WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite lidar measurements

  1. Simulation of Satellite Water Vapour Lidar Measurements: Performance Assessment under Real Atmospheric Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Kiemle, Christoph; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Bauer, Heinz; Summa, Donato; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    A lidar simulator has been applied to assess the performances of a satellite water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. Measurements performed by the airborne Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) water vapour DIAL on 15 May 2002 during ESA’s Water Vapour Lidar Experiment (WALEX), in combination with MM5 mesoscale model output, were used to obtain backscatter and water vapour fields with high resolution and accuracy. These data and model output serve as input for the ...

  2. Sub-visual cirrus LIDAR measurements for satellite masking improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; Larroza, Eliane G.; Lopes, Fábio J. S.; de Jesus, Wellington C.; Bottino, Marcus; Nakaema, Walter M.; Steffens, Juliana

    2008-10-01

    Understanding the impact of cirrus cloud on modifying both the solar reflected and terrestrial emitted radiations is crucial for climate studies. Unlike most boundary layer stratus and stratocumulus clouds that have a net cooling effect on the climate, high-level thin cirrus clouds have a warming effect on our climate. However, the satellites as GOES from the NOAA series are limited to the cloud top and its reflectivity or brightness temperature, without assessing accurately the optical depth or physical thickness. Other more recent sensors as MODIS are able to determine optical depths for aerosols and clouds but when related to cirrus they are still inaccurate. Research programs as First ISCCP, FIRE, HOIST, ECLIPS and ARM have concentrated efforts in the research of cirrus, being based mainly on the observations of combined terrestrial remote sensing and airplanes instruments. LIDARs are able to detect sub-visual cirrus cloud (SVCs) in altitudes above 15 km and estimate exactly their height, thickness and optical depth, contributing with information for satellites sensors and radiative transfer models. In order to research characteristics of SVCs, the LIDAR system at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares has as objective to determine such parameters and implement a cirrus cloud mask that could be used in the satellite images processing as well as in the qualitative improvement of the radiative parameters for numerical models of climate changes. The first preliminary study shows where we compare the data lidar with Brightness temperature differences between the split-window data from GOES-10 (DSA/INPE) and CALIPSO.

  3. An Analysis of Satellite, Radiosonde, and Lidar Observations of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soden, Brian J.; Turner, David D.; Lesht, B. M.; Miloshevich, Larry M.

    2004-02-25

    To improve our understanding of the distribution and radiative effects of water vapor, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has conducted a series of coordinated water vapor Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs). This study uses observations collected from four ARM IOPs to accomplish two goals: first, we compare radiosonde and Raman lidar observations of upper tropospheric water vapor with co-located geostationary satellite radiances at 6.7 micrometers. During all four IOPs, we find excellent agreement between the satellite and Raman lidar observations of upper tropospheric humidity with systematic differences of ~10%. In contrast, radiosondes equipped with Vaisala sensors are shown to be systematically drier in the upper troposphere by ~40% relative to both the lidar and satellite measurements. Second, we assess the performance of various "correction" strategies designed to rectify known deficiencies in the radiosonde measurements. It is shown that existing methods for correcting the radiosonde dry bias, while effective in the lower troposphere, offer little improvement in the upper troposphere. An alternative method based on variational assimilation of satellite radiances is presented and, when applied to the radiosonde measurements, is shown to significantly improve their agreement with coincident Raman lidar observations. It is suggested that a similar strategy could be used to improve the quality of the global historical record of radiosonde water vapor observations during the satellite era.

  4. Wind Measurement LIDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) proposes a Wind Measurement LIDAR whose sensor assembly is composed of SPEC Gen IV LIDAR seeker, with 12.8...

  5. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val. PMID:28198389

  6. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  7. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O'Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-15

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  8. Extrapolation of contrail investigations by LIDAR to larger scale measurements. Analysis and calibration of CCD camera and satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, R.; Homburg, F.; Freudenthaler, V.; Jaeger, H. [Frauenhofer Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The CCD image of a persistent contrail and the coincident LIDAR measurement are presented. To extrapolate the LIDAR derived optical thickness to the video field of view an anisotropy correction and calibration has to be performed. Observed bright halo components result from highly regular oriented hexagonal crystals with sizes of 200 {mu}m-2 mm. This explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation threshold of natural cirrus. Optical thickness from LIDAR shows significant discrepancies to the result from coincident NOAA-14 data. Errors result from anisotropy correction and parameterized relations between AVHRR channels and optical properties. (author) 28 refs.

  9. Aerosol measurements over Southern Africa using LIDAR, satellite and sun-photometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available .O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Lynwood Road, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS), 11-15 August 2009 3Department of Physics... km Slide 4 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za 2-3 km Data head2right LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Pretoria (25.45 S ; 28.16 E) head2right HYSPLIT NASA head2right AERONET University of Wits (26 S; 28 E) 2002 to 2008...

  10. Can Wind Lidars Measure Turbulence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Gottschall, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Modeling of the systematic errors in the second-order moments of wind speeds measured by continuous-wave (ZephIR) and pulsed (WindCube) lidars is presented. These lidars use the conical scanning technique to measure the velocity field. The model captures the effect of volume illumination and coni...

  11. TOLNET – A Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Profiling Network for Satellite Continuity and Process Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newchurch Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone lidars measure continuous, high-resolution ozone profiles critical for process studies and for satellite validation in the lower troposphere. However, the effectiveness of lidar validation by using single-station data is limited. Recently, NASA initiated an interagency ozone lidar observation network under the name TOLNet to promote cooperative multiple-station ozone-lidar observations to provide highly timeresolved (few minutes tropospheric-ozone vertical profiles useful for air-quality studies, model evaluation, and satellite validation. This article briefly describes the concept, stations, major specifications of the TOLNet instruments, and data archiving.

  12. Rayleigh LIDAR and satellite (HALOE, SABER, CHAMP and COSMIC) measurements of stratosphere-mesosphere temperature over a southern sub-tropical site, Reunion (20.8° S; 55.5° E): climatology and comparison study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, climatology of the middle atmosphere thermal structure is presented, based on 14 years of LIDAR and satellite (HALOE, SABER, CHAMP and COSMIC) temperature measurements. The data is collected over a southern sub-tropical site...

  13. End-to-End Simulation for a Forest-Dedicated Full-Waveform Lidar Onboard a Satellite Initialized from Airborne Ultraviolet Lidar Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxia Shang; Patrick Chazette

    2015-01-01

    In order to study forests at the global scale, a detailed link budget for a lidar system onboard satellite is presented. It is based on an original approach coupling airborne lidar observations and an end-to-end simulator. The simulator is initialized by airborne lidar measurements performed over temperate and tropical forests on the French territory, representing a wide range of forests ecosystems. Considering two complementary wavelengths of 355 and 1064 nm, the end-to-end simulator compute...

  14. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.

    1993-01-01

    the source, instantaneous crosswind plume profiles were detected repetitively at high spatial (1.5 m) and temporal (3 sec) intervals by use of a mini LIDAR system. The experiments were accompanied by measurement of the surface-layer mean wind and turbulence quantities by sonic anemometers. On the basis...

  15. Shear and Turbulence Effects on Lidar Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael; Sathe, Ameya; Gayle Nygaard, Nicolai

    Wind lidars are now used extensively for wind resource measurements. It is known that lidar wind speed measure-ments are affected by both turbulence and wind shear. This report explains the mechanisms behind these sensitivities. For turbulence, it is found that errors in the scalar mean speed...... are usually only small. However, particularly in re-spect of a lidar calibration procedure, turbulence induced errors in the cup anemometer speed are seen to be signifi-cantly larger. Wind shear is shown to induce measurement errors both due to possible imperfections in the lidar sensing height and due...... to the averaging of a non-linear speed profile. Both effects in combination have to be included when modelling the lidar error. Attempts to evaluate the lidar error from ex-perimental data have not been successful probably due to a lack of detailed knowledge of both the wind shear and the actual lidar sensing...

  16. Lidar beams in opposite directions for quality assessment of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization spaceborne measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre H

    2010-04-20

    We present the "lidar beams in opposite directions" (LIBOD) technique and applications for quality assessment of spaceborne observations made by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite. LIBOD is applicable to standard total backscatter lidar because it does not require a priori knowledge of the particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio. In this paper, we present (i) an objective assessment of the lidar signal quality and representativity of correlative ground-based lidar and CALIOP measurements only using normalized range-corrected lidar signals and (ii) a numerical filtering and optimization technique for reducing the spurious oscillations induced by noisy signal differentiation as needed for retrieval of particle extinction coefficients and extinction-to-backscatter ratio profiles. Numerical simulations and Monte Carlo tests are conducted for assessing the performance of the LIBOD technique. The applications are illustrated with examples of actual correlative 532 nm lidar profiles from CALIOP and a ground-based lidar deployed in Tamanrasset in the heart of Sahara in 2006 and near Strasbourg, France, in 2007.

  17. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  18. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  19. Lidar Turbulence Measurements for Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Sathe, Ameya; Gottschall, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of the systematic errors in the second-order moments of wind speeds measured by continuous-wave (ZephIR) and pulsed (WindCube) lidars is presented. These lidars use the velocity azimuth display technique to measure the velocity vector. The model is developed for the line-of-sight averaging......, whereas they are up to 70% for the horizontal velocity variances. The systematic errors also vary with atmospheric stability, being lowest for the very unstable conditions. It is concluded that with the current measurement configuration, these lidars cannot be used to measure turbulence precisely....

  20. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  1. Potential for Using Satellite Lidar for Seasonal Snow Depth Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, M. F.; Stoll, J.; Harding, D. J.; Fassnacht, S. R.; Carabajal, C. C.; Markus, T.

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluates the potential for estimating snow depth in complex mountainous terrain using high resolution satellite lidar. For over three decades, satellite remote sensing of snow depth and water equivalent has relied primarily on passive microwave sensors with an approximately 25 km footprint. While successfully employed in many global water balance analyses, their large footprints, necessary to capture the natural emission of the surface, are too coarse to define the spatial heterogeneity of mountain watershed-scale snow due to variable topography and vegetation. In this study, the capability of satellite lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth was evaluated primarily using surface elevations observed by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) flown on board the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite from 2003-2009, with a footprint size of ~70m. The evaluation includes the analysis of GLAS waveforms at near-repeat locations during snow-off and snow on conditions, using several snow depth estimation approaches, focusing on the Uinta Mountains of NE Utah. Also presented is the concept for the ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), currently set to launch in July 2016, and its potential capability for characterizing snow depth. The opportunity for partnering through NASA's Early Adopter Program using prototype aircraft observations also is presented.

  2. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  3. Vapor Measurements from the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, T.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor measurements from the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar were made for the first time during a campaign at NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory. Comparisons were made among the GSFC lidar, the NOAA Lidar and water vapor sondes which were flown from the observatory at times coincident with the lidar measurements.

  4. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  5. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  6. End-to-End Simulation for a Forest-Dedicated Full-Waveform Lidar Onboard a Satellite Initialized from Airborne Ultraviolet Lidar Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Shang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study forests at the global scale, a detailed link budget for a lidar system onboard satellite is presented. It is based on an original approach coupling airborne lidar observations and an end-to-end simulator. The simulator is initialized by airborne lidar measurements performed over temperate and tropical forests on the French territory, representing a wide range of forests ecosystems. Considering two complementary wavelengths of 355 and 1064 nm, the end-to-end simulator computes the performance of spaceborne lidar systems for different orbits. The analysis is based on forest structural (tree top height, quadratic mean canopy height and optical (forest optical thickness parameters. Although an ultraviolet lidar appears to be a good candidate for airborne measurements, our results show that the limited energy is not favorable for spaceborne missions with such a wavelength. A near infrared wavelength at 1064 nm is preferable, requiring ~100 mJ laser emitted energy, which is in agreement with current and future spaceborne missions involving a lidar. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio at the ground level to extract both the structural and optical parameters of forests must be larger than 10. Hence, considering the presence of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere and assuming a stationary forest, a good detection probability of 99% can be reached when 4 or 5 satellite revisits are considered for a lidar system onboard the ISS or ICESat, respectively. This concerns ~90% of forest covers observed from the lidar, which have an optical thickness less than 3.

  7. Turbulence measurements using six lidar beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    The use of wind lidars for measuring wind has increased significantly for wind energy purposes. The mean wind speed measurement using the velocity azimuth display (VAD) technique can now be carried out as reliably as the traditional instruments like the cup and sonic anemometers. Using the VAD...... technique the turbulence measurements are far from being reliable. Two mechanisms contribute to systematic errors in the measurement of turbulence. One is the averaging of small scales of turbulence due to the volume within which lidars measure wind speed. The other is the contamination by the cross...... components of the Reynolds stress tensor, which arises because, in a VAD scan the lidar beams are combined to obtain different components of the wind field. In this work we demonstrate theoretically, how the contamination by the cross components can be avoided by using the measured variances of the line...

  8. Lidar Measurements of Industrial Benzene Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to measure benzene concentrations was added to the RIVM mobile DIAL system. In a ten-days campaign, it was used to measure benzene emissions in the Rijnmond, a heavily industrialised area in the South-west of the Netherlands with petrochemical industry, petrochemical products storage and the port of Rotterdam. On two of the ten days, benzene emissions were found. Combined with measurements of wind speed and wind direction, the Lidar measurements indicated the possible origins of these emissions. This makes the Lidar a valuable tool, augmenting the data collected at fixed monitoring stations.

  9. Lidar Measurements of Industrial Benzene Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout A.J.C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure benzene concentrations was added to the RIVM mobile DIAL system. In a ten-days campaign, it was used to measure benzene emissions in the Rijnmond, a heavily industrialised area in the South-west of the Netherlands with petrochemical industry, petrochemical products storage and the port of Rotterdam. On two of the ten days, benzene emissions were found. Combined with measurements of wind speed and wind direction, the Lidar measurements indicated the possible origins of these emissions. This makes the Lidar a valuable tool, augmenting the data collected at fixed monitoring stations.

  10. Measurements of Saharan dust aerosols over the Eastern Mediterranean using elastic backscatter-Raman lidar, spectrophotometric and satellite observations in the frame of the EARLINET project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Papayannis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the vertical distributions of Saharan dust aerosols over the N.E. Mediterranean region, which were obtained during a typical dust outbreak on August 2000, by two lidar systems located in Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece, in the frame of the European EARLINET project. MODIS and ground sun spectrophotometric data, as well as air-mass backward trajectories confirmed the existence of Saharan dust in the case examined, which was also successfully forecasted by the DREAM dust model. The lidar data analysis for the period 2000-2002 made possible, for the first time, an estimation of the vertical extent of free tropospheric dust layers [mean values of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio, LR at 355 nm], as well as a seasonal distribution of Saharan dust outbreaks over Greece, under cloud-free conditions. A mean value of the lidar ratio at 355 nm was obtained over Athens (53±1 sr and over Thessaloniki (44±2 sr during the Saharan dust outbreaks. The corresponding aerosol optical thickness (AOT at 355 nm, in the altitude range 0-5 km, was 0.69±0.12 and 0.65±0.10 for Athens and Thessaloniki, respectively (within the dust layer the AOT was 0.23 and 0.21, respectively. Air-mass back-trajectory analysis performed in the period 2000-2002 for all Saharan dust outbreaks over the N.E. Mediterranean indicated the main pathways followed by the dust aerosols.

  11. LIDAR for atmospheric backscatter and temperature measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this effort are to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles and temperature using a zenith looking lidar, designed for a small lander.The lidar...

  12. TOLNet - A Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Profiling Network for Satellite Continuity and Process Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Kuang, Shi; Wang, Lihua; LeBlanc, Thierry; Alvarez II, Raul J.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Brown, Steve; Johnson, Bryan; Burris, John F.; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA initiated an interagency ozone lidar observation network under the name TOLNet to promote cooperative multiple-station ozone-lidar observations to provide highly time-resolved (few minutes) tropospheric-ozone vertical profiles useful for air-quality studies, model evaluation, and satellite validation.

  13. Vertical Accuracy Comparison of Digital Elevation Model from LIDAR and Multitemporal Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octariady, J.; Hikmat, A.; Widyaningrum, E.; Mayasari, R.; Fajari, M. K.

    2017-05-01

    Digital elevation model serves to illustrate the appearance of the earth's surface. DEM can be produced from a wide variety of data sources including from radar data, LiDAR data, and stereo satellite imagery. Making the LiDAR DEM conducted using point cloud data from LiDAR sensor. Making a DEM from stereo satellite imagery can be done using same temporal or multitemporal stereo satellite imagery. How much the accuracy of DEM generated from multitemporal stereo stellite imagery and LiDAR data is not known with certainty. The study was conducted using LiDAR DEM data and multitemporal stereo satellite imagery DEM. Multitemporal stereo satellite imagery generated semi-automatically by using 3 scene stereo satellite imagery with acquisition 2013-2014. The high value given each of DEM serve as the basis for calculating high accuracy DEM respectively. The results showed the high value differences in the fraction of the meter between LiDAR DEM and multitemporal stereo satellite imagery DEM.

  14. MERGING AIRBORNE LIDAR DATA AND SATELLITE SAR DATA FOR BUILDING CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yamamoto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A frequent map revision is required in GIS applications, such as disaster prevention and urban planning. In general, airborne photogrammetry and LIDAR measurements are applied to geometrical data acquisition for automated map generation and revision. However, attribute data acquisition and classification depend on manual editing works including ground surveys. In general, airborne photogrammetry and LiDAR measurements are applied to geometrical data acquisition for automated map generation and revision. However, these approaches classify geometrical attributes. Moreover, ground survey and manual editing works are finally required in attribute data classification. On the other hand, although geometrical data extraction is difficult, SAR data have a possibility to automate the attribute data acquisition and classification. The SAR data represent microwave reflections on various surfaces of ground and buildings. There are many researches related to monitoring activities of disaster, vegetation, and urban. Moreover, we have an opportunity to acquire higher resolution data in urban areas with new sensors, such as ALOS2 PALSAR2. Therefore, in this study, we focus on an integration of airborne LIDAR data and satellite SAR data for building extraction and classification.

  15. Turbulence measurement with a two-beam nacelle lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Rozenn; Sathe, Ameya; Mioullet, A.; Courtney, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the turbulence intensity measurement is performed for a lidar measuring horizontally with two beams. First the turbulence intensity measured by such a system was evaluated theoretically. The Mann model of turbulence was used to evaluate the true value of the turbulence intensity of the wind speed and the main effects of the lidar measurement principles on turbulence intensity measurement were modeled:- A lidar senses the wind speed over the probe volume acting as a low pass-fi...

  16. Alexandrite laser source for atmospheric lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelon, J.; Loth, C.; Flamant, P.; Megie, G.

    1986-01-01

    During the past years, there has been a marked increase in interest in the applications of vibronic solid state lasers to meteorology and atmospheric physics. Two airborne lidar programs are now under development in France. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method with vibronic solid state lasers is very attractive for water vapor, temperature and pressure measurements. Alexandrite laser and titanium-sapphire are both suitable for these applications. However, only alexandrite rods are commercially available. The requirements on the laser source for airborne dial applications are two fold: (1) a restriction on laser linewidth and a requirement on stability and tunability with a good spectral purity; and (2) a requirement on the time separation between the two pulses. These constraints are summarized.

  17. Ocean Lidar Measurements of Beam Attenuation and a Roadmap to Accurate Phytoplankton Biomass Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30° off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  18. Combining satellite photographs and raster lidar data for channel connectivity in tidal marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Hodges, Ben

    2017-04-01

    High resolution airborne lidar is capable of providing topographic detail down to the 1 x 1 m scale or finer over large tidal marshes of a river delta. Such data sets can be challenging to develop and ground-truth due to the inherent complexities of the environment, the relatively small changes in elevation throughout a marsh, and practical difficulties in accessing the variety of flooded, dry, and muddy regions. Standard lidar point-cloud processing techniques (as typically applied in large lidar data collection program) have a tendency to mis-identify narrow channels and water connectivity in a marsh, which makes it difficult to directly use such data for modeling marsh flows. Unfortunately, it is not always practical, or even possible, to access the point cloud and re-analyze the raw lidar data when discrepancies have been found in a raster work product. Faced with this problem in preparing a model of the Trinity River delta (Texas, USA), we developed an approach to integrating analysis of a lidar-based raster with satellite images. Our primary goal was to identify the clear land/water boundaries needed to identify channelization in the available rasterized lidar data. The channel extraction method uses pixelized satellite photographs that are stretched/distorted with image-processing techniques to match identifiable control features in both lidar and photographic data sets. A kmeans clustering algorithm was applied cluster pixels based on their colors, which is effective in separating land and water in a satellite photograph. The clustered image was matched to the lidar data such that the combination shows the channel network. In effect, we are able to use the fact that the satellite photograph is higher resolution than the lidar data, and thus provides connectivity in the clustering at a finer scale. The principal limitation of the method is the where the satellite image and lidar suffer from similar problems For example, vegetation overhanging a narrow

  19. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  20. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  1. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  2. EZ LIDAR measurement results in the frame of Indian Monsoon TIGER-Z NASA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Sauvage, L.

    2008-10-01

    Lidar investigation of temporal and vertical optical atmospheric properties will play a key role in the future for a continuous monitoring over the whole planet through world ground based networks. The EZ LidarTM, manufactured by LEOSPHERE, has been validated in several campaigns as that one in Southern Great Plains (ARM) or at Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA). An EZ LIDARTM with cross-polarization capabilities was deployed in Kanpur, India in the frame of TIGER-Z campaign organized by NASA/AERONET in order to measure aerosol microphysical and optical properties in the Gange basin. In addition, 12 sun-photometers were deployed during this campaign and CALIPSO (The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) data were also acquired. In this work we present the results in retrieving aerosol extinction and backscattering from EZ LidarTM measurements, and the validation of the space borne instrument CALIPSO under the satellite track. EZ LidarTM is also coupled with the photometers to provide the measurements of the Aerosol Optical Depth over the selected region.

  3. Mapping Urban Tree Canopy Cover Using Fused Airborne LIDAR and Satellite Imagery Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmehr, Ebadat G.; Amati, Marco; Fraser, Clive S.

    2016-06-01

    Urban green spaces, particularly urban trees, play a key role in enhancing the liveability of cities. The availability of accurate and up-to-date maps of tree canopy cover is important for sustainable development of urban green spaces. LiDAR point clouds are widely used for the mapping of buildings and trees, and several LiDAR point cloud classification techniques have been proposed for automatic mapping. However, the effectiveness of point cloud classification techniques for automated tree extraction from LiDAR data can be impacted to the point of failure by the complexity of tree canopy shapes in urban areas. Multispectral imagery, which provides complementary information to LiDAR data, can improve point cloud classification quality. This paper proposes a reliable method for the extraction of tree canopy cover from fused LiDAR point cloud and multispectral satellite imagery data. The proposed method initially associates each LiDAR point with spectral information from the co-registered satellite imagery data. It calculates the normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) value for each LiDAR point and corrects tree points which have been misclassified as buildings. Then, region growing of tree points, taking the NDVI value into account, is applied. Finally, the LiDAR points classified as tree points are utilised to generate a canopy cover map. The performance of the proposed tree canopy cover mapping method is experimentally evaluated on a data set of airborne LiDAR and WorldView 2 imagery covering a suburb in Melbourne, Australia.

  4. Power curve measurement with a nacelle mounted lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Courtney, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Nacelle-based lidars are an attractive alternative to conventional mast base reference wind instrumentation where the erection of a mast is expensive, for example offshore. In this paper, the use of this new technology for the specific application of wind turbine power performance measurement...... is tested. A pulsed lidar prototype, measuring horizontally, was installed on the nacelle of a multi-megawatt wind turbine. A met mast with a top-mounted cup anemometer standing at two rotor diameters in front of the turbine was used as a reference. After a data-filtering step, the comparison of the 10 min...... in wind speed measurements. A lower scatter in the power curve was observed for the lidar than for the mast. Since the lidar follows the turbine nacelle as it yaws, it always measures upwind. The wind measured by the lidar therefore shows a higher correlation with the turbine power fluctuations than...

  5. A lidar equipped with photon counter for measuring stratospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Hu, Huanling

    1991-01-01

    A large lidar system was developed at the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics. It is composed of a high power frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (120 mJ at 532 nm, 1 mrad), a 651 mm diameter receiving telescope, and a 64 channel photon counter. The lidar observations are controlled by an IBM PC/AT computer. One of the projects is to use the lidar system to make regular observations of stratospheric aerosols. Profiles of scattering ratio have been obtained since November 1989. Meanwhile, an Xe-Cl laser (308 nm wavelength) was assembled to allow the lidar to make measurements of vertical ozone distributions.

  6. Forest Canopy Height Estimation from Calipso Lidar Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Lucker, Patricia L.; Trepte, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The canopy height is an important parameter in aboveground biomass estimation. Lidar remote sensing from airborne or satellite platforms, has a unique capability for forestry applications. This study introduces an innovative concept to estimate canopy height using CALIOP two wavelengths lidar measurements. One main advantage is that the concept proposed here is dependent on the penetration depths at two wavelengths without making assumption about the last peak of waveform as the ground location, and it does not require the ancillary Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data in order to obtain the slope information of terrain. Canopy penetration depths at two wavelengths indicate moderately strong relationships for estimating the canopy height. Results show that the CALIOP-derived canopy heights were highly correlated with the ICESat/GLAS-derived values with a mean RMSE of 3.4 m and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.89. Our findings present a relationship between the penetration difference and canopy height, which can be used as another metrics for canopy height estimation, except the full waveforms.

  7. Comparison of Stratospheric Ozone Measurements Made by Lidar, SAGE II and HALOE Satellites over Hefei Area%激光雷达与SAGE II及HALOE卫星观测合肥地区平流层臭氧对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴永华; 胡欢陵; 胡顺星; 周军

    2000-01-01

    The validation of stratospheric ozone measurement by lidar was demonstrated by the comparison with ozone results of SAGE II and HALOE. The analysis indicates that ozone profiles by lidar agree well with ones by SAGE II over the altitudes 18~37.5~km, their relative differences were within 12% from 20 to 30~km and less than 26.5% from 32 to 35~km altitudes. The ozone distribution by Lidar and HALOE measurement coincided well with the relative difference less than 15% in the range 20~32km. Intercomparisons of ozone profiles presented by lidar, SAGE II and HALOE measurements on the same or adjacent days, show the better agreement in the stratosphere.%通过与SAGE II和HALOE两个卫星仪器多天的臭氧数据对比,验证了激光雷达观测合肥地区平流层臭氧数据的有效性。分析表明在18~37.5~km范围内激光雷达与SAGE II及HALOE观测得到的臭氧浓度分布表现了较好的一致性;其中,激光雷达与SAGE II臭氧结果的相对偏差一般在20~32~km范围内小于10%,~32~35~km范围内小于26.5%;激光雷达与HALOE臭氧结果的相对偏差在21~32~km范围内一般小于15%。激光雷达、SAGE II和HALOE三者同天或邻天的平流层臭氧结果相比,也表现了较好的一致性。

  8. Measurement of turbulence spectra using scanning pulsed wind lidars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sathe, A.; Mann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent velocity spectra, as measured by a scanning pulsed wind lidar (WindCube), are analyzed. The relationship between ordinary velocity spectra and lidar derived spectra is mathematically very complex, and deployment of the three-dimensional spectral velocity tensor is necessary. The resulting

  9. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  10. Evaluation of three lidar scanning strategies for turbulence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    , and w velocity variances and covariances. In order to assess the ability of these different scanning techniques to measure turbulence, a Halo scanning lidar, WindCube v2 pulsed lidar, and ZephIR continuous wave lidar were deployed at field sites in Oklahoma and Colorado with collocated sonic anemometers......Several errors occur when a traditional Doppler beam swinging (DBS) or velocity-azimuth display (VAD) strategy is used to measure turbulence with a lidar. To mitigate some of these errors, a scanning strategy was recently developed which employs six beam positions to independently estimate the u, v.......Results indicate that the six-beam strategy mitigates some of the errors caused by VAD and DBS scans, but the strategy is strongly affected by errors in the variance measured at the different beam positions. The ZephIR and WindCube lidars overestimated horizontal variance values by over 60% under unstable...

  11. Turbulence measurement with a two-beam nacelle lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Sathe, Ameya; Mioullet, A.

    The analysis of the turbulence intensity measurement is performed for a lidar measuring horizontally with two beams. First the turbulence intensity measured by such a system was evaluated theoretically. The Mann model of turbulence was used to evaluate the true value of the turbulence intensity...... of the wind speed and the main effects of the lidar measurement principles on turbulence intensity measurement were modeled: - A lidar senses the wind speed over the probe volume acting as a low pass-filter and thus cannot resolve high frequency turbulence; - The horizontal wind speed is retrieved from...... the combination of the radial speeds measured along two line-of-sights with different orientations; this results in the contamination of the lidar turbulence intensity measurement from the transverse component of the wind field. Secondly, the theoretical results were compared to experimental measurements. A two...

  12. Ground and aircraft lidar measurements of sea salt and dust plumes with a small wide-field-of-view system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John N.

    2004-12-01

    A small portable lidar system was recently used to derive aerosol optical concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. The mini lidar uses a telescope setup with a relatively wide field of view allowing for measurements from close in (~60 m range) with no near field correction. In order to account for the large dynamic range, a custom logarithmic amplifier is used. Lidar measurements have been made in Hawaii and examples will be shown. More recently the Lidar was mounted on an aircraft for an experiment in the United Arab Emirates. In this case, the Lidar system was used to looking up, forward and down. The Lidar measurements looking up and down provided vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations. The lidar looking forward were used to derive quantitative aerosol extinction values using an existing and a new approach. Preliminary examples of this UAE data are shown. Being able to model aerosol phase functions is important for both satellite and Lidar aerosol retrievals. Mie theory is adequate for spherical particles but complex aerosols such as dust and organics are more difficult to model. Here we discuss phase function measurements we have made with our ground based polar nephelometer for sea salt and more recently for dust in the United Arab Emirates.

  13. Requirements For Lidar Aerosol and Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Woeste, L.

    Laser remote sensing is the preferable method, when spatial-temporal resolved data is required. Data from stationary laser remote sensing devices at the earth surface give a very good impression about daily, annual and in general time trends of a measurand and can be compared sometimes to airborne instruments to get a direct link between optical and other methods. Space borne measurements on the other hand are the only possibility for obtaining as much data, as modeller wish to have to initialise, compare or validate there computation. But in this case it is very difficult to get the input in- formation, which is necessary for good quantitative analysis as well as to find points for comparison. In outer space and other harsh field environments only the simplest and most robust equipment for the respective purpose should be applied, to ensure a long-term stable operation. The first question is: what do we have to know about the properties of the atmosphere to get reliable data from instruments, which are just simple enough?, and secondly: how to set-up the instruments? Even for the evaluation of backscatter coefficients a density profile and the so-called Lidar-ratio, the ratio of backscatter to total volume scatter intensity, is necessary. Raman Lidar is a possibility to handle this problem by measuring aerosol extinction profiles. But again a density profile and in addition a guess about the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinc- tion between the Raman and laser wavelength are required. Unfortunately the tech- nique for Raman measurements is much more sensible and less suited for space borne measurements, because of the much smaller back scatter cross sections and the result- ing weak signals. It becomes worth, when we will have to maintain special laser with colours at molecular absorption bands in outer space, to measure gas concentration. I want to present simulation of optical systems for laser remote sensing, experimental experiences and compare air

  14. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    Radar and Lidar instruments are active remote sensing sensors with the potential of measuring forest vertical and horizontal structure and the aboveground biomass (AGB). In this paper, we present the analysis of radar and lidar data acquired over the La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Radar polarimetry at L-band (25 cm wavelength), P-band (70 cm wavelength) and interferometry at C-band (6 cm wavelength) and VV polarization were acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) system. Lidar images were provided by a large footprint airborne scanning Lidar known as the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). By including field measurements of structure and biomass over a variety of forest types, we examined: 1) sensitivity of radar and lidar measurements to forest structure and biomass, 2) accuracy of individual sensors for AGB estimation, and 3) synergism of radar imaging measurements with lidar imaging and sampling measurements for improving the estimation of 3-dimensional forest structure and AGB. The results showed that P-band radar combined with any interformteric measurement of forest height can capture approximately 85% of the variation of biomass in La Selva at spatial scales larger than 1 hectare. Similar analysis at L-band frequency captured only 70% of the variation. However, combination of lidar and radar measurements improved estimates of forest three-dimensional structure and biomass to above 90% for all forest types. We present a novel data fusion approach based on a Baysian estimation model with the capability of incorporating lidar samples and radar imagery. The model was used to simulate the potential of data fusion in future satellite mission scenarios as in BIOMASS (planned by ESA) at P-band and DESDynl (planned by NASA) at L-band. The estimation model was also able to quantify errors and uncertainties associated with the scale of measurements, spatial variability of forest structure, and differences in radar and lidar

  15. Urban Aerosol Optical Properties Measurement by Elastic Counter-Look Lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Wang X.; Boselli A.; He Y; Sannino A.; Song C.; Spinelli N.

    2016-01-01

    The new developed elastic lidar system utilizes two identical elastic lidars, in counter-look configuration, to measure aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficients without any hypotheses. Compared to elastic-Raman lidar and high spectral resolution lidar, the proposed counter-look elastic lidar can use low power eyesafe laser and all available wavelengths. With this prototype lidar system, urban aerosol optical properties and their spatial distribution have been directly measured, incl...

  16. On the stratospheric aerosol budget at Northern mid-latitudes from 21 years of ground-based lidar and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Hauchecorne, Alain; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Jumelet, Julien; Keckhut, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a new high-quality 21-year series of continuous stratospheric aerosol observations at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, 44° N, 6° E) in Southern France using two powerful and well-maintained lidar systems. In contrast to previous studies making use of the observations by aerosol-dedicated lidars operating within the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), we exploit the backscatter measurements from the off-line 355 nm channel of stratospheric ozone lidar (LiO3S) and low-gain 532 nm channel of stratospheric temperature lidar (LTA). The presented series of stratospheric aerosol backscatter and extinction at 532 nm, spanning from January 1994 through 2016, include on average 10-11 lidar acquisitions per month after careful quality screening. The OHP lidar observations are compared with global space-borne measurements of zonal-mean stratospheric extinction by SAGE II, GOMOS, OSIRIS and CALIOP instruments, altogether covering the time span of OHP lidar data sets. Both ground-based and satellite monthly-mean stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depth between 17 and 30 km altitude (sAOD1730km) series are in good cross-agreement with discrepancies well below the measurement errors, thereby ensuring the quality and coherency of all data sets exploited for our study. The global satellite observations are then used to identify the drivers of stratospheric aerosol variability observed locally by the OHP lidars. The 21-year aerosol series reflect two essential periods in the global volcanic activity over the past two decades. The first one, a long volcanically-quiescent period of low aerosol burden (0.002Vernier et al. (2011), takes place mainly during the southern tropics convective season, which together with the timescale of poleward transport is compatible with the observed seasonality of aerosol in the mid-latitude stratosphere.

  17. Measurement of turbulence spectra using scanning pulsed wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent velocity spectra, as measured by a scanning pulsed wind lidar (WindCube), are analyzed. The relationship between ordinary velocity spectra and lidar derived spectra is mathematically very complex, and deployment of the three-dimensional spectral velocity tensor is necessary. The resulting...... scanning lidar spectra depend on beam angles, line-of-sight averaging, sampling rate, and the full three-dimensional structure of the turbulence being measured, in a convoluted way. The model captures the attenuation and redistribution of the spectral energy at high and low wave numbers very well...

  18. Raman lidar measurements of tropospheric water vapor over Hefei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghua Wu(吴永华); Huanling Hu(胡欢陵); Shunxing Hu(胡顺星); Jun Zhou(周军)

    2003-01-01

    L625 Raman lidar has been developed for water vapor measurements over Hefei, China since September2000. By transmitting laser beam of frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser, Raman scattering signals of watervapor and nitrogen molecules are simultaneously detected by the cooled photomultipliers with photoncounting mode. Water vapor mixing ratios measured by Raman lidar show the good agreements withradiosonde observations, which indicates this Raman lidar is reliable. Many observation cases show thataerosol optical parameters have the good correlation with water vapor distribution in the lower troposphere.

  19. Sea surface wind speed estimation from space-based lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global satellite observations of lidar backscatter measurements acquired by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO mission and collocated sea surface wind speed data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E, are used to investigate the relation between wind driven wave slope variance and sea surface wind speed. The new slope variance – wind speed relation established from this study is similar to the linear relation from Cox-Munk (1954 and the log-linear relation from Wu (1972, 1990 for wind speed larger than 7 m/s and 13.3 m/s, respectively. For wind speed less than 7 m/s, the slope variance is proportional to the square root of the wind speed, assuming a two dimensional isotropic Gaussian wave slope distribution. This slope variance – wind speed relation becomes linear if a one dimensional Gaussian wave slope distribution is assumed. Contributions from whitecaps and subsurface backscattering are effectively removed by using 532 nm lidar depolarization measurements. This new slope variance – wind speed relation is used to derive sea surface wind speed from CALIPSO single shot lidar measurements (70 m spot size, after correcting for atmospheric attenuation. The CALIPSO wind speed result agrees with the collocated AMSR-E wind speed, with 1.2 m/s rms error.

  20. Lidar Measurements of Stratospheric Ozone, Aerosols and Temperature during the SAUNA Campaign at Sodankyla, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, T.; Twigg, L.; Sumnicht, G.; McPeters, R.; Bojkov, B.; Kivi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Sodankyla Total Column Ozone Intercomparison (SAUNA) campaign took place at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Center (FMI-ARC) at Sodankyla, Finland (67.37 N) in two separate phases during early spring 2006, and winter 2007. These campaigns has several goals: to determine and improve the accuracy of total column ozone measurements during periods of low solar zenith angle and high total column ozone; to determine the effect of ozone profile shape on the total column retrieval; and to make validate satellite ozone measurements under these same conditions. The GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar (STROZ), which makes profile measurements of ozone temperature, aerosols and water vapor participated in both phases of the campaign. During the deployments, more than 30 profile measurements were made by the lidar instrument, along with Dobson, Brewer, DOAS, ozonesonde, and satellite measurements. The presentation will concentrate on STROZ lidar results from the second phase of the campaign and comparisons with other instruments will be discussed. This will include both ground-based and satellite comparisons.

  1. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  2. Potential scientific research which will benefit from an airborne Doppler lidar measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    Areas of research which can be significantly aided by the Doppler lidar airborne system are described. The need for systematic development of the airborne Doppler lidar is discussed. The technology development associated with the systematic development of the system will have direct application to satellite systems for which the lidar also promises to be an effective instrument for atmospheric research.

  3. Distinguishing cirrus cloud presence in autonomous lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Campbell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP satellite-based cloud datasets from 2012 are investigated for metrics that help distinguish the cirrus cloud presence of in autonomous lidar measurements, using temperatures, heights, optical depth and phase. A thermal threshold, proposed by Sassen and Campbell (2001; SC2001 for cloud top temperature Ttop ≤ −37 °C, is evaluated vs. CALIOP algorithms that identify ice-phase cloud layers alone using depolarized backscatter. Global mean cloud top heights (11.15 vs. 10.07 km a.m.s.l., base heights (8.76 vs. 7.95 km a.m.s.l., temperatures (−58.48 °C vs. −52.18 °C and −42.40 °C vs. −38.13 °C, respectively for tops and bases and optical depths (1.18 vs. 1.23 reflect the sensitivity to these competing constraints. Over 99% of all Ttop ≤ −37 °C clouds are classified as ice by CALIOP Level 2 algorithms. Over 81% of all ice clouds correspond with Ttop ≤ −37 °C. For instruments lacking polarized measurements, and thus practical phase estimates, Ttop ≤ −37 °C proves stable for distinguishing cirrus, as opposed to the risks of glaciated liquid water cloud contamination occurring in a given sample from clouds identified at warmer temperatures. Uncertainties in temperature profiles use to collocate with lidar data (i.e., model reanalyses/sondes may justifiably relax the Ttop ≤ −37 °C threshold to include warmer cases. The ambiguity of "warm" (Ttop > −37 °C ice cloud genus cannot be reconciled completely with available measurements, however, conspicuously including phase. Cloud top heights and optical depths are evaluated as potential constraints, as functions of CALIOP-retrieved phase. However, these data provide, at best, additional constraint in regional samples, compared with temperature alone, and may exacerbate classification uncertainties overall globally.

  4. a Brief Climatology of Cirrus LIDAR Ratios Measured by High Spectral Resolution LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, R.; Holz, R.; Hair, J. W.; Vaughan, M. A.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    Our ability to detect and probe the vertical extent of cirrus was hugely improved with the launch of the NASA-CNES CALIPSO mission in April 2006. However, our skill at retrieving the optical properties of the cirrus detected by the CALIPSO lidar is not yet commensurate with our detection abilities. As with any new observing system, CALIPSO faces challenges and uncertainties in the retrieval of the geophysical parameters from its fundamental measurements. Specifically, extinction and optical depth retrievals for elastic backscatter lidars like CALIPSO typically rely on a priori assumptions about layer-mean extinction-to-backscatter ratios (AKA lidar ratios), which can vary regionally and for which uncertainties are high. To improve CALIPSO optical properties retrievals, we show High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements acquired with systems from the University of Wisconsin and NASA Langley. HSRLs can directly determine ice cloud extinction and lidar ratio by separately measuring the molecular and particulate components of the total backscattered signal, thus largely eliminating many of the uncertainties inherent in elastic backscatter retrievals. These measurements were acquired during the SEAC4RS (Huntsville, AL, USA and Singapore), and FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ 2014 (BAO tower near Boulder, CO, USA) field campaigns, and an intensive operations period in Hampton, VA, USA.

  5. Depolarization Ratio of Clouds Measured by Multiple-Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Makino, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We have developed the Multiple Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL) system for the study of optically thick low-level clouds. It has 8 telescopes; 4 telescopes for parallel channels and another 4 for perpendicular channels. The MFMSPL is the first lidar system that can measure depolarization ratio for optically thick clouds where multiple scattering is dominant. Field of view of each channel was 10mrad and was mounted with different angles ranging from 0 mrad (vertical) to 30mrad. And footprint size from the total FOV was achieved to be close to that of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar at the altitude of 1km in order to reproduce similar degree of multiple scattering effects as observed from space. The MFMSPL has started observations since June 2014 and has been continuously operated at National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan. Observations proved expected performance such that measured depolarization ratio was comparable to the one observed by CALIPSO lidar.

  6. Surface ozone measurements using differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sohan L.; Arya, B. C.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Arora, Arun K.; Sinha, Randhir K.

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have been influencing the global atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial era, causing shifts from its natural state. The measurements have shown that tropospheric ozone is increasing gradually due to anthropogenic activities. Surface ozone is a secondary pollutant, its concentration in lower troposphere depends upon its precursors (CO, CH4, non methane hydrocarbons, NOx) as well as weather and transport phenomenon. The surface ozone exceeding the ambient air quality standard is health hazard to human being, animal and vegetation. The regular information of its concentrations on ground levels is needed for setting ambient air quality objectives and understanding photo chemical air pollution in urban areas. A Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using a tunable CO2 laser has been designed and developed at National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, to monitor water vapour, surface ozone, ammonia, ethylene etc. Some times ethylene and surface ozone was found to be more than 40 ppb and 140 ppb respectively which is a health hazard. Seasonal variation in ozone concentrations shows maximum in the months of summer and autumn and minimum in monsoon and winter months. In present communication salient features of experimental set up and results obtained will be presented in detail.

  7. Measuring forest structure along productivity gradients in the Canadian boreal with small-footprint Lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Douglas K; Coops, Nicholas C; Wulder, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    The structure and productivity of boreal forests are key components of the global carbon cycle and impact the resources and habitats available for species. With this research, we characterized the relationship between measurements of forest structure and satellite-derived estimates of gross primary production (GPP) over the Canadian boreal. We acquired stand level indicators of canopy cover, canopy height, and structural complexity from nearly 25,000 km of small-footprint discrete return Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) data and compared these attributes to GPP estimates derived from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). While limited in our capacity to control for stand age, we removed recently disturbed and managed forests using information on fire history, roads, and anthropogenic change. We found that MODIS GPP was strongly linked to Lidar-derived canopy cover (r = 0.74, p Lidar-derived canopy height and structural complexity as these attributes are largely a function of stand age. A relationship was apparent between MODIS GPP and the maximum sampled heights derived from Lidar as growth rates and resource availability likely limit tree height in the prolonged absence of disturbance. The most structurally complex stands, as measured by the coefficient of variation of Lidar return heights, occurred where MODIS GPP was highest as productive boreal stands are expected to contain a wider range of tree heights and transition to uneven-aged structures faster than less productive stands. While MODIS GPP related near-linearly to Lidar-derived canopy cover, the weaker relationships to Lidar-derived canopy height and structural complexity highlight the importance of stand age in determining the structure of boreal forests. We conclude that an improved quantification of how both productivity and disturbance shape stand structure is needed to better understand the current state of boreal forests in Canada and how these forests are changing in

  8. Ocean Lidar Measurements of Beam Attenuation and a Roadmap to Accurate Phytoplankton Biomass Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Mike; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhai, Pengwang; Weimer, Carl; Winker, David; Verhappen, Carolus C.; Butler, Carolyn; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hunt, Bill; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Lifermann, Anne; Josset, Damien; Hou, Weilin; MacDonnell, David; Rhew, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30° off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  9. An Innovative Concept for Spacebased Lidar Measurement of Ocean Carbon Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Michael; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; hide

    2015-01-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30Âdeg off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  10. Variability and evolution of the midlatitude stratospheric aerosol budget from 22 years of ground-based lidar and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaykin, Sergey M.; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Jumelet, Julien; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Bourassa, Adam; Degenstein, Doug A.; Rieger, Landon A.; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Robert, Charles; DeLand, Matthew; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2017-02-01

    The article presents new high-quality continuous stratospheric aerosol observations spanning 1994-2015 at the French Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, 44° N, 6° E) obtained by two independent, regularly maintained lidar systems operating within the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Lidar series are compared with global-coverage observations by Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS), Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), and Ozone Mapping Profiling Suite (OMPS) satellite instruments, altogether covering the time span of OHP lidar measurements. Local OHP and zonal-mean satellite series of stratospheric aerosol optical depth are in excellent agreement, allowing for accurate characterization of stratospheric aerosol evolution and variability at northern midlatitudes during the last 2 decades. The combination of local and global observations is used for a careful separation between volcanically perturbed and quiescent periods. While the volcanic signatures dominate the stratospheric aerosol record, the background aerosol abundance is found to be modulated remotely by the poleward transport of convectively cleansed air from the deep tropics and aerosol-laden air from the Asian monsoon region. The annual cycle of background aerosol at midlatitudes, featuring a minimum during late spring and a maximum during late summer, correlates with that of water vapor from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Observations covering two volcanically quiescent periods over the last 2 decades provide an indication of a growth in the nonvolcanic component of stratospheric aerosol. A statistically significant factor of 2 increase in nonvolcanic aerosol since 1998, seasonally restricted to late summer and fall, is associated with the influence of the Asian monsoon and growing pollution therein.

  11. Lidar Uncertainty Measurement Experiment (LUMEX) - Understanding Sampling Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, W. A.; Banta, R. M.; Hardesty, M.; Pichugina, Y.; Senff, Christoph; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A.; Carroll, B.; Delgado, R.; Muschinski, A.

    2016-06-01

    Coherent Doppler LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has been widely used to provide measurements of several boundary layer parameters such as profiles of wind speed, wind direction, vertical velocity statistics, mixing layer heights and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). An important aspect of providing this wide range of meteorological data is to properly characterize the uncertainty associated with these measurements. With the above intent in mind, the Lidar Uncertainty Measurement Experiment (LUMEX) was conducted at Erie, Colorado during the period June 23rd to July 13th, 2014. The major goals of this experiment were the following: Characterize sampling error for vertical velocity statistics Analyze sensitivities of different Doppler lidar systems Compare various single and dual Doppler retrieval techniques Characterize error of spatial representativeness for separation distances up to 3 km Validate turbulence analysis techniques and retrievals from Doppler lidars This experiment brought together 5 Doppler lidars, both commercial and research grade, for a period of three weeks for a comprehensive intercomparison study. The Doppler lidars were deployed at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) site in Erie, site of a 300 m meteorological tower. This tower was instrumented with six sonic anemometers at levels from 50 m to 300 m with 50 m vertical spacing. A brief overview of the experiment outline and deployment will be presented. Results from the sampling error analysis and its implications on scanning strategy will be discussed.

  12. Evaluation of three lidar scanning strategies for turbulence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Wharton, Sonia; Sathe, Ameya; Bonin, Timothy A.; Chilson, Phillip B.; Muschinski, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several errors occur when a traditional Doppler beam swinging (DBS) or velocity-azimuth display (VAD) strategy is used to measure turbulence with a lidar. To mitigate some of these errors, a scanning strategy was recently developed which employs six beam positions to independently estimate the u, v, and w velocity variances and covariances. In order to assess the ability of these different scanning techniques to measure turbulence, a Halo scanning lidar, WindCube v2 pulsed lidar, and ZephIR continuous wave lidar were deployed at field sites in Oklahoma and Colorado with collocated sonic anemometers.Results indicate that the six-beam strategy mitigates some of the errors caused by VAD and DBS scans, but the strategy is strongly affected by errors in the variance measured at the different beam positions. The ZephIR and WindCube lidars overestimated horizontal variance values by over 60 % under unstable conditions as a result of variance contamination, where additional variance components contaminate the true value of the variance. A correction method was developed for the WindCube lidar that uses variance calculated from the vertical beam position to reduce variance contamination in the u and v variance components. The correction method reduced WindCube variance estimates by over 20 % at both the Oklahoma and Colorado sites under unstable conditions, when variance contamination is largest. This correction method can be easily applied to other lidars that contain a vertical beam position and is a promising method for accurately estimating turbulence with commercially available lidars.

  13. Nacelle lidar for power curve measurement - Avedoere campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Davoust, S.

    2013-01-15

    Wind turbine power performance requires the measurement of the free wind speed at hub height upstream of the turbine. For modern multi-megawatt wind turbines, this means that the wind speed needs to be measured at great heights, from 80m to 150m. The standard wind speed measurement with a cup anemometer, requiring the erection of a tall met mast, then becomes more and more challenging and expensive. A forward looking lidar, mounted on the turbine nacelle, combines the advantages of a nacelle based instrument - no mast/platform installation difficulties - and those of the lidar technology - remote measurement of the wind speed away from the instrument. In the first phase of the EUDP project: ''Nacelle lidar for power performance measurement'', a measurement campaign with a nacelle lidar prototype placed on an onshore turbine demonstrated the potential of the technology for power curve measurement. The main deviations of this method to the requirement of the IEC 61400-12-1 were identified and a procedure was established for the use of a nacelle lidar specifically for power curve measurement. This report describes the results of a second measurement campaign aiming at testing and finalising the procedure. (Author)

  14. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekeri Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015.

  15. Retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction from airborne coherent Doppler wind lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chouza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for calibration and quantitative aerosol optical properties retrieval from Doppler wind lidars (DWL is presented in this work. Due to the strong wavelength dependence of the atmospheric molecular backscatter and the low sensitivity of the coherent detection to spectrally broad signals, calibration methods for aerosol lidars cannot be applied to a coherent DWLs usually operating at wavelengths between 1.5–2 μm. Instead, concurrent measurements of an airborne DWL at 2 μm and the POLIS ground-based aerosol lidar at 532 nm are used in this work, in combination with sun photometer measurements, for the calibration and retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles. The proposed method was applied to measurements from the SALTRACE experiment in June–July 2013, which aimed at quantifying the aerosol transport and change in aerosol properties from the Sahara desert to the Caribbean. The retrieved backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles from the airborne DWL are within 20% of POLIS aerosol lidar and CALIPSO satellite measurements. Thus the proposed method extends the capabilities of coherent DWL to measure profiles of the horizontal and vertical wind towards aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles, which is of high benefit for aerosol transport studies.

  16. Progress in Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Broadband LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.; Georgieva, Elena; Huang, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Innovative active system using advanced source technology development will enable precise daytime or nighttime measurements of column CO2. Directly responds to NRC DS ASCENDS mission. Number of lasers is reduced compared to competing technologies which reduces the complexity of sensor and thus the cost and risk of failure. Knowledge gained from previously developed passive sensor decreases the risk and cost of the present lidar system development. The instrument can play a significant role as an intercomparison instrument for OCO (Orbiting Carbon Observatory) if it is rebuilt and launched as well as other laser based instruments under development for participation in ASCENDS. It can play a role as an airborne instrument in its own right in addressing the problems of scale arising from differences between point observations by the existing ground based CO2 network and wider area measurements obtained by satellites. Developed 2.0 micron broadband system as well and will compare performance of both systems to choose optimal approach for ASCENDS. Have begun development of approach that uses array detectors instead of APD. This approach will have lower noise than APD and may simplify design of the detector optical train.

  17. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite measurements should not be viewed as a replacement for stream gauges. However, occasionally it is suggested that because satellite-based measurements can provide river discharge, a motivation for satellite approaches is an increasing lack of stream gauges. This is an argument for more stream gauges, but not necessarily for satellite measurements. Rather, in-situ and spaceborne methods of estimating discharge are complementary. Stream gauges provide frequent measurements at one point in the river reach whereas satellites have the potential to measure throughout all reaches but at orbital repeat intervals of days to weeks. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT) is an opportunity to further develop these complements. The motivation for SWOT, and indeed for any satellite based method of estimating discharge, should not be as a replacement for stream gauges. Scientific and application uses should motivate the measurements. For example, understanding floods with their dynamic water surfaces are best sampled from remote platforms that provide water surface elevations throughout the floodwave. As another example, today’s water and energy balance models are giving outputs at increasing spatial resolution and are making use of water surface elevations throughout the modeled basin. These models require a similar resolution in the calibrating and validating observations. We should also be aware of practical limitations. In addition to providing spatially distributed hydrodynamic measurements on rivers, SWOT will be able to measure storage changes in the estimated 30 million lakes in the world that are larger than a hectare. Knowing the storage changes in these lakes is especially important in certain regions such as the Arctic but gauging even a small fraction of these is impractical. Another motivator for satellite methods is that even in the presence of stream gauges, discharge data is not always well shared throughout all countries

  18. Monostatic Doppler lidar using an Nd:YAG laser for wind-velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersenev, V. I.; Kaptsov, L. N.; Priezzhev, A. V.

    1987-10-01

    A monostatic Doppler lidar using a CW Nd:YAG laser has been developed for measurements of wind velocity. A series of atmospheric measurements using this lidar was carried out. At medium turbulence levels, the limiting lidar range is 200 m. As compared with a CO2 Doppler lidar, the Nd:YAG lidar has a better spatial resolution, is more convenient to use, and does not require a cooled photodetector.

  19. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  20. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2016-04-08

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R² > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift.

  1. An Assessment of Differences in Tree Cover Measurements between Landsat and Lidar-derived Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H.; Song, X. P.; Armston, J.; Hancock, S.; Duncanson, L.; Zhao, F. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Huang, C.; Hansen, M.; Goetz, S. J.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-12-01

    Tree cover is one of the most important canopy structural variables describe interactions between atmosphere and biosphere, and is also linked to the function and quality of ecosystem services. Large-area tree cover measurements are traditionally based on multispectral satellite imagery, and there are several global products available at high to medium spatial resolution (30m-1km). Recent developments in lidar remote sensing, including the upcoming Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) lidar, offers an alternative means to map tree cover over broad geographical extents. However, differences in the definition of tree cover and the retrieval method can result in large discrepancies between products derived from multispectral imagery and lidar data, and can potentially impact their further use in ecosystem modelling and above-ground biomass mapping. To separate the effects of cover definition and retrieval method, we first conducted a meta-analysis of several tree cover data sets across different biogeographic regions using three publicly available Landsat-based tree cover products (GLCF, NLCD and GLAD), and two waveform and discrete return airborne lidar products. We found that, whereas Landsat products had low-moderate agreements (up to 40% mean difference) on tree cover estimates particularly at the high end (e.g. >80%), airborne lidar can provide more accurate and consistent measurements (mean difference definitions of tree cover (e.g. crown cover vs. fractional cover). We further recommended the use of lidar data as a complement or alternative to ultra-fine resolution images in training/validating Landsat-class images for large-area tree cover mapping.

  2. LIDAR wind speed measurements at a Taiwan onshore wind park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ta-Hui; Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Li, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Ya-Fei; Tai, Tzy-Hwan; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of wind speed and wind direction were carried out using a Leosphere Windcube LIDAR system at a Taiwan onshore wind park. The Lidar shot a total of five laser beams to the atmosphere to collect the light-of-sight (LOS) velocity. Four beams were sent successively in four cardinal directions along a 28° scanning cone angle, followed by a fifth, vertical beam. An unchangeable sampling rate of approximately 1.2 Hz was set in the LIDAR system to collect the LOS velocity. The supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data from two GE 1.5 MW wind turbines near the LIDAR deployment site were acquired for the whole measuring period from February 4 to February 16 of 2015. The SCADA data include the blade angular velocity, the wind velocity measured at hub height from an anemometer mounted on the nacelle, the wind turbine yaw angle, and power production; each parameter was recorded as averages over 1-min periods. The data analysis involving the LIDAR measurements and the SCADA data were performed to obtain the turbulent flow statistics. The results show that the turbine power production has significant dependence to the wind speed, wind direction, turbulence intensity and wind shear.

  3. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Concentration in the ASCENDS 2014 Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Chen, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We report progress in demonstrating a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line by using 30 wavelength samples distributed across the lube. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength 10 times per second. The retrievals solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape and the column average CO2 concentrations using radiative transfer calculations based on HITRAN, the aircraft altitude, range to the scattering surface, and the atmospheric conditions. We compare these to CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. The number of wavelength samples can be reduced in the retrievals. During the ASCENDS airborne campaign in 2013 two flights were made in February over snow in the Rocky Mountains and the Central Plains allowing measurement of snow-covered surface reflectivity. Several improvements were made to the lidar for the 2014 campaign. These included using a new step-locked laser diode source, and incorporating a new HgCdTe APD detector and analog digitizer into the lidar receiver. Testing showed this detector had higher sensitivity, analog response, and a more linear dynamic range than the PMT detector used previously. In 2014 flights were made in late August and early September over the California Central Valley, the redwood forests along the California coast, two desert areas in Nevada and California, and two flights above growing agriculture in Iowa. Two flights were also made under OCO-2 satellite ground tracks. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, and mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, and through thin clouds and aerosol scattering. The lidar measurements clearly

  4. A semianalytic Monte Carlo code for modelling LIDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Elisa; Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Bortoli, Daniele; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margherita; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2007-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) is an optical active remote sensing technology with many applications in atmospheric physics. Modelling of LIDAR measurements appears useful approach for evaluating the effects of various environmental variables and scenarios as well as of different measurement geometries and instrumental characteristics. In this regard a Monte Carlo simulation model can provide a reliable answer to these important requirements. A semianalytic Monte Carlo code for modelling LIDAR measurements has been developed at ISAC-CNR. The backscattered laser signal detected by the LIDAR system is calculated in the code taking into account the contributions due to the main atmospheric molecular constituents and aerosol particles through processes of single and multiple scattering. The contributions by molecular absorption, ground and clouds reflection are evaluated too. The code can perform simulations of both monostatic and bistatic LIDAR systems. To enhance the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation, analytical estimates and expected value calculations are performed. Artificial devices (such as forced collision, local forced collision, splitting and russian roulette) are moreover foreseen by the code, which can enable the user to drastically reduce the variance of the calculation.

  5. Model Predictive Control of Wind Turbines using Uncertain LIDAR Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Soltani, Mohsen; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2013-01-01

    The problem of Model predictive control (MPC) of wind turbines using uncertain LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) measurements is considered. A nonlinear dynamical model of the wind turbine is obtained. We linearize the obtained nonlinear model for different operating points, which are determined...... by the effective wind speed on the rotor disc. We take the wind speed as a scheduling variable. The wind speed is measurable ahead of the turbine using LIDARs, therefore, the scheduling variable is known for the entire prediction horizon. By taking the advantage of having future values of the scheduling variable...... on wind speed estimation and measurements from the LIDAR is devised to find an estimate of the delay and compensate for it before it is used in the controller. Comparisons between the MPC with error compensation, the MPC without error compensation and an MPC with re-linearization at each sample point...

  6. Extreme dust storm over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015: satellite, lidar, and surface observations in the Cyprus region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert; Nisantzi, Argyro; Solomos, Stavros; Kallos, George; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2016-11-01

    A record-breaking dust storm originating from desert regions in northern Syria and Iraq occurred over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015. In this contribution of a series of two articles (part 1, observations; part 2, atmospheric modeling), we provide a comprehensive overview of the aerosol conditions during this extreme dust outbreak in the Cyprus region. These observations are based on satellite observations (MODIS, moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer) of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Ångström exponent, surface particle mass (PM10) concentrations measured at four sites in Cyprus, visibility observations at three airports in southern Cyprus and corresponding conversion products (particle extinction coefficient, dust mass concentrations), EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) lidar observations of dust vertical layering over Limassol, particle optical properties (backscatter, extinction, lidar ratio, linear depolarization ratio), and derived profiles of dust mass concentrations. Maximum 550 nm AOT exceeded values of 5.0, according to MODIS, and the mass loads were correspondingly > 10 g m-2 over Larnaca and Limassol during the passage of an extremely dense dust front on 8 September 2015. Hourly mean PM10 values were close to 8000 µg m-3 and the observed meteorological optical range (visibility) was reduced to 300-750 m at Larnaca and Limassol. The visibility observations suggest peak values of the near-surface total suspended particle (TSP) extinction coefficients of 6000 Mm-1 and thus TSP mass concentrations of 10 000 µg m-3. The Raman polarization lidar observations mainly indicated a double layer structure of the dust plumes (reaching to about 4 km height), pointing to at least two different dust source regions. Dust particle extinction coefficients (532 nm) already exceeded 1000 Mm-1 and the mass concentrations reached 2000 µg m-3 in the elevated dust layers on 7 September, more than 12 h before the peak dust front on

  7. Upconversion-based lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Fix, Andreas; Wirth, Martin

    2016-01-01

    For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm, and dete......For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm...

  8. Assessing spaceborne lidar detection and characterization of aerosols near clouds using coincident airborne lidar and other measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Omar, A. H.; Burton, S. P.; Rogers, R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    The objectives are to 1) evaluate potential shortcomings in the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol height detection concerning specific biomass burning smoke events informed by airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in different cloud environments and 2) study the lidar-derived atmospheric parameters in the vicinity of clouds for the cases where smoke is within or above clouds. In the case of light absorbing aerosols like biomass burning smoke, studies show that the greater the cloud cover below the aerosols, the more likely the aerosols are to heat the planet. An accurate aerosol height assumption is also crucial to a correct retrieval of aerosol chemical composition from passive space-based measurements (through the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and aerosol absorption coefficient, as exemplified by aerosol retrievals using the passive Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)). Strong smoke events are recognized as very difficult to quantify from space using passive (MODIS, OMI etc...) or active (CALIOP) satellite sensors for different reasons. This study is performed through (i) the selection of smoke events with coincident CALIOP and airborne HSRL aerosol observations, with smoke presence determined according to the HSRL aerosol classification data, (ii) the order of such events by range of HSRL aerosol optical depth, total color ratio and depolarization ratio (the latter two informing on the size and shape of the particles) and the evaluation of CALIOP's detection, classification and retrieval performance for each event, (iii) the study of the HSRL (or CALIOP when available) atmospheric parameters (total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, mean attenuated backscatter) in the vicinity of clouds for each smoke event.

  9. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA). In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  10. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Songhua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA. In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  11. Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, R. T. H.

    1969-01-01

    Lidar is an optical radar technique employing laser energy. Variations in signal intensity as a function of range provide information on atmospheric constituents, even when these are too tenuous to be normally visible. The theoretical and technical basis of the technique is described and typical values of the atmospheric optical parameters given. The significance of these parameters to atmospheric and meteorological problems is discussed. While the basic technique can provide valuable information about clouds and other material in the atmosphere, it is not possible to determine particle size and number concentrations precisely. There are also inherent difficulties in evaluating lidar observations. Nevertheless, lidar can provide much useful information as is shown by illustrations. These include lidar observations of: cirrus cloud, showing mountain wave motions; stratification in clear air due to the thermal profile near the ground; determinations of low cloud and visibility along an air-field approach path; and finally the motion and internal structure of clouds of tracer materials (insecticide spray and explosion-caused dust) which demonstrate the use of lidar for studying transport and diffusion processes.

  12. Cloud boundary height measurements using lidar and radar

    CERN Document Server

    Venema, V; Apituley, A; Van Lammeren, J A; Ligthart, L; Venema, Victor; Russchenberg, Herman; Apituley, Arnoud; Lammeren, Andre van; Ligthart, Leo

    2000-01-01

    Using only lidar or radar an accurate cloud boundary height estimate is often not possible. The combination of lidar and radar can give a reliable cloud boundary estimate in a much broader range of cases. However, also this combination with standard methods still can not measure the cloud boundaries in all cases. This will be illustrated with data from the Clouds and Radiation measurement campaigns, CLARA. Rain is a problem: the radar has problems to measure the small cloud droplets in the presence of raindrops. Similarly, few large particles below cloud base can obscure the cloud base in radar measurements. And the radar reflectivity can be very low at the cloud base of water clouds or in large regions of ice clouds, due to small particles. Multiple cloud layers and clouds with specular reflections can pose problems for lidar. More advanced measurement techniques are suggested to solve these problems. An angle scanning lidar can, for example, detect specular reflections, while using information from the rada...

  13. Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, J.-P.; Aubry, Y.

    1981-09-01

    It is noted that a photodetector at the telescope focal plane of a lidar produces a signal which is processed, giving information on the concentration of the species being monitored. The delay between the emitted and return signals indicates the distance to the interacting volume. Because of the poor efficiency of the interaction processes, the main difficulty in developing a good lidar has to do with the availability of sufficiently efficient lasers. Certain laser characteristics are discussed, and a CNES program for the development of lasers for lidar techniques is presented, future space applications being considered as mid-term objectives. The various components of the laser system developed by CNES are described. These are a dual frequency tunable oscillator, the amplifier chain, the beam control unit and wavelength servo-system, and the harmonic conversion subsystem.

  14. Comparison of 3D turbulence measurements using three staring wind lidars and a sonic anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Courtney, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The goals are to compare lidar volume averaged wind measurement with point measurement reference sensors and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing 3D turbulence measurements with lidars. For that purpose three pulsed lidars were used in staring mode, placed so that their beams crossed clos...

  15. Upconversion-based lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Fix, Andreas; Wirth, Martin

    2016-01-01

    For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm...

  16. Lidar measurements of launch vehicle exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Phan D.; Curtis, David; Farley, Robert; Soletsky, Philip; Davidson, Gilbert; Gelbwachs, Jerry A.

    1997-10-01

    The Mobile Lidar Trailer (MLT) was developed and operated to characterize launch vehicle exhaust plume and its effects on the environment. Two recent applications of this facility are discussed in this paper. In the first application, the MLT was used to characterize plumes in the stratosphere up to 45 km in support of the Air Force Space and Missile Center's Rocket Impact on Stratospheric Ozone program. Solid rocket motors used by Titan IV and other heavy launch vehicles release large quantities of gaseous hydrochloric acid in the exhaust and cause concerns about a possible depletion of the ozone layer. The MLT was deployed to Cape Canaveral Air Station since October 1995 to monitor ozone and to investigate plume dynamics and properties. Six campaigns have been conducted and more are planned to provide unique data with the objective of addressing the environmental issues. The plume was observed to disperse rapidly into horizontally extended yet surprisingly thin layer with thickness recorded in over 700 lidar profiles to be less than 250 meters. MLT operates with the laser wavelengths of 532, 355 and 308 nm and a scanning receiving telescope. Data on particle backscattering at the three wavelengths suggest a consistent growth of particle size in the 2-3 hour observation sessions following the launch. In the second type of application, the MLT was used as a remote sensor of nitrogen dioxide, a caustic gaseous by-product of common liquid propellant oxidizer. Two campaigns were conducted at the Sol Se Mete Canyon test site in New Mexico in December 1996 an January 1997 to study the dispersion of nitrogen dioxide and rocket plume.

  17. Performance simulation of a spaceborne infrared coherent lidar for measuring tropospheric wind profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Kyoka, Gamo; Mizutani, Kohei; Chikako, Takahashi; Itabe, Toshikazu; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Kubota, Takuji; Okamoto, Kozo; Oki, Riko; Satoh, Masaki; Satoh, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    An effort has begun in Japan to develop a spaceborne instrument for measuring tropospheric winds. This project is a collaboration between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI, Japan) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) [1,2]. The aim is to measure the horizontal wind field in the troposphere on a global scale with a precision better than 3 ms-1, and a vertical and horizontal (along the satellite ground track) resolution better than 1 km and 100 km, respectively. In order to support the definition and the development of the instrument, an end-to-end simulator has been implemented including modules for i) simulating the time-dependent laser shot return power, ii) for averaging the spectral power of several returns and iii) for estimating the line-of-sight wind from the Doppler shift of the averaged spectra. The simulations take into account the satellite position and motion along the orbit track, the observational and instrumental characteristics, a 3-D representation of the relevant atmospheric parameters (i.e. wind field, cloud coverage and aerosols distribution) and the Earth surface characteristics. The simulator and the method for estimating the line-of-sight wind will be presented. We will show the results obtained for a payload composed of two 2-μm coherent LIDARs looking in orthogonal directions, and for a satellite moving on a low orbit. The precision, accuracy and the vertical and horizontal resolution of the wind estimates will be discussed. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T. Ishibashi, P. Baron, and T. Nishizawa, Future Doppler lidar wind measurement from space in Japan, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8529, 2012 [2] S. Ishii, H. Iwai, K. Mizutani, P. Baron, T. Itabe, H. Fukuoka, T. Ishikawa, A. Sato and A. Asai, 2-μm coherent LIDAR for CO2 and wind measurements, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8872, 2013

  18. The Three-Dimensional Spatial Structure of Cirrus Clouds Determined from Lidar Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Wylie, D.; Wolf, W.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous imagery from the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) and meteorological satellites were used to quantify the spatial structure of cirrus clouds with 60 m resolution. This data was used to determine the spatial distributions of cloud base altitude, cloud top altitude, and mid-cloud altitude. Two dimensional auto-correlation functions describing the mean shape of cirrus clouds were computed. Because cirrus clouds seldom have distinct edges, these correlation functions are derived as a function of a threshold value which defines the cloud edge.

  19. New mobile Raman lidar for measurement of tropospheric water vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chenbo; ZHOU Jun; YUE Guming; QI Fudi; FAN Aiyuan

    2007-01-01

    The content of water vapor in atmosphere is very little and the ratio of volume of moisture to air is about 0.1%-3%,but water vapor is the most active molecule in atmosphere.There are many absorption bands in infrared(IR)wavelength for water vapor,and water vapor is also an important factor in cloud formation and precipitation,therefore it takes a significant position in the global radiation budget and climatic changes.Because of the advantages of the high resolution,wide range,and highly automatic operation,the Raman lidar has become a new-style and useful tool to measure water vapor.In this paper,first,the new mobile Raman lidar's structure and specifications were introduced.Second,the process method of lidar data was described.Finally,the practical and comparative experiments were made over Hefei City in China.The results of measurement show that this lidar has the ability to gain profiles of ratio of water vapor mixing ratio from surface to a height of about 8 km at night.Mean-while,the measurement of water vapor in daytime has been taken,and the profiles of water vapor mixing ratio at ground level have been detected.

  20. Eye-safe lidar system for pesticide spray drift measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2015-02-04

    Spray drift is one of the main sources of pesticide contamination. For this reason, an accurate understanding of this phenomenon is necessary in order to limit its effects. Nowadays, spray drift is usually studied by using in situ collectors which only allow time-integrated sampling of specific points of the pesticide clouds. Previous research has demonstrated that the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique can be an alternative for spray drift monitoring. This technique enables remote measurement of pesticide clouds with high temporal and distance resolution. Despite these advantages, the fact that no lidar instrument suitable for such an application is presently available has appreciably limited its practical use. This work presents the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for the monitoring of pesticide clouds. Parameter design of this system is carried out via signal-to-noise ratio simulations. The instrument is based on a 3-mJ pulse-energy erbium-doped glass laser, an 80-mm diameter telescope, an APD optoelectronic receiver and optomechanically adjustable components. In first test measurements, the lidar system has been able to measure a topographic target located over 2 km away. The instrument has also been used in spray drift studies, demonstrating its capability to monitor the temporal and distance evolution of several pesticide clouds emitted by air-assisted sprayers at distances between 50 and 100 m.

  1. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  2. Design of a Non-scanning Lidar for Wind Velocity and Direction Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar system for wind velocity and direction measurement is presented. The lidar use a wide field of view (FOV) objective lens as an optical antenna for both beam transmitting and signal receiving. By four fibers coupled on different position on the focal plane, the lidar can implement wind vector measurement without any scanning movement.

  3. Design of a Non-scanning Lidar for Wind Velocity and Direction Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Doppler lidar system for wind velocity and direction measurement is presented. The lidar use a wide field of view (FOV objective lens as an optical antenna for both beam transmitting and signal receiving. By four fibers coupled on different position on the focal plane, the lidar can implement wind vector measurement without any scanning movement.

  4. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  5. Remote Measurement of Shallow Media Depth Using Polarization Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Steven E.

    Active noncontact range measurement sensors transmit electromagnetic radiation onto a remote target and process the received scattered signals to resolve the separation distance, or range, between the sensor and target. For lidar sensors, range is resolved by halving the roundtrip transit time multiplied by the speed of light, accounting for the refractive indices of the transit media. The ranging technique enables remote measurement of depth by resolving the range to sequential surfaces. Depth measurement in the shallow regime has conventionally been limited by the presence of ambiguous, overlapping optical pulses scattered from sequential surfaces. Enhanced performance in the shallow regime has conventionally come at the expense of the increased cost and complexity associated with high performance componentry. The issue of remote shallow depth measurement presents an opportunity for a novel approach to lidar sensor development. In this work, I discuss how the issue of ambiguity in the shallow depth measurement may be addressed by exploiting the polarization orientation of the transmitted and received optical signals, the components of which are modified during the range observation by naturally-occurring phenomena. Conventional pulsed time of flight laser ranging sensors are unable to resolve the shallow depth between overlapping pulses received from sequential surfaces due to operation in the scalar lidar regime, where the intensity of the received scattered signal is measured with no regard for polarization information. Enhanced performance by scalar lidar sensors in the shallow media regime has been conventionally enabled through incorporation of picosecond pulse width lasers and fast photodetectors, along with their associated increase in cost and complexity. The polarization lidar approach to shallow depth measurement developed in the dissertation facilitates the use of common lasers, optics, and detection componentry, making it comparatively less complex

  6. Retrieval of ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient from space-borne CALIOP lidar measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Lucker, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; Audouy, Claude; Ferrier, Christophe; Haouchine, Said; Hunt, Bill; Getzewich, Brian

    2016-12-12

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30° off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180° scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  7. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  8. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razenkov Ilya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm.

  9. Optical characteristics of biomass burning aerosols over Southeastern Europe determined from UV-Raman lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of smoke on the aerosol loading in the free troposphere over Thessaloniki, Greece is examined in this paper. Ten cases during 2001–2005 were identified when very high aerosol optical depth values in the free troposphere were observed with a UV-Raman lidar. Particle dispersion modeling (FLEXPART and satellite hot spot fire detection (ATSR showed that these high free tropospheric aerosol optical depths are mainly attributed to the advection of smoke plumes from biomass burning regions over Thessaloniki. The biomass burning regions were found to extend across Russia in the latitudinal belt between 45° N–55° N, as well as in Eastern Europe (Baltic countries, Western Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine. The highest frequency of agricultural fires occurred during the summer season (mainly in August. The data collected allowed the optical characterization of the smoke aerosols that arrived over Greece, where limited information has so far been available. Two-wavelength backscatter lidar measurements showed that the backscatter-related Ångström exponent ranged between 0.5 and 2.4 indicating a variety of particle sizes. UV-Raman lidar measurements showed that for smoke particles the extinction to backscatter ratios varied between 40 sr for small particles to 100 sr for large particles. Dispersion model estimations of the carbon monoxide tracer concentration profiles for smoke particles indicate that the variability of the optical parameters is a function of the age of the smoke plumes.

  10. Lidar measurements of aerosol at Varanasi (25.28° N, 82.96° E), India during CAIPEEX scientific campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu, R.; Bhavani Kumar, Y.; Rao, Y. Jaya; Samuel, E. James J.; Thara, P.; Jayaraman, A.

    2016-05-01

    A compact dual polarization lidar (DPL) was designed and developed at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL) for daytime measurements of the boundary layer aerosol distribution and depolarization properties with very high vertical and temporal resolution. The lidar employs a compact flashlamp pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and operates at 532 nm wavelength. The lidar system uses a stable biaxial configuration between transmitter and receiver units. The receiver utilizes a 150 mm Schmidt Cassegranin telescope for collecting laser returns from the atmosphere. The collected backscattered light is separated into co and cross-polarization signals using a polarization beam splitter cube. A set of mini-PMTs have been used for detection of light from atmosphere during daylight period. A two channel transient recorder system with built-in ADC has been employed for recording the detected light. The entire lidar system is housed in a compact cabinet which can be easily transported for field measurements. During 2014, the lidar system was installed at the Banaras Hindu University (BHU) campus, Varanasi (25.28° N, 82.96° E, 82 m AMSL) and operated for a period of three months in to support the cloud aerosol interaction and precipitation enhancement experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted by Indian Institute of tropical meteorology (IITM). During this campaign period, the lidar measurements were carried out in the vertical direction with spatial resolution of 7.5 m and time sampling of 30s. The lidar measurements revealed the occurrence of boundary layer growth during convective periods and also detected the long-range transport dust layers with significant depolarization. In the present paper, we present the lidar measurements obtained during the campaign period and discuss the observation of transport of dust layer over the experimental site with support of back trajectory analysis and satellite data. The Lidar observations were compared with the available satellite

  11. High-resolution measurements of humidity and temperature with lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Spaeth, Florian; Hammann, Eva; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional thermodynamic fields of temperature and moisture including their turbulent fluctuations have been observed with the two scanning lidar systems of University of Hohenheim in three field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. In this contribution, we will introduce these two self-developed instruments and illustrate their performance with measurement examples. Finally, an outlook to envisioned future research activities with the new data sets of the instruments is given. Our temperature lidar is based on the rotational Raman technique. The scanning rotational Raman lidar (RRL) uses a seeded frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. A two-mirror scanner with a 40-cm telescope collects the atmospheric backscatter signals. Humidity measurements are made with a scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which uses a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm as transmitter. This laser is pumped with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and injection-seeded for switching between the online and offline wavelengths. The DIAL receiver consists of a scanning 80-cm telescope. The measured temperature and humidity profiles of both instruments have typical resolutions of only a few seconds and 100 m in the atmospheric boundary layer both in day- and night-time. Recent field experiments with the RRL and the DIAL of University of Hohenheim were (1) the HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in spring 2013 in western Germany - this activity is embedded in the project HD(CP)2 (High-definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction); (2) a measurement campaign in Hohenheim in autumn 2013; (3) the campaign SABLE (Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange) in south-western Germany in summer 2014. The collected moisture and temperature data will serve as initial thermodynamic fields for forecast experiments related to the formation of clouds and precipitation. Due to their high resolution and high precision, the systems are capable of resolving

  12. CALIPSO satellite validation using an elastic backscattering Lidar system and the AERONET sun photometer data; Validacao dos dados do satelite CALIPSO utilizando um sistema Lidar de retroespelhamento elastico e o fotometro solar da rede AERONET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Fabio Juliano da Silva

    2011-07-01

    Aerosol and clouds play an important role in the Earth's climate process through their direct and indirect contributions to the radiation budget. The largest difficulty in predicting the climate change processes is associated with uncertainties in the distribution and properties of aerosols and clouds, as well as their interactions on a global scale. The CALIPSO mission was developed as part of the NASA program, in collaboration with the French space agency CNES, with the main goal to develop studies that will help to quantify the uncertainties about aerosols and clouds. The CALIPSO satellite carried a Lidar system on board, named CALIOP, as a primary instrument, able to provide the aerosol and cloud vertical profiles and distribution, as well as their interactions. Once the optical properties measured by CALIOP are retrieved, using a complex set of algorithms, it is necessary to study and develop methodologies in order to assess the accuracy of the CALIOP products. In this context, a validation methodology was developed in order to verify the assumed values of the Lidar Ratio selected by the CALIOP algorithms, using two ground-based remote sensing instruments, an elastic backscatter Lidar system (MSP) installed at IPEN in Sao Paulo and the AERONET sun photometers operating at five different locations in Brazil, Rio Branco - Acre (RB), Alta Floresta - Mato Grosso (AF), Cuiaba - Mato Grosso (CB), Campo Grande - Mato Grosso do Sul (CG) e Sao Paulo - Sao Paulo (SP). Those days when the CALIOP system and ground-based instruments spatially coincided, were selected and analyzed under cloud-free conditions, as well as days when the trajectories of air masses indicated the transport of air parcels from the CALIOP track towards the ground-based sensors. The Lidar Ratio values from the Aeronet/Caliop proposed model was determined and showed good consistency with those initially assumed by the CALIOP Algorithm. Based on the quantitative comparison, a mean difference of

  13. Atmospheric NO2 concentration measurements using differential absorption lidar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Raj, P. Ernest

    1992-02-01

    Using the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, two types of approaches, namely, reflection from retroreflector / topographic target and backscatter from atmosphere, are available for studying remotely the atmospheric NO2 concentration. The Argon ion lidar system at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India has been used for the measurements by following both the path-averaged and range-resolved approaches. For the former, a topographic target (hill) is used for determining path-averaged surface concentration. In the latter, spectral properties of atmospheric attenuation is used for making range-resolved measurements in the surface layer. The results of the observations collected by following both approaches are presented. The average surface NO2 concentration was found to vary between 0.01 and 0.105 ppm and the range-resolved measurements exhibited higher values suggesting treatment of the lidar data for scattering and extinction effects due to atmospheric aerosols and air molecules, and atmospheric turbulence. Certain modifications that are suggested to the experimental set-up, data acquisition and analysis to improve the measurements are briefly described.

  14. Detailed signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuechao; Li, Sining; Lu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Lidar is short for light detection and ranging, which is a tool to help measuring some useful information of atmosphere. In the recent years, more and more attention was paid to the research of wind measurement by lidar. Because the accurate wind information can be used not only in weather report, but also the safety guarantee of the airplanes. In this paper, a more detailed signal model of wind measurement lidar is proposed. It includes the laser transmitting part which describes the broadening of the spectral, the laser attenuation in the atmosphere, the backscattering signal and the detected signal. A Voigt profile is used to describe the broadening of the transmitting laser spectral, which is the most common situation that is the convolution of different broadening line shapes. The laser attenuation includes scattering and absorption. We use a Rayleigh scattering model and partially-Correlated quadratic-Velocity-Dependent Hard-Collision (pCqSDHC) model to describe the molecule scattering and absorption. When calculate the particles scattering and absorption, the Gaussian particles model is used to describe the shape of particles. Because of the Doppler Effect occurred between the laser and atmosphere, the wind velocity can be calculated by the backscattering signal. Then, a two parameter Weibull distribution is used to describe the wind filed, so that we can use it to do the future work. After all the description, the signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar is decided. And some of the simulation is given by MATLAB. This signal model can describe the system more accurate and more detailed, so that the following work will be easier and more efficient.

  15. CART and GSFC raman lidar measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles for EOS validation and ARM radiation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Turner, D. D.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Schwenner, G.; Evans, K. D.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Tooman, T.

    1998-01-01

    The aerosol retrieval algorithms used by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) sensors on the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) AM-1 platform operate by comparing measured radiances with tabulated radiances that have been computed for specific aerosol models. These aerosol models are based almost entirely on surface and/or column averaged measurements and so may not accurately represent the ambient aerosol properties. Therefore, to validate these EOS algorithms and to determine the effects of aerosols on the clear-sky radiative flux, we have begun to evaluate the vertical variability of ambient aerosol properties using the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Raman Lidars. Using the procedures developed for the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), we have developed and have begun to implement algorithms for the CART Raman Lidar to routinely provide profiles of aerosol extinction and backscattering during both nighttime and ,daytime operations. Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles are computed for both lidar systems using data acquired during the 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). By integrating these aerosol extinction profiles, we derive measurements of aerosol optical thickness and compare these with coincident sun photometer measurements. We also use these measurements to measure the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio S(sub a) (i.e. 'lidar ratio'). Furthermore, we use the simultaneous water vapor measurements acquired by these Raman lidars to investigate the effects of water vapor on aerosol optical properties.

  16. Lidar Ratios for Dust Aerosols Derived From Retrievals of CALIPSO Visible Extinction Profiles Constrained by Optical Depths from MODIS-Aqua and CALIPSO/CloudSat Ocean Surface Reflectance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stuart A.; Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CALIPSO's (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) analysis algorithms generally require the use of tabulated values of the lidar ratio in order to retrieve aerosol extinction and optical depth from measured profiles of attenuated backscatter. However, for any given time or location, the lidar ratio for a given aerosol type can differ from the tabulated value. To gain some insight as to the extent of the variability, we here calculate the lidar ratio for dust aerosols using aerosol optical depth constraints from two sources. Daytime measurements are constrained using Level 2, Collection 5, 550-nm aerosol optical depth measurements made over the ocean by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the Aqua satellite, which flies in formation with CALIPSO. We also retrieve lidar ratios from night-time profiles constrained by aerosol column optical depths obtained by analysis of CALIPSO and CloudSat backscatter signals from the ocean surface.

  17. Single-ended measurement of infrared extinction using lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, E R; Williams, M F; van der Laan, J E

    1978-01-15

    The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of single-ended measurement of the total extinction coefficient using an ir lidar system. Extinction was measured using a CO(2) laser radar system at four wavelengths near 10.3 microm. The measured results agree with theoretical estimates of extinction over a wide range. Single-ended measurements of extinction appear feasible to a horizontal range of 10 km using commercially available components. The system could potentially generate extinction data in a 3-D grid, enabling one to determine ir transmission between any two points in the field.

  18. Trans-boundary aerosol transport during a winter haze episode in China revealed by ground-based Lidar and CALIPSO satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kai; Wu, Lixin; Wong, Man Sing; Letu, Husi; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Sheng, Shijie; Teng, Jiyao; Xiao, Xin; Yuan, Limei

    2016-09-01

    By employing PM2.5 observation data, ground-based lidar measurements, MODIS and CALIPSO satellite images, meteorological data, and back trajectories analysis, we investigate a trans-boundary transport of aerosols during a large-area haze episode in China during 3-5 January 2015. The ground-based lidar observations indicated similar episodes of external aerosols passing through and mixing into three East China cities. A considerable amount of total AOD below 3 km (46% in average) was contributed by the external aerosol layers during passing over and importing. CALIPSO satellite observations of central and eastern China revealed a high altitude pollutant belt on January 3. Although the severest ground pollution was found in central and south-eastern Hebei, the high altitude pollution transport was greater in south-western Shandong, north-western Jiangsu, and north-western Anhui. These observations along with the analysis of air mass trajectories and wind fields indicates pollutants moving from Hebei, Henan and Hubei probably contributed to the haze pollution in Shandong and Jiangsu. This study reveals haze transports from North China Plain to East China could be a common phenomenon influenced by the winter monsoon in northern China. Hence, effective control of air pollution requires collaboration among different cities and provinces throughout China. The long-term measurements of aerosol vertical properties by ground-based lidar and CALIPSO are extremely valuable in quantifying the contributions of external factors and will be helpful in validating and improving various air quality models.

  19. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone lidars are well suited to measuring the high spatio-temporal variability of this important trace gas. Furthermore, lidar measurements in conjunction with balloon soundings, aircraft, and satellite observations provide substantial information about a variety of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Examples of processes elucidated by ozone-lidar measurements are presented, and modeling studies using WRF-Chem, RAQMS, and DALES/LES models illustrate our current understanding and shortcomings of these processes.

  20. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon, M.; Vercherin, B.; Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.

    2014-05-01

    Turbine-mounted lidars provide preview measurements of the incoming wind field. By reducing loads on critical components and increasing the potential power extracted from the wind, the performance of wind turbine controllers can be improved [2]. As a result, integrating a light detection and ranging (lidar) system has the potential to lower the cost of wind energy. This paper presents an evaluation of turbine-mounted lidar availability. Availability is a metric which measures the proportion of time the lidar is producing controller-usable data, and is essential when a wind turbine controller relies on a lidar. To accomplish this, researchers from Avent Lidar Technology and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory first assessed and modeled the effect of extreme atmospheric events. This shows how a multirange lidar delivers measurements for a wide variety of conditions. Second, by using a theoretical approach and conducting an analysis of field feedback, we investigated the effects of the lidar setup on the wind turbine. This helps determine the optimal lidar mounting position at the back of the nacelle, and establishes a relationship between availability, turbine rpm, and lidar sampling time. Lastly, we considered the role of the wind field reconstruction strategies and the turbine controller on the definition and performance of a lidar's measurement availability.

  1. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  2. Investigation of turbulence measurements with a continuous wave, conically scanning LiDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Mikkelsen, T.; Courtney, M.

    2009-03-15

    LIDAR systems are getting more and more accurate and reliable. It has been shown many times that the mean horizontal wind speed measured by a lidar over flat terrain compares very well with that measured by a cup anemometer. But can a lidar measure turbulence? Here we investigate the case of a continuous wave, conically scanning Zephir lidar. First, the wind speed standard deviation measured by such a lidar gives on average 80% of the standard deviation measured by a cup anemometer. This difference is due to the spatial averaging inherently made by a cw conically scanning lidar. The spatial averaging is done in two steps: 1) the weighted averaging of the wind speed in the probe volume of the laser beam; 2) the averaging of the wind speeds occurring on the circular path described by the conically scanning lidar. Therefore the standard deviation measured by a lidar resolves only the turbulence structures larger than a length scale depending on the circle diameter and the mean wind speed (range of magnitude: 100m). However, the Zephir lidar gives another turbulence quantity, the so-called turbulence parameter, which can resolve turbulence structures with a smaller length scale. In this paper, we suggest a volumetric filtering of the turbulence to represent the effect of the spatial averaging operated by a lidar when measuring the wind speed. We then evaluate this model by comparing the theoretical results to experimental data obtained with several Zephir systems, for both turbulence quantities. (au)

  3. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-05-18

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m(-1) to 1.6e-4 m(-1)) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m(-1)sr(-1) and 1.7e-06 m(-1)sr(-1)) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind.

  4. Lidar method of measurement of atmospheric extinction and ozone profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a method of measurement of atmospheric extinction and of ozone profiles by use of the backscatter signal from a monostatic lidar is given. The central feature of the procedure involves a measurement of the ratio of the Raman backscatter returns of both the oxygen and nitrogen atmospheric content. Because the ratio of the number density of both species is known to high accuracy, the measurement itself becomes a measure of the ratio of two transmissions to altitude along with a ratio of the two system constants. The calibration measurement for determining the value of the ratio of the two system constants or electro-optical conversion constants is accomplished by a lidar measurement of identical atmospheric targets while at the same time interchanging the two optical filters in the two optical channels of the receiver. More details of the procedure are discussed. Factoring this calibrated value into the measured O2/N2 profile ratio provides a measured value of the ratio of the two transmissions. Or equivalently, it provides a measurement of the difference of the two extinction coefficients at the O2 and N2 Raman wavelengths as a function of the height.

  5. Standardization of the Definitions of Vertical Resolution and Uncertainty in the NDACC-archived Ozone and Temperature Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Payen, Godin-Beekmann; Gabarrot, Franck; vanGijsel, Anne; Bandoro, J.; Sica, R.; Trickl, T.

    2012-01-01

    The international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is a global network of high-quality, remote-sensing research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the Earth atmosphere. As part of NDACC, over 20 ground-based lidar instruments are dedicated to the long-term monitoring of atmospheric composition and to the validation of space-borne measurements of the atmosphere from environmental satellites such as Aura and ENVISAT. One caveat of large networks such as NDACC is the difficulty to archive measurement and analysis information consistently from one research group (or instrument) to another [1][2][3]. Yet the need for consistent definitions has strengthened as datasets of various origin (e.g., satellite and ground-based) are increasingly used for intercomparisons, validation, and ingested together in global assimilation systems.In the framework of the 2010 Call for Proposals by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) located in Bern, Switzerland, a Team of lidar experts was created to address existing issues in three critical aspects of the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature data retrievals: signal filtering and the vertical filtering of the retrieved profiles, the quantification and propagation of the uncertainties, and the consistent definition and reporting of filtering and uncertainties in the NDACC- archived products. Additional experts from the satellite and global data standards communities complement the team to help address issues specific to the latter aspect.

  6. Standardization of the Definitions of Vertical Resolution and Uncertainty in the NDACC-archived Ozone and Temperature Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Payen, Godin-Beekmann; Gabarrot, Franck; vanGijsel, Anne; Bandoro, J.; Sica, R.; Trickl, T.

    2012-01-01

    The international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is a global network of high-quality, remote-sensing research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the Earth atmosphere. As part of NDACC, over 20 ground-based lidar instruments are dedicated to the long-term monitoring of atmospheric composition and to the validation of space-borne measurements of the atmosphere from environmental satellites such as Aura and ENVISAT. One caveat of large networks such as NDACC is the difficulty to archive measurement and analysis information consistently from one research group (or instrument) to another [1][2][3]. Yet the need for consistent definitions has strengthened as datasets of various origin (e.g., satellite and ground-based) are increasingly used for intercomparisons, validation, and ingested together in global assimilation systems.In the framework of the 2010 Call for Proposals by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) located in Bern, Switzerland, a Team of lidar experts was created to address existing issues in three critical aspects of the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature data retrievals: signal filtering and the vertical filtering of the retrieved profiles, the quantification and propagation of the uncertainties, and the consistent definition and reporting of filtering and uncertainties in the NDACC- archived products. Additional experts from the satellite and global data standards communities complement the team to help address issues specific to the latter aspect.

  7. Lidar Measurements of Methane and Applications for Aircraft and Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Abshire, James; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric methane levels have remained relatively constant over the last decade around 1.78 parts per million (ppm) but observations since 2007 show that levels may be increasing. This trend may be caused by increased fossil fuel production, rice farming, livestock and landfills, but the underlying causes are quite uncertain. One hypothesis is that reservoirs of carbon trapped in the permafrost regions of northern Canada, Europe, and Siberia thaw as global temperatures rise and are releasing increasing amounts of methane. Another hypothesis points to increased production of methane by microbes as the permafrost warms. Currently most observations of greenhouse gases are limited to in-situ (surface and tower sites) and limited airborne in-situ measurements. Space column density measurements are starting to become available from the GOSAT mission. Although methane survives for a shorter time in the atmosphere than CO2, its impact on climate change per molecule is about 23 times than that of CO2. Accurate global observations of several greenhouse gases, including methane, are urgently needed in order to better understand climate change processes and to reduce the uncertainty in the carbon budget. Differential absorption lidar is a well-established technique to measure atmospheric gases, and methane has optical absorption bands near 1.65,2.2,3.4 and 7.8 micron. The near infrared overtones lines of CH4 near 1650 nm are relatively free of interference from other species. There are absorption lines near 1651 nm which are both temperature insensitive and have line strengths well suited for lidar measurements. We have developed a laser and demonstrated lidar measurements of CH4 using lines in this band. Our laser uses a narrow linewidth 1064 nm laser pulse passing through a nonlinear crystal. We generate the tunable laser signals near 1651 nm by using the optical parametric amplification (OPA) process. Inside the crystal the 1064 nm beam overlaps with an injection seed

  8. NWP Impact of Cloud Top and Boundary Layer Winds from a Satellite Borne Lidar: an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, R. G.; Grassotti, C.; Hoffman, R. N.; Mickelson, M.; Nehrkorn, T.; Louis, J.-F.

    1992-01-01

    Observing systems simulation experiments (OSSE's) provide a powerful tool to assess the impact of proposed satellite borne observing systems on meteorological applications models. We describe the results of an OSSE conducted to assess the impact of data from a low power lidar wind sensor on the forecast accuracy of a global spectral numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Global Data Assimilation System. The instrument would be operating at near-infrared wavelengths thereby increasing the backscatter signal relative to comparable infrared lidar.

  9. Optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds over oceans from CALIPSO infrared radiometer and lidar measurements, and an evaluation of the lidar multiple scattering factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed evaluation of cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm and comparisons to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP flying on-board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations satellite. The blackbody radiance taken in the IIR Version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are then compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent 2-way transmittance through the cloud. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40% as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. This behavior is explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT to be applied to correct the measured transmittance, which is taken equal to 0.6 in the CALIOP Version 3 algorithm, and which is found here to vary with temperature (and hence cloud particle size from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  10. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    , including skyscrapers and bridges, which were confounded and extracted as buildings. This can be attributed to low point density at building edges and on flat roofs or occlusions due to which LiDAR cannot give as much precise planimetric accuracy as photogrammetric techniques (in segmentation) and lack of optimum use of textural information as well as contextual information (especially at walls which are away from roof) in automatic extraction algorithm. In addition, there were no separate classes for bridges or the features lying inside the water and multiple water height levels were also not considered. Based on these inferences, we conclude that the LiDAR-based 3D feature extraction supplemented by high resolution satellite data is a potential application which can be used for understanding and characterization of urban setup.

  11. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  12. Development of a Methodology for Mapping Forest Height and Biomass Using Satellite Based SAR and Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Claudia; Schmullius, Christiane

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents first results of a study investigating satellite, multifrequent radar and lidar data for characterising the three-dimensional forest structure. Biomass is an important structural parameter to asses the carbon pool of forests. The synergy of lidar and SAR data for forest biomass mapping is promising. The study introduced here aims to combine TerraSAR-X, ALOS PALSAR and ICESat/GLAS data. Some preliminary results for the test site in Thuringian Forest, a low mountain range in eastern Germany, with a focus on the GLAS data will be described. Two methods for filtering invalid GLAS shots are investigated. Moreover, different ICESat/GLAS waveforms parameters were calculated and compared to an airborne lidar based Digital Height Model (DHM) and a forest inventory data base.

  13. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry, LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Saipan Island, Commonwealth of Northern Maraina Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with gridded LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size)...

  14. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry, gridded LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Tinian Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with gridded LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size)...

  15. Lidar Aerosol Profiles Measured From Halifax During Summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L.; Duck, T. J.; Doyle, J.; Harris, R.; Beauchamp, S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere were obtained with a high-power Raman Lidar from Halifax, Nova Scotia (44.63N, 63.58W) on the East Coast of Canada during Summer 2007. Observations throughout the troposphere at high temporal resolution were made possible by using a new dual-receiver setup. The lidar was operated in clear-sky conditions, and several long duration (> 80 hours) data sets were obtained. The measurements reveal the presence of boundary-layer aerosols during episodes of pollution transport from the Eastern US and Canada, and are compared with surface measurements of ozone and other species. Boundary layer development, entrainment and mixing are evident in the data. Structured plumes at higher altitudes are traced back to biomass burning events throughout North America. Aerosols were also observed on two occasions at 15 km in altitude, and are most likely due to pyroconvection. The measurements are being used to help understand transport and mixing processes, and to form a climatology of aerosol export from North America during the summer months.

  16. Detecting tropical forest biomass dynamics from repeated airborne lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Meyer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reducing uncertainty of terrestrial carbon cycle depends strongly on the accurate estimation of changes of global forest carbon stock. However, this is a challenging problem from either ground surveys or remote sensing techniques in tropical forests. Here, we examine the feasibility of estimating changes of tropical forest biomass from two airborne lidar measurements of forest height acquired about 10 yr apart over Barro Colorado Island (BCI, Panama. We used the forest inventory data from the 50 ha Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS plot collected every 5 yr during the study period to calibrate the estimation. We compared two approaches for detecting changes in forest aboveground biomass (AGB: (1 relating changes in lidar height metrics from two sensors directly to changes in ground-estimated biomass; and (2 estimating biomass from each lidar sensor and then computing changes in biomass from the difference of two biomass estimates, using two models, namely one model based on five relative height metrics and the other based only on mean canopy height (MCH. We performed the analysis at different spatial scales from 0.04 ha to 10 ha. Method (1 had large uncertainty in directly detecting biomass changes at scales smaller than 10 ha, but provided detailed information about changes of forest structure. The magnitude of error associated with both the mean biomass stock and mean biomass change declined with increasing spatial scales. Method (2 was accurate at the 1 ha scale to estimate AGB stocks (R2 = 0.7 and RMSEmean = 27.6 Mg ha−1. However, to predict biomass changes, errors became comparable to ground estimates only at a spatial scale of about 10 ha or more. Biomass changes were in the same direction at the spatial scale of 1 ha in 60 to 64% of the subplots, corresponding to p values of respectively 0.1 and 0.033. Large errors in estimating biomass changes from lidar data resulted from the uncertainty in detecting changes at 1 ha from ground

  17. Procedure for wind turbine power performance measurement with a two-beam nacelle lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Rozenn; Rivera, Rebeca L.; Antoniou, Ioannis; Davoust, Samuel; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Courtney, Michael; Diznabi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the main steps to use a two-beam nacelle mounted lidar to measure a wind turbine power curve including the preparation of the measurement campaign, the installation of the lidar on the turbine na-celle, the measurement of the wind speed and the wind direction, and the reporting.

  18. Procedure for wind turbine power performance measurement with a two-beam nacelle lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Rivera, R.L.; Antoniou, I.; Davoust, S.; Pedersen, Troels F.; Courtney, M.; Diznabi, B.

    2013-01-15

    This report describes the main steps to use a two-beam nacelle mounted lidar to measure a wind turbine power curve including the preparation of the measurement campaign, the installation of the lidar on the turbine nacelle, the measurement of the wind speed and the wind direction, and the reporting. (Author)

  19. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  20. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  1. Procedure for wind turbine power performance measurement with a two-beam nacelle lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Rivera, Rebeca L.; Antoniou, Ioannis;

    This report describes the main steps to use a two-beam nacelle mounted lidar to measure a wind turbine power curve including the preparation of the measurement campaign, the installation of the lidar on the turbine na-celle, the measurement of the wind speed and the wind direction......, and the reporting....

  2. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  3. Performance of the Lidar Design and Data Algorithms for the GLAS Global Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.

    2007-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in early 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument design includes high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of atmospheric clouds and aerosol. The backscatter lidar operates at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. For the atmospheric cloud and aerosol measurements, the 532 nm channel was designed for ultra high efficiency with solid state photon counting detectors and etalon filtering. Data processing algorithms were developed to calibrate and normalize the signals and produce global scale data products of the height distribution of cloud and aerosol layers and their optical depths and particulate scattering cross sections up to the limit of optical attenuation. The paper will concentrate on the effectiveness and limitations of the lidar channel design and data product algorithms. Both atmospheric receiver channels meet and exceed their design goals. Geiger Mode Avalanche Photodiode modules are used for the 532 nm signal. The operational experience is that some signal artifacts and non-linearity require correction in data processing. As with all photon counting detectors, a pulse-pile-up calibration is an important aspect of the measurement. Additional signal corrections were found to be necessary relating to correction of a saturation signal-run-on effect and also for daytime data, a small range dependent variation in the responsivity. It was possible to correct for these signal errors in data processing and achieve the requirement to accurately profile aerosol and cloud cross section down to 10-7 llm-sr. The analysis procedure employs a precise calibration against molecular scattering in the mid-stratosphere. The 1064 nm channel detection employs a high-speed analog APD for surface and atmospheric measurements where the detection sensitivity is limited by detector noise and is over an order of magnitude less than at 532 nm. A unique feature of

  4. CSIR South Africa mobile LIDAR - First scientific results: comparison with satellite, sun photometer and model simulations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available in Fig. 3b, which further evidences the planetary (nocturnal) boundary layer (PBL) structure. The PBL is found to be at approximately 3 km and is stable without much variation. During the night, when there is no solar input, aerosols are non... thermodynamic chemical reactions causing turbulence in the PBL. The boundary layer height is therefore expected to vary more during the day and to stabilise after sunset. Aerosol extinction measurements by LIDAR and SAGE II When validating the results from...

  5. Time-of-flight measurement with femtosecond pulses for high precision ranging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Kim, S.-W.

    2010-10-01

    The time-of-flight of light pulses has long been used as a direct measure of distance, but the state-of-the-art measurement precision using conventional light pulses or microwaves reaches only several hundreds of micromeres. This is due to the bandwidth limit of the photodetectors available today, which is in the picosecond range at best. Here, we improve the time-of-flight precision to the nanometer regime by timing femtosecond pulses through phase-locking control of the pulse repetition rate using the optical cross-correlation technique that exploits a second-harmonic birefringence crystal and a balance photodetector. The enhanced capability is maintained at long range without periodic ambiguity, being well suited to terrestrial lidar applications such as geodetic surveying, range finders and absolute altimeters. This method could also be applied to future space missions of formation-flying satellites for synthetic aperture imaging and remote experiments related to the general relativity theory.

  6. Uncertainty of power curve measurement with a two-beam nacelle-mounted lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael Stephen; Friis Pedersen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Nacelle lidars are attractive for offshore measurements since they can provide measurements of the free wind speed in front of the turbine rotor without erecting a met mast, which significantly reduces the cost of the measurements. Nacelle-mounted pulsed lidars with two lines of sight (LOS) have...... already been demonstrated to be suitable for use in power performance measurements. To be considered as a professional tool, however, power curve measurements performed using these instruments require traceable calibrated measurements and the quantification of the wind speed measurement uncertainty. Here...... we present and demonstrate a procedure fulfilling these needs. A nacelle lidar went through a comprehensive calibration procedure. This calibration took place in two stages. First with the lidar on the ground, the tilt and roll readings of the inclinometers in the nacelle lidar were calibrated...

  7. Synchronous starphotometry and lidar measurements at Eureka in High Canadian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baibakov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present recent progress related to the night-time retrievals of aerosol and cloud optical depth using starphotometry over the PEARL (Polar Environmental Atmospheric Research Laboratory station at Eureka (Nunavut, Canada in the High Arctic (80° N, 86° W. In the spring of 2011 and 2012, the SPSTAR starphotometer was employed to acquire aerosol optical depth (AOD measurements while vertical aerosol and cloud backscatter coefficient profiles were acquired using the CANDAC Raman Lidar (CRL. Several events were detected and characterized using starphotometry-lidar synergy: aerosols (short term aerosol events on 9 and 10 March 2011; a potential multi-night aerosol event across three polar nights (13–15 March 2012, a thin cloud event (21 February 2011 and a very low altitude ice crystals (10 March 2011. Using a simple backscatter coefficient threshold criterion we calculated fine and coarse (sub and super-micron mode AODs from the vertically integrated CRL profiles. These were compared with their starphotometry analogues produced from a spectral deconvolution algorithm. The process-level analysis showed, in general, good agreement in terms of the physical coherence between high frequency starphotometry and lidar data. We argue that R2 (coefficient of determination is the most robust means of comparing lidar and starphotometer data since it is sensitive to significant optico-physical variations associated with these two independent data sources while being minimally dependent on retrieval and calibration artifacts. Differences between the fine and course mode components of the starphotometry and lidar data is clearly also useful but is more dependent on such artifacts. Studying climatological seasonal aerosol trends necessitates effective cloud-screening procedures: temporal and spectral cloud screening of starphotometry data was found to agree moderately well with temporal cloud screening results except in the presence of thin homogeneous cloud

  8. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

    2014-02-01

    Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

  9. Doppler lidar wind measurement with the edge technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    The edge technique is a new and powerful method for measuring small frequency shifts. Range resolved lidar measurements of winds can be made with high accuracy and high vertical resolution using the edge technique to measure the Doppler shift of an atmospheric backscattered signal from a pulsed laser. The edge technique can be used at near-infrared or visible wavelengths using well developed solid state lasers and detectors with various edge filters. In the edge technique, the laser frequency is located on the steep slope of the spectral response function of a high resolution optical filter. Due to the steep slope of the edge, very small frequency shifts cause large changes in measured signal. The frequency of the outgoing laser pulse is determined by measuring its location on the edge of the filter. This is accomplished by sending a small portion of the beam to the edge detection setup where the incoming light is split into two channels - an edge filter and an energy monitor channel. The energy monitor signal is used to normalize the edge filter signal for magnitude. The laser return backscattered from the atmosphere is collected by a telescope and directed through the edge detection setup to determine its frequency (location on the edge) in a similar manner for each range element. The Doppler shift, and thus the wind, is determined from a differential measurement of the frequency of the outgoing laser pulse and the frequency of the laser return backscattered from the atmosphere. We have conducted simulations of the performance of an edge lidar system using an injection seeded pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns. The central fringe of a Fabry-Perot etalon is used as a high resolution edge filter to measure the shift of the aerosol return.

  10. Development of a pulsed 9.5 micron lidar for regional scale O3 measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A pulsed infrared lidar system designed for application to the remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases from an airborne platform is described. The system is also capable of measuring the infrared backscatter characteristics of the ocean surface, terrain, cloud, and aerosol targets. The lidar employed is based on dual wavelength pulse energy measurements in the 9-11 micrometer wavelength region.

  11. Comparison of 3D turbulence measurements using three staring wind lidars and a sonic anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Cariou, J.-P.; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Three pulsed lidars were used in staring, non-scanning mode, placed so that their beams crossed close to a 3D sonic anemometer. The goal is to compare lidar volume averaged wind measurement with point measurement reference sensors and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing 3D turbulence mea...

  12. Combined wind measurements by two different lidar instruments in the Arctic middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hildebrand

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available During a joint campaign in January 2009 the Rayleigh/Mie/Raman (RMR lidar and the sodium lidar at the ALOMAR Observatory (69° N, 16° E in Northern Norway were operated simultaneously for more than 40 h, collecting data for wind measurements in the middle atmosphere from 30 up to 110 km altitude. At the upper (lower altitude range where the RMR (sodium lidar can operate, both lidars probe the same sounding volume, allowing to compare the derived wind speeds. We present the first simultaneous common volume wind measurements in the middle atmosphere using two different lidar instruments. The comparison of winds derived by RMR and sodium lidar is excellent for long integration times of 10 h as well as shorter ones of 1 h. Combination of data from both lidars allows identifying wavy structures between 30 and 110 km altitude, whose amplitudes increase with height. We have also performed lidar measurements of the same wind component using two independent branches of the RMR lidar and found a good agreement of the results but also identified inhomogeneities in the horizontal wind at about 55 km altitude of up to 20 ms−1. Such small scale inhomogeneities in the horizontal wind field are an essential challenge when comparing data from different instruments.

  13. Low-Pass Parabolic FFT Filter for Airborne and Satellite Lidar Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongke Jiao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce random errors of the lidar signal inversion, a low-pass parabolic fast Fourier transform filter (PFFTF was introduced for noise elimination. A compact airborne Raman lidar system was studied, which applied PFFTF to process lidar signals. Mathematics and simulations of PFFTF along with low pass filters, sliding mean filter (SMF, median filter (MF, empirical mode decomposition (EMD and wavelet transform (WT were studied, and the practical engineering value of PFFTF for lidar signal processing has been verified. The method has been tested on real lidar signal from Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL. Results show that PFFTF has advantages over the other methods. It keeps the high frequency components well and reduces much of the random noise simultaneously for lidar signal processing.

  14. Low-pass parabolic FFT filter for airborne and satellite lidar signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhongke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Enhai; Yue, Yongjian

    2015-10-14

    In order to reduce random errors of the lidar signal inversion, a low-pass parabolic fast Fourier transform filter (PFFTF) was introduced for noise elimination. A compact airborne Raman lidar system was studied, which applied PFFTF to process lidar signals. Mathematics and simulations of PFFTF along with low pass filters, sliding mean filter (SMF), median filter (MF), empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and wavelet transform (WT) were studied, and the practical engineering value of PFFTF for lidar signal processing has been verified. The method has been tested on real lidar signal from Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL). Results show that PFFTF has advantages over the other methods. It keeps the high frequency components well and reduces much of the random noise simultaneously for lidar signal processing.

  15. Measurement of vehicles speed with full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzal, Michał; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Zygmunt, Marek; Wojtanowski, Jacek; Piotrowski, Wiesław

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of vehicles speed by means of displacement measurement with "time of flight" lidar requires gathering of accurate information about distance to the vehicle in a set time interval. As with any pulsed laser lidar, its maximum range is limited by available incoming signal to noise ratio. That ratio determines not only maximum range, but also accuracy of measurement. For fast and precise measurements of speed of the vehicles their displacement should bee measured with centimeter accuracy. However that demand is hard to reach on long distances and poor quality of the echo signal. Improving accuracy beyond given by a single pulse probing requires emission of several probing pulses. Total displacement error will than fall with the square root of the number of executed measurements. Yet this method will not extend available distance beyond the limit set by threshold detection systems. Acquisition of the full waveform of received signals is a method that allows extension of maximum range through synchronic addition of subsequent waveforms. Doing so improves SNR by a well-known factor of square root of the number of carried additions. Disadvantage of this method is that it requires use of fast analog to digital converters for data acquisition, and simple distance calculation algorithms may not give the adequate accuracy due to relatively long sampling period of reasonable priced ADC's. In this article more advanced algorithms of distance calculations that base on ADC raw data are presented and analyzed. Practical implementation of algorithm in prototype design of laser speed gun is shown along with real life test results.

  16. Using airborne LIDAR to measure tides and river slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talke, S. A.; Hudson, A.; Chickadel, C. C.; Farquharson, G.; Jessup, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial variability of tides and the tidally-averaged water-level is often poorly resolved in shallow waters, despite its importance in validating models and interpreting dynamics. In this contribution we explore using airborne LIDAR to remotely observe tides and along-river slope in the Columbia River estuary (CRE). Using an airplane equipped with LIDAR, differential GPS, and an infra-red camera, we flew 8 longitudinal transects over a 50km stretch of the CRE over a 14 hour period in June 2013. After correcting for airplane elevation, pitch and roll and median filtering over 1km blocks, a spatially-resolved data set of relative water level was generated. Results show the tide (amplitude 2m) propagating upstream at the expected phase velocity. A sinusoid with 2 periods (12.4 and 24 hours) was next fit to data to produce a smooth tide and extract the mean slope. Comparison with 4 tide gauges indicates first order agreement with measured tides (rms error 0.1m), and confirms that a substantial sub-tidal gradient exists in the CRE. This proof-of-concept experiment indicates that remote sensing of tides in coastal areas is feasible, with possible applications such as improving bathymetric surveys or inferring water depths.

  17. The study of atmospheric correction of satellite remotely sensed images intended for air pollution using sun-photometers (AERONET) and lidar system in Lemesos, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Matsas, Alexandros

    2010-10-01

    Solar radiation reflected by the Earth's surface to satellite sensors is modified by its interaction with the atmosphere. The objective of atmospheric correction is to determine true surface reflectance values by removing atmospheric effects from satellite images. Atmospheric correction is arguably the most important part of the pre-processing of satellite remotely sensed data. The most important parameter in applying any atmospheric correction is the aerosol optical thickness which is also used for assessing air pollution. This paper explores how the AOT is extracted from atmospheric corrected satellite imagery acquired from Landsat ETM + and how then AOT values are used to assess air pollution. The atmospheric correction algorihm developed by Hadjimitsis and Clayton (2009) is applied to short wavelengths like Landsat TM band 1 and 2 (0.45-0.52μm, 0.52-0.60 μm). The results are also assessed using Lidar system and Cimel Sunphotometer located in the premises of the Cyprus University of Technology in Limassol. The authors run the atmospheric correction developed by Hadjimitsis and Clayton (2009) in MATLAB and sample AOT results for the Landsat ETM+ images acquired on the 15/01/2010, 20/4/2010, 09/06/2010 are shown. For the Landsat ETM+ image acquired on 20/4/2010, the AOT was found 1.4 after the application of the atmospheric correction. Such value complies with the AOT value measured by the Cimel Sun-photometer (AERONET) during the satellite overpass. An example of how Lidar is used to assess the existing atmospheric conditions which is useful for assessing air pollution is also presented.

  18. The efficiency of lidar measurements of wind velocity by a correlation lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astafurov, V.G.; Ignatova, E.Yu.; Matvienko, G.G. (Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation))

    1992-05-01

    A suboptimal estimate of the wind velocity based on the spectral processing of lidar signals is constructed. The error of this estimate is calculated and its calculations are performed for different atmospheric conditions and instrumental parameters for the experimentally confirmed models of the correlation functions of lidar signals. Some recommendations are given on the choice of parameters of a two-path method of sounding with an account of evolution time of the aerosol inhomogeneities. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Mapping Urban Tree Canopy Coverage and Structure using Data Fusion of High Resolution Satellite Imagery and Aerial Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, A.; Rogan, J.; Williams, C. A.; Martin, D. G.; Ratick, S.; Nowak, D.

    2015-12-01

    Urban tree canopy (UTC) coverage is a critical component of sustainable urban areas. Trees provide a number of important ecosystem services, including air pollution mitigation, water runoff control, and aesthetic and cultural values. Critically, urban trees also act to mitigate the urban heat island (UHI) effect by shading impervious surfaces and via evaporative cooling. The cooling effect of urban trees can be seen locally, with individual trees reducing home HVAC costs, and at a citywide scale, reducing the extent and magnitude of an urban areas UHI. In order to accurately model the ecosystem services of a given urban forest, it is essential to map in detail the condition and composition of these trees at a fine scale, capturing individual tree crowns and their vertical structure. This paper presents methods for delineating UTC and measuring canopy structure at fine spatial resolution (HVAC benefits from UTC for individual homes, and for assessing the ecosystem services for entire urban areas. Such maps have previously been made using a variety of methods, typically relying on high resolution aerial or satellite imagery. This paper seeks to contribute to this growing body of methods, relying on a data fusion method to combine the information contained in high resolution WorldView-3 satellite imagery and aerial lidar data using an object-based image classification approach. The study area, Worcester, MA, has recently undergone a large-scale tree removal and reforestation program, following a pest eradication effort. Therefore, the urban canopy in this location provides a wide mix of tree age class and functional type, ideal for illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed methods. Early results show that the object-based classifier is indeed capable of identifying individual tree crowns, while continued research will focus on extracting crown structural characteristics using lidar-derived metrics. Ultimately, the resulting fine resolution UTC map will be

  20. Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Ozone in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seabrook Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on differential absorption lidar (DIAL measurements of tropospheric ozone in the Canadian Arctic during springtime. Measurements at Eureka Weather Station revealed that mountains have a significant effect on the vertical structure of ozone above Ellesmere Island. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletions were not observed during periods when the flow of air from over the sea ice was blocked by mountains. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the mid troposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies will be shown in the presentation, while one is described in this paper.

  1. Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Ozone in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Jeffrey; Whiteway, James

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of tropospheric ozone in the Canadian Arctic during springtime. Measurements at Eureka Weather Station revealed that mountains have a significant effect on the vertical structure of ozone above Ellesmere Island. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletions were not observed during periods when the flow of air from over the sea ice was blocked by mountains. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the mid troposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies will be shown in the presentation, while one is described in this paper.

  2. Airborne compact rotational Raman lidar for temperature measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Decheng; Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry; Mahon, Nick; Deng, Min; Glover, Brent; Burkhart, Matthew; Kuestner, William; Heesen, Ben

    2016-09-05

    We developed an airborne compact rotational Raman lidar (CRL) for use on the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) aircraft to obtain two-dimensional (2D) temperature disman tributions. It obtained fine-scale 2D temperature distributions within 3 km below the aircraft for the first time during the PECAN (Plains Elevated Convection At Night) campaign in 2015. The CRL provided nighttime temperature measurements with a random error of <0.5 K within 800 m below aircraft at 45 m vertical and 1000 m horizontal resolution. The temperatures obtained by the CRL and a radiosonde agreed. Along with water vapor and aerosol measurements, the CRL provides critical parameters on the state of the lower atmosphere for a wide range of atmospheric research.

  3. Assessing the uncertainty of biomass change estimates obtained using multi-temporal field, lidar sampling, and satellite imagery on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, H.

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of statistical sampling designs for aboveground biomass (and carbon) inventory and monitoring programs that can make efficient use of a variety of available data sources, including field plots, airborne lidar sampling, and satellite imagery. While the use of multiple sources, or levels, of remote sensing data can significantly increase the precision of biomass change estimates, especially in remote areas (such as interior Alaska) where it is extremely expensive to establish field plots, it can be challenging to accurately characterize the uncertainty (i.e. variance and bias) of the estimates obtained from these complex multi-level designs. In this study we evaluate a model-based approach to estimate changes in biomass over the western lowlands of the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska during the period 2004-2009 using a combination of field plots, lidar sampling, and satellite imagery. The model-based approach -- where all inferences are conditioned on the model relating the remote-sensing measurements to the inventory parameter of interest (e.g. biomass) - is appropriate for cases where it is cost-prohibitive, or infeasible, to establish a probability sample of field plots that are both spatially and temporally coincident with each remote sensing data set. For example, a model-based approach can be used to obtain biomass estimates over a period of time, even when field data is only available for the current time period. In this study, lidar data were collected in 2004 and 2009 over single swaths that covered 130 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots distributed on a regular grid over the entire western Kenai. Field measurements on FIA plots were initially acquired over the period 1999-2003 and fifty-percent of these plots were remeasured in the period 2004-2009. In addition, high-accuracy coordinates (GPS equipment. Changes in biomass (and associated uncertainty) estimated from field remeasurements alone were compared to

  4. Wind Profiling from a New Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection Doppler Lidar Transceiver during Wind Measurement Intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Demoz, B.; Veneable, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Maryland, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other lidars and other sensors will be presented.

  5. Measurement of the lidar signal fluctuation with a shot-per-shot instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux, E; Fiorani, L

    1998-10-20

    A measurement of the signal noise was carried out with a shot-per-shot lidar. This system was operated in the UV spectral region for ozone profiling in the low troposphere. We report on important discrepancies between our results and the estimations based on the assumptions commonly supporting the numerical modeling of lidar experiments.

  6. Spatial averaging-effects on turbulence measured by a continuous-wave coherent lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob;

    2009-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused continuous-wave coherent Doppler lidar on observed wind turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is described and analysed. For the first time, comparisons of lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneously obtained from a mast...

  7. Spatially explicit modelling of forest structure and function using airborne lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data combined with micrometeorological measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Valerie Anne

    This research models canopy-scale photosynthesis at the Groundhog River Flux Site through the integration of high-resolution airborne remote sensing data and micrometeorological measurements collected from a flux tower. Light detection and ranging (lidar) data are analysed to derive models of tree structure, including: canopy height, basal area, crown closure, and average aboveground biomass. Lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data are used to model canopy chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoid concentrations (known to be good indicators of photosynthesis). The integration of lidar and hyperspectral data is applied to derive spatially explicit models of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) absorbed by the canopy as well as a species classification for the site. These products are integrated with flux tower meteorological measurements (i.e., air temperature and global solar radiation) collected on a continuous basis over 2004 to apply the C-Fix model of carbon exchange to the site. Results demonstrate that high resolution lidar and lidar-hyperspectral integration techniques perform well in the boreal mixedwood environment. Lidar models are well correlated with forest structure, despite the complexities introduced in the mixedwood case (e.g., r2=0.84, 0.89, 0.60, and 0.91, for mean dominant height, basal area, crown closure, and average aboveground biomass). Strong relationships are also shown for canopy scale chlorophyll/carotenoid concentration analysis using integrated lidar-hyperspectral techniques (e.g., r2=0.84, 0.84, and 0.82 for Chl(a), Chl(a+b), and Chl(b)). Examination of the spatially explicit models of fPAR reveal distinct spatial patterns which become increasingly apparent throughout the season due to the variation in species groupings (and canopy chlorophyll concentration) within the 1 km radius surrounding the flux tower. Comparison of results from the modified local-scale version of the C-Fix model to tower gross ecosystem

  8. High-Energy 2-Micrometers Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy 2-micrometer wavelength lasers have been incorporated in a prototype coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Calibration tests and sample atmospheric data are presented on wind and aerosol profiling.

  9. Initial approach in biomass burning aerosol transport tracking with CALIPSO and MODIS satellites, sunphotometer, and a backscatter lidar system in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, E.; Lopes, F. J. S.

    2009-09-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing concern about the direct and indirect influence of the aerosols in the Earth's radiative budget. Aerosols from biomass burning activities have been identified as a significant radiative forcing agent. A significant concentration quantity of aerosol particles observed in the atmosphere can be associated with intense anthropogenic biomass burning activity. The CALIPSO satellite and ground-based Lidar systems are indispensable to provide the vertical structure and optical properties of aerosol and clouds on global and local scale, respectively. The Brazilian mid-western region is one of the biggest producers of biomass burning in the whole continent. Aerosols from biomass burning can be transported to distances of hundreds or thousands of kilometers. It has been developed a computational routine to map the CALIPSO overpasses over the whole country in order to retrieve the total coverage taking special attention in the Brazilian AERONET sites. In this context, the measured data from AERONET, CALIPSO and MODIS Satellite and the MSP-Lidar system from Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) can be used to map the aerosols biomass burning plumes transported from the mid-western to the southeastern region. In total 5 sites were chosen spanning from 0 to 23 South latitude and 46 to 60 West in longitude in coverage during 2007 and we were able to identify such transports during the months of August and September.

  10. Instantaneous Shoreline Extraction Utilizing Integrated Spectrum and Shadow Analysis From LiDAR Data and High-resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Chieh

    Shoreline delineation and shoreline change detection are expensive processes in data source acquisition and manual shoreline delineation. These costs confine the frequency and interval of shoreline mapping periods. In this dissertation, a new shoreline delineation approach was developed targeting on lowering the data source cost and reducing human labor. To lower the cost of data sources, we used the public domain LiDAR data sets and satellite images to delineate shorelines without the requirement of data sets being acquired simultaneously, which is a new concept in this field. To reduce the labor cost, we made improvements in classifying LiDAR points and satellite images. Analyzing shadow relations with topography to improve the satellite image classification performance is also a brand-new concept. The extracted shoreline of the proposed approach could achieve an accuracy of 1.495 m RMSE, or 4.452m at the 95% confidence level. Consequently, the proposed approach could successfully lower the cost and shorten the processing time, in other words, to increase the shoreline mapping frequency with a reasonable accuracy. However, the extracted shoreline may not compete with the shoreline extracted by aerial photogrammetric procedures in the aspect of accuracy. Hence, this is a trade-off between cost and accuracy. This approach consists of three phases, first, a shoreline extraction procedure based mainly on LiDAR point cloud data with multispectral information from satellite images. Second, an object oriented shoreline extraction procedure to delineate shoreline solely from satellite images; in this case WorldView-2 images were used. Third, a shoreline integration procedure combining these two shorelines based on actual shoreline changes and physical terrain properties. The actual data source cost would only be from the acquisition of satellite images. On the other hand, only two processes needed human attention. First, the shoreline within harbor areas needed to be

  11. Wind gust measurements using pulsed Doppler wind-lidar: comparison of direct and indirect techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    model, driven by the Doppler lidar measurements, which uses a non-linear particle filter to estimate the small-scale turbulent fluctuations. The first results show that the reconstruction method can reproduce the wind speed maxima measured by the sonic anemometer if a low-pass filter with a cut......-off frequency similar to the lidar measurement frequency is applied to the sonic data. These results from the reconstructed wind are better than the maxima derived directly from the wind lidar measurements. However, the maxima of the raw sonic anemometer signal are still higher than the maxima...

  12. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  13. Joint elastic side-scattering LIDAR and Raman LIDAR measurements of aerosol optical properties in south east Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, L.; Rizi, V.; Will, M.; Allen, C.; Botts, A.; Calhoun, M.; Carande, B.; Claus, J.; Coco, M.; Emmert, L.; Esquibel, S.; Grillo, A. F.; Hamilton, L.; Heid, T. J.; Iarlori, M.; Klages, H.-O.; Kleifges, M.; Knoll, B.; Koop, J.; Mathes, H.-J.; Menshikov, A.; Morgan, S.; Patterson, L.; Petrera, S.; Robinson, S.; Runyan, C.; Sherman, J.; Starbuck, D.; Wakin, M.; Wolf, O.

    2017-03-01

    We describe an experiment, located in south-east Colorado, U.S.A., that measured aerosol optical depth profiles using two LIDAR techniques. Two independent detectors measured scattered light from a vertical UV laser beam. One detector, located at the laser site, measured light via the inelastic Raman backscattering process. This is a common method used in atmospheric science for measuring aerosol optical depth profiles. The other detector, located approximately 40 km distant, viewed the laser beam from the side. This detector featured a 3.5 m2 mirror and measured elastically scattered light in a bistatic LIDAR configuration following the method used at the Pierre Auger cosmic ray observatory. The goal of this experiment was to assess and improve methods to measure atmospheric clarity, specifically aerosol optical depth profiles, for cosmic ray UV fluorescence detectors that use the atmosphere as a giant calorimeter. The experiment collected data from September 2010 to July 2011 under varying conditions of aerosol loading. We describe the instruments and techniques and compare the aerosol optical depth profiles measured by the Raman and bistatic LIDAR detectors.

  14. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Landfill Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod; Gardiner, Tom; Finlayson, Andrew; Connor, Andy

    2017-04-01

    DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR (DIAL) MEASURMENTS OF LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS F. INNOCENTI *, R.A. ROBINSON *, T.D. GARDINER, A. FINLAYSON *, A. CONNOR* * National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, United Kingdom Methane is one of the most important gaseous hydrocarbon species for both industrial and environmental reasons. Understanding and quantifying methane emissions to atmosphere is an important element of climate change research. Range-resolved infrared Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements provide the means to map and quantify a wide range of different methane sources. DIAL is a powerful technique that can be used to track and quantify plumes emitted from area emission sources such as landfill sites, waste water treatment plants and petrochemical plants. By using lidar (light detection and ranging), the DIAL technique is able to make remote range-resolved single-ended measurements of the actual distribution of target gases in the atmosphere, with no disruption to normal site operational activities. DIAL provides 3D mapping of emission concentrations and quantification of emission rates for a wide range of target gases such as methane. The NPL DIAL laser source is operated alternately at two similar wavelengths. One of these, termed the "on-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a wavelength which is absorbed by the target species. The other, the "off-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a nearby wavelength which is not absorbed significantly by the target species. The two wavelengths are chosen to be close, so that the atmospheric scattering properties are the same for both wavelengths. They are also chosen so that any differential absorption due to other atmospheric species are minimised. Any measured difference in the returned signals is therefore due to absorption by the target gas. In the typical DIAL measurement configuration the mobile DIAL facility is positioned downwind of the area being

  15. Simulation of Satellite, Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR with DART (I):Waveform Simulation with Quasi-Monte Carlo Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Yin, Tiangang; Lauret, Nicolas; Grau, Eloi; Rubio, Jeremy; Cook, Bruce D.; Morton, Douglas C.; Sun, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) provides unique data on the 3-D structure of atmosphere constituents and the Earth's surface. Simulating LiDAR returns for different laser technologies and Earth scenes is fundamental for evaluating and interpreting signal and noise in LiDAR data. Different types of models are capable of simulating LiDAR waveforms of Earth surfaces. Semi-empirical and geometric models can be imprecise because they rely on simplified simulations of Earth surfaces and light interaction mechanisms. On the other hand, Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) models are potentially accurate but require long computational time. Here, we present a new LiDAR waveform simulation tool that is based on the introduction of a quasi-Monte Carlo ray tracing approach in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Two new approaches, the so-called "box method" and "Ray Carlo method", are implemented to provide robust and accurate simulations of LiDAR waveforms for any landscape, atmosphere and LiDAR sensor configuration (view direction, footprint size, pulse characteristics, etc.). The box method accelerates the selection of the scattering direction of a photon in the presence of scatterers with non-invertible phase function. The Ray Carlo method brings traditional ray-tracking into MCRT simulation, which makes computational time independent of LiDAR field of view (FOV) and reception solid angle. Both methods are fast enough for simulating multi-pulse acquisition. Sensitivity studies with various landscapes and atmosphere constituents are presented, and the simulated LiDAR signals compare favorably with their associated reflectance images and Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) waveforms. The LiDAR module is fully integrated into DART, enabling more detailed simulations of LiDAR sensitivity to specific scene elements (e.g., atmospheric aerosols, leaf area, branches, or topography) and sensor configuration for airborne or satellite LiDAR sensors.

  16. Relative vegetation profiles in a Neotropical forest: comparison of lidar instrumentation and field-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, F. B.; Palace, M. W.; Ducey, M.; Czarnecki, C.; Zanin Shimbo, J.; Mota e Silva, J.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical forests are considered to be some of the most structurally complex forests in the world. Understanding vegetation height structure in these forests can aid in understanding the spatial temporal components of disturbance, from blowdowns to gap dynamics. Vegetation profiles can be used to better estimate carbon storage and flux across the landscape. Using light detection and ranging (lidar) data collected at La Selva, Costa Rica from four instruments (three airborne, one terrestrial) at four times since 2005, and field data collected in January 2012, we generated relative vegetation profiles for twenty plots in La Selva. Relative vegetation profiles were derived from lidar data by accounting for obscured plant material through a log transformation of the cumulative proportion of observations (percent canopy closure). Profiles were derived from field data using two different sets of allometric equations describing crown shape and tree height. We conducted a cluster analysis on similarity matrices developed in R (version 2.14.1) using three different metrics (sum of squares, Kullback-Leibler divergence, Kolmogorov-Smirnov D statistic) and identified general similarity between lidar profiles. Results were consistent across each of the three similarity metrics. Three distinct clusters were found, with profiles from three airborne lidar instruments, two profiles from a terrestrial lidar instrument, and profiles derived from field data forming the clusters. Our results indicate that although estimating lidar relative vegetation profiles from field data was not possible, terrestrial lidar relative vegetation profiles are generally similar to airborne relative vegetation profiles. Given the rapidity and repeatability of terrestrial lidar measurements, these results show promise for terrestrial lidar instruments to collect plot-specific data on forest structure and vertical distribution of plant material. Furthermore, identifying relationships between terrestrial and

  17. Improved mixing height monitoring through a combination of lidar and radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface-based radon (222Rn measurements can be combined with lidar backscatter to obtain a higher quality time series of mixing height within the planetary boundary layer (PBL than is possible from lidar alone, and a more quantitative measure of mixing height than is possible from only radon. The reason why lidar measurements are improved is that there are times when lidar signals are ambiguous, and reliably attributing the mixing height to the correct aerosol layer presents a challenge. By combining lidar with a mixing length scale derived from a time series of radon concentration, automated and robust attribution is possible during the morning transition.

    Radon measurements provide mixing information during the night, but concentrations also depend on the strength of surface emissions. After processing radon in combination with lidar, we obtain nightly measurements of radon emissions and are able to normalise the mixing length scale for changing emissions. After calibration with lidar, the radon-derived equivalent mixing height agrees with other measures of mixing on daily and hourly timescales and is a potential method for studying intermittent mixing in nocturnal boundary layers.

  18. A portable UAV LIDAR system for coastal topographic surveys and sea surface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Liu, Philip L.-F.; Tseng, Kuo-Hsin; Yeh, Sunny

    2017-04-01

    A light-weight UAV system for coastal topography and coastal sea surface measurements is developed. This system is based on techniques of a multirotor UAV, a light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an inertial measurement unit, and a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS). The synchronization and data recording are achieved using Labview. This system can be operated in a very low attitude flight within a range of 10m that can provide very high resolution of point cloud data. The performance of this system has been tested and calibrated with known targets. The vertical root-mean-square error is less than about 10 cm, depending on the flight height. Applications of the system, including coastal topographic surveys, tidal elevation measurement, wave measurements, and bottom roughness measurements are presented and discussed. The tide and wave measurements are compared with in-situ measurements using pressure sensors. The results of comparison suggest that this system is a useful tool to measure the sea surface elevation and topography. The challenges of applying this system are also discussed.

  19. Differential Absorption Lidar Measurements of Fugitive Benzene Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Helmore, J.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Connor, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is based on the optical analogue of radar; lidar (light detection and ranging). It provides the capability to remotely measure the concentration and spatial distribution of compounds in the atmosphere. The ability to scan the optical measurement beam throughout the atmosphere enables pollutant concentrations to be mapped, and emission fluxes to be determined when combined with wind data. The NPL DIAL systems can operate in the UV and infrared spectral, enabling the measurement of a range of air pollutants and GHGs including hazardous air pollutants such as benzene. The mobile ground based DIAL systems developed at NPL for pollution monitoring have been used for over 25 years. They have been deployed for routine monitoring, emission factor studies, research investigations and targeted monitoring campaigns. More recently the NPL DIAL has been used in studies to validate other monitoring techniques. In support of this capability, NPL have developed a portable, configurable controlled release system (CRF) able to simulate emissions from typical sources. This has been developed to enable the validation and assessment of fugitive emission monitoring techniques. Following a brief summary of the technique, we outline recent developments in the use of DIAL for monitoring fugitive and diffuse emissions, including the development of a European Standard Method for fugitive emission monitoring. We will present the results of a number of validation exercises using the CRF presenting an update on the performance of DIAL for emission quantification and discuss the wider validation of novel technologies. We will report on recent measurements of the emissions of benzene from industrial sites including a large scale emissions monitoring study carried out by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and will report on the measurement of emissions from petrochemical facilities and examine an example of the identification

  20. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air.

  1. Nacelle lidar for power curve measurement - Avedøre campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Davoust, Samuel

    anemometer, requiring the erection of a tall met mast, then becomes more and more challenging and expensive. A forward looking lidar, mounted on the turbine nacelle, combines the advantages of a nacelle based instrument - no mast/platform installation difficulties - and those of the lidar technology - remote......Wind turbine power performance requires the measurement of the free wind speed at hub height upstream of the turbine. For modern multi-megawatt wind turbines, this means that the wind speed needs to be measured at great heights, from 80m to 150m. The standard wind speed measurement with a cup...... measurement of the wind speed away from the instrument. In the first phase of the EUDP project: “Nacelle lidar for power performance measurement”, a measurement campaign with a na-celle lidar prototype placed on an onshore turbine demonstrated the poten-tial of the technology for power curve measurement...

  2. Procedure to detect impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (lidar) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cuenca, B.; Alonso-Rodríguez, M. C.; Domenech-Tofiño, E.; Valcárcel Sanz, N.; Delgado-Hernández, J.; Peces-Morera, Juan José; Arozarena-Villar, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The detection of impervious surfaces is an important issue in the study of urban and rural environments. Imperviousness refers to water's inability to pass through a surface. Although impervious surfaces represent a small percentage of the Earth's surface, knowledge of their locations is relevant to planning and managing human activities. Impervious structures are primarily manmade (e.g., roads and rooftops). Impervious surfaces are an environmental concern because many processes that modify the normal function of land, air, and water resources are initiated during their construction. This paper presents a novel method of identifying impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The inputs for the procedure are SPOT images formed by four spectral bands (corresponding to red, green, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths), a digital terrain model, and an .las file. The proposed method computes five decision indexes from the input data to classify the studied area into two categories: impervious (subdivided into buildings and roads) and non-impervious surfaces. The impervious class is divided into two subclasses because the elements forming this category (mainly roads and rooftops) have different spectral and height properties, and it is difficult to combine these elements into one group. The classification is conducted using a decision tree procedure. For every decision index, a threshold is set for which every surface is considered impervious or non-impervious. The proposed method has been applied to four different regions located in the north, center, and south of Spain, providing satisfactory results for every dataset.

  3. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 1. Lidar intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestershire (England)); Post, M.J. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1991-03-20

    An airborne continuous wave (CW) focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar were used to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than {approximately}50% near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  4. Rayleigh Lidar observed atmospheric temperature characteristics over a western Indian location: intercomparison with satellite observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Vaishnav, Rajesh; Shukla, Krishna K.; Lal, Shyam; Chandra, Harish; Acharya, Yashwant B.

    2017-07-01

    General characteristics of sub-tropical middle atmospheric temperature structure over a high altitude station, Mt. Abu (24.5°N, 72.7°E, altitude 1670 m, above mean sea level (amsl)) are presented using about 150 nights observational datasets of Rayleigh Lidar. The monthly mean temperature contour plot shows two distinct maxima in the stratopause region ( 45-55 km), occurring during February-March and September-October, a seasonal dependence similar to that reported for mid- and high-latitudes respectively. Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) are stronger at an altitude 60 km in the mesospheric temperature in comparison to stratospheric region. A comparison with the satellite (Halogen Occultation Experiment, (HALOE)) data shows qualitative agreement, but quantitatively a significant difference is found between the observation and satellite. The derived temperatures from Lidar observations are warmer 2-3 K in the stratospheric region and 5-10 K in the mesospheric region than temperatures observed from the satellite. A comparison with the models, COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA)-86 and Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Extended (MSISE)-90, showed differences of 3 K in the stratosphere and 5-10 K in the mesosphere, with deviations somewhat larger for CIRA-86. In most of the months and in all altitude regions model temperatures were lower than the Lidar observed temperature except in the altitude range of 40-50 km. MSISE-90 Model temperature overestimates as compared to Lidar temperature during December-February in the altitude region of 50-60 km. In the altitude region of 55-70 km both models deviate significantly, with differences exceeding 10-12 K, particularly during equinoctial periods. An average heating rate of 2.5 K/month during equinoxes and cooling rate of 4 K/month during November-December are found in altitude region of 50-70 km, relatively less heating and cooling rates are found in the altitude range of 30-50 km. The stratospheric

  5. Lidar-measurement of the atmospheric aerosols' extinction based on the field study SAMUM-1; Lidar-Messung der Extinktion des atmosphaerischen Aerosols am Beispiel der Feldstudie SAMUM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esselborn, Michael

    2008-07-01

    In the frame of this thesis a high-resolution spectral LIDAR (HSRL) was used for the field study SAMUM during May/June 2006 and January/February 2008 on board of the research aircraft Falcon. The intensity of the LIDAR signals are mainly influences by backscattering and extinction of atmospheric particles (aerosols). Using a narrow-band optical filter the HSRL allows the measurement of the molecular backscattering besides the total atmospheric backscattering. During SAMUM-1 the optical properties of the Sahara dust aerosols were measured for the first time, esp. its extinction, the ratio extinction/backscattering and the depolarization close to the source region. The results of the optical density of the aerosols were compared with satellite-based data. South of the Atlas-mountains optical aerosol densities in the range of 0.50 to 0.60 were measured.

  6. 2-Micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2014-01-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations. This new 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of this year for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It is able to make measurements of the total amount of atmospheric CO2 from the aircraft to the ground or cloud. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  7. Estimation of aircraft wake vortex parameters from data measured with a 1.5-μm coherent Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalikho, I N; Banakh, V A

    2015-07-15

    A strategy of measurement by a 1.5-μm pulsed coherent Doppler lidar "Stream Line" has been developed, and a method for estimation of aircraft wake vortices from the lidar data has been proposed. The principal possibility of obtaining the information about the vortex situation over an airport airfield with the Stream-Line lidar has been demonstrated.

  8. Volume-imaging lidar observations of the convective structure surrounding the flight path of a flux-measuring aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eloranta, E.W.; Forrest, D.K. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. Here the authors report on convective structure measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) made from instrumented aircraft flights. To compensate for the limited spatial resolution of the aircraft flight path the data is correlated with simultaneous LIDAR measurements which provide a much larger scale picture of the atmosphere. Together these two diagnostics provide a much more informative picture of the ABL, especially in the vicinity of particular convective eddy structures. It becomes clear from this work that stable results require longer flight paths than the 15km legs in this sample area. Horizontal wind speeds from the two instruments agree very well.

  9. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Velocity and Altitude of Space and Arial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to support future NASA missions to planetary bodies. The lidar transmits three laser beams and measures line-of-sight range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. Accurate altitude and velocity vector data, derived from the line-of-sight measurements, enables the landing vehicle to precisely navigate from several kilometers above the ground to the designated location and execute a gentle touchdown. The same lidar sensor can also benefit terrestrial applications that cannot rely on GPS or require surface-relative altitude and velocity data.

  10. New Lidar Laser Configuration for Earth Science Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR Phase 1 program, Fibertek successfully developed and demonstrated a breadboard version of a pulsed fiber laser capable of high-spectral resolution lidar...

  11. New Lidar Laser Configuration for Earth Science Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek, Inc. and Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) propose to optimize and verify, an advanced platform for direct-detection lidar transmitter, based on...

  12. Analysis of the Uncertainty in Wind Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Doppler Lidar during XPIA: Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, Rob [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In March and April of 2015, the ARM Doppler lidar that was formerly operated at the Tropical Western Pacific site in Darwin, Australia (S/N 0710-08) was deployed to the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) for the eXperimental Planetary boundary-layer Instrument Assessment (XPIA) field campaign. The goal of the XPIA field campaign was to investigate methods of using multiple Doppler lidars to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional measurements of winds and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, and to characterize the uncertainties in these measurements. The ARM Doppler lidar was one of many Doppler lidar systems that participated in this study. During XPIA the 300-m tower at the BAO site was instrumented with well-calibrated sonic anemometers at six levels. These sonic anemometers provided highly accurate reference measurements against which the lidars could be compared. Thus, the deployment of the ARM Doppler lidar during XPIA offered a rare opportunity for the ARM program to characterize the uncertainties in their lidar wind measurements. Results of the lidar-tower comparison indicate that the lidar wind speed measurements are essentially unbiased (~1cm s-1), with a random error of approximately 50 cm s-1. Two methods of uncertainty estimation were tested. The first method was found to produce uncertainties that were too low. The second method produced estimates that were more accurate and better indicators of data quality. As of December 2015, the first method is being used by the ARM Doppler lidar wind value-added product (VAP). One outcome of this work will be to update this VAP to use the second method for uncertainty estimation.

  13. Combined wind measurements by two different lidar instruments in the Arctic middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hildebrand

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During a joint campaign in January 2009, the Rayleigh/Mie/Raman (RMR lidar and the sodium lidar at the ALOMAR Observatory (69° N, 16° E in Northern Norway were operated simultaneously for more than 40 h, collecting data for wind measurements in the middle atmosphere from 30 up to 110 km altitude. As both lidars share the same receiving telescopes, the upper altitude range of the RMR lidar and the lower altitude range of the sodium lidar overlap in the altitude region of ≈80–85 km. For this overlap region we are thus able to present the first simultaneous wind measurements derived from two different lidar instruments. The comparison of winds derived by RMR and sodium lidar is excellent for long integration times of 10 h as well as shorter ones of 1 h. Combination of data from both lidars allows identifying wavy structures between 30 and 110 km altitude, whose amplitudes increase with height. We have also performed vertical wind measurements and measurements of the same horizontal wind component using two independent lasers and telescopes of the RMR lidar and show how to use this data to calibrate and validate the wind retrieval. For the latter configuration we found a good agreement of the results but also identified inhomogeneities in the horizontal wind at about 55 km altitude of up to 20 ms−1 for an integration time of nearly 4 h. Such small-scale inhomogeneities in the horizontal wind field are an essential challenge when comparing data from different instruments.

  14. A Compact Remote Sensing Lidar for High Resolution Measurements of Methane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ? Develop the technology for a compact, space-qualifiable laser transmitter for a lidar operating at 1.65 5 to enable Earth observation CH4 measurements. ? Reduce...

  15. Atmospheric aerosol load morphological classification and retrieved visibility based on lidar backscatter measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the tropospheric aerosol load morphological classification and its impact on temporal variation of visibility are investigated using a continuous 23-hour single channel CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR backscatter measurement. The trajectory...

  16. Multifunction Lidar for Air Data and Kinetic Air Hazard Measurement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ophir proposes to develop a multifunction, low-cost lidar capable of accurately measuring kinetic air hazards, and air data, simultaneously. The innovation is...

  17. A review of turbulence measurements using ground-based wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    pioneered in the first 15 yr, i.e., from 1972–1997, when standard techniques could not be used to measure turbulence. Obtaining unfiltered turbulence statistics from the large probe volume of the lidars has been and still remains the most challenging aspect. Until now, most of the processing algorithms......A review of turbulence measurements using ground-based wind lidars is carried out. Works performed in the last 30 yr, i.e., from 1972–2012 are analyzed. More than 80% of the work has been carried out in the last 15 yr, i.e., from 1997–2012. New algorithms to process the raw lidar data were...... that have been developed have shown that by combining an isotropic turbulence model with raw lidar measurements, we can obtain unfiltered statistics.We believe that an anisotropic turbulence model will provide a more realistic measure of turbulence statistics. Future development in algorithms will depend...

  18. Lidar profilers in the context of wind energy–a verification procedure for traceable measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschall, Julia; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn;

    2012-01-01

    for lidar profilers that enables us to achieve the required traceability. The procedure is based on a direct comparison of the measurements from the lidar and reference sensors mounted on a mast at various height levels. First, the data are corrected and filtered to obtain a representative data set ensuring...... are both used to correct the lidar measurements and to derive a corresponding uncertainty budget. A significant limitation of the procedure is the considerable uncertainty introduced by the reference sensors themselves. The decision as to whether to apply the derived correction as a lidar calibration......, the existing standards only permit the use of cup anemometers as standard instruments. The main issue preventing the use of remote sensors in such standards is the need to maintain the traceability of the measurements in the international standard system. In this paper, we describe a verification procedure...

  19. Improved mixing height monitoring through a combination of lidar and radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface-based radon (222Rn measurements can be combined with lidar backscatter to obtain a higher quality time series of mixing height within the Planetary Boundary-Layer (PBL than is possible from lidar alone, and a more quantitative measure of mixing height than is possible from only radon. The lidar measurements benefit because even when aerosol layers are detected, reliably attributing the mixing height to the correct layer presents a challenge. By combining lidar with a mixing length scale derived from a time series of radon concentration, automated and robust attribution is possible during the morning transition.

    Radon measurements also provide mixing information during the night and with the addition of lidar these measurements become insensitive to night-to-night changes in radon emissions. After calibration with lidar, the radon-derived equivalent mixing height agrees with other measures of mixing on daily and hourly time scales and is a potential method for studying intermittent mixing in nocturnal boundary layers.

  20. Lidar measurement of stratospheric dust from St. Augustine Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Browell, E. V.; Northam, G. B.

    1976-01-01

    The detection of a stratospheric dust layer of probable volcanic origin over Hampton, Va., on the evening of Jan. 28, 1976, with a 20-inch lidar system is reported. A digitized cathode-ray-tube trace of a return signal from altitudes of 12 to 24 km on January 28 is provided, and it is shown that 38% of the return was due to stratospheric aerosol. Noting that measurements on January 22 and February 2 showed no traces of this stratospheric dust layer, trajectories of dust-laden air parcels are followed from initiation at 0000 GMT on January 24 at the St. Augustine Volcano on Augustine Island, Alaska (59 deg N, 153 deg W). Analysis of the trajectories indicates that dust injected into the stratosphere at 59 deg N, 153 deg W could have been transported to Virginia in about 4 days. It is concluded that if the St. Augustine Volcano was the source of the dust, at least 23 deg of meridional transport from polar latitudes was observed.

  1. Characterizing Tropical Forest Structure using Field-based Measurements and a Terrestrial Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palace, M. W.; Sullivan, F.; Ducey, M. J.; Herrick, C.

    2015-12-01

    Forest structure comprises numerous quantifiable components of forest biometric characteristics, one of which is tree architecture. This structural component is important in the understanding of the past and future trajectories of these biomes. Tropical forests are often considered the most structurally complex and yet least understood of forested ecosystems. New technologies have provided novel avenues for quantifying properties of forested ecosystems, one of which is LIght Detection And Ranging (lidar). This sensor can be deployed on satellite, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and terrestrial platforms. In this study we examined the efficacy of a terrestrial lidar scanner (TLS) system in a tropical forest to estimate forest structure. Our study was conducted in January 2012 at La Selva, Costa Rica at twenty locations in predominantly undisturbed forest. At these locations we collected field measured biometric attributes using a variable plot design. We also collected TLS data from the center of each plot. Using this data we developed relative vegetation profiles (RVPs) and calculated a series of parameters including entropy, FFT, number of layers and plant area index to develop statistical relationships with field data. We developed statistical models using multiple linear regressions, all of which converged on statistically significant relationships with the strongest relationship being for mean crown depth (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.01, RMSE = 1.1 m). Tree density was found to have the least strong statistical relationship (r2 = 0.45, p < 0.01, RMSE = 160.7 n ha-1). We found significant relationship between basal area and lidar metrics (r2 = 0.76, p < 0.001, RMSE = 3.68 number ha-1). Models developed for biomass 1 had a higher r-squared value and lower RMSE than that of biomass2 (biomass1: r2 = 0.7, p < 0.01, RMSE = 28.94 Mg ha-1; biomass2: r2 = 0.67, p < 0.01, RMSE = 40.62 Mg ha-1). Parameters selected in our models varied, thus indicating the potential relevance of

  2. Space-borne clear air lidar measurements in the presence of broken cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Astin

    Full Text Available A number of proposed lidar systems, such as ESA’s AEOLUS (formerly ADM and DIAL missions (e.g. WALES are to make use of lidar returns in clear air. However, on average, two-thirds of the globe is covered in cloud. Hence, there is a strong likelihood that data from these instruments may be contaminated by cloud. Similarly, optically thick cloud may not be penetrated by a lidar pulse, resulting in unobservable regions that are overshadowed by the cloud. To address this, it is suggested, for example, in AEOLUS, that a number of consecutive short sections of lidar data (between 1 and 3.5 km in length be tested for cloud contamination or for overshadowing and only those that are unaffected by cloud be used to derive atmospheric profiles. The prob-ability of obtaining profiles to near ground level using this technique is investigated both analytically and using UV air-borne lidar data recorded during the CLARE’98 campaign. These data were measured in the presence of broken cloud on a number of flights over southern England over a four-day period and were chosen because the lidar used has the same wavelength, footprint and could match the along-track spacing of the proposed AEOLUS lidar.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques; general circulation

  3. All-Fiber Airborne Coherent Doppler Lidar to Measure Wind Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An all-fiber airborne pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (CDL prototype at 1.54μm is developed to measure wind profiles in the lower troposphere layer. The all-fiber single frequency pulsed laser is operated with pulse energy of 300μJ, pulse width of 400ns and pulse repetition rate of 10kHz. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest pulse energy of all-fiber eye-safe single frequency laser that is used in airborne coherent wind lidar. The telescope optical diameter of monostatic lidar is 100 mm. Velocity-Azimuth-Display (VAD scanning is implemented with 20 degrees elevation angle in 8 different azimuths. Real-time signal processing board is developed to acquire and process the heterodyne mixing signal with 10000 pulses spectra accumulated every second. Wind profiles are obtained every 20 seconds. Several experiments are implemented to evaluate the performance of the lidar. We have carried out airborne wind lidar experiments successfully, and the wind profiles are compared with aerological theodolite and ground based wind lidar. Wind speed standard error of less than 0.4m/s is shown between airborne wind lidar and balloon aerological theodolite.

  4. Vertical distribution of aerosols over the east coast of India inferred from airborne LIDAR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satheesh, S.K. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Divecha Centre for Climate Change; Vinoj, V. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Suresh Babu, S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Nair, Vijayakumar S. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India). Space Physics Lab.

    2009-07-01

    The information on altitude distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere is essential in assessing the impact of aerosol warming on thermal structure and stability of the atmosphere. In addition, aerosol altitude distribution is needed to address complex problems such as the radiative interaction of aerosols in the presence of clouds. With this objective, an extensive, multi-institutional and multi-platform field experiment (ICARB-Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget) was carried out under the Geosphere Biosphere Programme of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO-GBP) over continental India and adjoining oceans during March to May 2006. Here, we present airborne LIDAR measurements carried out over the east Coast of the India during the ICARB field campaign. An increase in aerosol extinction (scattering + absorption) was observed from the surface upwards with a maximum around 2 to 4 km. Aerosol extinction at higher atmospheric layers (>2 km) was two to three times larger compared to that of the surface. A large fraction (75-85%) of aerosol column optical depth was contributed by aerosols located above 1 km. The aerosol layer heights (defined in this paper as the height at which the gradient in extinction coefficient changes sign) showed a gradual decrease with an increase in the offshore distance. A large fraction (60-75%) of aerosol was found located above clouds indicating enhanced aerosol absorption above clouds. Our study implies that a detailed statistical evaluation of the temporal frequency and spatial extent of elevated aerosol layers is necessary to assess their significance to the climate. This is feasible using data from space-borne lidars such as CALIPSO, which fly in formation with other satellites like MODIS AQUA and MISR, as part of the A-Train constellation. (orig.)

  5. Vertical distribution of aerosols over the east coast of India inferred from airborne LIDAR measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Satheesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The information on altitude distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere is essential in assessing the impact of aerosol warming on thermal structure and stability of the atmosphere. In addition, aerosol altitude distribution is needed to address complex problems such as the radiative interaction of aerosols in the presence of clouds. With this objective, an extensive, multi-institutional and multi-platform field experiment (ICARB-Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget was carried out under the Geosphere Biosphere Programme of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO-GBP over continental India and adjoining oceans during March to May 2006. Here, we present airborne LIDAR measurements carried out over the east Coast of the India during the ICARB field campaign. An increase in aerosol extinction (scattering + absorption was observed from the surface upwards with a maximum around 2 to 4 km. Aerosol extinction at higher atmospheric layers (>2 km was two to three times larger compared to that of the surface. A large fraction (75–85% of aerosol column optical depth was contributed by aerosols located above 1 km. The aerosol layer heights (defined in this paper as the height at which the gradient in extinction coefficient changes sign showed a gradual decrease with an increase in the offshore distance. A large fraction (60–75% of aerosol was found located above clouds indicating enhanced aerosol absorption above clouds. Our study implies that a detailed statistical evaluation of the temporal frequency and spatial extent of elevated aerosol layers is necessary to assess their significance to the climate. This is feasible using data from space-borne lidars such as CALIPSO, which fly in formation with other satellites like MODIS AQUA and MISR, as part of the A-Train constellation.

  6. LIDAR wind speed measurements from a rotating spinner (SpinnerEx 2009)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, Torben; Hansen, Kasper H.; Sjoeholm, M.; Harris, M.

    2010-08-15

    In the context of the increasing application of remote sensing techniques in wind energy, the feasibility of upwind observations via a spinner-mounted wind lidar was tested during the SpinnerEx 2009 experiment. The objective was to install a QinetiQ (Natural Power) ZephIR lidar in the rotating spinner of a MW-sized wind turbine, and investigate the approaching wind fields from this vantage point. Time series of wind speed measurements from the lidar with 50 Hz sampling rate were successfully obtained for approximately 60 days, during the measurement campaign lasting from April to August 2009. In this report, information is given regarding the experimental setup and the lidar's operation parameters. The geometrical model used for the reconstruction of the scanning pattern of the lidar is described. This model takes into account the lidar's pointing direction, the spinner axis's vertical tilt and the wind turbine's yaw relative to the mean wind speed direction. The data analysis processes are documented. A methodology for the calculation of the yaw misalignment of the wind turbine relative to the wind direction, as a function of various averaging times, is proposed, using the lidar's instantaneous line-of-sight radial wind speed measurements. Two different setups have been investigated in which the approaching wind field was measured at distances of 0.58 OE and 1.24 OE rotor diameters upwind, respectively. For both setups, the instantaneous yaw misalignment of the turbine has been estimated from the lidar measurements. Data from an adjacent meteorological mast as well as data logged within the wind turbine's control system were used to evaluate the results. (author)

  7. Estimating Carbon STOCK Changes of Mangrove Forests Using Satellite Imagery and Airborne LiDAR Data in the South Sumatra State, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Y.; Fukushima, A.; Imai, Y.; Tanahashi, Y.; Nakama, E.; Ohta, S.; Kawazoe, K.; Akune, N.

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to estimate the biomass in the mangrove forests using satellite imagery and airborne LiDAR data, and 2) to estimate the amount of carbon stock changes using biomass estimated. The study area is located in the coastal area of the South Sumatra state, Indonesia. This area is approximately 66,500 ha with mostly flat land features. In this study, the following procedures were carried out: (1) Classification of types of tree species using Satellite imagery in the study area, (2) Development of correlation equations between spatial volume based on LiDAR data and biomass stock based on field survey for each types of tree species, and estimation of total biomass stock and carbon stock using the equation, and (3) Estimation of carbon stock change using Chronological Satellite Imageries. The result showed the biomass and the amount of carbon stock changes can be estimated with high accuracy, by combining the spatial volume based on airborne LiDAR data with the tree species classification based on satellite imagery. Quantitative biomass monitoring is in demand for projects related to REDD+ in developing countries, and this study showed that combining airborne LiDAR data with satellite imagery is one of the effective methods of monitoring for REDD+ projects.

  8. ESTIMATING CARBON STOCK CHANGES OF MANGROVE FORESTS USING SATELLITE IMAGERY AND AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA IN THE SOUTH SUMATRA STATE, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Maeda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were 1 to estimate the biomass in the mangrove forests using satellite imagery and airborne LiDAR data, and 2 to estimate the amount of carbon stock changes using biomass estimated. The study area is located in the coastal area of the South Sumatra state, Indonesia. This area is approximately 66,500 ha with mostly flat land features. In this study, the following procedures were carried out: (1 Classification of types of tree species using Satellite imagery in the study area, (2 Development of correlation equations between spatial volume based on LiDAR data and biomass stock based on field survey for each types of tree species, and estimation of total biomass stock and carbon stock using the equation, and (3 Estimation of carbon stock change using Chronological Satellite Imageries. The result showed the biomass and the amount of carbon stock changes can be estimated with high accuracy, by combining the spatial volume based on airborne LiDAR data with the tree species classification based on satellite imagery. Quantitative biomass monitoring is in demand for projects related to REDD+ in developing countries, and this study showed that combining airborne LiDAR data with satellite imagery is one of the effective methods of monitoring for REDD+ projects.

  9. Windscanner: 3-D wind and turbulence measurements from three steerable doppler lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, T; Mann, J; Courtney, M; Sjoeholm, M [Wind Energy Department, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: torben.mikkelsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-01

    At RISOe DTU we has started to build a new-designed laser-based lidar scanning facility for detailed remote measurements of the wind fields engulfing the huge wind turbines of today. Our aim is to measure in real-time 3D wind vector data at several hundred points every second: 1) upstream of the turbine, 2) near the turbine, and 3) in the wakes of the turbine rotors. Our first proto-type Windscanner is now being built from three commercially available Continuous Wave (CW) wind lidars modified with fast adjustable focus length and equipped with 2-D prism-based scan heads, in conjunction with a commercially available pulsed wind lidar for extended vertical profiling range. Design, construction and initial testing of the new 3-D wind lidar scanning facility are described and the functionality of the Windscanner and its potential as a new research facility within the wind energy community is discussed.

  10. Pure Rotational Raman Lidar for Temperature Measurements from 5-40 Km Over Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Song, Shalei; Yang, Yong; Li, Faquan; Cheng, Xuewu; Chen, Zhenwei; Liu, Linmei; McCormick, M. Patrick; Gong, Shunsheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a pure rotational Raman lidar (PRR) was established for the atmospheric temperature measurements from 5 km to 40 km over Wuhan, China (30.5°N, 114.5°E). To extract the expected PRR signals and simultaneously suppress the elastically backscattered light, a high-spectral resolution polychromator for light splitting and filtering was designed. Observational results revealed that the temperature difference measured by PRR lidar and the local radiosonde below 30 km was less than 3.0 K. The good agreement validated the reliability of the PRR lidar. With the 1-h integration and 150-m spatial resolution, the statistical temperature error for PRR lidar increases from 0.4 K at 10 km up to 4 K at altitudes of about 30 km. In addition, the whole night temperature profiles were obtained for study of the long-term observation of atmospheric fluctuations.

  11. Pure Rotational Raman Lidar for Temperature Measurements from 5-40 Km Over Wuhan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yajuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a pure rotational Raman lidar (PRR was established for the atmospheric temperature measurements from 5 km to 40 km over Wuhan, China (30.5°N, 114.5°E. To extract the expected PRR signals and simultaneously suppress the elastically backscattered light, a high-spectral resolution polychromator for light splitting and filtering was designed. Observational results revealed that the temperature difference measured by PRR lidar and the local radiosonde below 30 km was less than 3.0 K. The good agreement validated the reliability of the PRR lidar. With the 1-h integration and 150-m spatial resolution, the statistical temperature error for PRR lidar increases from 0.4 K at 10 km up to 4 K at altitudes of about 30 km. In addition, the whole night temperature profiles were obtained for study of the long-term observation of atmospheric fluctuations.

  12. Cirrus cloud properties measurement using lidar in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chengli; Tao, Zongming; Hu, Shunxing; Che, Huizheng; Yu, Jie; Feng, Caiyun; Xie, Chenbo; Liu, Dong; Zhong, Zhiqing; Yuan, Ke'e.; Cao, Kaifa; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Yingjian; Chen, Zhenyi

    2016-01-01

    Cirrus cloud has an important effect on the radiation balance between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The vertical structures, optical depth and effective lidar ratio of cirrus cloud detected by Mie scattering-polarization-Raman lidar system in Beijing from April 11 to December 31, 2012 are analyzed. The results show that the cloud height in Beijing is lower in spring and higher in autumn, with a mean value of about 8km. The mean of cloud thickness is 0.74km. The mean of optical depth is 0.092, and most observed cirrus cloud is thin while optical depth is less than 0.3. The effective lidar ratio of cirrus is lower in summer and higher in winter, inversely related to local temperature, with a mean value of 32.29Sr.

  13. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  14. Optical and geometrical properties of cirrus clouds in Amazonia derived from 1 year of ground-based lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Diego A.; Barja, Boris; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Seifert, Patric; Baars, Holger; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Artaxo, Paulo

    2017-03-01

    Cirrus clouds cover a large fraction of tropical latitudes and play an important role in Earth's radiation budget. Their optical properties, altitude, vertical and horizontal coverage control their radiative forcing, and hence detailed cirrus measurements at different geographical locations are of utmost importance. Studies reporting cirrus properties over tropical rain forests like the Amazon, however, are scarce. Studies with satellite profilers do not give information on the diurnal cycle, and the satellite imagers do not report on the cloud vertical structure. At the same time, ground-based lidar studies are restricted to a few case studies. In this paper, we derive the first comprehensive statistics of optical and geometrical properties of upper-tropospheric cirrus clouds in Amazonia. We used 1 year (July 2011 to June 2012) of ground-based lidar atmospheric observations north of Manaus, Brazil. This dataset was processed by an automatic cloud detection and optical properties retrieval algorithm. Upper-tropospheric cirrus clouds were observed more frequently than reported previously for tropical regions. The frequency of occurrence was found to be as high as 88 % during the wet season and not lower than 50 % during the dry season. The diurnal cycle shows a minimum around local noon and maximum during late afternoon, associated with the diurnal cycle of precipitation. The mean values of cirrus cloud top and base heights, cloud thickness, and cloud optical depth were 14.3 ± 1.9 (SD) km, 12.9 ± 2.2 km, 1.4 ± 1.1 km, and 0.25 ± 0.46, respectively. Cirrus clouds were found at temperatures down to -90 °C. Frequently cirrus were observed within the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which are likely associated to slow mesoscale uplifting or to the remnants of overshooting convection. The vertical distribution was not uniform, and thin and subvisible cirrus occurred more frequently closer to the tropopause. The mean lidar ratio was 23.3 ± 8.0 sr. However, for

  15. Comparison of Airborne LiDAR and Satellite Hyperspectral Remote Sensing to Estimate Vascular Plant Richness in Deciduous Mediterranean Forests of Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ceballos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Andes foothills of central Chile are characterized by high levels of floristic diversity in a scenario, which offers little protection by public protected areas. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of this diversity must be gained in order to aid in conservation management. Heterogeneous environmental conditions involve an important number of niches closely related to species richness. Remote sensing information derived from satellite hyperspectral and airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data can be used as proxies to generate a spatial prediction of vascular plant richness. This study aimed to estimate the spatial distribution of plant species richness using remote sensing in the Andes foothills of the Maule Region, Chile. This region has a secondary deciduous forest dominated by Nothofagus obliqua mixed with sclerophyll species. Floristic measurements were performed using a nested plot design with 60 plots of 225 m2 each. Multiple predictors were evaluated: 30 topographical and vegetation structure indexes from LiDAR data, and 32 spectral indexes and band transformations from the EO1-Hyperion sensor. A random forest algorithm was used to identify relevant variables in richness prediction, and these variables were used in turn to obtain a final multiple linear regression predictive model (Adjusted R2 = 0.651; RSE = 3.69. An independent validation survey was performed with significant results (Adjusted R2 = 0.571, RMSE = 5.05. Selected variables were statistically significant: catchment slope, altitude, standard deviation of slope, average slope, Multiresolution Ridge Top Flatness index (MrRTF and Digital Crown Height Model (DCM. The information provided by LiDAR delivered the best predictors, whereas hyperspectral data were discarded due to their low predictive power.

  16. Lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio of the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S

    2014-07-28

    Bio-optical models are used to develop a model of the lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio applicable to oceanographic lidar. The model is based on chlorophyll concentration, and is expected to be valid for Case 1 waters. The limiting cases of narrow- and wide-beam lidars are presented and compared with estimates based on in situ optical measurements. Lidar measurements are also compared with the model using in situ or satellite estimates of chlorophyll concentration. A modified lidar ratio is defined, in which the properties of pure sea water are removed. This modified ratio is shown to be nearly constant for wide-beam lidar operating in low-chlorophyll waters, so accurate inversion to derive extinction and backscattering is possible under these conditions. This ratio can also be used for lidar calibration.

  17. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the results from phase 2 of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase two of the project included two measurement campaigns conducted at given sites. The purpose was to find out if the lidar-to-lidar calibration procedure can be conducted with similar results...

  18. Fine-measuring technique and application for sea surface wind by mobile Doppler wind lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhishen; Wang, Zhangjun; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Li, Zhigang; Zhang, Xin; Bi, Decang; Chen, Yubao; Li, Rongzhong; Yang, Yuqiang

    2009-06-01

    The Key Laboratory of Ocean Remote Sensing of the Ministry of Education of China, Ocean University of China, has developed the first mobile Doppler wind lidar in China. As an important component of meteorological services for the Good Luck Beijing 2007 Qingdao International Regatta, the mobile Doppler wind lidar was used to measure the sea surface wind (SSW) with 100 m*100 m spatial and 10-min temporal resolution in Qingdao from 15 to 23 August 2007. We present the results from two aspects of this campaign. First, the lidar was operated in the fixed-direction mode and compared to SSW simultaneously measured by a collocated buoy. Second, we present lidar wind measurements throughout the regatta and show good agreement with the match situation of the International Regatta. In addition, we present a case study, accounting for the observation of sailboats stopped by the headwind. With considerable data accumulated, we have shown that the mobile Doppler wind lidar can indeed provide near real-time SSW in support of the sailing games. The lidar has also provided meteorological services for the 2008 Olympic sailing games from 8 to 22 August and Paralympics Sailing Games from 8 to 13 September 2008 in Qingdao.

  19. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 1; Methods and Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Leifer, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured at night by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site in April 1994. These lidar data are used to derive aerosol profiles for altitudes between 0.0 1 5 and 5 km. Since this lidar detects Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen molecules as well as the elastic scattering from molecules and aerosols, it measures both aerosol backscattering and extinction simultaneously. The aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio varied between approximately 30 sr and 75 sr at 351 nm. Aerosol optical thicknesses derived by integrating the lidar profiles of aerosol extinction measured at night between 0. I and 5 km are found to be about 10-40% lower than those measured by a Sun photometer during the day. This difference is attributed to the contribution by stratospheric aerosols not included in the lidar estimates as well as to diurnal differences in aerosol properties and concentrations. Aerosol profiles close to the surface were acquired by pointing the lidar nearly horizontally. Measurements of aerosol scattering from a tower-mounted nephelometer are found to be 40% lower than lidar measurements of aerosol extinction over a wide range of relative humidities even after accounting for the difference in wavelengths. The reasons for this difference are not clear but may be due to the inability of the nephelometer to accurately measure scattering by large particles.

  20. Measurements of aerosol distribution by an elastic-backscatter lidar in summer 2008 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenyi Chen; Wenqing Liu; Yujun Zhang; Nanjing Zhao; Junfeng He; Jun Ruan

    2009-01-01

    Elastic lidar observations of profiles of the aerosol extinction,backscattering coefficients,and the lidar ratio have been performed in Beijing.The elastic lidar transmitts wavelengths of 532 and 355 nm.The measurement altitude can reach up to 6 km.The similarity of the extinction and backscattering profiles suggests a close relation between the mean transmission and reflection properties.The lidar ratio on July 22,2008 varied from 10 to 30 sr with the mean value of 20 sr.The profiles of the aerosol properties indicate the cirrus at 6-km altitude and a well-mixed boundary layer from July 22 to 24,2008.The detected boundary layer also agrees well with the high and stable ozone concentration obtained from the differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS)system.

  1. RIVM Tropospheric ozone LIDAR Measurements during TROLIX'91

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apituley A

    1991-01-01

    For the intercomparison of several LIDAR systems for the vertical profiling of tropospheric ozone developed in the EUREKA/EUROTRAC subproject TESLAS a field campaign was held at the RIVM site in Bilthoven, the Netherlands, during the period from June 10 to June 28, 1991. In this report an overview

  2. RIVM Tropospheric ozone LIDAR Measurements during TROLIX'91

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apituley A

    1991-01-01

    For the intercomparison of several LIDAR systems for the vertical profiling of tropospheric ozone developed in the EUREKA/EUROTRAC subproject TESLAS a field campaign was held at the RIVM site in Bilthoven, the Netherlands, during the period from June 10 to June 28, 1991. In this report an overview

  3. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Aerosol Measurements during MILAGRO and TEXAQS/GOMACCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Cook Anthony; Harper, David; Burton, Sharon; Clayton, Marian; Clarke, Antony; Russell, Phil; Redemann, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Two1 field experiments conducted during 2006 provided opportunities to investigate the variability of aerosol properties near cities and the impacts of these aerosols on air quality and radiative transfer. The Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX-MEX)/Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX-B) joint experiment conducted during March 2006 investigated the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) (http://www.al.noaa.gov/2006/) conducted during August and September 2006 investigated climate and air quality in the Houston/Gulf of Mexico region. During both missions, the new NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 King Air aircraft and measured profiles of aerosol extinction, backscattering, and depolarization to: 1) characterize the spatial and vertical distributions of aerosols, 2) quantify aerosol extinction and optical thickness contributed by various aerosol types, 3) investigate aerosol variability near clouds, 4) evaluate model simulations of aerosol transport, and 5) assess aerosol optical properties derived from a combination of surface, airborne, and satellite measurements.

  4. Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in the middle atmosphere with a twin Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Jens; Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Winds play an important role for the filtering of gravity waves traveling from the ground to higher altitudes. They control the propagation of gravity waves and the amount of transported energy and momentum. The thermal structure of the atmosphere determines its stability, hence the buoyancy frequency. Therefore, knowing winds and temperatures in the middle atmosphere is crucial to study and interpret atmospheric dynamics comprehensively. Both temperature and wind affect the propagation of infrasound waves through the middle atmosphere. Observing winds and temperatures in the middle atmosphere on routine basis is challenging since a large part of this altitude range is not accessible by radars or satellites. Using the Doppler Rayleigh Iodine Spectrometer DoRIS, our Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the Arctic station ALOMAR in Northern Norway (69°N, 16°E) is capable to measure winds and temperatures simultaneously in the middle atmosphere between about 20 and 80 km altitude. Since two independently steerable telescopes are used, we can derive two wind components at once. Winds and temperatures are measured even under daylight conditions, yielding observations spanning multiple days, which is essential for, e.g., gravity-wave studies. We will present results from case studies and a larger data set covering winter situations between 2012 and 2015, including stratospheric warmings and periods of enhanced gravity wave activity.

  5. Estimating Aboveground Forest Carbon Stock of Major Tropical Forest Land Uses Using Airborne Lidar and Field Measurement Data in Central Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, R. B.; Watanabe, M.; Motohka, T.; Shiraishi, T.; shimada, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are providing environmental goods and services including carbon sequestration, energy regulation, water fluxes, wildlife habitats, fuel, and building materials. Despite the policy attention, the tropical forest reserve in Southeast Asian region is releasing vast amount of carbon to the atmosphere due to deforestation. Establishing quality forest statistics and documenting aboveground forest carbon stocks (AFCS) are emerging in the region. Airborne and satellite based large area monitoring methods are developed to compliment conventional plot based field measurement methods as they are costly, time consuming, and difficult to implement for large regions. But these methods still require adequate ground measurements for calibrating accurate AFCS model. Furthermore, tropical region comprised of varieties of natural and plantation forests capping higher variability of forest structures and biomass volumes. To address this issue and the needs for ground data, we propose the systematic collection of ground data integrated with airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne LiDAR enables accurate measures of vertical forest structure, including canopy height and volume demanding less ground measurement plots. Using an appropriate forest type based LiDAR sampling framework, structural properties of forest can be quantified and treated similar to ground measurement plots, producing locally relevant information to use independently with satellite data sources including synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In this study, we examined LiDAR derived forest parameters with field measured data and developed general and specific AFCS models for tropical forests in central Sumatra. The general model is fitted for all types of natural and plantation forests while the specific model is fitted to the specific forest type. The study region consists of natural forests including peat swamp and dry moist forests, regrowth, and mangrove and plantation forests

  6. Quantifying Above-Cloud Aerosols through Integrating Multi-Sensor Measurements from A-Train Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying above-cloud aerosols can help improve the assessment of aerosol intercontinental transport and climate impacts. Large-scale measurements of aerosol above low-level clouds had been generally unexplored until very recently when CALIPSO lidar started to acquire aerosol and cloud profiles in June 2006. Despite CALIPSO s unique capability of measuring above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD), such observations are substantially limited in spatial coverage because of the lidar s near-zero swath. We developed an approach that integrates measurements from A-Train satellite sensors (including CALIPSO lidar, OMI, and MODIS) to extend CALIPSO above-cloud AOD observations to substantially larger areas. We first examine relationships between collocated CALIPSO above-cloud AOD and OMI absorbing aerosol index (AI, a qualitative measure of AOD for elevated dust and smoke aerosol) as a function of MODIS cloud optical depth (COD) by using 8-month data in the Saharan dust outflow and southwest African smoke outflow regions. The analysis shows that for a given cloud albedo, above-cloud AOD correlates positively with AI in a linear manner. We then apply the derived relationships with MODIS COD and OMI AI measurements to derive above-cloud AOD over the whole outflow regions. In this talk, we will present spatial and day-to-day variations of the above-cloud AOD and the estimated direct radiative forcing by the above-cloud aerosols.

  7. Fiber-Optic Gratings for Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Leila B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band filters in the form of phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg gratings incorporated into optical fibers are being developed for differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments used to measure concentrations of atmospheric water vapor. The basic idea is to measure the relative amounts of pulsed laser light scattered from the atmosphere at two nearly equal wavelengths, one of which coincides with an absorption spectral peak of water molecules and the other corresponding to no water vapor absorption. As part of the DIAL measurement process, the scattered light is made to pass through a filter on the way to a photodetector. Omitting other details of DIAL for the sake of brevity, what is required of the filter is to provide a stop band that: Surrounds the water-vapor spectral absorption peaks at a wavelength of 946 nm, Has a spectral width of at least a couple of nanometers, Contains a pass band preferably no wider than necessary to accommodate the 946.0003-nm-wavelength water vapor absorption peak [which has 8.47 pm full width at half maximum (FWHM)], and Contains another pass band at the slightly shorter wavelength of 945.9 nm, where there is scattering of light from aerosol particles but no absorption by water molecules. Whereas filters used heretofore in DIAL have had bandwidths of =300 pm, recent progress in the art of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters has made it feasible to reduce bandwidths to less than or equal to 20 pm and thereby to reduce background noise. Another benefit of substituting fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters for those now in use would be significant reductions in the weights of DIAL instruments. Yet another advantage of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters is that their transmission spectra can be shifted to longer wavelengths by heating or stretching: hence, it is envisioned that future DIAL instruments would contain devices for fine adjustment of transmission wavelengths through stretching or heating of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters

  8. Lidar System for Airborne Measurement of Clouds and Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matthew; Scott, V. Stanley; Izquierdo, Luis Ramos; Marzouk, Joe

    2008-01-01

    A lidar system for measuring optical properties of clouds and aerosols at three wavelengths is depicted. The laser transmitter is based on a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal pumped by light coupled to the crystal via optical fibers from laser diodes that are located away from the crystal to aid in dissipating the heat generated in the diodes and their drive circuits. The output of the Nd:YVO4 crystal has a wavelength of 1064 nm, and is made to pass through frequency-doubling and frequency-tripling crystals. As a result, the net laser output is a collinear superposition of beams at wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm. The laser operates at a pulse-repetition rate of 5 kHz, emitting per-pulse energies of 50 microJ at 1064 nm, 25 microJ at 532 nm and 50 microJ at 355 nm. An important feature of this system is an integrating sphere located between the laser output and the laser beam expander lenses. The integrating sphere collects light scattered from the lenses. Three energy-monitor detectors are located at ports inside the integrating sphere. Each of these detectors is equipped with filters such that the laser output energy is measured independently for each wavelength. The laser output energy is measured on each pulse to enable the most accurate calibration possible. The 1064-nm and 532-nm photodetectors are, more specifically, single photon-counting modules (SPCMs). When used at 1064 nm, these detectors have approximately 3% quantum efficiency and low thermal noise (fewer than 200 counts per second). When used at 532 nm, the SPCMs have quantum efficiency of about 60%. The photodetector for the 355-nm channel is a photon-counting photomultiplier tube having a quantum efficiency of about 20%. The use of photon-counting detectors is made feasible by the low laser pulse energy. The main advantage of photon-counting is ease of inversion of data without need for complicated calibration schemes like those necessary for analog detectors. The disadvantage of photon-counting detectors

  9. Development of LiDAR measurements for the German offshore test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenmeier, A.; Kühn, M.; Wächter, M.; Rahm, S.; Mellinghoff, H.; Siegmeier, B.; Reeder, L.

    2008-05-01

    The paper introduces the content of the recently started joint research project 'Development of LiDAR measurements for the German Offshore Test Site' which has the objective to support other research projects at the German offshore test site 'alpha ventus'. The project has started before the erection of the offshore wind farm and one aim is to give recommendations concerning LiDAR technology useable for offshore measurement campaigns and data analysis. The work is organized in four work packages. The work package LiDAR technology deals with the specification, acquisition and calibration of a commercial LiDAR system for the measurement campaigns. Power curve measurements are dedicated to power curve assessment with ground-based LiDAR using standard statistical methods. Additionally, it deals with the development of new methods for the measurement of non-steady short-term power curves. Wind field research aims at the development of wake loading simulation methods of wind turbines and the exploration of loading control strategies and nacelle-based wind field measurement techniques. Finally, dissemination of results to the industry takes place in work package Technology transfer.

  10. Advances in Pulsed Lidar Measurements of CO2 Column Concentrations from Aircraft and for Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Riris, H.; Numata, K.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.

    2016-12-01

    We have demonstrated an improved pulsed, multiple-wavelength integrated path differential absorption lidar for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations. The lidar measures the range resolved shape of the 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption line to scattering surfaces, including the ground and the tops of clouds. Airborne measurements have used both 30 and 15 fixed wavelength samples distributed across the line. Analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength 10 times per second. The retrievals solve for the CO2 absorption line shape and the column average CO2 concentrations by using radiative transfer calculations, the aircraft altitude and range to the scattering surface, and the atmospheric conditions. We compare these to CO2 concentrations from in-situ sensors. In recent campaigns the lidar used a step-locked laser diode source, and a new HgCdTe APD detector in the receiver. During August and September 2014 the ASCENDS campaign flew over the California Central Valley, a coastal redwood forest, desert areas, and above growing crops in Iowa. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, and mixing ratio worked well when measuring over variable topography and through thin clouds and aerosols. The retrievals clearly show the decrease in CO2 concentration over growing cropland. Airborne lidar measurements of horizontal gradients of CO2 concentrations across Nevada, Colorado and Nebraska showed good agreement with those from a model of CO2 flux and transport (PCTM). In several flights the agreement of the lidar with the column average concentration was ppm, with standard deviation of 0.9 ppm. Two additional flights were made in February 2016 using a larger laser spot size and an optimized receiver. These improved the sensitivity x3, and the retrievals show 0.7 ppm precision over the desert in 1 second averaging time. A summary of these results will be presented, along with on-going developments for a space version.

  11. On the impact of a refined stochastic model for airborne LiDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Glennie, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Accurate topographic information is critical for a number of applications in science and engineering. In recent years, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has become a standard tool for acquiring high quality topographic information. The assessment of airborne LiDAR derived DEMs is typically based on (i) independent ground control points and (ii) forward error propagation utilizing the LiDAR geo-referencing equation. The latter approach is dependent on the stochastic model information of the LiDAR observation components. In this paper, the well-known statistical tool of variance component estimation (VCE) is implemented for a dataset in Houston, Texas, in order to refine the initial stochastic information. Simulations demonstrate the impact of stochastic-model refinement for two practical applications, namely coastal inundation mapping and surface displacement estimation. Results highlight scenarios where erroneous stochastic information is detrimental. Furthermore, the refined stochastic information provides insights on the effect of each LiDAR measurement in the airborne LiDAR error budget. The latter is important for targeting future advancements in order to improve point cloud accuracy.

  12. Using the UFL-8 UV fluorescent LIDAR to collect ground truth data for calibrating MODIS based CDOM, chlorophyll and suspended sediment measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlinszky, A.; Pelevin, V.; Goncharenko, I.; Soloviev, D.; Molnár, G.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing of water quality parameters is becoming a routine method in oceanological applications around the world. One of the main difficulties of calibrating satellite images to map water quality parameters is the large number and high spatial coverage of ground truth data needed. The UFL-8 fluorescent LIDAR developed by the Shirshov Oceanological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences measures CDOM, chlorophyll and suspended sediment near-surface concentrations optically in situ, on a travelling boat, and so is capable of a large number of widespread measurements very quickly. The registration of the measured values is connected to a GPS, so all measurements are geo-tagged and can be used for interpolating maps of the measured parameters. Since this instrument also has to be calibrated, some water samples have to be collected, but the optical measurements usually show very strong correlation to the water sample data. This approach was tested on Lake Balaton, Hungary in September 2008. Lake Balaton is characterized by its large area (597 km2), elongated shape and relatively shallow water depth (avg 3,2 m). The lake has a strong trophic gradient from the SW to the NE, the main tributary river carries large amounts of CDOM and suspended sediment concentrations can be very high because the lake is shallow and the sediment is fine grained. We measured in diverse weather conditions, and in an enclosed bay, a narrow strait and a large area of open water. 28 water samples were collected during the LIDAR measurement and the CDOM, chlorophyll and suspended sediment concentrations were measured in the laboratory using classic hydrological methods. These results were used to calibrate the LIDAR measurements with R2 values between 0,90 and 0,95. The relative values measured by the LIDAR were converted to absolute values using this regression, and the point-by-point results were interpolated into a raster with a cell size equal to the spatial resolution of

  13. Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Carbon Dioxide Measurement - Novel Lidar Technologies and Techniques with Path to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    The societal benefits of understanding climate change through identification of global carbon dioxide sources and sinks led to the desired NASA's active sensing of carbon dioxide emissions over nights, days, and seasons (ASCENDS) space-based missions of global carbon dioxide measurements. For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique operating at the two-micron wavelength. Currently, an airborne two-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development. This IPDA lidar measures carbon dioxide as well as water vapor, the dominant interfering molecule on carbon dioxide remote sensing. Advancement of this triple-pulse IPDA lidar development is presented.

  14. Evaluating CALIOP Nighttime Level 2 Aerosol Profile Retrievals Using a Global Transport Model Equipped with Two-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation and Ground-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. R.; Tackett, J. L.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Vaughan, M.; Winker, D. M.; Welton, E. J.; Prospero, J. M.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.

    2011-12-01

    Launched in 2006, the Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization instrument (CALIOP) flown aboard the NASA/CNES Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite has collected the first high-resolution global, inter-seasonal and multi-year measurements of aerosol structure. Profiles for aerosol particle extinction coefficient and column-integrated optical depth (AOD) are unique and highly synergistic satellite measurements, given the limitations of passive aerosol remote sensors from resolving information vertically. However, accurate value-added (Level 2.0) CALIOP aerosol products require comprehensive validation of retrieval techniques and calibration stability. Daytime Level 2.0 CALIOP AOD retrievals have been evaluated versus co-located NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-AQUA) data. To date, no corresponding investigation of nighttime retrieval performance has been conducted from a lack of requisite global nighttime validation datasets. In this paper, Version 3.01 CALIOP 5-km retrievals of nighttime 0.532 μm AOD from 2007 are evaluated versus corresponding 0.550 μm AOD analyses derived with the global 1° x 1° U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS). Mean regional profiles of CALIOP nighttime 0.532 μm extinction coefficient are assessed versus NASA Micropulse Lidar Network and NIES Skynet Lidar Network measurements. NAAPS features a two-dimensional variational assimilation procedure for quality-assured MODIS and NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD products. Whereas NAAPS nighttime AOD datasets represent a nominal 12-hr forecast field, from lack of MODIS/MISR retrievals for assimilation in the dark sector of the model, evaluation of NAAPS 00-hr analysis and 24-hr forecast skill versus MODIS and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) indicates adequate stability for conducting this study. Corresponding daytime comparisons of CALIOP retrievals with NAAPS

  15. Estimating Turbulence Statistics and Parameters from Lidar Measurements. Remote Sensing Summer School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya

    , as well as experimental evidence from different measurement campaigns at a test center in Denmark. Several measurement configurations from the commercial and research lidars are described along with mathematical formulations of estimated turbulence statistics and parameters for the respective......This report is prepared as a written contribution to the Remote Sensing Summer School, that is organized by the Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. It provides an overview of the state-of-the-art with regards to estimating turbulence statistics from lidar measurements...... systematic errors in the estimated turbulence statistics. New techniques of post-processing the lidar measurements are also discussed, amongst others the so-called six-beam technique, which reduces the systematic errors in the estimated turbulence statistics significantly. The report ends...

  16. Measurement of Satellite Bunches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Boccardi, A; Bozyigit, S; Bravin, E; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Roncarolo, F; Welsch, C P; Fisher, A S

    2012-01-01

    The RF gymnastics involved in the delivery of proton and lead ion bunches to the LHC can result in satellite bunches of varying intensity occupying the nominally empty RF buckets. Quantification of these satellites is crucial for bunch-by-bunch luminosity normalization as well as for machine protection. We present an overview of the longitudinal density monitor (LDM) which is the principal instrument for the measurement of satellite bunches in the LHC. The LDM uses single photon counting of synchrotron light. The very high energies reached in the LHC, combined with a dedicated undulator for diagnostics, allow synchrotron light measurements to be made with both protons and heavy ions. The arrival times of photons are collected over a few million turns, with the resulting histogram corrected for the effects of the detector’s deadtime and afterpulsing in order to reconstruct the longitudinal profile of the entire LHC ring. The LDM has achieved a dynamic range in excess of 105 and a time resolution of 90 ps. Ex...

  17. Assessment of depth and turbidity with airborne Lidar bathymetry and multiband satellite imagery in shallow water bodies of the Alaskan North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylam, Kutalmis; Brown, Rebecca A.; Hupp, John R.

    2017-06-01

    Airborne Lidar bathymetry (ALB) is an effective and a rapidly advancing technology for mapping and characterizing shallow coastal water zones as well as inland fresh-water basins such as rivers and lakes. The ability of light beams to detect and traverse shallow water columns has provided valuable information about unmapped and often poorly understood coastal and inland water bodies of the world. Estimating ALB survey results at varying water clarity and depth conditions is essential for realizing project expectations and preparing budgets accordingly. In remote locations of the world where in situ water clarity measurements are not feasible or possible, using multiband satellite imagery can be an effective tool for estimating and addressing such considerations. For this purpose, we studied and classified reflected electromagnetic energy from selected water bodies acquired by RapidEye sensor and then correlated findings with ALB survey results. This study was focused not on accurately measuring depth from optical bathymetry but rather on using multiband satellite imagery to quickly predict ALB survey results and identify potentially turbid water bodies with limited depth penetration. For this study, we constructed an in-house algorithm to confirm ALB survey findings using bathymetric waveform information. The study findings are expected to contribute to the ongoing understanding of forecasting ALB survey expectations in unknown and varying water conditions, especially in remote and inaccessible parts of the world.

  18. Aerosol Lidar for the Relative Backscatter Amplification Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.; Nadeev, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter amplification presents only in a turbulent atmosphere, when the laser beam is propagates twice through the same inhomogeneities. We proposed technical solution to detect backscatter amplification. An aerosol micro pulse lidar with a beam expansion via receiving telescope was built to study this effect. Our system allows simultaneous detection of two returns from the same scattering volume: exactly on the axis of the laser beam and off the axis.

  19. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchitta, B K; Ferguson, H M

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  20. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  1. Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 From Regional to Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Dobler, Jeremy; Campbell, Joel; Meadows, Byron; Obland, Michael; Ismail, Syed; Kooi, Susan; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is a critical forcing for the Earth's climate and the knowledge on its distributions and variations influences predictions of the Earth's future climate. Large uncertainties in the predictions persist due to limited observations. This study uses the airborne Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IMCW) lidar developed at NASA Langley Research Center to measure regional atmospheric CO2 spatio-temporal variations. Further lidar development and demonstration will provide the capability of global atmospheric CO2 estimations from space, which will significantly advances our knowledge on atmospheric CO2 and reduce the uncertainties in the predictions of future climate. In this presentation, atmospheric CO2 column measurements from airborne flight campaigns and lidar system simulations for space missions will be discussed. A measurement precision of approx.0.3 ppmv for a 10-s average over desert and vegetated surfaces has been achieved. Data analysis also shows that airborne lidar CO2 column measurements over these surfaces agree well with in-situ measurements. Even when thin cirrus clouds present, consistent CO2 column measurements between clear and thin cirrus cloudy skies are obtained. Airborne flight campaigns have demonstrated that precise atmospheric column CO2 values can be measured from current IM-CW lidar systems, which will lead to use this airborne technique in monitoring CO2 sinks and sources in regional and continental scales as proposed by the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport â€" America project. Furthermore, analyses of space CO2 measurements shows that applying the current IM-CW lidar technology and approach to space, the CO2 science goals of space missions will be achieved, and uncertainties in CO2 distributions and variations will be reduced.

  2. Intercomparisons of Lidar Backscatter Measurements and In-situ Data from GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudamani, S.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) took place during Nov. 1989 and May - Jun. 1990 and involved flight surveys of the Pacific region by the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The experimental instruments were lidars operating at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the thermal infrared and various optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. The primary motivation for GLOBE was the development of spaceborne wind sensing lidar. This paper will concern a comparison of direct backscatter measurements and backscatter calculated from particle counter data. Of special interest is that the particle measurements provided data on composition, and thus refractive index variation may be included in the analysis.

  3. Remote Sensing of Clouds using Satellites, Lidars, CLF/XLF and IR Cameras at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirinos J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clouds in the field of view of the fluorescence detectors affect the detection of the extensive air showers. Several remote sensing techniques are used to detect night-time clouds over the 3000 km2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Four lidars at the fluorescence detector sites are performing different patterns of scans of the surrounding sky detecting clouds. Two laser facilities (CLF and XLF are shooting into the sky delivering cloud cover above them every 15 minutes. Four IR cameras detect the presence of clouds within the FOV of the fluorescence detectors every 5 minutes. A method using GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites identifies night-time clouds twice per hour with a spatial resolution of 2.4 km by 5.5 km over the Observatory. We upload all this information into several databases to be used for the reconstruction of cosmic ray events and to find exotic events.

  4. Remote Sensing of Clouds using Satellites, Lidars, CLF/XLF and IR Cameras at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, J.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds in the field of view of the fluorescence detectors affect the detection of the extensive air showers. Several remote sensing techniques are used to detect night-time clouds over the 3000 km2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Four lidars at the fluorescence detector sites are performing different patterns of scans of the surrounding sky detecting clouds. Two laser facilities (CLF and XLF) are shooting into the sky delivering cloud cover above them every 15 minutes. Four IR cameras detect the presence of clouds within the FOV of the fluorescence detectors every 5 minutes. A method using GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites identifies night-time clouds twice per hour with a spatial resolution of 2.4 km by 5.5 km over the Observatory. We upload all this information into several databases to be used for the reconstruction of cosmic ray events and to find exotic events.

  5. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  6. Simulation and design of solar-blind Raman Lidar for water vapor measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongchen; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Lei, Ning; Wang, Li

    2017-02-01

    A novel water vapor Raman Lidar is developed at a solar-blind wavelength of 266nm. To obtain signals of Mie-Rayleigh scattering spectra and Raman scattering spectra of H2O, N2 and O2 with fine separation and high efficient extraction, a newly high-efficiency Raman polychromatic system is designed using the combination of dichroic mirrors and narrow- band interference filters. Using the standard atmospheric scattering models and aerosol extinction coefficients, the rejection rate of Mie-Rayleigh scattering signals and the signal-to-noise ratio of atmospheric water vapor measurement are simulated. The optimal parameters of Lidar system are obtained based on the detailed analysis and the discussion of the SNR of echo signals. Lidar emission wavelength and Raman scattering echo wavelengths are all in the ultraviolet range below 300nm known as the "solar-blind" region, because practically all radiation at these wavelengths is absorbed by the ozone layer in the stratosphere. It has the advantage of detecting water vapor in the daytime without the influence of solar background radiation in the system. Through the comparison between the Raman Lidars at the wavelengths of 266nm and 355nm respectively, it is concluded that the detection performance of the designed system at 266nm is better than the Raman Lidar system at 355nm during the daytime measurement, and the measurement height can be up to the 4 km.

  7. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heese Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  8. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Deng, Ruru

    2016-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  9. Orientation correction of wind direction measurements by means of staring lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; José Trujillo, Juan; Kühn, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In spite of the efforts made at the time of installation of wind vanes or ultrasonic anemometers (Sonic), there is always a remaining uncertainty of several degrees in the absolute north of such sensors. In this research a method is presented to reduce the azimuthal orientation error of wind direction sensors by means of Doppler Lidar measurements. The method is based on the comparison between the conventional sensor and a distant long range lidar pointing to it in staring mode. By comparing their line-of-sight wind speeds any misalignment between both systems can be estimated more accurately. This method was applied in an measurement campaign in the offshore wind farm alpha ventus next to the meteorological mast FINO 1. The maximum alignment error of a Sonic was reduced to below ±1°. This accurate alignment has asserted, that no bias exists between Lidar and Sonic wind speed measurements.

  10. Optical depth distribution of optically thin clouds and surface elevation variability derived from CALIPSO lidar measurements (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael D.; Campbell, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the major greenhouse gases in the Earth's climate system. The CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has been significantly increased over the last 150 years, due mainly to anthropogenic activities. Comprehensive measurements of global atmospheric CO2 distributions are urgently needed to develop a more complete understanding of CO2 sources and sinks. Because of the importance of the atmospheric CO2 measurements, satellite missions with passive sensors such as GOSAT and OCO-2 have been launched, and those with active sensors like Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) using an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar are being studied. The required accuracy and precision for the column-integrated CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) is high, within 1.0 ppm or approximately 0.26%, which calls for unbiased CO2 measurements and accurate determinations of the path length. The presence of clouds and aerosols can make the measurement complicated, especially for passive instruments. The heterogeneity generated by the surface elevation changes within the field of view of the sensors and the grid boxes of averaged values of atmospheric CO2 would also cause significant uncertainties in XCO2 estimates if the path length is not accurately known. Thus, it is required to study the cloud and aerosol distributions as well as the surface elevation variability in assessing the performance of the CO2 measurements from both active and passive instruments. The CALIPSO lidar has acquired nearly 10 years of global measurement data. It provides a great opportunity to study the global distribution of clouds and aerosols as well as the statistics of the surface elevation variations. In this study we have analyzed multiple years of the CALIPSO Level 2 data to derive the global occurrence of aerosols and optically thin clouds. The results show that clear sky does not occur as frequently as expected. The global average

  11. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone by Ozonesonde and Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y. B.; Froidevaux, L.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Bojkov, B.; Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Filipiak, M. J.; Harwood, R. S.; Fuller, R. A.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Cofield, R. E.; Cuddy, D. T.; Jarnot, R. F.; Knosp, B. W.; Perun, V. S.; Schwartz, W. V.; Snyder, P. C.; Stek, R. P.; Thurstans, P. A.; Wagner, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present validation studies of MLS version 2.2 upper tropospheric and stratospheric ozone profiles using ozonesonde and lidar data as well as climatological data. Ozone measurements from over 60 ozonesonde stations worldwide and three lidar stations are compared with coincident MLS data. The MLS ozone stratospheric data between 150 and 3 hPa agree well with ozonesonde measurements, within 8% for the global average. MLS values at 215 hPa are biased high compared to ozonesondes by approximately 20% at middle to high latitude, although there is a lot of variability in this altitude region.

  12. Using Lidar and Radar measurements to constrain predictions of forest ecosystem structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Alexander S; Saatchi, Sassan S; Chazdon, Robin L; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2011-06-01

    Insights into vegetation and aboveground biomass dynamics within terrestrial ecosystems have come almost exclusively from ground-based forest inventories that are limited in their spatial extent. Lidar and synthetic-aperture Radar are promising remote-sensing-based techniques for obtaining comprehensive measurements of forest structure at regional to global scales. In this study we investigate how Lidar-derived forest heights and Radar-derived aboveground biomass can be used to constrain the dynamics of the ED2 terrestrial biosphere model. Four-year simulations initialized with Lidar and Radar structure variables were compared against simulations initialized from forest-inventory data and output from a long-term potential-vegtation simulation. Both height and biomass initializations from Lidar and Radar measurements significantly improved the representation of forest structure within the model, eliminating the bias of too many large trees that arose in the potential-vegtation-initialized simulation. The Lidar and Radar initializations decreased the proportion of larger trees estimated by the potential vegetation by approximately 20-30%, matching the forest inventory. This resulted in improved predictions of ecosystem-scale carbon fluxes and structural dynamics compared to predictions from the potential-vegtation simulation. The Radar initialization produced biomass values that were 75% closer to the forest inventory, with Lidar initializations producing canopy height values closest to the forest inventory. Net primary production values for the Radar and Lidar initializations were around 6-8% closer to the forest inventory. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition resulted in improved biomass and basal-area dynamics as well as leaf-area index. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition and fine-scale structure by combining the remote-sensing measurements with ground-based inventory data further improved

  13. LiDAR measurements of full scale wind turbine wake characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Mann, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Full scale wind speed measurements, recorded inside the wake of an operating 2MW/80m wind turbine,has been performed during the spring 2009, as part of the EU-TOPFARM project. Longitudinal wind speeds in wake cross sections are measured with a LiDAR system mounted in the rear of the nacelle. The ...

  14. LiDAR measurements of full scale wind turbine wake characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Mann, Jakob;

    2009-01-01

    Full scale wind speed measurements, recorded inside the wake of an operating 2MW/80m wind turbine,has been performed during the spring 2009, as part of the EU-TOPFARM project. Longitudinal wind speeds in wake cross sections are measured with a LiDAR system mounted in the rear of the nacelle...

  15. Validation of aerosol measurements by the satellite sensors SAM II and Sage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    A global data base on stratospheric aerosols has been obtained with the aid of the sensors SAM II and SAGE since the satellites carrying the sensors were launched in October 1978 and Feburary 1979, respectively. Several major comparative experiments have been conducted to acquire correlative data for validating the extinction profiles measured by these satellite sensors. The present investigation has the objective to present results from the first two of these experiments, which were conducted at Sondrestorm, Greenland, in November 1978, and at Poker Flat, Alaska, in July 1979. In both experiments, extinction profiles derived from the correlative sensors (dustsonde, lidar, filter, wire impactor) agreed, to within their respective uncertainties, with the extinction profiles measured by SAM II and SAGE (which in turn agreed with each other).

  16. Lidar measurements of Bora wind effects on aerosol loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Maruška; Wang, Longlong; Stanič, Samo; Bergant, Klemen; Eichinger, William E.; Ocaña, Francisco; Strajnar, Benedikt; Škraba, Primož; Vučković, Marko; Willis, William B.

    2017-02-01

    The Vipava valley in Slovenia is well known for the appearance of strong, gusty North-East Bora winds, which occur as a result of air flows over an adjacent orographic barrier. There are three prevailing wind directions within the valley which were found to give rise to specific types of atmospheric structures. These structures were investigated using a Mie scattering lidar operating at 1064 nm, which provided high temporal and spatial resolution backscatter data on aerosols, which were used as tracers for atmospheric flows. Wind properties were monitored at the bottom of the valley and at the rim of the barrier using two ultrasonic anemometers. Twelve time periods between February and April 2015 were selected when lidar data was available. The periods were classified according to the wind speed and direction and investigated in terms of appearance of atmospheric structures. In two periods with strong or moderate Bora, periodic atmospheric structures in the lidar data were observed at heights above the mountain barrier and are believed to be Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, induced by wind shear. No temporal correlation was found between these structures and wind gusts at the ground level. The influence of the wind on the height of the planetary boundary layer was studied as well. In periods with low wind speeds, the vertical evolution of the planetary boundary layer was found to be governed by solar radiation and clouds. In periods with strong or moderate Bora wind, convection within the planetary boundary layer was found to be much weaker due to strong turbulence close to the ground, which inhibited mixing through the entire layer.

  17. Design of an airborne lidar for stratospheric aerosol measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A modular, multiple-telescope receiving concept is developed to gain a relatively large receiver collection aperture without requiring extensive modifications to the aircraft. This concept, together with the choice of a specific photodetector, signal processing, and data recording system capable of maintaining approximately 1% precision over the required large signal amplitude range, is found to be common to all of the options. It is recommended that development of the lidar begin by more detailed definition of solutions to these important common signal detection and recording problems.

  18. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  19. Exploration of Whole Atmosphere Lidar: Mach-zehnder Receiver to Extend Fe Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements from the Thermosphere to the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John A.; Chu, Xinzhao

    2016-06-01

    A receiver employing a field-widened Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is investigated for extending the wind measurement range of a narrowband Fe Doppler (372 nm) lidar from its existing measurement range in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) down to the ground. This design uses the multiple transmitted frequencies available from the base Fe Doppler lidar in combination with an MZI receiver to make a measurement of the Doppler shift from Rayleigh-Mie scattering that is independent of aerosol backscatter ratio, temperature and pressure of the lidar volume and also independent of geometric overlap, the chopper function and any other factor affecting the signal in both MZI channels equally. A ratio is constructed from the three frequencies and two channels of the interferometer that exhibits a measurement performance of 1.75 times the Cramer-Rao lower bound, which is comparable to the dual MZI (DMZ) while preserving the insensitivity to backscatter spectrum of the quad MZI (QMZ). Using actual data obtained recently from the Fe Doppler lidar, we show the expected measurement performance of this whole atmosphere lidar instrument concept.

  20. A comparison of Doppler lidar wind sensors for Earth-orbit global measurement applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1985-01-01

    Now, there are four Doppler lidar configurations which are being promoted for the measurement of tropospheric winds: (1) the coherent CO2 Lidar, operating in the 9 micrometer region using a pulsed, atmospheric pressure CO2 gas discharge laser transmitter, and heterodyne detection; (2) the coherent Neodymium doped YAG or Glass Lidar, operating at 1.06 micrometers, using flashlamp or diode laser optical pumping of the solid state laser medium, and heterodyne detection; (3) the Neodymium doped YAG/Glass Lidar, operating at the doubled frequency (at 530 nm wavelength), again using flashlamp or diode laser pumping of the laser transmitter, and using a high resolution tandem Fabry-Perot filter and direct detection; and (4) the Raman shifted Xenon Chloride Lidar, operating at 350 nm wavelength, using a pulsed, atmospheric pressure XeCl gas discharge laser transmitter at 308 nm, Raman shifted in a high pressure hydrogen cell to 350 nm in order to avoid strong stratospheric ozone absorption, also using a high resolution tandem Fabry-Perot filter and direct detection. Comparisons of these four systems can include many factors and tradeoffs. The major portion of this comparison is devoted to efficiency. Efficiency comparisons are made by estimating the number of transmitted photons required for a single pulse wind velocity estimate of + or - 1 m/s accuracy in the middle troposphere, from an altitude of 800 km, which is assured to be reasonable for a polar orbiting platform.

  1. 2-micron Double Pulsed IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke; Scola, Tory

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a high energy pulsed 2-micron IPDA lidar instrument to measure the atmospheric CO2 column density. The IPDA lidar is operated on the long wavelength wing of R(30) CO2 line at 2050.967 nm (4875.749 cm-1) in the side-line operation mode. The R(30) line is an excellent absorption line for the measurements of CO2 in 2µm wavelength region with regard to the strength of the absorption lines, low susceptibility to atmospheric temperature variability, and freedom from problematic interference with other absorption lines. The Ho:Tm:YLF laser transmitter is designed to be operated in a unique double pulse format that can produce two-pulse pair in 10 Hz operation. Typically, the output energies of the laser transmitter are 100mJ and 45mJ for the first pulse and the second pulse, respectively. We injection seed the first pulse with on-line frequency and the second pulse with off-line frequency. The IPDA lidar instrument size, weight and power consumption were restricted to small research aircraft payload requirements. The airborne IPDA lidar instrument measures the total integrated column content of CO2 from the instrument to the ground but with weighting that can be tuned by controlling the transmitted wavelengths. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. The 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne demonstration was conducted during March 20, 2014 through April 10, 2014. IPDA lidar airborne flights included various operating and environmental conditions. Environmental conditions included different flight altitude up to 8.3 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Besides, some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating the IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. The lidar instrument is robust during all of the flights. This paper describes

  2. Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART 5 for Modeling Airborne and Satellite Spectroradiometer and LIDAR Acquisitions of Natural and Urban Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Gastellu-Etchegorry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite and airborne optical sensors are increasingly used by scientists, and policy makers, and managers for studying and managing forests, agriculture crops, and urban areas. Their data acquired with given instrumental specifications (spectral resolution, viewing direction, sensor field-of-view, etc. and for a specific experimental configuration (surface and atmosphere conditions, sun direction, etc. are commonly translated into qualitative and quantitative Earth surface parameters. However, atmosphere properties and Earth surface 3D architecture often confound their interpretation. Radiative transfer models capable of simulating the Earth and atmosphere complexity are, therefore, ideal tools for linking remotely sensed data to the surface parameters. Still, many existing models are oversimplifying the Earth-atmosphere system interactions and their parameterization of sensor specifications is often neglected or poorly considered. The Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART model is one of the most comprehensive physically based 3D models simulating the Earth-atmosphere radiation interaction from visible to thermal infrared wavelengths. It has been developed since 1992. It models optical signals at the entrance of imaging radiometers and laser scanners on board of satellites and airplanes, as well as the 3D radiative budget, of urban and natural landscapes for any experimental configuration and instrumental specification. It is freely distributed for research and teaching activities. This paper presents DART physical bases and its latest functionality for simulating imaging spectroscopy of natural and urban landscapes with atmosphere, including the perspective projection of airborne acquisitions and LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR waveform and photon counting signals.

  3. Underwater lidar system: design challenges and application in pollution detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pradip; Sankolli, Swati; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-05-01

    The present remote sensing techniques have imposed limitations in the applications of LIDAR Technology. The fundamental sampling inadequacy of the remote sensing data obtained from satellites is that they cannot resolve in the third spatial dimension, the vertical. This limits our possibilities of measuring any vertical variability in the water column. Also the interaction between the physical and biological process in the oceans and their effects at subsequent depths cannot be modeled with present techniques. The idea behind this paper is to introduce underwater LIDAR measurement system by using a LIDAR mounted on an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). The paper introduces working principles and design parameters for the LIDAR mounted AUV (AUV-LIDAR). Among several applications the papers discusses the possible use and advantages of AUV-LIDAR in water pollution detection through profiling of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in water bodies.

  4. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Subhourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar system, developed jointly by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min 17 temporal integration.

  5. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  6. Doppler lidar atmospheric wind sensors - A comparative performance evaluation for global measurement applications from earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison is made of four prominent Doppler lidar systems, ranging in wavelength from the near UV to the middle IR, which are presently being studied for their potential in an earth-orbiting global tropospheric wind field measurement application. The comparison is restricted to relative photon efficiencies, i.e., the required number of transmitted photons per pulse is calculated for each system for midtropospheric velocity estimate uncertainties ranging from + or - 1 to + or - 4 m/s. The results are converted to laser transmitter pulse energy and power requirements. The analysis indicates that a coherent CO2 Doppler lidar operating at 9.11-micron wavelength is the most efficient.

  7. Dynamic displacement estimation by fusing LDV and LiDAR measurements via smoothing based Kalman filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a smoothing based Kalman filter to estimate dynamic displacement in real-time by fusing the velocity measured from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the displacement from a light detection and ranging (LiDAR). LiDAR can measure displacement based on the time-of-flight information or the phase-shift of the laser beam reflected off form a target surface, but it typically has a high noise level and a low sampling rate. On the other hand, LDV primarily measures out-of-plane velocity of a moving target, and displacement is estimated by numerical integration of the measured velocity. Here, the displacement estimated by LDV suffers from integration error although LDV can achieve a lower noise level and a much higher sampling rate than LiDAR. The proposed data fusion technique estimates high-precision and high-sampling rate displacement by taking advantage of both LiDAR and LDV measurements and overcomes their limitations by adopting a real-time smoothing based Kalman filter. To verify the performance of the proposed dynamic displacement estimation technique, a series of lab-scale tests are conducted under various loading conditions.

  8. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-11-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1. The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 m s-1 (2°) and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 m s-1 (12°) for wind speed (wind direction). The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  9. Ship-borne wind LIDAR measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentek, Rolf; Heinemann, Günther; Kohnemann, Svenja

    2017-04-01

    During the two cruises of RV Polarstern (Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany) a wind LIDAR was installed on the upper deck of the ship. The measurements in the Arctic were taken over two weeks (June 2014) in the Fram Strait and in the Antarctic over six weeks (December/January 2015/2016) in the Weddell Sea. Measurements included horizontal and vertical scan programs that allow for the computation of different wind profiles. Since the LIDAR was not motion-stabilized, motion correction was done during post processing. Depending on weather condition data up to 1 km (and in single cases up to 2 km) height was collected. An evaluation of the derived vertical wind profiles was done by comparing them to on board surface measurements and radio soundings. The RMSD of wind speed between the LIDAR and the radiosonde measurements was found as 0.7 - 1.2 m/s depending on data selection and height. Overall, the wind LIDAR is an excellent tool for the measurement of wind profiles with high spatial (10m) and temporal resolution (15min).

  10. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Achtert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 m s−1. The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 m s−1 (2° and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 m s−1 (12° for wind speed (wind direction. The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  11. Evaluation and calibration methods for LIDAR/DIAL measurements in ambient air; Methodes d'evaluation et de calibration des mesures LIDAR/DIAL en air ambiant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, A.

    2001-03-01

    One of today's major concerns for populations and governments is air quality. The present work has been supported by environmental agencies ADEME (Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maitrise de l'Energie) and INERIS (Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et de Risques). We studied the optical detection of atmospheric pollutants by the LIDAR technique (Light Detection And Ranging), where backscattered signals are recorded range resolved, as an optical RADAR. Thanks to many collaborations, we could evaluate for the first time the performances of a LIDAR system in the frame of AFNOR and VDI/DIN standards. The technique used for the evaluation is based on an original set-up involving calibration cells inserted in the optical path. The LIDAR system tested was the LIDAR 510M ELIGHT implemented since 1999 into the air quality network of the city Lyon (COPARLY). We evaluated this DIAL system (Differential Absorption LIDAR) at INERIS, on 5 pollutants: sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, toluene and benzene. Another part of the work is dedicated to the optical characterisation of urban aerosols, and in particular of nano-metric soot particles from a diesel engine. Original experiments and study of multispectral scattering are presented. Fractal theories including intra-cluster scattering have been used for analysing the results. Finally, we report two LIDAR measurement campaigns during summer smog episodes. The first in Paris, where ozone LIDAR measurements are compared to spot monitors at three levels of the Eiffel Tower within 33 h; and the second in Lyon, where the obtained 3-D mappings of ozone concentrations could be used to validate a photochemical model. Such validations are essential for predicting future ozone episodes. (author)

  12. Satellite to measure equatorial ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer E (Explorer 55) Satellite is described. The satellite will gather information on the earth's upper atmosphere, particularly regarding the condition of the protective ozone layer. The satellite will also provide information concerning the earth's heat balance, and heat flow characteristics, and energy conversion mechanisms.

  13. Influence of wind conditions on wind turbine loads and measurement of turbulence using lidars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sathe, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Variations in wind conditions influence the loads on wind turbines significantly. In order to determine these loads it is important that the external conditions are well understood. Wind lidars are well developed nowadays to measure wind profiles upwards from the surface. But how turbulence can be m

  14. Full two-dimensional rotor plane inflow measurements by a spinner-integrated wind lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Angelou, Nikolas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Wind turbine load reduction and power performance optimization via advanced control strategies is an active area in the wind energy community. In particular, feed-forward control using upwind inflow measurements by lidar (light detection and ranging) remote sensing instruments has at...

  15. Influence of wind conditions on wind turbine loads and measurement of turbulence using lidars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sathe, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Variations in wind conditions influence the loads on wind turbines significantly. In order to determine these loads it is important that the external conditions are well understood. Wind lidars are well developed nowadays to measure wind profiles upwards from the surface. But how turbulence can be

  16. Variations of the Wake Height over the Bolund Escarpment Measured by a Scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Julia; Mann, Jakob; Angelou, Nikolas

    2016-01-01

    The wake zone behind the escarpment of the Bolund peninsula in the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, has been investigated with the help of a continuous-wave Doppler lidar. The instrument measures the line-of-sight wind speed 390 times per second in highly resolved 7- m tall profiles by rapidly changing t...

  17. Improvement of vertical velocity statistics measured by a Doppler lidar through comparison with sonic anemometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Chilson, Phillip B.; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    Since turbulence measurements from Doppler lidars are being increasingly used within wind energy and boundary-layer meteorology, it is important to assess and improve the accuracy of these observations. While turbulent quantities are measured by Doppler lidars in several different ways, the simplest and most frequently used statistic is vertical velocity variance (w'2) from zenith stares. However, the competing effects of signal noise and resolution volume limitations, which respectively increase and decrease w'2, reduce the accuracy of these measurements. Herein, an established method that utilises the autocovariance of the signal to remove noise is evaluated and its skill in correcting for volume-averaging effects in the calculation of w'2 is also assessed. Additionally, this autocovariance technique is further refined by defining the amount of lag time to use for the most accurate estimates of w'2. Through comparison of observations from two Doppler lidars and sonic anemometers on a 300 m tower, the autocovariance technique is shown to generally improve estimates of w'2. After the autocovariance technique is applied, values of w'2 from the Doppler lidars are generally in close agreement (R2 ≈ 0.95 - 0.98) with those calculated from sonic anemometer measurements.

  18. Dynamic Data Filtering of Long-Range Doppler LiDAR Wind Speed Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Doppler LiDARs have become flexible and versatile remote sensing devices for wind energy applications. The possibility to measure radial wind speed components contemporaneously at multiple distances is an advantage with respect to meteorological masts. However, these measurements must be filtered due to the measurement geometry, hard targets and atmospheric conditions. To ensure a maximum data availability while producing low measurement errors, we introduce a dynamic data filter approach that conditionally decouples the dependency of data availability with increasing range. The new filter approach is based on the assumption of self-similarity, that has not been used so far for LiDAR data filtering. We tested the accuracy of the dynamic data filter approach together with other commonly used filter approaches, from research and industry applications. This has been done with data from a long-range pulsed LiDAR installed at the offshore wind farm ‘alpha ventus’. There, an ultrasonic anemometer located approximately 2.8 km from the LiDAR was used as reference. The analysis of around 1.5 weeks of data shows, that the error of mean radial velocity can be minimised for wake and free stream conditions.

  19. Multipath Estimation in Urban Environments from Joint GNSS Receivers and LiDAR Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Antonio J.; Fabio Dovis; David De Castro; Xin Chen; Khurram Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, multipath error on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals in urban environments is characterized with the help of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements. For this purpose, LiDAR equipment and Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver implementing a multipath estimating architecture were used to collect data in an urban environment. This paper demonstrates how GPS and LiDAR measurements can be jointly used to model the environment and obtain robust receivers....

  20. A Novel Satellite Mission Concept for Upper Air Water Vapour, Aerosol and Cloud Observations Using Integrated Path Differential Absorption LiDAR Limb Sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Weitnauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new satellite mission to deliver high quality measurements of upper air water vapour. The concept centres around a LiDAR in limb sounding by occultation geometry, designed to operate as a very long path system for differential absorption measurements. We present a preliminary performance analysis with a system sized to send 75 mJ pulses at 25 Hz at four wavelengths close to 935 nm, to up to 5 microsatellites in a counter-rotating orbit, carrying retroreflectors characterized by a reflected beam divergence of roughly twice the emitted laser beam divergence of 15 µrad. This provides water vapour profiles with a vertical sampling of 110 m; preliminary calculations suggest that the system could detect concentrations of less than 5 ppm. A secondary payload of a fairly conventional medium resolution multispectral radiometer allows wide-swath cloud and aerosol imaging. The total weight and power of the system are estimated at 3 tons and 2,700 W respectively. This novel concept presents significant challenges, including the performance of the lasers in space, the tracking between the main spacecraft and the retroreflectors, the refractive effects of turbulence, and the design of the telescopes to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio for the high precision measurements. The mission concept was conceived at the Alpbach Summer School 2010.

  1. Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

    2012-08-01

    We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China (31.5 °N, 117 °E). Patterned after the Colorado State University (CSU) narrowband sodium lidar with a dye laser-based transmitter, the USTC sodium temperature/wind lidar was deployed with a number of technical improvements that facilitate automation and ease of operation; these include a home constructed pulsed dye amplifier (PDA), a beam-steering system, a star-tracking program, and an electronic timing control. With the averaged power of ∼1.2 W output from PDA and the receiving telescope diameter of 0.76 m, our lidar system has a power aperture product of ∼0.55 Wm(2) and is comparable to the CSU and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) sodium lidar systems. The uncertainties of typical measurements induced by photon noise and laser locking fluctuation for the temperature and wind with a 2 km vertical and 15 min temporal resolutions under the nighttime clear sky condition are estimated to be ∼1.0 K and ∼1.5 m/s, respectively, at the sodium peak (e.g., 91 km), and 8 K and 10 m/s, respectively, at both sodium layer edges (e.g., 81 km and 105 km). The USTC narrowband sodium lidar has been operated regularly during the night since November 2011. Using the initial data collected, we demonstrate the reliability and suitability of these high resolution and precision datasets for studying the wave perturbations in the mesopause region.

  2. Lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds during the 1989 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) was conducted during January to February 1989 from the Sola Air Station, Norway. As part of this expedition, the NASA Langley Research Center's multiwavelength airborne lidar system was flown on the NASA Ames Research Center's DC-8 aircraft to measure ozone (O3) and aerosol profiles in the region of the polar vortex. The lidar system simultaneously transmitted laser beams at 1064, 603, 311, and 301.5 nm to measure atmospheric scattering, polarization and O3 profiles. Long range flights were made between Stavanger, Norway, and the North Pole, and between 40 deg W and 20 deg E meridians. Eleven flights were made, each flight lasting an average of 10 hours covering about 8000 km. Atmospheric scattering ratios, aerosol polarizations, and aerosol scattering ratio wavelength dependences were derived from the lidar measurements to altitudes above 27 km. The details of the aerosol scattering properties of lidar observations in the IR, VIS, and UV regions are presented along with correlations with the national meteorological Center's temperature profiles.

  3. LIDAR as an alternative to passive collectors to measure pesticide spray drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Solanelles, Francesc; Garcerá, Cruz; Chueca, Patricia; Arnó, Jaume; del Moral, Ignacio; Masip, Joan; Camp, Ferran; Viana, Rafael; Escolà, Alexandre; Gràcia, Felip; Planas, Santiago; Moltó, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide spray drift entails a series of risks and costs in terms of human, animal and environmental well-being. A proper understanding of this phenomenon is essential to minimise these risks. However, most conventional methods used in drift measurement are based on point collectors which are unable to obtain information concerning the temporal or spatial evolution of the pesticide cloud. Such methods are also costly, labour-intensive, and require a considerable amount of time. The aim of this paper is to propose a method to measure the spray drift based on lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and to prove that it can be an alternative to passive collectors. An analytical model is proposed to relate the measurements obtained through passive collectors and those obtained with lidar systems considering several spray application and meteorological parameters. The model was tested through an experimental campaign involving multiple ground spray tests. A lidar system and two types of passive collectors (nylon strings and water-sensitive paper) were used simultaneously to measure the drift. The results showed for each test a high coefficient of determination (R2 ≈ 0.90) between the lidar signal and the tracer mass captured by the nylon strings. This coefficient decreased (R2 = 0.77) when all tests were considered together. Lidar measurements were also used to study the evolution of the pesticide cloud with high range (1.5 m) and temporal resolution (1 s) and to estimate its velocity. Furthermore, a very satisfactory adjustment (R2 = 0.89) was observed between the tracer mass collected by the nylon lines and the coverage on water-sensitive paper sheets. These results are in accordance with the proposed analytical model and allow the conclusion that the application and meteorological parameters can be considered spatially invariant for a given test but are not invariant for different tests.

  4. A six-beam method to measure turbulence statistics using ground-based wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Vasiljevic, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    A so-called six-beam method is proposed to measure atmospheric turbulence using a ground-based wind lidar. This method requires measurement of the radial velocity variances at five equally spaced azimuth angles on the base of a scanning cone and one measurement at the centre of the scanning circle...... lidar (WindScanner), and the derived turbulence statistics (using both methods) such as the u and v variances are compared with those obtained from a reference cup anemometer and a wind vane at 89m height under different atmospheric stabilities. The measurements show that in comparison to the reference...... cup anemometer, depending on the atmospheric stability and the wind field component, the six-beam method measures between 85 and 101% of the reference turbulence, whereas the VAD method measures between 66 and 87% of the reference turbulence....

  5. A six-beam method to measure turbulence statistics using ground-based wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Vasiljevic, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    A so-called six-beam method is proposed to measure atmospheric turbulence using a ground-based wind lidar. This method requires measurement of the radial velocity variances at five equally spaced azimuth angles on the base of a scanning cone and one measurement at the center of the scanning circle...... lidar (WindScanner), and the derived turbulence statistics (using both methods) such as the u and v variances are compared with those obtained from a reference cup anemometer and a wind vane at 89m height under different atmospheric stabilities. The measurements show that in comparison to the reference...... cup anemometer, depending on the atmospheric stability and the wind field component, the six-beam method measures between 85–101% of the reference turbulence, whereas the VAD method measures between 66–87% of the reference turbulence....

  6. Satellite measurements of formaldehyde from shipping emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marbach

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available International shipping is recognized as a pollution source of growing importance, in particular in the remote marine boundary layer. Nitrogen dioxide originating from ship emissions has previously been detected in satellite measurements. This study presents the first satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO linked to shipping emissions as derived from observations made by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME instrument.

    We analyzed enhanced HCHO tropospheric columns from shipping emissions over the Indian Ocean between Sri Lanka and Sumatra. This region offers good conditions in term of plume detection with the GOME instrument as all ship tracks follow a single narrow track in the same east-west direction as used for the GOME pixel scanning. The HCHO signal alone is weak but could be clearly seen in the high-pass filtered data. The line of enhanced HCHO in the Indian Ocean as seen in the 7-year composite of cloud free GOME observations clearly coincides with the distinct ship track corridor from Sri Lanka to Indonesia. The observed mean HCHO column enhancement over this shipping route is about 2.0×1015 molec/cm2.

    The observed HCHO pattern also agrees qualitatively well with results from the coupled earth system model ECHAM5/MESSy applied to atmospheric chemistry (EMAC. However, the modelled HCHO values over the ship corridor are two times lower than in the GOME high-pass filtered data. This might indicate that the used emission inventories are too low and/or that the in-plume chemistry taking place in the narrow path of the shipping lanes are not well represented at the rather coarse model resolution.

  7. First results of combined Fe-lidar/Radar measurements at Davis, 69° S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffner, J.; Morris, R. J.; Kaifler, B.; Viehl, T.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The mobile scanning Fe-lidar of the IAP-Kühlungsborn was moved to Davis, Antarctica, 69° S, 78° E during November 2010. This location was chosen because PMSE/NLC observations by MST-radar/RMR-lidar have been performed since 2003/2001 by the Australian Antarctic Division. Davis is the only station in Antarctica where comparable long-term observations to Alomar, 69° N are available. A comparison of both locations allows a detailed comparison of differences or similarities between the northern (NH) / southern hemisphere (SH) at mesopause altitudes. The Fe-lidar is a two wavelength system which measures Doppler temperature/vertical wind and iron densities by resonance scattering at 386 nm. The fundamental wavelength at 772 nm is used for aerosol measurements from the stratosphere to the mesosphere including NLC in summer or PSC in winter. Measurements are almost background free which allows year round operation independent of sunlight. At Davis the lidar was in operation 24% of the first year (2150 hours) which has not been achieved elsewhere with a mesospheric lidar. This unusual and already largest lidar data base of Antarctica shows the thermal structure of the mesopause region and the iron layer in great detail. Strong tides throughout the year have been observed and a link of the early part of the PMSE season to the stratospheric vortex has been found. More than 700 hours of temperature observation during the PMSE-season are compared with common volume PMSE/NLC observations. For the first time temperature and vertical wind measurements through PMSE and NLC have been achieved by a lidar showing that the SH in particular in December/January differs significantly from the NH in June/July. The temperature measurements near 86 km altitude show that the summer mesopause is surprisingly similar to the NH at PMSE altitudes but differs significantly at higher altitudes. Unlike the NH the southern mesopause altitude changes throughout the season by several kilometres

  8. The Fertilizing Role of African Dust in the Amazon Rainforest. A First Multiyear Assessment Based on Data from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongbin [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Chin, Mian [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Yuan, Tianle [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Bian, Huisheng [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Remer, L. A. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Prospero, J. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Omar, Ali [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Winker, D. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Yang, Yuekui [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD (United States); Zhang, Yan [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD (United States); Zhang, Zhibo [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Chun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    The productivity of the Amazon rainforest is constrained by the availability of nutrients, in particular phosphorus (P). Deposition of long-range transported African dust is recognized as a potentially important but poorly quantified source of phosphorus. This study provides a first multiyear satellite-based estimate of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin using three dimensional (3D) aerosol measurements over 2007-2013 from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8~48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8~50) kg ha-1 a-1. The dust deposition shows significant interannual variation that is negatively correlated with the prior-year rainfall in the Sahel. The CALIOP-based multi-year mean estimate of dust deposition matches better with estimates from in-situ measurements and model simulations than a previous satellite-based estimate does. The closer agreement benefits from a more realistic geographic definition of the Amazon Basin and inclusion of meridional dust transport calculation in addition to the 3D nature of CALIOP aerosol measurements. The imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006~0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7~39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest. This out-of-Basin P input is comparable to the hydrological loss of P from the Basin, suggesting an important role of African dust in preventing phosphorus depletion on time scales of decades to centuries.

  9. A six-beam method to measure turbulence statistics using ground-based wind lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sathe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A so-called six-beam method is proposed to measure atmospheric turbulence using a ground-based wind lidar. This method requires measurement of the radial velocity variances at five equally spaced azimuth angles on the base of a scanning cone and one measurement at the center of the scanning circle, i.e.using a vertical beam at the same height. The scanning configuration is optimized to minimize the sum of the random errors in the measurement of the second-order moments of the components (u,v, w of the wind field. We present this method as an alternative to the so-called velocity azimuth display (VAD method that is routinely used in commercial wind lidars, and which usually results in significant averaging effects of measured turbulence. In the VAD method, the high frequency radial velocity measurements are used instead of their variances. The measurements are performed using a pulsed lidar (WindScanner, and the derived turbulence statistics (using both methods such as the u and v variances are compared with those obtained from a reference cup anemometer and a wind vane at 89 m height under different atmospheric stabilities. The measurements show that in comparison to the reference cup anemometer, depending on the atmospheric stability and the wind field component, the six-beam method measures between 85–101% of the reference turbulence, whereas the VAD method measures between 66–87% of the reference turbulence.

  10. A six-beam method to measure turbulence statistics using ground-based wind lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, A.; Mann, J.; Vasiljevic, N.; Lea, G.

    2015-02-01

    A so-called six-beam method is proposed to measure atmospheric turbulence using a ground-based wind lidar. This method requires measurement of the radial velocity variances at five equally spaced azimuth angles on the base of a scanning cone and one measurement at the centre of the scanning circle, i.e.using a vertical beam at the same height. The scanning configuration is optimized to minimize the sum of the random errors in the measurement of the second-order moments of the components (u,v, w) of the wind field. We present this method as an alternative to the so-called velocity azimuth display (VAD) method that is routinely used in commercial wind lidars, and which usually results in significant averaging effects of measured turbulence. In the VAD method, the high frequency radial velocity measurements are used instead of their variances. The measurements are performed using a pulsed lidar (WindScanner), and the derived turbulence statistics (using both methods) such as the u and v variances are compared with those obtained from a reference cup anemometer and a wind vane at 89 m height under different atmospheric stabilities. The measurements show that in comparison to the reference cup anemometer, depending on the atmospheric stability and the wind field component, the six-beam method measures between 85 and 101% of the reference turbulence, whereas the VAD method measures between 66 and 87% of the reference turbulence.

  11. Full two-dimensional rotor plane inflow measurements by a spinner-integrated wind lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Angelou, Nikolas; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mikkelsen, Torben; Harris, Michael; Slinger, Chris; Kapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionWind turbine load reduction and power performance optimization via advanced control strategies is an active area in the wind energy community. In particular, feed-forward control using upwind inflow measurements by lidar (light detection and ranging) remote sensing instruments has attracted an increasing interest during the last couple of years. So far, the reported inflow measurements have been along a few measurement directions or at most on a circle in front of the turbine, whi...

  12. Assessing the Temperature Dependence of Narrow-Band Raman Water Vapor Lidar Measurements: A Practical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Walker, Monique; Cardirola, Martin; Sakai, Tetsu; Veselovskii, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Narrow-band detection of the Raman water vapor spectrum using the lidar technique introduces a concern over the temperature dependence of the Raman spectrum. Various groups have addressed this issue either by trying to minimize the temperature dependence to the point where it can be ignored or by correcting for whatever degree of temperature dependence exists. The traditional technique for performing either of these entails accurately measuring both the laser output wavelength and the water vapor spectral passband with combined uncertainty of approximately 0.01 nm. However, uncertainty in interference filter center wavelengths and laser output wavelengths can be this large or larger. These combined uncertainties translate into uncertainties in the magnitude of the temperature dependence of the Raman lidar water vapor measurement of 3% or more. We present here an alternate approach for accurately determining the temperature dependence of the Raman lidar water vapor measurement. This alternate approach entails acquiring sequential atmospheric profiles using the lidar while scanning the channel passband across portions of the Raman water vapor Q-branch. This scanning is accomplished either by tilt-tuning an interference filter or by scanning the output of a spectrometer. Through this process a peak in the transmitted intensity can be discerned in a manner that defines the spectral location of the channel passband with respect to the laser output wavelength to much higher accuracy than that achieved with standard laboratory techniques. Given the peak of the water vapor signal intensity curve, determined using the techniques described here, and an approximate knowledge of atmospheric temperature, the temperature dependence of a given Raman lidar profile can be determined with accuracy of 0.5% or better. A Mathematica notebook that demonstrates the calculations used here is available from the lead author.

  13. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  14. Assessment of the quality of OSIRIS mesospheric temperatures using satellite and ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sheese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS on the Odin satellite is currently in its 12th year of observing the Earth's limb. For the first time, continuous temperature profiles extending from the stratopause to the upper mesosphere have been derived from OSIRIS measurements of Rayleigh-scattered sunlight. Through most of the mesosphere, OSIRIS temperatures are in good agreement with coincident temperature profiles derived from other satellite and ground-based measurements. In the altitude region of 55–80 km, OSIRIS temperatures are typically within 4–5 K of those from the SABER, ACE-FTS, and SOFIE instruments on the TIMED, SciSat-I, and AIM satellites, respectively. The mean differences between individual OSIRIS profiles and those of the other satellite instruments are typically within the combined uncertainties and previously reported biases. OSIRIS temperatures are typically within 2 K of those from the University of Western Ontario's Purple Crow Lidar in the altitude region of 52–79 km, where the mean differences are within combined uncertainties. Near 84 km, OSIRIS temperatures exhibit a cold bias of 10–15 K, which is due to a cold bias in OSIRIS O2 A-band temperatures at 85 km, the upper boundary of the Rayleigh-scatter derived temperatures; and near 48 km OSIRIS temperatures exhibit a cold bias of 5–15 K, which is likely due to multiple-scatter effects that are not taken into account in the retrieval.

  15. Ground-based water vapor Raman lidar measurements up to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere – Part 1: Instrument development, optimization, and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. McDermid

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the importance of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS and the scarcity of high-quality, long-term measurements, JPL began the development of a powerful Raman lidar in 2005 to try to meet these needs. This development was endorsed by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and the validation program for the EOS-Aura satellite. In this paper we review the stages in the instrumental development of the lidar and the conclusions from three validation campaigns: MOHAVE, MOHAVE-II, and MOHAVE 2009 (Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments. The data analysis, profile retrieval and calibration procedures, as well as additional results from MOHAVE-2009 are presented in detail in a companion paper (Leblanc et al., 2011a. Ultimately the lidar has demonstrated capability to measure water vapor profiles from ~1 km above the ground to the lower stratosphere, reaching 14 km for 1-h integrated profiles and 21 km for 6-h integrated profiles, with a precision of 10 % or better near 13 km and below, and an estimated accuracy of 5 %.

  16. 2013-2014 Lidar Campaign: Measurements of Inflow at a Northern Oklahoma Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, Sonia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Newman, Jennifer [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Irons, Zack [Enel Green Power North America, Inc., Andover, MA (United States); Miller, Wayne O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-25

    In November 2013, LLNL deployed two vertically-profiling, Doppler Laser Detection and Ranging (lidar) instruments at Enel Green Power North America’s 235 MW wind farm in Northern Oklahoma to collect wind measurements. The lidars were used to measure wake-free observations of the free-stream wind flow (i.e., inflow) for purposes of quantifying rotor-disk wind characteristics under varying atmospheric conditions. The measurements included horizontal wind speed, vertical wind speed, wind direction, and turbulence intensity, taken at a ~1 Hz sampling rate and averaged over 10-minute intervals. From these measurements we also calculated wind shear across the turbine rotor disk and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE).

  17. Multiyear Aerosol Study Based on Lidar&Sunphotometer Measurements in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemuc, Anca; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Andrei, Simona; Dandocsi, Alexandru; Stefanie, Horatiu

    2016-06-01

    This observational study focused on three-years time-averaged data set (January 2012-2015). An investigation of long-term trends was performed on two different data sets derived from active and passive remote sensing measurements in Magurele, Romania. Measurements of sun photometer aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm and 340 nm show the mean values of 0.230 ±0 .118 and 0.398 ± 0.185, respectively. The lidar AOD at 532 and 355nm has a mean of 0.271 ±.0.164 and 0.472 ± 0.165 respectively. The highest seasonal mean value was measured by the lidar during the summer of 2014 while the lowest seasonal value was measured by the sunphotometer in February 2012. The origin of atmospheric aerosols has been analyzed using both backtajectories of Hysplit and Circulation Type Classification (CTCs) methods.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  19. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  20. Lidar Observations of Tropical High-altitude Cirrus Clouds: Results form Dual Wavelength Raman Lidar Measurements During the ALBATROSS Campaign 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, R.; Wegener, Alfred; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman Lidar Observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus cloud were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degress S and 23.5 degrees N and altitudes between 11 and 16km.

  1. Lidar Observations of Tropical High-altitude Cirrus Clouds: Results form Dual Wavelength Raman Lidar Measurements During the ALBATROSS Campaign 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, R.; Wegener, Alfred; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman Lidar Observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus cloud were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degress S and 23.5 degrees N and altitudes between 11 and 16km.

  2. Investigation on the monthly variation of cirrus optical properties over the Indian subcontinent using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observation (Calipso)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaman, Reji K.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds have been identified as one of the atmospheric component which influence the radiative processes in the atmosphere and plays a key role in the Earth Radiation Budget. CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) is a joint NASA-CNES satellite mission designed to provide insight in understanding of the role of aerosols and clouds in the climate system. This paper reports the study on the variation of cirrus cloud optical properties of over the Indian sub - continent for a period of two years from January 2009 to December 2010, using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observations (Calipso). Indian Ocean and Indian continent is one of the regions where cirrus occurrence is maximum particularly during the monsoon periods. It is found that during the south-west monsoon periods there is a large cirrus cloud distribution over the southern Indian land masses. Also it is observed that the north-east monsoon periods had optical thick clouds hugging the coast line. The summer had large cloud formation in the Arabian Sea. It is also found that the land masses near to the sea had large cirrus presence. These cirrus clouds were of high altitude and optical depth. The dependence of cirrus cloud properties on cirrus cloud mid-cloud temperature and geometrical thickness are generally similar to the results derived from the ground-based lidar. However, the difference in macrophysical parameter variability shows the limits of space-borne-lidar and dissimilarities in regional climate variability and the nature and source of cloud nuclei in different geographical regions.

  3. AGLITE: a multi-wavelength lidar for measuring emitted aerosol concentrations and fluxes and air motion from agricultural facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Bingham, Gail E.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Swasey, Jason A.; Hancock, Jed J.; Crowther, Blake G.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Marchant, Christian; Cutts, James N.; Huish, David C.; Earl, Curtis L.; Andersen, Jan M.; Cox, McLain L.

    2006-12-01

    AGLITE is a multi-wavelength lidar developed for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar transmitter is a 10 kHz pulsed NdYAG laser at 355, 532 and 1064 nm. We analyze lidar backscatter and extinction to extract aerosol physical properties. All-reflective optics and dichroic and interferometric filters permit all wavelengths to be measured simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting by MTs, an APD, and fast data acquisition. The lidar housing is a transportable trailer suitable for all-weather operation at any accessible site. We direct the laser and telescope FOVs to targets of interest in both azimuth and elevation. The lidar has been applied in atmospheric studies at a swine production farm in Iowa and a dairy in Utah. Prominent aerosol plumes emitted from the swine facility were measured as functions of temperature, turbulence, stability and the animal feed cycle. Particle samplers and turbulence detectors were used by colleagues specializing in those fields. Lidar measurements also focused on air motion as seen by scans of the farm volume. The value of multi-wavelength, eye-safe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements has been confirmed by the successful operation of AGLITE.

  4. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  5. Backscatter and depolarization measurements of aerosolized biological simulants using a chamber lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Santarpia, Josh; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    To ensure agent optical cross sections are well understood from the UV to the LWIR, volume integrated measurements of aerosolized agent material at a few key wavelengths is required to validate existing simulations. Ultimately these simulations will be used to assess the detection performance of various classes of lidar technology spanning the entire range of the optical spectrum. The present work demonstrates an optical measurement architecture based on lidar allowing the measurement of backscatter and depolarization ratio from biological aerosols released in a refereed, 1-m cubic chamber. During 2009, various upgrades have been made to the chamber LIDAR system, which operates at 1.064 μm with sub nanosecond pulses at a 120 Hz repetition rate. The first build of the system demonstrated a sensitivity of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) on the order of 5×105 ppl with 1 GHz InGaAs detectors. To increase the sensitivity and reduce noise, the InGaAs detectors were replaced with larger-area silicon avalanche photodiodes for the second build of the system. In addition, computer controlled step variable neutral density filters are now incorporated to facilitate calibrating the system for absolute back-scatter measurements. Calibrated hard target measurements will be combined with data from the ground truth instruments for cross-section determination of the material aerosolized in the chamber. Measured results are compared to theoretical simulations of cross-sections.

  6. Formaldehyde (HCHO) column measurements from airborne instruments: Comparison with airborne in-situ measurements, model, and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeong-Ahn; Park, Rokjin; Nowlan, Caroline; González Abad, Gonzalo; Chance, Kelly; Janz, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Trace gas measurements from airborne instruments are useful to evaluate and improve a retrieval algorithm developed for the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS). We used radiances measured from two airborne 2D array sensors, the GeoCAPE Airborne Simulator (GCAS) and the Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) for DISCOVER-AQ Texas in 2013 and for KORUS-AQ in 2016 to retrieve formaldehyde (HCHO) columns and to evaluate the GEMS retrieval algorithm. In addition, we used simulated aerosol concentrations constrained by airborne LIDAR observations for AMF calculation to convert slant columns to vertical columns. We compared retrieved HCHO columns with vertical columns obtained from in-situ airborne HCHO measurements. Optical properties and distributions of aerosols are found to be important factors, affecting HCHO retrievals. Finally, additional comparisons of retrieved results with model simulations and low-orbiting satellites provides quantitative information for improving bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic carbon emissions.

  7. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on a Potassium Faraday Dispersive Filter for Daytime Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new high-spectral-resolution lidar technique is proposed for measuring the profiles of atmospheric temperature in daytime. Based on the theory of high resolution Rayleigh scattering, the feasibility and advantages of using potassium (K Faraday dispersive optical filters as blocking filters for measuring atmospheric temperature are demonstrated with a numerical simulation. It was found that temperature profiles could be measured within 1K error for the height of 9 km with a 500 m range resolution in 60 min by using laser pulses with 1mJ/pulse and 1 kHz, and a 50 cm diameter telescope. Furthermore, we are developing compact pulsed laser system for temperature lidar transmitter.

  8. Evidence of High Ice Supersaturation in Cirrus Clouds Using ARM Raman Lidar Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Turner, David D.

    2004-06-05

    Water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere are crucial to understanding the radiative feedback of cirrus clouds on the Earth’s climate. We use a unique, year-long dataset of water vapor mixing ratio inferred from ground-based Raman lidar measurements to study the role of ice supersaturation in ice nucleation processes. We find that ice supersaturation occurs 31% of the time in over 300,000 data points. We also examine the distribution of ice supersaturation with height and find that in the uppermost portion of a cloud layer, the air is ice supersaturated 43% of the time. These measurements show that large ice supersaturation is common in cirrus clouds, which supports the theory of ice forming homogeneously. Given the continuous nature of these Raman lidar measurements, our results have important implications for studying ice nucleation processes using cloud microphysical models.

  9. ARM Raman Lidar Measurements of High Ice Supersaturation in Cirrus Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Turner, David D.

    2004-09-01

    Water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere are crucial to understanding the radiative feedback of cirrus clouds on the Earth's climate. We use a unique, year-long dataset of water vapor mixing ratio inferred from ground-based Raman lidar measurements to study the role of ice supersaturation in ice nucleation processes. We find that ice supersaturation occurs 31% of the time in over 300,000 data points. We also examine the distribution of ice supersaturation with height and find that in the uppermost portion of a cloud layer, the air is ice supersaturated 43% of the time. These measurements show that large ice supersaturation is common in cirrus clouds, which supports the theory of ice forming homogeneously. Given the continuous nature of these Raman lidar measurements, our results have important implications for studying ice nucleation processes using cloud microphysical models.

  10. LIDAR wind speed measurements from a rotating spinner (SpinnerEx 2009)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mikkelsen, Torben; Hansen, Kasper Hjorth

    spinner of a MW-sized wind turbine, and investigate the approaching wind fields from this vantage point. Time series of wind speed measurements from the lidar with 50 Hz sampling rate were successfully obtained for approximately 60 days, during the measurement campaign lasting from April to August 2009...... and the wind turbine’s yaw relative to the mean wind speed direction. The data analysis processes are documented. A methodology for the calculation of the yaw misalignment of the wind turbine relative to the wind direction, as a function of various averaging times, is proposed, using the lidar’s instantaneous...... the lidar measurements. Data from an adjacent meteorological mast as well as data logged within the wind turbine’s control system were used to evaluate the results....

  11. First lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols from a high-altitude aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1995-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric processes related to radiation, climate change, atmospheric dynamics, meteorology, the global hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric chemistry, and yet our knowledge of the global distribution of water vapor is very limited. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the potential of providing needed high resolution water vapor measurements from aircraft and from space, and the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is a key step in the development of this capability. The LASE instrument is the first fully engineered, autonomous DIAL system, and it is designed to operate from a high-altitude aircraft (ER-2) and to make water vapor and aerosol profile measurements across the troposphere. The LASE system was flown from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in a series of engineering flights during September 1994. This paper discusses the characteristics of the LASE system and presents the first LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles.

  12. Summer sudden Na number density enhancements measured with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinrich

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present summer Na-densities and atmospheric temperatures measured 80 to 110 km above the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR. The Weber Na Lidar is part of ALOMAR, located at 69° N in Norway, 150 km north of the Arctic Circle. The sun does not set here during the summer months, and measurements require a narrowband Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (FADOF.

    We discuss an observed sudden enhancement in the Na number density around 22:00 UT on 1 to 2 June 2006. We compare this observation with previous summer measurements and find a frequent appearance of Na number density enhancements near local midnight. We describe the time of appearance, the altitude distribution, the duration and the strength of these enhancements and compare them to winter observations. We investigate possible formation mechanisms and, as others before, we find a strong link between these Na number density enhancements and sporadic E layers.

  13. Integration Of GPS And GLONASS Systems In Geodetic Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciuk, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    The article shows the results of satellites measurements elaborations using GPS & GLONASS signals. The aim of this article is to define the influence of adding GLONASS signals on position determination accuracy. It especially concerns areas with big horizon coverages. Object of the study were analysis of DOP coefficients, code and RTK solutions, and usage of satellite techniques in levelling. The performed studies and analysis show that integrated GPS-GLONASS satellite measurements provide possibility to achieve better results than measurements using single navigation satellite system (GPS).

  14. Ground-based integrated path coherent differential absorption lidar measurement of CO2: hard target return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sato

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT have made a great deal of effort to develop a coherent 2-μm differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL for measuring CO2 and wind speed. First, coherent Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA lidar experiments were conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and a hard target (surface return located about 7.12 km south of NICT on 11, 27, and 28 December 2010. The detection sensitivity of a 2-μm IPDA lidar was examined in detail using the CO2 concentration measured by the hard target. The precisions of CO2 measurement for the hard target and 900, 4500 and 27 000 shot pairs were 6.5, 2.8, and 1.2%, respectively. The results indicated that a coherent IPDA lidar with a laser operating at a high pulse repetition frequency of a few tens of KHz is necessary for measuring the CO2 concentration of the hard target with a precision of 1–2 ppm. Statistical comparisons indicated that, although a small amount of in situ data and the fact that they were not co-located with the hard target made comparison difficult, the CO2 volume mixing ratio measured with the Co2DiaWiL was about 5 ppm lower than that measured with the in situ sensor. The statistical results indicated that there were no differences between the hard target and atmospheric return measurements. A precision of 1.5% was achieved from the atmospheric return, which is lower than that obtained from the hard-target returns. Although long-range DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL CO2 measurement with the atmospheric return can result in highly precise measurement, the precision of the atmospheric return measurement was widely distributed comparing to that of the hard target return. Our results indicated that it is important to use a Q-switched laser to measure the range-gated differential absorption optical depth with the atmospheric return and that it is better to simultaneously conduct both hard target and atmospheric return

  15. Lidar Altimeter Measurements of Canopy Structure: Methods and Validation for Closed Canopy, Broadleaf Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, D. J.; Lefsky, M. A.; Parker, G. G.; Blair, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Lidar altimeter observations of vegetated landscapes provide a time-resolved measure of laser pulse backscatter energy from canopy surfaces and the underlying ground. Airborne lidar altimeter data was acquired using the Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery (SLICER) for a successional sequence of four, closed-canopy, deciduous forest stands in eastern Maryland. The four stands were selected so as to include a range of canopy structures of importance to forest ecosystem function, including variation in the height and roughness of the outer-most canopy surface and the vertical organization of canopy stories and gaps. The character of the SLICER backscatter signal is described and a method is developed that accounts for occlusion of the laser energy by canopy surfaces, transforming the backscatter signal to a canopy height profile (CHP) that quantitatively represents the relative vertical distribution of canopy surface area. The transformation applies an increased weighting to the backscatter amplitude as a function of closure through the canopy and assumes a horizontally random distribution of the canopy components. SLICER CHPs, averaged over areas of overlap where lidar ground tracks intersect, are shown to be highly reproducible. CHP transects across the four stands reveal spatial variations in vegetation, at the scale of the individual 10 m diameter laser footprints, within and between stands. Averaged SLICER CHPs are compared to analogous height profile results derived from ground-based sightings to plant intercepts measured on plots within the four stands. Tbe plots were located on the segments of the lidar ground tracks from which averaged SLICER CHPs were derived, and the ground observations were acquired within two weeks of the SLICER data acquisition to minimize temporal change. The differences in canopy structure between the four stands is similarly described by the SLICER and ground-based CHP results, however a Chi-square test of similarity

  16. Tropospheric temperature measurements with the pure rotational Raman lidar technique using nonlinear calibration functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Pavlinskiy, Aleksei V.; Nakhtigalova, Daria P.

    2017-01-01

    Among lidar techniques, the pure rotational Raman (PRR) technique is the best suited for tropospheric and lower stratospheric temperature measurements. Calibration functions are required for the PRR technique to retrieve temperature profiles from lidar remote sensing data. Both temperature retrieval accuracy and number of calibration coefficients depend on the selected function. The commonly used calibration function (linear in reciprocal temperature 1/T with two calibration coefficients) ignores all types of broadening of individual PRR lines of atmospheric N2 and O2 molecules. However, the collisional (pressure) broadening dominates over other types of broadening of PRR lines in the troposphere and can differently affect the accuracy of tropospheric temperature measurements depending on the PRR lidar system. We recently derived the calibration function in the general analytical form that takes into account the collisional broadening of all N2 and O2 PRR lines (Gerasimov and Zuev, 2016). This general calibration function represents an infinite series and, therefore, cannot be directly used in the temperature retrieval algorithm. For this reason, its four simplest special cases (calibration functions nonlinear in 1/T with three calibration coefficients), two of which have not been suggested before, were considered and analyzed. All the special cases take the collisional PRR lines broadening into account in varying degrees and the best function among them was determined via simulation. In this paper, we use the special cases to retrieve tropospheric temperature from real PRR lidar data. The calibration function best suited for tropospheric temperature retrievals is determined from the comparative analysis of temperature uncertainties yielded by using these functions. The absolute and relative statistical uncertainties of temperature retrieval are given in an analytical form assuming Poisson statistics of photon counting. The vertical tropospheric temperature

  17. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, M. F.; Kühn, M.; PetroviĆ, V.; Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, T.; Croce, A.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dual- Lidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement of wake profiles on a line as well as wake area scans were executed to illustrate the applicability of Lidar scanning to measuring small scale wind flow effects. The downsides of Lidar with respect to the hot wire probes are the larger measurement probe volume and the loss of some measurements due to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar for accurately measuring small scale flow structures in a wind tunnel.

  18. Method of radial velocities for the estimation of aircraft wake vortex parameters from data measured by coherent Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalikho, I N; Banakh, V A; Holzäpfel, F; Rahm, S

    2015-09-21

    The method of radial velocities (RV) is applied to estimate aircraft wake vortex parameters from measurements conducted with pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (PCDL). Operations of the Stream Line lidar and the 2-µm PCDL are simulated numerically to analyze the accuracy of the estimated wake vortex parameters with the RV method. The RV method is also used to estimate wake vortex trajectories and circulation from lidar measurements at Tomsk and Munich airports. The method of velocity envelopes and the RV method are compared employing data gathered with the 2-µm PCDL. The domain of applicability of the RV method is determined.

  19. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Achtert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This holds particularly within the planetary boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of winds with a random error below 0.2 m s−1, comparable to the measurement error of standard radiosondes. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  20. Two-day period fluctuation of PMC occurrence over Syowa Station, Antarctica observed by a ground-based lidar and AIM satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ejiri, M. K.; Tomikawa, Y.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T.; Tsuda, T. T.; Nishiyama, T.

    2014-12-01

    A Rayleigh/Raman lidar system has been operated by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) since February, 2011 (JARE 52nd) in Syowa Station Antarctica (69.0S, 39.5E). The lidar system consists of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355nm) as a transmitter and two telescopes with four photo multiplier tubes which are to detect Rayleigh scattered light from low and high atmosphere at 355 nm and N2 Raman emission at 387nm. Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) was detected by the lidar at 22:30UT (+3hr for LT) on Feb 4th, 2011, the first day of a routine operation. This event was the first time to detect PMC over Syowa Station by a lidar [Suzuki et al., Ann. Geophys., 2013]. However, signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the PMC event was not so good due to large shot noises from daytime background signals. Moreover, a receiver system was designed mainly for nighttime observations. In this way, observation of PMC during the midnight sun, which also corresponds to most frequent PMC season, was difficult. Thus, to improve SNR of the PMC observation with the lidar during daytime, a narrow band-pass Fabry-Perot etalon unit has been developed and installed in the receiver system on Dec 2013 by JARE 55th. By using this new system, clear PMC signals were successfully detected under daylight condition during the period of summer operation of JARE55th. During this period of 53 days (from 17 Dec. 2013 to 7 Feb. 2014), only 11 days were with a clear sky and suitable for PMC observation. Thus, it was difficult to study temporal variations on a PMC activity only by using the lidar data. Fortunately, NASA's AIM satellite had passed near Syowa Station and provided with complimentary PMC data during observation gap of the lidar. By combining our lidar data with the AIM/CIPS data, nearly continuous monitoring of PMC variability over Syowa Station was achieved for period between 13th and 18th in January 2014. PMC occurrence with an interval of two days over Syowa Station during the period was clearly

  1. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Icy Satellite Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javeed, Aurya; Barmatz, Martin; Zhong, Fang; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    With regard to planetary science, NASA aspires to: "Advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system, the potential for life elsewhere, and the hazards and resources present as humans explore space". In pursuit of such an end, the Galileo and Cassini missions garnered spectral data of icy satellite surfaces implicative of the satellites' structure and material composition. The potential for geophysical modeling afforded by this information, coupled with the plausibility of life on icy satellites, has pushed Jupiter's Europa along with Saturn's Enceladus and Titan toward the fore of NASA's planetary focus. Understanding the evolution of, and the present processes at work on, the aforementioned satellites falls squarely in-line with NASA's cited goal.

  2. Selected Geomagnetic Measurements From Several Satellites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — More than 17 million selected magnetic observations from several orbiting low-altitude satellites are contained in this digital collection. Except for MAGSAT, all...

  3. Rapid, high-resolution measurement of leaf area and leaf orientation using terrestrial LiDAR scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brian N.; Mahaffee, Walter F.

    2017-06-01

    The rapid evolution of high performance computing technology has allowed for the development of extremely detailed models of the urban and natural environment. Although models can now represent sub-meter-scale variability in environmental geometry, model users are often unable to specify the geometry of real domains at this scale given available measurements. An emerging technology in this field has been the use of terrestrial LiDAR scanning data to rapidly measure the three-dimensional geometry of trees, such as the distribution of leaf area. However, current LiDAR methods suffer from the limitation that they require detailed knowledge of leaf orientation in order to translate projected leaf area into actual leaf area. Common methods for measuring leaf orientation are often tedious or inaccurate, which places constraints on the LiDAR measurement technique. This work presents a new method to simultaneously measure leaf orientation and leaf area within an arbitrarily defined volume using terrestrial LiDAR data. The novelty of the method lies in the direct measurement of the fraction of projected leaf area G from the LiDAR data which is required to relate projected leaf area to total leaf area, and in the new way in which radiation transfer theory is used to calculate leaf area from the LiDAR data. The method was validated by comparing LiDAR-measured leaf area to (1) ‘synthetic’ or computer-generated LiDAR data where the exact area was known, and (2) direct measurements of leaf area in the field using destructive sampling. Overall, agreement between the LiDAR and reference measurements was very good, showing a normalized root-mean-squared-error of about 15% for the synthetic tests, and 13% in the field.

  4. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Pollution above the Oil Sands Region in Northern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Monika; Whiteway, James; Seabrook, Jeffrey; Gray, Lawrence; Strawbridge, Kevin B.

    2016-06-01

    Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol were conducted from a Twin Otter aircraft above the oil sands region of northern Alberta. For the majority of the flights, significant amounts of aerosol were observed within the boundary layer, up to an altitude of 2.0 km above sea level (ASL), while the ozone concentration remained at background levels (30-45 ppb) downwind of the industry. On August 24th the lidar measured a separated layer of aerosol above the boundary layer, at a height of 2.0 km ASL, in which the ozone mixing ratio increased to 70 ppb. Backward trajectory calculations revealed that the air containing this separated aerosol layer had passed over an area of forest fires. Directly below the layer of forest fire smoke, pollution from the oil sands industry was observed. Measurements of the backscatter linear depolarization ratio were obtained with a ground based lidar operated by Environment Canada within the oil sands region. The depolarization measurements aided in discriminating between the separate sources of pollution from industry and forest fires. The depolarization ratio was 5-6% in forest fire smoke and 7-10% in the industrial pollution.

  5. Windscanner: 3-D wind and turbulence measurements from three steerable doppler lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    At RISO DTU we has started to build a new-designed laser-based lidar scanning facility for detailed remote measurements of the wind fields engulfing the huge wind turbines of today. Our aim is to measure in real-time 3D wind vector data at several hundred points every second: 1) upstream of the t......At RISO DTU we has started to build a new-designed laser-based lidar scanning facility for detailed remote measurements of the wind fields engulfing the huge wind turbines of today. Our aim is to measure in real-time 3D wind vector data at several hundred points every second: 1) upstream...... of the turbine, 2) near the turbine, and 3) in the wakes of the turbine rotors. Our first proto-type Windscanner is now being built from three commercially available Continuous Wave (CW) wind lidars modified with fast adjustable focus length and equipped with 2-D prism-based scan heads, in conjunction...

  6. Lidar Measurements of Wind and Cloud Around Venus from an Orbiting or Floating/flying Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Limaye, Sanjay; Emmitt, George D.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    Given the presence of clouds and haze in the upper portion of the Venus atmosphere, it is reasonable to consider a Doppler wind lidar (DWL) for making remote measurements of the 3-dimensional winds within the tops of clouds and the overlying haze layer. Assuming an orbit altitude of 250 kilometers and cloud tops at 60 kilometers (within the upper cloud layer), an initial performance assessment of an orbiting DWL was made using a numerical instrument and atmospheres model developed for both Earth and Mars. It is reasonable to expect vertical profiles of the 3-dimensional wind speed with 1 kilometer vertical resolution and horizontal spacing of 25 kilometers to several 100 kilometers depending upon the desired integration times. These profiles would begin somewhere just below the tops of the highest clouds and extend into the overlying haze layer to some to-be-determined height. Getting multiple layers of cloud returns is also possible with no negative impact on velocity measurement accuracy. The knowledge and expertise for developing coherent Doppler wind lidar technologies and techniques, for Earth related mission at NASA Langley Research Center is being leveraged to develop an appropriate system suitable for wind measurement around Venus. We are considering a fiber-laser-based lidar system of high efficiency and smaller size and advancing the technology level to meet the requirements for DWL system for Venus from an orbiting or floating/flying platform. This presentation will describe the concept, simulation and technology development plan for wind and cloud measurements on Venus.

  7. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Pollution above the Oil Sands Region in Northern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Monika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol were conducted from a Twin Otter aircraft above the oil sands region of northern Alberta. For the majority of the flights, significant amounts of aerosol were observed within the boundary layer, up to an altitude of 2.0 km above sea level (ASL, while the ozone concentration remained at background levels (30-45 ppb downwind of the industry. On August 24th the lidar measured a separated layer of aerosol above the boundary layer, at a height of 2.0 km ASL, in which the ozone mixing ratio increased to 70 ppb. Backward trajectory calculations revealed that the air containing this separated aerosol layer had passed over an area of forest fires. Directly below the layer of forest fire smoke, pollution from the oil sands industry was observed. Measurements of the backscatter linear depolarization ratio were obtained with a ground based lidar operated by Environment Canada within the oil sands region. The depolarization measurements aided in discriminating between the separate sources of pollution from industry and forest fires. The depolarization ratio was 5-6% in forest fire smoke and 7-10% in the industrial pollution.

  8. Three Dimensional Measurements of Boundary Layer Statistics using Scanning Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frehlich, R.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate measurements and modeling of the boundary layer is challenging, especially for the stable night time boundary layer, the highly turbulent boundary layer, and the early morning transition to convection. High quality profiles of mean and turbulent statistics of the night time boundary layer are logistically difficult using instrumented towers or instrumented research aircraft. One of the fundamental limits to the accuracy of atmospheric estimates of mean and turbulent quantities is the number of independent samples of the relevant processes. Traditional measurements from towers, sodars, radar profilers, and instrumented aircraft essentially produce a spatial sample of the atmosphere along a line defined by the mean wind (or aircraft trajectory). Advanced three dimensional measurements of the boundary layer provides the highest statistical accuracy which is essential to understand complex rapidly changing processes. The development of eye-safe scanning Doppler lidars and processing algorithms to correct for the spatial filtering by the laser pulse smoothing and the contribution from estimation error have produced profiles of the mean velocity and key turbulence statistics (the energy dissipation rate, velocity variance, and turbulence length scale) for two orthogonal horizontal velocity components. This requires accurate information about the sensing volume of the lidar measurements as well as the statistical properties of the estimation error. The various processing techniques and fundamental assumptions for the analysis of scanning Doppler lidar data will be presented for various atmospheric conditions. Unresolved issues for future work will also be outlined.

  9. Cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and number density measurements using a Raman lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, David N. [Laser Remote Sensing Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Melfi, S. Harvey [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid microspheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  10. Recent lidar technology developments and their influence on measurements of tropospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the influences of recent technology developments in the areas of lasers, detectors, andoptical filters of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system on the measurenent of tropospheric water vapor (H2O) profiles are discussed. The lidar parameters selected are based upon a diode-seeded Ti:sapphire laser that is locked to an H2O line in the 820- or 930-nm band of H2O. To assess the influence of the mode of deployment on the measurement of tropospheric H2O, DIAL performance is evaluated for operation from a medium-altitude (12 km) aircraft, the ground, and space-based systems. It is found that incorporation of these developments could greatly enhance DIAL measurement capability.

  11. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  12. Scanning Lidar Measurements of the Full-Scale RDD Field Trial Puff Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoying; Roy, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    A vertically scanning lidar (light/radar) was used to measure the time evolution of clouds generated by a small explosive device. Vertical sweeps were performed at a downwind distance of 105 m from the detonation. The measured quantity obtained from the lidar was the light extinction coefficient. This quantity is directly proportional to the aerosol concentration. The background aerosol value was set to 0.0001 m (-1) (assuming a visibility of 40 km), and assuming the scattering properties of the explosively generated cloud is the same as the background aerosol, the authors found that the instantaneous maximal local concentration of aerosol in the cloud did not exceed 500 times the background aerosol value, and the instantaneous concentration was typically less than five times the background aerosol value. In the two trials that were done, the volumes of the clouds were reasonably close at 2,700 m(3) and 4,000 m(3), respectively.

  13. Remote measurement of atmospheric temperature profiles in clouds with rotational Raman lidar; Fernmessung atmosphaerischer Temperaturprofile in Wolken mit Rotations-Raman-Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrendt, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

    2000-07-01

    The development of a lidar receiver for remote measurements of atmospheric temperature profiles with the rotational Raman method is described. By a new receiver concept, this instrument allowed for the first time remote temperature measurements without any perturbation by the presence of clouds up to a backscatter ratio of 45. In addition, high efficiency of the spectral separation of atmospheric backscatter signals leads to improved measurement resolution: the minimum integration time needed for a statistical uncertainty < {+-}1 K at, e.g., 10 km height and 960 m height resolution is only 5 minutes. The measurement range extends to over 45 km altitude. Results of field campaigns obtained with the instrument are presented and discussed. In winter 1997/98, the instrument was transferred with the GKSS Raman lidar to Esrange (67.9 N, 21.1 E) in northern Sweden, where pioneering remote measurements of local temperatures in orographically induced polar stratospheric clouds could be carried out. (orig.)

  14. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric entrainment zone and the potential temperature jump across the top of the mixed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Lidar data of the atmospheric entrainment zone from six days of clear air convection obtained in central Illinois during July 1979 are presented. A new method to measure the potential temperature jump across the entrainment zone based on only one temperature sounding and continuous lidar measurements of the mixed layer height is developed. An almost linear dependence is found between the normalized entrainment rate and the normalized thickness of the entrainment zone.

  15. Absolute Position of Targets Measured Through a Chamber Window Using Lidar Metrology Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubalak, David; Hadjimichael, Theodore; Ohl, Raymond; Slotwinski, Anthony; Telfer, Randal; Hayden, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a useful tool for taking metrology measurements without the need for physical contact with the parts under test. Lidar instruments are aimed at a target using azimuth and elevation stages, then focus a beam of coherent, frequency modulated laser energy onto the target, such as the surface of a mechanical structure. Energy from the reflected beam is mixed with an optical reference signal that travels in a fiber path internal to the instrument, and the range to the target is calculated based on the difference in the frequency of the returned and reference signals. In cases when the parts are in extreme environments, additional steps need to be taken to separate the operator and lidar from that environment. A model has been developed that accurately reduces the lidar data to an absolute position and accounts for the three media in the testbed air, fused silica, and vacuum but the approach can be adapted for any environment or material. The accuracy of laser metrology measurements depends upon knowing the parameters of the media through which the measurement beam travels. Under normal conditions, this means knowledge of the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the air in the measurement volume. In the past, chamber windows have been used to separate the measuring device from the extreme environment within the chamber and still permit optical measurement, but, so far, only relative changes have been diagnosed. The ability to make accurate measurements through a window presents a challenge as there are a number of factors to consider. In the case of the lidar, the window will increase the time-of-flight of the laser beam causing a ranging error, and refract the direction of the beam causing angular positioning errors. In addition, differences in pressure, temperature, and humidity on each side of the window will cause slight atmospheric index changes and induce deformation and a refractive index gradient within the window. Also, since the window is a

  16. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  17. Ground-based integrated path coherent differential absorption lidar measurement of CO2: foothill target return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ishii

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT has made a great deal of effort to develop a coherent 2 μm differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL for measuring CO2 and wind speed. First, coherent Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA lidar experiments were conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and a foothill target (tree and ground surface located about 7.12 km south of NICT on 11, 27, and 28 December 2010. The detection sensitivity of a 2 μm IPDA lidar was examined in detail using the CO2 concentration measured by the foothill reflection. The precisions of CO2 measurements for the foothill target and 900, 4500 and 27 000 shot pairs were 6.5, 2.8, and 1.2%, respectively. The results indicated that a coherent IPDA lidar with a laser operating at a high pulse repetition frequency of a few tens of KHz is necessary for XCO2 (column-averaged dry air mixing ratio of CO2 measurement with a precision of 1–2 ppm in order to observe temporal and spatial variations in the CO2. Statistical comparisons indicated that, although a small amount of in situ data and the fact that they were not co-located with the foothill target made comparison difficult, the CO2 volume mixing ratio obtained by the Co2DiaWiL measurements for the foothill target and atmospheric returns was about −5 ppm lower than the 5 min running averages of the in situ sensor. Not only actual difference of sensing volume or the natural variability of CO2 but also the fluctuations of temperature could cause this difference. The statistical results indicated that there were no biases between the foothill target and atmospheric return measurements. The 2 μm coherent IPDA lidar can detect the CO2 volume mixing ratio change of 3% in the 5 min signal integration. In order to detect the position of the foothill target, to measure a range with a high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio, and to reduce uncertainty due to the presence of aerosols and clouds, it is

  18. Synergy of airborne LiDAR and Worldview-2 satellite imagery for land cover and habitat mapping: A BIO_SOS-EODHaM case study for the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücher, C. A.; Roupioz, L.; Kramer, H.; Bogers, M. M. B.; Jongman, R. H. G.; Lucas, R. M.; Kosmidou, V. E.; Petrou, Z.; Manakos, I.; Padoa-Schioppa, E.; Adamo, M.; Blonda, P.

    2015-05-01

    A major challenge is to develop a biodiversity observation system that is cost effective and applicable in any geographic region. Measuring and reliable reporting of trends and changes in biodiversity requires amongst others detailed and accurate land cover and habitat maps in a standard and comparable way. The objective of this paper is to assess the EODHaM (EO Data for Habitat Mapping) classification results for a Dutch case study. The EODHaM system was developed within the BIO_SOS (The BIOdiversity multi-SOurce monitoring System: from Space TO Species) project and contains the decision rules for each land cover and habitat class based on spectral and height information. One of the main findings is that canopy height models, as derived from LiDAR, in combination with very high resolution satellite imagery provides a powerful input for the EODHaM system for the purpose of generic land cover and habitat mapping for any location across the globe. The assessment of the EODHaM classification results based on field data showed an overall accuracy of 74% for the land cover classes as described according to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) taxonomy at level 3, while the overall accuracy was lower (69.0%) for the habitat map based on the General Habitat Category (GHC) system for habitat surveillance and monitoring. A GHC habitat class is determined for each mapping unit on the basis of the composition of the individual life forms and height measurements. The classification showed very good results for forest phanerophytes (FPH) when individual life forms were analyzed in terms of their percentage coverage estimates per mapping unit from the LCCS classification and validated with field surveys. Analysis for shrubby chamaephytes (SCH) showed less accurate results, but might also be due to less accurate field estimates of percentage coverage. Overall, the EODHaM classification results encouraged us to derive the heights of

  19. A Five-Parameter Wind Field Estimation Method Based on Spherical Upwind Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, S.; Kühn, M.

    2014-12-01

    Turbine mounted scanning lidar systems of focussed continuous-wave type are taken into consideration to sense approaching wind fields. The quality of wind information depends on the lidar technology itself but also substantially on the scanning technique and reconstruction algorithm. In this paper a five-parameter wind field model comprising mean wind speed, vertical and horizontal linear shear and homogeneous direction angles is introduced. A corresponding parameter estimation method is developed based on the assumption of upwind lidar measurements scanned over spherical segments. As a main advantage of this method all relevant parameters, in terms of wind turbine control, can be provided. Moreover, the ability to distinguish between shear and skew potentially increases the quality of the resulting feedforward pitch angles when compared to three-parameter methods. It is shown that minimal three measurements, each in turn from two independent directions are necessary for the application of the algorithm, whereas simpler measurements, each taken from only one direction, are not sufficient.

  20. Measuring Plume Meander in the Nighttime Stable Boundary Layer with Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, A.; Miller, D. R.; Nappo, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Complex dynamics of the stable planetary boundary layer (PBL), such as the effects of density currents, intermittent turbulence, surface-layer decoupling, internal gravity waves, cold air pooling, and katabatic flows affect plume transport and diffusion. A better understanding of these effects is needed for nighttime transport model development. The JORNADA (Joint Observational Research on Nocturnal Atmospheric Dispersion of Aerosols) field campaign, conducted in the New Mexico desert during April 2005, sought to address some of these issues The JORNADA data set includes simultaneous micrometeorological measurements of the boundary layer structure, turbulence, and wave activity along with continuous lidar measurement of aerosol plume releases. What makes JORNADA unique is the real-time monitoring of an elevated plume with a lidar. The quantification of plume meander will be presented in this paper. The application of these techniques to the JORNADA data allows for a more complete understanding of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL). We will present an in-depth analysis of lidar measurements of plume meander and dispersion and their relationship to the complexities of NBL structure.

  1. Aerosol classification using airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar measurements – methodology and examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm, aerosol optical depth (AOD (532 nm, backscatter (532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, and spectral depolarization ratio are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of AOD and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion AOD to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  2. Regional and Global Atmospheric CO2 Measurements Using 1.57 Micron IM-CW Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Harrison, F. Wallace; Dobler, Jeremy; Campbell, Joel; Kooi, Susan; Meadows, Byron; Fan, Tai-Fang; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is a critical forcing for the Earth's climate, and knowledge of its distribution and variations influences predictions of the Earth's future climate. Accurate observations of atmospheric CO2 are also crucial to improving our understanding of CO2 sources, sinks and transports. To meet these science needs, NASA is developing technologies for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, which is aimed at global CO2 observations. Meanwhile an airborne investigation of atmospheric CO2 distributions as part of the NASA Suborbital Atmospheric Carbon and Transport â€" America (ACT-America) mission will be conducted with lidar and in situ instrumentation over the central and eastern United States during all four seasons and under a wide range of meteorological conditions. In preparing for the ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center and Exelis Inc./Harris Corp. have jointly developed and demonstrated the capability of atmospheric CO2 column measurements with an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar. Since 2005, a total of 14 flight campaigns have been conducted. A measurement precision of approx.0.3 ppmv for a 10-s average over desert and vegetated surfaces has been achieved, and the lidar CO2 measurements also agree well with in-situ observations. Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales have been observed during these campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200A-300 sq km over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Results from recent flight campaigns are presented in this paper. The ability to achieve the science objectives of the ASCENDS mission with an IM-CW lidar is also discussed in this paper, along with the plans for the ACT-America aircraft investigation that begins in the winter of 2016.

  3. Optical and microphysical properties of smoke over Cape Verde inferred from multiwavelength lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesche, Matthias (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig (Germany); Dept. of Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: matthias.tesche@itm.su.se; Muller, Detlef (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig (Germany); Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory, Gwangju Inst. of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)); Gross, Silke (Meteorological Inst., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)); Ansmann, Albert; Althausen, Dietrich (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig (Germany)); Freudenthaler, Volker (Meteorological Inst., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany)); Weinzierl, Bernadett; Veira, Andreas; Petzold, Andreas (Inst. for Atmospheric Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Lidar measurements of mixed dust/smoke plumes over the tropical Atlantic ocean were carried out during the winter campaign of SAMUM-2 at Cape Verde. Profiles of backscatter and extinction coefficients, lidar ratios, and Aangstroem exponents related to pure biomass-burning aerosol from southern West Africa were extracted from these observations. Furthermore, these findings were used as input for an inversion algorithm to retrieve microphysical properties of pure smoke. Seven measurement days were found suitable for the procedure of aerosol-type separation and successive inversion of optical data that describe biomass-burning smoke. We inferred high smoke lidar ratios of 87 +-17 sr at 355 nm and 79 +- 17 sr at 532 nm. Smoke lidar ratios and Aangstroem exponents are higher compared to the ones for the dust/smoke mixture. These numbers indicate higher absorption and smaller sizes for pure smoke particles compared to the dust/smoke mixture. Inversion of the smoke data set results in mean effective radii of 0.22 +- 0.08 mum with individual results varying between 0.10 and 0.36 mum. The single-scattering albedo for pure biomass-burning smoke was found to vary between 0.63 and 0.89 with a very low mean value of 0.75 +- 0.07. This is in good agreement with findings of airborne in situ measurements which showed values of 0.77 +- 0.03. Effective radii from the inversion were similar to the ones found for the fine mode of the in situ size distributions

  4. A new approach to measure the ocean temperature using Brillouin lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Zhiwei Lü; Yongkang Dong; Weiming He

    2006-01-01

    @@ An approach of lidar measurements of ocean temperature through measuring the spectral linewidth of the backscattered Brillouin lines is presented. An empirical equation for the temperature as a function of Brillouin linewidth and salinity is derived. Theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The equation also reveals the dependence of the temperature on the salinity and Brillouin linewidth.It is shown that the uncertainty of the salinity has very little impact on the temperature measurement.The uncertainty of this temperature measurement methodology is approximately 0.02 ℃.

  5. Offshore Wind Measurements Using Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  6. Variation in daytime troposphereic aerosol via LIDAR and sunphotometer measurements in Penang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F. Y.; Hee, W. S.; Hwee, S. L.; Abdullah, K.; Tiem, L. Y.; Matjafri, M. Z.; Lolli, S.; Holben, B.; Welton, E. J.

    2014-03-01

    Aerosol is one of the important factors that will influence the air quality, visibility, clouds, and precipitation processes in the troposphere. In this work, we investigated the variation of aerosol during daytime in Penang, Malaysia in certain days within July 2013. Vertical LIDAR scattering ratio and backscattering profiles, and columnar optical properties (optical depth, Angström exponent) of aerosols were measured using Raymetrics LIDAR and a CIMEL sunphotometer respectively. Specifically, we have determined the daytime variation of intensity and distribution level of aerosol, as well as the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and cloud classification. Subsequently, the data of columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) and size distribution in the atmospheric were used to quantify the properties of aerosol variation during daytime over Penang, Malaysia.

  7. On the Interpretation of Gravity Wave Measurements by Ground-Based Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dörnbrack

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks the simple question: How can we interpret vertical time series of middle atmosphere gravity wave measurements by ground-based temperature lidars? Linear wave theory is used to show that the association of identified phase lines with quasi-monochromatic waves should be considered with great care. The ambient mean wind has a substantial effect on the inclination of the detected phase lines. The lack of knowledge about the wind might lead to a misinterpretation of the vertical propagation direction of the observed gravity waves. In particular, numerical simulations of three archetypal atmospheric mountain wave regimes show a sensitivity of virtual lidar observations on the position relative to the mountain and on the scale of the mountain.

  8. Offshore wind measurements using Doppler aerosol wind lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  9. Characterization of the Temporal-Spatial Variability of Trans-Atlantic Dust Transport Based on CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    The trans-Atlantic dust transport has important implications for human and ecosystem health, the terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycle, weather systems, and climate. A reliable assessment of these influences requires the characterization of dust distributions in three dimensions and over long time periods. We provide an observation-based multiyear estimate of trans-Atlantic dust transport by using a 7-year (2007 - 2013) lidar record from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. We estimate that on a basis of the 7-year average and integration over 10S - 30N, 182 Tg a-1 dust leaves the coast of North Africa at 15W, of which 132 Tg a-1 and 43 Tg a-1 reaches 35W and 75W, respectively. These flux estimates have an overall known uncertainty of (45 - 70). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 - 48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8 - 50) kg ha-1 a-1. This imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006 - 0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 - 39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest, which is comparable to the loss of phosphorus to rainfall. Significant seasonal variations are observed in both the magnitude of total dust transport and its meridional and vertical distributions. The observed large interannual variability of annual dust transport is highly anti-correlated with the prior-year Sahel Precipitation Index. Comparisons of CALIPSO measurements with surface-based observations and model simulations will also be discussed.

  10. Aerosol size distribution and refractive index from bistatic lidar angular scattering measurements in the surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandithurai, G.; Devara, P.C.S.; Raj, P.E.; Sharma, S. [Indian Inst. of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India)

    1996-05-01

    The results of an inversion method by iteration for determining the aerosol size distribution and the refractive index of atmospheric aerosols in the surface layer from bistatic lidar angular scattering measurements, followed by a brief description of the experimental and data retrieval techniques are presented. The continuous wave, bistatic Argon ion lidar at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune (18{degree}31{prime}N, 73{degree}51{prime}E, 559 m AMSL), India has been used for the measurements. Results of the analysis of 420 samples collected over a 7 years` period indicate mean value of size and refractive indices of 4.0 and 1.6, respectively, with greater fraction of larger particles during premonsoon while smaller particles during post-monsoon months at the lidar site. The retrieved aerosol parameters are compared with those determined from spectroradiometer observations at the same site. The results are found well in agreement with those obtained previously by the authors using the library search method. The above observations of angular distribution of scattered intensity are used with an aerosol model to infer the dominant type of aerosols present in the environment in and around the experimental station.

  11. Airborne Lidar for Simultaneous Measurement of Column CO2 and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption feathers for the gas at this particular wavelength. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers. This paper will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both CO2 and water vapor (H2O) in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver telescope, detection system and data acquisition. Future plans for the IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  12. Target categorization of aerosol and clouds by continuous multiwavelength-polarization lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baars

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Absolute calibrated signals at 532 and 1064 nm and the depolarization ratio from a multiwavelength lidar are used to categorize primary aerosol but also clouds in high temporal and spatial resolution. Automatically derived particle backscatter coefficient profiles in low temporal resolution (30 min are applied to calibrate the lidar signals. From these calibrated lidar signals, new atmospheric parameters in temporally high resolution (quasi-particle-backscatter coefficients are derived. By using thresholds obtained from multiyear, multisite EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network measurements, four aerosol classes (small; large, spherical; large, non-spherical; mixed, partly non-spherical and several cloud classes (liquid, ice are defined. Thus, particles are classified by their physical features (shape and size instead of by source. The methodology is applied to 2 months of continuous observations (24 h a day, 7 days a week with the multiwavelength-Raman-polarization lidar PollyXT during the High-Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE in spring 2013. Cloudnet equipment was operated continuously directly next to the lidar and is used for comparison. By discussing three 24 h case studies, it is shown that the aerosol discrimination is very feasible and informative and gives a good complement to the Cloudnet target categorization. Performing the categorization for the 2-month data set of the entire HOPE campaign, almost 1 million pixel (5 min  ×  30 m could be analysed with the newly developed tool. We find that the majority of the aerosol trapped in the planetary boundary layer (PBL was composed of small particles as expected for a heavily populated and industrialized area. Large, spherical aerosol was observed mostly at the top of the PBL and close to the identified cloud bases, indicating the importance of hygroscopic growth of the

  13. Measurements of fluorescent aerosols using a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system during DUBI 2016 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Shi, J.; Sugimoto, N.; Tang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system. Previous studies have shown that abundant bioaerosols (such as microorganisms) injected into the atmosphere along with dust events, could affect leeward ecosystem and human health, even induce globe climate change. However, the challenge in quantifying bioaerosol climate effects (e.g., radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions) arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of their concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties. Lidar, as one of most advanced active remote sensing, is used to offer some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. In order to investigate the characterization of atmospheric bioaerosols along transported pathways of dust aerosols, we carried out DUBI (DUst BIoaerosol) 2016 Campaign over Northern China in spring of 2016. Lots of instruments, including bioaerosol sampling, lidar as well as others, were installed at three sites­ (Erenhot, Zhangbei and Jinan) simultaneously. A multi-channel lidar spectrometer system was developed to observe Mie, Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from the atmosphere. The lidar system operated polarization measurements at 355nm, aiming to identify dust particles from other aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser with energy of 80mJ at 355nm and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum between 360nm and 720nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm using two spectrometers simultaneously. The spectrometer mainly includes an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrographs, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at Zhangbei during DUBI 2016 Campaign. It has been

  14. French airborne lidar measurements for Eyjafjallajökull ash plume survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chazette

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An Ultra-Violet Rayleigh-Mie lidar has been integrated aboard the French research aircraft Falcon 20 in order to monitor the ash plume emitted by the Eyjafjallajökul volcano in April–May 2010. Three operational flights were carried out on 21 April, 12 and 16 May 2010 inside French, Spanish and British air spaces, respectively. The original purpose of the flights was to provide the French civil aviation authorities with objective information on the presence and location of the ash plume. The present paper presents the results of detailed analyses elaborated after the volcano crisis. They bear on the structure of the ash clouds and their optical properties such as ash extinction coefficient and lidar ratio. Lidar ratios were measured in the range of 33 to 48 sr, in good agreement with the ratios derived from ground-based lidar measurements performed near Paris (France in April 2010 (∼47 sr. The ash signature in terms of particulate depolarization was consistent around 45 ± 7% during all flights. Such a value seems to be a good identification parameter for ash. Using specific cross-sections between 0.29 and 1.1 m2 g−1, the minimum (maximal mass concentrations in the ash plumes are derived for the flights on 12 and 16 May. They were 190 (2300 and 270 (1600 μg m−3, respectively. It may be rather less than, or of the order of the critical level of damage (2 mg m−3 for the aircraft engines, but well above the 200 μg m−3 warning level.

  15. A time-space synchronization of coherent Doppler scanning lidars for 3D measurements of wind fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola

    This thesis consists of the results of a Ph.D. study that was focused on the development of the system of three time-space synchronized pulsed coherent Doppler scanning lidars, which are coordinated by a remote ’master computer’. This system has the unique capability to measure a complete three...... synchronization and time control of the emission, steering and acquisition were achieved, resulting that the complete lidar measurement process is controlled from the single hardware component. The system was formed using a novel approach, in which the master computer simultaneously coordinates the remote lidars...... through a UDP/IP and TCP/IP network by exchange of network packets. Since the size of the packets is roughly 1 kB, this approach allows an uninterrupted and fast coordination of the lidars, even in the case of mobile networks such as GSM. With this approach a maximum lag of 10 ms was observed in terms...

  16. Data Analysis of a Pulsed 2-micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar For Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Yu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The study of climate change requires precise measurement of the production, migration, and sinking of greenhouse gases. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is one of the principal greenhouse gases. NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) has developed a pulsed 2-micron coherent differential absorption lidar (DiAL) for CO2 measurement, operating on the R30 absorption line. On April 5, 2010, the lidar instrument transmitted alternating On-line and Off-line pulses from LARC into a residential area in Poquoson, Virginia; while a passive in-situ sensor measured the local CO2 concentration. This paper outlines a procedure to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return signal using the DiAL method; our calculation produced results in line with the in-situ measurement and matched the current state of DiAL instrument accuracy. Data from April 5 is part of a series of experiments validating the measurement accuracy and precision of this lidar. After a summative verification, a packaged lidar may be installed on research aircraft to perform CO2 studies at a great range of latitudes throughout the year, and to discover sources, sinks, and migration trends for this key greenhouse gas. The following procedure is used to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return using the DiAL method. First, MATLAB software developed at LARC sorts the lidar return into On-only and Off-only files containing pulses of only that type. The sorted pulses are reexamined for quality based on the center frequency, energy, and power - unsatisfactory pulses are removed. A 512-point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) with 256-point shift is performed on each pulse to discretize the atmospheric return signal according to 63 distance 'bins'. Next, comparing decay rates of the On-line and Off-line atmospheric return intensity with distance yields the Differential Absorption Optical Slope (DAOD), which is proportional to the concentration of the desired gas. Then, in-situ meteorological data - pressure

  17. Mobile LiDAR Measurement for Aerosol Investigation in South-Central Hebei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Yunhui; Wong Man, Sing; Wang, Runfeng; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Wang, Luyao; Bai, Yang; Rao, Lanlan

    2016-04-01

    With the rapid industrialization and urbanization in China during the last decades, the increasing anthropogenic pollutant emissions have significantly caused serious air pollution problems which are adversely influencing public health. Hebei is one of the most air polluted provinces in China. In January 2013, an extremely severe and persistent haze episode with record-breaking PM2.5 outbreak affecting hundreds of millions of people occurred over eastern and northern China. During that haze episode, 7 of the top 10 most polluted cities in China were located in the Hebei Province according to the report of China's Ministry of Environmental Protection. To investigate and the spatial difference and to characterize the vertical distribution of aerosol in different regions of south-central Hebei, mobile measurements were carried out using a mini micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MiniMPL) in March 2014. The mobile LiDAR kit consisting of a MiniMPL, a vibration reduction mount, a power inverter, a Windows surface tablet and a GPS receiver were mounted in a car watching though the sunroof opening. For comparison, a fixed measurement using a traditional micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MPL-4B) was conducted simultaneously in Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei Province. The equipped car was driven from downtown Shijiazhuang by way of suburban and rural area to downtown Cangzhou, Handan, and Baoding respectively at almost stable speed around 100Km per hour along different routes which counted in total more than 1000Km. The results can be summarized as: 1) the spatial distribution of total aerosol optical depth along the measurement routes in south-central Hebei was controlled by local terrain and population in general, with high values in downtown and suburban in the plain areas, and low values in rural areas along Taihang mountain to the west and Yan mountain to the north; 2) obviously high AODs were obtained at roads crossing points, inside densely populated area and nearby

  18. Double-Pulse Two-Micron IPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-micron laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation from up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  19. Nacelle lidar for power curve measurement - Avedøre campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Rozenn; Davoust, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbine power performance requires the measurement of the free wind speed at hub height upstream of the turbine. For modern multi-megawatt wind turbines, this means that the wind speed needs to be measured at great heights, from 80m to 150m. The standard wind speed measurement with a cup anemometer, requiring the erection of a tall met mast, then becomes more and more challenging and expensive. A forward looking lidar, mounted on the turbine nacelle, combines the advantages of a nacelle ...

  20. The atmospheric transparency measured with a LIDAR system at the Telescope Array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tomida, Takayuki; Arai, Takahito; Benno, Takuya; Chikawa, Michiyuki; Doura, Koji; Fukushima, Masaki; Hiyama, Kazunori; Honda, Ken; Ikeda, Daisuke; Matthews, John N; Nakamura, Toru; Oku, Daisuke; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Tokuno, Hisao; Tameda, Yuichiro; Thomson, Gordon B; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Udo, Shigeharu; Ukai, Hisashi; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.07.012

    2011-01-01

    An atmospheric transparency was measured using a LIDAR with a pulsed UV laser (355nm) at the observation site of Telescope Array in Utah, USA. The measurement at night for two years in $2007\\sim 2009$ revealed that the extinction coefficient by aerosol at the ground level is $0.033^{+0.016}_{-0.012} \\rm km^{-1}$ and the vertical aerosol optical depth at 5km above the ground is $0.035^{+0.019}_{-0.013}$. A model of the altitudinal aerosol distribution was built based on these measurements for the analysis of atmospheric attenuation of the fluorescence light generated by ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  1. Maximum-likelihood reconstruction of photon returns from simultaneous analog and photon-counting lidar measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Veberic, Darko

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for combining the analog and photon-counting measurements of lidar transient recorders into reconstructed photon returns. The method takes into account the statistical properties of the two measurement modes and estimates the most likely number of arriving photons and the most likely values of acquisition parameters describing the two measurement modes. It extends and improves the standard combining ("gluing") methods and does not rely on any ad hoc definitions of the overlap region nor on any ackground subtraction methods.

  2. Investigation of tropical cirrus cloud properties using ground based lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaman, Reji K.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Krishnakumar, V.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Raghunath, K.; Venkat Ratnam, M.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds play a significant role in the Earths radiation budget. Therefore, knowledge of geometrical and optical properties of cirrus cloud is essential for the climate modeling. In this paper, the cirrus clouds microphysical and optical properties are made by using a ground based lidar measurements over an inland tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), Andhra Pradesh, India. The variation of cirrus microphysical and optical properties with mid cloud temperature is also studied. The cirrus clouds mean height is generally observed in the range of 9-17km with a peak occurrence at 13- 14km. The cirrus mid cloud temperature ranges from -81°C to -46°C. The cirrus geometrical thickness ranges from 0.9- 4.5km. During the cirrus occurrence days sub-visual, thin and dense cirrus were at 37.5%, 50% and 12.5% respectively. The monthly cirrus optical depth ranges from 0.01-0.47, but most (extinction ranges from 2.8E-06 to 8E-05 and depolarization ratio and lidar ratio varies from 0.13 to 0.77 and 2 to 52 sr respectively. A positive correlation exists for both optical depth and extinction with the mid-cloud temperature. The lidar ratio shows a scattered behavior with mid-cloud temperature.

  3. Tracking of urban aerosols using combined lidar-based remote sensing and ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-Y. He

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A measuring campaign was performed over the neighboring towns of Nova Gorica in Slovenia and Gorizia in Italy on 24 and 25 May 2010, to investigate the concentration and distribution of urban aerosols. Tracking of two-dimensional spatial and temporal aerosol distributions was performed using scanning elastic lidar operating at 1064 nm. In addition, PM10 concentrations of particles, NOx and meteorological data were continuously monitored within the lidar scanning region. Based on the collected data, we investigated the flow dynamics and the aerosol concentrations within the lower troposphere and an evidence for daily aerosol cycles. We observed a number of cases with spatially localized increased lidar returns, which were found to be due to the presence of point sources of particulate matter. Daily aerosol concentration cycles were also clearly visible with a peak in aerosol concentration during the morning rush hours and daily maximum at around 17:00 Central European Time. We also found that the averaged horizontal atmospheric extinction within the scanning region 200 m above the ground is correlated to the PM10 concentration at the ground level with a correlation coefficient of 0.64, which may be due to relatively quiet meteorological conditions and basin-like terrain configuration.

  4. Measurements of profiles of aerosol/cloud in the lower atmosphere using a lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary measurements of profiles of aerosol/cloud in the lower atmosphere using a homemade stationary groundbased lidar system will be presented. In addition, information on basic characteristics and performance of the lidar system will be provided. Aerosol/Cloud lidar system in monostatic coaxial configuration uses the fundamental (1064 nm) and the second harmonic (532 nm) of a pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser to provide information on the relative concentration and spatial distribution of aerosol particles and cloud water droplets. Beam expander is used to reduce the laser beam divergence before to be transmitted into the atmosphere. In this study, high-resolution vertical profiles from the near ground up to 15 km altitude are obtained. A Newtonian telescope of diameter 400 mm with an adjustable field of view (FOV) is used to collect the elastic backscattered signal. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used for the 532 nm wavelength detection channel, while an avalanche photodiode (APD) is used for the 1064 nm wavelength detection channel. The optoelectronic detection channels use two similar very high frequency preamplification circuit. Data are acquired with a nominal spatial resolution of 7.5 m using a 12-bit 20 MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for each channel. Many functions, such as, range determination, background subtraction, digitization, and averaging are performed by the receiver subsystem. In addition, spatial resolution and linear dynamic range were optimized during signal processing.

  5. French airborne lidar measurements for Eyjafjallajökull ash plume survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chazette

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An Ultra-Violet Rayleigh-Mie lidar has been integrated aboard the French research aircraft Falcon20 in order to monitor the ash plume emitted by the Eyjafjallajökul volcano in April–May 2010. Three operational flights were carried out on 21 April, 12 and 16 May 2010 inside French, Spanish and British air spaces, respectively. The original purpose of the flights was to provide the French civil aviation authorities with objective information on the presence and location of the ash plume. The present paper presents the results of detailed analyses elaborated after the volcano crisis. They bear on the structure of the ash clouds and their optical properties such as the extinction coefficient and the lidar ratio. Lidar ratios were measured in the range of 43 to 50 sr, in good agreement with the ratios derived from ground-based lidar near Paris (France in April 2010 (~48 sr. The ash signature in terms of particulate depolarization was consistent during all flights (between 34 ± 3 % and 38 ± 3%. Such a value seems to be a good identification parameter for volcanic ash. Using specific cross-sections between 0.19 and 1.1 m2 g−1, the minimum (maximal mass concentrations in the ash plumes derived for the flights on 12 and 16 May were 140 (2300 and 250 (1500 μg m−3, respectively. It may be rather less than, or of the order of the critical level of damage (2 mg m−3 for the aircraft engines, but well above the 200 μg m−3 warning level.

  6. Remote measurements of water pollution with a lidar polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheives, T. C.; Rouse, J. W., Jr.; Mayo, W. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    This paper examines a dual polarization laser backscatter system as a method for remote measurements of certain water quality parameters. Analytical models for describing the backscatter from turbid water and oil on turbid water are presented and compared with experimental data. Laser backscatter field measurements from natural waterways are presented and compared with simultaneous ground observations of the water quality parameters: turbidity, suspended solids, and transmittance. The results of this study show that the analytical models appear valid and that the sensor investigated is applicable to remote measurements of these water quality parameters and oil spills on water.-

  7. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  8. Combining satellite, aerial and ground measurements to assess forest carbon stocks in Democratic Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Benjamin; Bouvy, Alban; Stephenne, Nathalie; Mathoux, Pierre; Bastin, Jean-François; Baudot, Yves; Akkermans, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks changes has been a rising topic in the recent years as a result of REDD+ mechanisms negotiations. Such monitoring will be mandatory for each project/country willing to benefit from these financial incentives in the future. Aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies offer cost advantages in implementing large scale forest inventories. Despite the recent progress made in the use of airborne LiDAR for carbon stocks estimation, no widely operational and cost effective method has yet been delivered for central Africa forest monitoring. Within the Maï Ndombe region of Democratic Republic of Congo, the EO4REDD project develops a method combining satellite, aerial and ground measurements. This combination is done in three steps: [1] mapping and quantifying forest cover changes using an object-based semi-automatic change detection (deforestation and forest degradation) methodology based on very high resolution satellite imagery (RapidEye), [2] developing an allometric linear model for above ground biomass measurements based on dendrometric parameters (tree crown areas and heights) extracted from airborne stereoscopic image pairs and calibrated using ground measurements of individual trees on a data set of 18 one hectare plots and [3] relating these two products to assess carbon stocks changes at a regional scale. Given the high accuracies obtained in [1] (> 80% for deforestation and 77% for forest degradation) and the suitable, but still to be improved with a larger calibrating sample, model (R² of 0.7) obtained in [2], EO4REDD products can be seen as a valid and replicable option for carbon stocks monitoring in tropical forests. Further improvements are planned to strengthen the cost effectiveness value and the REDD+ suitability in the second phase of EO4REDD. This second phase will include [A] specific model developments per forest type; [B] measurements of afforestation, reforestation and natural regeneration processes and

  9. Efficient statistical classification of satellite measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Supervised statistical classification is a vital tool for satellite image processing. It is useful not only when a discrete result, such as feature extraction or surface type, is required, but also for continuum retrievals by dividing the quantity of interest into discrete ranges. Because of the high resolution of modern satellite instruments and because of the requirement for real-time processing, any algorithm has to be fast to be useful. Here we describe an algorithm based on kernel estimation called Adaptive Gaussian Filtering that incorporates several innovations to produce superior efficiency as compared to three other popular methods: k-nearest-neighbour (KNN), Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This efficiency is gained with no compromises: accuracy is maintained, while estimates of the conditional probabilities are returned. These are useful not only to gauge the accuracy of an estimate in the absence of its true value, but also to re-calibrate a retrieved image and...

  10. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  11. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  12. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  13. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Column Abundance Made Using a Pulsed IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anamd; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection IPDA lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) pumped by a Nd:YAG laser and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  14. Importance of Raman Lidar Aerosol Extinction Measurements for Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zaw

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a UV Raman Lidar for aerosol extinction, and combining Microwave Radiometer derived Liquid Water Path (LWP with Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer derived Cloud Optical depth, to get cloud effective radius (Reff, we observe under certain specialized conditions, clear signatures of the Twomey Aerosol Indirect effect on cloud droplet properties which are consistent with the theoretical bounds. We also show that the measurement is very sensitive to how far the aerosol layer is from the cloud base and demonstrate that surface PM25 is far less useful. Measurements from both the DOE ARM site and new results at CCNY are presented.

  15. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  16. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dooren, M F; Kühn, M.; Petrovic, V.;

    2016-01-01

    compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement...... to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar...

  17. Monitoring Depth of Shallow Atmospheric Boundary Layer to Complement LiDAR Measurements Affected by Partial Overlap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Pal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that the incomplete laser beam receiver field-of-view overlap (i.e., partial overlap of ground-based vertically-pointing aerosol LiDAR restricts the observational range for detecting aerosol layer boundaries to a certain height above the LiDAR. This height varies from one to few hundreds of meters, depending on the transceiver geometry. The range, or height of full overlap, is defined as the minimum distance at which the laser beam is completely imaged onto the detector through the field stop in the receiver optics. Thus, the LiDAR signal below the height of full overlap remains erroneous. In effect, it is not possible to derive the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL top (zi below the height of full overlap using lidar measurements alone. This problem makes determination of the nocturnal zi almost impossible, as the nocturnal zi is often lower than the minimum possible retrieved height due to incomplete overlap of lidar. Detailed studies of the nocturnal boundary layer or of variability of low zi would require changes in the LiDAR configuration such that a complete transceiver overlap could be achieved at a much lower height. Otherwise, improvements in the system configuration or deployment (e.g., scanning LiDAR are needed. However, these improvements are challenging due to the instrument configuration and the need for Raman channel signal, eye-safe laser transmitter for scanning deployment, etc. This paper presents a brief review of some of the challenges and opportunities in overcoming the partial overlap of the LiDAR transceiver to determine zi below the height of full-overlap using complementary approaches to derive low zi. A comprehensive discussion focusing on four different techniques is presented. These are based on the combined (1 ceilometer and LiDAR; (2 tower-based trace gas (e.g., CO2 concentration profiles and LiDAR measurements; (3 222Rn budget approach and LiDAR-derived results; and (4 encroachment model

  18. Land mobile satellite propagation measurements in Japan using ETS-V satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Noriaki; Tanaka, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichi; Wakana, Hiromitsu

    1993-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of land mobile satellite communications channels have been investigated actively in recent years. Information of propagation characteristics associated with multipath fading and shadowing is required to design commercial land mobile satellite communications systems, including protocol and error correction method. CRL (Communications Research Laboratory) has carried out propagation measurements using the Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V) at L band (1.5 GHz) through main roads in Japan by a medium gain antenna with an autotracking capability. This paper presents the propagation statistics obtained in this campaign.

  19. Interference susceptibility measurements for an MSK satellite communication link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Fujikawa, Gene

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of measurements of the degradation of an MSK satellite link due to modulated and CW (unmodulated) interference. These measurements were made using a hardware based satellite communication link simulator at NASA-Lewis. The results indicate the amount of bit error rate degradation caused by CW interference as a function of frequency and power level, and the degradation caused by adjacent channel and cochannel modulated interference as a function of interference power level. Results were obtained for both the uplink case (including satellite nonlinearity) and the downlink case (linear channel).

  20. Characterization of tropospheric ozone based on lidar measurement in Hangzhou, East China during the G20 Leaders' Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenjing; Liu, Cheng; Fan, Guangqiang; Hu, Qihou; Huang, Xin; Dong, Yunsheng; Zhang, Tianshu; Liu, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the G20 (Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors) Leaders' Summit (Sep.5th-6th, 2016), a series of strict air quality control measures were implemented in Hangzhou and its surrounding regions from Aug.26th to Sep.6th. A differential absorption lidar was employed to monitor tropospheric ozone in urban Hangzhou during a campaign from Aug. 24th to Sep. 10th, and the satellite-based NO2 VCDs and HCHO VCDs in the troposphere were also retrieved using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). During our campaign, six O3 pollution events, which were determined according to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of China (GB-3095-2012), and two stages with rapid reduction of O3 concentration on Aug. 26th and Sep.4-6th were observed. The temporal variation tendency of O3 concentrations was well reproduced by the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). Typical cases with the abrupt rise and decline of O3 concentrations were analyzed using Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) back trajectory, satellite NO2 and HCHO product and the prediction by WRF-Chem model. The transport from northern cities have an important impact on pollutants observed in Hangzhou, and the chemical sensitivity of O3 production, which were approximately evaluated using the ratio of HCHO VCDs to NO2 VCDs in the troposphere, was turned from a mixed VOC-NOx-limited regime into a NOX-limited regime in Hangzhou due to the strict emission control measures.

  1. Development and Integration of a Pulsed 2-micron Direct Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Lidar for CO2 Column Measurement from Airborne platform Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop, integrate and demonstrate a 2-micron pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument CO2 Column Measurement from Airborne platform...

  2. Airborne LIDAR as a tool for estimating inherent optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Charles; Arnone, Robert

    2012-06-01

    LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems have been used most extensively to generate elevation maps of land, ice and coastal bathymetry. There has been space-, airborne- and land-based LIDAR systems. They have also been used in underwater communication. What have not been investigated are the capabilities of LIDARs to measure ocean temperature and optical properties vertically in the water column, individually or simultaneously. The practical use of bathymetric LIDAR as a tool for the estimation of inherent optical properties remains one of the most challenging problems in the field of optical oceanography. LIDARs can retrieve data as deep as 3-4 optical depths (e.g. optical properties can be measured through the thermocline for ~70% of the world's oceans). Similar to AUVs (gliders), UAV-based LIDAR systems will increase temporal and spatial measurements by several orders of magnitude. The LIDAR Observations of Optical and Physical Properties (LOOPP) Conference was held at NURC (2011) to review past, current and future LIDAR research efforts in retrieving water column optical/physical properties. This new observational platform/sensor system is ideally suited for ground truthing hyperspectral/geostationary satellite data in coastal regions and for model data assimilation.

  3. High Frequency Field Measurements of an Undular Bore Using a 2D LiDAR Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kévin Martins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The secondary wave field associated with undular tidal bores (known as whelps has been barely studied in field conditions: the wave field can be strongly non-hydrostatic, and the turbidity is generally high. In situ measurements based on pressure or acoustic signals can therefore be limited or inadequate. The intermittent nature of this process in the field and the complications encountered in the downscaling to laboratory conditions also render its study difficult. Here, we present a new methodology based on LiDAR technology to provide high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of the free surface of an undular tidal bore. A wave-by-wave analysis is performed on the whelps, and comparisons between LiDAR, acoustic and pressure-derived measurements are used to quantify the non-hydrostatic nature of this phenomenon. A correction based on linear wave theory applied on individual wave properties improves the results from the pressure transducer (Root mean square error, R M S E of 0 . 19 m against 0 . 38 m; however, more robust data is obtained from an upwards-looking acoustic sensor despite high turbidity during the passage of the whelps ( R M S E of 0 . 05 m. Finally, the LiDAR scanner provides the unique possibility to study the wave geometry: the distribution of measured wave height, period, celerity, steepness and wavelength are presented. It is found that the highest wave from the whelps can be steeper than the bore front, explaining why breaking events are sometimes observed in the secondary wave field of undular tidal bores.

  4. Ground-based lidar measurements from Ny-Ålesund during ASTAR 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herber

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR in March and April 2007, measurements obtained at the AWIPEV Arctic Research Base in Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen at 78.9° N, 11.9° E (operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research – AWI and the Institut polaire français Paul-Emile Victor – IPEV, supported the airborne campaign. This included lidar data from the Koldewey Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL and the Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL, located in the atmospheric observatory as well as photometer data and the daily launched radiosonde. The MPL features nearly continuous measurements; the KARL was switched on whenever weather conditions allowed observations (145 h in 61 days. From 1 March to 30 April, 71 meteorological balloon soundings were performed and compared with the concurrent MPL measurements; photometer measurements are available from 18 March. For the KARL data, a statistical overview of particle detection based on their optical properties backscatter ratio and volume depolarization can be given. The altitudes of the occurrence of the named features (subvisible and visible ice and water as well as mixed-phase clouds, aerosol layers as well as their dependence on different air mass origins are analyzed. Although the spring 2007 was characterized by rather clean conditions, diverse case studies of cloud and aerosol occurrence during March and April 2007 are presented in more detail, including temporal development and main optical properties as depolarization, backscatter and extinction coefficients. Links between air mass origins and optical properties can be presumed but need further evidence.

  5. Integrated Geohazard Screening Using Remote Sensing, Including Satellite and Helicopter Based Imagery, LiDAR, and Geophysics, in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A. M.; Kozaci, O.; Hitchcock, C. S.; Konieczny, G.; Garrie, D.

    2015-12-01

    We performed a detailed geohazard investigation of a 5 km-wide, 650km-long corridor through Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia. The study area includes the Rasht and Alai valleys at the boundary between the Pamir Mountains and the Alai Range of the southern Tien Shan. Ongoing collision between the India and Eurasia plates has resulted in the Tien Shan orogenic belt and the Pamir Mountains. Thus the study area is one of the most seismically active regions in the world. Rapid uplift, erosion, and steep slopes give rise to widespread landsliding and massive rock slope failures in both the Pamir and Tien Shan Mountains. Our integrated data acquisition and interpretation plan used airborne and remote sensing methods including satellite based DEMs and high resolution imagery, LiDAR, aerial photography, and helicopter based electromagnetic resistivity (HEM). Analysis of these data sets allowed us to delineate potential geohazards through surficial geologic mapping. Initial desktop geohazard screening included 1:50,000-scale mapping for potential faults, landslides, and liquefiable deposits, which included traffic light-style susceptibility maps for route refinement and hazard mitigation. As part of detailed investigations, continuous HEM data was collected and processed at a spatial sampling interval of approximately 3m. Apparent resistivity was calculated for each of the five operating frequencies over the entire survey area. For the purposes of this study, resistivity values at 10 m and 20 m depths were sliced from the interpolated 3D Differential Resistivity model for use in the analysis. Using GIS, we compared these results with mapped Quaternary units and found good correlation between resistivity contrasts and the boundaries of mapped surficial units. With this confidence, the HEM measurements were further analyzed to identify subsurface features and to develop a 3D geologic model. Based on this analysis we provided a framework for an optimized geotechnical

  6. Stratospheric temperature measurement with scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for wind retrieval from mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haiyun; Dou, Xiankang; Shangguan, Mingjia; Zhao, Ruocan; Sun, Dongsong; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shu, Zhifeng; Xue, Xianghui; Han, Yuli; Han, Yan

    2014-09-08

    Temperature detection remains challenging in the low stratosphere, where the Rayleigh integration lidar is perturbed by aerosol contamination and ozone absorption while the rotational Raman lidar is suffered from its low scattering cross section. To correct the impacts of temperature on the Rayleigh Doppler lidar, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on cavity scanning Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) is developed. By considering the effect of the laser spectral width, Doppler broadening of the molecular backscatter, divergence of the light beam and mirror defects of the FPI, a well-behaved transmission function is proved to show the principle of HSRL in detail. Analysis of the statistical error of the HSRL is carried out in the data processing. A temperature lidar using both HSRL and Rayleigh integration techniques is incorporated into the Rayleigh Doppler wind lidar. Simultaneous wind and temperature detection is carried out based on the combined system at Delhi (37.371°N, 97.374°E; 2850 m above the sea level) in Qinghai province, China. Lower Stratosphere temperature has been measured using HSRL between 18 and 50 km with temporal resolution of 2000 seconds. The statistical error of the derived temperatures is between 0.2 and 9.2 K. The temperature profile retrieved from the HSRL and wind profile from the Rayleigh Doppler lidar show good agreement with the radiosonde data. Specifically, the max temperature deviation between the HSRL and radiosonde is 4.7 K from 18 km to 36 km, and it is 2.7 K between the HSRL and Rayleigh integration lidar from 27 km to 34 km.

  7. Pulsed Lidar for Measurement of C02 Concentrations for the ASCENDS Mission - Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Rodriquez, Michael; Kawa, S. Randy

    2011-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-based sounding technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit for NASA is ASCENDS mission. The mission's goals are to provide measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundance with global-coverage, a few hundred km spatial and monthly temporal resolution. These are needed to better understand CO2 fluxes and the processes that regulate CO2 storage by the land and oceans. For the lIP, we are developing and demonstrating the lidar techniques and key lidar technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to demonstrate the key capabilities needed for a space lidar and mission approach for the ASCENDS mission. We use a pulsed lidar technique, which is much less sensitive to errors from cloud and atmospheric scattering and to noise from solar background. It allows continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio in the lower troposphere during day and night. Our approach uses the 1570nm CO2 band and a two-wavelength laser absorption spectrometer, which continuously measures at nadir from a circular polar orbit. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. It uses a pair of tunable laser transmitters, which allowing measurement of the extinction from a single selected CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band and from a line pair in the Oxygen A-band near 765 nm. These regions have temperature insensitive absorption lines are free from interference from other gases. The lasers pulse at 10KHz, use tunable diode seed lasers followed by laser amplifiers, and have MHz spectral widths. During the measurement the lasers are stepped across the selected lines at a kHz rate. The receiver uses a 1-m class telescope and photon sensitive detectors and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the

  8. Depolarization properties of cirrus clouds from polarization lidar measurements over Hefei in spring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenzhu Wang; Ruli Chi; Bo Liu; Jun Zhou

    2008-01-01

    @@ A new polarization lidar has been developed for detecting depolarization characteristics of aerosol and cirrus over Hefei (31.90°N, 117.16°E), China. The fundamental principle of polarization lidar is briefly introduced.

  9. Digitization and Position Measurement of Astronomical Plates of Saturnian Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, D.; Yu, Y.; Zhang, H. Y.; Qiao, R. C.

    2014-05-01

    Using the advanced commercial scanners to digitize astronomical plates may be a simple and effective way. In this paper, we discuss the method of digitizing and astrometrically reducing six astronomical plates of Saturnian satellites, which were taken from the 1 m RCC (Ritchey Chretien Coude) telescope of Yunnan Observatory in 1988, by using the 10000XL scanner of Epson. The digitized images of the astronomical plates of Saturnian satellites are re-reduced, and the positions of Saturnian satellites based on the UCAC2 (The Second US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog) catalogue are given. A comparison of our measured positions with the IMCCE (Institut de Mecanique Celeste et de Calcul des Ephemerides) ephemeris of Saturnian satellites shows the high quality of our measurements, which have an accuracy of 106 mas in right ascension and 89 mas in declination. Moreover, our measurements appear to be consistent with this ephemeris within only about 56 mas in right ascension and 9 mas in declination.

  10. Ground-based water vapor Raman lidar measurements up to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere – Part 2: Data analysis and calibration for long-term monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Leblanc

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-recognized, key role of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS and the scarcity of high-quality, long-term measurements triggered the development by JPL of a powerful Raman lidar to try to meet these needs. This development started in 2005 and was endorsed by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and the validation program for the EOS-Aura satellite. In this paper we review all the stages of the instrument data acquisition, data analysis, profile retrieval and calibration procedures, as well as selected results from the recent validation campaign MOHAVE-2009 (Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments. The stages in the instrumental development and the conclusions from three validation campaigns (including MOHAVE-2009 are presented in details in a companion paper (McDermid et al., 2011. In its current configuration, the lidar demonstrated capability to measure water vapor profiles from ~1 km above the ground to the lower stratosphere with an estimated accuracy of 5 %. Since 2005, nearly 1000 profiles have been routinely measured with a precision of 10 % or better near 13 km. Since 2009, the profiles have typically reached 14 km for 1 h integration times and 1.5 km vertical resolution, and can reach 21 km for 6-h integration times using degraded vertical resolutions.

  11. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  12. CART Raman Lidar Aerosol and Water Vapor Measurements in the Vicinity of Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Marian B.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Newsom, Rob; Sivaraman, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and water vapor profiles acquired by the Raman lidar instrument located at the Climate Research Facility (CRF) at Southern Great Plains (SGP) provide data necessary to investigate the atmospheric variability in the vicinity of clouds near the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Recent CARL upgrades and modifications to the routine processing algorithms afforded the necessarily high temporal and vertical data resolutions for these investigations. CARL measurements are used to investigate the behavior of aerosol backscattering and extinction and their correlation with water vapor and relative humidity.

  13. Comparison of Large Eddy Simulations of a convective boundary layer with wind LIDAR measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the horizontal wind speed and of the standard deviation of vertical wind speed from Large Eddy Simulations of a convective atmospheric boundary layer are compared to wind LIDAR measurements up to 1400 m. Fair agreement regarding both types of profiles is observed only when...... the simulated flow is driven by a both time- and height-dependent geostrophic wind and a time-dependent surface heat flux. This underlines the importance of mesoscale effects when the flow above the atmospheric surface layer is simulated with a computational fluid dynamics model....

  14. Lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols from Mount Pinatubo at Camaguey, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuña, Juan Carlos

    Lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols made at Camaguey, Cuba 21°N, six months after Mount Pinatubo eruption, show a very large increase in the stratospheric aerosol burden. Peak scattering ratios greater than 20 have been observed in early January 1992. In the same month integrated backscattering in the layer between 16 and 33 km shows a maximum value larger than 5 × 10 -3 sr -1. The course of those parameters such as the height of peaks and of the layer base between January 1992 and November 1993 is shown.

  15. Analysis of a potassium lidar system for upper-atmospheric wind-temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papen, G C; Gardner, C S; Pfenninger, W M

    1995-10-20

    We report a detailed analysis of wind-temperature (W/T) lidar systems based on mesospheric potassium as the tracer. Currently, most narrow-band (W/T) systems use sodium (Na) as the tracer because of its relatively large natural abundance, large cross section, and the ability to use Doppler-free Na spectroscopy to generate accurate absolute frequency markers. We show that a potassium-based system with existing near-infrared solid-state laser technology operating at the potassium D lines has the potential to make W/T measurements that are more accurate than current Na narrow-band systems and can be far simpler technically.

  16. Observing System Simulations for the NASA ASCENDS Lidar CO2 Mission Concept: Substantiating Science Measurement Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Stephan R.; Baker, David Frank; Schuh, Andrew E.; Abshire, James Brice; Browell, Edward V.; Michalak, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of Carbon Emissions, Nights, Days, and Seasons) is envisioned as the next generation of dedicated, space-based CO2 observing systems, currently planned for launch in about the year 2022. Recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages, in comparison to current and planned passive CO2 instruments, that promise to advance CO2 measurement capability and carbon cycle understanding into the next decade. Assessment and testing of possible lidar instrument technologies indicates that such sensors are more than feasible, however, the measurement precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency. It is, therefore, important to quantitatively and consistently evaluate the measurement capabilities and requirements for the prospective active system in the context of advancing our knowledge of carbon flux distributions and their dependence on underlying physical processes. This amounts to establishing minimum requirements for precision, relative accuracy, spatial/temporal coverage and resolution, vertical information content, interferences, and possibly the tradeoffs among these parameters, while at the same time framing a mission that can be implemented within a constrained budget. Here, we present results of observing system simulation studies, commissioned by the ASCENDS Science Requirements Definition Team, for a range of possible mission implementation options that are intended to substantiate science measurement requirements for a laser-based CO2 space instrument.

  17. Innovative LIDAR 3D Dynamic Measurement System to estimate fruit-tree leaf area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Cortiella, Ricardo; Llorens-Calveras, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre; Arnó-Satorra, Jaume; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Masip-Vilalta, Joan; Camp, Ferran; Gràcia-Aguilá, Felip; Solanelles-Batlle, Francesc; Planas-DeMartí, Santiago; Pallejà-Cabré, Tomàs; Palacin-Roca, Jordi; Gregorio-Lopez, Eduard; Del-Moral-Martínez, Ignacio; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a LIDAR-based 3D Dynamic Measurement System is presented and evaluated for the geometric characterization of tree crops. Using this measurement system, trees were scanned from two opposing sides to obtain two three-dimensional point clouds. After registration of the point clouds, a simple and easily obtainable parameter is the number of impacts received by the scanned vegetation. The work in this study is based on the hypothesis of the existence of a linear relationship between the number of impacts of the LIDAR sensor laser beam on the vegetation and the tree leaf area. Tests performed under laboratory conditions using an ornamental tree and, subsequently, in a pear tree orchard demonstrate the correct operation of the measurement system presented in this paper. The results from both the laboratory and field tests confirm the initial hypothesis and the 3D Dynamic Measurement System is validated in field operation. This opens the door to new lines of research centred on the geometric characterization of tree crops in the field of agriculture and, more specifically, in precision fruit growing.

  18. Innovative LIDAR 3D Dynamic Measurement System to Estimate Fruit-Tree Leaf Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Del-Moral-Martínez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a LIDAR-based 3D Dynamic Measurement System is presented and evaluated for the geometric characterization of tree crops. Using this measurement system, trees were scanned from two opposing sides to obtain two three-dimensional point clouds. After registration of the point clouds, a simple and easily obtainable parameter is the number of impacts received by the scanned vegetation. The work in this study is based on the hypothesis of the existence of a linear relationship between the number of impacts of the LIDAR sensor laser beam on the vegetation and the tree leaf area. Tests performed under laboratory conditions using an ornamental tree and, subsequently, in a pear tree orchard demonstrate the correct operation of the measurement system presented in this paper. The results from both the laboratory and field tests confirm the initial hypothesis and the 3D Dynamic Measurement System is validated in field operation. This opens the door to new lines of research centred on the geometric characterization of tree crops in the field of agriculture and, more specifically, in precision fruit growing.

  19. Information content and sensitivity of the 3β + 2α lidar measurement system for aerosol microphysical retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Liu, Xu; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Stamnes, Snorre; Sawamura, Patricia; Moore, Richard H.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2016-11-01

    There is considerable interest in retrieving profiles of aerosol effective radius, total number concentration, and complex refractive index from lidar measurements of extinction and backscatter at several wavelengths. The combination of three backscatter channels plus two extinction channels (3β + 2α) is particularly important since it is believed to be the minimum configuration necessary for the retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties and because the technological readiness of lidar systems permits this configuration on both an airborne and future spaceborne instrument. The second-generation NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) has been making 3β + 2α measurements since 2012. The planned NASA Aerosol/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) satellite mission also recommends the 3β + 2α combination.Here we develop a deeper understanding of the information content and sensitivities of the 3β + 2α system in terms of aerosol microphysical parameters of interest. We use a retrieval-free methodology to determine the basic sensitivities of the measurements independent of retrieval assumptions and constraints. We calculate information content and uncertainty metrics using tools borrowed from the optimal estimation methodology based on Bayes' theorem, using a simplified forward model look-up table, with no explicit inversion. The forward model is simplified to represent spherical particles, monomodal log-normal size distributions, and wavelength-independent refractive indices. Since we only use the forward model with no retrieval, the given simplified aerosol scenario is applicable as a best case for all existing retrievals in the absence of additional constraints. Retrieval-dependent errors due to mismatch between retrieval assumptions and true atmospheric aerosols are not included in this sensitivity study, and neither are retrieval errors that may be introduced in the inversion process. The choice of a simplified model adds clarity to the

  20. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  1. A comparison of forest height prediction from FIA field measurement and LiDAR data via spatial models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhen Li

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a high correspondence between tree height measurements acquired from airborne LiDAR and that those measured using conventional field techniques. Though these results are very promising, most of the studies were conducted over small experimental areas and tree height was measured carefully or using expensive instruments in the field, which is...

  2. Multi-beam Lidar Instrument Design, Measurement Capabilities, and Technical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, B.; Ranson, J.; Dubayah, R.; Coyle, B.; Salerno, C.

    2007-12-01

    A multi-beam Laser Altimeter has been designed and studied at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the critical technologies have developed and tested resulting in a mature and technically ready instrument approach. The instrument consists of three separate beams each providing a near-contiguous profile of 25 m diameter laser footprints. The across-track separation of the beams can be design includes a high-quality GPS receiver for providing precise orbital position information and a state-of-the-art Star Tracker and Inertial Measurement Unit to provide precise and accurate laser beam pointing knowledge. The digitizer-based ranging system will provide ranging to bare surfaces with ~3 cm range precision. The return waveforms will also provide vegetation height measurements with ~1 m of accuracy. The laser transmitters have been fully developed, characterize, and tested. Engineering Test Unit has been built at NASA/GSFC for environmental testing. Test units of the laser demonstrated 5 Billion shots without damage and diode testing indicates lifetimes of ~10 Billion shots per laser can be expected. A new waveform digitizer has been developed with improvements in sampling rate and dynamic range over the ICESat digitizer system, thus allowing higher quality waveforms to be collected, which is critical importantly for vegetation studies. This multi-beam Lidar design is the basis for the Lidar on the DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice) mission described in the NRC Decadal Survey Report that consists of a Multi-beam Lidar and an L-band InSAR to be launched in the 2010-2013 timeframe.

  3. Advances in lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Piotr Andrzej

    Quantitative laser remote sensing (lidar) measurements have always posed a challenge for the research community. The complexity of the data inversion and the instrumentation itself makes lidar results difficult to interpret. This dissertation presents a suite of 3 elastic lidar experiments. The goal of these studies was to quantitatively approach atmospheric physical phenomena such as rainfall (chapter 3), a distribution of concentration of particulates in Mexico City (chapter 4) and emission rates and emission factors from an agricultural facility in Iowa (chapter 5). The studies demonstrate that elastic lidar measurements are possible not only in a qualitative sense but also in a quantitative sense. The lidar study of rainfall was intended to provide rainfall data in small spatial and temporal scales (1.5m and 1s resolution). The two levels of lidar inversion algorithms allowed the calculation of rainfall rates in small scales. The problem of the distribution of particles over Mexico City required mobile lidar measurements. The elastic lidar data were successfully inverted to extinction coefficients which were then combined with aerosol size distribution. As a result, a spatial distribution of particulate concentration was created to illustrate the transport processes and intensity of Mexico City pollution. The measurements of particulate emission fluxes from a livestock facility involved a stationary scanning elastic lidar, in-situ aerosol size distribution measurements and wind measurements. The data from the 3 independent measurement platforms combined together resulted in emission rates and emission factors. The results from this experiment demonstrated that the new lidar approach is an adequate tool for measurement of aerosol emissions from livestock production facilities. The studies presented in the dissertation show quantitative lidar measurements in combination with other instruments measurements. This approach significantly extends the applications of

  4. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  5. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  6. Assessment of measurement error due to sampling perspective in the space-based Doppler lidar wind profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, S. H.; Emmitt, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A Multipair Algorithm (MPA) has been developed to minimize the contribution of the sampling error in the simulated Doppler lidar wind profiler measurements (due to angular and spatial separation between shots in a shot pair) to the total measurement uncertainty. Idealized wind fields are used as input to the profiling model, and radial wind estimates are passed through the MPA to yield a wind measurement for 300 x 300 sq km areas. The derived divergence fields illustrate the gradient patterns that are particular to the Doppler lidar sampling strategy and perspective.

  7. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris B. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regional sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51 and the fine particle mass fraction (64%. Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.

  8. Retrieval of Aerosol Parameters from Continuous H24 Lidar-Ceilometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisi, D.; Barnaba, F.; Costabile, F.; Di Liberto, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wille, H.

    2016-06-01

    Ceilometer technology is increasingly applied to the monitoring and the characterization of tropospheric aerosols. In this work, a method to estimate some key aerosol parameters (extinction coefficient, surface area concentration and volume concentration) from ceilometer measurements is presented. A numerical model has been set up to derive a mean functional relationships between backscatter and the above mentioned parameters based on a large set of simulated aerosol optical properties. A good agreement was found between the modeled backscatter and extinction coefficients and the ones measured by the EARLINET Raman lidars. The developed methodology has then been applied to the measurements acquired by a prototype Polarization Lidar-Ceilometer (PLC). This PLC instrument was developed within the EC- LIFE+ project "DIAPASON" as an upgrade of the commercial, single-channel Jenoptik CHM15k system. The PLC run continuously (h24) close to Rome (Italy) for a whole year (2013-2014). Retrievals of the aerosol backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm and of the relevant aerosol properties were performed using the proposed methodology. This information, coupled to some key aerosol type identification made possible by the depolarization channel, allowed a year-round characterization of the aerosol field at this site. Examples are given to show how this technology coupled to appropriate data inversion methods is potentially useful in the operational monitoring of parameters of air quality and meteorological interest.

  9. Fifth generation lithospheric magnetic field model from CHAMP satellite measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Maus, S.; Hermann Lühr; Martin Rother; Hemant, K.; Balasis, G.; Patricia Ritter; Claudia Stolle

    2007-01-01

    Six years of low-orbit CHAMP satellite magnetic measurements have provided an exceptionally high-quality data resource for lithospheric magnetic field modeling and interpretation. Here we describe the fifth-generation satellite-only magnetic field model MF5. The model extends to spherical harmonic degree 100. As a result of careful data selection, extensive corrections, filtering, and line leveling, the model has low noise levels, even if evaluated at the Earth's surface. The model is particu...

  10. Arrangements for enhanced measurements of a large turbine near-wake using LiDAR from the nacelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, J. J.; Rettenmeier, A.; Schlipf, D.

    2008-05-01

    New LiDAR techniques are being tested and developed to support the development of large offshore wind turbines. Our interest in this paper is concentrated in wake measurements; therefore, a pulsed standard LiDAR is adapted for fullscale wind field measurements from the nacelle of a large wind turbine. We show the conceptual framework for planned adaptations to a Windcube® LiDAR for operation at the nacelle of a 5 MW wind turbine. The standard scanning mode is to be modified to properly obtain downstream and also upstream wind speeds. The wind field measurements are intended for verification of models for near-wake wind speed, wake meandering and new predictive control estrategies.

  11. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure made Using an IPDA Lidar Operating in the Oxygen A-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Abshire, James B.; Stephen, Mark; Rodriquez, Michael; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Mao, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of atmospheric pressure made using an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar that operates in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are needed for NASA s Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission to measure atmospheric CO2. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve our predictions of climate change. The goal of ASCENDS is to determine the CO2 dry mixing ratio with lidar measurements from space at a level of 1 ppm. Analysis to date shows that with current weather models, measurements of both the CO2 column density and the column density of dry air are needed. Since O2 is a stable molecule that uniformly mixed in the atmosphere, measuring O2 absorption in the atmosphere can be used to infer the dry air density. We have developed an airborne (IPDA) lidar for Oxygen, with support from the NASA ESTO IIP program. Our lidar uses DFB-based seed laser diodes, a pulsed modulator, a fiber laser amplifier, and a non-linear crystal to generate wavelength tunable 765 nm laser pulses with a few uJ/pulse energy. The laser pulse rate is 10 KHz, and average transmitted laser power is 20 mW. Our lidar steps laser pulses across a selected line O2 doublet near 764.7 nm in the Oxygen A-band. The direct detection lidar receiver uses a 20 cm diameter telescope, a Si APD detector in Geiger mode, and a multi-channel scalar to detect and record the time resolved laser backscatter in 40 separate wavelength channels. Subsequent analysis is used to estimate the transmission line shape of the doublet for the laser pulses reflected from the ground. Ground based data analysis allows averaging from 1 to 60 seconds to increase SNR in the transmission line shape of the doublet. Our retrieval algorithm fits the expected O2 lineshapes against the measurements and

  12. Evaluation of Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds data obtained by ground based lidars (at Dome C, McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville) and the satellite based CALIOP lidar system versus a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snels, Marcel; Fierli, Federico; de Muro, Mauro; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Cairo, Francesco; Di Liberto, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds play an important role in the ozone depletion process in polar regions and are thus strongly linked to climate changes. Long term observations are needed to monitor the presence of PSCs and to compare to climate models. The last decades PSCs in Antarctica have been observed by using the CALIOP lidar system on the CALIPSO satellite and by ground based lidars at Dumont D'Urville, McMurdo, Casey, and since 2014 at Dome C. We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville and Dome C stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. However, a statistical analysis of PSC observations shows a satisfactory agreement between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar. The differences may be attributed to averaging processes for data with a bad signal to noise ratio, which tends to smear out the values of the optical parameters. Data from some Chemistry Climate models (CCMs) having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived CALIPSO (i

  13. Improving Measurement of Forest Structural Parameters by Co-Registering of High Resolution Aerial Imagery and Low Density LiDAR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huabing; Gong, Peng; CHENG, XIAO; Clinton, Nick; Li, Zengyuan

    2009-01-01

    Forest structural parameters, such as tree height and crown width, are indispensable for evaluating forest biomass or forest volume. LiDAR is a revolutionary technology for measurement of forest structural parameters, however, the accuracy of crown width extraction is not satisfactory when using a low density LiDAR, especially in high canopy cover forest. We used high resolution aerial imagery with a low density LiDAR system to overcome this shortcoming. A morphological filtering was used to ...

  14. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  15. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  16. Optical properties of different aerosol types: seven years of combined Raman-elastic backscatter lidar measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Giannakaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present our combined Raman/elastic backscatter lidar observations which were carried out at the EARLINET station of Thessaloniki, Greece, during the period 2001–2007. The largest optical depths are observed for Saharan dust and smoke aerosol particles. For local and continental polluted aerosols the measurements indicate high aerosol loads. However, measurements associated with the local path indicate enhanced aerosol load within the Planetary Boundary Layer. The lowest value of aerosol optical depth is observed for continental aerosols, from West directions with less free tropospheric contribution. The largest lidar ratios, of the order of 70 sr, are found for biomass burning aerosols. A significant and distinct correlation between lidar ratio and backscatter related Ångström exponent values were estimated for different aerosol categories. Scatter plot between lidar ratio values and Ångström exponent values for local and continental polluted aerosols does not show a significant correlation, with a large variation in both parameters possibly due to variable absorption characteristics of these aerosols. Finally for continental aerosols with west and northwest directions that follow downward movement when arriving at our site constantly low lidar ratios almost independent of size are found.

  17. Characterizing the seasonal cycle and vertical structure of ozone in Paris, France using four years of ground based LIDAR measurements in the lowermost troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amélie; Ancellet, Gérard; Ravetta, François; Thomas, Jennie L.; Pazmino, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Systematic ozone LIDAR measurements were completed during a 4 year period (2011-2014) in Paris, France to study the seasonal variability of the vertical structure of ozone in the urban boundary layer. In addition, we use in-situ measurements from the surface air quality network that is located in Paris (AIRPARIF). Specifically, we use ozone and NO2 measurements made at two urban stations: Paris13 (60 m ASL) and the Eiffel Tower (310 m ASL) to validate and interpret the LIDAR profiles. Remote sensed tropospheric NO2 integrated columns from the SAOZ instrument located in Paris are also used to interpret ozone measurements. Comparison between ozone LIDAR measurements averaged from 250 m to 500 m and the Eiffel Tower in-situ measurements shows that the accuracy of the LIDAR (originally ±14 μg·m-3) is significantly improved (±7 μg·m-3) when a small telescope with a wide angular aperture is used. Results for the seasonal cycle of the ozone vertical gradient are found to be similar using two methods: (1) measured differences between AIRPARIF stations with measurements at 60 m ASL and 310 m ASL and (2) using LIDAR profiles from 300 m to the top of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). Ozone concentrations measured by the LIDAR increase with altitude within the PBL, with a steeper gradient in winter (60 μg·m-3·km-1) and a less strong gradient in summer (20 μg·m-3·km-1). Results show that in winter, there is a sharp positive gradient of ozone at the surface, which is explained by ozone titration by NO combined with increased atmospheric stability in winter. In the afternoon during summer, photochemistry and vertical mixing are large enough to compensate for ozone titration near the surface, where NOx is emitted, and there is no gradient in ozone observed. In contrast, in the summer during the morning, ozone has a sharper positive vertical gradient similar to the winter values. Comparison of the vertically averaged ozone concentrations up to (0-3 km) and urban layer

  18. Measuring snow and glacier ice properties from satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    KöNig, Max; Winther, Jan-Gunnar; Isaksson, Elisabeth

    2001-02-01

    Satellite remote sensing is a convenient tool for studying snow and glacier ice, allowing us to conduct research over large and otherwise inaccessible areas. This paper reviews various methods for measuring snow and glacier ice properties with satellite remote sensing. These methods have been improving with the use of new satellite sensors, like the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) during the last decade, leading to the development of new and powerful methods, such as SAR interferometry for glacier velocity, digital elevation model generation of ice sheets, or snow cover mapping. Some methods still try to overcome the limitations of present sensors, but future satellites will have much increased capability, for example, the ability to measure the whole optical spectrum or SAR sensors with multiple polarization or frequencies. Among the methods presented are the satellite-derived determination of surface albedo, snow extent, snow volume, snow grain size, surface temperature, glacier facies, glacier velocities, glacier extent, and ice sheet topography. In this review, emphasis is put on the principles and theory of each satellite remote sensing method. An extensive list of references, with an emphasis on studies from the 1990s, allows the reader to delve into specific topics.

  19. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  20. An innovative rotational Raman lidar to measure the temperature profile from the surface to 30 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Mariscal, Jean-François; d'Almeida, Eric; Dahoo, Pierre-Richard; Porteneuve, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    A concept of innovative rotational Raman lidar with daylight measurement capability is proposed to measure the vertical profile of temperature from the ground to the middle stratosphere. The optical filtering is made using a Fabry-Pérot Interferometer with line spacing equal to the line spacing of the Raman spectrum. The detection is made using a linear PMT array operated in photon counting mode. We plan to build a prototype and to test it at the Haute-Provence Observatory lidar facility. to achieve a time resolution permitting the observation of small-scale atmospheric processes playing a role in the troposphere-stratosphere interaction as gravity waves. If successful, this project will open the possibility to consider a Raman space lidar for the global observation of atmospheric temperature profiles.

  1. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  2. Satellite data sets for the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L.; Bernstein, R.L. [SeaSpace Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This abstract describes the type of data obtained from satellite measurements in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The data sets have been widely used by the ARM team to derive cloud-top altitude, cloud cover, snow and ice cover, surface temperature, water vapor, and wind, vertical profiles of temperature, and continuoous observations of weather needed to track and predict severe weather.

  3. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  4. An Orbiting Standards Platform for communication satellite system RF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R. G.; Woodruff, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Orbiting Standards Platform (OSP) is a proposed satellite dedicated to performing RF measurements on space communications systems. It would consist of a quasi-geostationary spacecraft containing an ensemble of calibrated RF sources and field strength meters operating in several microwave bands, and would be capable of accurately and conveniently measuring critical earth station and satellite RF performance parameters, such as EIRP, gain, figure of merit (G/T), crosspolarization, beamwidth, and sidelobe levels. The feasibility and utility of the OSP concept has been under joint study by NASA, NBS, Comsat and NTIA. A survey of potential OSP users was conducted by NTIA as part of this effort. The response to this survey, along with certain trends in satellite communications system design, indicates a growing need for such a measurement service.

  5. LIDAR and SODAR Measurements of Wind Speed and Direction in Upland Terrain for Wind Energy Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamon McKeogh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge of the wind resource is necessary in the developmental and operational stages of a wind farm site. As wind turbines continue to grow in size, masts for mounting cup anemometers—the accepted standard for resource assessment—have necessarily become much taller, and much more expensive. This limitation has driven the commercialization of two remote sensing (RS tools for the wind energy industry: The LIDAR and the SODAR, Doppler effect instruments using light and sound, respectively. They are ground-based and can work over hundreds of meters, sufficient for the tallest turbines in, or planned for, production. This study compares wind measurements from two commercial RS instruments against an instrumented mast, in upland (semi-complex terrain typical of where many wind farms are now being installed worldwide. With appropriate filtering, regression analyses suggest a good correlation between the RS instruments and mast instruments: The RS instruments generally recorded lower wind speeds than the cup anemometers, with the LIDAR more accurate and the SODAR more precise.

  6. Rotational Raman lidar to measure the atmospheric temperature from the ground to 30 km

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, D.; Hauchecorne, A.; Chanin, M.L. (CNRS, Verrieres le Buisson (France))

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe in this paper a lidar method using the anti-Stokes rotational lines of N[sub 2] and O[sub 2] Raman spectrum to determine the temperature of the atmosphere up to 30 km. The method uses the variation with the temperature of the envelop of the intensities of the backscattered rotational Raman spectrum, or more precisely the variations of the ratio of the intensities at two close-by wavelengths. For each temperature of the gas, the ratio of the fluxes through two narrow and close-by filters takes a definite value directly related to the temperature. The difficulty of eliminating the near-by contribution of the Mie backscattering was solved by doubling the filters to produce a rejection factor of 10[sub +8] at the central wavelength. The validity of the method was illustrated by comparing a number of temperature profiles obtained simultaneously with radiosonde and by this new Raman lidar. The theoretical calculation of the method led to an analytic calibration function which, once adjusted with a radiosonde, can provide the temperature on successive days of measurement in the height range 50 to 25 km.

  7. Lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds: results from dual-wavelength Raman lidar measurements during the ALBATROSS campaign 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, Georg; Schaefer, H. J.; Schrems, Otto; Neuber, R.; Rairoux, P.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus clouds were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degrees south and 23.5 degrees north and altitudes between 11 and 16 km. Volume depolarization is found to be a sensitive parameter for the detection of subvisible cloud layers. Using Mie scattering calculations estimates of the ice water content are derived.

  8. Forecasting of radiation fog with a new decision support system based on automatic LIDAR-ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffineur, Quentin; Haeffelin, Martial; Bravo-Aranda, Juan-Antonio; Drouin, Marc-Antoine; Casquero-Vera, Juan-Andrés; Dupont, Jean-Charles; De Backer, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    Radiation fog is the most frequent cause of surface visibility below 1 km, and is one of the most common and persistent weather hazards encountered in aviation and to nearly all forms of surface transport. Forecasting radiation fog can be difficult, a number of approaches have been used to integrate the satellite data, numerical modeling and standard surface observations. These approaches lack generally the vertical and temporal resolution, representation of boundary layer and microphysical processes. They typically do not represent accurately the activation processes of fog droplets that depend on the chemical and physical properties of the aerosols. The automatic LIDAR-ceilometer (ALC) primarily designed for cloud base height detection has greatly improved over the last years and now offers the opportunity to analyse in near real-time the backscatter signal in the boundary layer that potentially contains major information to predict radiation fog formation or not. During the preliminary stage of fog formation, the backscatter profile may be influenced by atmospheric humidity due to the presence in the atmosphere of hygroscopic aerosols that see their size increase with their moisture content inducing an increase of the backscatter magnitude. In the framework of TOPROF (COST-ACTION, http://www.toprof.imaa.cnr.it/) activities, collaboration was initiated between the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI) and the Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédéction Atmosphérique (SIRTA, IPSL) to develop a forward stepwise screening algorithm (PARAFOG) to help prediction of radiation fog formation. PARAFOG is a new decision support system for radiation fog forecasting based on analysis of the attenuated backscatter measured by ALCs, found at most airports, which provides information about the aerosol-particle hygroscopic growth process (Haeffelin et al., 2016). The monitoring of this hygroscopic growth process could provide useful warning to forecasters, in

  9. Development of a mobile Doppler lidar system for wind and temperature measurements at 30-70 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhaoai; Hu, Xiong; Guo, Wenjie; Guo, Shangyong; Cheng, Yongqiang; Gong, Jiancun; Yue, Jia

    2017-02-01

    A mobile Doppler lidar system has been developed to simultaneously measure zonal and meridional winds and temperature from 30 to 70 km. Each of the two zonal and meridional wind subsystems employs a 15 W power, 532 nm laser and a 1 m diameter telescope. Iodine vapor filters are used to stabilize laser frequency and to detect the Doppler shift of backscattered signal. The integration method is used for temperature measurement. Experiments were carried out using the mobile Doppler lidar in August 2014 at Qinghai, China (91°E, 38°N). The zonal wind was measured from 20 to 70 km at a 3 km spatial resolution and 2 h temporal resolution. The measurement error is about 0.5 m/s at 30 km, and 10 m/s at 70 km. In addition, the temperature was measured from 30 to 70 km at 1 km spatial resolution and 1 h temporal resolution. The temperature measurement error is about 0.4 K at 30 km, and 8.0 K at 70 km. Comparison of the lidar results with the temperature of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER), the zonal wind of the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Re-search and Applications (MERRA), and radiosonde zonal wind shows good agreement, indicating that the Doppler lidar results are reliable.

  10. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Hyperspectral Imaging and Bathymetric Lidar for Measuring Channel Morphology Across a Range of River Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.; Glennie, C. L.; Pan, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Singhania, A.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable topographic information is critical to many applications in the riverine sciences. Quantifying morphologic change, modeling flow and sediment transport, and assessing aquatic habitat all require accurate, spatially distributed measurements of bed elevation. Remote sensing has emerged as a powerful tool for acquiring such data, but the capabilities and limitations associated with various remote sensing techniques must be evaluated systematically. In this study, we assessed the potential of hyperspectral imaging and bathymetric LiDAR for measuring channel morphology across a range of conditions in two distinct field sites: the clear-flowing Snake River in Grand Teton National Park and the confluence of the Blue and Colorado Rivers in north-central Colorado, USA. Field measurements of water column optical properties highlighted differences among these streams, including the highly turbid Muddy Creek also entering the Colorado, and enabled theoretical calculations of bathymetric precision (smallest detectable change in depth) and dynamic range (maximum detectable depth). Hyperspectral imaging can yield more precise depth estimates in shallow, clear water but bathymetric LiDAR could provide more consistent performance across a broader range of depths. Spectrally-based depth retrieval was highly accurate on the Snake River but less reliable in the more complex confluence setting. Stratification of the Blue/Colorado site into clear and turbid subsets did not improve depth retrieval performance. To obtain bed elevations, image-derived depth estimates were subtracted from water surface elevations derived from near-infrared LiDAR acquired at the same time as the hyperspectral images. For the water-penetrating green LiDAR, bed elevations were inferred from laser waveforms. On the Snake River, hyperspectral imaging resulted in smaller mean and root mean square errors than bathymetric LiDAR, but at the Blue/Colorado site the optical approach was subject to a shallow

  12. Results of ionospheric measurements, got on micro satellite "Compass-2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Garipov, G. K.; Kapustina, O.; Mikhailov, Yu. M.; Mikhailova, G. A.; Ruzhin, Yu. Ya.; Sinelnikov, V. M.; Shirokov, A. V.; Yashin, I. V.; Danilkin, V. A.; Degtyar, V. G.

    Results of measurements, executed by complex of scientific instruments of micro satellite Compass-2 in the period of 2006-2007, are presented. The project was aimed on registration and study of ionospheric effects, related to the natural and anthropogenic anomalous phenomena. The effects of interaction of solar wind with magnetosphere in the period of flare activity of the Sun and anomalous low frequency radiations, happened one day before the earthquake with magnitude 4.2, are registered. The data was got on measurements of corpuscular radiation, wide band radiations and low frequency waves along the orbit of satellite.

  13. An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE to Assess the Impact of Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL Measurements on the Numerical Simulation of a Tropical Cyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of wind observations has been recognized for many years. However, wind observations—especially three-dimensional global wind measurements—are very limited. A satellite-based Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL is proposed to measure three-dimensional wind profiles using remote sensing techniques. Assimilating these observations into a mesoscale model is expected to improve the performance of the numerical weather prediction (NWP models. In order to examine the potential impact of the DWL three-dimensional wind profile observations on the numerical simulation and prediction of tropical cyclones, a set of observing simulation system experiments (OSSEs is performed using the advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model and its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR data assimilation system. Results indicate that assimilating the DWL wind observations into the mesoscale numerical model has significant potential for improving tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasts.

  14. Comparison of Visibility Measurements over Horizontal Path by Micro-pulsed Lidar and Visibility Meter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As a powerful tool to scan the atmosphere, the 1idar can derive visibility values by directly collecting the backscattering laser light from the atmosphere. Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric visibility by Micro-pulsed lidar (MPL) and a commercial visibility meter (VM) NQ-1 have been performed to evaluate the feasibility of the MPL system designed by the Ocean Remote Sensing Laboratory (ORSL) of the Ocean University of China (OUC) from October 21 2005 to November 21 2005 in the Shilaoren Sightseeing Garden on the Qingdao coast. All the 880 data samples obtained by the two instruments have high correlation coefficients (up to 0.86), which indicates it is feasible to utilize MPL to measure atmospheric visibility.

  15. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  16. Theoretical description of improving measurement accuracy for incoherence Mie Doppler wind lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Jun; Ren De-Ming; Zhao Wei-Jiang; Qu Yan-Chen; Chen Zhen-Lei; Geng Li-Jie

    2013-01-01

    For the nonlinearity of Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) transmission spectrum,the measurement uncertainty of incoherent Mie Doppler wind lidar based on it increases evidently with the increase of backscattering signal Doppler shift.A method of repeating the use of the approximate linear part of FPI transmission spectra for reducing the high uncertainty of a big Doppler shift is proposed.One of the ways of realizing this method is discussed in detail,in which the characteristics of FPI transmission spectrum changing with thickness and incident angle are utilized simultaneously.Under different atmosphere conditions,it has been proved theoretically that the range of measurement uncertainty drops to one-sixth while its minimum has no serious change.This method can be used not only to guide the new system design,but also as a new working way for the fabricated system.

  17. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were 6 km.

  18. The NASA Langley High Altitude Lidar Observatory (HALO) - Advancements in Airborne DIAL Measurements of CH4 and H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Notari, A.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Hare, R. J.; Harper, D. B.; Antill, C.; Cook, A. L.; Young, J.; Chuang, T.; Welch, W.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) has the second largest radiative forcing of the long-lived greenhouse gasses (GHG) after carbon dioxide. However, methane's much shorter atmospheric lifetime and much stronger warming potential make its radiative forcing equivalent to that for CO2 over a 20-year time horizon which makes CH4 a particularly attractive target for mitigation strategies. Similar to CH4, water vapor (H2O) is the most dominant of the short-lived GHG in the atmosphere and plays a key role in many atmospheric processes. Atmospheric H2O concentrations span over four orders of magnitude from the planetary boundary layer where high impact weather initiates to lower levels in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere where water vapor has significant and long term impacts on the Earth's radiation budget. Active remote sensing employing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique enables scientific assessments of both natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of CH4 with high accuracy and precision as well as and its impacts on the climate. The DIAL technique also allows for profiling of tropospheric water vapor for weather and climate applications with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. NASA Langley is developing the High Altitude Lidar Observatory (HALO) lidar system to address the observational needs of NASA's weather, climate, carbon cycle, and atmospheric composition focus areas. HALO is a multi-function airborne lidar being developed to measure atmospheric H2O and CH4 mixing ratios and aerosol and cloud optical properties using the DIAL and High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) techniques, respectively. HALO is designed as an airborne simulator for future space based DIAL missions and will serve as test bed for risk reduction of key technologies required of future space based GHG DIAL missions. A system level overview and up-to-date progress of the HALO lidar will be presented. Simulations on the expected accuracy and precision of HALO CH4

  19. Algorithms for the inversion of lidar signals: Rayleigh-Mie measurements in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Masci

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the features and the performances of the algorithms, developed at the Lidar Station of L'Aquila, for retrieving atmospheric parameters and constituents from elastic lidar signals. The algorithm for ozone retrieving is discussed in detail and checked with model lidar signals to take into account the numerical distortion on the profile. The performances of the aerosol backscattering ratio algorithm that includes the transmission loss due to the aerosol extinction are evaluated. A new algorithm developed to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles from elastic lidar returns in the altitude range 30-90 km is also examined in detail.

  20. LAPS Lidar Measurements at the ARM Alaska Northslope Site (Support to FIRE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Lysak, Daniel B., Jr.; Petach, Tomas M.; Esposito, Steven T.; Mulik, Karoline R.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of data summaries of the results obtained during the May 1998 measurement period at Barrow Alaska. This report does not contain any data interpretation or analysis of the results which will follow this activity. This report is forwarded with a data set on magnetic media which contains the reduced data from the LAPS lidar in 15 minute intervals. The data was obtained during the period 15-30 May 1998. The measurement period overlapped with several aircraft flights conducted by NASA as part of the FIRE project. The report contains a summary list of the data obtained plus figures that have been prepared to help visualize the measurement periods. The order of the presentation is as follows: Section 1. A copy of the Statement of Work for the planned activity of the second measurement period at the ARM Northslope site is provided. Section 2. A list of the data collection periods shows the number of one minute data records stored during each hour of operation and the corresponding size (Mbytes) of the one hour data folders. The folder and file names are composed from the year, month, day, hour and minute. The date/time information is given in UTC for easier comparison with other data sets. Section 3. A set of 4 comparisons between the LAPS lidar results and the sondes released by the ARM scientists from a location nearby the lidar. The lidar results show the +/- 1 sigma statistical error on each of the independent 75 m altitude bins of the data. This set of 4 comparisons was used to set and validate the calibration value which was then used for the complete data set. Section 4. A set of false color figures with up to 10 hours of specific humidity measurements are shown in each graph. Two days of measurements are shown on each page. These plots are crude representations of the data and permit a survey which indicates when the clouds were very low or where interesting events may occur in the results. These plots are prepared using the real time sequence

  1. Polarization Diversity Image-Reject Homodyne Receiver for Directional Radial Velocity Measurements in Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved method and a LIDAR system comprising an emitter for emission of a coherent electromagnetic EM signal and a transmitting optical arrangement configured to transmit the electromagnetic signal towards a measurement area. By the method and system, detection...

  2. Climatological and radiative properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds derived by automatic evaluation of lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast-Sjögren, Erika; Rolf, Christian; Seifert, Patric; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Bei P.; Krämer, Martina; Peter, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus, i.e., high, thin clouds that are fully glaciated, play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget as they interact with both long- and shortwave radiation and affect the water vapor budget of the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Here, we present a climatology of midlatitude cirrus clouds measured with the same type of ground-based lidar at three midlatitude research stations: at the Swiss high alpine Jungfraujoch station (3580 m a.s.l.), in Zürich (Switzerland, 510 m a.s.l.), and in Jülich (Germany, 100 m a.s.l.). The analysis is based on 13 000 h of measurements from 2010 to 2014. To automatically evaluate this extensive data set, we have developed the Fast LIdar Cirrus Algorithm (FLICA), which combines a pixel-based cloud-detection scheme with the classic lidar evaluation techniques. We find mean cirrus optical depths of 0.12 on Jungfraujoch and of 0.14 and 0.17 in Zürich and Jülich, respectively. Above Jungfraujoch, subvisible cirrus clouds (τ change in cloud morphology at Jungfraujoch above ˜ 13 km, possibly because high particle number densities form in the observed cirrus clouds, when many ice crystals nucleate in the high supersaturations following rapid uplifts in lee waves above mountainous terrain. The retrieved optical properties are used as input for a radiative transfer model to estimate the net cloud radiative forcing, CRFNET, for the analyzed cirrus clouds. All cirrus detected here have a positive CRFNET. This confirms that these thin, high cirrus have a warming effect on the Earth's climate, whereas cooling clouds typically have cloud edges too low in altitude to satisfy the FLICA criterion of temperatures below -38 °C. We find CRFNET = 0.9 W m-2 for Jungfraujoch and 1.0 W m-2 (1.7 W m-2) for Zürich (Jülich). Further, we calculate that subvisible cirrus (τ < 0.03) contribute about 5 %, thin cirrus (0.03 < τ < 0.3) about 45 %, and opaque cirrus (0.3 < τ) about 50 % of the total cirrus radiative forcing.

  3. First open field measurements with a portable CO2 lidar/dial system for early forest fires detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, Pasquale; Gelfusa, Michela; Lupelli, Ivan; Malizia, Andrea; Moretti, Alessandro; Richetta, Maria; Serafini, Camilla; Bellecci, Carlo

    2011-11-01

    Lidar and dial are well established methods to explore the atmosphere. Different groups have already shown experimentally the possibility to measure the density variation of aerosol and particulate in the atmosphere due to plumes emitted in forest fires with this kind of systems. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the capabilities of our mobile Lidar system, based on a CO2 laser, to detect forest fires and minimizing false alarms. For this purpose, our system can be operated in both lidar and dial configurations in sequence. The first Lidar measurement is performed to evaluate the variation of the local density into the atmosphere, using a nonabsorption water wavelength 10R18 (10.571 μm). If the returned signal reports a backscattering peak, the presence of a fire is probable. To confirm this hypothesis, a second dial measurement is carried out to reveal a second component emitted during the combustion process. The chosen second component is water vapour, which is, as it is well-known, largely produced during the first combustion stage. Measuring the water concentration peak after the detection of the aerosol density increment (referred to the standard mean atmospheric value) represents a good method to reduce false alarms with a dial system. In order to test this methodology, a first set of measurements has been performed in a field near the Engineering Faculty of the University of Rome "Tor Vergata". A quite small controlled-fire has been lighted into a box at a distance of about one kilometre from the system. The data acquired at the two wavelengths (10R18 and 10R20) have been averaged on 100 elastic backscattered Lidar signals. The first results confirm the effectiveness of the measurement strategy for reducing the number of false alarm preserving the early detection.

  4. Determination of atmospheric aerosol properties over land using satellite measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Leeuw, G. de

    2009-01-01

    Mostly, aerosol properties are poorly understood because the aerosol properties are very sparse. The first workshop on the determination of atmospheric aerosol properties over land using satellite measurements is convened in Bremen, Germany. In this workshop, the topics of discussions included a var

  5. An MPC approach to individual pitch control of wind turbines using uncertain LIDAR measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Soltani, Mohsen; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad;

    2013-01-01

    Spatial distribution of the wind field exerts unbalanced loads on wind turbine structures and it is shown these loads could be mitigated by controlling each blade’s angle individually (individual pitch control). In this work the problem of individual pitch control of a variable-speed variablepitch...... wind turbine in the full load region is considered. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the problem. A new approach is proposed to simplify the optimization problem of MPC. We linearize the obtained nonlinear model for different operating points which are determined by the effective wind...... speed on the rotor disc and take the wind speed as a scheduling variable. The wind speed is measurable ahead of the turbine using LIDARs, therefore the scheduling variable is known for the entire prediction horizon. We consider uncertainty in the wind propagation, which is the traveling time of wind...

  6. Measurement uncertainty analysis in incoherent Doppler lidars by a new scattering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Aniceto; Lázaro, Antonio

    2006-08-21

    We need to examine the uncertainty added to the Doppler measurement process of atmospheric wind speeds of a practical incoherent detection lidar. For this application, the multibeam Fizeau wedge has the advantage over the Fabry-Perot interferometer of defining linear fringe patterns. Unfortunately, the convenience of using the transfer function for angular spectrum transmission has not been available because the nonparallel mirror geometry of Fizeau wedges. In this paper, we extent the spatial-frequency arguments used in Fabry-Perot etalons to the Fizeau geometry by using a generalized scattering matrix method based on the propagation of optical vortices. Our technique opens the door to consider complex, realistic configurations for any Fizeau-based instrument.

  7. Measurement of tropospheric CO2 and aerosol extinction profiles with Raman lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peitao Zhao; Yinchao Zhang; Lian Wang; Kaifa Cao; Jia Su; Shunxing Hu; Huanling Hu

    2008-01-01

    A prototype Raman lidar was designed for monitoring tropospheric CO2 profile and other scientific investigatious.The third harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (354.7-nm wavelength) was used as stimulated light source to provide nighttime measurements.Filter with high rejection ratio performance was used to extract CO2 Raman signals from Rayleigh-Mie scattering signals effectively.To improve the real time monitoring function,a two-channel signal collection system was designed to collect CO2 and N2 Raman scattering signals simultaneously. The N2 Raman scattering signals were used to retrieve aerosol extinction coefficient.Typical features of CO2 concentration profile and aerosol extinction coefficient in Herei were presented.The mixing ratio of atmospheric CO2 in Hefei can reach about 360-400 ppmv.

  8. Validation of vortex code viscous models using lidar wake measurements and CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel; Machefaux, Ewan; Gaunaa, Mac;

    2014-01-01

    The newly implemented vortex code Omnivor coupled to the aero-servo-elastic tool hawc2 is described in this paper. Vortex wake improvements by the implementation of viscous effects are considered. Different viscous models are implemented and compared with each other. Turbulent flow fields...... with sheared inflow are used to compare the vortex code performance with CFD and lidar measurements. Laminar CFD computations are used to evaluate the performance of the viscous models. Consistent results between the vortex code and CFD tool are obtained up to three diameters downstream. The modelling...... of viscous boundaries appear more important than the modelling of viscosity in the wake. External turbulence and shear appear sufficient but their full potential flow modelling would be preferred....

  9. Structure Measurements of Leaf and Woody Components of Forests with Dual-Wavelength Lidar Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Howe, G.; Martel, J.; Hewawasam, K.; Douglas, E. S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Wang, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Schaefer, M.; Newnham, G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest structure plays a critical role in the exchange of energy, carbon and water between land and atmosphere and nutrient cycle. We can provide detailed forest structure measurements of leaf and woody components with the Dual Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), which acquires full-waveform scans at both near-infrared (NIR, 1064 nm) and shortwave infrared (SWIR, 1548 nm) wavelengths from simultaneous laser pulses. We collected DWEL scans at a broadleaf forest stand and a conifer forest stand at Harvard Forest in June 2014. Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. We threshold a normalized difference index (NDI), defined as the difference between returned power at the two wavelengths divided by their sum, to classify each return pulse as a leaf or trunk/branch hit. We obtain leaf area index (LAI), woody area index (WAI) and vertical profiles of leaf and woody components directly from classified lidar hits without empirical wood-to-total ratios as are commonly used in optical methods of LAI estimation. Tree heights, diameter at breast height (DBH), and stem count density are the other forest structure parameters estimated from our DWEL scans. The separation of leaf and woody components in tandem with fine-scale forest structure measurements will benefit studies on carbon allocation of forest ecosystems and improve our understanding of the effects of forest structure on ecosystem functions. This research is supported by NSF grant, MRI-0923389

  10. Comparison of Canopy Volume Measurements of Scattered Eucalypt Farm Trees Derived from High Spatial Resolution Imagery and LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niva Kiran Verma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies estimating canopy volume are mostly based on laborious and time-consuming field measurements; hence, there is a need for easier and convenient means of estimation. Accordingly, this study investigated the use of remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 and LiDAR for estimating tree height, canopy height and crown diameter, which were then used to infer the canopy volume of remnant eucalypt trees at the Newholme/Kirby ‘SMART’ farm in north-east New South Wales. A regression model was developed with field measurements, which was then applied to remote-sensing-based measurements. LiDAR estimates of tree dimensions were generally lower than the field measurements (e.g., 6.5% for tree height although some of the parameters (such as tree height may also be overestimated by the clinometer/rangefinder protocols used. The WorldView-2 results showed both crown projected area and crown diameter to be strongly correlated to canopy volume, and that crown diameter yielded better results (Root Mean Square Error RMSE 31% than crown projected area (RMSE 42%. Although the better performance of LiDAR in the vertical dimension cannot be dismissed, as suggested by results obtained from this study and also similar studies conducted with LiDAR data for tree parameter measurements, the high price and complexity associated with the acquisition and processing of LiDAR datasets mean that the technology is beyond the reach of many applications. Therefore, given the need for easier and convenient means of tree parameters estimation, this study filled a gap and successfully used 2D multispectral WorldView-2 data for 3D canopy volume estimation with satisfactory results compared to LiDAR-based estimation. The result obtained from this study highlights the usefulness of high resolution data for canopy volume estimations at different locations as a possible alternative to existing methods.

  11. Spectral Measurements of Geosynchronous Satellites During Glint Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, F.; Tucker, R.; Weld, E.; Chun, F.; Tippets, R.

    During certain times of the year, stable geosynchronous (GEO) satellites are known to glint or exhibit a very bright specular reflection, which is easily observed through broadband photometric filters. The glints are typically brighter in the Johnson red filter compared to the Johnson blue filter. In previous years, USAFA cadets have developed and refined techniques to take, calibrate and process satellite spectral data taken using a diffraction grating on the USAFA 16-inch, f/8.2 telescope (slitless spectroscopy). To the best of our knowledge, we have not seen any published research on observing glints across the visible spectrum. We present research from an Air Force Academy senior physics capstone project on observing glints off of GEO satellites using slitless spectroscopy. We discuss the calibration of the measurements using solar analog and solar twin stars, as well as results of the spectra of a glinting GEO satellite. A key question is whether a GEO satellite glint is localized in wavelength or equally observed across the entire spectra.

  12. Identification of tower-wake distortions using sonic anemometer and lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Quelet, Paul T.; Choukulkar, Aditya; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel E.; Oncley, Steven P.; Brewer, W. Alan; Debnath, Mithu; Ashton, Ryan; Valerio Iungo, G.; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2017-02-01

    The eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) field campaign took place in March through May 2015 at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, utilizing its 300 m meteorological tower, instrumented with two sonic anemometers mounted on opposite sides of the tower at six heights. This allowed for at least one sonic anemometer at each level to be upstream of the tower at all times and for identification of the times when a sonic anemometer is in the wake of the tower frame. Other instrumentation, including profiling and scanning lidars aided in the identification of the tower wake. Here we compare pairs of sonic anemometers at the same heights to identify the range of directions that are affected by the tower for each of the opposing booms. The mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy are used to quantify the wake impact on these first- and second-order wind measurements, showing up to a 50 % reduction in wind speed and an order of magnitude increase in turbulent kinetic energy. Comparisons of wind speeds from profiling and scanning lidars confirmed the extent of the tower wake, with the same reduction in wind speed observed in the tower wake, and a speed-up effect around the wake boundaries. Wind direction differences between pairs of sonic anemometers and between sonic anemometers and lidars can also be significant, as the flow is deflected by the tower structure. Comparisons of lengths of averaging intervals showed a decrease in wind speed deficit with longer averages, but the flow deflection remains constant over longer averages. Furthermore, asymmetry exists in the tower effects due to the geometry and placement of the booms on the triangular tower. An analysis of the percentage of observations in the wake that must be removed from 2 min mean wind speed and 20 min turbulent values showed that removing even small portions of the time interval due to wakes impacts these two quantities. However, a vast majority of intervals have no

  13. Identification of tower-wake distortions using sonic anemometer and lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Quelet, Paul T.; Choukulkar, Aditya; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel E.; Oncley, Steven P.; Brewer, W. Alan; Debnath, Mithu; Ashton, Ryan; Iungo, G. Valerio; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2017-02-02

    The eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) field campaign took place in March through May 2015 at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, utilizing its 300 m meteorological tower, instrumented with two sonic anemometers mounted on opposite sides of the tower at six heights. This allowed for at least one sonic anemometer at each level to be upstream of the tower at all times and for identification of the times when a sonic anemometer is in the wake of the tower frame. Other instrumentation, including profiling and scanning lidars aided in the identification of the tower wake. Here we compare pairs of sonic anemometers at the same heights to identify the range of directions that are affected by the tower for each of the opposing booms. The mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy are used to quantify the wake impact on these first- and second-order wind measurements, showing up to a 50 % reduction in wind speed and an order of magnitude increase in turbulent kinetic energy. Comparisons of wind speeds from profiling and scanning lidars confirmed the extent of the tower wake, with the same reduction in wind speed observed in the tower wake, and a speed-up effect around the wake boundaries. Wind direction differences between pairs of sonic anemometers and between sonic anemometers and lidars can also be significant, as the flow is deflected by the tower structure. Comparisons of lengths of averaging intervals showed a decrease in wind speed deficit with longer averages, but the flow deflection remains constant over longer averages. Furthermore, asymmetry exists in the tower effects due to the geometry and placement of the booms on the triangular tower. An analysis of the percentage of observations in the wake that must be removed from 2 min mean wind speed and 20 min turbulent values showed that removing even small portions of the time interval due to wakes impacts these two quantities. However, a vast majority of intervals have no

  14. An Inter-Comparison Study of Multi- and DBS Lidar Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauscher, Lukas; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Callies, Doron

    2016-01-01

    WindScanners were focused on one point next to a reference mast in complex terrain. This multi-lidar (ML) technique is also compared to a profiling lidar using the Doppler beam swinging (DBS) method. First- and second-order statistics of the radial wind velocities from the individual instruments...

  15. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  16. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  17. Primary and Secondary Controls on Measurements of Forest Height Using Large-Footprint Lidar at the Hubbard Brook LTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Robert G.; Blair, J. Bryan; Schwarz, Paul A.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Dubayah, Ralph; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    On September 26, 1999, we mapped canopy structure over 90% of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire, using the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). This airborne instrument was configured to emulate data expected from the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) space mission. We compared above ground heights of the tallest surfaces detected by lidar with average forest canopy heights estimated from tree-based measurements in or near 346 0.05 ha plots (made in autumn of 1997 and 1998). Vegetation heights had by far the predominant influence on lidar top heights, but with this large data set we were able to measure two significant secondary effects: those of steepness or slope of the underlying terrain and of tree crown form. The size of the slope effect was intermediate between that expected from models of homogeneous canopy layers and for solitary tree crowns. The first detected surfaces were also proportionately taller for plots with more basal area in broad leaved northern hardwoods than for mostly coniferous plots. We expected this because of the contrast between the shapes of cumulative distributions of surface area for elliptical or hemi-elliptical tree crowns and those for conical crowns. Correcting for these secondary effects, when appropriate data are available for calibration, may improve vegetation structure estimates in regional studies using VCL or similar lidar data sources.

  18. Doppler Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar for wind and temperature measurements in the middle atmosphere up to 80 km

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baumgarten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A direct detection Doppler lidar for measuring wind speed in the middle atmosphere up to 80 km with 2 h resolution was implemented in the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar (69° N, 16° E. The random error of the line of sight wind is about 0.6 m/s and 10 m/s at 49 km and 80 km, respectively. We use a Doppler Rayleigh Iodine Spectrometer (DoRIS at the iodine line 1109 (~532.260 nm. DoRIS uses two branches of intensity cascaded channels to cover the dynamic range from 10 to 100 km altitude. The wind detection system was designed to extend the existing multi-wavelength observations of aerosol and temperature performed at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. The lidar uses two lasers with a mean power of 14 W at 532 nm each and two 1.8 m diameter tiltable telescopes. Below about 49 km altitude the accuracy and time resolution is limited by the maximum count rate of the detectors used and not by the number of photons available. We report about the first simultaneous Rayleigh temperature and wind measurements by lidar in the strato- and mesosphere on 17 and 23 January 2009.

  19. Integration of remote lidar and in-situ measured data to estimate particulate flux and emission from tillage operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Bingham, Gail E.; Wojcik, Michael; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Martin, Randal S.; Marchant, Christian; Moore, Kori; Bradford, Bill

    2010-10-01

    Agriculture, through wind erosion, tillage and harvest operations, burning, diesel-powered machinery and animal production operations, is a source of particulate matter emissions. Agricultural sources vary both temporally and spatially due to daily and seasonal activities and inhomogeneous area sources. Conventional point sampling methods originally designed for regional, well mixed aerosols are challenged by the disrupted wind flow and by the small mobile source of the emission encountered in this study. Atmospheric lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) technology provides a means to derive quantitative information of particulate spatial and temporal distribution. In situ point measurements of particulate physical and chemical properties are used to characterize aerosol physical parameters and calibrate lidar data for unambiguous lidar data processing. Atmospheric profiling with scanning lidar allows estimation of temporal and 2D/3D spatial variations of mass concentration fields for different particulate fractions (PM1, PM2.5, PM10, and TSP) applicable for USEPA regulations. This study used this advanced measurement technology to map PM emissions at high spatial and temporal resolutions, allowing for accurate comparisons of the Conservation Management Practice (CMP) under test. The purpose of this field study was to determine whether and how much particulate emission differs from the conventional method of agricultural fall tillage and combined CMP operations.

  20. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic boundary layer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol distributions were measured from an aircraft using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the 1988 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-3A) to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during the summer. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Several cases of continental polar air masses were examined during the experiment. The aerosol scattering associated with these air masses was very low, and the atmospheric distribution of aerosols was quite homogeneous for those air masses that had been transported over the ice for greater than or = 3 days. The transition in O3 and aerosol distributions from tundra to marine conditions was examined several times. The aerosol data clearly show an abrupt change in aerosol scattering properties within the mixed layer from lower values over the tundra to generally higher values over the water. The distinct differences in the heights of the mixed layers in the two regions was also readily apparent. Several cases of enhanced O3 were observed during ABLE-3 in conjunction with enhanced aerosol scattering in layers in the free atmosphere. Examples are presented of the large scale variations of O3 and aerosols observed with the airborne lidar system from near the surface to above the tropopause over the Arctic during ABLE-3.

  1. Interpreting aerosol lidar profiles to better estimate surface PM2.5 for columnar AOD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, D. Allen; Tsai, Tzu-Chin; Chen, Jen-Ping; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Jeng, Yung-Jyh; Chiang, Wei-Li; Lin, Neng-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products have been used to estimate surface PM2.5 in different parts of the world. However, some revealed good but some relatively poorer relationship between AOD and PM2.5. The increasingly available lidar-based aerosol extinction profiles provide insights into the boundary layer as well as residual above it. Here we report a study in Taiwan using four-year (2006-2009) MPLNet data to characterize aerosol vertical distribution. We derived haze layer height (HLH) from MPLNet aerosol extinction profiles and classified profile differences by mean PBL extinction (MPE) and near-surface extinction (NSE). The former represents the mean extinction within boundary layer and the latter the closest extinction to surface. The comparison of MPE versus NSE leads to three distinct classifications of aerosol profiles to help interpret the relationship between AOD and PM2.5. The approximation of normalizing AODAERONET by HLH closely follows MPE in correlating with PM2.5 (≥0.8 with respect to season or ≥0.85 with respect to profile classification). The correlation resulted from AODMODIS/HLH is systematically lower than that derived by AODAERONET/HLH. PM2.5 values are overall better estimated by profile classification than those derived by season. Better performance of PM2.5 is obtained with the approximation (i.e., normalizing AOD by HLH) than that using AOD only. The performance metrics used in quantifying the relationship reveal improvements in uncertainty by 2.9 μg m-3 (or 20%) with AODAERONET/HLH and 2.3 μg m-3 (or 15%) with AODMODIS/HLH in comparison to using AOD only.

  2. Monitoring Surface Climate With its Emissivity Derived From Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared (IR) spectral emissivity data have been shown to be significant for atmospheric research and monitoring the Earth fs environment. Long-term and large-scale observations needed for global monitoring and research can be supplied by satellite-based remote sensing. Presented here is the global surface IR emissivity data retrieved from the last 5 years of Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements observed from the MetOp-A satellite. Monthly mean surface properties (i.e., skin temperature T(sub s) and emissivity spectra epsilon(sub v) with a spatial resolution of 0.5x0.5-degrees latitude-longitude are produced to monitor seasonal and inter-annual variations. We demonstrate that surface epsilon(sub v) and T(sub s) retrieved with IASI measurements can be used to assist in monitoring surface weather and surface climate change. Surface epsilon(sub v) together with T(sub s) from current and future operational satellites can be utilized as a means of long-term and large-scale monitoring of Earth 's surface weather environment and associated changes.

  3. Multipath estimation in urban environments from joint GNSS receivers and LiDAR sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khurram; Chen, Xin; Dovis, Fabio; De Castro, David; Fernández, Antonio J

    2012-10-30

    In this paper, multipath error on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals in urban environments is characterized with the help of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements. For this purpose, LiDAR equipment and Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver implementing a multipath estimating architecture were used to collect data in an urban environment. This paper demonstrates how GPS and LiDAR measurements can be jointly used to model the environment and obtain robust receivers. Multipath amplitude and delay are estimated by means of LiDAR feature extraction and multipath mitigation architecture. The results show the feasibility of integrating the information provided by LiDAR sensors and GNSS receivers for multipath mitigation.

  4. Gravity wave observations by Doppler wind and temperature lidar measurements in the strato- and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Hildebrand, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    The observation of wind and temperature perturbations by gravity waves propagating throughout the strato- and mesosphere is a challenging task. Both the kinetic and potential energy density can be derived and yield information about ensemble mean properties of gravity waves. We measure temperatures and winds with the Doppler Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR research station in Northern Norway (69N, 16E). Using two independently steerable telescopes and lasers we are able to measure vertical profiles of two wind components and temperatures simultaneously. The observations can be performed even under sunlit conditions, which is essential for measuring atmospheric perturbations over several days and during summer at this location. We report on the first observation of persistent inertia gravity wave signatures in the horizontal wind and temperature. The measurements cover the altitude range from 20 km to about 80 km during night and to about 70 km during daytime. For one case with observations lasting more than 50 hours, we find amplitudes of 5 to 25 m/s and 1 to 8 K in wind and temperature, respectively. The measured kinetic to potential energy density ratio is about 10, indicating that the majority of variability is due to waves with intrinsic frequencies close to the inertial frequency. The entire wave field is mainly characterized by the presence of multiple waves, however quasi-monochromatic waves can be identified at limited times and allow a more detailed analysis of wave properties like propagation direction, amplitudes and the momentum flux.

  5. Measurements of the Spatial Variability of Mean Wind Profiles Using Multiple Doppler Lidars over Distances less than 1 Km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, R. M.; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Iungo, V.; Pichugina, Y. L.; Quelet, P. T.; Wolfe, D. E.; Oncley, S.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Delgado, R.; McCaffrey, K.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in wind speed can translate to large differences in wind energy (WE) revenues, so WE decision making requires accurate measurements of wind profiles through the turbine rotor layer of the lower atmosphere. Advances in understanding and modeling of boundary-layer processes, also needed by WE, requires such measurements through an even deeper layer—at least the lowest few hundreds of meters. An important use for such accurate measured wind-profile data is in the initiation and verification of NWP models. This prospect raises several fundamental questions, such as, what does the modeled profile represent, how was the measured profile determined, and what if the profile had been measured from a different site within the grid cell? To address these questions, two experiments were conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in modestly complex terrain downwind of the mountains. The Lidar Uncertainty Measurement Experiment (LUMEX) in June-July 2014 featured 5 Doppler lidars (2 scanning), and XPIA in April-May 2015, 11 Doppler lidars, including 5 scanning systems. Two broad goals of these projects were to assess differences in scanning and other data acquisition procedures on the measurements, addressed in (Pichugina et al.) at this conference, and to evaluate the effects of varying spatial separations on differences in the measured winds, addressed in the present paper. Sonic anemometers every 50 m on the 300-m BAO tower were used as a reference for the wind calculations, as well as another profile location. Lidar scan data indicated terrain-related regions of stronger flow within the scan volume of more than 1 m/s that were at least semi-recurrent. This variability produced significant differences in mean rotor-level winds by 2 identical profiling lidars separated by 500 m. During XPIA, four of the scanning Doppler lidars performed intersecting elevation scans (vertical-slice or "RHI") to create 'virtual towers' at various separation

  6. Lidar reflectance from snow at 2.05  μm wavelength as measured by the JPL Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph C

    2016-03-10

    We report airborne measurements of lidar directional reflectance (backscatter) from land surfaces at a wavelength in the 2.05 μm CO₂ absorption band, with emphasis on snow-covered surfaces in various natural environments. Lidar backscatter measurements using this instrument provide insight into the capabilities of lidar for both airborne and future global-scale CO₂ measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO₂ Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. Lidar measurement capability is particularly useful when the use of solar scattering spectroscopy is not feasible for high-accuracy atmospheric CO₂ measurements. Consequently, performance in high-latitude and winter season environments is an emphasis. Snow-covered surfaces are known to be dark in the CO₂ band spectral regions. The quantitative backscatter data from these field measurements help to elucidate the range of backscatter values that can be expected in natural environments.

  7. Generic methodology for calibrating profiling nacelle lidars

    OpenAIRE

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    2015-01-01

    Improving power performance assessment by measuring at different heights has been demonstrated using ground-based profiling LIDARs. More recently, nacelle-mounted lidars studies have shown promising capabilities to assess power performance. Using nacelle lidars avoids the erection of expensive meteorology masts, especially offshore. A new generation of commercially developed profiling nacelle lidars has sophisticated measurement capabilities.As for any other measuring system, lidars measureme...

  8. Measurements of sea ice by satellite and airborne altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine

    A changing sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is an early indicator of a climate in transition, the sea ice has in addition a large impact on the climate. The annual and interannual variations of the sea ice cover have been observed by satellites since the start of the satellite era in 1979......, and it has been in retreat every since. The mass balance of the sea ice is an important input to climate models, where the ice thickness is the most uncertain parameter. In this study, data from the CryoSat-2 radar altimeter satellite are used. CryoSat-2 has been measuring the sea ice in the Arctic Ocean...... freeboard is found to be 35 cm for both the airborne and satellite data implying, that the radar signal is here reflected from the snow surface, probably due to weather conditions. CryoSat-2 is very sensitive to returns from specular surfaces, even if they appear o_-nadir. This contaminates the “true...

  9. Air quality performed with satellite measurement within the QUITSAT project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masieri, Samuele; Petritoli, Andrea; Premuda, Margarita; Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    Ground pollutants monitoring, using satellite observation, represents an interesting and high potential approach to air quality that could be inserted into Global monitoring systems. The QUITSAT Italian pilot project (air QUality with Integration of ground based and SAtellite measurements and chemical Transport and multiphase model), funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), proposes a new approach producing some interesting results in this frame. The approach focuses in the integration of the satellite observations (ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY and AURA/OMI) with the outputs of the GAMES (Gas Aerosol Modelling Evaluation System) chemical transport model, to provide the evaluation of the tropospheric profiles of some atmo-spheric compounds such as NO2 , O3 , HCHO and SO2 . This activity appears to be very useful to retrieve the surface concentration of trace gases from tropospheric columns of atmospheric compounds obtained with satellite instrumentation. The comparison with the in situ analyzer network over the Po' Valley shows a good correlation between the two data set. The corre-spondence can be improved taking into account also concentration gradients between different stations, classifying the ground base stations according to their rural or urban characteristics and considering the general orography of the ground. Results and methodology are presented and discussed.

  10. NASA LaRC airborne high spectral resolution lidar aerosol measurements during MILAGRO: observations and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kleinman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL measures vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization at both 532 nm and 1064 nm. In March of 2006 the HSRL participated in the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO campaign along with several other suites of instruments deployed on both aircraft and ground based platforms. This paper presents high spatial and vertical resolution HSRL measurements of aerosol extinction and optical depth from MILAGRO and comparisons of those measurements with similar measurements from other sensors and model predictions. HSRL measurements coincident with airborne in situ aerosol scattering and absorption measurements from two different instrument suites on the C-130 and G-1 aircraft, airborne aerosol optical depth (AOD and extinction measurements from an airborne tracking sunphotometer on the J-31 aircraft, and AOD from a network of ground based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun photometers are presented as a validation of the HSRL aerosol extinction and optical depth products. Regarding the extinction validation, we find bias differences between HSRL and these instruments to be less than 3% (0.01 km−1 at 532 nm, the wavelength at which the HSRL technique is employed. The rms differences at 532 nm were less than 50% (0.015 km−1. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive validation of the HSRL measurement of aerosol extinction and optical depth to date. The observed bias differences in ambient aerosol extinction between HSRL and other measurements is within 15–20% at visible wavelengths, found by previous studies to be the differences observed with current state-of-the-art instrumentation (Schmid et al., 2006.

  11. NASA LaRC airborne high spectral resolution lidar aerosol measurements during MILAGRO: observations and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL measures vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization at both 532 nm and 1064 nm. In March of 2006 the HSRL participated in the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO campaign along with several other suites of instruments deployed on both aircraft and ground based platforms. This paper presents high spatial and vertical resolution HSRL measurements of aerosol extinction and optical depth from MILAGRO and comparisons of those measurements with similar measurements from other sensors and model predictions. HSRL measurements coincident with airborne in situ aerosol scattering and absorption measurements from two different instrument suites on the C-130 and G-1 aircraft, airborne aerosol optical depth (AOD and extinction measurements from an airborne tracking sunphotometer on the J-31 aircraft, and AOD from a network of ground based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun photometers are presented as a validation of the HSRL aerosol extinction and optical depth products. Regarding the extinction validation, we find bias differences between HSRL and these instruments to be less than 3% (0.01 km−1 at 532 nm, the wavelength at which the HSRL technique is employed. The rms differences at 532 nm were less than 50% (0.015 km−1. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive validation of the HSRL measurement of aerosol extinction and optical depth to date. The observed bias differences in ambient aerosol extinction between HSRL and other measurements is within 15–20% at visible wavelengths, found by previous studies to be the differences observed with current state-of-the-art instrumentation (Schmid et al., 2006.

  12. Tropospheric BrO column densities in the Arctic derived from satellite: retrieval and comparison to ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sihler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During polar spring, halogen radicals like bromine monoxide (BrO play an important role in the chemistry of tropospheric ozone destruction. Satellite measurements of the BrO distribution have become a particularly useful tool to investigate this probably natural phenomenon, but the separation of stratospheric and tropospheric partial columns of BrO is challenging. In this study, an algorithm was developed to retrieve tropospheric vertical column densities of BrO from data of high-resolution spectroscopic satellite instruments such as the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2. Unlike recently published approaches, the presented algorithm is capable of separating the fraction of BrO in the activated troposphere from the total BrO column solely based on remotely measured properties. The presented algorithm furthermore allows to estimate a realistic measurement error of the tropospheric BrO column. The sensitivity of each satellite pixel to BrO in the boundary layer is quantified using the measured UV radiance and the column density of the oxygen collision complex O4. A comparison of the sensitivities with CALIPSO LIDAR observations demonstrates that clouds shielding near-surface trace-gas columns can be reliably detected even over ice and snow. Retrieved tropospheric BrO columns are then compared to ground-based BrO measurements from two Arctic field campaigns in the Amundsen Gulf and at Barrow in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Our algorithm was found to be capable of retrieving enhanced near-surface BrO during both campaigns in good agreement with ground-based data. Some differences between ground-based and satellite measurements observed at Barrow can be explained by both elevated and shallow surface layers of BrO. The observations strongly suggest that surface release processes are the dominating source of BrO and that boundary layer meteorology influences the vertical distribution.

  13. Cloud and Thermodynamic Parameters Retrieved from Satellite Ultraspectral Infrared Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mango, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric-thermodynamic parameters and surface properties are basic meteorological parameters for weather forecasting. A physical geophysical parameter retrieval scheme dealing with cloudy and cloud-free radiance observed with satellite ultraspectral infrared sounders has been developed and applied to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS). The retrieved parameters presented herein are from radiance data gathered during the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx). JAIVEx provided intensive aircraft observations obtained from airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) systems, in-situ measurements, and dedicated dropsonde and radiosonde measurements for the validation of the IASI products. Here, IASI atmospheric profile retrievals are compared with those obtained from dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and the airborne FTS system. The IASI examples presented here demonstrate the ability to retrieve fine-scale horizontal features with high vertical resolution from satellite ultraspectral sounder radiance spectra.

  14. New ground-based lidar enables volcanic CO2 flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Nuvoli, Marcello; Chiodini, Giovanni; Minopoli, Carmine; Tamburello, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    There have been substantial advances in the ability to monitor the activity of hazardous volcanoes in recent decades. However, obtaining early warning of eruptions remains challenging, because the patterns and consequences of volcanic unrests are both complex and nonlinear. Measuring volcanic gases has long been a key aspect of volcano monitoring since these mobile fluids should reach the surface long before the magma. There has been considerable progress in methods for remote and in-situ gas sensing, but measuring the flux of volcanic CO2-the most reliable gas precursor to an eruption-has remained a challenge. Here we report on the first direct quantitative measurements of the volcanic CO2 flux using a newly designed differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which were performed at the restless Campi Flegrei volcano. We show that DIAL makes it possible to remotely obtain volcanic CO2 flux time series with a high temporal resolution (tens of minutes) and accuracy (volcanic CO2 represents a major step forward in volcano monitoring, and will contribute improved volcanic CO2 flux inventories. Our results also demonstrate the unusually strong degassing behavior of Campi Flegrei fumaroles in the current ongoing state of unrest.

  15. Scanning rotational Raman lidar at 355 nm for the measurement of tropospheric temperature fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radlach

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For high-resolution measurements of temperature fields in the atmospheric boundary layer and the lower free troposphere a scanning eye-safe lidar which deploys the rotational Raman technique at 355 nm was developed. To optimize the filters of the receiver for both high nighttime and daytime performance, detailed simulation studies have been performed. The receiver is fiber-coupled to a sequential setup of multicavity interference filters used under small angles of incidence. Examples of nighttime and daytime measurements with the system which has a total power-aperture-efficiency product of 0.006 W m2 are presented. Noontime temperature measurements with a temporal resolution of 60 s result in 1-sigma statistical temperature uncertainty of <1 K up to 1 km height and <2 K up to 2 km height. With an integration time of 60 min and a gliding average of 750 m a 1-sigma statistical temperature uncertainty of <1 K up to 14 km height is achieved during night.

  16. NOx emission trends in megacities derived from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor; Beekmann, Matthias; Richter, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    The effects of air pollutant emissions on both local air quality in megacities and composition of the atmosphere on regional and global scales are currently an important issue of atmospheric researches. In order to properly evaluate these effects, atmospheric models should be provided with accurate information on emissions of major air pollutants. However, such information is frequently very uncertain, as it is documented in literature. The quantification of emissions and related effects is an especially difficult task in the case of developing countries. Recently, it has been demonstrated that satellite measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) can be used as a source of independent information on NOx emissions. In particular, the satellite measurements were used in our earlier studies to improve spatial allocation of NOx emissions, to estimate multi-annual changes of NOx emissions on regional scales and to validate data of traditional emission inventories (see Ref. 1, 2). The goals of the present study are (1) developing an efficient method for estimation of NOx emissions trend in megacity regions by using satellite measurements and an inverse modeling technique and (2) obtaining independent estimates of NOx emission trends in several megacities in Europe and the Middle East in the period from 1996 to 2008. The study is based on the synergetic use of the data for tropospheric NO2 column amounts derived from the long-term GOME and SCIAMACHY measurements and simulations performed by the CHIMERE chemistry transport model. We performed the analysis involving methods of different complexity ranging from estimation of linear trends in the tropospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellite measurements to evaluation of nonlinear trends in NOx emission estimates obtained with the inverse modeling approach, which, in the given case, involves only very simple and transparent formulations. The most challenging part of the study is the nonlinear trend estimation, which is

  17. Coupled simulations and comparison with multi-lidar measurements of the wind flow over a double-ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veiga Rodrigues, C.; Palma, J.M.L.M.; Vasiljevic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    The wind flow over a double-ridge site has been numerically simulated with a nested model- chain coupling, down to horizontal resolutions of 40 m. The results were compared with field measurements attained using a triple-lidar instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, which allowed measureme......The wind flow over a double-ridge site has been numerically simulated with a nested model- chain coupling, down to horizontal resolutions of 40 m. The results were compared with field measurements attained using a triple-lidar instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, which allowed...... terrain and forested areas. The analysis was restricted to June 10th 2015, for which measurements and simulations both predicted gravity wave activity, the later showing formation of rotors in the lee of both ridges and some events of wave breaking above the ridge top....

  18. Lidar measurements during a haze episode in Penang, Malaysia and validation of the ECMWF MACC-II model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Wei Ying; Lolli, Simone; Hee, Wan Shen; Lim, Hwee San; Jafri, M. Z. Mat; Benedetti, Angela; Jones, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Haze is a phenomenon which occurs when there is a great amount of tiny particulates suspended in the atmosphere. During the period of March 2014, a long period of haze event occurred in Penang, Malaysia. The haze condition was measured and monitored using a ground-based Lidar system. By using the measurements obtained, we evaluated the performance of the ECMWF MACC-II model. Lidar measurements showed that there was a thick aerosol layer confined in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) with extinction coefficients exceeding values of 0.3 km-1. The model however has underestimated the atmospheric conditions in Penang. Backward trajectories analysis was performed to identify aerosols sources and transport. It is speculated that the aerosols came from the North-East direction which was influenced by the North-East monsoon wind and some originated from the central eastern coast of Sumatra along the Straits of Malacca.

  19. Laser sources for lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmer, J.; Iadevaia, A.; Yin, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced LIDAR applications such as next gen: Micro Pulse; Time of Flight (e.g., Satellite Laser Ranging); Coherent and Incoherent Doppler (e.g., Wind LIDAR); High Spectral Resolution; Differential Absorption (DIAL); photon counting LIDAR (e.g., 3D LIDAR); are placing more demanding requirements on conventional lasers (e.g., increased rep rates, etc.) and have inspired the development of new types of laser sources. Today, solid state lasers are used for wind sensing, 2D laser Radar, 3D scanning and flash LIDAR. In this paper, we report on the development of compact, highly efficient, high power all-solidstate diode pulsed pumped ns lasers, as well as, high average power/high pulse energy sub nanosecond (picosecond (lasers for these next gen LIDAR applications.

  20. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  1. Raman-shifted eye-safe aerosol lidar (REAL) in 2010: instrument status and two-component wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Shane D.

    2010-10-01

    This paper and corresponding seminar given on 20 September 2010 at the 16th International School for Quantum Electronics in Nesebar, Bulgaria, will describe the key hardware aspects of the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and recent advances in extracting two-component wind vector fields from the images it produces. The REAL is an eye-safe, ground-based, scanning, elastic aerosol backscatter lidar operating at 1.54 microns wavelength. Operation at this wavelength offers several advantages compared to other laser wavelengths including: (1) maximum eye-safety, (2) invisible beam, (3) superior performance photodetectors compared with those used at longer wavelengths, (4) low atmospheric molecular scattering when compared with operation at shorter wavelengths, (5) good aerosol backscattering, (6) atmospheric transparency, and (7) availability of optical and photonic components used in the modern telecommunations industry. A key issue for creating a high-performance direct-detection lidar at 1.5 microns is the use of InGaAs avalanche photodetectors that have active areas of at most 200 microns in diameter. The small active area imposes a maximum limitation on the field-of-view of the receiver (about 0.54 mrad full-angle for REAL). As a result, a key requirement is a transmitter that can produce a pulsed (>10 Hz) beam with low divergence (150 mJ), and short pulse-duration (lidars in that two components of motion can be sensed. (Doppler lidars can sense only the radial component of flow.) Two-component velocity estimation is done by computing two-dimensional cross-correlation functions (CCFs) and noting the displacement of the peak of the CCF with respect to the origin. Motion vectors derived from this method are compared with coincident sonic anemometer measurements at 1.6 km range. Preliminary results indicate the method performs best when the atmosphere is stable with light winds.

  2. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  3. Tropospheric Ozone Source Attribution in Southern California during Summer 2014 Based on Lidar Measurements and Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Munoz, Maria Jose; Johnson, Matthew S.; Leblanc, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, significant efforts have been made to increase tropospheric ozone long-term monitoring. A large number of ground-based, airborne and space-borne instruments are currently providing valuable data to contribute to better understand tropospheric ozone budget and variability. Nonetheless, most of these instruments provide in-