning reflectors and horn-type feeds. Future ocean observation missions call...... for new solutions, such as digitally-beamforming array feeds (DBAFs) as well as stationary and more complex reflectors. Our studies demonstrate that DBAFs can overcome the physically fundamental limitations of traditional horn feeds, and are capable of meeting all the challenging requirements for the next...

  3. Remote Sensing of Grassland Biophysical Parameters in the Context of the Sentinel-2 Satellite Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Sakowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the potential of the Sentinel-2 satellite for monitoring the seasonal changes in grassland total canopy chlorophyll content (CCC, fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the vegetation canopy (FAPAR, and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed only by its photosynthesizing components (GFAPAR. Reflectance observations were collected on a continuous basis during growing seasons by means of a newly developed ASD-WhiteRef system. Two models using Sentinel-2 simulated data (linear regression-vegetation indices (VIs approach and multiple regression (MR reflectance approach were tested to estimate vegetation biophysical parameters. To assess whether the use of full solar spectrum reflectance data is able to provide an added value in CCC and GFAPAR estimation accuracy, a third model based on partial least squares regression (PLSR and the ASD-WhiteRef reflectance data was tested. The results showed that FAPAR remained quite stable during the reproduction and senescence stages, and no significant relationships between FAPAR and VIs were found. On the other hand, GFAPAR showed clearer seasonal trends. The comparison of the three models revealed no significant differences in the accuracies of CCC and GFAPAR predictions and demonstrated a strong contribution of SWIR bands to the explained variability of investigated parameters. The promising results highlight the potential of the Sentinel-2 satellite for retrieving biophysical parameters from space.

  4. The Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS mission: design, execution, and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Jacob

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS mission was conducted in two 3-week deployments based in Alaska (April 2008 and western Canada (June–July 2008. Its goal was to better understand the factors driving current changes in Arctic atmospheric composition and climate, including (1 influx of mid-latitude pollution, (2 boreal forest fires, (3 aerosol radiative forcing, and (4 chemical processes. The June–July deployment was preceded by one week of flights over California (ARCTAS-CARB focused on (1 improving state emission inventories for greenhouse gases and aerosols, (2 providing observations to test and improve models of ozone and aerosol pollution. ARCTAS involved three aircraft: a DC-8 with a detailed chemical payload, a P-3 with an extensive aerosol and radiometric payload, and a B-200 with aerosol remote sensing instrumentation. The aircraft data augmented satellite observations of Arctic atmospheric composition, in particular from the NASA A-Train. The spring phase (ARCTAS-A revealed pervasive Asian pollution throughout the Arctic as well as significant European pollution below 2 km. Unusually large Siberian fires in April 2008 caused high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols and also affected ozone. Satellite observations of BrO column hotspots were found not to be related to Arctic boundary layer events but instead to tropopause depressions, suggesting the presence of elevated inorganic bromine (5–10 pptv in the lower stratosphere. Fresh fire plumes from Canada and California sampled during the summer phase (ARCTAS-B indicated low NOx emission factors from the fires, rapid conversion of NOx to PAN, no significant secondary aerosol production, and no significant ozone enhancements except when mixed with urban pollution.

  5. Concept of a small satellite for sub-MeV and MeV all sky survey: the CAST mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Takashima, Takeshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mitani, Takefumi; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Shin

    2012-09-01

    MeV and sub-MeV energy band from ~200 keV to ~2 MeV contains rich information of high-energy phenomena in the universe. The CAST (Compton Telescope for Astro and Solar Terrestrial) mission is planned to be launched at the end of 2010s, and aims at providing all-sky map in this energy-band for the first time. It is made of a semiconductor Compton telescope utilizing Si as a scatterer and CdTe as an absorber. CAST provides allsky sub-MeV polarization map for the first time, as well. The Compton telescope technology is based on the design used in the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) onboard ASTRO-H, characterized by its tightly stacked semiconductor layers to obtain high Compton reconstruction efficiency. The CAST mission is currently planned as a candidate for the small scientific satellite series in ISAS/JAXA, weighting about 500 kg in total. Scalable detector design enables us to consider other options as well. Scientific outcome of CAST is wide. It will provide new information from high-energy sources, such as AGN and/or its jets, supernova remnants, magnetors, blackhole and neutron-star binaries and others. Polarization map will tell us about activities of jets and reflections in these sources, as well. In addition, CAST will simultaneously observe the Sun, and depending on its attitude, the Earth.

  6. The Near Earth Object Surveillance Satellite: Mission status and CCD evolution after 18 months on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B.; Scott, R.; Sale, M.

    2014-09-01

    The Near Earth Object Surveillance Satellite (NEOSSat) is a small telescope equipped microsatellite designed to perform both Space Situational Awareness (SSA) experiments and asteroid detection. NEOSSat was launched on 25 February 2013, however, due to time pressures, NEOSSat was launched with only the minimal software required to keep the spacecraft safe. The time pressure also resulted in the spacecraft undergoing reduced system and environmental testing on the ground. The full software suite, required to obtain imagery and maintain stable pointing, has since been uploaded to the spacecraft. NEOSSat has obtained imagery since June 2013, with the shutter both open and closed, but as of March 2014 has not achieved the fine pointing required to obtain scientifically useful data. The collected imagery is being used to characterize the on-board CCD camera. While gain and dark current values agree with pre-launch values, unexpected artefacts have appeared in the images. Methods for mitigating the artefacts through image processing have been developed, and spacecraft-level fixes are currently being investigated. In addition, damage from high energy particles impacting the CCD has produced hot pixels in imagery. We have been able to measure the evolution of these hot pixels over several months, both in terms of numbers and characteristics; these results will be presented. In addition, early results from the mission (image quality issues and evolution, early imagery examples), as well as the mission status (including fine pointing), will be discussed.

  7. A miniature, low-power scientific fluxgate magnetometer: A stepping-stone to cube-satellite constellation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, D. M.; Mann, I. R.; Ciurzynski, M.; Barona, D.; Narod, B. B.; Bennest, J. R.; Pakhotin, I. P.; Kale, A.; Bruner, B.; Nokes, C. D. A.; Cupido, C.; Haluza-DeLay, T.; Elliott, D. G.; Milling, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulty in making low noise magnetic measurements is a significant challenge to the use of cube-satellite (CubeSat) platforms for scientific constellation class missions to study the magnetosphere. Sufficient resolution is required to resolve three-dimensional spatiotemporal structures of the magnetic field variations accompanying both waves and current systems of the nonuniform plasmas controlling dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. This paper describes the design, validation, and test of a flight-ready, miniature, low-mass, low-power, and low-magnetic noise boom-mounted fluxgate magnetometer for CubeSat applications. The miniature instrument achieves a magnetic noise floor of 150-200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, consumes 400 mW of power, has a mass of 121 g (sensor and boom), stows on the hull, and deploys on a 60 cm boom from a three-unit CubeSat reducing the noise from the onboard reaction wheel to less than 1.5 nT at the sensor. The instrument's capabilities will be demonstrated and validated in space in late 2016 following the launch of the University of Alberta Ex-Alta 1 CubeSat, part of the QB50 constellation mission. We illustrate the potential scientific returns and utility of using a CubeSats carrying such fluxgate magnetometers to constitute a magnetospheric constellation using example data from the low-Earth orbit European Space Agency Swarm mission. Swarm data reveal significant changes in the spatiotemporal characteristics of the magnetic fields in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system, even when the spacecraft are separated by only approximately 10 s along track and approximately 1.4° in longitude.

  8. Visir-Sat - a Prospective Micro-Satellite Based Multi-Spectral Thermal Mission for Land Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, G.; Menz, G.; Heinemann, S.; Hartmann, M.; Oertel, D.

    2015-04-01

    Current space-borne thermal infrared satellite systems aimed at land surface remote sensing retain some significant deficiencies, in particular in terms of spatial resolution, spectral coverage, number of imaging bands and temperature-emissivity separation. The proposed VISible-to-thermal IR micro-SATellite (VISIR-SAT) mission addresses many of these limitations, providing multi-spectral imaging data with medium-to-high spatial resolution (80m GSD from 800 km altitude) in the thermal infrared (up to 6 TIR bands, between 8 and 11μm) and in the mid infrared (1 or 2 MIR bands, at 4μm). These MIR/TIR bands will be co-registered with simultaneously acquired high spatial resolution (less than 30 m GSP) visible and near infrared multi-spectral imaging data. To enhance the spatial resolution of the MIR/TIR multi-spectral imagery during daytime, data fusion methods will be applied, such as the Multi-sensor Multi-resolution Technique (MMT), already successfully tested over agricultural terrain. This image processing technique will make generation of Land Surface Temperature (LST) EO products with a spatial resolution of 30 x 30 m2 possible. For high temperature phenomena such as vegetation- and peat-fires, the Fire Disturbance Essential Climate Variables (ECV) "Active fire location" and "Fire Radiative Power" will be retrieved with less than 100 m spatial resolution. Together with the effective fire temperature and the spatial extent even for small fire events the innovative system characteristics of VISIR-SAT go beyond existing and planned IR missions. The comprehensive and physically high-accuracy products from VISIR-SAT (e.g. for fire monitoring) may synergistically complement the high temperature observations of Sentinel-3 SLSTR in a unique way. Additionally, VISIR-SAT offers a very agile sensor system, which will be able to conduct intelligent and flexible pointing of the sensor's line-of-sight with the aim to provide global coverage of cloud free imagery every 5

  9. TYCHO: Demonstrator and operational satellite mission to Earth-Moon-Libration point EML-4 for communication relay provision as a service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Andreas; Homeister, Maren

    2015-03-01

    In the current wake of mission plans to the Moon and to Earth-Moon Libration points (EML) by several agencies and organizations, TYCHO identifies the key role of telecommunication provision for the future path of lunar exploration. It demonstrates an interesting extension to existing communication methods to the Moon and beyond by combining innovative technology with a next frontier location and the commercial space communication sector. It is evident that all communication systems will rely on direct communication to Earth ground stations. In case of EML-2 missions around HALO orbits or bases on the far side of the Moon, it has to be extended by communication links via relay stations. The innovative approach is that TYCHO provides this relay communication to those out-of-sight lunar missions as a service. TYCHO will establish a new infrastructure for future missions and even create a new market for add-on relay services. The TMA-0 satellite is TYCHO's first phase and a proposed demonstrator mission to the Earth-Moon Libration point EML-4. It demonstrates relay services needed for automated exploratory and manned missions (Moon bases) on the rim (>90°E and >90°W) and far side surface, to lunar orbits and even to EML-2 halo orbits (satellites and space stations). Its main advantage is the permanent availability of communication coverage. This will provide full access to scientific and telemetry data and furthermore to crucial medical monitoring and safety. The communication subsystem is a platform for conventional communication but also a test-bed for optical communication with high data-rate LASER links to serve the future needs of manned bases and periodic burst data-transfer from lunar poles. The operational TMA-1 satellite is a stand-alone mission integrated into existing space communication networks to provide open communication service to external lunar missions. Therefore the long-time stable libration points EML-4 and -5 are selected to guarantee an

  10. Technology development of the Space Transportation System mission and terrestrial applications of satellite technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The Space Transportation System (STS) is discussed, including the launch processing system, the thermal protection subsystem, meteorological research, sound supression water system, rotating service structure, improved hypergol or removal systems, fiber optics research, precision positioning, remote controlled solid rocket booster nozzle plugs, ground operations for Centaur orbital transfer vehicle, parachute drying, STS hazardous waste disposal and recycle, toxic waste technology and control concepts, fast analytical densitometry study, shuttle inventory management system, operational intercommunications system improvement, and protective garment ensemble. Terrestrial applications are also covered, including LANDSAT applications to water resources, satellite freeze forecast system, application of ground penetrating radar to soil survey, turtle tracking, evaluating computer drawn ground cover maps, sparkless load pulsar, and coupling a microcomputer and computing integrator with a gas chromatograph.

  11. Efficient estimation algorithms for a satellite-aided search and rescue mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentiero, P.; Garza-Robles, R.

    1977-01-01

    It has been suggested to establish a search and rescue orbiting satellite system as a means for locating distress signals from downed aircraft, small boats, and overland expeditions. Emissions from Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELT), now available in most U.S. aircraft are to be utilized in the positioning procedure. A description is presented of a set of Doppler navigation algorithms for extracting ELT position coordinates from Doppler data. The algorithms have been programmed for a small computing machine and the resulting system has successfully processed both real and simulated Doppler data. A software system for solving the Doppler navigation problem must include an orbit propagator, a first guess algorithm, and an algorithm for estimating longitude and latitude from Doppler data. Each of these components is considered.

  12. Computational mission analysis and conceptual system design for super low altitude satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Xu; Jinlong Wang; Nan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with system engineering and design methodology for super low altitude satel ites in the view of the com-putational mission analysis. Due to the slight advance of imaging instruments, such as the focus of camera and the image element of charge coupled device (CCD), it is an innovative and economical way to improve the camera’s resolution to enforce the satel ite to fly on the lower altitude orbit. DFH-3, the mature satel ite bus de-veloped by Chinese Academy of Space Technology, is employed to define the mass and power budgets for the computational mis-sion analysis and the detailed engineering design for super low altitude satel ites. An effective iterative algorithm is proposed to solve the ergodic representation of feasible mass and power bud-gets at the flight altitude under constraints. Besides, boundaries of mass or power exist for every altitude, where the upper boundary is derived from the maximum power, while the minimum thrust force holds the lower boundary before the power reaching the initial value. What’s more, an analytical algorithm is employed to numerical y investigate the coverage percentage over the altitude, so that the nominal altitude could be selected from al the feasi-ble altitudes based on both the mass and power budgets and the repetitive ground traces. The local time at the descending node is chosen for the nominal sun-synchronous orbit based on the average evaluation function. After determining the key orbital ele-ments based on the computational mission analysis, the detailed engineering design on the configuration and other subsystems, like power, telemetry telecontrol and communication (TT&C), and attitude determination and control system (ADCS), is performed based on the benchmark bus, besides, some improvements to the bus are also implemented to accommodate the flight at a super low altitude. Two operation strategies, drag-free closed-loop mode and on/off open-loop mode, are presented to maintain the satel

  13. Magnetometer Data in the Classroom as a part of the NASA THEMIS Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Bean, J.; Walker, A.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA-funded THEMIS mission was designed to determine the onset time and location of magnetic substorms of Earth's space environment, a prerequisite to understanding space weather. THEMIS is an acronym for Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms. he Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS) project was the flagship, formal education component of the E/PO program. With the placement of magnetometers in the proximity of rural schools throughout the country, middle and high school teachers along with their students benefited from the opportunity to work with 'real-time' data and participated in hands-on space science activities. Particular attention was paid to placing the magnetometer stations at schools in rural communities whose students were traditionally underserved and underrepresented in the sciences. The project offered to the teachers of these students long-term professional development opportunities that centered around THEMIS-related space science and the magnetometer data. The THEMIS E/PO final evaluation report for the main phase of the THEMIS mission covered the period from 2003-2009, describing the impact of this program such as this program placed magnetometers sites at 13 rural, underserved schools/communities, two-fifths of which are on tribal lands; and provided intensive professional development for 20 teachers from 2004 through 2009. A core group of eight teachers estimated reaching more than 2,720 students with THEMIS-related materials/ideas. 75% of these students are minorities in science. Core teachers provided evidence of the project's positive impact on students' attitudes toward science and their choices for courses that position them for STEM-related careers. Core teachers reported sharing THEMIS-related materials/ideas with 275 colleagues. The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer featured the Petersburg, Alaska site potentially reaching more than 5 million viewers in two airings, according to Nielsen

  14. Recent dynamics of alpine lakes on the endorheic Changtang Plateau from multi-mission satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kehan; Yao, Fangfang; Wang, Jida; Luo, Jiancheng; Shen, Zhanfeng; Wang, Chao; Song, Chunqiao

    2017-09-01

    Monitoring of the alpine lakes on the endorheic Changtang Plateau is vitally important in understanding climate impacts on hydrological cycle. Existing studies have revealed an accelerated lake expansion on the Changtang Plateau during the 2000s compared with prior decades. However, the partial hiatus of recent Landsat archive affected the continuation of understanding the lake changes in the recent decade. Here we synergistically used imagery from Landsat and Huanjing satellites to enable a detailed monitoring of lake area dynamics on the Changtang Plateau. Our results present that lakes on the Changtang Plateau continued to expand at a rapid rate of 340.79 km2 yr-1 (1.06% yr-1, p variations of the selected 24 large lakes fluctuated within 0.22-2.46% (in coefficient of variation) for glacier-fed lakes and 0.17-2.36% for non-glacier-fed lakes. Most of these lakes expanded during the unfrozen period (from May/June to October) and reached to their maximum extents in September or October. By spatially associating our revealed lake changes with climate variables, we observed that the recent lake expansion is more related to precipitation than to temperature, although future efforts are needed for a more comprehensive picture of the lake changing mechanisms.

  15. Science Instrument Support Electronics Systems for the Relativity Mission Satellite, Gravity Probe B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, W. J.; Brumley, R. W.; Buchman, S.; Clarke, B.; Hipkins, D. N.; Farley, R.; Shestople, P.; Meriwether, D.; Gray, C.

    The Relativity Mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B), uses four redundant high precision electrostatically suspended mechanical gyroscopes for measuring the relativistic precessions of the frame of reference in a 640 km polar orbit. The two precessions to be measured are predicted in General Relativity are the geodetic effect, 6.6 arcsec/year, and the frame dragging effect, 0.042 arcsec/year. The Science Instrument Support Electronics or Payload Electronics Package enables this measurement to be performed by providing the necessary control and monitoring functions for the Science Instrument Assembly that contains the four gyroscopes and reference star tracking telescope. This paper describes the overall architecture of the Payload Electronics system and the design and operation of its component parts: 1) the SQUID Readout electronics (SRE) for gyroscope orientation measurement, 2) The Gyroscope Suspension System (GSS) for gyroscope electrostatic suspension and spin axis alignment, 3) the Telescope Readout Electronics (TRE) for measurement of the reference star location, 4) the Experiment Control Unit (ECU) for heater, valve, and rotor electrostatic charge control and thermometry, 5) the custom GPS receiver for orbital position determination and time reference generation, and 6) the Gas Management Assembly (GMA) that controls and routes the gaseous helium used for initial gyroscope spin-up. Contingent upon a successful launch of Gravity Probe on April 17 2004, preliminary performance results will be presented along side the predicated performance estimates derived from system analysis and test on the ground prior to launch.

  16. A new 25 years Arctic Sea level record from ESA satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Cheng, Yongcun; Knudsen, Per

    the ESA GOCE mission we are now able to derive a mean dynamic topography of the Arctic Ocean with unprecedented accuracy to constrain the ocean circulation. We present both a new estimation of the mean ocean circulation and new estimates of large scale sea level changes based on satellite data and perform......The Arctic is an extremely challenging region for the use of remote sensing for ocean studies. One is the fact that despite 25 years of altimetry only very limited sea level observations exists in the interior of the Arctic Ocean. However, with Cryosat-2 SAR altimetry the situation is changing...... and through development of tailored retrackers dealing with presence of sea ice within the radar footprint, we can now develop sea surface height and its variation in most of the Arctic Ocean. We have processed 5 years of Cryosat-2 data quantified as either Lead or Ocean data within the Cryosat-2 SAR mask...

  17. A new 25 years Arctic Sea level record from ESA satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Cheng, Yongcun; Knudsen, Per

    the ESA GOCE mission we are now able to derive a mean dynamic topography of the Arctic Ocean with unprecedented accuracy to constrain the ocean circulation. We present both a new estimation of the mean ocean circulation and new estimates of large scale sea level changes based on satellite data and perform......The Arctic is an extremely challenging region for the use of remote sensing for ocean studies. One is the fact that despite 25 years of altimetry only very limited sea level observations exists in the interior of the Arctic Ocean. However, with Cryosat-2 SAR altimetry the situation is changing...... and through development of tailored retrackers dealing with presence of sea ice within the radar footprint, we can now develop sea surface height and its variation in most of the Arctic Ocean. We have processed 5 years of Cryosat-2 data quantified as either Lead or Ocean data within the Cryosat-2 SAR mask...

  18. The scientific basis for a satellite mission to retrieve CCN concentrations and their impacts on convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rosenfeld

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The cloud -mediated radiative forcing is widely recognized as the main source of uncertainty in our knowledge of the anthropogenic climate forcing and in our understanding of climate sensitivity. Current outstanding challenges are (1 global measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the cloudy boundary layer from space, and, (2 disentangling the effects of aerosols from the thermodynamic and meteorological effects on the clouds. Here we present a new concept for a way to overcome these two challenges, using relatively simple passive satellite measurements in the visible and IR. The idea is to use the clouds themselves as natural CCN chambers by retrieving simultaneously the number of activated aerosols at cloud base, Na, and the cloud base updraft speed. The Na is obtained by analyzing the distribution of cloud drop effective radius in convective elements as a function distance above cloud base. The cloud base updraft velocities are estimated by double stereoscopic viewing and tracking of the evolution of cloud surface features just above cloud base. In order to resolve the vertical dimension of the clouds, the field of view will be 100 m for the microphysical retrievals, and 50 m for the stereoscopic measurements. The viewing geometry will be 30 degrees off nadir eastward, with the Sun in the back at 30 degrees off zenith westward, which requires a Sun synchronous orbit at 14:00 LST. Having measured simultaneously the thermodynamic environment, the vertical motions of the clouds, their microstructure and the CCN concentration will allow separating the dynamic from the CCN effects. This concept is being applied in the proposed satellite mission named Clouds, Hazards and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER.

  19. The scientific basis for a satellite mission to retrieve CCN concentrations and their impacts on convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rosenfeld

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cloud-mediated aerosol radiative forcing is widely recognized as the main source of uncertainty in our knowledge of the anthropogenic forcing on climate. The current challenges for improving our understanding are (1 global measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the cloudy boundary layer from space, and (2 disentangling the effects of aerosols from the thermodynamic and meteorological effects on the clouds. Here, we present a new conceptual framework to help us overcome these two challenges, using relatively simple passive satellite measurements in the visible and infared (IR. The idea is to use the clouds themselves as natural CCN chambers by retrieving simultaneously the number of activated aerosols at cloud base, Na, and the cloud base updraft speed. The Na is obtained by analyzing the distribution of cloud drop effective radius in convective elements as a function of distance above cloud base. The cloud base updraft velocities are estimated by double stereoscopic viewing and tracking of the evolution of cloud surface features just above cloud base. In order to resolve the vertical dimension of the clouds, the field of view will be 100 m for the microphysical retrievals, and 50 m for the stereoscopic measurements. The viewing geometry will be eastward and 30 degrees off nadir, with the Sun in the back at 30 degrees off zenith westward, requiring a Sun-synchronous orbit at 14 LST. Measuring simultaneously the thermodynamic environment, the vertical motions of the clouds, their microstructure and the CCN concentration will allow separating the dynamics from the CCN effects. This concept is being applied in the proposed satellite mission named Clouds, Hazards and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER.

  20. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography Satellite Mission - An Assessment of Swath Altimetry Measurements of River Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Matthew D.; Durand, Michael; Alsdorf, Douglas; Chul-Jung, Hahn; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Lee, Hyongki

    2012-01-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission, scheduled for launch in 2020 with development commencing in 2015, will provide a step-change improvement in the measurement of terrestrial surface water storage and dynamics. In particular, it will provide the first, routine two-dimensional measurements of water surface elevations, which will allow for the estimation of river and floodplain flows via the water surface slope. In this paper, we characterize the measurements which may be obtained from SWOT and illustrate how they may be used to derive estimates of river discharge. In particular, we show (i) the spatia-temporal sampling scheme of SWOT, (ii) the errors which maybe expected in swath altimetry measurements of the terrestrial surface water, and (iii) the impacts such errors may have on estimates of water surface slope and river discharge, We illustrate this through a "virtual mission" study for a approximately 300 km reach of the central Amazon river, using a hydraulic model to provide water surface elevations according to the SWOT spatia-temporal sampling scheme (orbit with 78 degree inclination, 22 day repeat and 140 km swath width) to which errors were added based on a two-dimension height error spectrum derived from the SWOT design requirements. Water surface elevation measurements for the Amazon mainstem as may be observed by SWOT were thereby obtained. Using these measurements, estimates of river slope and discharge were derived and compared to those which may be obtained without error, and those obtained directly from the hydraulic model. It was found that discharge can be reproduced highly accurately from the water height, without knowledge of the detailed channel bathymetry using a modified Manning's equation, if friction, depth, width and slope are known. Increasing reach length was found to be an effective method to reduce systematic height error in SWOT measurements.

  1. Evaluation of the third- and fourth-generation GOCE Earth gravity field models with Australian terrestrial gravity data in spherical harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexer, Moritz; Hirt, Christian; Pail, Roland; Claessens, Sten

    2014-04-01

    In March 2013, the fourth generation of European Space Agency's (ESA) global gravity field models, DIR4 (Bruinsma et al. in Proceedings of the ESA living planet symposium, 28 June-2 July, Bergen, ESA, Publication SP-686, 2010b) and TIM4 (Migliaccio et al. in Proceedings of the ESA living planet symposium, 28 June-2 July, Bergen, ESA, Publication SP-686, 2010), generated from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) gravity observation satellite was released. We evaluate the models using an independent ground truth data set of gravity anomalies over Australia. Combined with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity, a new gravity model is obtained that is used to perform comparisons with GOCE models in spherical harmonics. Over Australia, the new gravity model proves to have significantly higher accuracy in the degrees below 120 as compared to EGM2008 and seems to be at least comparable to the accuracy of this model between degree 150 and degree 260. Comparisons in terms of residual quasi-geoid heights, gravity disturbances, and radial gravity gradients evaluated on the ellipsoid and at approximate GOCE mean satellite altitude ( km) show both fourth generation models to improve significantly w.r.t. their predecessors. Relatively, we find a root-mean-square improvement of 39 % for the DIR4 and 23 % for TIM4 over the respective third release models at a spatial scale of 100 km (degree 200). In terms of absolute errors, TIM4 is found to perform slightly better in the bands from degree 120 up to degree 160 and DIR4 is found to perform slightly better than TIM4 from degree 170 up to degree 250. Our analyses cannot confirm the DIR4 formal error of 1 cm geoid height (0.35 mGal in terms of gravity) at degree 200. The formal errors of TIM4, with 3.2 cm geoid height (0.9 mGal in terms of gravity) at degree 200, seem to be realistic. Due to combination with GRACE and SLR data, the DIR models, at satellite altitude, clearly

  2. New Space at Airbus Defence & Space to facilitate science missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boithias, Helene; Benchetrit, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    In addition to Airbus legacy activities, where Airbus satellites usually enable challenging science missions such as Venus Express, Mars Express, Rosetta with an historic landing on a comet, Bepi Colombo mission to Mercury and JUICE to orbit around Jupiter moon Ganymede, Swarm studying the Earth magnetic field, Goce to measure the Earth gravitational field and Cryosat to monitor the Earth polar ice, Airbus is now developing a new approach to facilitate next generation missions.After more than 25 years of collaboration with the scientists on space missions, Airbus has demonstrated its capacity to implement highly demanding missions implying a deep understanding of the science mission requirements and their intrinsic constraints such as- a very fierce competition between the scientific communities,- the pursuit of high maturity for the science instrument in order to be selected,- the very strict institutional budget limiting the number of operational missions.As a matter of fact, the combination of these constraints may lead to the cancellation of valuable missions.Based on that and inspired by the New Space trend, Airbus is developing an highly accessible concept called HYPE.The objective of HYPE is to make access to Space much more simple, affordable and efficient.With a standardized approach, the scientist books only the capacities he needs among the resources available on-board, as the HYPE satellites can host a large range of payloads from 1kg up to 60kg.At prices significantly more affordable than those of comparable dedicated satellite, HYPE is by far a very cost-efficient way of bringing science missions to life.After the launch, the scientist enjoys a plug-and-play access to two-way communications with his instrument through a secure high-speed portal available online 24/7.Everything else is taken care of by Airbus: launch services and the associated risk, reliable power supply, setting up and operating the communication channels, respect of space law

  3. Precise Orbit Determination of Earth's Satellites for Climate Change Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespe, Francesco

    The tremendous improvement of the gravity field models which we are achieving with the last Earth's satellite missions like, CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE devoted to its recovery could make feasibile the use of precise orbit determination (POD) of Earth satellites as a tool for sensing global changes of some key atmosphere parameters like refractivity and extinction. Such improvements indeed, coupled with the huge number of running Earth's satellites and combinations of their orbital parameters (namely the nodes) in a gravity field free fashion (hereafter GFF) can magnify the solar radiation pressure acting on medium earth orbit satellites :GPS, Etalon and, in near real future GALILEO and its smooth modulation through the Earth's atmosphere (penumbra). We would remind that The GFF technique is able to cancel out with "n" satellite orbital parameters the first n-1 even zonal harmonics of the gravity field. Previously it was demonstrated that the signal we want to detect could in principle emerge from the noise threshold but, more refined models of the atmosphere would be needed to perform a more subtle analysis. So we will re-compute the signal features of penumbra by applying more refined atmospheric models. The analysis will be performed by including in GFF Earth's satellites equipped with DORIS systems (Jason, Spot 2-3-4-5, ENVISAT etc.) other than those ranged with SLR and GPS. The introduction of DORIS tracked satellites indeed will allow to cancel higher and higher order of even zonal harmonics and will make still more favourable the signal to noise budget. The analysis will be performed over a time span of at least few tens of years just to enhance probable climate signatures.

  4. Nuda vida y goce. // Bare life and jouissance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view that connects politics and psychoanalysis, the aim of this essay is to investigate the causes of the annihilation of the subject in the totalitarian regimes, making him a victim of power, reduced to a bare life. This question leads us to analyze the jouissance within the frame of a regime that proposes the unification of a universal jouissance. These questions are considered to be relevant in the field that makes possible the intersection between politics and subjectivity. The direct proposal of this essay is related to thought, by trying to bring thought into play, in conjunction with the concepts of jouissance and the annihilation of the subject in the totalitarian regimes. It deals with the articulation between thought and jouissance and uses these ideas like conceptual tools, with the aim of considering the subjectivity of the time. // Desde el punto de vista que relaciona la política con el psicoanálisis, la propuesta de este ensayo trata de interrogar qué produce la aniquilación del sujeto en los regímenes totalitarios, al convertirlo en víctimas del poder, reducido a nuda vida. Este cuestionamiento nos conduce a preguntarnos sobre el goce en el marco de un régimen que propone la unificación de un goce universal. Consideramos pertinentes estos cuestionamientos en la vertiente que posibilita el cruce entre política y subjetividad. La propuesta expresa de este ensayo se relaciona con el pensar; con la posibilidad de recuperar una reflexión sobre el pensar, tratando de ponerlo en escena, en conjunción con el goce y la aniquilación del sujeto en los regímenes totalitarios. Se trata de una articulación entre pensar y goce y toma estas nociones como herramientas conceptuales, en el interés por considerar la subjetividad de la época.

  5. Data use investigations for applications Explorer Mission A (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission): HCMM's role in studies of the urban heat island, Great Lakes thermal phenomena and radiometric calibration of satellite data. [Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester New York and Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Schimminger, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of data from NASA'a heat capacity mapping mission satellite for studies of the urban heat island, thermal phenomena in large lakes and radiometric calibration of satellite sensors was assessed. The data were found to be of significant value in all cases. Using HCMM data, the existence and microstructure of the heat island can be observed and associated with land cover within the urban complex. The formation and development of the thermal bar in the Great Lakes can be observed and quantitatively mapped using HCMM data. In addition, the thermal patterns observed can be associated with water quality variations observed both from other remote sensing platforms and in situ. The imaging radiometer on-board the HCMM satellite is shown to be calibratible to within about 1.1 C of actual surface temperatures. These findings, as well as the analytical procedures used in studying the HCMM data, are included.

  6. Comparison of gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission satellite altimetry wave heights with in situ near-shore buoy data.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Hithin, N.K.

    The applicability of altimeter data for the coastal region is examined by comparing the gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission significant wave height (SWH) data with the in situ buoy measurements at four stations off the east and west...

  7. Assimilation of satellite data to optimize large-scale hydrological model parameters: a case study for the SWOT mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedinotti, V.; Boone, A.; Ricci, S.; Biancamaria, S.; Mognard, N.

    2014-11-01

    During the last few decades, satellite measurements have been widely used to study the continental water cycle, especially in regions where in situ measurements are not readily available. The future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will deliver maps of water surface elevation (WSE) with an unprecedented resolution and provide observation of rivers wider than 100 m and water surface areas greater than approximately 250 x 250 m over continental surfaces between 78° S and 78° N. This study aims to investigate the potential of SWOT data for parameter optimization for large-scale river routing models. The method consists in applying a data assimilation approach, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm, to correct the Manning roughness coefficients of the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere)-TRIP (Total Runoff Integrating Pathways) continental hydrologic system. Parameters such as the Manning coefficient, used within such models to describe water basin characteristics, are generally derived from geomorphological relationships, which leads to significant errors at reach and large scales. The current study focuses on the Niger Basin, a transboundary river. Since the SWOT observations are not available yet and also to assess the proposed assimilation method, the study is carried out under the framework of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). It is assumed that modeling errors are only due to uncertainties in the Manning coefficient. The true Manning coefficients are then supposed to be known and are used to generate synthetic SWOT observations over the period 2002-2003. The impact of the assimilation system on the Niger Basin hydrological cycle is then quantified. The optimization of the Manning coefficient using the EKF (extended Kalman filter) algorithm over an 18-month period led to a significant improvement of the river water levels. The relative bias of the water level is globally improved (a 30

  8. Dimensión histórica y estructural de las nuevas formas de goce

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Gómez

    2015-01-01

    ¿Nos encontramos frente a unneo-sujeto afectado por nuevossíntomas? A esta pregunta proponemosenganchar otra: en lo que asíse denomina ¿estamos ante nuevasformas de goce? El artículo interrogael estatuto del goce implicado en localificado de nuevos síntomas, en elcurso de una indagación emprendidacon Lacan, especialmente conlo que avanza en su seminario Loscuatro conceptos fundamentalesdel psicoanálisis, a propósito de laestructura de la pulsión, la actividadpulsional, el goce pulsional,el go...

  9. The average acceleration approach applied to gravity coefficients recovery based on GOCE orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The average acceleration approach was applied to recover a gravity field model Model_ACA from GOCE precise science orbits from September 2 to November 2, 2010, and furthermore a so called sequential least square adjustment was used. The model was compared with other gravity field models based on CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE. The result shows that the model is superior to gravity field based on CHAMP, and with higher accuracy than other international gravity field models based on only GOCE data before 80 degree. The degree geoid height of Model_ACA reaches 3 cm up to 90 degree and order.

  10. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, D.B.T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and

  11. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, T.; Visser, P.; Vermeersen, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and steady-st

  12. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, D.B.T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and steady-st

  13. Assimilation of satellite data to optimize large scale hydrological model parameters: a case study for the SWOT mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pedinotti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, satellite measurements have been widely used to study the continental water cycle, especially in regions where in situ measurements are not readily available. The future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT satellite mission will deliver maps of water surface elevation (WSE with an unprecedented resolution and provide observation of rivers wider than 100 m and water surface areas greater than approximately 250 m × 250 m over continental surfaces between 78° S and 78° N. This study aims to investigate the potential of SWOT data for parameter optimization for large scale river routing models which are typically employed in Land Surface Models (LSM for global scale applications. The method consists in applying a data assimilation approach, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF algorithm, to correct the Manning roughness coefficients of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrologic System. Indeed, parameters such as the Manning coefficient, used within such models to describe water basin characteristics, are generally derived from geomorphological relationships, which might have locally significant errors. The current study focuses on the Niger basin, a trans-boundary river, which is the main source of fresh water for all the riparian countries. In addition, geopolitical issues in this region can restrict the exchange of hydrological data, so that SWOT should help improve this situation by making hydrological data freely available. In a previous study, the model was first evaluated against in-situ and satellite derived data sets within the framework of the international African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis (AMMA project. Since the SWOT observations are not available yet and also to assess the proposed assimilation method, the study is carried out under the framework of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE. It is assumed that modeling errors are only due to uncertainties in the Manning coefficient. The true

  14. Assimilation of satellite data to optimize large scale hydrological model parameters: a case study for the SWOT mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedinotti, V.; Boone, A.; Ricci, S.; Biancamaria, S.; Mognard, N.

    2014-04-01

    During the last few decades, satellite measurements have been widely used to study the continental water cycle, especially in regions where in situ measurements are not readily available. The future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will deliver maps of water surface elevation (WSE) with an unprecedented resolution and provide observation of rivers wider than 100 m and water surface areas greater than approximately 250 m × 250 m over continental surfaces between 78° S and 78° N. This study aims to investigate the potential of SWOT data for parameter optimization for large scale river routing models which are typically employed in Land Surface Models (LSM) for global scale applications. The method consists in applying a data assimilation approach, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm, to correct the Manning roughness coefficients of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrologic System. Indeed, parameters such as the Manning coefficient, used within such models to describe water basin characteristics, are generally derived from geomorphological relationships, which might have locally significant errors. The current study focuses on the Niger basin, a trans-boundary river, which is the main source of fresh water for all the riparian countries. In addition, geopolitical issues in this region can restrict the exchange of hydrological data, so that SWOT should help improve this situation by making hydrological data freely available. In a previous study, the model was first evaluated against in-situ and satellite derived data sets within the framework of the international African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project. Since the SWOT observations are not available yet and also to assess the proposed assimilation method, the study is carried out under the framework of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE). It is assumed that modeling errors are only due to uncertainties in the Manning coefficient. The true Manning

  15. Investigation of ice particle habits to be used for ice cloud remote sensing for the GCOM-C satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letu, Husi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Riedi, Jerome; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; -Labonnote, Laurent C.; Baran, Anthony J.; Nagao, Takashi M.; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2016-09-01

    In this study, various ice particle habits are investigated in conjunction with inferring the optical properties of ice clouds for use in the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate (GCOM-C) satellite programme. We develop a database of the single-scattering properties of five ice habit models: plates, columns, droxtals, bullet rosettes, and Voronoi. The database is based on the specification of the Second Generation Global Imager (SGLI) sensor on board the GCOM-C satellite, which is scheduled to be launched in 2017 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. A combination of the finite-difference time-domain method, the geometric optics integral equation technique, and the geometric optics method is applied to compute the single-scattering properties of the selected ice particle habits at 36 wavelengths, from the visible to the infrared spectral regions. This covers the SGLI channels for the size parameter, which is defined as a single-particle radius of an equivalent volume sphere, ranging between 6 and 9000 µm. The database includes the extinction efficiency, absorption efficiency, average geometrical cross section, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, size parameter of a volume-equivalent sphere, maximum distance from the centre of mass, particle volume, and six nonzero elements of the scattering phase matrix. The characteristics of calculated extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor of the five ice particle habits are compared. Furthermore, size-integrated bulk scattering properties for the five ice particle habit models are calculated from the single-scattering database and microphysical data. Using the five ice particle habit models, the optical thickness and spherical albedo of ice clouds are retrieved from the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances-3 (POLDER-3) measurements, recorded on board the Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a

  16. Improving Surface Geostrophic Current from a GOCE-Derived Mean Dynamic Topography Using Edge-Enhancing Diffusion Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Reales, J. M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Vigo, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, we found that EED filtering provides similar estimation of the current velocities in both cases, whereas a non-linear isotropic filter (the Perona and Malik filter) returns results influenced by local residual noise when a difficult case is tested. We found that EED filtering......With increased geoid resolution provided by the gravity and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) mission, the ocean's mean dynamic topography (MDT) can be now estimated with an accuracy not available prior to using geodetic methods. However, an altimetric-derived MDT still needs filtering...... in order to remove short wavelength noise unless integrated methods are used in which the three quantities are determined simultaneously using appropriate covariance functions. We studied nonlinear anisotropic diffusive filtering applied to the oceanA ' s MDT and a new approach based on edge...

  17. Geothermal estimates from GOCE data alone: assessment of feasibility and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorutti, Alberto; Braitenberg, Carla

    2017-04-01

    The characteristics of the available global gravity models derived from satellite gravity suggest that they could be applied in modelling the downward continuation of the temperature field at a continental scale. To obtain this, we quantified how and to which extent the mass distribution that we can obtain from inverse modelling of gravity can be linked to the factors affecting the temperature field, such as the radiogenic heat production and the thermal conductivity of rocks. Since there is no direct physical law linking the two fields, we resort to a reference lithosphere, built up on a set of lithological parameters -including their associated uncertainties. A central and most critical assumption is that the crustal heat production can be tied to crustal thickness, a relationship which strength shows extreme variability in different geodynamic domains. We take this into account, including it as a parameter uncertainty and propagating it to the results. Pursuing the search for a reliable method to isolate the component of the heat flow due to the crustal heat production from the available measurements, we test this framework on the go_cons_gcf_2_tim_r5 release of the GOCE-derived field. We so obtain a satisfactory distinction between different heat transport domains (dominated by heat production, conduction from the mantle, or shallow plays), which proved helpful in interpolating regional heat flow maps at the resolution of the gravity data (about 140 km).

  18. Mean and profile-based dynamic ocean topography determination in the Mediterranean Sea within the GOCE+++ project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziavos, Ilias N.; Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Grigoriadis, Vassilios N.; Tzanou, Eleni A.

    2017-04-01

    A composite part in the synergy between geodesy and oceanography is the determination of the dynamic ocean topography (DOT), the latter being the deviation of the Mean Sea Surface (MSS) relative to the geoid. The advent of satellite altimetry during the last twenty years has allowed the determination of MSS models with even increasing accuracy and resolution, while the latest operational capabilities of the SAR and SAR-in modes have enabled the use of altimetric data close to the coastline and at distances as short as a few km. The limiting factor for the determination of rigorous, in the sense of resolution and accuracy, DOT models was the insufficient knowledge of the marine geoid, which suffered from both long- and medium-wavelength errors. Both stem from the fact that the satellite data had poor resolution, thus limiting the maximum resolvable harmonic degree, while marine gravity data are of varying accuracy and by no means cover all Earth's oceans. The advent of GOCE and GRACE missions, resulted in high-accuracy observations of the Earth's potential with uniform distribution over the entire Earth, so that the geoid signal can be resolved with comparable accuracy as is the case with altimetry-derived MSS models. The main scope of this work is the determination of DOT models for the Mediterranean basic following two approaches. The first one treats both the MSS and the geoid as purely static fields, so that a mean DOT model is determined through the difference between the DTU2015 MSS and the GOCO05c geoid model. For the determination of this static DOT, various filtering options such as boxcar, wiener, and cosine-tapper are applied, along with wavelet multiresolution analysis with selective filtering. All filters intend to remove or at least reduce the geoid omission and commission errors present in the differences between the MSS and the geoid. In the second approach, the DOT is treated as a varying field, so that Cryosat2-derived sea surface heights (SSHs

  19. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during

  20. Dimensión histórica y estructural de las nuevas formas de goce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Gómez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ¿Nos encontramos frente a unneo-sujeto afectado por nuevossíntomas? A esta pregunta proponemosenganchar otra: en lo que asíse denomina ¿estamos ante nuevasformas de goce? El artículo interrogael estatuto del goce implicado en localificado de nuevos síntomas, en elcurso de una indagación emprendidacon Lacan, especialmente conlo que avanza en su seminario Loscuatro conceptos fundamentalesdel psicoanálisis, a propósito de laestructura de la pulsión, la actividadpulsional, el goce pulsional,el goce autoerótico y la repeticióncomo encuentro fallido con el goceoriginario.

  1. Cuerpo y Feminidad: "Goce Otro" de Jacques Lacan y "Devenir-Mujer" en Deleuze y Guattari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Conde Soto

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Jacques Lacan introduce en su seminario XX Aún (1972-73 una distinción entre dos tipos de goce [jouissance]: un goce fálico o sexual propiamente masculino, y en el caso de la posición femenina, y complementario del anterior, un goce Otro o goce del cuerpo absolutamente particular de cada mujer. Deleuze y Guattari piensan la feminidad en Mil mesetas (1980 como un devenir-mujer consistente en la construcción de un "cuerpo sin órganos" singular y propio más allá del organismo que resulta de disciplinar familiar y socialmente este cuerpo. Este estudio pretende demostrar la convergencia de ambas propuestas al pensar la feminidad como una vivencia singular del propio cuerpo.

  2. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during T

  3. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-02-11

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  4. La alexitimia: entre la angustia y el goce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo García Valdez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En la clínica de las enfermedades psicosomáticas se plantea la interrogante sobre la participación del psiquismo como etiología. Sin embargo, quienes proceden técnicamente a partir de las observaciones clínicas puras —sin considerar una ruptura epistémica que permita la conceptuación de sus acciones—, escamotean la participación de la subjetividad planteada por el psicoanálisis, que con su corpus teórico puede contribuir a una racionalidad propiamente humana de fenómenos inexplicados por la medicina. Este trabajo contribuye articulando las categorías psicoanalíticas de angustia y goce a la categoría médica denominada alexitimia.

  5. The search and rescue satellite mission - A basis for international cooperation. [in aircraft crash and marine distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redisch, W. N.; Trudell, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The use of geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites to monitor and locate signals of the Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) and Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIB) of general aviation aircraft and inspected marine vessels respectively is described. The joint U.S. Canada/France SARSAT demonstration program will require a minimum of four minutes of mutual visibility of distress transmitter, local user terminal and satellite to obtain a location by Doppler tracking. The program consisting of placing instrumentation on-board three of the Tiros-N series of NOAA operational satellites is attracting interest also from other countries including the USSR, Norway, Australia, and Japan.

  6. Development and Validation of the On-Board Control Procedures Subsystem for the Herschel and Planck Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraguto, M.; Wittrock, T.; Barrenscheen, M.; Paakko, M.; Sipinen, V.; Pelttari, L.

    2009-05-01

    The On-Board Control Procedures (OBCP) subsystem of Herschel and Planck Satellites' Central Data Management Unit (CDMU) Application SW (ASW) provides means to control the spacecraft through small script-like programs written in a specific language called On-board Command Language (OCL). The implementation for Herschel and Planck satellites is an adaptation from previous experiences on instruments like Rosetta/OSIRIS, Venus Express/VMC and Dawn/FC, but it had also been adapted successfully for the GOCE satellite already. A thorough validation campaign has been conducted to qualify the H&P SW implementation for flight. The purpose of having on-board control procedures is to allow the ground operators to be able to prepare and up-link complex operations sequences (more complex than simple sequences of mission time-line telecommands) to be executed on-board during the mission operational phase. This is possible because the OBCPs run in a quite separate subsystem, so the creation of a new procedure does not require modification, uplink and re-validation of the whole on-board software. The OBCP subsystem allows these control procedures to be developed, tested on ground, and executed on the spacecraft.

  7. SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. Volume 42; Satellite Primary Productivity Data and Algorithm Development: A Science Plan for Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Balch, William; Campbell, Janet W.; Iverson, Richard L.; Kiefer, Dale A.; Morel, Andre; Yoder, James A.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Two issues regarding primary productivity, as it pertains to the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) are presented in this volume. Chapter 1 describes the development of a science plan for deriving primary production for the world ocean using satellite measurements, by the Ocean Primary Productivity Working Group (OPPWG). Chapter 2 presents discussions by the same group, of algorithm classification, algorithm parameterization and data availability, algorithm testing and validation, and the benefits of a consensus primary productivity algorithm.

  8. Small is Beautiful — Technology Trends in the Satellite Industry and Their Implications for Planetary Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, A.

    2017-02-01

    It’s an exciting time in the space business - new technologies being developed under the ‘NewSpace’ umbrella have some profound implications for planetary science missions over the next three decades.

  9. Vertical and Horizontal Analysis of Crustal Structure of Southeastern Mediterranean and the Egyptian Coastal Zone, from Bouguer and Satellite Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Salah

    2016-07-01

    The present Tectonic system of Southeastern Mediterranean is driven by the collision of the African and Eurasian plates, the Arabian Eurasian convergence and the displacement of the Anatolian Aegean microplate, which generally represents the characteristic of lithospheric structure of the region. In the scope of this study, Bouguer and the satellite gravity (satellite altimetry) anomalies of southeastern Mediterranean and North Eastern part of Egypt were used for investigating the lithospheric structures. Second order trend analyses were applied firstly to Bouguer and satellite altimetry data for examining the characteristic of the anomaly. Later, the vertical and horizontal derivatives applications were applied to the same data. Generally, the purpose of the applying derivative methods is determining the vertical and horizontal borders of the structure. According to the results of derivatives maps, the study area could mainly divided into important four tectonic subzones depending on basement and Moho depth maps. These subzones are distributed from south to the north as: Nile delta-northern Sinai zone, north Egyptian coastal zone, Levantine basin zone and northern thrusting (Cyprus and its surroundings) zone. These zones are separated from each other by horizontal tectonic boundaries and/or near-vertical faults that display the block-faulting tectonic style of this belt. Finally, the gravity studies were evaluated together with the seismic activity of the region. Consequently, the geodynamical structure of the region is examined with the previous studies done in the region. Thus, the current study indicates that satellite gravity mission data is a valuable source of data in understanding the tectonic boundary behavior of the studied region and that satellite gravity data is an important modern source of data in the geodynamical studies.

  10. Orbit determination and estimation of non-gravitational accelerations for the GOCE reentry phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; van den IJssel, J. A. A.

    2016-11-01

    During its reentry phase from 21 October to 10 November 2013, the European Space Agency (ESA) Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) continued to provide high-quality, dual-frequency observations by its Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, star tracker and accelerometers. This resulted in a unique data set for testing high-precision orbit determination at altitudes down to as low as 137 km. In addition, the accelerometers kept working down to this altitude as well, be it with growing periods during which they were saturated. This made it possible to test the capability of estimating non-gravitational accelerations in high drag environments by GPS. A reduced-dynamic orbit determination based on an extended Kalman filter approach was adopted to cope with the estimation of the orbit parameters, including the exponentially growing non-gravitational accelerations. The orbits were found to be consistent with Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) observations at a level of just a few centimeters for a few passes collected up to 2 November 2013. Also orbit overlap comparisons and comparisons with external orbit solutions indicate a 3-dimensional orbit quality at the dm level or better. In addition, high correlations were found between the estimated non-gravitational accelerations and those from the accelerometers during all periods when they were not saturated: typically close to 0.99 for the X axis of the gradiometer reference frame (close to the flight direction), for which the non-gravitational acceleration signal is by far the largest. High correlations were found as well for the Y axis (0.68-0.96) and Z axis (0.61-0.93), predominantly aligned with respectively the cross-track and height direction. The highest correlations were found for the last days, as long as the accelerometers were not saturated.

  11. Comparison of numerical solution strategies for gravity field recovery from GOCE SGG observations implemented on a parallel platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pail

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of a full set of gravity field parameters from satellite gravity gradiometry (SGG is a huge numerical and computational task. In practice, parallel computing has to be applied to estimate the more than 90 000 harmonic coefficients parameterizing the Earth’s gravity field up to a maximum spherical harmonic degree of 300. Three independent solution strategies, i.e. two iterative methods (preconditioned conjugate gradient method, semi-analytic approach and a strict solver (Distributed Non-approximative Adjustment, which are operational on a parallel platform (‘Graz Beowulf Cluster’, are assessed and compared both theoretically and on the basis of a realistic-as-possible numerical simulation, regarding the accuracy of the results, as well as the computational effort. Special concern is given to the correct treatment of the coloured noise characteristics of the gradiometer. The numerical simulations show that there are no significant discrepancies among the solutions of the three methods. The newly proposed Distributed Nonapproximative Adjustment approach, which is the only one of the three methods that solves the inverse problem in a strict sense, also turns out to be a feasible method for practical applications.Key words. Spherical harmonics – satellite gravity gradiometry – GOCE – parallel computing – Beowulf cluster

  12. The IfE Global Gravity Field Model Recovered from GOCE Orbit and Gradiometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hu; Muiller, Jurgen; Brieden, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    An independent global gravity field model is computed from the GOCE orbit and gradiometer data using our own IfE software. We analysed the same data period that were considered for the first released GOCE models. The Acceleration Approach is applied to process the orbit data. The gravity gradients are processed in the framework of the remove-restore technique by which the low-frequency noise of the original gradients are removed. For the combined solution, the normal equations are summed by the Variance Component Estimation Approach. The result in terms of accumulated geoid height error calculated from the coefficient difference w.r.t. EGM2008 is about 11 cm at D/O 200, which corresponds to the accuracy level of the first released TIM and DIR solutions. This indicates that our IfE model has a comparable performance as the other official GOCE models.

  13. A GOCE-only global gravity field model by the space-wise approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliaccio, Federica; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Gatti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The global gravity field model computed by the spacewise approach is one of three official solutions delivered by ESA from the analysis of the GOCE data. The model consists of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and the corresponding error covariance matrix. The main idea behind this approach...... the orbit to reduce the noise variance and correlation before gridding the data. In the first release of the space-wise approach, based on a period of about two months, some prior information coming from existing gravity field models entered into the solution especially at low degrees and low orders...... degrees; the second is an internally computed GOCE-only prior model to be used in place of the official quick-look model, thus removing the dependency on EIGEN5C especially in the polar gaps. Once the procedure to obtain a GOCE-only solution has been outlined, a new global gravity field model has been...

  14. Demonstrating soil moisture remote sensing with observations from the UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Clara; Shah, Rashmi; Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Masters, Dallas; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of spaceborne Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) bistatic radar receivers to sense changes in soil moisture is investigated using observations from the low Earth orbiting UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1). Previous studies using receivers on aircraft or towers have shown that ground-reflected GNSS signals are sensitive to changes in soil moisture, though the ability to sense this variable from space has yet to be quantified. Data from TDS-1 show a 7 dB sensitivity of reflected signals to temporal changes in soil moisture. If the effects of surface roughness and vegetation on the reflected signals can be quantified, spaceborne GNSS bistatic radar receivers could provide soil moisture on relatively small spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Global thermochemical imaging of the lithosphere using satellite and terrestrial observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, Javier; Lebedev, Sergei; Martinec, Zdenek; Celli, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Conventional methods of seismic tomography, topography, gravity and electromagnetic data analysis and geodynamic modelling constrain distributions of seismic velocity, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity at depth, all depending on temperature and composition of the rocks within the Earth. However, modelling and interpretation of multiple data sets provide a multifaceted image of the true thermochemical structure of the Earth that needs to be appropriately and consistently integrated. A simple combination of gravity, electromagnetic, geodynamics, petrological and seismic models alone is insufficient due to the non-uniqueness and different sensitivities of these models, and the internal consistency relationships that must connect all the intermediate parameters describing the Earth involved. Thermodynamic and petrological links between seismic velocities, density, electrical conductivity, viscosity, melt, water, temperature, pressure and composition within the Earth can now be modelled accurately using new methods of computational petrology and data from laboratory experiments. The growth of very large terrestrial and satellite (e.g., Swarm and GOCE ESA missions) geophysical data sets over the last few years, together with the advancement of petrological and geophysical modelling techniques, now present an opportunity for global, thermochemical and deformation 3D imaging of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle with unprecedented resolution. This project combines state-of-the-art seismic waveform tomography (using both surface and body waves), newly available global gravity satellite data (geoid and gravity anomalies and new gradiometric measurements from ESA's GOCE mission) and surface heat flow and elevation within a self-consistent thermodynamic framework. The aim is to develop a method for detailed and robust global thermochemical image of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle. In a preliminary study, we convert a state-of-the-art global

  16. Simulation of whistler waves excited in the presence of a cold plasma cloud - Implications for the CRRES mission. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation model is constructed to study the excitation of whistler waves in the presence of a cold plasma cloud for conditions representative of those after the release of lithium in the inner plasma sheet during the Combined Release and Radiation Effect Satellite mission. The results indicate that a standing-wave pattern with discrete wave frequencies is formed within the cloud. The magnetic wave amplitude inside the cloud, which is limited by quasi-linear diffusion, is of the order of several nanoteslas. Assuming a magnetospheric loss cone of 5 deg, the observed pitch angle diffusion produced by the whistler waves is sufficient to put the electrons on strong diffusion.

  17. Neptune's small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P.

    1992-04-01

    The small satellites of Neptune and other planets discovered during the Voyager 2 mission are discussed in terms of their composition and relationship to the planetary systems. The satellite Proteus is described in terms of its orbit, five other satellites are described, and they are compared to ther small satellites and systems. Neptune's satellites are hypothesized to be related to the ring system, and the satellite Galatea is related to the confinement of the rings.

  18. From Satellites to Rings: The Diversity of the Saturnian System Ices in the VIS-NIR at the End of Cassini-VIMS Nominal Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2008-09-01

    After four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the whole population of Saturnian icy objects allowing a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division). The results we present are derived from the whole dataset available at june 2008 which consists of about 1500 full-disk observations of the moons as well as several radial mosaics of the ring system. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (I/F continua, VIS spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide IR bands strengths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to identify the disk-integrated compositional units of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants” abundances and typical regolith grain properties for both satellites and rings. These quantities are varying between the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Some significant differences are detected in the VIS colors of co-orbital moons Epimetheus and Janus, with the first very red and therefore similar to Hyperion while the last is more "neutral” these results could help to decipher the origins and evolutional story of these two moons. The water ice band strengths of the A-B rings are the most intense of the Saturnian system denoting a minimal presence of "contaminants” which can be estimated thanks to the 350-520 nm spectral slope. Finally we compare these spectral parameters with some TNOs and outer solar system objects (1995UG5, 90377-Sedna, 1996TO66, Pholus, Triton, Charon, Oberon, Titania) to search for possible analogies. This research was possible thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  19. A Novel Satellite Mission Concept for Upper Air Water Vapour, Aerosol and Cloud Observations Using Integrated Path Differential Absorption LiDAR Limb Sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Weitnauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new satellite mission to deliver high quality measurements of upper air water vapour. The concept centres around a LiDAR in limb sounding by occultation geometry, designed to operate as a very long path system for differential absorption measurements. We present a preliminary performance analysis with a system sized to send 75 mJ pulses at 25 Hz at four wavelengths close to 935 nm, to up to 5 microsatellites in a counter-rotating orbit, carrying retroreflectors characterized by a reflected beam divergence of roughly twice the emitted laser beam divergence of 15 µrad. This provides water vapour profiles with a vertical sampling of 110 m; preliminary calculations suggest that the system could detect concentrations of less than 5 ppm. A secondary payload of a fairly conventional medium resolution multispectral radiometer allows wide-swath cloud and aerosol imaging. The total weight and power of the system are estimated at 3 tons and 2,700 W respectively. This novel concept presents significant challenges, including the performance of the lasers in space, the tracking between the main spacecraft and the retroreflectors, the refractive effects of turbulence, and the design of the telescopes to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio for the high precision measurements. The mission concept was conceived at the Alpbach Summer School 2010.

  20. An initial estimate of the North Atlantic steady-state geostrophic circulation from GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, R.J.; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    is already superior to a similar estimate based on 8 years of GRACE observations. This result primarily depends on the fact that the GOCE mean dynamic topography (MDT) is generally less noisy than that obtained from the GRACE data. It therefore requires less smoothing and so there is less attenuation...

  1. Validation of GOCE gravity field models by means of orbit residuals and geoid comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Ackermann, C.; Hosse, M.

    2011-01-01

    Three GOCE-based gravity field solutions have been computed by ESA’s high-level processing facility and were released to the user community. All models are accompanied by variance-covariance information resulting either from the least squares procedure or a Monte-Carlo approach. In order to obtain

  2. Validation of GOCE gravity field models by means of orbit residuals and geoid comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Ackermann, C.; Hosse, M.

    2011-01-01

    Three GOCE-based gravity field solutions have been computed by ESA’s high-level processing facility and were released to the user community. All models are accompanied by variance-covariance information resulting either from the least squares procedure or a Monte-Carlo approach. In order to obtain i

  3. Next Generation Gravity Mission: a Step Forward in the Earth's Gravity Field Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrin, P.; Aguirre, M.; Massotti, L.; Cesare, S.

    2009-04-01

    with Position Sensing Detectors (PSDs). Basically, the satellite orientation relative to the interferometer laser beam and the lateral displacement of the laser beam axis from the retro-reflector are measured from the position and optical power of the laser beam portions focused on the PSDs. The lateral displacement information is utilized for driving a "Beam Steering Mechanism" that keeps the laser beam emitted by one satellite pointed towards the retro-reflector on the other satellite. Both the laser interferometer core and the telescope assembly of the angle/lateral metrology have been breadboarded and tested. This paper will be organized as follows: Section I will introduce the problem of the geoid determination, gravity field retrieval and the prior mission GOCE. Section II will describe the next generation gravity mission, the measurement models and requirements derivation. Section III will give an overview of the laser metrology system design and the metrology proof of concept. Finally, Section IV will be focused on the mission control issues, as the drag-free and the loose formation flying control, the attitude control and the Laser Beam Pointing Control.

  4. INSIGHT (interaction of low-orbiting satellites with the surrounding ionosphere and thermosphere)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicht, Anja; Reussner, Elisabeth; Lühr, Hermann; Stolle, Claudia; Xiong, Chao; Schmidt, Michael; Blossfeld, Mathis; Erdogan, Eren; Pancetta, Francesca; Flury, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the DFG special program "Dynamic Earth" the project INSIGHT, started in September 2015, is studying the interactions between the ionosphere and thermosphere as well as the role of the satellites and their instruments in observing the space environment. Accelerometers on low-Earth orbiters (LEOs) are flown to separate non-gravitational forces acting on the satellite from influences of gravitational effects. Amongst others these instruments provide valuable information for improving our understanding of thermospheric properties like densities and winds. An unexpected result, for example, is the clear evidence of geomagnetic field control on the neutral upper atmosphere. The charged particles of the ionosphere act as mediators between the magnetic field and the thermosphere. In the framework of INSIGHT the climatology of the thermosphere will be established and the coupling between the ionosphere and thermosphere is studied. There are indications that the accelerometers are influenced by systematic errors not identified up to now. For GRACE it is one of the discussed reasons, why this mission so far did not reach the baseline accuracy. Beutler et al. 2010 discussed the limited use of the GRACE accelerometer measurements in comparison to stochastic pulses in gravity field recovery. Analysis of the accelerometer measurements show many structures in the high frequency region which can be traced back to switching processes of electric circuits in the spacecraft, like heater and magnetic torquer switching, or so called twangs, which can be associated with discharging of non-conducting surfaces of the satellite. As all observed signals have the same time dependency a common origin is very likely, namely the coupling of time variable electric currents into the accelerometer signal. In GOCE gravity field gradients non-gravitational signatures around the magnetic poles are found indicating that even at lower frequencies problems occur. INSIGHT will identify

  5. Oceanic Weather Decision Support for Unmanned Global Hawk Science Missions into Hurricanes with Tailored Satellite Derived Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, Wayne; Griffin, Sarah; Velden, Christopher; Zipser, Ed; Cecil, Daniel; Braun, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to identify in-flight hazards to high-altitude aircraft, namely the Global Hawk. The Global Hawk was used during Septembers 2012-2016 as part of two NASA funded Hurricane Sentinel-3 field campaigns to over-fly hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean. This talk identifies the cause of severe turbulence experienced over Hurricane Emily (2005) and how a combination of NOAA funded GOES-R algorithm derived cloud top heights/tropical overshooting tops using GOES-13/SEVIRI imager radiances, and lightning information are used to identify areas of potential turbulence for near real-time navigation decision support. Several examples will demonstrate how the Global Hawk pilots remotely received and used real-time satellite derived cloud and lightning detection information to keep the aircraft safely above clouds and avoid regions of potential turbulence.

  6. A New Class of Advanced Accuracy Satellite Instrumentation (AASI) for the CLARREO Mission: Interferometer Test-bed Tradestudies and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Grandmont, F. J.; Buijs, H.; Gero, P. J.; Best, F. A.; Tobin, D. C.; Knuteson, R. O.; Laporte, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    NASA has selected CLARREO (Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory), a climate mission recommended by the 2007 Decadal Survey of the US National Research Council, as a potential new start in 2010. CLARREO will measure spectrally resolved radiance from the earth and atmospheric bending of GPS signals related to atmospheric structure (refractivity) as benchmark measurements of long-term climate change trends. CLARREO will provide more complete spectral and time-of-day coverage and will fly basic physical standards to eliminate the need to assume on-board reference stability. Therefore, the spectral radiances from this mission will also serve as benchmarks to propagate a highly accurate calibration to other space-borne IR instruments. Technology development and risk reduction for the CLARREO mission is being conducted at the Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The objective of this work is to develop and demonstrate the technology necessary to measure IR spectrally resolved radiances (3 - 50 micrometers) with ultra high accuracy (model forecasts. The proposed work (University of Wisconsin-Madison and Harvard University) was selected for the 2007 NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) and will develop four primary technologies to assure SI traceability on-orbit and demonstrate the ultra high accuracy measurement capability required for CLARREO: (1) On-orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS), a high emissivity blackbody source that uses multiple miniature phase-change cells to provide a revolutionary on-orbit standard with absolute temperature accuracy proven over a wide range of temperatures, (2) On-orbit Cavity Emissivity Modules (OCEMs), providing a source (quantum cascade laser, QCL, or “Heated Halo”) to measure any change in the cavity emissivity of the OARS, (3) On-orbit Spectral Response Module (OSRM), a source for spectral response measurements using a nearly monochromatic QCL source configured to

  7. Satellite mission Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) partners with formal and informal education programs to study clouds on the edge of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. Q.; Maggi, B. H.

    2004-12-01

    The satellite-based research mission "Aeronomy of Ice In the Mesosphere" (AIM), has developed an exciting partnership of formal and informal education programs that will connect students and the public to the unique scientific aspects of the mission. The AIM satellite mission is dedicated to providing a scientific basis for understanding why Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) form and vary. PMCs are sometimes known as Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs) or "night shinning" clouds because of their visibility at dawn and dusk. The visible manifestation of PMCs provides a unique opportunity for Education and Public Outreach. The AIM outreach programs will utilize the beautiful images of "clouds on the edge of space" as a tool to motivate students and the public to increase their knowledge and understanding about issues surrounding changes in our atmosphere. In an effort to provide formal and informal outreach opportunities worldwide, AIM has developed a partnership with the GLOBE program. GLOBE is a network of schools, science centers, and clubs from over 105 countries where participants collect scientific data according to precise protocols and enter the data into a central database allowing both scientists and students to utilize the data. The collaboration between AIM and GLOBE will involve participants in collecting and utilizing NLC data worldwide. This partnership will provide a mechanism for sustaining AIM education opportunities for both formal and informal education venues in the future. Included in the formal education component of AIM outreach is the implementation of two educator workshops that will establish partnerships between the mission and classrooms nationwide. The educator workshops will be held in Alaska due to the optimal location for viewing NLCs. Participants attending the workshops will be chosen from a national pool allowing teachers working with students in southern latitudes an opportunity to experience the excitement of working with data that can only

  8. 面向新任务插入的电子侦察卫星任务规划方法%Mission Planning for Electronic Reconnaissance Satellites Oriented the Insertion of the New Missions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝江汉; 黄维; 李建军; 王迪

    2011-01-01

    This paper builds up dynamic Constraint Satisfied Problem (CSP) with two-level optimization objective, puts forward a dynamic insertion algorithm based on heuristic rules focusing on the arrival of the new missions with objective to maximize the sum of tasks planned and minimize the changes of the initial reconnaissance plans after the all or some of new mission insertion. At last, it gives an example of the electronic reconnaissance satellites to validate the model and algorithm. The result shows that the algorithm is able to satisfy the require that the variety of original scheme is as small as possible, after inserting new tasks, also validate the model and algorithm. It makes sense in continuing the research and solving the practical problems.%针对电子侦察卫星在执行初始侦察计划的过程中新任务动态到达的情况,以最大化完成任务优先级之和,并使新任务到达后,对原侦察计划调整最小为目标,建立了具有两级优化目标的动态约束满足模型,提出了一种基于启发式规则的动态插入算法,最后通过仿真实例,对模型和算法进行了验证,实验结果表明算法一定程度上能够满足卫星新任务插入后使得原始方案变化尽可能小的要求,也验证了该模型和算法的合理性,同时对开展后续的研究和解决实际问题具有一定现实启发意义.

  9. Commentary to "LARES successfully launched in orbit: Satellite and mission description" by A. Paolozzi and I. Ciufolini

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We comment on some statements in a recent paper by Paolozzi and Ciufolini concerning certain remarks raised by us on the realistic accuracy obtainable in testing the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect in the gravitational field of the Earth with the newly launched LARES satellite together with the LAGEOS and LAGEOS II spacecraft in orbit for a long time. The orbital configuration of LARES is different from that of the originally proposed LAGEOS-3. Indeed, while the latter one should have been launched to the same altitude of LAGEOS (i.e. about $h_{\\rm L}=5890$ km) in an orbital plane displaced by $180$ deg with respect to that of LAGEOS ($I_{\\rm L}=110$ deg, $I_{\\rm L3}=70$ deg), LARES currently moves at a much smaller altitude (about $h_{\\rm LR}=1440$ km) and at a slightly different inclination ($I_{\\rm LR} = 69.5$ deg). As independently pointed out in the literature by different authors, the overall accuracy of a LARES-LAGEOS-LAGEOS II Lense-Thirring test may be unfavorably \\textcolor{black}{impacte...

  10. Validation of MPI-ESM Decadal Hindcast Experiments with Terrestrial Water Storage Variations as Observed by the GRACE Satellite Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangjing Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Time-variations in the gravity field as observed by the GRACE mission provide for the first time quantitative estimates of the terrestrial water storage (TWS at monthly resolution over one decade (2002–2011. TWS from GRACE is applied here to validate three different ensemble sets of decadal hindcasts performed with the coupled climate model MPI-ESM within the German research project MiKlip. Those experiments differ in terms of the applied low (LR and medium (MR spatial resolution configuration of MPI-ESM, as well as by the applied ensemble initialization strategy, where ocean-only (b0 is replaced by atmosphere and ocean (b1 anomaly initialization. Moderately positive skill scores of the initialized hindcasts are obtained both with respect to the zero anomaly forecast and the uninitialized projections in particular for lead year 1 in moderate to high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Skill scores gradually increase when moving from b0-LR to b1-LR, and less prominent also for b1-LR to b1-MR, thereby documenting improvements of the MPI-ESM decadal climate prediction system during the most recent years.

  11. Propagation of Satelite Rainfall Products uncertainties in hydrological applications : Examples in West-Africa in the framework of the Megha-Tropiques Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casse, C.; Gosset, M.; Peugeot, C.; Boone, A.; Pedinotti, V.

    2013-12-01

    The use of satellite based rainfall in research or operational Hydrological application is becoming more and more frequent. This is specially true in the Tropics where ground based gauge (or radar) network are generally scarce and often degrading. Member of the GPM constellation, the new French-Indian satellite Mission Megha-Tropiques (MT) dedicated to the water and energy budget in the tropical atmosphere contributes to a better monitoring of rainfall in the inter-tropical zone. As part of this mission, research is developed on the use of MT rainfall products for hydrological research or operational application such as flood monitoring. A key issue for such applications is how to account for rainfall products biases and uncertainties, and how to propagate them in the end user models ? Another important question is how to choose the best space-time resolution for the rainfall forcing, given that both model performances and rain-product uncertainties are resolution dependent. This talk will present on going investigations and perspectives on this subject, with examples from the Megha_tropiques Ground validation sites in West Africa. The CNRM model Surfex-ISBA/TRIP has been set up to simulate the hydrological behavior of the Niger River. This modeling set up is being used to study the predictability of Niger Floods events in the city of Niamey and the performances of satellite rainfall products as forcing for such predictions. One of the interesting feature of the Niger outflow in Niamey is its double peak : a first peak attributed to 'local' rainfall falling in small to medium size basins situated in the region of Niamey, and a second peak linked to the rainfall falling in the upper par of the river, and slowly propagating through the river towards Niamey. The performances of rainfall products are found to differ between the wetter/upper part of the basin, and the local/sahelian areas. Both academic tests with artificially biased or 'perturbed' rainfield and actual

  12. Merging aerosol optical depth data from multiple satellite missions to view agricultural biomass burning in Central and East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Xue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural biomass burning (ABB in Central and East China occurs every year from May to October and peaks in June. The biomass burning event in June 2007 was very strong. During the period from 26 May to 16 June 2007, ABB occurred mainly in Anhui, Henan, Jiangsu and Shandong provinces. A comprehensive set of aerosol optical depth (AOD data, produced by a merger of AOD product data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MIRS, is used to study the spatial and temporal distribution of agricultural biomass aerosols in Central and East China combining with ground observations from both AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET measurements. We compared merged AOD data with single-sensor single-algorithm AOD data (MODIS Dark Target AOD data, MODIS Deep Blue AOD data, SRAP-MODIS AOD data and MISR AOD data. In this comparison, we found merged AOD products can improve the quality of AOD products from single-sensor single-algorithm data sets by expanding the spatial coverage of the study area and keeping the statistical confidence in AOD parameters. There existed high correlation (0.8479 between the merged AOD data and AERONET measurements. Our merged AOD data make use of synergetic information conveyed in all of the available satellite data. The merged AOD data were used for the analysis of the biomass burning event from 26 May to 16 June 2007 together with meteorological data. The merged AOD products and the ground observations from China suggest that biomass burning in Central and East China has had great impact on AOD over China. Influenced by this ABB, the highest AOD value in Beijing on 12 June 2007 reached 5.71.

  13. Merging aerosol optical depth data from multiple satellite missions to view agricultural biomass burning in Central and East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y.; Xu, H.; Mei, L.; Guang, J.; Guo, J.; Li, Y.; Hou, T.; Li, C.; Yang, L.; He, X.

    2012-04-01

    Agricultural biomass burning (ABB) in Central and East China occurs every year from May to October and peaks in June. The biomass burning event in June 2007 was very strong. During the period from 26 May to 16 June 2007, ABB occurred mainly in Anhui, Henan, Jiangsu and Shandong provinces. A comprehensive set of aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, produced by a merger of AOD product data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MIRS), is used to study the spatial and temporal distribution of agricultural biomass aerosols in Central and East China combining with ground observations from both AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET) measurements. We compared merged AOD data with single-sensor single-algorithm AOD data (MODIS Dark Target AOD data, MODIS Deep Blue AOD data, SRAP-MODIS AOD data and MISR AOD data). In this comparison, we found merged AOD products can improve the quality of AOD products from single-sensor single-algorithm data sets by expanding the spatial coverage of the study area and keeping the statistical confidence in AOD parameters. There existed high correlation (0.8479) between the merged AOD data and AERONET measurements. Our merged AOD data make use of synergetic information conveyed in all of the available satellite data. The merged AOD data were used for the analysis of the biomass burning event from 26 May to 16 June 2007 together with meteorological data. The merged AOD products and the ground observations from China suggest that biomass burning in Central and East China has had great impact on AOD over China. Influenced by this ABB, the highest AOD value in Beijing on 12 June 2007 reached 5.71.

  14. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  15. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  16. Ground-based diffusion experiments on liquid Sn-In systems using the shear cell technique of the satellite mission Foton-M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Kraatz, Kurt-Helmut; Frohberg, Günter

    2004-11-01

    This study reported in this paper was aimed at testing the shear cell that was developed for the satellite mission Foton-M1 to measure diffusion coefficients in liquid metals under microgravity (microg)-conditions. Thick Layer diffusion experiments were performed in the system Sn90In10 versus Sn under 1 g-conditions. For this system several microg-diffusion results are available as reference data. This combination provides a low, but sufficiently stable, density layering throughout the entire experiment, which is important to avoid buoyancy-driven convection. The experimental results were corrected for the influences of the shear-induced convection and mixing after the final shearing, both of which are typical for the shear cell technique. As the result, the reproducibility and the reliability of the diffusion coefficients in the ground-based experiments were within the limits of error of microg-data. Based on our results we discuss the necessary conditions to avoid buoyancy-driven convection.

  17. Global Characterization of CO2 Column Retrievals from Shortwave-Infrared Satellite Observations of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Miller

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The global characteristics of retrievals of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, from shortwave infrared observations has been studied using the expected measurement performance of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2 mission. This study focuses on XCO2 retrieval precision and averaging kernels and their sensitivity to key parameters such as solar zenith angle (SZA, surface pressure, surface type and aerosol optical depth (AOD, for both nadir and sunglint observing modes. Realistic simulations have been carried out and the single sounding retrieval errors for XCO2 have been derived from the formal retrieval error covariance matrix under the assumption that the retrieval has converged to the correct answer and that the forward model can adequately describe the measurement. Thus, the retrieval errors presented in this study represent an estimate of the retrieval precision. For nadir observations, we find single-sounding retrieval errors with values typically less than 1 part per million (ppm over most land surfaces for SZAs less than 70° and up to 2.5 ppm for larger SZAs. Larger errors are found over snow/ice and ocean surfaces due to their low albedo in the spectral regions of the CO2 absorption bands and, for ocean, also in the O2 A band. For sunglint observations, errors over the ocean are significantly smaller than in nadir mode with values in the range of 0.3 to 0.6 ppm for small SZAs which can decrease to values as small as 0.15 for the largest SZAs. The vertical sensitivity of the retrieval that is represented by the column averaging kernel peaks near the surface and exhibits values near unity throughout most of the troposphere for most anticipated scenes. Nadir observations over dark ocean or snow/ice surfaces and observations with large AOD and large SZA show a decreased sensitivity to near-surface CO2. All simulations are carried out for a mid-latitude summer atmospheric profile, a given aerosol type and

  18. A new approach to assess isostatic compensation of topography in continental domain from GOCE gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadio, Cécilia; Saraswati, Anita; Cattin, Rodolphe; Mazzotti, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    Estimating how topography is maintained provides insights into the different factors responsible for surface deformations and their relative roles. Here, we develop a new and simple approach to assess the degree of isostatic compensation of continental topography at regional scale from GOCE gravity gradients. We calculate the ratio between the radial gradient observed by GOCE and that calculated from topography only. From analytical and statistical formulations, simple relationships between this ratio and the degree of compensation are obtained under the Airy-Heiskanen isostasy hypothesis. Then, a value of degree of compensation at each point of study area can be easily deduced. We apply our method to the Alaska-Canada Cordillera and validate our results by comparison with a standard isostatic gravity anomaly model and additional geophysical information for this area. Both our GOCE-based results and the isostatic anomaly show that Airy-Heiskanen isostasy prevails for the Yukon Plateau whereas additional mechanisms are required to support topography below the Northwest Territories Craton and the Yakutat collision zone.

  19. Numerical modeling and remote sensing of global water management systems: Applications for land surface modeling, satellite missions, and sustainable water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solander, Kurt C.

    The ability to accurately quantify water storages and fluxes in water management systems through observations or models is of increasing importance due to the expected impacts from climate change and population growth worldwide. Here, I describe three innovative techniques developed to better understand this problem. First, a model was created to represent reservoir storage and outflow with the objective of integration into a Land Surface Model (LSM) to simulate the impacts of reservoir management on the climate system. Given this goal, storage capacity represented the lone model input required that is not already available to an LSM user. Model parameterization was linked to air temperature to allow future simulations to adapt to a changing climate, making it the first such model to mimic the potential response of a reservoir operator to climate change. Second, spatial and temporal error properties of future NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite reservoir operations were quantified. This work invoked the use of the SWOTsim instrument simulator, which was run over a number of synthetic and actual reservoirs so the resulting error properties could be extrapolated to the global scale. The results provide eventual users of SWOT data with a blueprint of expected reservoir error properties so such characteristics can be determined a priori for a reservoir given knowledge about its topology and anticipated repeat orbit pass over its location. Finally, data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission was used in conjunction with in-situ water use records to evaluate sustainable water use at the two-digit HUC basin scale over the contiguous United States. Results indicate that the least sustainable water management region is centered in the southwest, where consumptive water use exceeded water availability by over 100% on average for some of these basins. This work represents the first attempt at evaluating sustainable

  20. Towards improved estimation of the dynamic topography and ocean circulation in the high latitude and arctic ocean: The importance of GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, J. A.; Raj, R. P.; Nilsen, J. E. Ø.

    2013-01-01

    . In this respect this study combines in-situ hydrographical data, surface drifter data and direct current meter measurements, with coupled sea ice - ocean models, radar altimeter data and the latest GOCE-based geoid in order to estimate and assess the quality, usefulness and validity of the new GOCE derived mean...

  1. Mapping the mass distribution of Earth's mantle using satellite-derived gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panet, Isabelle; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Greff-Lefftz, Marianne; Métivier, Laurent; Diament, Michel; Mandea, Mioara

    2014-02-01

    The dynamics of Earth's mantle are not well known. Deciphering mantle flow patterns requires an understanding of the global distribution of mantle density. Seismic tomography has been used to derive mantle density distributions, but converting seismic velocities into densities is not straightforward. Here we show that data from the GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) mission can be used to probe our planet's deep mass structure. We construct global anomaly maps of the Earth's gravitational gradients at satellite altitude and use a sensitivity analysis to show that these gravitational gradients image the geometry of mantle mass down to mid-mantle depths. Our maps highlight north-south-elongated gravity gradient anomalies over Asia and America that follow a belt of ancient subduction boundaries, as well as gravity gradient anomalies over the central Pacific Ocean and south of Africa that coincide with the locations of deep mantle plumes. We interpret these anomalies as sinking tectonic plates and convective instabilities between 1,000 and 2,500km depth, consistent with seismic tomography results. Along the former Tethyan Margin, our data also identify an east-west-oriented mass anomaly likely in the upper mantle. We suggest that by combining gravity gradients with seismic and geodynamic data, an integrated dynamic model for Earth can be achieved.

  2. The ALEXIS mission recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloch, J.; Armstrong, T.; Dingler, B.; Enemark, D.; Holden, D.; Little, C.; Munson, C.; Priedhorsky, B.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Smith, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Warner, R.; Dill, B.; Huffman, G.; McLoughlin, F.; Mills, R.; Miller, R. [AeroAstro, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The authors report the recovery of the ALEXIS small satellite mission. ALEXIS is a 113-kg satellite that carries an ultrasoft x-ray telescope array and a high-speed VHF receiver/digitizer (BLACKBEARD), supported by a miniature spacecraft bus. It was launched by a Pegasus booster on 1993 April 25, but a solar paddle was damaged during powered flight. Initial attempts to contact ALEXIS were unsuccessful. The satellite finally responded in June, and was soon brought under control. Because the magnetometer had failed, the rescue required the development of new attitude control-techniques. The telemetry system has performed nominally. They discuss the procedures used to recover the ALEXIS mission.

  3. Gravity changes in mid-west Greenland from GOCE gravity model and gradient data using ground and airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tscherning, Carl Christian; Herceg, Matija; Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna

    GOCE TRF (terrestrial reference frame) vertical anomalous gradients (Tzz) from two periods have been used to determine gravity anomalies changes in mid-west Greenland, where a large mass-loss has been detected using GRACE (Fig. 1). As additional data were used the GOCE DIR-3 model and ground...... gravity at the coast on solid rock, where no mass loss is expected. The methods of Least-Squares Collocation (LSC) and the Reduced Point Mass (RPM) methods have been used, however only LSC included the ground data....

  4. Interpretation of Continental Scale Gravity Signatures from GOCE at Smaller Scale Mineral Hosting outcrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    The GOCE gravity field is globally homogeneous at the resolution of about 50km or better allowing for the first time to analyze tectonic structures on the continental scale. Geologic correlation studies propose to continue the tectonic lineaments across continents to the pre-breakup position. Tectonic events that induce density changes, as metamorphic events and magmatic events, should then show up in the gravity field. Applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field places today's observed field at the pre-breakup position (Braitenberg, 2014). The same reconstruction can be applied to the seismic velocity models, to allow a joint gravity-velocity analysis. The geophysical fields bear information to control the likeliness of the hypothesized continuation of lineations. Total absence of a signal, makes the cross-continental continuation of the lineament unprobable, as continental-wide lineaments are controlled by rheologic and compositional differences of crust and upper mantle. Special attention is given to Greenstone belts, which are associated to a class of important mineralizations. The outcrops are limited in extent, but are associated with a much broader gravity signature, which cannot be explained by the outcropping masses alone. The gravity requires a mass source residing at lower crustal level, giving evidence of the mantle-crust melting processes influencing the tectonic characteristic at surface. The study is carried out over the African and South American continents. Reference Braitenberg C. (2014). Exploration of tectonic structures with GOCE in Africa and across-continents. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, doi:10.1016/j.jag.2014.013

  5. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  6. Action planning for agile earth-observing satellite mission planning problem%面向动作序列的敏捷卫星任务规划问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凯; 白国庆; 陈英武; 贺仁杰; 邢立宁

    2012-01-01

    针对新一代敏捷卫星对地观测任务规划问题,考虑了直拍直传、立体成像、多条带拼接等复杂任务需求和观测、数据下传、对日定向等九种卫星动作,在任务规划的同时进行卫星动作规划.设计并实现了前瞻启发式构造算法,算法满足卫星存储、能量等复杂约束,在前瞻过程中每次决定当前任务是否安排.采用基于专家知识的多种启发式规则决定任务安排与安排卫星动作序列.仿真实例及实际工程应用表明,算法可以在很短的时间内给出较好的结果,证明了本文方法对于敏捷卫星任务规划问题的适用性.%The mission of Earth observing satellite (EOS) is to acquire photographs of specified areas on Earth surface at the requests of users. The goal is to select a feasible task sequence to maximize the sum of weights. This research presents the mission planning problem of the next-generation agile Earth-observing satellite(AEOS). The complex user requests(including multi-strip area, real time download request, and stereoscopic request) and complex satellite constraints were considered, covering eight satellite actions(including observe action, data download, SSR Erase action, attitude movement, heliocentric pointing, geocentric pointing, and instrument action) . A chronological look ahead algorithm was designed to solve the problem, heuristic rules based on expert knowledge were used to make choices and arrange satellite actions, which satisfy all satellite physical constraints and operational constraints. For the current experiment instances and applications, the algorithm can give results in very short time. Experiment results suggest that our algorithm works well for the agile earth-observing satellite planning problem.

  7. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  8. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the Earth¡¦s crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The Earth¡¦s gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  9. Modelling the Earth's static and time-varying gravity field using a combination of GRACE and GOCE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is modelling the static and time-varying parts of the Earth's gravity field at the global scale based on data acquired by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In addition, a new

  10. Modelling the Earth's static and time-varying gravity field using a combination of GRACE and GOCE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is modelling the static and time-varying parts of the Earth's gravity field at the global scale based on data acquired by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In addition, a new methodol

  11. Control of deep lithospheric roots on crustal scale GOCE gravity and gradient fields evident in Gondwana reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla; Mariani, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    The GOCE gravity field is globally homogeneous at the resolution of about 80km or better allowing for the first time to analyze tectonic structures at continental scale. Geologic correlation studies based on age determination and mineral composition of rock samples propose to continue the tectonic lineaments across continents to the pre-breakup position. Tectonic events which induce density changes, as metamorphic events and magmatic events, should then show up in the gravity field. Therefore gravity can be used as a globally available supportive tool for interpolation of isolated samples. Applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field places today's observed field at the pre-breakup position. In order to test the possible deep control of the crustal features, the same reconstruction is applied to the seismic velocity models, and a joint gravity-velocity analysis is performed. The geophysical fields allow to control the likeliness of the hypothesized continuation of lineations based on sparse surface outcrops. Total absence of a signal, makes the cross-continental continuation of the lineament improbable, as continental-wide lineaments are controlled by rheologic and compositional differences of lithospheric mantle. It is found that the deep lithospheric roots as those found below cratons control the position of the positive gravity values. The explanation is that the deep lithospheric roots focus asthenospheric upwelling outboard of the root protecting the overlying craton from magmatic intrusions. The study is carried out over the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105 Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological

  12. GHRSST Level 2P Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) onboard Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GDS2 Version -The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) is a well calibrated passive microwave radiometer, similar to the Special Sensor...

  13. The Prisma Hyperspectra Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, R.; Ananasso, C.; Guarini, R.; Lopinto, E.; Candela, L.; Pisani, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    PRISMA (PRecursore IperSpettrale della Missione Applicativa) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) hyperspectral mission currently scheduled for the lunch in 2018. PRISMA is a single satellite placed on a sun- synchronous Low Earth Orbit (620 km altitude) with an expected operational lifetime of 5 years. The hyperspectral payload consists of a high spectral resolution (VNIR-SWIR) imaging spectrometer, optically integrated with a medium resolution Panchromatic camera. PRISMA will acquire data on areas of 30 km Swath width and with a Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) of 30 m (hyperspectral) and of 5 m Panchromatic (PAN). The PRISMA Ground Segment will be geographically distributed between Fucino station and ASI Matera Space Geodesy Centre and will include the Mission Control Centre, the Satellite Control Centre and the Instrument Data Handling System. The science community supports the overall lifecycle of the mission, being involved in algorithms definition, calibration and validation activities, research and applications development.

  14. Space VLBI Mission: VSOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yasuhiro; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Edwards, P. G.

    2001-03-01

    We succeeded in performing space VLBI observations using the VLBI satellite HALCA (VSOP satellite), launched in February, 1997 aboard the first M-V rocket developed by ISAS. The mission is led by ISAS and NAO, with the collaborations from CRL, NASA, NRAO, and other institutes and observatories in Europe, Australia, Canada, South-Africa, and China, We succeeded to make a lot of observations and to get the new features from the active galaxies, the cosmic jets, and other astronomical objects.

  15. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.

    2013-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics and the Front-End Electronic Unit) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench and with drops in ZARM catapult. Besides, a thermal stability is needed for the accelerometer core and front-end electronics to avoid bias and scale factor variation, and reached by a thermal box designed by Astrium, spacecraft manufacturer. The accelerometers are designed to endure the launch vibrations and the thermal environment at

  16. 基于时空域混合法利用Kaula正则化精确和快速解算GOCE地球重力场%Accurate and rapid determination of GOCE Earth's gravitational field using time-space-wise-approach associated with Kaula regularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑伟; 许厚泽; 钟敏; 员美娟; 周旭华

    2011-01-01

    The GOCE Earth's gravitational field complete up to degree and order 250 is recovered based on the time-space-wise-approach associated with Kaula regularization in order to study the influences of satellite gravity gradiometry on the accuracy of medium-high frequency Earth' s gravitational field recovery. The simulated results show: Firstly, the time-space-wise-approach is an effective way to accurately and rapidly determine the high-degree Earth's gravitational field;Secondly, the Kaula regularization is one of the key processes to reduce ill condition of normal matrix; Thirdly, the large-scale linear system of equations is solved quickly using the improved pre-conditioned conjugate-gradient iterative approach, and the computing speed can be improved at least l000 times as compared to the direct least-squares approach; Fourthly, at the degree 250 ,cumulative geoid height and gravity anomaly errors are 9. 295 cm and 0. 204 mGal with orbital error I cm and gravity gradient error 3XIO-12/s2 , respectively. Finally, the complementarity of high-accuracy and high-resolution Earth' s gravitational field recovery between international GRACE and GOCE missions is demonstrated.%为了研究卫星重力梯度技术对中高频地球重力场反演精度的影响,本文基于时空域混合法,利用Kaula正则化反演了250阶GOCE地球重力场.模拟结果表明:第一,时空域混合法是精确和快速求解高阶地球重力场的有效方法;第二,Kaula正则化是降低正规阵病态性的重要方法;第三,基于改进的预处理共轭梯度迭代法可快速求解大型线性方程组,计算速度较直接最小二乘法至少提高1000倍;第四,基于卫星轨道误差1 cm和卫星重力梯度误差3×10-12/s2,在250阶处反演累计大地水准面和重力异常的精度分别为9.295 cm和0.204 mGal.第五,论证了基于国际GRACE和GOCE卫星计划反演高精度和高空间分辨率地球重力场的互补性.

  17. A new degree-2190 (10 km resolution) gravity field model for Antarctica developed from GRACE, GOCE and Bedmap2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Christian; Rexer, Moritz; Scheinert, Mirko; Pail, Roland; Claessens, Sten; Holmes, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The current high-degree global geopotential models EGM2008 and EIGEN-6C4 resolve gravity field structures to ˜ 10 km spatial scales over most parts of the of Earth's surface. However, a notable exception is continental Antarctica, where the gravity information in these and other recent models is based on satellite gravimetry observations only, and thus limited to about ˜ 80-120 km spatial scales. Here, we present a new degree-2190 global gravity model (GGM) that for the first time improves the spatial resolution of the gravity field over the whole of continental Antarctica to ˜ 10 km spatial scales. The new model called SatGravRET2014 is a combination of recent Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite gravimetry with gravitational signals derived from the 2013 Bedmap2 topography/ice thickness/bedrock model with gravity forward modelling in ellipsoidal approximation. Bedmap2 is a significantly improved description of the topographic mass distribution over the Antarctic region based on a multitude of topographic surveys, and a well-suited source for modelling short-scale gravity signals as we show in our study. We describe the development of SatGravRET2014 which entirely relies on spherical harmonic modelling techniques. Details are provided on the least-squares combination procedures and on the conversion of topography to implied gravitational potential. The main outcome of our work is the SatGravRET2014 spherical harmonic series expansion to degree 2190, and derived high-resolution grids of 3D-synthesized gravity and quasigeoid effects over the whole of Antarctica. For validation, six data sets from the IAG Subcommission 2.4f "Gravity and Geoid in Antarctica" (AntGG) database were used comprising a total of 1,092,981 airborne gravimetric observations. All subsets consistently show that the Bedmap2-based short-scale gravity modelling improves the agreement over satellite

  18. SmallSats, Iodine Propulsion Technology, Applications to Low-Cost Lunar Missions, and the Iodine Satellite (iSAT) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Closing Remarks: ?(1) SmallSats hold significant potential for future low cost high value missions; (2) Propulsion remains a key limiting capability for SmallSats that Iodine can address: High ISP * Density for volume constrained spacecraft; Indefinite quiescence, unpressurized and non-hazardous as a secondary payload; (3) Iodine enables MicroSat and SmallSat maneuverability: Enables transfer into high value orbits, constellation deployment and deorbit; (4) Iodine may enable a new class of planetary and exploration class missions: Enables GTO launched secondary spacecraft to transit to the moon, asteroids, and other interplanetary destinations for approximately 150 million dollars full life cycle cost including the launch; (5) ESPA based OTVs are also volume constrained and a shift from xenon to iodine can significantly increase the transfer vehicle change in volume capability including transfers from GTO to a range of Lunar Orbits; (6) The iSAT project is a fast pace high value iodine Hall technology demonstration mission: Partnership with NASA GRC and NASA MSFC with industry partner - Busek; (7) The iSAT mission is an approved project with PDR in November of 2014 and is targeting a flight opportunity in FY17.

  19. De un sendero sacrificial surcado de goce // from a sacrificed path plow through of pleasure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orozco Guzmán

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo discierne un semblante maldito del sacrificio. En nombre del amor se ha idealizado el sacrificio como paradigma de su audacia y heroísmo, mientras la cultura se ha encargado de enaltecer la proeza sacrificial como puesta en acto del amor. El destinatario de esta inmolación suprema inscribe la producción del goce divino en calidad de objeto “a”, tal como lo revelan sacrificios paradigmáticos presentes en la historia y la literatura. // The current work discerns a cursed countenance from the sacrifice. The sacrifice has been idealized in love's name, as paradigm of its courage and heroism, meanwhile the culture has taken charge of dignifying the sacrificed feat as event in the love act. The addressee of this supreme immolation registers the production of the divine enjoyment as “a” object, just as it is revealed by paradigmatic sacrifices present on history and literature.

  20. Preface to the Special Issue on "Geophysical and Climate Change Studies in Tibet, Xinjiang, and Siberia (TibXS from Satellite Geodesy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue publishes papers on recent results in geophysical and climate change studies over Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia (TibXS based upon some of the key sensors used in satellite geodesy, including satellite gravimetric sensors (GRACE and GOCE, satellite altimeters (TOPEX, Jason-1 and -2, and ENVISAT, and Global Positioning System satellites. Results from ground- and airborne-based geodetic observations, notably those based on airborne gravimeter, superconducting gravimeter (SG and seismometers are also included in the special issue. In all, 22 papers were submitted for this special issue; 17 papers were accepted.

  1. Analysis of the accuracy of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height models using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Mukul; Vinee Srivastava; Malay Mukul

    2015-08-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) carried out in February 2000 has provided near global topographic data that has been widely used in many fields of earth sciences. The mission goal of an absolute vertical accuracy within 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ∼10 m was achieved based on ground validation of SRTM data through various studies using global positioning system (GPS). We present a new and independent assessment of the vertical accuracy of both the X- and C-band SRTM datasets using data from the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of high-precision static GPS stations. These stations exist worldwide, have better spatial distribution than previous studies, have a vertical accuracy of 6 mm and constitute the most accurate ground control points (GCPs) possible on earth; these stations are used as fiducial stations to define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Globally, for outlier-filtered data (135 X-band stations and 290 C-band stations), the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibits a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 8.2 ± 0.7 and 6.9 ± 0.5 m for X- and C-band data, respectively. Continent-wise, Africa, Australia and North America comply with the SRTM mission absolute vertical accuracy of 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ∼10 m. However, Asia, Europe and South America have vertical errors higher than the SRTM mission goal. At stations where both the X- and C-band SRTM data were present, the root mean square error (RMSE) of both the X- and C-bands was identical at 11.5 m, indicating similar quality of both the X- and C-band SRTM data.

  2. Assessment of the suitability of GOCE-based geoid models for the unification of the North American vertical datums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadiparvar, Babak; Sideris, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Precise gravimetric geoid heights are required when the unification of vertical datums is performed using the Geodetic Boundary Value Problem (GBVP) approach. Five generations of Global Geopotential Models (GGMs) derived from Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) observations have been computed and released so far (available via IAG's International Centre for Global Earth Models, ICGEM, http://icgem.gfz-potsdam.de/ICGEM/). The performance of many of these models with respect to geoid determination has been studied in order to select the best performing model to be used in height datum unification in North America. More specifically, Release-3, 4 and 5 of the GOCE-based global geopotential models have been evaluated using GNSS-levelling data as independent control values. Comparisons against EGM2008 show that each successive release improves upon the previous one, with Release-5 models showing an improvement over EGM2008 in Canada and CONUS between spherical harmonic degrees 100 and 210. In Alaska and Mexico, a considerable improvement over EGM2008 was brought by the Release-5 models when used up to spherical harmonic degrees of 250 and 280, respectively. The positive impact of the Release-5 models was also felt when a gravimetric geoid was computed using the GOCE-based GGMs together with gravity and topography data in Canada. This geoid model, with appropriately modified Stokes kernel between spherical harmonic degrees 190 and 260, performed better than the official Canadian gravimetric geoid model CGG2013, thus illustrating the advantages of using the latest release GOCE-based models for vertical datum unification in North America.

  3. La mercancía como imperativo de goce en la no relación con el otro

    OpenAIRE

    Montealegre Pabello, Fernando Michel

    2013-01-01

    La economía fetichista está basada en intercambios donde lo único que sostiene al dinero en sí, es la deuda misma (préstamos bancarios, hipotecas, tarjetas de crédito) y el cuerpo como mercancía/objeto con lo que podría pensarse que lo que intercambia el sujeto no es una mercancía sino su mismo goce como excedente o plus capitalizado.

  4. Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalmeir, Michael; Gataullin, Yunir; Indrajit, Agung

    HERMES (Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite) is potential European satellite mission for global flood management, being implemented by Technical University Munich and European Space Agency. With its main instrument - a reliable and precise Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna...

  5. Main methods of trajectory synthesis for scenarios of space missions with gravity assist maneuvers in the system of Jupiter and with landing on one of its satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Yu. F.; Tuchin, A. G.; Grushevskii, A. V.; Koryanov, V. V.; Tuchin, D. A.; Morskoy, I. M.; Simonov, A. V.; Dobrovolskii, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a methodology for designing trajectories of spacecraft intended for the contact and remote studies of Jupiter and its natural satellites is considered. This methodology should take into account a number of specific features. Firstly, in order to maintain the propellant consumption at an acceptable level, the flight profile, ensuring the injection of the spacecraft into orbit around the Jovian moon, should include a large number of gravity assist maneuvers both in the interplanetary phase of the Earth-to-Jupiter flight and during the flight in the system of the giant planet. Secondly, the presence of Jupiter's powerful radiation belts also imposes fairly strict limitations on the trajectory parameters.

  6. An approach to Moho discontinuity recovery from on-orbit GOCE data with application over Indo-Pak region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Hussain, Matloob

    2016-10-01

    In this research, a modified form of Vening Meinesz-Moritz (VMM) theory of isostasy for the second-order radial derivative of gravitational potential, measured from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), is developed for local Moho depth recovery. An integral equation is organised for inverting the GOCE data to compute a Moho model in combination with topographic/bathymetric heights of SRTM30, sediment and consolidated crystalline basement and the laterally-varying density contrast model of CRUST1.0. A Moho model from EGM2008 to degree and order 180 is also computed based on the same principle for the purpose of comparison. In addition, we compare both of them with the 3 available seismic Moho models; two global and one regional over the Indo-Pak region. Numerical results show that our GOCE-based Moho model is closer to the all seismic models than that of EGM2008. The model is closest to the regional one with a standard deviation of 5.5 km and a root mean squares error of 7.8 km, which is 2.3 km smaller than the corresponding one based on EGM2008.

  7. Impact of GPS tracking data of LEO satellites on global GPS solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothacher, M.; Svehla, D.

    Already at present quite a few Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites (SAC-C, CHAMP, JASON-1, GRACE-1 and GRACE-2) are equipped with one or more GPS receivers for precise orbit determination or other applications (atmospheric sounding, gravity field recovery, . . . ). This trend will continue in the near future (e.g., with the GOCE and COSMIC missions) and we will soon have an entire "constellation" of LEO satellites tracked by GPS at our disposal. In this contribution we want to study the impact of LEO GPS measurements (from a single LEO satellite or from a LEO constellation) on global GPS solutions, where GPS satellite orbits and clocks, Earth rotation parameters (ERPs), station coordinates and troposphere zenith delays are determined simultaneously using the data of the global network of the International GPS Service (IGS). In order to assess the impact of the LEO GPS data on global IGS results, we have to perform a combined analysis of the space-borne and the ground-based GPS data. Such a combination may benefit on one hand from the differences between a ground station and a LEO, e.g., (1) the different tracking geometry (coverage of isolated geographical areas by LEOs, rapidly changing geometry, . . . ), (2) that LEOs connect all ground stations within 1-2 hours, (3) that baselines between LEO and ground stations may be longer than station-station baselines, (4) that no tropospheric delays have to be estimated for LEOs, and (5) that LEOs orbit the Earth within the ionosphere and may therefore contribute to global ionosphere models. On the other hand we have to deal with difficult aspects of precise orbit determination for the LEOs: only if we succeed to obtain very accurate dynamic or reduced-dynamic orbits for the LEOs, we will have a chance at all to improve the global GPS results. We present first results concerning the influence of LEO data on GPS orbits, ERPs, site coordinates, and troposphere zenith delays using both, variance-covariance analyses based on

  8. Contribution of GNSS CORS Infrastructure to the Mission of Modern Geodesy and Status of GNSS CORS in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalermchon Satirapod

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geodesy is the science of measuring and mapping the geometry, orientation and gravity field of the Earth including the associated variations with time. Geodesy has also provided the foundation for high accuracy surveying and mapping. Modern Geodesy involves a range of space and terrestrial technologies that contribute to our knowledge of the solid earth, atmosphere and oceans. These technologies include: Global Positioning System/Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GPS/GNSS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI, Satellite Altimetry, Gravity Mapping Missions such as GRACE, CHAMP and GOCE, satelliteborne Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR, Absolute and Relative Gravimetry, and Precise Terrestrial Surveying (Levelling and Traversing. A variety of services have been established in recent years to ensure high accuracy and reliable geodetic products to support geoscientific research. The reference frame defined by Modern Geodesy is now the basis for most national and regional datums. Furthermore, the GPS/GNSS technology is a crucial geopositioning tool for both Geodesy and Surveying. There is therefore a blurring of the distinction between geodetic and surveying GPS/GNSS techniques, and increasingly the ground infrastructure of continuously operating reference stations (CORS receivers attempts to address the needs of both geodesists and other positioning professionals. Yet Geodesy is also striving to increase the level of accuracy by a factor of ten over the next decade in order to address the demands of “global change” studies. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS is an important component of the International Association of Geodesy. GGOS aims to integrate all geodetic observations in order to generate a consistent high quality set of geodetic parameters for monitoring the phenomena and processes within the “System Earth”. Integration implies the inclusion of all relevant

  9. Athena Mission Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Rau, Arne

    2015-09-01

    The optimization of the Athena mission, the ESA's large X-ray observatory for 2028, is a key challenge. Critical elements for achieving the scientific performances are obviously the two instruments and the optics. However, additional aspects related to the overall mission performances are crucial as well, including the particle background environment (separate presentation), the calibration, the response time to Target of Opportunity requests, the functionality of the science ground segment, and the available high-quality data analysis tools. In addition, the full performance of the satellite will be modeled by an end-to-end simulator. In this presentation we will give an overview of the various systems and also present the Mock Observing Plan that is used to optimize the mission. The work presented in this contribution is based on a collective effort of the Athena science community and is coordinated by the Athena Mission Performance Working Group.

  10. Virtual Satellite Integration Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated environment for rapid design studies of small satellite missions will be developed. This environment will be designed to streamline processes at the...

  11. Virtual Satellite Integration Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advatech Pacific proposes to develop a Virtual Satellite Integration Environment (VSIE) for the NASA Ames Mission Design Center. The VSIE introduces into NASA...

  12. User requirements and user acceptance of current and next-generation satellite mission and sensor complement, oriented toward the monitoring of water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.; Fowler, T. R.; Robinson, P.

    1975-01-01

    Principal water resources users were surveyed to determine the applicability of remotely sensed data to their present and future requirements. Analysis of responses was used to assess the levels of adequacy of LANDSAT 1 and 2 in fulfilling hydrological functions, and to derive systems specifications for future water resources-oriented remote sensing satellite systems. The analysis indicates that water resources applications for all but the very large users require: (1) resolutions on the order of 15 meters, (2) a number of radiometric levels of the same order as currently used in LANDSAT 1 (64), (3) a number of spectral bands not in excess of those used in LANDSAT 1, and (4) a repetition frequency on the order of 2 weeks. The users had little feel for the value of new sensors (thermal IR, passive and active microwaves). What is needed in this area is to achieve specific demonstrations of the utility of these sensors and submit the results to the users to evince their judgement.

  13. The Simbox Experiment with Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures: Hardware-Tests and First Resutls from the German-Chinese satellite Mission Shenzhou 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengler, Svenja; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Ruediger

    2013-02-01

    The Simbox experiment was the first joint German-Chinese space project. In this context Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures were exposed to microgravity for a 17-day period. To carry out a successful space mission, diverse hardware tests were performed in advance. Due to the limited oxygen supply inside the hardware units, cells were fixed after 5 days under microgravity conditions. As a control, samples were exposed in an on-board 1g reference centrifuge. To investigate the space effect, a ground-based study was performed with the same hardware and identical experimental procedures. As we were able to obtain high quality RNA from the RNAlater quenched samples, we used the Affymetrix Arabidopsis genome array for a transcriptome analysis. Our experiment aimed at the identification of plant genes that were differentially expressed after long-term exposure to microgravity. Pair-wise comparison of flight samples with 1g controls revealed the largest differences between space 1g and ground 1g controls.

  14. The Sentinel-3 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berruti, B.; Mavrocordatos, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Sentinel-3 Operational Mission is part of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, which was established to support Europe's goals regarding sustainable development and global governance of the environment by providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge. The series of Sentinel-3 satellites will ensure global, frequent and near-realtime ocean, ice and land monitoring, with the provision of observation data in routine, long term (20 years of operations) and continuous fashion, with a consistent quality and a very high level of availability. The first launch is expected in 2013. Currently half way through the development phase of the project, this paper presents the consolidated Sentinel-3 design and expected performances related to the different mission objectives (ocean colour, altimetry, surface temperature, land). The operational concept and key system performances are also addressed, as well as the satellite and instruments design. Finally, the schedule for the remaining development is presented.

  15. The DTU13 MSS (Mean Sea Surface) and MDT (Mean Dynamic Topography) from 20 Years of Satellite Altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Stenseng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    enables the determination of sea level in leads in the ice, which has enabled us to derive an accurate MSS all the way to 88°N.With the availability to determine the geoid with higher accuracy than ever before due to the launch of the GRACE and GOCE satellites, is hence become possible to derive...... a satellite only mean dynamic topography (MDT) from the difference between the MSS and the geoid. Here the DTU13MSS and DTU13MDT are presented and we demonstrate how these can be used to derive realistic geostrophic currents in the world’s ocean comparable to oceanographic derived MDT....

  16. Gas mission; Mission gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This preliminary report analyses the desirable evolutions of gas transport tariffing and examines some questions relative to the opening of competition on the French gas market. The report is made of two documents: a synthesis of the previous report with some recommendations about the tariffing of gas transport, about the modalities of network access to third parties, and about the dissociation between transport and trade book-keeping activities. The second document is the progress report about the opening of the French gas market. The first part presents the European problem of competition in the gas supply and its consequences on the opening and operation of the French gas market. The second part presents some partial syntheses about each topic of the mission letter of the Ministry of Economics, Finances and Industry: future evolution of network access tariffs, critical analysis of contractual documents for gas transport and delivery, examination of auxiliary services linked with the access to the network (modulation, balancing, conversion), consideration about the processing of network congestions and denied accesses, analysis of the metering dissociation between the integrated activities of gas operators. Some documents are attached in appendixes: the mission letter from July 9, 2001, the detailed analysis of the new temporary tariffs of GdF and CFM, the offer of methane terminals access to third parties, the compatibility of a nodal tariffing with the presence of three transport operators (GdF, CFM and GSO), the contract-type for GdF supply, and the contract-type for GdF connection. (J.S.)

  17. Towards improved estimation of the dynamic topography and ocean circulation in the high latitude and arctic ocean: The importance of GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, J. A.; Raj, R. P.; Nilsen, J. E. Ø.

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic plays a fundamental role in the climate system and shows significant sensitivity to anthropogenic climate forcing and the ongoing climate change. Evidently changes in the Arctic and surrounding seas have far reaching influences on regional and global environment and climate variability...... dynamic topography for studies of the ocean circulation and transport estimates in the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean........ In this respect this study combines in-situ hydrographical data, surface drifter data and direct current meter measurements, with coupled sea ice - ocean models, radar altimeter data and the latest GOCE-based geoid in order to estimate and assess the quality, usefulness and validity of the new GOCE derived mean...

  18. Heterogeneity of the North Atlantic oceanic lithosphere based on integrated analysis of GOCE satellite gravity and geological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barantseva, Olga; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2015-01-01

    bathymetry, whereas the northern part of the region is characterized by ultraslow spreading. In order to understand the links between deep geodynamical processes that control the spreading rate, on one hand, and their manifestations such as oceanic floor bathymetry and heat flow, on the other hand, we model...

  19. Exploration Missions to Host Small Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, Jonathan; Pelfrey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The next-generation heavy launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS), will provide the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the exploration mission trajectory. We will describe the payload mission concept of operations, the payload capacity for the SLS, and the payload requirements. Exploration Mission 1, currently planned for launch in December 2017, will be the first mission to carry such payloads on the SLS.

  20. La invención Lacaniana del concepto de goce. (The Lacanian Invention of the Concept of Jouissance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Javier Bonoris

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumen En el siguiente trabajo nos proponemos hacer un recorrido por el concepto de goce en la obra de Lacan. En primer lugar, intentaremos demostrar que Lacan inventó la noción de goce para remediar los escollos teóricos y clínicos que implicaban las hipótesis freudianas sobre la pulsión y el problema de la satisfacción en psicoanálisis. Por otro lado, se considerarán los lineamientos principales de algunos seguidores de Lacan sobre el goce, para compararlos con las ideas freudianas y las del propio Lacan. Por último, se abordará este concepto específicamente desde la obra de Lacan, aspirando a encontrar su particularidad y la novedad teórica que introduce en la teoría psicoanalítica. Palabras Clave: goce, cuerpo, saber, escritura. Abstract This paper is intended as a review of the concept of jouissance in Lacan's work. First, it will try to demonstrate that Lacan invented the notion of jouissance to remedy the theoretical and clinical pitfalls implied in Freudian hypotheses on drive and the problem of satisfaction in psychoanalysis. Then, it will consider the main ideas of some followers of Lacan in relation to jouissance in order to compare them with Freud and Lacan's ideas. Finally, this concept will be specifically addressed from Lacan's work, aiming to find its particularity and the theoretical novelty that it introduces in the psychoanalytic theory. Keywords: jouissance, body, knowledge, writing. Résumé Cet article a pour but de faire un examen du concept de jouissance chez Lacan. Dans un premier temps, l'on essayera de démontrer que Lacan a créé la notion de jouissance afin de remédier les obstacles théoriques et cliniques des hypothèses freudiennes sur la pulsion et sur le problème de la satisfaction en psychanalyse. Ensuite, l'on examinera les principales positions de quelques disciples de Lacan par rapport à la jouissance, afin de les comparer avec les idées freudiennes et celles de Lacan. Finalement, l

  1. Improved representations of the Mediterranean Geoid within the GEOMED 2 project. Contributions of local gravity, GOCE and Cryosat2 data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barzaghi, Riccardo; Vergos, George S.; Albertella, Alberta

    )-based techniques have provided the geoid estimation in the frequency domain. In this work, the pre-processing steps consisting in merging and validating all the available gravity observations for the wider Mediterranean are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the latest basin-wide geoid models are estimated from...... of a Mediterranean-wide gravity database. The data employed within GEOMED 2 for the determination of the marine geoid are land and marine gravity data, GOCE/GRACE based Global Geopotential Models and a combination of MISTRAL and SRTM/bathymetry terrain models. The processing methodology will be based on the well...

  2. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  3. The PROBA-3 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    PROBA-3 is the next ESA mission in the PROBA line of small technology demonstration satellites. The main goal of PROBA-3 is in-orbit demonstration of formation flying techniques and technologies. The mission will consist of two spacecraft together forming a giant (150 m long) coronagraph called ASPIICS (Association of Spacecraft for Polarimetric and Imaging Investigation of the Corona of the Sun). The bigger spacecraft will host the telescope, and the smaller spacecraft will carry the external occulter of the coronagraph. ASPIICS heralds the next generation of solar coronagraphs that will use formation flying to observe the inner corona in eclipse-like conditions for extended periods of time. The occulter spacecraft will also host the secondary payload, DARA (Davos Absolute RAdiometer), that will measure the total solar irradiance. PROBA-3 is planned to be launched in 2019. The scientific objectives of PROBA-3 will be discussed in the context of other future solar and heliospheric space missions.

  4. The Hinode Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The Solar-B satellite was launched in 2006 by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), and was renamed Hinode ('sunrise' in Japanese). Hinode carries three instruments: the X-ray telescope (XRT), the EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS), and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). These instruments were developed by ISAS/JAXA in cooperation with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan as domestic partner, and NASA and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK) as international partners. ESA and the Norwegian Space Center have been providing a downlink station. The Hinode (Solar-B) Mission gives a comprehensive description of the Hinode mission and its instruments onboard. This book is most useful for researchers, professionals, and graduate students working in the field of solar physics, astronomy, and space instrumentation. This is the only book that carefully describes the details of the Hinode mission; it is richly illustrated with full-color ima...

  5. COMS normal operation for Earth Observation mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Min

    2012-09-01

    Communication Ocean Meteorological Satellite (COMS) for the hybrid mission of meteorological observation, ocean monitoring, and telecommunication service was launched onto Geostationary Earth Orbit on June 27, 2010 and it is currently under normal operation service since April 2011. The COMS is located on 128.2° East of the geostationary orbit. In order to perform the three missions, the COMS has 3 separate payloads, the meteorological imager (MI), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), and the Ka-band antenna. Each payload is dedicated to one of the three missions, respectively. The MI and GOCI perform the Earth observation mission of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively. For this Earth observation mission the COMS requires daily mission commands from the satellite control ground station and daily mission is affected by the satellite control activities. For this reason daily mission planning is required. The Earth observation mission operation of COMS is described in aspects of mission operation characteristics and mission planning for the normal operation services of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring. And the first year normal operation results after the In-Orbit-Test (IOT) are investigated through statistical approach to provide the achieved COMS normal operation status for the Earth observation mission.

  6. Tres cuerpos y un solo goce verdadero. // Three bodies and only one real pleasure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Uribe Cano.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Talking about body from a positivist perspective means the appearance of the body-soul duality; nevertheless, from an analytical viewpoint, we understand that the body, as a receptacle of the human, is paradoxically unrelated and ominous to ourselves. So, to apprehend such a concept it is necessary a topology of it in order to be different from being and entity. The text analyses what makes psychoanalysis different from other practices: its interpretation of the body as inhabited by the libido and its chance of pleasure mediated by the appearance of the signifier, going through the desire, the request and the sexuality; moments that, as well as psychism, inaugurate a real, symbolic and imaginary body as logs allowing its unification and the appearance of a fourth differentiating element, the enjoying substance and its topologic tying function. // Hablar de cuerpo, desde una perspectiva positivista, supone la aparición de la dualidad cuerpo-alma; empero, desde una óptica analítica, tenemos que el cuerpo, en tanto receptáculo de lo humano, es paradójicamente, ajeno y ominoso a nosotros mismos. De aquí que para aprehender dicho concepto sea necesaria una topología del mismo para diferenciarse de ser y ente. El texto examina lo que diferencia al psicoanálisis de otras praxis: su apreciación del cuerpo como habitado por la libido y su posibilidad de goce mediada por la aparición del significante, pasando por el deseo, la demanda y la sexualidad; momentos que además del psiquismo, inauguran un cuerpo real, simbólico e imaginario como registros que posibilitan su unificación y la aparición de un cuarto elemento diferenciador, la substancia gozante y su función de anudación topológica.

  7. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  8. First China-Europe Satellite Successfully Launched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeYing

    2004-01-01

    On December 30, 2003 China successfully launched TC-1,the first of two scientific satellites known as Double Star, The mission,the first time that European instruments were integrated with Chinese satellites,was carried out by a Long March 2C/SM rocket at 3:06 am from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan province.

  9. Improvement of least-squares collocation error estimates using local GOCE Tzz signal standard deviations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2015-01-01

    The method of Least-Squares Collocation (LSC) may be used for the modeling of the anomalous gravity potential (T) and for the computation (prediction) of quantities related to T by a linear functional. Errors may also be estimated. However, when using an isotropic covariance function or equivalen...... on gravity anomalies (at 10 km altitude) predicted from GOCE Tzz. This has given an improved agreement between errors based on the differences between values derived from EGM2008 (to degree 512) and predicted gravity anomalies.......The method of Least-Squares Collocation (LSC) may be used for the modeling of the anomalous gravity potential (T) and for the computation (prediction) of quantities related to T by a linear functional. Errors may also be estimated. However, when using an isotropic covariance function or equivalent...... outside the data area. On the other hand, a comparison of predicted quantities with observed values show that the error also varies depending on the local data standard deviation. This quantity may be (and has been) estimated using the GOCE second order vertical derivative, Tzz, in the area covered...

  10. The Use of GOCE/GRACE Information in the Latest NGS xGeoid15 Model for the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, S. A.; Li, X.; Youngman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through its Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, is flying airborne gravity surveys over the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Towards this end, all available airborne data has been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID15. The xGEOID15 model is the second in a series of annual experimental geoid models that incorporates NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques, to ultimately compute a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here, we focus on the combination of the latest GOCE/GRACE models with the terrestrial gravimetry (land/airborne) that was applied for xGeoid15. Comparisons against existing combination gravitational solutions, such as EGM2008 and EIGEN6C4, as well as recent geoid models, such as xGeoid14 and CGG2013, are interesting for what they reveal about the respective use of the GOCE/GRACE satgrav information.

  11. Autonomous Attitude Determination and Control System for the Ørsted Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Wisniewski, Rafal; Blanke, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system.......The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system....

  12. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Ancillary Files, 2015- (NCEI Accession 0122596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  13. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Auxiliary Files, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122597)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  14. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Telemetry, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122599)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  15. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Orbital Information, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  16. I satelliti della missione EROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano De Corso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available EROS mission satellitesThe EROS (Earth Remote Observation Satellite constellation is property of ImageSat International N.V. an international company and a commercial provider of high-resolution, satellite earth-imagery collected by its Earth Remote Observation Satellite. EROS A is equipped with a camera whose focal plane of CCD (Charge Coupled Device detectors produces a standard image resolution of 1.9 meters. EROS B slightly larger and similar in appearance to EROS A, the new satellite has superior capabilities, including a larger camera of CCD/ TDI type (Charge Coupled Device/Time Delay Integration, with standard panchromatic resolution of 0.70 m at an altitude of about 500 km, a larger on-board recorder, improved pointing accuracy and a faster data communication link.

  17. The SSETI-express Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Melville, N.

    provides a description of the organisation behind the project and the mission of the satellite. Further it provides a technical overview of both the space segment and the ground segment together with key lessons learnt from the process of building a student satellite with widely distributed teams.......In January 2004 a group of students met at the European Space Technology and Research Centre (ESTEC) in Holland to discuss the feasibility of building a micro-satellite, dubbed SSETI-Express, from parts derived from other student satellite projects and launch it within one and a half year....... The project is an initiative under the ESA Education Department and the Student Space Exploration and Technology Initiative (SSETI)[3], an European student organisation. The satellite is currently scheduled for launch on the 30th of June 2005 atop a "Cosmos" launch vehicle from Plesetsk in Russia. This paper...

  18. KuaFu Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lidong; TU Chuanyi; Schwenn Rainer; Donovan Eric; Marsch Eckart; WANG Jingsong; ZHANG Yongwei; XIAO Zuo

    2006-01-01

    The KuaFu mission-Space Storms, Aurora and Space Weather Explorer-is an "L1+Polar" triple satellite project composed of three spacecraft: KuaFu-A will be located at L1 and have instruments to observe solar EUV and FUV emissions, and white-light Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and to measure radio waves, the local plasma and magnetic field,and high-energy particles. KuaFuB1 and KuaFu- B2 will bein polar orbits chosen to facilitate continuous 24 hours a day observation of the north polar Aurora Oval. The KuaFu mission is designed to observe the complete chain of disturbances from the solar atmosphere to geospace, including solar flares, CMEs, interplanetary clouds, shock waves, and their geo-effects, such as magnetospheric sub-storms and magnetic storms, and auroral activities. The mission may start at the next solar maximum (launch in about 2012), and with an initial mission lifetime of two to three years. KuaFu data will be used for the scientific study of space weather phenomena, and will be used for space weather monitoring and forecast purposes. The overall mission design, instrument complement, and incorporation of recent technologies will target new fundamental science, advance our understanding of the physical processes underlying space weather, and raise the standard of end-to-end monitoring of the Sun-Earth system.

  19. Free Fall tests for the qualification of Ultra sensitive accelerometers for space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Françoise, Liorzou; Pierre, Marque Jean; Santos Rodrigues, Manuel

    ONERA is developing since a long time accelerometers for space applications in the field of Earth Observations and Fundamental Physics. The more recent examples are the accelerom-eters embarked on the ESA GOCE mission launched in March 2009, dedicated to the Earth precise gravity field mapping, and the accelerometers of the CNES MICROSCOPE mission dedicated to the in orbit test of the Equivalence Principle. Those Ultra sensitive accelerome-ters are optimised for the space environment and operate over an acceleration range less than 10-6 ms-2 with an outstanding accuracy around 10-12 ms-2Hz1/2. Their testability on ground requires creating a low gravity environment in order to verify their functionalities and partially their performances before their delivery before launch. Free fall tests are the only way to ob-tain such a microgravity environment in representating space conditions. The presentation will show in a first part the results of the free fall test campaigns performed in the 120-meter high ZARM drop tower that have led to the qualification of the GOCE accelerometers. In a second part, it will describe the test plan being conducted to assess the best free-fall environment for the MICROSCOPE accelerometers. In particular, some efforts have been paid by ZARM and ONERA to develop a dedicated "free-flyer"capsule, in order to reduce the residual drag acceleration along the fall. Some results from the preliminary tests performed in preparation to the MICROSCOPE qualification campaign will be also presented.

  20. Internet-Protocol-Based Satellite Bus Architecture Designed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slywczak, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA is designing future complex satellite missions ranging from single satellites and constellations to space networks and sensor webs. These missions require more interoperability, autonomy, and coordination than previous missions; in addition, a desire exists to have scientists retrieve data directly from the satellite rather than a central distribution source. To meet these goals, NASA has been studying the possibility of extending the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite for spacebased applications.

  1. Plan of advanced satellite communication experiments using ETS-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi

    1989-01-01

    In 1992, an Engineering Test Satellite 6 is scheduled to be launched by an H-2 rocket. The missions of ETS-6 are to establish basic technologies of inter-satellite communications using S-band, millimeter waves and optical beams and of fixed and mobile satellite communications using multibeam antenna on board the satellite. A plan of the experiments is introduced.

  2. GOCE-based height system unification between Greece and Turkey. First considerations over marine and land areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergos, Georgios S.; Erol, Bihter; Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Grigoriadis, Vassilios N.; Serkan Işık, Mustafa; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2016-04-01

    The unification of local vertical Datums (LVDs) at a country-wide scale has gained significant attention lately, due to the availability of GOCE-based Global Geopotential Models (GGMs). The latter, offer unprecedented geoid height accuracies at the 1-1.5 cm level for spherical harmonic expansions to d/o 225-230. Within a single country, several LVDs may be used, especially in the event of islandic nations, therefore the unification of all of them to a single nation-wide LVD is of utmost importance. The same holds for neighboring countries, where the unification of their vertical datums is necessary as a tool of engineering, cross-border collaboration and environmental and risk management projects. The aforementioned set the main scope of the work carried out in the frame of the present study, which referred to the use of GOCE and GOCE/GRACE GGMs in order to unify the LVDs of Greece and Turkey. It is well-known that the two countries share common borders and are a path for large-scale engineering projects in the energy sector. Therefore, the availability of a common reference for orthometric heights in both countries and/or the determination of the relative offset of their individual zero-level geopotential value poses an emerging issue. The determination of the geopotential value Wo(LVD) for the Greek and Turkish LVDs was first carried out separately for each region performing as well different estimates for the marine area of the Aegean Sea and the terrestrial border-region along eastern Thrace. From that, possible biases of the Hellenic and Turkish LVDs themselves have been drawn and analyzed to determine spatial correlations. Then, the relative offset between the two LVDs was determined employing GPS/Levelling data for both areas and the latest GO-DIR-R5, GO-TIM-R5 and GOCO05s models as well as EGM2008. The estimation of the mean offset was used to provide as well a direct link between the Greek and Turkish LVDs with the IAG conventional value recently proposed

  3. The Ballerina experiment on the Romer mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian

    2001-01-01

    The Romer mission has recently been approved as the next mission within the Danish Small Satellite Program. The scientific payload will consist of two separate experiments, the MONS and the Ballerina payloads. The primary objective of Ballerina is to provide accurate, real-time positions relayed...

  4. The THEMIS Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, J. L

    2009-01-01

    The THEMIS mission aims to determine the trigger and large-scale evolution of substorms by employing five identical micro-satellites which line up along the Earth's magnetotail to track the motion of particles, plasma, and waves from one point to another and for the first time, resolve space-time ambiguities in key regions of the magnetosphere on a global scale. The primary goal of THEMIS is to elucidate which magnetotail process is responsible for substorm onset at the region where substorm auroras map: (i) local disruption of the plasma sheet current (current disruption) or (ii) the interaction of the current sheet with the rapid influx of plasma emanating from reconnection. The probes also traverse the radiation belts and the dayside magnetosphere, allowing THEMIS to address additional baseline objectives. This volume describes the mission, the instrumentation, and the data derived from them.

  5. Introductory remarks to the mission and system aspects session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Rene; Schuyer, M.

    1991-12-01

    A brief history of the measurement of Earth potential fields is presented. The scientific objectives of the Aristoteles mission are summarized. Cooperation between NASA and ESA in developing the Aristoteles mission constraints are presented in tabular form. Correspondence between major mission and technical constraints is discussed. Program status of the Aristoteles mission and the mission baseline are described. The planned configuration of the Aristoteles satellite is shown in diagrammatic form.

  6. Technology demonstration by the BIRD-mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briess, K.; Barwald, W.; Gill, E.; Kayal, H.; Montenbruck, O.; Montenegro, S.; Halle, W.; Skrbek, W.; Studemund, H.; Terzibaschian, T.; Venus, H. [DLR, Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Weltraumsensor & Planetenerkundung

    2005-01-01

    The (BIRD)-mission is dedicated to the remote sensing of hot spot events like vegetation fires, coal seam fires or active volcanoes from space and to the space demonstration of new technologies. For these objectives a lot of new small satellite technologies and a new generation of cooled infrared array sensors suitable for small satellite missions are developed to fulfil the high scientific requirements of the mission. The paper describes the new developed technologies like onboard navigation system, the high-performance failure tolerant spacecraft computer, the precision reaction wheels, the star sensor, the attitude control system, the onboard classification experiment and the results and flight experience up to now.

  7. Optical Payload for the STARE Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

    2011-03-13

    Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

  8. Cibola flight experiment satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P.; Liddle, Doug; Paffett, John; Sweeting, Martin; Curiel, A.; Sun, Wei; Eves, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    In order to achieve an "economy of scale" with respect to payload capacity the major trend in telecommunications satellites is for larger and larger platforms. With these large platforms the level of integration between platform and payload is increasing leading to longer delivery schedules. The typical lifecycle for procurement of these large telecommunications satellites is now 3-6 years depending on the level of non-recurring engineering needed. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has designed a low-cost platform aimed at telecommunications and navigation applications. SSTL's Geostationary Minisatellite Platform (GMP) is a new entrant addressing the lower end of the market with payloads up to 250kg requiring less than 1.5 kW power. The British National Space Centre through the MOSAIC Small Satellite Initiative supported the development of GMP. The main design goals for GMP are low-cost for the complete mission including launch and operations and a platform allowing flexible payload accommodation. GMP is specifically designed to allow rapid development and deployment with schedules typically between 1 and 2 years from contract signature to flight readiness. GMP achieves these aims by a modular design where the level of integration between the platform and payload is low. The modular design decomposes the satellite into three major components - the propulsion bay, the avionics bay and the payload module. Both the propulsion and avionics bays are reusable, largely unchanged, and independent of the payload configuration. Such a design means that SSTL or a 3rd party manufacturer can manufacture the payload in parallel to the platform with integration taking place quite late in the schedule. In July 2003 SSTL signed a contract for ESA's first Galileo navigation satellite known as GSTBV2/A. The satellite is based on GMP and ESA plan to launch it into a MEO orbit late in 2005. The second flight of GMP is likely to be in 2006 carrying a geostationary payload

  9. ESA CHEOPS mission: development status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, N.; Asquier, J.; Corral Van Damme, C.; Isaak, K.; Ratti, F.; Safa, F.; Southworth, R.; Broeg, C.; Benz, W.

    2016-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Science Programme Committee (SPC) selected CHEOPS (Characterizing Exoplanets Satellite) in October 2012 as the first S-class mission (S1) within the Agency's Scientific Programme, targeting launch readiness by the end of 2017. The CHEOPS mission is devoted to the first-step characterization of known exoplanets orbiting bright stars, to be achieved through the precise measurement of exo-planet radii using the technique of transit photometry. It is implemented as a partnership between ESA and a consortium of Member States led by Switzerland. CHEOPS is considered as a pilot case for implementing "small science missions" in ESA with the following requirements: science driven missions selected through an open Call for missions (bottom-up process); spacecraft development schedule much shorter than for M and L missions, in the range of 4 years; and cost-capped missions to ESA with possibly higher Member States involvement than for M or L missions. The paper describes the CHEOPS development status, focusing on the performed hardware manufacturing and test activities.

  10. Sentinel-2 Mission status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoersch, Bianca; Colin, Olivier; Gascon, Ferran; Arino, Olivier; Spoto, Francois; Marchese, Franco; Krassenburg, Mike; Koetz, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Copernicus is a joint initiative of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA), designed to establish a European capacity for the provision and use of operational monitoring information for environment and security applications. Within the Copernicus programme, ESA is responsible for the development of the Space Component, a fully operational space-based capability to supply earth-observation data to sustain environmental information Services in Europe. The Sentinel missions are Copernicus dedicated Earth Observation missions composing the essential elements of the Space Component. In the global Copernicus framework, they are complemented by other satellites made available by third-parties or by ESA and coordinated in the synergistic system through the Copernicus Data-Access system versus the Copernicus Services. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission provides continuity to services relying on multi-spectral high-resolution optical observations over global terrestrial surfaces. Sentinel-2 capitalizes on the technology and the vast experience acquired in Europe and the US to sustain the operational supply of data for services such as forest monitoring, land cover changes detection or natural disasters management. The Sentinel-2 mission offers an unprecedented combination of the following capabilities: ○ Systematic global coverage of land surfaces: from 56°South to 84°North, coastal waters and Mediterranean sea; ○ High revisit: every 5 days at equator under the same viewing conditions with 2 satellites; ○ High spatial resolution: 10m, 20m and 60m; ○ Multi-spectral information with 13 bands in the visible, near infra-red and short wave infra-red part of the spectrum; ○ Wide field of view: 290 km. The data from the Sentinel-2 mission are available openly and freely for all users with online easy access since December 2015. The presentation will give a status report on the Sentinel-2 mission, and outlook for the remaining ramp-up Phase, the

  11. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P. (Compiler)

    2016-01-01

    This is a software tutorial and presentation demonstrating the application of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) to the critical design phase of NASA missions. The demonstration discusses GMAT basics, then presents a detailed example of GMAT application to the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. Other examples include OSIRIS-Rex. This talk is a combination of existing presentations; a GMAT basics and overview, and technical presentations from the TESS and OSIRIS-REx projects on their application of GMAT to critical mission design. The GMAT basics slides are taken from the open source training material. The OSIRIS-REx slides are from a previous conference presentation. The TESS slides are a streamlined version of the CDR package provided by the project with SBU and ITAR data removed by the TESS project.

  12. The Asteroid Impact Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, Ian; Galvez, Andres; Mellab, Karim

    2016-04-01

    radar facilities. For the first time, an impact experiment at asteroid scale will be performed with accurate knowledge of the precise impact conditions and also the impact outcome, together with information on the physical properties of the target, ultimately validating at appropriate scales our knowledge of the process and impact simulations. AIM's important technology demonstration component includes a deep-space optical communication terminal and inter-satellite network with two CubeSats deployed in the vicinity of the Didymos system and a lander on the surface of the secondary. To achieve a low-cost objective AIM's technology and scientific payload are being combined to support both close-proximity navigation and scientific investigations. AIM will demonstrate the capability to achieve a small spacecraft design with a very large technological and scientific mission return.

  13. MIOSAT Mission Scenario and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostara, C.; Dionisio, C.; Sgroi, G.; di Salvo, A.

    2008-08-01

    MIOSAT ("Mssione Ottica su microSATellite") is a low-cost technological / scientific microsatellite mission for Earth Observation, funded by Italian Space Agency (ASI) and managed by a Group Agreement between Rheinmetall Italia - B.U. Spazio - Contraves as leader and Carlo Gavazzi Space as satellite manufacturer. Several others Italians Companies, SME and Universities are involved in the development team with crucial roles. MIOSAT is a microsatellite weighting around 120 kg and placed in a 525 km altitude sun-synchronuos circular LEO orbit. The microsatellite embarks three innovative optical payloads: Sagnac multi spectral radiometer (IFAC-CNR), Mach Zehender spectrometer (IMM-CNR), high resolution pancromatic camera (Selex Galileo). In addition three technological experiments will be tested in-flight. The first one is an heat pipe based on Marangoni effect with high efficiency. The second is a high accuracy Sun Sensor using COTS components and the last is a GNSS SW receiver that utilizes a Leon2 processor. Finally a new generation of 28% efficiency solar cells will be adopted for the power generation. The platform is highly agile and can tilt along and cross flight direction. The pointing accuracy is in the order of 0,1° for each axe. The pointing determination during images acquisition is definition, highlighting trade-offs for mission implementation. MIOSAT mission design has been constrained from challenging requirements in terms of satellite mass, mission lifetime, instrument performance, that have implied the utilization of satellite agility capability to improve instruments performance in terms of S/N and resolution. The instruments provide complementary measurements that can be combined in effective ways to exploit new applications in the fields of atmosphere composition analysis, Earth emissions, antropic phenomena, etc. The Mission is currently in phase B and the launch is planned for 2011.

  14. The Mothership Mission Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S. M.; DiCorcia, J. D.; Bonin, G.; Gump, D.; Lewis, J. S.; Foulds, C.; Faber, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Mothership is considered to be a dedicated deep space carrier spacecraft. It is currently being developed by Deep Space Industries (DSI) as a mission concept that enables a broad participation in the scientific exploration of small bodies - the Mothership mission architecture. A Mothership shall deliver third-party nano-sats, experiments and instruments to Near Earth Asteroids (NEOs), comets or moons. The Mothership service includes delivery of nano-sats, communication to Earth and visuals of the asteroid surface and surrounding area. The Mothership is designed to carry about 10 nano-sats, based upon a variation of the Cubesat standard, with some flexibility on the specific geometry. The Deep Space Nano-Sat reference design is a 14.5 cm cube, which accommodates the same volume as a traditional 3U CubeSat. To reduce cost, Mothership is designed as a secondary payload aboard launches to GTO. DSI is offering slots for nano-sats to individual customers. This enables organizations with relatively low operating budgets to closely examine an asteroid with highly specialized sensors of their own choosing and carry out experiments in the proximity of or on the surface of an asteroid, while the nano-sats can be built or commissioned by a variety of smaller institutions, companies, or agencies. While the overall Mothership mission will have a financial volume somewhere between a European Space Agencies' (ESA) S- and M-class mission for instance, it can be funded through a number of small and individual funding sources and programs, hence avoiding the processes associated with traditional space exploration missions. DSI has been able to identify a significant interest in the planetary science and nano-satellite communities.

  15. Antenna System for Nano-satelite Mission GOMX-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Pedersen, Gert F.; Christiansen, J.;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the antenna design for a nano-satellite mission launched in September, the GOMX-3 mission. Some of the key design challenges are discussed and the chosen solutions are presented. In an effort to minimize development and manufacturing costs for future missions, this study...

  16. The NeXT Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, T.; Kelley, R; Mitsuda, K.; Kunieda, H.; Petre, R.; White, N; Dotani, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Fukazawa, Y.; Hayashida, K.; Ishida, M.; Ishisaki, Y; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; K. Koyama

    2008-01-01

    The NeXT (New exploration X-ray Telescope), the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission which is currently planed for launch in 2013. NeXT is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by multi-layer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will a...

  17. The WAXS/WFXT Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Chincarini, G L

    1999-01-01

    I present the science goals and give a brief summary of the Wide Angle X-ray survey with a Wide Field X-ray Telescope (WAXS/WFXT) mission proposal (Phase A) which will be submitted to the Italian Space Agency (ASI) following the call for proposal under the Small Satellite program. The text points out the uniqueness of the mission for the study of the evolution of clusters of galaxies and of the Large-Scale Structure at large redshifts and for the study of the Milky Way. I present, furthermore, the successful result of the metrology of the first wide field X-ray optics ever made.

  18. Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a partnership formed between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to place the next Landsat satellite in orbit in January 2013. The Landsat era that began in 1972 will become a nearly 41-year global land record with the successful launch and operation of the LDCM. The LDCM will continue the acquisition, archiving, and distribution of multispectral imagery affording global, synoptic, and repetitive coverage of the Earth's land surfaces at a scale where natural and human-induced changes can be detected, differentiated, characterized, and monitored over time. The mission objectives of the LDCM are to (1) collect and archive medium resolution (30-meter spatial resolution) multispectral image data affording seasonal coverage of the global landmasses for a period of no less than 5 years; (2) ensure that LDCM data are sufficiently consistent with data from the earlier Landsat missions in terms of acquisition geometry, calibration, coverage characteristics, spectral characteristics, output product quality, and data availability to permit studies of landcover and land-use change over time; and (3) distribute LDCM data products to the general public on a nondiscriminatory basis at no cost to the user.

  19. Induction studies with satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    1999-01-01

    analysis of the geomagnetic field is performed, and the Q-response, which is the transfer function between the internal (induced) and the external (inducing) expansion coefficients is determined for a specific frequency. In the second approach, known as the geomagnetic depth sounding method, the C....... This paper reviews and discusses the possibilities for induction studies using high-precision magnetic measurements from low-altitude satellites. The different methods and various transfer functions are presented, with special emphasis on the differences in analysing data from ground stations and from...... satellites. The results of several induction studies with scalar satellite data (from the POGO satellites) and with vector data (from the Magsat mission) demonstrate the ability to probe the Earth's conductivity from space. However, compared to the results obtained with ground data the satellite results...

  20. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini Spacecraft was launched in October 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its moons; it entered orbit around Saturn in July 2004 for a nominal four-year Prime Mission, later augmented by two extensions: the Equinox Mission, from July 2008 through September 2010, and the Solstice Mission, from October 2010 through September 2017. This paper provides an overview of the maneuver activities from August 2011 through June 2012 which include the design of 38 Orbit Trim Maneuvers--OTM-288 through OTM-326-- for attaining 14 natural satellite encounters: seven with Titan, six with Enceladus, and one with Dione.

  1. Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Control Based on Magnetic Torquing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1995-01-01

    Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics.......Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics....

  2. Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Control Based on Magnetic Torquing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1995-01-01

    Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics.......Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technilogical improvement of micro-electronics....

  3. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  4. The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, David H.; Hoffman, Tom L.; Havens, Glen G.

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, launched in September 2011, successfully completed its Primary Science Mission in June 2012 and is currently in Extended Mission operations. Competitively selected under a NASA Announcement of Opportunity in December 2007, GRAIL is a Discovery Program mission subject to a mandatory project cost cap. The purpose of the mission is to precisely map the gravitational field of the Moon to reveal its internal structure from crust to core, determine its thermal evolution, and extend this knowledge to other planets. The mission uses twin spacecraft flying in tandem to provide the gravity map. The GRAIL Flight System, consisting of the spacecraft and payload, was developed based on significant heritage from previous missions such an experimental U.S. Air Force satellite, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. The Mission Operations System (MOS) was based on high-heritage multimission operations developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin. Both the Flight System and MOS were adapted to meet the unique challenges posed by the GRAIL mission design. This paper summarizes the implementation challenges and accomplishments of getting GRAIL ready for launch. It also discusses the in-flight challenges and experiences of operating two spacecraft, and mission results.

  5. Geoid Recovery using Geophysical Inverse Theory Applied to Satellite to Satellite Tracking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a new method for determination of the geopotential. The analysis is aimed at the GRACE mission. This Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) mission is viewed as a mapping mission The result will be maps of the geoid. The elements of potential theory, celestial mechanics, and Geophysical Inverse Theory are integrated into a computation architecture, and the results of several simulations presented Centimeter accuracy geoids with 50 to 100 km resolution can be recovered with a 30 to 60 day mission.

  6. Satellite imager calibration and validation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhengani, L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The success or failure of any earth observation mission depends on the quality of its data. Data quality is assessed by determining the radiometric, spatial, spectral and geometric fidelity of the satellite sensor. The process is termed calval...

  7. Design of ground segments for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Guy

    1994-01-01

    New concepts must be implemented when designing a Ground Segment (GS) for small satellites to conform to their specific mission characteristics: low cost, one main instrument, spacecraft autonomy, optimized mission return, etc. This paper presents the key cost drivers of such ground segments, the main design features, and the comparison of various design options that can meet the user requirements.

  8. Phobos Sample Return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Zakharov, A.; Martynov, M.; Polischuk, G.

    Very mysterious objects of the Solar system are the Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos. Attempt to study Phobos in situ from an orbiter and from landers have been done by the Russian mission FOBOS in 1988. However, due to a malfunction of the onboard control system the landers have not been delivered to the Phobos surface. A new robotics mission to Phobos is under development now in Russia. Its main goal is the delivery of samples of the Phobos surface material to the Earth for laboratory studies of its chemical, isotopic, mineral composition, age etc. Other goals are in situ studies of Phobos (regolith, internal structure, peculiarities in orbital and proper rotation), studies of Martian environment (dust, plasma, fields). The payload includes a number of scientific instruments: gamma and neutron spectrometers, gaschromatograph, mass spectrometers, IR spectrometer, seismometer, panoramic camera, dust sensor, plasma package. To implement the tasks of this mission a cruise-transfer spacecraft after the launch and the Earth-Mars interplanetary flight will be inserted into the first elliptical orbit around Mars, then after several corrections the spacecraft orbit will be formed very close to the Phobos orbit to keep the synchronous orbiting with Phobos. Then the spacecraft will encounter with Phobos and will land at the surface. After the landing the sampling device of the spacecraft will collect several samples of the Phobos regolith and will load these samples into the return capsule mounted at the returned vehicle. This returned vehicle will be launched from the mother spacecraft and after the Mars-Earth interplanetary flight after 11 monthes with reach the terrestrial atmosphere. Before entering into the atmosphere the returned capsule will be separated from the returned vehicle and will hopefully land at the Earth surface. The mother spacecraft at the Phobos surface carrying onboard scientific instruments will implement the "in situ" experiments during an year

  9. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, microscopically visible granules that cluster around centrosomes. These structures, which contain numerous proteins directly involved in centrosome maintenance, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis, have traditionally been viewed as vehicles for protein trafficking...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  10. Tandem-X Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M.

    2015-04-01

    TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) is an innovative formation flying radar mission that opens a new era in spaceborne radar remote sensing. Its primary objective is the acquisition of a global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with unprecedented accuracy (12 m horizontal resolution and 2 m relative height accuracy). This goal is achieved by extending the TerraSAR-X synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission by a second TerraSAR-X like satellite, TanDEM-X (TDX). Both satellites fly in close orbit formation of a few hundred meters distance, and the resulting large single-pass SAR interferometer features flexible baseline selection enabling the acquisition of highly accurate cross-track interferograms not impacted by temporal decorrelation and atmospheric disturbances. Beyond the global DEM, several secondary mission objectives based on along-track interferometry as well as new bistatic and multistatic SAR techniques have been defined. Since 2010 both satellites have been operated in close formation to map all land surfaces at least twice and difficult terrain even up to four times. While data acquisition for the DEM generation will be concluded by the end of 2014 it is expected to complete the processing of the global DEM in the second half of 2016.

  11. Satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  12. Tethered satellite design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarini, G.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of the satellite to perform a variety of space operations to be accomplished from the shuttle is reviewed considering use of the satellite with man-in-loop and closed loop modes and deployment (toward or away from Earth, up to 100 km), stationkeeping, retrieval and control of the satellite. Scientific payloads are to be used to perform experiments and scientific investigation for applications such as magnetometry, electrodynamics, atmospheric science, chemical release, communications, plasmaphysics, dynamic environment, and power and thrust generation. The TSS-S will be reused for at least 3 missions after reconfiguration and refurbishment by changing the peculiar mission items such as thermal control, fixed boom for experiments, aerodynamic tail for yaw attitude control, external skin, experiments, and any other feature. The TSS-S is to be composed of three modules in order to allow independent integration of a single module and to facilitate the refurbishment and reconfiguration between flights. The three modules are service, auxiliary propulsion, and payload modules.

  13. SWARM - An earth Observation Mission investigating Geospace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Lühr, H.; Knudsen, D.;

    2008-01-01

    The Swarm mission was selected as the 5th mission in ESA's Earth Explorer Programme in 2004. This mission aims at measuring the Earth's magnetic field with unprecedented accuracy. This will be done by a constellation of three satellites, where two will fly at lower altitude, measuring the gradient...... of the magnetic field, and one satellite will fly at higher altitude. The measured magnetic field is the sum of many contributions including both magnetic fields and currents in the Earth's interior and electrical currents in Geospace. In order to separate all these sources electric field and plasma measurements...... will also be made to complement the primary magnetic field measurements. Together these will allow the deduction of information on a series of solid earth processes responsible for the creation of the fields measured. The completeness of the measurements on each satellite and the constellation aspect...

  14. SOHO Mission Science Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Footage shows the SOHO Mission Pre-Launch Science Briefing. The moderator of the conference is Fred Brown, NASA/GSFC Public Affairs, introduces the panel members. Included are Professor Roger Bonnet, Director ESA Science Program, Dr. Wesley Huntress, Jr., NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Dr. Vicente Domingo, ESA SOHO Project Scientist. Also present are several members from the SOHO Team: Dr. Richard Harrison, Art Poland, and Phillip Scherrer. The discussions include understanding the phenomena of the sun, eruption of gas clouds into the atmosphere, the polishing of the mirrors for the SOHO satellite, artificial intelligence in the telescopes, and the launch and operating costs. The panel members are also seen answering questions from various NASA Centers and Paris.

  15. Satellite observations of ground water changes in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2002 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. GRACE consists of two satellites with a separation of about 200 km.  By accurately measuring the separation between the twin satellites, the differences in the gravity field can be determined. Monthly observ...

  16. 一种基于多Agent强化学习的多星协同任务规划算法%An Algorithm of Cooperative Multiple Satellites Mission Planning Based on Multi-agent Reinforcement Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冲; 景宁; 李军; 王钧; 陈浩

    2011-01-01

    在分析任务特点和卫星约束的基础上给出了多星协同任务规划问题的数学模型.引入约束惩罚算子和多星联合惩罚算子对卫星Agent原始的效用值增益函数进行改进,在此基础上提出了一种多卫星Agent强化学习算法以求解多星协同任务分配策略,设计了基于黑板结构的多星交互方式以降低学习交互过程中的通信代价.通过仿真实验及分析证明该方法能够有效解决多星协同任务规划问题.%A multi-satellite cooperative planning problem model was given considering the characteristics of the task requests and satellite constraints. Then the original performance function of each satellite agent was modified by introducing both the constraint punishing operator and the multi-satellite joint punishing operator. Next, a multi-satellite reinforcement learning algorithm (MUSARLA)was proposed to derive the coordinated task allocation strategy. Furethermore, the interaction among multiple satellites was designed based on blackboard architecture to reduce the communication cost while learning. Fimally, simulated experiments are carried out which verified the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  17. OLFAR a radio telescope based on nano satellites in moon orbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, S.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Bentum, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    It seems very likely that missions with nano-satellites in professional scientific or commercial applications will not be single-satellite missions. Well structured formations or less structured swarms of nano-satellites will be able to perform tasks that cannot be done in the “traditional” way. The

  18. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Outline: Introduction to the Cassini mission, and Cassini mission Objectives; Cassini spacecraft, instruments, launch, and orbit insertion; Saturn, Rings, and Satellite, Titan; Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); and Infrared observations of Saturn and titan.

  19. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...

  20. The DTU12MDT global mean dynamic topography and ocean circulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity and Ocean Circulation Experiment - GOCE satellite mission measure the Earth gravity field with unprecedented accuracy leading to substantial improvements in the modelling of the ocean circulation and transport. In this study of the performance of GOCE, a newer gravity model has been...... to results obtained using pre-GOCE gravity field models. The results of this study show that geostrophic surface currents associated with the mean circulation have been further improved and that currents having speeds down to 5 cm/s have been recovered....

  1. The SPOT satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, J.-P.

    1981-03-01

    The background, objectives and data products of the French SPOT remote sensing satellite system are presented. The system, which was developed starting in 1978 with the subsequent participation of Sweden and Belgium, is based on a standard multimission platform with associated ground control station and a mission-specific payload, which includes two High-Resolution Visible range instruments allowing the acquisition of stereoscopic views from different orbits. Mission objectives include the definition of future remote sensing systems, the compilation of a cartographic and resources data base, the study of species discrimination and production forecasting based on frequent access and off-nadir viewing, the compilation of a stereoscopic data base, and platform and instrument qualification, for possible applications in cartography, geology and agriculture. Standard data products will be available at three levels of preprocessing: radiometric correction only, precision processing for vertical viewing, and cartographic quality processing.

  2. The Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. Shown from left to right in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, the Europa images in September 1996, and the Callisto images in November 1997.Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission

  3. Soviet satellite communications science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birch, J.N.; Campanella, S.J.; Gordon, G.D.; McElroy, D.R.; Pritchard, W.L.; Stamminger, R.

    1991-08-01

    This is a report by six US scientists and engineers concerning the current state of the art and projections of future Soviet satellite communications technologies. The panel members are experts in satellite stabilization, spacecraft environments, space power generation, launch systems, spacecraft communications sciences and technologies, onboard processing, ground stations, and other technologies that impact communications. The panel assessed the Soviet ability to support high-data-rate space missions at 128 Mbps by evaluating current and projected Soviet satellite communications technologies. A variety of space missions were considered, including Earth-to-Earth communications via satellites in geostationary or highly elliptical orbits, those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a direct path and those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a relay satellite. Soviet satellite communications capability, in most cases, is 10 years behind that of the United States and other industrialized nations. However, based upon an analysis of communications links needed to support these missions using current Soviet capabilities, it is well within the current Soviet technology to support certain space missions outlined above at rates of 128 Mbps or higher, although published literature clearly shows that the Soviet Union has not exceeded 60 Mbps in its current space system. These analyses are necessary but not sufficient to determine mission data rates, and other technologies such as onboard processing and storage could limit the mission data rate well below that which could actually be supported via the communications links. Presently, the Soviet Union appears to be content with data rates in the low-Earth-orbit relay via geostationary mode of 12 Mbps. This limit is a direct result of power amplifier limits, spacecraft antenna size, and the utilization of K{sub u}-band frequencies. 91 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. OMV mission simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cok, Keith E.

    1989-01-01

    The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will be remotely piloted during rendezvous, docking, or proximity operations with target spacecraft from a ground control console (GCC). The real-time mission simulator and graphics being used to design a console pilot-machine interface are discussed. A real-time orbital dynamics simulator drives the visual displays. The dynamics simulator includes a J2 oblate earth gravity model and a generalized 1962 rotating atmospheric and drag model. The simulator also provides a variable-length communication delay to represent use of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and NASA Communications (NASCOM). Input parameter files determine the graphics display. This feature allows rapid prototyping since displays can be easily modified from pilot recommendations. A series of pilot reviews are being held to determine an effective pilot-machine interface. Pilots fly missions with nominal to 3-sigma dispersions in translational or rotational axes. Console dimensions, switch type and layout, hand controllers, and graphic interfaces are evaluated by the pilots and the GCC simulator is modified for subsequent runs. Initial results indicate a pilot preference for analog versus digital displays and for two 3-degree-of-freedom hand controllers.

  5. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Spacecraft Constellation System, Mission Results, and Prospect for Follow-On Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Joe Fong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC spacecraft constellation consisting of six LEO satellites is the world's first operational GPS Radio Occultation (RO mission. The mission is jointly developed by Taiwan¡¦s National Space Organization (NSPO and the United States¡¦UCAR in collaboration with NSF, USAF, NOAA, NASA, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the US Naval Research Laboratory. The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites were successfully launched from Vandenberg US AFB in California at 0140 UTC 15 April 2006 into the same orbit plane of the designated 516 km altitude. The mission goal is to deploy the six satellites into six orbit planes at 800 km altitude with a 30-degree separation for evenly distributed global coverage. All six FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites are currently maintaining a satisfactory good state-of-health. Five out of six satellites have reached their final mission orbit of 800 km as of November 2007. The data as received by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites constellation have been processed in near real time into 2500 good ionospheric profiles and 1800 good atmospheric profiles per day. These have outnumbered the worldwide radiosondes (~900 mostly over land launched from the ground per day. The processed atmospheric RO data have been assimilated into the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP models for real-time weather prediction and typhoon/hurricane forecasting by many major weather centers in the world. This paper describes the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellite constellation system performance and the mission results that span the period from April 2006 to October 2007; and reviews the prospect of a future follow-on mission.

  6. The Arctic Regional Communications Small SATellite (ARCSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph; Kress, Martin; Sims, William; Spehn, Stephen; Jaeger, Talbot; Sanders, Devon

    2013-01-01

    Traditional satellite missions are extremely complex and expensive to design, build, test, launch and operate. Consequently many complementary operational, exploration and research satellite missions are being formulated as a growing part of the future space community capabilities using formations of small, distributed, simple to launch and inexpensive highly capable small scale satellites. The Arctic Regional Communications small SATellite (ARCSAT) initiative would launch a Mini-Satellite "Mothership" into Polar or Sun Sync low-earth-orbit (LEO). Once on orbit, the Mothership would perform orbital insertion of four internally stored independently maneuverable nanosatellites, each containing electronically steerable antennas and reconfigurable software-defined radios. Unlike the traditional geostationary larger complex satellite communication systems, this LEO communications system will be comprised of initially a five small satellite formation that can be later incrementally increased in the total number of satellites for additional data coverage. ARCSAT will provide significant enabling capabilities in the Arctic for autonomous voice and data communications relay, Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA), data-extraction from unattended sensors, and terrestrial Search & Rescue (SAR) beacon detection missions throughout the "data starved desert" of the Arctic Region.

  7. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Near Real-Time Altimetry Validation System (NRTAVS) QA Reports, 2015 - (NCEI Accession 0122600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  8. Enhanced mission performance from autonomous instrument guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Betto, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    examples of such autonomous space instrumentation. With its full autonomy, this star tracker is capable of providing, in real-time, the absolute orientation with respect to the celestial reference frame with an accuracy of a few arc seconds. This high accuracy along with the robust operations, low weight...... and power consumption makes the mu ASC an ideal instrument for small, high yielding satellite missions. The ASC has hitherto been used by the satellite AOCS and the high accuracy scientific instrument for attitude recovery (among others onboard ORSTED, CHAMP, and GRACE), and satellite high accuracy target...

  9. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  10. China Plans To Carry Out 15 Launch Missions In 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ In 2007,China made 10 launch missions and achieved complete success,including the launch of Chang'e-1 satellite,in-orbit delivery of Nigcomsat-1 and 100th launch of Long March series launch vehicle.

  11. GPM Constellation Reconfiguration and Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission that uses combined active and passive remote sensing techniques to improve global precipitation measurements derived from dedicated and operational passive microwave sensors. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals to (1) advance the knowledge of precipitation physics and the global water cycle variability, and (2) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation and innovative application methods. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional domestic and international partners in satellite constellation buildup and ground validation activities. The GPM concept is centered on employing a dualfrequency precipitation radar and a microwave radiometer with high-frequency capabilities on a core satellite to serve as a physics observatory and calibration standard to provide a consistent framework for unifying precipitation measurements from a heterogeneous constellation of passive microwave sensors. Building on the siccess of TRMM, GPM extends combined radadradiometer precipitation measurements into the mid and high latitudes, with new science foci on improved capabilities for light-rain and snowfall measurements, as well as more accurate precipitation retrievals over land. With recent studies indicating that AMSU-B rainfall estimates are comparable in quality to those derived from conically-scanning radiometers over land, it is envisioned that cross-track microwave sounders with high-frequency channels on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), NOAA-N', and MetOp satellites can play a significant role in augmenting conically-scanning microwave radiometers to achieve better

  12. The Copernicus Sentinel-3 Mission: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, C.; Berruti, B.; Mavrocordatos, C.; Nieke, J.; Seitz, B.; Frerrick, J.; Vuilleumier@esa int, P.; Rebhan, H.; Mecklenburg, S.; Goryl, P.; Féménias, P.

    2016-02-01

    Sentinel-3 is an operational mission in high-inclination, low earth orbit for the provision of observational data to Copernicus services. Products include ocean, ice and land surface altimetry, complemented by thermal and visible wavelength multi-spectral image data. The operational character of the mission implies a high level of availability of the data products and fast delivery time, which have been important design drivers for the mission. In terms of ocean applications, the Sentinel-3 payload is designed to monitor open-ocean, coastal and inland waters using a suite of contemporaneous measurements. The spacecraft accommodates a topography payload consisting of a SAR Radar Altimeter (SRAL) and a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) plus a suite of instruments for precise orbit determination (POD). In addition, two large optical instruments - the Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) and the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer instrument (SLSTR) have been developed as part of the mission. Full performance will be achieved with a constellation of two identical satellites, separated by 180 degrees in the same orbital plane. Together, the optical and topography instruments of Sentinel-3 will ensure the continuation of important data streams established with ESA's ERS and ENVISAT satellites. Four Sentinel-3 satellites are in development with Sentinel-3A planned for launch in late 2015 and the Sentinel-3B satellite launch expected in 2017. Procurement of the C and D satellites is ongoing. The overall service duration is planned to be 20 years and is expected to be fulfilled by a series of several satellites. This paper reports the current status of the Sentinel-3 Mission and presets some first results from the instrument payload.

  13. The Europa Jupiter System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Clark, K.; Erd, C.; Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R. R.; Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.; van Houten, T.

    2009-05-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) will be an international mission that will achieve Decadal Survey and Cosmic Vision goals. NASA and ESA have concluded a joint study of a mission to Europa, Ganymede and the Jupiter system with orbiters developed by NASA and ESA; contributions by JAXA are also possible. The baseline EJSM architecture consists of two primary elements operating in the Jovian system: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The JEO mission has been selected by NASA as the next Flagship mission to the out solar system. JEO and JGO would execute an intricately choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. JEO and JGO would carry eleven and ten complementary instruments, respectively, to monitor dynamic phenomena (such as Io's volcanoes and Jupiter's atmosphere), map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneath the ice shells of Europa and Ganymede. EJSM will fully addresses high priority science objectives identified by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision for exploration of the outer solar system. The Decadal Survey recommended a Europa Orbiter as the highest priority outer planet flagship mission and also identified Ganymede as a highly desirable mission target. EJSM would uniquely address several of the central themes of ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme, through its in-depth exploration of the Jupiter system and its evolution from origin to habitability. EJSM will investigate the potential habitability of the active ocean-bearing moons Europa and Ganymede, detailing the geophysical, compositional, geological and external processes that affect these icy worlds. EJSM would also explore Io and Callisto, Jupiter's atmosphere, and the Jovian magnetosphere. By understanding the Jupiter system and unraveling its history, the

  14. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  15. Orbital Express mission operations planning and resource management using ASPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Knight, Russell; Jones, Grailing; Tran, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    As satellite equipment and mission operations become more costly, the drive to keep working equipment running with less labor-power rises. Demonstrating the feasibility of autonomous satellite servicing was the main goal behind the Orbital Express (OE) mission. Like a tow-truck delivering gas to a car on the road, the "servicing" satellite of OE had to find the "client" from several kilometers away, connect directly to the client, and transfer fluid (or a battery) autonomously, while on earth-orbit. The mission met 100% of its success criteria, and proved that autonomous satellite servicing is now a reality for space operations. Planning the satellite mission operations for OE required the ability to create a plan which could be executed autonomously over variable conditions. As the constraints for execution could change weekly, daily, and even hourly, the tools used create the mission execution plans needed to be flexible and adaptable to many different kinds of changes. At the same time, the hard constraints of the plans needed to be maintained and satisfied. The Automated Scheduling and Planning Environment (ASPEN) tool, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was used to create the schedule of events in each daily plan for the two satellites of the OE mission. This paper presents an introduction to the ASPEN tool, an overview of the constraints of the OE domain, the variable conditions that were presented within the mission, and the solution to operations that ASPEN provided. ASPEN has been used in several other domains, including research rovers, Deep Space Network scheduling research, and in flight operations for the NASA's Earth Observing One mission's EO1 satellite. Related work is discussed, as are the future of ASPEN and the future of autonomous satellite servicing.

  16. Satellite (Natural)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  17. Chartering Launchers for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Daniel

    The question of how to launch small satellites has been solved over the years by the larger launchers offering small satellites the possibility of piggy-backing. Specific fixtures have been developed and commercialized: Arianespace developed the ASAP interface, the USAF studied ESPA, NASA has promoted Shuttle launch possibilities, Russian authorities and companies have been able to find solutions with many different launchers... It is fair to say that most launcher suppliers have worked hard and finally often been able to find solutions to launch most small satellites into orbit. It is also true, however, that most of these small satellites were technology demonstration missions capable of accepting a wide range of orbit and launch characteristics: orbit altitude and inclination, launch date, etc. In some cases the small satellite missions required a well-defined type of orbit and have therefore been obliged to hire a small launcher on which they were the prime passenger. In our paper we would like to propose an additional solution to all these possibilities: launchers could plan well in advance (for example about 3 years), trips to precisely defined orbits to allow potential passengers to organize themselves and be ready on the D-Day. On the scheduled date the chartered launcher goes to the stated orbit while on another date, another chartered launcher goes to another orbit. The idea is to organize departures for space like trains or airplanes leaving on known schedules for known destinations.

  18. Chameleon gravity and satellite geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, J R

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility of the detection of a chameleon effect by an earth orbiting satellite such as LAGEOS, and possible constraints that might be placed on chameleon model parameters. Approximate constraints presented here result from using a simple monopole approximation for the gravitational field of the earth, along with results from the Khoury-Weltman chameleon model, solar system constraints obtained from the Cassini mission, and parameter bounds obtained from the LAGEOS satellite. It is furthermore suggested that a comparison of ground-based and space-based multipole moments of the geopotential could reveal a possible chameleon effect.

  19. Fast and accurate prediction for aerodynamic forces and moments acting on satellites flying in Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuhon; Huang, Fei; Hu, Pengju; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    A fundamental prerequisite for satellites operating in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is the availability of fast and accurate prediction of non-gravitational aerodynamic forces, which is characterised by the free molecular flow regime. However, conventional computational methods like the analytical integral method and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique are found failing to deal with flow shadowing and multiple reflections or computationally expensive. This work develops a general computer program for the accurate calculation of aerodynamic forces in the free molecular flow regime using the test particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) method, and non-gravitational aerodynamic forces actiong on the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite is calculated for different freestream conditions and gas-surface interaction models by the computer program.

  20. The CHEOPS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg, Christopher; benz, willy; fortier, andrea; Ehrenreich, David; beck, Thomas; cessa, Virginie; Alibert, Yann; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) is a joint ESA-Switzerland space mission dedicated to search for exoplanet transits by means of ultra-high precision photometry. It is expected to be launch-ready at the end of 2017.CHEOPS will be the first space observatory dedicated to search for transits on bright stars already known to host planets. It will have access to more than 70% of the sky. This will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for planets for which the mass has already been estimated from ground-based radial velocity surveys and for new planets discovered by the next generation ground-based transits surveys (Neptune-size and smaller). The measurement of the radius of a planet from its transit combined with the determination of its mass through radial velocity techniques gives the bulk density of the planet, which provides direct insights into the structure and/or composition of the body. In order to meet the scientific objectives, a number of requirements have been derived that drive the design of CHEOPS. For the detection of Earth and super-Earth planets orbiting G5 dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes in the range 6 ≤ V ≤ 9 mag, a photometric precision of 20 ppm in 6 hours of integration time must be reached. This time corresponds to the transit duration of a planet with a revolution period of 50 days. In the case of Neptune-size planets orbiting K-type dwarf with magnitudes as faint as V=12 mag, a photometric precision of 85 ppm in 3 hours of integration time must be reached. To achieve this performance, the CHEOPS mission payload consists of only one instrument, a space telescope of 30 cm clear aperture, which has a single CCD focal plane detector. CHEOPS will be inserted in a low Earth orbit and the total duration of the CHEOPS mission is 3.5 years (goal: 5 years).The presentation will describe the current payload and mission design of CHEOPS, give the development status, and show the expected performances.

  1. Moon Search Algorithms for NASA's Dawn Mission to Asteroid Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Skillman, David; McLean, Brian; Mutchler, Max; Carsenty, Uri; Palmer, Eric E; 10.1117/12.915564

    2013-01-01

    A moon or natural satellite is a celestial body that orbits a planetary body such as a planet, dwarf planet, or an asteroid. Scientists seek understanding the origin and evolution of our solar system by studying moons of these bodies. Additionally, searches for satellites of planetary bodies can be important to protect the safety of a spacecraft as it approaches or orbits a planetary body. If a satellite of a celestial body is found, the mass of that body can also be calculated once its orbit is determined. Ensuring the Dawn spacecraft's safety on its mission to the asteroid (4) Vesta primarily motivated the work of Dawn's Satellite Working Group (SWG) in summer of 2011. Dawn mission scientists and engineers utilized various computational tools and techniques for Vesta's satellite search. The objectives of this paper are to 1) introduce the natural satellite search problem, 2) present the computational challenges, approaches, and tools used when addressing this problem, and 3) describe applications of various...

  2. Evaluation of human operator visual performance capability for teleoperator missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, C. T.; Malone, T. B.; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the human operator visual performance demands of teleoperator system applications to earth-orbital missions involving visual system requirements for satellite retrieval and satellite servicing functions. The first phase of an experimental program implementing this investigation is described in terms of the overall test apparatus and procedures used, the specific tests performed, and the test results obtained.

  3. A Robust Controller Structure for Pico-Satellite Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Martin Nygaard; Green, Martin; Kristensen, Mads

    This paper describes the development of a robust controller structure for use in pico-satellite missions. The structure relies on unknown disturbance estimation and use of robust control theory to implement a system that is robust to both unmodeled disturbances and parameter uncertainties. As one...... possible application, a satellite mission with the purpose of monitoring shipping routes for oil spills has been considered. However, it is the aim of the control structure to be widely applicable and adaptable for a vide variety of pico-satellite missions. The robust control structure has been evaluated...

  4. The Ballerina experiment on the Rømer mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian

    2001-01-01

    The Rømer mission has recently been approved as the next mission within the Danish Small Satellite Program. The scientific payload will consist of two separate experiments, the MONS and the Ballerina payloads. The primary objective of Ballerina is to provide accurate, real-time positions relayed...

  5. Cassini: Mission to Saturn and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Stuart J.; Flury, Walter; Horn, Linda J.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Stetson, Douglas S.; Stoller, Richard L.; Tan, Grace H.

    1992-01-01

    The Cassini Mission to Saturn and Titan represents an important step into the exploration of the outerplanets. It will expand on the flyby encounters of Pioneer and Voyager and parallel the detailed exploration of the Jupiter system to be accomplished by the Galileo Mission. By continuing the study of the two giant planets and enabling detailed comparisons of their structure and behavior, Cassini will provide a tremendous insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system. In addition, by virtue of its focus on the Saturnian satellite Titan, Cassini will return detailed data on an environment whose atmospheric chemistry may resemble that of the primitive Earth. The scientific objectives can be divided into five categories: Titan, Saturn, rings, icy satellites, and magnetospheres. The key area of interest to exobiologists is Titan; the other four scientific categories will be discussed briefly to provide a comprehensive overview of the Cassini Mission.

  6. The Europa Clipper Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Robert; Goldstein, Barry; Magner, Thomas; Prockter, Louise; Senske, David; Paczkowski, Brian; Cooke, Brian; Vance, Steve; Wes Patterson, G.; Craft, Kate

    2014-05-01

    A NASA-appointed Science Definition Team (SDT), working closely with a technical team from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), recently considered options for a future strategic mission to Europa, with the stated science goal: Explore Europa to investigate its habitability. The group considered several mission options, which were fully technically developed, then costed and reviewed by technical review boards and planetary science community groups. There was strong convergence on a favored architecture consisting of a spacecraft in Jupiter orbit making many close flybys of Europa, concentrating on remote sensing to explore the moon. Innovative mission design would use gravitational perturbations of the spacecraft trajectory to permit flybys at a wide variety of latitudes and longitudes, enabling globally distributed regional coverage of the moon's surface, with nominally 45 close flybys at altitudes from 25 to 100 km. We will present the science and reconnaissance goals and objectives, a mission design overview, and the notional spacecraft for this concept, which has become known as the Europa Clipper. The Europa Clipper concept provides a cost-efficient means to explore Europa and investigate its habitability, through understanding the satellite's ice and ocean, composition, and geology. The set of investigations derived from the Europa Clipper science objectives traces to a notional payload for science, consisting of: Ice Penetrating Radar (for sounding of ice-water interfaces within and beneath the ice shell), Topographical Imager (for stereo imaging of the surface), ShortWave Infrared Spectrometer (for surface composition), Neutral Mass Spectrometer (for atmospheric composition), Magnetometer and Langmuir Probes (for inferring the satellite's induction field to characterize an ocean), and Gravity Science (to confirm an ocean).The mission would also include the capability to perform reconnaissance for a future lander

  7. Study on Earth Radiation Budget mission scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlhopolsky, R.; Hollmann, R.; Mueller, J.; Stuhlmann, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this study is to study optimized satellite configurations for observation of the radiation balance of the earth. We present a literature survey of earth radiation budget missions and instruments. We develop a parametric tool to simulate realistic multiple satellite mission scenarios. This tool is a modular computer program which models satellite orbits and scanning operation. We use Meteosat data sampled at three hour intervals as a database to simulate atmospheric scenes. Input variables are satellite equatorial crossing time and instrument characteristics. Regional, zonal and global monthly averages of shortwave and longwave fluxes for an ideal observing system and several realistic satellite scenarios are produced. Comparisons show that the three satellite combinations which have equatorial crossing times at midmorning, noon and midafternoon provide the best shortwave monitoring. Crossing times near sunrise and sunset should be avoided for the shortwave. Longwave diurnal models are necessary over and surfaces and cloudy regions, if there are only two measurements made during daylight hours. We have found in the shortwave inversion comparison that at least 15% of the monthly regional errors can be attributed to the shortwave anisotropic models used. (orig.) 68 refs.

  8. Aiming at a 1-cm orbit for low earth orbiters: Reduced-dynamic and kinematic precise orbit determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.N.A.M.; Van den IJssel, J.

    2003-01-01

    The computation of high-accuracy orbits is a prerequisite for the success of Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) missions such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE. The mission objectives of these satellites cannot be reached without computing orbits with an accuracy at the few cm level. Such a level of accuracy might be a

  9. Satellite Ocean Biology: Past, Present, Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1978 when the first satellite ocean color proof-of-concept sensor, the Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner, was launched, much progress has been made in refining the basic measurement concept and expanding the research applications of global satellite time series of biological and optical properties such as chlorophyll-a concentrations. The seminar will review the fundamentals of satellite ocean color measurements (sensor design considerations, on-orbit calibration, atmospheric corrections, and bio-optical algorithms), scientific results from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) missions, and the goals of future NASA missions such as PACE, the Aerosol, Cloud, Ecology (ACE), and Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GeoCAPE) missions.

  10. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    followed Hale’s into orbit. In 1879, Jules Verne wrote about launching small satellites with a gun possessing a muzzle velocity of 10 000 m/sec (ref. 3...was activated in 1950.11 It was located only a few tens of miles from the spot where Jules Verne had his Baltimore Gun Club fire a manned projectile to...principle, satellites can be launched by a single impulse applied at the Earth’s surface-say, with a large cannon, & la Jules Verne (sec. 8-3). In

  11. 基于激光干涉星间测距原理的下一代月球卫星重力测量计划需求论证%Demonstration of Requirement for Future Lunar Satellite Gravity Exploration Mission Based on Interferometric Laser Intersatellite Ranging Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑伟; 许厚泽; 钟敏; 员美娟

    2011-01-01

    development trend and focus of deep space exploration in the 21st century. The accurate measurement of lunar gravitational field is an important part of international lunar exploration mission , which determines the optimum design of lunar probe orbit and the suitable selection of ideal landing point from manned apacecraft in the lunar surface. Firstly, the future twin-satellite program for the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory ( GRAIL) lunar gravitational field exploration is introduced , including general overview , pivotal payloads ,and scientific objectives and research direction. Secondly. the executive suggestions including the feasible demonstration of lunar satellite tracking modes, the optimal selection of key payloads from lunar satellite, the optimized design of lunar satellite orbital parameters, and the previous implementation of simulation research are expatiated. ( 1 ) Because the measurement accuracy of the medium-long-wavelength lunar gravitational field ia high based on the Satellite-to-Satellite High-Low/Low-Low Tracking associated with the Doppler and Very Long Baseline Interferometry mode ( SST-HL/LL-Doppler-VLBI) ,its technical requirement is low , the lunar gravitational field can be quickly , low-costly and high-efficiently determined , the successful experiences of integrated system from the dedicated Earth' s gravity satellite - the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment ( GRACE) are used for reference, the requirement to orbital accuracy is low, and the farside signals of lunar gravitational field can be obtained effectively , it is optimal to use the SST-HL/LL-Doppler-VLBI mode in the future first lunar satellite gravitational exploration mission in China. (2) The high-accuracy key paylaads including the interferometric laser ranging system, compensating system of nonconservative force from lunar gravity satellite and Earth ' s Doppler-VLBI system should be developed in advance. (3) The optimal design of orbit altitude (50 ~ 100 km) and

  12. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  13. Which Orbit for the GRASP Mission ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, A.; Coulot, D.; Zoulida, M.; Deleflie, F.; Biancale, R.; Mandea, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) mission was first proposed in 2011 by JPL in response to the NASA NNH11ZDA012O call for Earth Venture-2 mission. Recently, considering the recommendation of the Prospective Scientific Seminar, CNES expresses its interest and the possibility to participate in a next new JPL proposal. GRASP is a spacecraft system designed to build an enduring and stable Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) for accurately measuring and understanding changes in sea level, ice sheets and other elements of the dynamic Earth system. These objectives set the 1 mm accuracy and 0.1 mm/year stability (GGOS, Meeting the Requirements of a Global Society on a Changing Planet in 2020, Plag and Pearlman, 2009) as the goals for the TRF; goals which are an order of magnitude more accurate than the current performance of the TRF. For that, GRASP will carry very precise sensor systems for all the key geodetic techniques used to define and monitor the TRF: a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver, a Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) retroreflector, a Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) receiver, and a novel Very Large Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) beacon. To reach mission goals, the first step is to determine the optimal orbit of this satellite. In this study, we present an original approach for determining such orbits, using evolutionary algorithms. The method allows us to optimize orbits according to specific criteria such as the visibility of the satellite from ground stations and satellites; especially the visibility of GRASP by at least two VLBI stations, with the longest possible baseline, and by GNSS satellites.

  14. Collision Avoidance: Coordination of Predicted Conjunctions between NASA Satellites and Satellites of other Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A.; Watson, W.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes one of the challenges facing the flight operations teams of the International Earth Observing constellation satellites at the 705 km orbit, including NASAs satellites. The NASA Earth Science Mission Operations (ESMO) Project has been dealing with predicted conjunctions (close approach) between operational/non-operational space objects and the satellites in the International Earth observing constellations for several years. Constellation satellites include: NASAs Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra, Aqua, and Aura, CloudSat, the joint NASA/CNES CALIPSO mission, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1), the Japan Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission-Water 1 (GCOM-W1) mission, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat 7 and Landsat 8, and until 2013, Argentinas SAC-C mission and the CNES PARASOL mission. The NASA Conjunction Analysis and Risk Assessment (CARA) team provides daily reports to the ESMO Project regarding any high interest close approach events (HIEs) involving the constellation satellites. The daily CARA reports provide risk assessment results that help the operations teams to determine if there is a need to perform a risk mitigation action. If the conjuncting space object is an operational satellite that is capable of maneuvering, the affected satellite team needs to coordinate their action plan with the owner operator of the conjuncting satellite. It is absolutely critical for the two teams to communicate as soon as possible. The goal is to minimize the collision risk; this can happen if both satellite operators do not coordinate their maneuver plans. The constellation teams have established guidelines for coordinating HIEs. This coordination process has worked successfully for several years for satellites that are operated by other organizations in the United States and by NASAs international partners, all with whom NASA has a cooperative agreement. However, the situation is different for HIEs with

  15. Aristoteles - An ESA mission to study the earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeck, K.

    In preparing for its first Solid-Earth Program, ESA has studied a satellite concept for a mission dedicated to the precise determination of the earth's geopotential (gravitational and magnetic) fields. Data from such a mission are expected to make substantial contributions to a number of research and applications fields in solid-earth geophysics, oceanography and global-change monitoring. The impact of a high-resolution gravity-field mission on studies of the various earth-science problems is assessed. The current state of our knowledge in this area is discussed and the ability of low-orbit satellite gradiometry to contribute to their solution is demonstrated.

  16. Polar Operational Environmental Satellites: Looking at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Roberto M.

    2000-01-01

    A broad overview of the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) Project is presented at a very high level. A general description of the scientific instruments on the Television Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) spacecraft is presented with emphasis put on their mission and the products derived from the data. Actual pictures produced from POES instruments data are shown to help the audience relate our work to their everyday life, as affected by the weather systems.

  17. Polar Operational Environmental Satellites: Looking at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Roberto M.

    2000-01-01

    A broad overview of the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) Project is presented at a very high level. A general description of the scientific instruments on the Television Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) spacecraft is presented with emphasis put on their mission and the products derived from the data. Actual pictures produced from POES instruments data are shown to help the audience relate our work to their everyday life, as affected by the weather systems.

  18. Reliability Growth Analysis of Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    obtained. In addition, the Cumulative Intensity Function ( CIF ) of a family of satellite systems was analyzed to assess its similarity to that of a...parameters are obtained. In addition, the Cumulative Intensity Function ( CIF ) of a family of satellite systems was analyzed to assess its similarity to that...System Figures 7a through 7i display the real CIF for a variety of GOES missions. These cumulative intensity functions have shapes similar to the

  19. Femto-satellite Swarm State and Density Estimation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is planning future missions involving fleets of small satellites in LEO and GEO that can exhibit autonomous collective behavior. Such a "swarm of...

  20. Moon Search Algorithms for NASA's Dawn Mission to Asteroid Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Mcfadden, Lucy A.; Skillman, David R.; McLean, Brian; Mutchler, Max; Carsenty, Uri; Palmer, Eric E.

    2012-01-01

    A moon or natural satellite is a celestial body that orbits a planetary body such as a planet, dwarf planet, or an asteroid. Scientists seek understanding the origin and evolution of our solar system by studying moons of these bodies. Additionally, searches for satellites of planetary bodies can be important to protect the safety of a spacecraft as it approaches or orbits a planetary body. If a satellite of a celestial body is found, the mass of that body can also be calculated once its orbit is determined. Ensuring the Dawn spacecraft's safety on its mission to the asteroid Vesta primarily motivated the work of Dawn's Satellite Working Group (SWG) in summer of 2011. Dawn mission scientists and engineers utilized various computational tools and techniques for Vesta's satellite search. The objectives of this paper are to 1) introduce the natural satellite search problem, 2) present the computational challenges, approaches, and tools used when addressing this problem, and 3) describe applications of various image processing and computational algorithms for performing satellite searches to the electronic imaging and computer science community. Furthermore, we hope that this communication would enable Dawn mission scientists to improve their satellite search algorithms and tools and be better prepared for performing the same investigation in 2015, when the spacecraft is scheduled to approach and orbit the dwarf planet Ceres.

  1. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  2. Missions and Moral Judgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Amy Turner

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the history of Spanish-American missions, discussing the view of missions in church history, their role in the Spanish conquest, and the role and ideas of Herbert E. Bolton. Focuses on differences among Spanish borderlands missions, paying particular attention to the Florida missions. (CMK)

  3. Towards Reduced Nickel-Cadmium Battery Cost for Micro Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the two Nickel-Cadmium technologies offered by Saft for satellites applications: the space-qualified VOS prismatic cells designed for long term LEO and GEO missions, and the VRE cylindrical cell devoted to launcher activities and to short life LEO missions for mini and micro satellites. It also details Saft's effort to minimize the cost for these cells - in strict compliance with customer's specification and without any changes to the existing product manufacturing process.

  4. Small satellites for global coverage: Potential and limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandau, Rainer; Brieß, Klaus; D'Errico, Marco

    2010-11-01

    There is an increasing need for Earth Observation (EO) missions to meet the information requirements in connection with Global Change Studies. Small and cost-effective missions are powerful tools to flexibly react to information requirements with space-borne solutions. Small satellite missions can be conducted relatively quickly and inexpensively by using commercial off-the-shelf-technologies, or they can be enhanced by using advanced technologies. A new class of advanced small satellites, including autonomously operating "intelligent" satellites may be created, opening new fields of application. The increasing number of small satellites and their applications drive developments in the fields of small launchers, small ground station networks, cost-effective data distribution methods, and cost-effective management and quality assurance procedures. There are many advantages of small satellite missions, like more frequent mission opportunities, a faster return of data, larger variety of missions, more rapid expansion of the technical and/or scientific knowledge base, greater involvement of small industry, feasibility by universities and others. This paper deals with general trends in the field of small satellite missions for Earth observation. Special attention is given to the potential of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of small satellite based systems. Examples show small satellites offer also the unique possibility to install affordable constellations to provide good daily coverage of the globe and/or allow us to observe dynamic phenomena. The facts and examples given in this paper lead to the conclusion: Small satellites are already powerful tools for monitoring global, regional and local phenomena. In the future, their application spectrum will even broaden based on the ongoing development in many areas of technology and observation techniques.

  5. Satellite orbital conjunction reports assessing threatening encounters in space (SOCRATES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, T. S.; Alfano, S.

    2006-05-01

    While many satellite operators are aware of the possibility of a collision between their satellite and another object in earth orbit, most seem unaware of the frequency of near misses occurring each day. Until recently, no service existed to advise satellite operators of an impending conjunction of a satellite payload with another satellite, putting the responsibility for determining these occurrences squarely on the satellite operator's shoulders. This problem has been further confounded by the lack of a timely, comprehensive data set of satellite orbital element sets and computationally efficient tools to provide predictions using industry-standard software. As a result, hundreds of conjunctions within 1 km occur each week, with little or no intervention, putting billions of dollars of space hardware at risk, along with their associated missions. As a service to the satellite operator community, the Center for Space Standards & Innovation (CSSI) offers SOCRATES-Satellite Orbital Conjunction Reports Assessing Threatening Encounters in Space. Twice each day, CSSI runs a list of all satellite payloads on orbit against a list of all objects on orbit using the catalog of all unclassified NORAD two-line element sets to look for conjunctions over the next seven days. The runs are made using STK/CAT-Satellite Tool Kit's Conjunction Analysis Tools-together with the NORAD SGP4 propagator in STK. This paper will discuss how SOCRATES works and how it can help satellite operators avoid undesired close approaches through advanced mission planning.

  6. Experimental millimeter-wave satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Masaaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Shiomi, Tadashi; Kitazume, Susumu

    This paper describes an experimental system of millimeter-wave satellite communications via Japan's Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) and a plan of experiments. Two experimental missions are planned using ETS-VI millimeter-wave (43/38 GHz bands) transponder, considering the millimeter-wave characteristics such as large transmission capacity and possibility to construct a small earth station with a high gain antenna. They are a personal communication system and an inter-satellite communication system. Experimental system including the configuration and the fundamental functions of the onboard transponder and the outline of the experiments are presented.

  7. IntroductionThe Cluster mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fehringer

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission, ESA’s first cornerstone project, together with the SOHO mission, dating back to the first proposals in 1982, was finally launched in the summer of 2000. On 16 July and 9 August, respectively, two Russian Soyuz rockets blasted off from the Russian cosmodrome in Baikonour to deliver two Cluster spacecraft, each into their proper orbit. By the end of August 2000, the four Cluster satellites had reached their final tetrahedral constellation. The commissioning of 44 instruments, both individually and as an ensemble of complementary tools, was completed five months later to ensure the optimal use of their combined observational potential. On 1 February 2001, the mission was declared operational. The main goal of the Cluster mission is to study the small-scale plasma structures in three dimensions in key plasma regions, such as the solar wind, bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail and the auroral zones. With its unique capabilities of three-dimensional spatial resolution, Cluster plays a major role in the International Solar Terrestrial Program (ISTP, where Cluster and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO are the European contributions. Cluster’s payload consists of state-of-the-art plasma instrumentation to measure electric and magnetic fields from the quasi-static up to high frequencies, and electron and ion distribution functions from energies of nearly 0 eV to a few MeV. The science operations are coordinated by the Joint Science Operations Centre (JSOC, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK, and implemented by the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany. A network of eight national data centres has been set up for raw data processing, for the production of physical parameters, and their distribution to end users all over the world. The latest information on the Cluster mission can be found at http://sci.esa.int/cluster/.

  8. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  9. Astronomy from satellite clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachnik, R.; Labeyrie, A.

    1984-03-01

    Attention is called to the accumulating evidence that giant space telescopes, comprising a number of separate mirrors on independent satellites, are a realistic prospect for providing research tools of extraordinary power. The ESA-sponsored group and its counterpart in the US have reached remarkably similar conclusions regarding the basic configuration of extremely large synthetic-aperture devices. Both share the basic view that a cluster of spacecraft is preferable to a single monolithic structure. The emphasis of the US group has been on a mission that sweeps across as many sources as possible in the minimum time; it is referred to as SAMSI (Spacecraft Array for Michelson Spatial Interferometry). The European group has placed more emphasis on obtaining two-dimensional images. Their system is referred to as TRIO because, at least initially, it involves three independent systems. Detailed descriptions are given of the two systems.

  10. A Broad View of the Chang'e 2 Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pang Dan

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's second lunar exploration satellite Chang'e 2 was launched on October 1 2010 from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center.The satellite was sent directly into an Earth-moon transfer orbit on a LM-3C launch vehicle.Five days later, the satellite reached a preliminary orbit 100km above the moon.All the payloads onboard Chang'e 2 have been operational since October 15,signifying a good start to Chang'e 2's six-month observation mission.

  11. The COBE mission - Its design and performance two years after launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, N. W.; Mather, J. C.; Weiss, R.; Bennett, C. L.; Cheng, E. S.; Dwek, E.; Gulkis, S.; Hauser, M. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Kelsall, T.

    1992-01-01

    The COBE mission, NASA's first space mission devoted primarily to cosmology, is described and the spacecraft concepts central to enabling the mission to achieve its scientific objectives are examined. The major components of the COBE instrument and spacecraft modules are shown and their characteristics are given. Early scientific results are summarized and plans for continuing satellite operations and data analysis are addressed.

  12. Del goce lacaniano a la escritura femenina: La histerización de la palabra en Hélène Cixous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maider Tornos Urzainki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Históricamente, la mujer ha sido concebida exclusivamente como un ser enfermo. Desde el discurso científico-médico, la histeria sirve para descalificar el cuerpo femenino —su sexo, su goce—, cuya irreverencia pulsional resulta intolerable para la moral burguesa del sistema capitalista. El psicoanálisis lacaniano, si bien desprestigia el cuerpo femenino —siempre la mirada masculina sobre el cuerpo femenino en falta—su teoría va a suscitar mucho interés en los círculos feministas franceses. Reapropiándose de esa posición de ‘no-toda’, desde el afuera del sistema falo-logo/céntrico, la escritura femenina de los años 70 va a recurrir al goce suplementario teorizado por Lacan para demostrar la violencia que ejerce el discurso hegemónico.

  13. Toward Improved Estimation of the Dynamic Topography and Ocean Circulation in the High Latitude and Arctic Ocean: The Importance of GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, J. A.; Raj, R. P.; Nilsen, J. E. Ø.

    2014-01-01

    and sea ice thickness influencing the albedo and CO2 exchange, melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and increased thawing of surrounding permafrost regions. In turn, the hydrological cycle in the high latitude and Arctic is expected to undergo changes although to date it is challenging to accurately......The Arctic plays a fundamental role in the climate system and shows significant sensitivity to anthropogenic climate forcing and the ongoing climate change. Accelerated changes in the Arctic are already observed, including elevated air and ocean temperatures, declines of the summer sea ice extent...... circulation and transport variability in the high latitude and Arctic Ocean. In this respect, this study combines in situ hydrographical data, surface drifter data and direct current meter measurements, with coupled sea ice–ocean models, radar altimeter data and the latest GOCE-based geoid in order...

  14. The Ballerina experiment on the Romer mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian

    2001-01-01

    The Romer mission has recently been approved as the next mission within the Danish Small Satellite Program. The scientific payload will consist of two separate experiments, the MONS and the Ballerina payloads. The primary objective of Ballerina is to provide accurate, real-time positions relayed...... to ground for approximate to 70 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) per year, and to study the temporal and spectral evolution of the early GRB X-ray afterglow. As an additional goal, Ballerina will detect and study bright X-ray transients. in particular X-ray novae and micro-quasar systems. Romer is currently...

  15. The ASTRO-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotani, Tadayasu; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-07-01

    ASTRO-H, the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission, planed for launch in 2014. ASTRO-H is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector based on a narrow-FOV semiconductor Compton Camera. With these instruments, ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. The simultaneous broad band pass, coupled with high spectral resolution of super massive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei; trace the growth history of the largest structures in the Universe; provide insights into the behavior of material in extreme gravitational fields; trace particle acceleration structures in clusters of galaxies and SNRs; and investigate the detailed physics of jets. In this presentation, we will describe the mission, scientific goal and the recent progress of the project.

  16. Accuracy analysis of the 2014-2015 Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-sec C-Band height model using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukul, Manas; Srivastava, Vinee; Mukul, Malay

    2016-07-01

    Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data products have been widely used in Earth Sciences without an estimation of their accuracy and reliability even though large outliers exist in them. The global 1 arc-sec, 30 m resolution, SRTM C-Band (C-30) data collected in February 2000 has been recently released (2014-2015) outside North America. We present the first global assessment of the vertical accuracy of C-30 data using Ground Control Points (GCPs) from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Network of high-precision static fiducial stations that define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Large outliers (height error ranging from -1285 to 2306 m) were present in the C-30 dataset and 14% of the data were removed to reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) of the dataset from ˜187 to 10.3 m which is close to the SRTM goal of an absolute vertical accuracy of RMSE ˜10 m. Globally, for outlier-filtered data from 287 GCPs, the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibited a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 6.5 ± 0.5 m. Continent-wise, only Australia, North and South America complied with the SRTM goal. At stations where all the X- and C-Band SRTM data were present, the RMSE of the outlier-filtered C-30 data was 11.7 m. However, the RMSE of outlier-included dataset where C- and X-Band data were present was ˜233 m. The results suggest that the SRTM data must only be used after regional accuracy analysis and removal of outliers. If used raw, they may produce results that are statistically insignificant with RMSE in 100s of meters.

  17. Accuracy analysis of the 2014–2015 Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-sec C-Band height model using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Mukul; Vinee Srivastava; Malay Mukul

    2016-07-01

    Global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data products have been widely used in EarthSciences without an estimation of their accuracy and reliability even though large outliers exist in them.The global 1 arc-sec, 30 m resolution, SRTM C-Band (C-30) data collected in February 2000 has beenrecently released (2014–2015) outside North America. We present the first global assessment of thevertical accuracy of C-30 data using Ground Control Points (GCPs) from the International GNSS Service(IGS) Network of high-precision static fiducial stations that define the International Terrestrial ReferenceFrame (ITRF). Large outliers (height error ranging from –1285 to 2306 m) were present in the C-30dataset and 14% of the data were removed to reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) of the datasetfrom ∼187 to 10.3 m which is close to the SRTM goal of an absolute vertical accuracy of RMSE ∼10 m.Globally, for outlier-filtered data from 287 GCPs, the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heightsexhibited a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 6.5 ± 0.5 m. Continent-wise,only Australia, North and South America complied with the SRTM goal. At stations where all the XandC-Band SRTM data were present, the RMSE of the outlier-filtered C-30 data was 11.7 m. However,the RMSE of outlier-included dataset where C- and X-Band data were present was ∼233 m. The resultssuggest that the SRTM data must only be used after regional accuracy analysis and removal of outliers.If used raw, they may produce results that are statistically insignificant with RMSE in 100s of meters.

  18. Antenna System for Nano-satelite Mission GOMX-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Pedersen, Gert F.; Christiansen, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the antenna design for a nano-satellite mission launched in September, the GOMX-3 mission. Some of the key design challenges are discussed and the chosen solutions are presented. In an effort to minimize development and manufacturing costs for future missions, this study...... shows how to modify off the shelf components in order to tailor them to the specifications of the mission at hand. The performance of the antenna is increased by up to 1.4 dB with a simple modification to adjust the resonance frequency. The antenna system’s performance is investigated through simulation...

  19. Return to Europa: Overview of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Tan-Wang, G.; Boldt, J.; Greeley, R.; Jun, I.; Lock, R.; Ludwinski, J.; Pappalardo, R.; Van Houten, T.; Yan, T.

    2009-01-01

    Missions to explore Europa have been imagined ever since the Voyager mission first suggested that Europa was geologically very young. Subsequently, Galileo supplied fascinating new insights into that satellite's secrets. The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) would be the NASA-led portion of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), an international mission with orbiters developed by NASA, ESA and possibly JAXA. JEO would address a very important subset of the complete EJSM science objectives and is designed to function alone or in conjunction with ESA's Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO).

  20. Mission design options for human Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, Paul D.; Braun, Robert D.; Ahn, Jaemyung; Putnam, Zachary R.

    Trajectory options for conjunction-class human Mars missions are examined, including crewed Earth-Mars trajectories with the option for abort to Earth, with the intent of serving as a resource for mission designers. An analysis of the impact of Earth and Mars entry velocities on aeroassist systems is included, and constraints are suggested for interplanetary trajectories based upon aeroassist system capabilities.