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Sample records for satellite incoherent scatter

  1. Automated detection of satellite contamination in incoherent scatter radar spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porteous

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous ion line spectra have been identified in many experiments. Such spectra are defined as deviations from the standard symmetric "double-humped" spectra derived from incoherent scatter radar echoes from the upper atmosphere. Some anomalous spectra – where there are sharp enhancements of power over restricted height ranges – have been attributed to satellite contamination in the beam path. Here we outline a method for detecting such contamination, and review in detail a few cases where the method enables the identification of anomalous spectra as satellite echoes, subsequently ascribed to specific orbital objects. The methods used here to identify such satellites provide a useful way of distinguishing anomalous spectra due to satellites from those of geophysical origin. Analysis of EISCAT Svalbard Radar data reveals that an average of 8 satellites per hour are found to cross the beam. Based on a relatively small sample of the data set, it appears that at least half of the occurrences of anomalous spectra are caused by satellite contamination rather than being of geophysical origin.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, instruments and techniques – Radio Science (signal processing

  2. Comparison of F-region electron density observations by satellite radio tomography and incoherent scatter methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 1995 a campaign of satellite radiotomography supported by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar and several other instruments was arranged in Scandinavia. A chain of four satellite receivers extending from the north of Norway to the south of Finland was installed approximately along a geomagnetic meridian. The receivers carried out difference Doppler measurements using signals from satellites flying along the chain. The EISCAT UHF radar was simultaneously operational with its beam swinging either in geomagnetic or in geographic meridional plane. With this experimental set-up latitudinal scans of F-region electron density are obtained both from the radar observations and by tomographic inversion of the phase observations given by the difference Doppler experiment. This paper shows the first results of the campaign and compares the electron densities given by the two methods.

  3. Incoherent Thomson scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1996-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wave vector is much larger than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  4. Enhanced incoherent scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nilsson

    Full Text Available Detailed model calculations of auroral secondary and photoelectron distributions for varying conditions have been used to calculate the theoretical enhancement of incoherent scatter plasma lines. These calculations are compared with EISCAT UHF radar measurements of enhanced plasma lines from both the E and F regions, and published EISCAT VHF radar measurements. The agreement between the calculated and observed plasma line enhancements is good. The enhancement from the superthermal distribution can explain even the very strong enhancements observed in the auroral E region during aurora, as previously shown by Kirkwood et al. The model calculations are used to predict the range of conditions when enhanced plasma lines will be seen with the existing high-latitude incoherent scatter radars, including the new EISCAT Svalbard radar. It is found that the detailed structure, i.e. the gradients in the suprathermal distribution, are most important for the plasma line enhancement. The level of superthermal flux affects the enhancement only in the region of low phase energy where the number of thermal electrons is comparable to the number of suprathermal electrons and in the region of high phase energy where the suprathermal fluxes fall to such low levels that their effect becomes small compared to the collision term. To facilitate the use of the predictions for the different radars, the expected signal- to-noise ratios (SNRs for typical plasma line enhancements have been calculated. It is found that the high-frequency radars (Søndre Strømfjord, EISCAT UHF should observe the highest SNR, but only for rather high plasma frequencies. The VHF radars (EISCAT VHF and Svalbard will detect enhanced plasma lines over a wider range of frequencies, but with lower SNR.

  5. Mapping plasma structures in the high-latitude ionosphere using beacon satellite, incoherent scatter radar and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neubert

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the autumn of the year 2000, four radio receivers capable of tracking various beacon satellites were set up along the southwestern coast of Greenland. They are used to reconstruct images of the ionospheric plasma density distribution via the tomographic method. In order to test and validate tomographic imaging under the highly variable conditions often prevailing in the high-latitude ionosphere, a time interval was selected when the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar conducted measurements of the ionospheric plasma density while the radio receivers tracked a number of beacon satellites. A comparison between two-dimensional images of the plasma density distribution obtained from the radar and the satellite receivers revealed generally good agreement between radar measurements and tomographic images. Observed discrepancies can be attributed to F region plasma patches moving through the field of view with a speed of several hundred meters per second, thereby smearing out the tomographic image. A notable mismatch occurred around local magnetic midnight when a magnetospheric substorm breakup occurred in the vicinity of southwest Greenland (identified from ground-based magnetometer observations. The breakup was associated with a sudden intensification of the westward auroral electrojet which was centered at about 69 and extended up to some 73 corrected geomagnetic latitude. Ground-based magnetometer data may thus have the potential of indicating when the tomographic method is at risk and may fail. We finally outline the application of tomographic imaging, when combined with magnetic field data, to estimate ionospheric Joule heating rates.

  6. Stimulated Raman scattering excited by incoherent light in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS excited by incoherent light is studied via particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a large bandwidth of incoherent light can reduce the growth of SRS and electron heating considerably in the linear stage. However, different components of the incoherent light can be coupled by the Langmuir waves, so that stimulated Raman backward scattering can develop. When the bandwidth of incoherent light is larger than the Langmuir wave frequency, forward SRS can be seeded between different components of the incoherent light. The incoherent light can only increase the time duration for nonlinear saturation but cannot diminish the saturation level obviously.

  7. Incoherent Scatter Plasma Lines: Observations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Hassanali; Bhatt, Asti; La Hoz, Cesar; Semeter, Joshua L.

    2017-10-01

    Space plasmas are host to the electrostatic Langmuir waves and a rich range of processes associated with them. Many of such processes that are of interest in micro-scale plasma physics and magnetosphere-ionosphere physics are open to investigation via incoherent scatter plasma lines—i.e., a pair of resonant peaks in the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) spectrum, symmetrically displaced from the radar transmitting frequency by about the plasma frequency, as the signature of Langmuir waves in the ISR spectrum. There now exists a large body of literature devoted to the investigation of a number of topics in ionospheric physics via plasma line theory and observation. It is the goal of this work to provide a comprehensive review of this literature, from the early theoretical works on oscillations in magnetized plasma to the recent advances in plasma line measurements and applications. This review includes detailed theoretical discussions on the intensity and frequency displacement of plasma lines. It reviews the experimental observations of plasma lines enhanced by various sources of energy and discusses the implications of the observations in the context of ionospheric physics. The review also covers the practical aspects of plasma line measurements, from measurement techniques to the applications of plasma lines in estimating the bulk parameters of the ionosphere.

  8. Refraction and Faraday rotation in the incoherent scatter radar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpynev, Boris G.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we consider the radiolocation equation for the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) method; the equation accounts for refraction effect and Faraday rotation in the VHF frequency domain. Our research shows that we cannot ignore refraction in processing the incoherent scatter data when lag-product is used to obtain the ionospheric characteristics. Effect of refraction can explain some uncertainties that arise during processing and interpretation of the ISR data. This effect shows that together with the "ion line" of incoherent scatter spectrum, a relatively small "electron line" also plays a significant role in forming the ionosphere response. The "electron line" behaves as an additional "radar induced" wideband radiolocation signal affected by refraction and Faraday rotation; it depends on the ionosphere temperature and ion composition. The presence of a wideband "electron line" produces specific distortions of the ISR spectrum during 3D-forming of the ionosphere response inside the ISR antenna diagram pattern. During testing, we found that the signal from the ISR "electron line" can be measured at much higher altitudes comparing to the "ion line." Hence, to improve the incoherent scatter technique, we can take the "electron line" and refraction into account.

  9. Incoherent Thomson scattering as a diagnostic tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wavelength is much smaller than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  10. Coherent and Incoherent Neutral Current Scattering for Supernova Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Divari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The total cross sections as well as the neutrino event rates are calculated in the neutral current neutrino scattering off 40Ar and 132Xe isotopes at neutrino energies (Ev<100 MeV. The individual contribution coming from coherent and incoherent channels is taking into account. An enhancement of the neutral current component is achieved via the coherent (0gs+→0gs+ channel which is dominant with respect to incoherent (0gs+→Jf one. The response of the above isotopes as a supernova neutrino detection has been considered, assuming a two parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution for the supernova neutrino energy spectra. The calculated total cross sections are tested on a gaseous spherical TPC detector dedicated for supernova neutrino detection.

  11. Measurement of very small hydrogen content in zirconium alloys by measuring thermal neutron incoherent scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y N; Lee, C H; Oh, H S; Park, S D; Somenkov, V A

    2002-01-01

    In neutron-scattering experiments, the incoherent scattering contributes to the background signal, which is an unwelcome property of matter. Among natural nuclei, the hydrogen nucleus (proton) has a remarkably large value of incoherent neutron scattering cross section. Therefore, a very small amount of hydrogen in a material could be analyzed by measuring the neutron incoherent scattering of the material. The hydrogen content of a metal or semiconductor is a matter of concern because it can affect significantly the physical, mechanical or chemical properties of materials although the amount of hydrogen is very small. In this study, the neutron incoherent scattering was measured using a 1-D position-sensitive detector at 1.835 A. Estimated detection limits are about 5 and 2 mu g/g for 10-min and 1-h measurements, respectively. Using the calibration data obtained by measurement of artificial samples (zircaloy+polypropylene films), the relative amounts of hydrogen in three commercial zircaloy samples were estima...

  12. Ionosonde measurements in Bayesian statistical ionospheric tomography with incoherent scatter radar validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Roininen, L.; Vierinen, J.; Orispää, M.; Kauristie, K.; Lehtinen, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    We validate two-dimensional ionospheric tomography reconstructions against EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements. Our tomography method is based on Bayesian statistical inversion with prior distribution given by its mean and covariance. We employ ionosonde measurements for the choice of the prior mean and covariance parameters, and use the Gaussian Markov random fields as a sparse matrix approximation for the numerical computations. This results in a computationally efficient and statistically clear inversion algorithm for tomography. We demonstrate how this method works with simultaneous beacon satellite and ionosonde measurements obtained in northern Scandinavia. The performance is compared with results obtained with a zero mean prior and with the prior mean taken from the International Reference Ionosphere 2007 model. In validating the results, we use EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar measurements as the ground truth for the ionization profile shape. We find that ionosonde measurements improve the reconstruction by adding accurate information about the absolute value and the height distribution of electron density, and outperforms the alternative prior information sources. With an ionosonde at continuous disposal, the presented method enhances stand-alone near real-time ionospheric tomography for the given conditions significantly.

  13. A new type of alternating code for incoherent scatter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, Michael P.

    1993-11-01

    An alternating code set is employed as one of several possible techniques used in incoherent scatter radar transmissions to obtain ambiguity-free measurements of autocorrelation functions or spectra with good range resolution. An alternating code set consists of several codes; typically, each successive radar pulse is modulated with a different code in the sequence. This technique is useful in other types of radar transmissions when the target is overspread, assuming the targets have certain statistical properties. Code sets for a new type of alternating code are presented for code lengths 8-12. This new type of alternating code differs from the first kind in two ways: it is subject to a slightly different condition for the elimination of ambiguity, and it is not restricted to lengths that are powers of 2. The new lengths are useful because they allow greater freedom in designing a multipurpose radar waveform best utilizing the available duty cycle of the radar. The alternating code technique is described in detail sufficient to allow an understanding of the two types and to show that the new condition for ambiguity-free measurements is a useful one. A search program was used to find the new sets; the aspects of the program important for decreasing the size of the search space are described. The code sets are presented, and their significance and uses are discussed.

  14. Investigations of homologous disaccharides by elastic incoherent neutron scattering and wavelet multiresolution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magazù, S.; Migliardo, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra dell’, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Vertessy, B.G. [Institute of Enzymology, Hungarian Academy of Science, Budapest (Hungary); Caccamo, M.T., E-mail: maccamo@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra dell’, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2013-10-16

    Highlights: • Innovative multiresolution wavelet analysis of elastic incoherent neutron scattering. • Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering measurements on homologues disaccharides. • EINS wavevector analysis. • EINS temperature analysis. - Abstract: In the present paper the results of a wavevector and thermal analysis of Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) data collected on water mixtures of three homologous disaccharides through a wavelet approach are reported. The wavelet analysis allows to compare both the spatial properties of the three systems in the wavevector range of Q = 0.27 Å{sup −1} ÷ 4.27 Å{sup −1}. It emerges that, differently from previous analyses, for trehalose the scalograms are constantly lower and sharper in respect to maltose and sucrose, giving rise to a global spectral density along the wavevector range markedly less extended. As far as the thermal analysis is concerned, the global scattered intensity profiles suggest a higher thermal restrain of trehalose in respect to the other two homologous disaccharides.

  15. Impact of anisotropic atomic motions in proteins on powder-averaged incoherent neutron scattering intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Gerald R.; Chevrot, Guillaume

    2012-12-01

    This paper addresses the question to which extent anisotropic atomic motions in proteins impact angular-averaged incoherent neutron scattering intensities, which are typically recorded for powder samples. For this purpose, the relevant correlation functions are represented as multipole series in which each term corresponds to a different degree of intrinsic motional anisotropy. The approach is illustrated by a simple analytical model and by a simulation-based example for lysozyme, considering in both cases the elastic incoherent structure factor. The second example shows that the motional anisotropy of the protein atoms is considerable and contributes significantly to the scattering intensity.

  16. Velocity-Autocorrelation Function in Liquids, Deduced from Neutron Incoherent Scattering Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carneiro, Kim

    1976-01-01

    The Fourier transform p(ω) of the velocity-autocorrelation function is derived from neutron incoherent scattering results, obtained from the two liquids Ar and H2. The quality and significance of the results are discussed with special emphasis on the long-time t-3/2 tail, found in computer...

  17. Separation of coherent and incoherent scattering in liquid para-H{sub 2} by polarisation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Mompean, F.J. [Madrid Univ. (Spain); Schaerpf, O.; Andersen, K.H. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Fak, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    In the 1960 IAEA Symposium on Neutron Scattering, Sarma presented his theoretical study on the scattering of cold neutrons by liquid hydrogen and demonstrated how the intimate coupling between nuclear and rotational degrees of freedom finally results in the possibility of observing collective modes from this material, which to many neutron scatterers is synonymous with `incoherent`. This problem is investigated with polarised neutrons to gain access to a limited region of the (Q,E) space where the collective response from this liquid is found. (author).

  18. Application of Incoherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Pharmaceutical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordallo, Heloisa N.; A. Zakharov, Boris; Boidyreva, E.V.

    2012-01-01

    This study centers on the use of inelastic neutron scattering as an alternative tool for physical characterization of solid pharmaceutical drugs. On the basis of such approach, relaxation processes in the pharmaceutical compound phenacetin (p-ethoxyacetanilide, C(10)H(13)NO(2)) were evidenced...... contributes to understanding the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonds, intramolecular dynamics, and conformational flexibility in pharmaceuticals on a molecular level, which can help in evaluating phase stability with respect to temperature variations on processing or on storage, and is related...

  19. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  20. A comparative study of ionospheric irregularity drift velocity derived from a GNSS receiver array and Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar measurements during high-latitude ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Morton, Yu T.

    2017-06-01

    The conventional ionospheric scintillation-based, spaced-receiver technique uses Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signal intensity measurements. It is not suitable, however, for high-latitude regions where phase scintillations occur much more often than amplitude scintillations. This paper demonstrates that GNSS signal carrier phase scintillations observed from a spaced-receiver array can be used to infer horizontal ionospheric drift velocities via time domain correlation. Drift velocities measured by the colocated Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar are cross compared against the estimated results from the GNSS receiver array. A comparative study is conducted based on two case studies on 20 and 31 December 2015, both accompanied by intense geomagnetic storms. Overall, the comparison results show statistical agreement between the GNSS receiver array estimation and incoherent scatter radar measurements.

  1. Investigation of ionospheric D-region aeronomy using incoherent scatter radar and optical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of complementary radar and optical observations of the lower ionosphere are presented. These studies were accomplished using the facilities at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, including 430-MHz incoherent scatter radar, tilting-filter photometers and 1-m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. The incoherent-scatter radar consists of two operational modes, the total power and ion-line power-spectrum measurements. When combined together, atmospheric and ionospheric parameters are accessible, to varying degrees, as functions of time and height. These include electron concentration, ion-neutral collision frequency, neutral atmosphere temperature, pressure and wind, and mean negative positive ion masses and concentrations. This is made possible by techniques suggested in this thesis. These techniques are based on the concept of mapping between experimental and theoretical power spectra, combined with electron concentration information from total power measurement, to extract the underlying aeronomical parameters. The optical observation of the atmospheric nightglow complements the incapability of radar telemetry during nighttime due to decreased signal strength.

  2. Precision Measurement of the n-3He Incoherent Scattering Length Using Neutron Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, M G; Black, T C; Chen, W C; Gentile, T R; Hussey, D S; Pushin, D; Wietfeldt, F E; Yang, L

    2008-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the low-energy neutron-3He incoherent scattering length using neutron interferometry: b_i' = (-2.417 +/- 0.012 statistical +/- 0.014 systematic) fm. It is in slight disagreement with the only previous measurement of this quantity by Zimmer, et al., b_i' = (-2.365 +/- 0.020) fm, which used a very different technique, pseudomagnetic spin rotation. The neutron-3He scattering lengths are important for testing and developing nuclear potential models that include three nucleon forces, effective field theories for few-body nuclear systems, and for understanding quantum excitations in liquid helium. This work demonstrates the first use of a polarized nuclear target in a neutron interferometer.

  3. MIDAS-W: a workstation-based incoherent scatter radar data acquisition system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holt

    Full Text Available The Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Data Acquisition System (MIDAS is based on an abstract model of an incoherent scatter radar. This model is implemented in a hierarchical software system, which serves to isolate hardware and low-level software implementation details from higher levels of the system. Inherent in this is the idea that implementation details can easily be changed in response to technological advances. MIDAS is an evolutionary system, and the MIDAS hardware has, in fact, evolved while the basic software model has remained unchanged. From the earliest days of MIDAS, it was realized that some functions implemented in specialized hardware might eventually be implemented by software in a general-purpose computer. MIDAS-W is the realization of this concept. The core component of MIDAS-W is a Sun Microsystems UltraSparc 10 workstation equipped with an Ultrarad 1280 PCI bus analog to digital (A/D converter board. In the current implementation, a 2.25 MHz intermediate frequency (IF is bandpass sampled at 1 µs intervals and these samples are multicast over a high-speed Ethernet which serves as a raw data bus. A second workstation receives the samples, converts them to filtered, decimated, complex baseband samples and computes the lag-profile matrix of the decimated samples. Overall performance is approximately ten times better than the previous MIDAS system, which utilizes a custom digital filtering module and array processor based correlator. A major advantage of MIDAS-W is its flexibility. A portable, single-workstation data acquisition system can be implemented by moving the software receiver and correlator programs to the workstation with the A/D converter. When the data samples are multicast, additional data processing systems, for example for raw data recording, can be implemented simply by adding another workstation with suitable software to the high-speed network. Testing of new data processing software is also greatly

  4. MIDAS-W: a workstation-based incoherent scatter radar data acquisition system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holt

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Data Acquisition System (MIDAS is based on an abstract model of an incoherent scatter radar. This model is implemented in a hierarchical software system, which serves to isolate hardware and low-level software implementation details from higher levels of the system. Inherent in this is the idea that implementation details can easily be changed in response to technological advances. MIDAS is an evolutionary system, and the MIDAS hardware has, in fact, evolved while the basic software model has remained unchanged. From the earliest days of MIDAS, it was realized that some functions implemented in specialized hardware might eventually be implemented by software in a general-purpose computer. MIDAS-W is the realization of this concept. The core component of MIDAS-W is a Sun Microsystems UltraSparc 10 workstation equipped with an Ultrarad 1280 PCI bus analog to digital (A/D converter board. In the current implementation, a 2.25 MHz intermediate frequency (IF is bandpass sampled at 1 µs intervals and these samples are multicast over a high-speed Ethernet which serves as a raw data bus. A second workstation receives the samples, converts them to filtered, decimated, complex baseband samples and computes the lag-profile matrix of the decimated samples. Overall performance is approximately ten times better than the previous MIDAS system, which utilizes a custom digital filtering module and array processor based correlator. A major advantage of MIDAS-W is its flexibility. A portable, single-workstation data acquisition system can be implemented by moving the software receiver and correlator programs to the workstation with the A/D converter. When the data samples are multicast, additional data processing systems, for example for raw data recording, can be implemented simply by adding another workstation with suitable software to the high-speed network. Testing of new data processing software is also greatly

  5. Frequency and power dependency of HF-induced ionization signatures in incoherent scatter radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Bjorn; Sergienko, Tima; Rietveld, Michael; Brandstrom, Urban; Senior, Andrew; Vickers, Hannah; Kosch, Michael

    Incoherent scatter radar observations of high-power HF radio-wave induced enhancements in backscatter from ion-acoustic and plasma waves have been observed with the EISCAT UHF radar during Heating experiments where the pump-frequency passed through the 3rd and 4th harmonic of the electron gyro-frequency. The altitude-variation of the enhancement indicate an asymmetry in HF-induced ionization between pump-frequencies below and above a gyro-resonance. Models for ionospheric electron density response to ionization from HF-accelerated electrons is compared to the very precise observations of the altitude variation of the matching-altitudes. Optical observations of radio induced optical emissions are used to determine the electron acceleration by HF-radio waves.

  6. Analysis of incoherent scatter during ionospheric heating near the fifth electron gyrofrequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Jian; Zhao, Haisheng; Xu, Zhengwen

    2017-04-01

    The observation of ultra-high frequency radar during an ionospheric heating experiment carried out at Tromsø site of European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association, Norway, is analyzed. When pump is operating slightly above the fifth electron gyrofrequency, some strong enhancements in radar echo and electron density occur in a wide altitude range and are in sync with the shifting and spread of plasma line around the reflection altitude, which may be due to the focusing or collimating of radar wave by irregularities. While some strong enhancements in electron density and radar echo around the reflection altitude do not correspond to the true increase in electron density, but due to the enhanced ion acoustic wave by parametric decay instability and oscillation two stream instability. In addition, the different heating rates and cooling rates at the pump frequencies below, around and above fifth gyrofrequency respectively result in the dependence of the enhancements in electron temperature on the pump frequency.

  7. Errors due to random noise in velocity measurement using incoherent-scatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    Full Text Available The random-noise errors involved in measuring the Doppler shift of an 'incoherent-scatter' spectrum are predicted theoretically for all values of Te/Ti from 1.0 to 3.0. After correction has been made for the effects of convolution during transmission and reception and the additional errors introduced by subtracting the average of the background gates, the rms errors can be expressed by a simple semi-empirical formula. The observed errors are determined from a comparison of simultaneous EISCAT measurements using an identical pulse code on several adjacent frequencies. The plot of observed versus predicted error has a slope of 0.991 and a correlation coefficient of 99.3%. The prediction also agrees well with the mean of the error distribution reported by the standard EISCAT analysis programme.

  8. MST data exchange through the NCAR incoherent-scatter radar data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    One means of making MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radar data more easily accessible for scientific research by the general scientific community is through a centralized data base. Such a data base can be designed to readily provide information on data availability and quality, and to provide copies of data from any radar in a common format to the user. The ionospheric incoherent scatter community has established a centralized data base at NCAR that may serve not only as a model for a possible MST data base, but also as a catalyst for getting an MST data base started. (Some key elements of the NCAR data base are given.) The NCAR data base can include MST data in the same framework with relatively little extra effort. They are willing to handle MST data on a limited basis in order to permit assessment of community interest and in order to provide some experience with a centralized data base for MST data.

  9. Errors due to random noise in velocity measurement using incoherent-scatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The random-noise errors involved in measuring the Doppler shift of an 'incoherent-scatter' spectrum are predicted theoretically for all values of Te/Ti from 1.0 to 3.0. After correction has been made for the effects of convolution during transmission and reception and the additional errors introduced by subtracting the average of the background gates, the rms errors can be expressed by a simple semi-empirical formula. The observed errors are determined from a comparison of simultaneous EISCAT measurements using an identical pulse code on several adjacent frequencies. The plot of observed versus predicted error has a slope of 0.991 and a correlation coefficient of 99.3%. The prediction also agrees well with the mean of the error distribution reported by the standard EISCAT analysis programme.

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation on Hydrided LWR Fuel Cladding by Small Angle Incoherent Neutron Scattering of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yong [ORNL; Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method was developed to precisely measure the uptake of total hydrogen in nuclear grade Ziraloy-4 cladding. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and H gas. By controlling the initial H gas pressure in the vessel and the temperature profile, target H concentrations from tens of ppm to a few thousands of wppm have been successfully achieved. Following H charging, the H content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method (VHE), by which the samples with desired H concentration were selected for the neutron study. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering (SANIS) were performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge national Laboratory (ORNL). Our study indicates that a very small amount ( 20 ppm) H in commercial Zr cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes for a wide range of H concentration by a nondestructive method. The H distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor, which is determined by calibration process with direct chemical analysis method on the specimen. This scale factor can be used for future test with unknown H concentration, thus provide a nondestructive method for absolute H concentration determination.

  11. The role of momentum transfer during incoherent neutron scattering is explained by the energy landscape model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Young, Robert D; Fenimore, Paul W

    2017-05-16

    We recently introduced a model of incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) that treats the neutrons as wave packets of finite length and the protein as a random walker in the free energy landscape. We call the model ELM for "energy landscape model." In ELM, the interaction of the wave packet with a proton in a protein provides the dynamic information. During the scattering event, the momentum [Formula: see text] is transferred by the wave packet to the struck proton and its moiety, exerting the force [Formula: see text] The resultant energy [Formula: see text] is stored elastically and returned to the neutron as it exits. The energy is given by [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the ambient temperature and [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text] 91 K Å) is a new elastobaric coefficient. Experiments yield the scattering intensity (dynamic structure factor) [Formula: see text] as a function of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] To test our model, we use published data on proteins where only thermal vibrations are active. ELM competes with the currently accepted theory, here called the spatial motion model (SMM), which explains [Formula: see text] by motions in real space. ELM is superior to SMM: It can explain the experimental angular and temperature dependence, whereas SMM cannot do so.

  12. Incoherent scatter radar observations of AGW/TID events generated by the moving solar terminator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Galushko

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs generated by the moving solar terminator have been made with the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar. Three experiments near 1995 fall equinox measured the AGW/TID velocity and direction of motion. Spectral and cross-correlation analysis of the ionospheric density observations indicates that ST-generated AGWs/TIDs were observed during each experiment, with the more-pronounced effect occurring at sunrise. The strongest oscillations in the ionospheric parameters have periods of 1.5 to 2 hours. The group and phase velocities have been determined and show that the disturbances propagate in the horizontal plane perpendicular to the terminator with the group velocity of 300-400 m s-1 that corresponds to the ST speed at ionospheric heights. The high horizontal group velocity seems to contradict the accepted theory of AGW/TID propagation and indicates a need for additional investigation.Key words. Ionosphere (wave propagation · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  13. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  14. The effects of Coulomb collisions on O+, H+, and He+ plasmas for topside incoherent scatter radar applications at Jicamarca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, M. A.; Kudeki, E.; Chau, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Coulomb collision effects on incoherent scatter radar signals become important when radar beams are pointed perpendicular to the Earth's magnetic field (B). To study these effects, Milla and Kudeki [2011] developed a procedure to estimate the spectrum of plasma density fluctuations (also known as incoherent scatter spectrum) based on simulations of collisional particle trajectories in single-ion component plasmas. In these simulations, collision effects on the particle motion are modeled using the standard Fokker-Planck model of Rosenbluth et al. [1957]. We have recently generalized the procedure of Milla and Kudeki to consider the case of multiple ion components in order to study the characteristics of the incoherent scatter spectrum in O+, H+, and He+ ionospheric plasmas, which is needed for the analysis of topside perpendicular-to-B observations at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. In this presentation, we will report on the development of this new approach and on the characteristics of the spectrum models that were developed. The simulation results show that the ion collision process can be fairly well approximated as a Gaussian motion process, a model that has been previously studied in the literature by different authors. However, in the case of electron collisions, the process is not Gaussian having a complicated dependence on plasma parameters. As it will be discussed, electron collisions have a significant impact on the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum. The ultimate application of the models that were developed is the simultaneous estimation of plasma drifts, densities, and temperatures of the topside equatorial ionosphere in perpendicular-to-B experiments at Jicamarca. This experimental evaluation will have a broader impact since the accuracy of the Fokker-Planck collision model will be tested. References: Milla, M. A., and E. Kudeki (2011), Incoherent scatter spectral theories-Part II: Modeling the spectrum for modes propagating perpendicular to B

  15. Nonlinear Interaction of Langmuir and Whistler Waves Observed with Incoherent Scatter Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, H.; Semeter, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    High-latitude ionosphere is characterized by particle precipitations of different origins. Among these are electron precipitation caused by quasi-static parallel electric fields and Alfven wave-particle interactions. In-situ measurements of fields and particles have commonly detected various plasma modes, such as Langmuir and whistler, enhanced by these precipitating electrons. The waves have been shown to undergo various nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle interaction including parametric type instabilities. Detecting such processes with in-situ instruments however is not always straightforward and certain processes may remain undetected. We present new incoherent scatter radar data from the auroral F-region where strong echoes simultaneously appear in the ion- and both up- and down-shifted plasma lines channels. While aspects of these observations have been previously discussed in detail in terms of electron beam-generated Langmuir turbulence, some new aspects, namely the presence of two peaks separated by 300 kHz in both the up- and down-shifted plasma line channels are discussed in this paper. The unique and asymmetric displacement of the peaks with respect to the radar transmitting frequency suggests that the anomalous spectra are produced as a result of the existence of non-resonant waves generated by nonlinear beating between intense Langmuir and whistler modes. The results suggest that such nonlinear interactions contribute to the appearance of wave activities close to the plasma frequency as observed by in-situ electric field spectral measurements and that not all these wave activities are directly generated by the initial electron beam. The anomalous plasma lines spectra are often observed just above the altitude where Langmuir turbulence is observed. This altitudinal morphology and its implications are also discussed is this paper.

  16. Comparison of the performance of different radar pulse compression techniques in an incoherent scatter radar measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving an estimate of an incoherent scatter radar signal is vital to provide reliable and unbiased information about the Earth's ionosphere. Thus optimizing the measurement spatial and temporal resolutions has attracted considerable attention. The optimization usually relies on employing different kinds of pulse compression filters in the analysis and a matched filter is perhaps the most widely used one. A mismatched filter has also been used in order to suppress the undesirable sidelobes that appear in the case of matched filtering. Moreover, recently an adaptive pulse compression method, which can be derived based on the minimum mean-square error estimate, has been proposed. In this paper we have investigated the performance of matched, mismatched and adaptive pulse compression methods in terms of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the variance and bias of the estimator. This is done by using different types of optimal radar waveforms. It is shown that for the case of low SNR the signal degradation associated to an adaptive filtering is less than that of the mismatched filtering. The SNR loss of both matched and adaptive pulse compression techniques was found to be nearly the same for most of the investigated codes for the case of high SNR. We have shown that the adaptive filtering technique is a compromise between matched and mismatched filtering method when one evaluates its performance in terms of the variance and the bias of the estimator. All the three analysis methods were found to have the same performance when a sidelobe-free matched filter code is employed.

  17. Hydrogen-storage materials dispersed into nanoporous substrates studied through incoherent inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colognesi, D., E-mail: daniele.colognesi@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ulivi, L.; Zoppi, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ramirez-Cuesta, A.J. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Orecchini, A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Karkamkar, A.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Fichtner, M.; Gil Bardaji, E.; Zhao-Karger, Z. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76347 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Densities of phonon states in some infiltrated H-storage materials are measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Signatures induced by the infiltration process on NaAlH{sub 4} phonon bands are detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weaker modifications are found in MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, mainly in the low-energy region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No relevant effect has been observed in LiBH{sub 4} + Mg(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}. - Abstract: Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering measurements on four impregnated/infiltrated composites of hydrides (namely, NaAlH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, LiBH{sub 4} + Mg(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}, and MgH{sub 2}) plus nanoporous scaffolds (active carbon fibers or silica-based MCM41) have been performed at low temperature. After a careful data analysis, the present experimental results have been compared to the corresponding spectroscopic data of bulk hydrides. Evident signatures induced by infiltration process on the NaAlH{sub 4} phonon bands have been detected, showing up as a strong peak broadening and smoothing together with, in some cases, an energy shift. Less pronounced phonon spectrum modifications have been found in MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, mainly concentrated in the low-energy acoustic region. Finally, no relevant effect has been observed for LiBH{sub 4} + Mg(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}.

  18. Space-time sampling strategies for electronically steerable incoherent scatter radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, John

    ncoherent scatter radar (ISR) systems allow researchers to peer into the ionosphere via remote sensing of intrinsic plasma parameters. ISR sensors have been used since the 1950s and until the past decade were mainly equipped with a single mechanically steerable antenna. As such, the ability to develop a two or three dimensional picture of the plasma parameters in the ionosphere has been constrained by the relatively slow mechanical steering of the antennas. A newer class of systems using electronically steerable array (ESA) antennas have broken the chains of this constraint, allowing researchers to create 3-D reconstructions of plasma parameters. There have been many studies associated with reconstructing 3-D fields of plasma parameters, but there has not been a systematic analysis into the sampling issues that arise. Also, there has not been a systematic study as to how to reconstruct these plasma parameters in an optimum sense as opposed to just using different forms of interpolation. The research presented here forms a framework that scientists and engineers can use to plan experiments with ESA ISR capabilities and to better analyze the resulting data. This framework attacks the problem of space-time sampling by ESA ISR systems from the point of view of signal processing, simulation and inverse theoretic image reconstruction. We first describe a physics based model of incoherent scatter from the ionospheric plasma, along with processing methods needed to create the plasma parameter measurements. Our approach leads to development of the space-time ambiguity function, forming a theoretical foundation of the forward model for ISR. This forward model is novel in that it takes into account the shape of the antenna beam and scanning method along with integration time to develop the proper statistics for a desired measurement precision. Once the forward model is developed, we present the simulation method behind the Simulator for ISR (SimISR). SimISR uses input plasma

  19. 29-Day Analysis of Scale Heights And The Inference of the Topside Ionosphere Over Millstone Hill During the 2002 Incoherent Scatter Radar Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Jennifer L.

    This study aims to characterize the topside ionospheric density and temperature profiles using readily available Global Positioning System (GPS) total electron content (TEC) and ionosonde bottomside profile of electron density. The aim of this study is to find a technique that can be applied globally rather than specific locations where a wealth of data exists. Knowledge of the distribution of electron density and its altitude dependence, known as scale height, is important for ionospheric empirical modeling and ionospheric studies, and for practical applications, such as time delay correction of radio-wave propagation through the ionosphere. Over the years, researchers have gathered information and developed several different methods to analyze the topside ionosphere, including: coherent scatter radar observations of underdense electron density irregularities, incoherent scatter radar (ISR) probing, topside sounders onboard satellites, in situ rocket and satellite observations, such as Global Positioning System (GPS),and occultation measurements. We were able to obtain topside information by an analysis of GPS TEC in combination with bottom side electron density profiles observed by ionosondes. This was verified by a study using one month's worth of data from Millstone Hill ISR observations.

  20. Identification of scintillation signatures on GPS signals originating from plasma structures detected with EISCAT incoherent scatter radar along the same line of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Biagio; Coleman, Chris; Skone, Susan; Häggström, Ingemar; Mitchell, Cathryn; Da Dalt, Federico; Panicciari, Tommaso; Kinrade, Joe; Bust, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation originates from the scattering of electromagnetic waves through spatial gradients in the plasma density distribution, drifting across a given propagation direction. Ionospheric scintillation represents a disruptive manifestation of adverse space weather conditions through degradation of the reliability and continuity of satellite telecommunication and navigation systems and services (e.g., European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, EGNOS). The purpose of the experiment presented here was to determine the contribution of auroral ionization structures to GPS scintillation. European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) measurements were obtained along the same line of sight of a given GPS satellite observed from Tromso and followed by means of the EISCAT UHF radar to causally identify plasma structures that give rise to scintillation on the co-aligned GPS radio link. Large-scale structures associated with the poleward edge of the ionospheric trough, with auroral arcs in the nightside auroral oval and with particle precipitation at the onset of a substorm were indeed identified as responsible for enhanced phase scintillation at L band. For the first time it was observed that the observed large-scale structures did not cascade into smaller-scale structures, leading to enhanced phase scintillation without amplitude scintillation. More measurements and theory are necessary to understand the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of large-scale to small-scale energy cascade and to reproduce the observations. This aspect is fundamental to model the scattering of radio waves propagating through these ionization structures. New insights from this experiment allow a better characterization of the impact that space weather can have on satellite telecommunications and navigation services.

  1. A unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear resonance and inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limbach, H.H.; Ulrich, S.; Buntkowsky, G. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Chaudret, B. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Lab. de Chimie de Coordination du C.N.R.S.; Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-08-12

    In this paper a unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is presented. It is shown that both exchange processes coexist i.e. do not transform into each other although they may dominate the spectra in different temperature ranges. This superposition is the consequence of the incorporation of the tunnel frequency J of the coherent process into the nuclear two-spin hamiltonian of hydrogen pairs which allows to treat the problem using the well known density matrix theory of NMR line-shapes developed by Alexander and Binsch. It is shown that this theory can also be used to predict the line-shapes of the rotational tunneling transitions observed in the INS spectra of transition metal dihydrogen complexes and that both NMR and INS spectra depend on similar parameters.

  2. Influence of incoherent scattering on stochastic deflection of high-energy negative particle beams in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillin, I.V. [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Shul' ga, N.F. [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Kharkov (Ukraine); V.N. Karazin Kharkov National University, Kharkov (Ukraine); Bandiera, L. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation on stochastic deflection of high-energy negatively charged particles in a bent crystal was carried out. On the basis of analytical calculation and numerical simulation it was shown that there is a maximum angle at which most of the beam is deflected. The existence of a maximum, which is taken in the correspondence of the optimal radius of curvature, is a novelty with respect to the case of positively charged particles, for which the deflection angle can be freely increased by increasing the crystal length. This difference has to be ascribed to the stronger contribution of incoherent scattering affecting the dynamics of negative particles that move closer to atomic nuclei and electrons. We therefore identified the ideal parameters for the exploitation of axial confinement for negatively charged particle beam manipulation in future high-energy accelerators, e.g., ILC or muon colliders. (orig.)

  3. A novel hybrid reconstruction algorithm for first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) of large objects with potential medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard; Elbakri, Idris A

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a first generation incoherent scatter CT (ISCT) hybrid (analytic-iterative) reconstruction algorithm for accurate ρ{e}imaging of objects with clinically relevant sizes. The algorithm reconstructs quantitative images of ρ{e} within a few iterations, avoiding the challenges of optimization based reconstruction algorithms while addressing the limitations of current analytical algorithms. A 4π detector is conceptualized in order to address the issue of directional dependency and is then replaced with a ring of detectors which detect a constant fraction of the scattered photons. The ISCT algorithm corrects for the attenuation of photons using a limited number of iterations and filtered back projection (FBP) for image reconstruction. This results in a hybrid reconstruction algorithm that was tested with sinograms generated by Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical (AN) simulations. Results show that the ISCT algorithm is weakly dependent on the ρ{e} initial estimate. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm reconstruct ρ{e} images with a mean error of -1% ± 3% for the AN model and from -6% to -8% for the MC model. Finally, the algorithm is capable of reconstructing qualitatively good images even in the presence of multiple scatter. The proposed algorithm would be suitable for in-vivo medical imaging as long as practical limitations can be addressed. © 2011 – IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved

  4. The dynamic cusp at low altitudes: a case study utilizing Viking, DMSP-F7, and Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Watermann

    Full Text Available Coincident multi-instrument magnetospheric and ionospheric observations have made it possible to determine the position of the ionospheric footprint of the magnetospheric cusp and to monitor its evolution over time. The data used include charged particle and magnetic field measurements from the Earth-orbiting Viking and DMSP-F7 satellites, electric field measurements from Viking, interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data from IMP-8, and Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations of the ionospheric plasma density, temperature, and convection. Viking detected cusp precipitation poleward of 75.5° invariant latitude. The ionospheric response to the observed electron precipitation was simulated using an auroral model. It predicts enhanced plasma density and elevated electron temperature in the upper E- and F-regions. Sondrestrom radar observations are in agreement with the predictions. The radar detected a cusp signature on each of five consecutive antenna elevation scans covering 1.2 h local time. The cusp appeared to be about 2° invariant latitude wide, and its ionospheric footprint shifted equatorward by nearly 2° during this time, possibly influenced by an overall decrease in the IMF Bz component. The radar plasma drift data and the Viking magnetic and electric field data suggest that the cusp was associated with a continuous, rather than a patchy, merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field.

  5. Ciphertext-only attack on optical cryptosystem with spatially incoherent illumination: from the view of imaging through scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meihua; He, Wenqi; Lu, Dajiang; Peng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Security analysis is important and necessary for a new cryptosystem. In this paper, we evaluate the security risk of the optical cryptosystem with spatially incoherent illumination from the view of imaging through scattering medium and then demonstrate that it is vulnerable to ciphertext-only attack. The proposed ciphertext-only attack method relies on the optical memory effect for speckle correlations, which reveals a fact that the ciphertext’s autocorrelation is essentially identical to the plaintext’s own autocorrelation. Furthermore, by employing of an improved dynamic hybrid input-output phase-retrieval algorithm, we show that a plaintext image can be directly reconstructed from the autocorrelation of its corresponding ciphertext without any prior knowledge about the plaintext or the phase keys. Meanwhile, the theory analysis and experiment results will also be provided to verify the validity and feasibility of our proposed ciphertext-only attack method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to report optical cryptanalysis from the point of view of imaging through scattering medium and we believe this contribution will open up an avenue to deepen the investigation of optical cryptosystems.

  6. Ciphertext-only attack on optical cryptosystem with spatially incoherent illumination: from the view of imaging through scattering medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meihua; He, Wenqi; Lu, Dajiang; Peng, Xiang

    2017-01-31

    Security analysis is important and necessary for a new cryptosystem. In this paper, we evaluate the security risk of the optical cryptosystem with spatially incoherent illumination from the view of imaging through scattering medium and then demonstrate that it is vulnerable to ciphertext-only attack. The proposed ciphertext-only attack method relies on the optical memory effect for speckle correlations, which reveals a fact that the ciphertext's autocorrelation is essentially identical to the plaintext's own autocorrelation. Furthermore, by employing of an improved dynamic hybrid input-output phase-retrieval algorithm, we show that a plaintext image can be directly reconstructed from the autocorrelation of its corresponding ciphertext without any prior knowledge about the plaintext or the phase keys. Meanwhile, the theory analysis and experiment results will also be provided to verify the validity and feasibility of our proposed ciphertext-only attack method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to report optical cryptanalysis from the point of view of imaging through scattering medium and we believe this contribution will open up an avenue to deepen the investigation of optical cryptosystems.

  7. Elastic incoherent neutron scattering operating by varying instrumental energy resolution: principle, simulations, and experiments of the resolution elastic neutron scattering (RENS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    The main aim of this paper is to present the scientific case of the resolution elastic neutron scattering (RENS) method that is based on the collection of elastic neutron scattering intensity as a function of the instrumental energy resolution and that is able to extract information on the system dynamical properties from an elastic signal. In this framework, it is shown that in the measured elastic scattering law, as a function of the instrumental energy resolution, an inflection point occurs when the instrumental energy resolution intersects the system relaxation time, and in an equivalent way, a transition in the temperature behavior of the measured elastic scattering law occurs when the characteristic system relaxation time crosses the instrumental energy resolution time. With regard to the latter, an operative protocol to determine the system characteristic time by different elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) thermal scans at different instrumental energy resolutions is also proposed. The proposed method, hence, is not primarily addressed to collect the measured elastic scattering intensity with a great accuracy, but rather relies on determining an inflection point in the measured elastic scattering law versus instrumental energy resolution. The RENS method is tested both numerically and experimentally. As far as numerical simulations are concerned, a simple model system for which the temperature behavior of the relaxation time follows an Arrhenius law, while its scattering law follows a Gaussian behavior, is considered. It is shown that the system relaxation time used as an input for the simulations coincides with the one obtained by the RENS approach. Regarding the experimental findings, due to the fact that a neutron scattering spectrometer working following the RENS method has not been constructed yet, different EINS experiments with different instrumental energy resolutions were carried out on a complex model system, i.e., dry and D(2)O hydrated

  8. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doster, W. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nakagawa, H. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Appavou, M. S. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-28

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at T{sub d} from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature T{sub g}. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature T{sub d}.

  9. Optimal binary phase codes and sidelobe-free decoding filters with application to incoherent scatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents binary phase codes and corresponding decoding filters which are optimal in the sense that they produce no sidelobes and they maximise the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR henceforth. The search is made by investigating all possible binary phase codes with a given length. After selecting the code, the first step is to find a filter which produces no sidelobes. This is possible for all codes with no zeros in the frequency domain, and it turns out that most codes satisfy this requirement. An example of a code which cannot be decoded in this way is a code with a single phase, i.e. a long pulse. The second step is to investigate the SNR performance of the codes. Then the optimal code of a given length is the one with the highest SNR at the filter output. All codes with lengths of 3–25 bits were studied, which means investigating 33554428 binary phase codes. It turns out that all Barker codes except the 11-bit code are optimal in the above sense. It is well known that the performance of matched-filter decoding of Barker codes is better than decoding without sidelobes. In the case of the 7-bit Barker code, it is shown here that the SNR given by sidelobe-free decoding is nearly 30% worse than that of standard decoding, but for the 13-bit code sidelobe-free decoding is only about 5% worse. The deterioration of SNR should be evaluated against the benefits gained in disposing of the sidelobes, which, even for the 13-bit code, contribute by 7.1% to the total signal power from a homogeneous target. Thus, regions of weak scattering can be contaminated by the sidelobes from neighbouring layers of strong scattering, causing broadening of thin spatial structures and giving a lower spatial resolution than implied by the bit length. A practical example is shown where sidelobes mask a weak signal when the standard matched filter is used in the analysis. An improvement is achieved when sidelobe-free filtering is carried out.

    Key words. Radio

  10. Statistical analysis on spatial correlation of ionospheric day-to-day variability by using GPS and Incoherent Scatter Radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yue

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the spatial correlations of ionospheric day-to-day variability are investigated by statistical analysis on GPS and Incoherent Scatter Radar observations. The meridional correlations show significant (>0.8 correlations in the latitudinal blocks of about 6 degrees size on average. Relative larger correlations of TEC's day-to-day variabilities can be found between magnetic conjugate points, which may be due to the geomagnetic conjugacy of several factors for the ionospheric day-to-day variability. The correlation coefficients between geomagnetic conjugate points have an obvious decrease around the sunrise and sunset time at the upper latitude (60° and their values are bigger between the winter and summer hemisphere than between the spring and autumn hemisphere. The time delay of sunrise (sunset between magnetic conjugate points with a high dip latitude is a probable reason. Obvious latitude and local time variations of meridional correlation distance, latitude variations of zonal correlation distance, and altitude and local time variations of vertical correlation distance are detected. Furthermore, there are evident seasonal variations of meridional correlation distance at higher latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere and local time variations of zonal correlation distance at higher latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. These variations can generally be interpreted by the variations of controlling factors, which may have different spatial scales. The influences of the occurrence of ionospheric storms could not be ignored. Further modeling and data analysis are needed to address this problem. We suggest that our results are useful in the specific modeling/forecasting of ionospheric variability and the constructing of a background covariance matrix in ionospheric data assimilation.

  11. C-Phycocyanin Hydration Water Dynamics in the Presence of Trehalose: An Incoherent Elastic Neutron Scattering Study at Different Energy Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Frank; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of C-phycocyanin hydration water dynamics in the presence of trehalose by incoherent elastic neutron scattering. By combining data from two backscattering spectrometers with a 10-fold difference in energy resolution we extract a scattering law S(Q,ω) from the Q-dependence of the elastic intensities without sampling the quasielastic range. The hydration water is described by two dynamically different populations—one diffusing inside a sphere and the other diffusing quasifreely—with a population ratio that depends on temperature. The scattering law derived describes the experimental data from both instruments excellently over a large temperature range (235–320 K). The effective diffusion coefficient extracted is reduced by a factor of 10–15 with respect to bulk water at corresponding temperatures. Our approach demonstrates the benefits and the efficiency of using different energy resolutions in incoherent elastic neutron scattering over a large angular range for the study of biological macromolecules and hydration water. PMID:17350998

  12. Measurement of Incoherent Scatter

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — For radio waves transmitted through the ionosphere with frequencies much larger (50 to 1300MHz) than the plasma frequency (up to 15MHz), very small-scale...

  13. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    Full Text Available High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers using a new experiment with the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter Svalbard radar (ESR are presented. The observations were made by means of a new type of hardware, which was connected in parallel with the standard receiver. The radar beam was aligned with the geomagnetic field. The experiment applies a new modulation principle. Two phase codes, one with 22 bits and the other with 5 bits, were transmitted at separate frequencies. Each bit was further modulated by a 5-bit Barker code. The basic bit length of both transmissions was 6 µs. Instead of storing the lagged products of the ionospheric echoes in the traditional way, samples of both the transmitted pulses and the ionospheric echoes were taken at intervals of 1 µs and stored on hard disk. The lagged products were calculated later in an off-line analysis. In the analysis a sidelobe-free Barker decoding technique was used. The experiment produces range ambiguities, which were removed by mathematical inversion. Sporadic-E layers were observed at 105–115 km altitudes, and they are displayed with a 150-m range resolution and a 10-s time resolution. The layers show sometimes complex shapes, including triple peaked structures. The thickness of these sublayers is of the order of 1–2 km and they may be separated by 5 km in range. While drifting downwards, the sublayers merge together to form a single layer. The plasma inside a layer is found to have a longer correlation length than that of the surrounding plasma. This may be an indication of heavy ions inside the layer. The field-aligned ion velocity is also calculated. It reveals shears in the meridional wind, which suggests that shears probably also exist in the zonal wind. Hence the wind shear mechanism is a possible generation mechanism of the layer. However, observations from the coherent SuperDARN radar indicate the presence of an ionospheric electric field pointing in the sector between

  14. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers using a new experiment with the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter Svalbard radar (ESR are presented. The observations were made by means of a new type of hardware, which was connected in parallel with the standard receiver. The radar beam was aligned with the geomagnetic field. The experiment applies a new modulation principle. Two phase codes, one with 22 bits and the other with 5 bits, were transmitted at separate frequencies. Each bit was further modulated by a 5-bit Barker code. The basic bit length of both transmissions was 6 µs. Instead of storing the lagged products of the ionospheric echoes in the traditional way, samples of both the transmitted pulses and the ionospheric echoes were taken at intervals of 1 µs and stored on hard disk. The lagged products were calculated later in an off-line analysis. In the analysis a sidelobe-free Barker decoding technique was used. The experiment produces range ambiguities, which were removed by mathematical inversion. Sporadic-E layers were observed at 105–115 km altitudes, and they are displayed with a 150-m range resolution and a 10-s time resolution. The layers show sometimes complex shapes, including triple peaked structures. The thickness of these sublayers is of the order of 1–2 km and they may be separated by 5 km in range. While drifting downwards, the sublayers merge together to form a single layer. The plasma inside a layer is found to have a longer correlation length than that of the surrounding plasma. This may be an indication of heavy ions inside the layer. The field-aligned ion velocity is also calculated. It reveals shears in the meridional wind, which suggests that shears probably also exist in the zonal wind. Hence the wind shear mechanism is a possible generation mechanism of the layer. However, observations from the coherent SuperDARN radar indicate the presence of an ionospheric electric field pointing in the sector between

  15. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtie, B.; Nygrén, T.; Lehtinen, M. S.; Huuskonen, A.

    2002-09-01

    High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers using a new experiment with the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter) Svalbard radar (ESR) are presented. The observations were made by means of a new type of hardware, which was connected in parallel with the standard receiver. The radar beam was aligned with the geomagnetic field. The experiment applies a new modulation principle. Two phase codes, one with 22 bits and the other with 5 bits, were transmitted at separate frequencies. Each bit was further modulated by a 5-bit Barker code. The basic bit length of both transmissions was 6 µs. Instead of storing the lagged products of the ionospheric echoes in the traditional way, samples of both the transmitted pulses and the ionospheric echoes were taken at intervals of 1 µs and stored on hard disk. The lagged products were calculated later in an off-line analysis. In the analysis a sidelobe-free Barker decoding technique was used. The experiment produces range ambiguities, which were removed by mathematical inversion. Sporadic-E layers were observed at 105 115 km altitudes, and they are displayed with a 150-m range resolution and a 10-s time resolution. The layers show sometimes complex shapes, including triple peaked structures. The thickness of these sublayers is of the order of 1 2 km and they may be separated by 5 km in range. While drifting downwards, the sublayers merge together to form a single layer. The plasma inside a layer is found to have a longer correlation length than that of the surrounding plasma. This may be an indication of heavy ions inside the layer. The field-aligned ion velocity is also calculated. It reveals shears in the meridional wind, which suggests that shears probably also exist in the zonal wind. Hence the wind shear mechanism is a possible generation mechanism of the layer. However, observations from the coherent SuperDARN radar indicate the presence of an ionospheric electric field pointing in the sector between west and north. Thus

  16. Polymer and Water Dynamics in Poly(vinyl alcohol/Poly(methacrylate Networks. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Incoherent Neutron Scattering Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Chiessi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemically cross-linked polymer networks of poly(vinyl alcohol/poly(methacrylate form monolitic hydrogels and microgels suitable for biomedical applications, such as in situ tissue replacement and drug delivery. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD simulation and incoherent neutron scattering methods are used to study the local polymer dynamics and the polymer induced modification of water properties in poly(vinyl alcohol/poly(methacrylate hydrogels. This information is particularly relevant when the diffusion of metabolites and drugs is a requirement for the polymer microgel functionality. MD simulations of an atomic detailed model of the junction domain at the experimental hydration degree were carried out at 283, 293 and 313 K. The polymer-water interaction, the polymer connectivity and the water dynamics were investigated as a function of temperature. Simulation results are compared with findings of elastic and quasi-elastic incoherent neutron scattering measurements, experimental approaches which sample the same space-time window of MD simulations. This combined analysis shows a supercooled water component and an increase of hydrophilicity and mobility with temperature of these amphiphilic polymer networks.

  17. Investigating the ionosphere response to exhaust products of ``Progress'' cargo spacecraft engines on the basis of Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter Radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpynev, Boris; Alsatkin, Sergei; Khakhinov, Vitaliy; Lebedev, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    The FSUE Central Research Institute of Machine Building (TsNIIMash), Rocket and Space Corporation "Energia", and Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (ISTP SB RAS) jointly conducted the active space experiment "Radar-Progress" in 2007-2015. During this experiment, we used the Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter Ra-dar to study space-time characteristics of ionospheric disturbances generated by exhaust products of "Progress" cargo spacecraft engines. As the basic effect during exhaust product injection we consider the formation of new centers for recombination of ambient ionospheric ions O+ on molecules of water and carbon dioxide. This produces an ionization "hole" in the region of injection. In nighttime conditions when the majority of experiments were performed, this hole was filled by hydrogen ions from the plasmasphere, thus the ion composition in the vicinity of the hole and incoherent scatter spectra were changed. For successful obser-vation of the ionization hole dynamics, the critical fac-tors are the degree of radar antenna diagram filling by exhaust products and the velocity of the thermospheric neutral wind, which makes exhaust gases move from the antenna diagram. These two factors lead to poor repeatability of successful experiments. Successful experiments recorded a decrease in electron density up to 35 % in the hole that existed for 30 min. The lifetime of the region with high concentration of H+ ions can be as long as one hour.

  18. Mixed quantum/classical approach to OH-stretch inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectroscopy for ambient and supercooled liquid water and ice Ih.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L; Skinner, J L

    2015-07-07

    OH-stretch inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS) has been measured to determine the vibrational density of states (VDOS) in the OH-stretch region for liquid water, supercooled water, and ice Ih, providing complementary information to IR and Raman spectroscopies about hydrogen bonding in these phases. In this work, we extend the combined electronic-structure/molecular-dynamics (ES/MD) method, originally developed by Skinner and co-workers to simulate OH-stretch IR and Raman spectra, to the calculation of IINS spectra with small k values. The agreement between theory and experiment in the limit k → 0 is reasonable, further validating the reliability of the ES/MD method in simulating OH-stretch spectroscopy in condensed phases. The connections and differences between IINS and IR spectra are analyzed to illustrate the advantages of IINS over IR in estimating the OH-stretch VDOS.

  19. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  20. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  1. Basic principles of incoherent scattering and its contribution to physical studies of the upper atmosphere principios basicos em espalhamento incogrente e sua contribuicao para o estudo da fisica na atmosfera superior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchhoff, V.W.J.H.

    1977-09-01

    The theory of incoherent scatter is presented from a practical point of view. Considerations on frequency of operation, spectrum, equipment and data analysis were reviewed and its contributions to the study of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere are summarized. The description stresses the physical processes rather than the mathematical treatment.

  2. A New On-the-Fly Sampling Method for Incoherent Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Data in MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlou, Andrew Theodore [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ji, Wei [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2014-09-02

    At thermal energies, the scattering of neutrons in a system is complicated by the comparable velocities of the neutron and target, resulting in competing upscattering and downscattering events. The neutron wavelength is also similar in size to the target's interatomic spacing making the scattering process a quantum mechanical problem. Because of the complicated nature of scattering at low energies, the thermal data files in ACE format used in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes are quite large { on the order of megabytes for a single temperature and material. In this paper, a new storage and sampling method is introduced that is orders of magnitude less in size and is used to sample scattering parameters at any temperature on-the-fly. In addition to the reduction in storage, the need to pre-generate thermal scattering data tables at fine temperatures has been eliminated. This is advantageous for multiphysics simulations which may involve temperatures not known in advance. A new module was written for MCNP6 that bypasses the current S(α,β) table lookup in favor of the new format. The new on-the-fly sampling method was tested for graphite for two benchmark problems at ten temperatures: 1) an eigenvalue test with a fuel compact of uranium oxycarbide fuel homogenized into a graphite matrix, 2) a surface current test with a \\broomstick" problem with a monoenergetic point source. The largest eigenvalue difference was 152pcm for T= 1200K. For the temperatures and incident energies chosen for the broomstick problem, the secondary neutron spectrum showed good agreement with the traditional S(α,β) sampling method. These preliminary results show that sampling thermal scattering data on-the-fly is a viable option to eliminate both the storage burden of keeping thermal data at discrete temperatures and the need to know temperatures before simulation runtime.

  3. Sensitivity of Depth-Integrated Satellite Lidar to Subaqueous Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Jasinski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented for estimating subaqueous integrated backscatter using near-nadir viewing satellite lidar. The algorithm takes into account specular reflection of laser light, laser scattering by wind-generated foam as well as sun glint and solar scattering from foam. The formulation is insensitive to the estimate of wind speed but sensitive to the estimate of transmittance used in the atmospheric correction. As a case study, CALIOP data over Tampa Bay were compared to MODIS 645 nm remote sensing reflectance, which previously has been shown to be nearly linearly related to turbidity. The results indicate good correlation on nearly all CALIOP cloud-free dates during the period 2006 through 2007, particularly those with relatively high atmospheric transmittance. The correlation decreases when data are composited over all dates but is still statistically significant, a possible indication of variability in the biogeochemical composition in the water. Overall, the favorable results show promise for the application of satellite lidar integrated backscatter in providing information about subsurface backscatter properties, which can be extracted using appropriate models.

  4. Diurnal variations of the ionospheric electron density height profiles over Irkutsk: Comparison of the incoherent scatter radar measurements, GSM TIP simulations and IRI predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsov, G. A.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Medvedev, A. V.; Alsatkin, S. S.; Oinats, A. V.; Lukianova, R. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The long-duration continuous Irkutsk incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements allowed us to obtain the monthly averaged height-diurnal variations of the electron density in the 180-600 km altitudinal range for 4 four seasons (winter, spring, summer, autumn) and for two solar activity levels (low and moderate). Considering these electron density variations as ;quiet ionosphere patterns; we compared them with the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) simulations and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) predictions. It was found that some observational features revealed from the ISR measurements are reproduced nicely by both the theoretical and empirical models, and some features agree better with the GSM TIP than with IRI. None of the models is able to reproduce a detailed multi-peak behavior of the electron density observed by ISR at ∼300 km and above for the spring and autumn under low solar activity, while for the spring the GSM TIP tends to reproduce the morning and daytime peaks at the same local times as they are seen from the ISR observations.

  5. Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra from fcc NiH 1.05, hcp CrH 1.0 and hcp MoH 1.2 at 15K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, B.; Belash, I. T.; Bokhenkov, E. L.; Ponyatovsky, E. G.; Antonov, V. E.; Pronina, L. N.

    1989-01-01

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra from nickel, chromium and molybdenum hydrides, synthesized under high pressure of gaseous hydrogen, have been obtained in the energy region of optical modes of hydrogen vibrations. The measurements have been carried out at the three-axis spectrometer IN1 on the hot source of the ILL High Flux Reactor with the Beryllium filter-detector technique. In all three cases the frequencies of the fundamental vibrations scale to the observed higher harmonics as 1:2:3. The spectra exhibit a fine structure around the fundamentals as well as around the harmonics. Possible reasons for this effect are discussed.

  6. Support scattering effects on low-gain satellite antenna pattern measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is to determine the difference between the scattering effects from two types of supports on satellite antenna pattern measurements. The difference in scattering effects is estimated by comparing low-gain antenna patterns recorded when using a foam tower...

  7. Nonlocal incoherent solitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Bang, Ole; Wyller, John

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of partially coherent beams in spatially nonlocal nonlinear media with a logarithmic type of nonlinearity. We derive analytical formulas for the evolution of the beam parameters and conditions for the formation of nonlocal incoherent solitons....

  8. Direct measurements of laser light scattering and aberration from the ARTEMIS geostationary satellite through thin clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, V.; Sodnik, Z.; Kuzkov, S.

    2017-05-01

    A precise ground based telescope system was developed for laser communication experiments with the geostationary satellite ARTEMIS of ESA. Precise tracking of the satellite was realized by using time resolved coordinates of the satellite. During the experiments, the time propagation of laser signal from the satellite and the point-ahead angle for the laser beam was calculated. Some laser experiments though thin clouds were performed. A splitting of some images of the laser beam from the satellite along declination and right ascension coordinates of telescope could be observed through thin clouds. The splitting along the declination coordinate may be interpreted as Raman scattering on molecules of water and strong refraction at small angles over horizon in the atmosphere. The splitting along the right ascension coordinate is equivalent to the calculated point-ahead angle for the satellite. We find out that a small part of laser beam was observed ahead of the velocity vector in the point where the satellite would be after the laser light from the satellite reaches the telescope. These results are in accordance with the theory of relativity for aberration of light during transition from immovable to movable coordinate systems. The stellar aberration, as a result of the Earth motion around of the Sun, was discovered by James Bradley in 1727 year performing observation positions of stars during the year. These results are in accordance with the theory of relativity also. We directly observed laser light aberration as result of moving of geostationary satellite with velocity 3.07 km/s in direction of Earth rotation. By using same methodical we directly observed light aberration of two stars also. We think that this methodical open way for direct determine of light aberration for different objects in our galactic also.

  9. Seismic imaging with incoherent wavefields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.; Verschuur, D.J.; Blacquière, G.

    2009-01-01

    In blended seismic acquisition incoherent source arrays are used to generate the seismic response. The blended shot records can be directly fed into a shot record migration scheme with a more advanced imaging condition. Blended shot records can also be simulated in the processing phase. In the

  10. Incoherence-Mediated Remote Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyue; Motter, Adilson E.; Nishikawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    In previously identified forms of remote synchronization between two nodes, the intermediate portion of the network connecting the two nodes is not synchronized with them but generally exhibits some coherent dynamics. Here we report on a network phenomenon we call incoherence-mediated remote synchronization (IMRS), in which two noncontiguous parts of the network are identically synchronized while the dynamics of the intermediate part is statistically and information-theoretically incoherent. We identify mirror symmetry in the network structure as a mechanism allowing for such behavior, and show that IMRS is robust against dynamical noise as well as against parameter changes. IMRS may underlie neuronal information processing and potentially lead to network solutions for encryption key distribution and secure communication.

  11. Scattered reflections and multiple traces in the range of 7-10 MHz on ionograms of the interkosmos-19 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpachev, A. T.; Zhbankov, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    The scattered reflections and multiple traces regularly recorded on the topside sounding ionograms of the Interkosmos-19 satellite in the frequency range of 7-10 MHz are considered. The reflected radio signals in this frequency range appear both above and below the critical frequency of the regular layer F2. They are observed at all altitudes of the topside ionosphere from hmF2 to a satellite altitude of 1000 km. It is shown that these phenomena regularly appear at high latitudes (≥60° ILAT) and, less often, in the equatorial region. The scattered reflections indicate the presence of small-scale irregularities, and continuous traces are a consequence of total internal reflection from large-scale irregularities. Small-scale irregularities evidently form within a large-scale irregularity. Ray tracing shows that the size of large-scale irregularities is hundreds of kilometers in height and tens of kilometers in latitude. The appearance of scattered reflections and multiple traces at high latitudes is nearly independent of local time; in the equatorial region, they appear only in the interval of 20-08 LT. All of this agrees well with other observations of irregularities in the ionospheric plasma of different scales.

  12. Neutron Scattering from 36Ar and 4He Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carneiro, K.

    1977-01-01

    Scale factors for neutron diffraction and neutron inelastic scattering are presented for common adsorbates, and the feasibility of experiments is discussed together with the information gained by each type of experiment. Diffraction, coherent inelastic scattering, and incoherent scattering are tr...

  13. Coherent and Incoherent Structural Dynamics in Laser-Excited Antimony

    CERN Document Server

    Waldecker, Lutz; Bertoni, Roman; Vasileiadis, Thomas; Garcia, Martin E; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the excitation of phonons in photoexcited antimony and demonstrate that the entire electron-lattice interactions, in particular coherent and incoherent electron-phonon coupling, can be probed simultaneously. Using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) with high temporal resolution, we observe the coherent excitation of the fully symmetric \\Ag\\ optical phonon mode via the shift of the minimum of the atomic potential energy surface. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to quantify the change in lattice potential and the associated real-space amplitude of the coherent atomic oscillations. In addition, our experimental configuration allows observing the energy transfer from electrons to phonons via incoherent electron-lattice scattering events. Applying a modified two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling is determined from the data as a function of electronic temperature.

  14. Neutron scattering from fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Freltoft, T.; Richter, D.

    1986-01-01

    -angle neutron scattering studies of the variation with aggregation rate are presented. These results allow a very detailed comparison to be made with the theoretical scattering curves. Preliminary incoherent inelastic data on the low-frequency dynamics of hydroxylated silica particle aggregates show a clear...

  15. Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A/sup -2/ based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required.

  16. Inelastic scattering in ocean water and its impact on trace gas retrievals from satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vountas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over clear ocean waters, photons scattered within the water body contribute significantly to the upwelling flux. In addition to elastic scattering, inelastic Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS by liquid water is also playing a role and can have a strong impact on the spectral distribution of the outgoing radiance. Under clear-sky conditions, VRS has an influence on trace gas retrievals from space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance such as from e.g. GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. The effect is particularly important for geo-locations with small solar zenith angles and over waters with low chlorophyll concentration. In this study, a simple ocean reflectance model (Sathyendranath and Platt, 1998 accounting for VRS has been incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The model has been validated by comparison with measurements from a swimming-pool experiment dedicated to detect the effect of scattering within water on the outgoing radiation and also with selected data sets from GOME. The comparisons show good agreement between experimental and model data and highlight the important role of VRS. To evaluate the impact of VRS on trace gas retrieval, a sensitivity study was performed on synthetic data. If VRS is neglected in the data analysis, errors of more than 30% are introduced for the slant column (SC of BrO over clear ocean scenarios. Exemplarily DOAS retrievals of BrO from real GOME measurements including and excluding a VRS compensation led to comparable results as in the sensitivity study, but with somewhat smaller differences between the two analyses. The results of this work suggest, that DOAS retrievals of atmospheric trace species from measurements of nadir viewing space-borne instruments have to take VRS scattering into account over waters with low chlorophyll concentrations, and that a simple correction term is enough to reduce the errors to an acceptable level.

  17. Incoherent "slow and fast light".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapasskii, Valerii; Kozlov, Gleb

    2009-11-23

    We show experimentally that the effects of pulse delay and advancement usually ascribed to the "slow and fast light" under conditions of the coherent population oscillations (CPO) can be universally observed with incoherent light fields on objects with the pure-intensity nonlinearity. As a light source, we used an incandescent lamp and as objects for study, a photochromic glass and a thermochromic coating. The response of the objects to intensity modulation of the incident light reproduced in all details the commonly accepted experimental evidences of the "light with a negative group velocity" and "ultraslow light". Thus we show that observations of the pulse delay (advancement) and characteristic changes in the light intensity modulation spectrum are not enough to make conclusion about modification of the light group velocity in the medium.

  18. Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo retrieval in the UV range: an application to OMI satellite validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ialongo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA and Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD at 320.1 nm are derived at Rome site by the comparison between Brewer and modelled spectra. The UVSPEC radiative transfer model is used to calculate the UV irradiances for different SSA values, taking into account as input data total ozone and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD obtained from Brewer spectral measurements. The accuracy in determining SSA depends on the aerosol amount and on Solar Zenith Angle (SZA value: SSA uncertainty increases when AOD and SZA decrease. The monthly mean values of SSA and AAOD during the period January 2005–June 2008 are analysed, showing a monthly and seasonal variability. It is found that the SSA and AAOD averages are 0.80±0.08 and 0.056±0.028, respectively.

    AAOD retrievals are also used to quantify the error in the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI surface UV products due to absorbing aerosols, not included in the current OMI UV algorithm. OMI and Brewer UV irradiances at 324.1 nm and Erythemal Dose Rates (EDRs under clear sky conditions, are compared as a function of AAOD. Three methods are considered to investigate on the applicability of an absorbing aerosol correction on OMI UV data at Rome site. Depending on the correction methodology, the bias value decreases from 18% to 2% for spectral irradiance at 324.1 nm and from 25% to 8% for EDR.

  19. Scattering properties and signatures of Antarctic snow derived from multitemporal satellite radar and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, W.; Linow, S.; Dierking, W.

    2009-04-01

    Radar backscattering from Antarctic snow shows high variability in dependence of imaging geometry, radar wavelength, and polarization. The azimuthal anisotropy is primarily caused by persistent katabatic winds and the resulting predominant pattern of sastrugi. Incidence angle dependence and magnitude of backscattering is related to snow morphology as a result of the vertical sequence of internal layers due to snow accumulation and subsequent snow metamorphism. We investigate the backscattering properties in X-Band in comparison to C- and L-Band between the coastal areas in Antarctica and the high-elevated plateau. The analysis is based on ScanSAR data from Terra-SAR, Envisat, and ALOS in Dronning Maud Land and the western Ross Sea region. Most of the image data were acquired during the winter season, when the snow also in the percolation zone is frozen. As a reference for the interpretation of satellite data serve field data from snow pits and firn cores, such as accumulation, density profiles, layering, grain size, and hardness. Also available are ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. In Dronning Maud Land, field data are available along several traverse routes and measurement profiles between the German overwintering base Neumayer and the Kohnen Station. In the western Ross Sea Region field data were collected in November 2008 near Scott Base (New Zealand) within ESA's Cryosat Cal/Val program. We apply a normalization procedure with respect to incidence and azimuth angle to the various data sources in order to generate normalized maps of the backscattering coefficient. Maps of backscattering coefficient and incidence angle dependence are used as input to a snow classification algorithm, which are interpreted along with the field data. The most significant differences in the backscattering properties can be understood as a result of variations in penetration depth between the dry snow zone and percolation zone. In the dry snow zone backscattering variations in

  20. Satellite peaks in the scattering of light from the two-dimensional randomly rough surface of a dielectric film on a planar metal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordam, T; Letnes, P A; Simonsen, I; Maradudin, A A

    2012-05-07

    A nonperturbative, purely numerical, solution of the reduced Rayleigh equation for the scattering of p- and s-polarized light from a dielectric film with a two-dimensional randomly rough surface deposited on a planar metallic substrate, has been carried out. It is found that satellite peaks are present in the angular dependence of the elements of the mean differential reflection coefficient in addition to an enhanced backscattering peak. This result resolves a conflict between the results of earlier approximate theoretical studies of scattering from this system.

  1. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering of the solar lightfield, due to energy absorption by vibrational modes of water molecules, may contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites over water. The inelastic fraction of the water-leaving radiance for clear water reaches values of 30% in the red part of the visible spectrum, and still reaches values of several percent in moderately turbid waters. Furthermore, inelastic scattering due to chlorophyll and yellow substance fluorescence adds to this fraction. For these reasons the inclusion of inelastic scattering sources into radiative-transfer models, used in ocean remote sensing applications or atmosphere remote sensing over the ocean, can be important. MOMO is a computer code based on the matrix-operator method designed to calculate the lightfield in the stratified atmosphere-ocean system. It has been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin and provides the full polarization state (in the newest version) and an air-sea interface accounting for radiative effects of the wind roughened water surface. The inclusion of Raman scattering effects is done by a processing module, that starts a primary MOMO program run with a high spectral resolution, to calculate the radiative energy available for inelastic scattering at each model layer boundary. The processing module then calculates the first order Raman source-terms for every observation wavelength at every layer boundary, accounting for the non-isotropicity (including the azimuthal dependence) of the Raman phase-function, the spectral redistribution, and the spectral dependence of the Raman scattering coefficient. These elementary source-terms then serve as input for the second program run, which then calculates the source-terms of all model layers, using the doubling-adding method, and the resulting radiance field. Higher orders of the Raman contribution can be computed with additional program runs. Apart from the Raman

  2. Using ocean-glint scattered sunlight as a diagnostic tool for satellite remote sensing of greenhouse gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Butz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic measurements of sunlight backscattered by the Earth's surface is a technique widely used for remote sensing of atmospheric constituent concentrations from space. Thereby, remote sensing of greenhouse gases poses particularly challenging accuracy requirements for instrumentation and retrieval algorithms which, in general, suffer from various error sources. Here, we investigate a method that helps disentangle sources of error for observations of sunlight backscattered from the glint spot on the ocean surface. The method exploits the backscattering characteristics of the ocean surface, which is bright for glint geometry but dark for off-glint angles. This property allows for identifying a set of clean scenes where light scattering due to particles in the atmosphere is negligible such that uncertain knowledge of the lightpath can be excluded as a source of error. We apply the method to more than 3 yr of ocean-glint measurements by the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT, which aims at measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 concentrations. The proposed method is able to clearly monitor recent improvements in the instrument calibration of the oxygen (O2 A-band channel and suggests some residual uncertainty in our knowledge about the instrument. We further assess the consistency of CO2 retrievals from several absorption bands between 6400 cm−1 (1565 nm and 4800 cm−1 (2100 nm and find that the absorption bands commonly used for monitoring of CO2 dry air mole fractions from GOSAT allow for consistency better than 1.5 ppm. Usage of other bands reveals significant inconsistency among retrieved CO2 concentrations pointing at inconsistency of spectroscopic parameters.

  3. Incoherent fractional Fourier transform and its optical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendlovic, D; Zalevsky, Z; Konforti, N; Dorsch, R G; Lohmann, A W

    1995-11-10

    The fractional Fourier transform is redefined for working with incoherent light. As a real transformation, the incoherent fractional Fourier transform overcomes coherent system disadvantages such as the speckle effect and the need for incoherent-coherent conversion. It also might have some applications for digital image and signal processing owing to its decreased computing complexity. An incoherent optical implementation of the new transform based on the shearing interferometer is suggested. Laboratory experimental results are given.

  4. Expressive Incoherence and Alexithymia in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Andreia P.; Steffgen, Georges; Samson, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Expressive incoherence can be implicated in socio-emotional communicative problems in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study examined expressive incoherence in 37 children with ASD and 41 typically developing (TD) children aged 3-13 years old during a frustration task. The role of alexithymia in expressive incoherence was also assessed.…

  5. Hydrogen ion study by incoherent scatter (IS) method: comparison of results taken by Kharkov IS radar with data from Arecibo and Millstone Hill radars, atmosphere explorer satellites and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, V. I.; Grigorenko, Ye. I.

    2003-04-01

    Investigation of hydrogen ion behavior in topside ionosphere with the Kharkov IS radar is conducted by the POLITE CEDAR program. Program aim is the study of flight ion morphology and dynamics for refinement of the global topside ionosphere models and forecast of the 'space weather'. In this paper, the H+ density data of radars at Kharkov, Arecibo and Millstone Hill are compared at altitudes up to 1000-1300 km for winter and summer, minimum and maximum of solar activity. The measurements showed that height and diurnal variations of H+ concentration over eastern and western hemispheres were generally in close agreement, It is revealed a strong longitudinal variation of H+ ion fraction that is accounted for different magnetic flux tube volumes due to the offset between the geographic and geomagnetic poles. The Kharkov radar data are also compared with results taken from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) database and FLIP model calculations, for midlatitude region, noon and midnight local time, at solar minimum. Comparisons show that H+ height distributions good agrees and corresponds close conditions of ionosphere-plasmasphere interaction. At the same time the model and AE data are lower than mesaured densities at Kharkov that can be explained by geophysical condition difference.

  6. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, John

    1975-01-01

    Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation covers the theory and experimental application of plasma scattering. The book discusses the basic properties of a plasma and of the interaction of radiation with a plasma; the relationship between the scattered power spectrum and the fluctuations in plasma density; and the incoherent scattering of low-temperature plasma. The text also describes the constraints and problems that arise in the application of scattering as a diagnostic technique; the characteristic performance of various dispersion elements, image dissectors, and detectors; and the ge

  7. ABSORPTION, SCATTERING, ATTENUATION COEFFICIENTS and Other Data from SATELLITE From Gulf of Maine from 19850101 to 19921231 (NCEI Accession 9400225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains binary raster images from landsat thematic mapper collected in Gulf of Maine between 1982 to 1985. A suite of Regional Satellite Products from...

  8. Ground clutter cancellation in incoherent radars: solutions for EISCAT Svalbard radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Turunen

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Incoherent scatter radars measure ionosphere parameters using modified Thomson scatter from free electrons in the target (see e.g. Hagfors, 1997. The integrated cross section of the ionospheric scatterers is extremely small and the measurements can easily be disturbed by signals returned by unwanted targets. Ground clutter signals, entering via the antenna side lobes, can render measurements at the nearest target ranges totally impossible. The EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, which started measurements in 1996, suffers from severe ground clutter and the ionosphere cannot be measured in any simple manner at ranges less than about 120–150 km, depending on the modulation employed. If the target and clutter signals have different, and clearly identifiable, properties then, in principle, there are always ways to eliminate the clutter. In incoherent scatter measurements, differences in the coherence times of the wanted and unwanted signals can be used for clutter cancellation. The clutter cancellation must be applied to all modulations, usually alternating codes in modern experiments, used for shorter ranges. Excellent results have been obtained at the ESR using a simple pulse-to-pulse clutter subtraction method, but there are also other possibilities.Key words: Radio science (ionospheric physics; signal processing; instruments and techniques

  9. Quantum Radiation Reaction: From Interference to Incoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Victor; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-01-29

    We investigate quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron interactions across different energy and intensity regimes. Using a fully quantum approach which also accounts exactly for the effect of the strong laser pulse on the electron motion, we identify in particular a regime in which radiation reaction is dominated by quantum interference. We find signatures of quantum radiation reaction in the electron spectra which have no classical analogue and which cannot be captured by the incoherent approximations typically used in the high-intensity regime. These signatures are measurable with presently available laser and accelerator technology.

  10. Yes, The Precautionary Principle Is Incoherent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Martin

    2017-11-01

    This article is a reply to Thomas Boyer-Kassem's discussion of my criticism of the precautionary principle published in this journal about a decade ago. Boyer-Kassem does not question the logical validity of the theorem proved in my original article, but he brings up important questions about its scope. He also challenges the plausibility of some of the assumptions on which it is based. In this comment, I argue that each objection can be adequately dealt with. As a decision rule, the precautionary principle is (still) incoherent. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Is the Precautionary Principle Really Incoherent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer-Kassem, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The Precautionary Principle has been an increasingly important principle in international treaties since the 1980s. Through varying formulations, it states that when an activity can lead to a catastrophe for human health or the environment, measures should be taken to prevent it even if the cause-and-effect relationship is not fully established scientifically. The Precautionary Principle has been critically discussed from many sides. This article concentrates on a theoretical argument by Peterson (2006) according to which the Precautionary Principle is incoherent with other desiderata of rational decision making, and thus cannot be used as a decision rule that selects an action among several ones. I claim here that Peterson's argument fails to establish the incoherence of the Precautionary Principle, by attacking three of its premises. I argue (i) that Peterson's treatment of uncertainties lacks generality, (ii) that his Archimedian condition is problematic for incommensurability reasons, and (iii) that his explication of the Precautionary Principle is not adequate. This leads me to conjecture that the Precautionary Principle can be envisaged as a coherent decision rule, again. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Development of an ice crystal scattering database for the global change observation mission/second generation global imager satellite mission: investigating the refractive index grid system and potential retrieval error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letu, Husi; Nakajima, Takashi Y; Matsui, Takashi N

    2012-09-01

    Computing time and retrieval error of the effective particle radius are important considerations when developing an ice crystal scattering database to be used in radiative transfer simulation and satellite remote sensing retrieval. Therefore, the light scattering database should be optimized based on the specifications of the satellite sensor. In this study, the grid system of the complex refractive index in the 1.6 μm (SW3) channel of the Global Change Observation Mission/Second Generation Global Imager satellite sensor is investigated for optimizing the ice crystal scattering database. This grid system is separated into twelve patterns according to the step size of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index. Specifically, the LIght Scattering solver Applicable to particles of arbitrary Shape/Geometrical-Optics Approximation technique is used to simulate the scattering of light by randomly oriented large hexagonal ice crystals. The difference of radiance with different step size of the refractive index is calculated from the developed light scattering database using the radiative transfer (R-STAR) solver. The results indicated that the step size of the real part is a significant factor in difference of radiance.

  13. Coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, M.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this contribution the authors present the distinction between coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission. As a first step they determine whether an autoionization process is photoemission-like or Auger-like. The discussion is based on measurements for a weakly bonded adsorption system, Ar/Pt(111). This type of system is well adapted to investigate these effects since it yields distinctly shifted spectral features depending on the nature of the process. After this, the question of resonance photoemission in metallic systems is addressed. This is done in connection with measurements at the 2p edges for Ni metal. Ni has been one of the prototype systems for resonant photoemission. The resonances have been discussed in connection with the strong correlation and d-band localization effects in this system. Based on the results some general comments about the appearance of resonant effects in metallic systems are made.

  14. Incoherent population mixing contributions to phase-modulation two-dimensional coherent excitation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Pascal; Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Vella, Eleonora; Tao, Chen; Leonelli, Richard; Silva, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results showing the effects of incoherent population mixing on two-dimensional (2D) coherent excitation spectra that are measured via a time-integrated population and phase-sensitive detection. The technique uses four collinear ultrashort pulses and phase modulation to acquire two-dimensional spectra by isolating specific nonlinear contributions to the photoluminescence or photocurrent excitation signal. We demonstrate that an incoherent contribution to the measured line shape, arising from nonlinear population dynamics over the entire photoexcitation lifetime, generates a similar line shape to the expected 2D coherent spectra in condensed-phase systems. In those systems, photoexcitations are mobile such that inter-particle interactions are important on any time scale, including those long compared with the 2D coherent experiment. Measurements on a semicrystalline polymeric semiconductor film at low temperatures show that, in some conditions in which multi-exciton interactions are suppressed, the technique predominantly detects coherent signals and can be used, in our example, to extract homogeneous line widths. The same method used on a lead-halide perovskite photovoltaic cell shows that incoherent population mixing of mobile photocarriers can dominate the measured signal since carrier-carrier bimolecular scattering is active even at low excitation densities, which hides the coherent contribution to the spectral line shape. In this example, the intensity dependence of the signal matches the theoretical predictions over more than two orders of magnitude, confirming the incoherent nature of the signal. While these effects are typically not significant in dilute solution environments, we demonstrate the necessity to characterize, in condensed-phase materials systems, the extent of nonlinear population dynamics of photoexcitations (excitons, charge carriers, etc.) in the execution of this powerful population-detected coherent

  15. Aspect sensitive E- and F-region SPEAR-enhanced incoherent backscatter observed by the EISCAT Svalbard radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Dhillon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the aspect sensitivity of heater-enhanced incoherent radar backscatter in the high-latitude ionosphere have demonstrated the directional dependence of incoherent scatter signatures corresponding to artificially excited electrostatic waves, together with consistent field-aligned signatures that may be related to the presence of artificial field-aligned irregularities. These earlier high-latitude results have provided motivation for repeating the investigation in the different geophysical conditions that obtain in the polar cap ionosphere. The Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR facility is located within the polar cap and has provided observations of RF-enhanced ion and plasma line spectra recorded by the EISCAT Svalbard UHF incoherent scatter radar system (ESR, which is collocated with SPEAR. In this paper, we present observations of aspect sensitive E- and F-region SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line enhancements that indicate excitation of both the purely growing mode and the parametric decay instability, together with sporadic E-layer results that may indicate the presence of cavitons. We note consistent enhancements from field-aligned, vertical and also from 5° south of field-aligned. We attribute the prevalence of vertical scatter to the importance of the Spitze region, and of that from field-aligned to possible wave/irregularity coupling.

  16. Methods of satellite oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical basis for remote sensing measurements of climate and ocean dynamics is examined. Consideration is given to: the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere; scattering in the atmosphere; and satellite observations using visible light. Consideration is also given to: the theory of radio scatter from the sea; scatter of centimeter waves from the sea; and the theory of operation of synthetic aperture radars. Additional topics include: the coordinate systems of satellite orbits for oceanographic remote sensing applications; the operating features of the major U.S. satellite systems for viewing the ocean; and satellite altimetry.

  17. Incidental experiences of affective coherence and incoherence influence persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsinger, Jeffrey R

    2013-06-01

    When affective experiences are inconsistent with activated evaluative concepts, people experience what is called affective incoherence; when affective experiences are consistent with activated evaluative concepts, people experience affective coherence. The present research asked whether incidental feelings of affective coherence and incoherence would regulate persuasion. Experiences of affective coherence and incoherence were predicted and found to influence the processing of persuasive messages when evoked prior to receipt of such messages (Experiments 1 and 3), and to influence the confidence with which thoughts generated by persuasive messages were held when evoked after presentation of such messages (Experiments 2 and 3). These results extend research on affective coherence and incoherence by showing that they exert a broader impact on cognitive activity than originally assumed.

  18. Semi-automated extraction of Deviation Indexes (DI from satellite Persistent Scatterers time series: tests on sedimentary volcanism and tectonically-induced motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cigna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We develop a methodology based on satellite Persistent Scatterers (PS time series and aimed to calculate two indexes which are capable to depict the deviation from a deformation model defined a priori. Through a simple mathematical approach, these indexes reproduce the visual process of identification of trend deviations that is usually performed manually by the radar-interpreter, and guide the prioritization of further interpretation for those areas recording significant variations within their motion history. First tests on semi-automated extraction of the Deviation Indexes (DI from RADARSAT-1 PS data available over Southern Italy allowed the quantification of tectonically-induced land motions which occurred in February 2005 within the town of Naro, and also the clear recognition of the precursors to mud volcano eruptions which occurred in August 2008 in the village of St. Barbara. For these areas, the information level brought by the DI increases and adds onto that of other PS parameters, such as yearly velocity, standard deviation and coherence. Factors exerting influence on the DI are critically tackled within the discussions, together with the analysis of the potentials of these indexes for monitoring and warning activities of geohazards.

  19. Whole-body intravoxel incoherent motion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Wurnig, Moritz C.; Eberhardt, Christian; Guggenberger, Roman; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Luechinger, Roger [University and ETH Zurich, Institute of Biomedical Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the technical feasibility of whole-body intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging. Whole-body MR images of eight healthy volunteers were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with eight b-values. Coronal parametrical whole-body maps of diffusion (D), pseudodiffusion (D*), and the perfusion fraction (F{sub p}) were calculated. Image quality was rated qualitatively by two independent radiologists, and inter-reader reliability was tested with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in the brain, liver, kidney, and erector spinae muscle. Depiction of anatomic structures was rated as good on D maps and good to fair on D* and F{sub p} maps. Exemplary mean D (10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), D* (10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and F{sub p} (%) values (± standard deviation) of the renal cortex were as follows: 1.7 ± 0.2; 15.6 ± 6.5; 20.9 ± 4.4. Inter-observer agreement was ''substantial'' to ''almost perfect'' (ICC = 0.80 - 0.92). The coefficient of variation of D* was significantly lower with the proposed algorithm compared to the conventional algorithm (p < 0.001), indicating higher stability. The proposed IVIM protocol allows computation of parametrical maps with good to fair image quality. Potential future clinical applications may include characterization of widespread disease such as metastatic tumours or inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  20. The measurement of self-diffusion coefficients in liquid metals with quasielastic neutron scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering (QENS) has proven to be a versatile tool to study self diffusion of atoms in liquid metals. Here it is shown, that coherent contributions to the signal in the small q limit appear as a flat and energy independent constant to the QENS signal in single-component liquid metals even for systems with a small incoherent scattering cross section, like aluminum. Container-less processing via electromagnetic or electrostatic levitation devices, especially des...

  1. Satellite retrieval of snow accumulation over the Antarctic ice sheet: a new approach based on SAR imagery and scatter-regime bridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, W.; Dierking, W.; Linow, S.

    2012-04-01

    Ice sheets are regarded as one of the major contributors to sea level rise, and more accurate data on mass gain and loss are required to determine its magnitude. Overall mass balance estimations are based on measurements of changes in gravity and surface elevation. By the budget method gain and loss are estimated separately. This has the advantage to yield further insight into underlying causes of mass imbalance. The main factor of uncertainty rests with the difficulty to correctly determine snow accumulation over large areas using remote sensing methods. Work from various authors demonstrates the potential for mapping snow accumulation based on microwave (MW) sensors. However, the main deficiencies in the current understanding of MW signatures of snow are the limited ability to effectively measure the most relevant snow properties in a representative way and the difficulty to establish a robust and reliable method for retrieving snow parameters, such as accumulation rate, from MW measurements. We present a new approach for reducing this uncertainty by improving the measurement of snow accumulation based on the simulation and analysis of MW satellite signals. Here the dense medium radiative transfer theory is applied to calculate the volume scattering and absorption coefficients of snow. As model input serve empirically derived profiles of effective grain size of snow as a function of mean surface temperature and accumulation rate. The coefficients for the density transition between low-density snow and dense firn are evaluated using a polynomial interpolation, an approach which we call scatter-regime bridging. We demonstrate the applicability of the method by comparing simulated backscattering coefficients with measured data from Envisat ASAR and ASCAT data (C-band), as well as QuickSCAT (Ku-band) scatterometer data. Simulations were carried out using accumulation data measured at a 200 km long section of a traverse in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Differences

  2. Experimental investigation of quantum effects in time-resolved resonance Rayleigh scattering from quantum well excitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Shah, Jagdeep; Shchegrov, Andrei V.

    2000-01-01

    Resonant Rayleigh scattering from quantum well excitons is investigated using ultrafast spectral interferometry. We isolate the coherent Rayleigh scattering from incoherent luminescence in a single speckle. Averaging the resonant Rayleigh intensity over several speckles allows us to identify...... features in support of quantum corrections to the classical description of the underlying scattering process....

  3. High-resolution interference with programmable classical incoherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Wei-Tao; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2015-07-01

    A scheme of high-resolution interference with classical incoherent light is proposed. In this scheme, the classical incoherent light is programmable in the amplitude distribution and wavefront, and with the programmable classical incoherent light we improve the resolution of the interference pattern by a factor of 2 compared with the scheme by Erkmen [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A29, 782 (2012)JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.29.000782]. Compared with other schemes for observing interference patterns, only single-pixel detection is needed in our proposal. Moreover, the high-resolution interference pattern can be inverted to obtain an image with better resolution compared with that of the scheme proposed by Erkmen. Furthermore, this scheme of high-resolution interference is verified in detail by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations.

  4. Electromagnetically Induced Grating Without Absorption Using Incoherent Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Yuan; Liu, Zhuan-Zhuan; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2017-10-01

    We propose a scheme for creating electromagnetically induced grating in a four-level double- Λ atomic system driven by a coupling field and an incoherent pump field. Owing to the incoherent pumping process, large refractivity accompanied with vanishing absorption or even gain across the probe field can be built up in the atoms, thus phase grating or gain-phase grating, which diffracts a probe light into different directions, can be formed with the help of a standing-wave coupling field. The diffraction efficiency of the gratings can be tuned by the coupling field intensity and the incoherent pump rate, hence the proposed gratings should be suitable for beam splitter and optical switching in optical communication and networking.

  5. Microscopic theory of coherent and incoherent optical properties of semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Martin

    2008-09-02

    An important question is whether there is a regime in which lasing from indirect semiconductors is possible. Thus, we discuss this question in this thesis. It is shown that under incoherent emission conditions it is possible to create an exciton condensate in multiple-quantum-well (MQW) systems. The influence of a MQW structure on the exciton lifetime is investigated. For the description of the light-matter interaction of a QW in the coherent excitation regime, the semiconductor Bloch equation (SBE) are used. The incoherent regime is described by the semiconductor luminescence equations (SLE). In principle it is even possible to couple SBE and SLE. The resulting theory is able to describe interactions between coherent and incoherent processes we investigate both, the coherent and the incoherent light-emission regime. Thus we define the investigated system and introduce the many-body Hamiltonian that describes consistently the light-matter interaction in the classical and the quantum limit. We introduce the SBE that allow to compute the light-matter interaction in the coherent scenario. The extended scattering model is used to investigate the absorption of a Ge QW for different time delays after the excitations. In this context, we analyze whether there is a regime in which optical gain can be realized. Then we apply a transfer-matrix method to include into our calculations the influence of the dielectric environment on the optical response. Thereafter the SLE for a MQW system are introduced. We derive a scheme that allows for decoupling environmental effects from the pure PL-emission properties of the QW. The PL of the actual QW system is obtained by multiplying this filter function and the free-space PL that describes the quantum emission into a medium with spatially constant background-refractive index. It is studied how the MQW-Bragg structure influences the PL-emission properties compared to the emission of a single QW device. As a last feature, it is shown

  6. Coherent imaging with pseudo-thermal incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gatti, A.; Bache, Morten; Magatti, D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate experimentally fundamental properties of coherent ghost imaging using spatially incoherent beams generated from a pseudo-thermal source. A complementarity between the coher- ence of the beams and the correlation between them is demonstrated by showing a complementarity between ghost...... diffraction and ordinary diffraction patterns. In order for the ghost imaging scheme to work it is therefore crucial to have incoherent beams. The visibility of the information is shown for the ghost image to become better as the object size relative to the speckle size is decreased, and therefore...

  7. Rainbow refractometry with a tailored incoherent semiconductor laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peil, Michael; Fischer, Ingo; Elsäßer, Wolfgang; Bakić, Saša; Damaschke, Nils; Tropea, Cameron; Stry, Sandra; Sacher, Joachim

    2006-08-01

    The authors demonstrate within a metrology experiment the applicability of a recently proposed temporally incoherent semiconductor laser source which relies on nonlinear dynamics. The realized spectrally broadband emission with an output power of 110mW and a coherence length of only 120μm is used in a rainbow refractometry experiment for sizing of liquid droplets, representing an important problem in industrial processes. The observed emission characteristics are attractive for implementation of modern imaging and metrology techniques which are based on the properties of well-directed, temporally incoherent light.

  8. Ultrafast spectral interferometry of resonant secondary emission from quantum wells: From Rayleigh scattering to coherent emission from biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Shah, Jagdeep; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    1999-01-01

    Recent investigations of secondary emission from quantum well excitons following ultrafast resonant excitation have demonstrated an intricate interplay of coherent Rayleigh scattering and incoherent luminescence. We have very recently demonstrated that it is possible to isolate and time resolve t...

  9. Depth enhancement of 3D microscopic living-cell image using incoherent fluorescent digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, L T; Wu, H Y; Zhao, Y; Kim, E G; Kim, N

    2017-03-01

    Multilayer images of living cells are typically obtained using confocal or multiphoton microscopy. However, limitations on the distance between consecutive scan layers hinder high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction, and scattering strongly degrades images of living cell components. Consequently, when overlapping information from different layers is focused on a specific point in the camera, this causes uncertainty in the depiction of the cell components. We propose a method that combines the Fresnel incoherent correlation holography and a depth-of-focus reduction algorithm to enhance the depth information of three-dimensional cell images. The proposed method eliminates overlap between light elements in the different layers inside living cells and limitations on the interlayer distance, and also enhances the contrast of the reconstructed holograms of living cells. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Dense Matter Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Edwards, M J; Lee, R W; Collins, G W; Cauble, R C; Hsing, W W; Hammel, B A

    2000-12-29

    We discuss the extension of the powerful technique of Thomson scattering to the x-ray regime for providing an independent measure of plasma parameters for dense plasmas. By spectrally-resolving the scattering, the coherent (Rayleigh) unshifted scattering component can be separated from the incoherent Thomson component, which is both Compton and Doppler shifted. The free electron density and temperature can then be inferred from the spectral shape of the high frequency Thomson scattering component. In addition, as the plasma temperature is decreased, the electron velocity distribution as measured by incoherent Thomson scattering will make a transition from the traditional Gaussian Boltzmann distribution to a density-dependent parabolic Fermi distribution to. We also present a discussion for a proof-of-principle experiment appropriate for a high energy laser facility.

  11. ABSORPTION, SCATTERING, ATTENUATION COEFFICIENTS and Other Data from NOAA-12 SATELLITE From World-Wide Distribution from 19960101 to 19961231 (NCEI Accession 9600023)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains Products developed from data collected from NOAA-11 AVHRR satellite in East Coast US/Canada as part of Coastal Ocean Program / Coastwatch. The...

  12. Coherent and incoherent nonparaxial self-accelerating Weber beams

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Wen, Feng; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng; Belić, Milivoj R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the coherent and incoherent nonparaxial Weber beams, theoretically and numerically. We show that the superposition of coherent self-accelerating Weber beams with transverse displacement cannot display the nonparaxial accelerating Talbot effect. The reason is that their lobes do not accelerate in unison, which is a requirement for the appearance of the effect. While for the incoherent Weber beams, they naturally cannot display the accelerating Talbot effect but can display the nonparaxial accelerating properties, although the transverse coherence length is smaller than the beam width, based on the second-order coherence theory. Our research method directly applies to the nonparaxial Mathieu beams as well, and one will obtain similar conclusions as for the Weber beams, although this is not discussed in the paper. Our investigation identifies families of nonparaxial accelerating beams that do not exhibit the accelerating Talbot effect, and in addition broadens the understanding of coherence proper...

  13. Momentum dissipation and effective theories of coherent and incoherent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Richard A.; Goutéraux, Blaise

    2015-01-01

    We study heat transport in two systems without momentum conservation: a hydrodynamic system, and a holographic system with spatially dependent, massless scalar fields. When momentum dissipates slowly, there is a well-defined, coherent collective excitation in the AC heat conductivity, and a crossover between sound-like and diffusive transport at small and large distance scales. When momentum dissipates quickly, there is no such excitation in the incoherent AC heat conductivity, and diffusion dominates at all distance scales. For a critical value of the momentum dissipation rate, we compute exact expressions for the Green's functions of our holographic system due to an emergent gravitational self-duality, similar to electric/magnetic duality, and SL(2, ) symmetries. We extend the coherent/incoherent classification to examples of charge transport in other holographic systems: probe brane theories and neutral theories with non-Maxwell actions.

  14. Behavior of aqueous Tetrabutylammonium bromide - a combined approach of microscopic simulation and neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous solution of tetrabutylammonium bromide is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, to give information on the dynamic modes involving the ions present. Using a careful combination of two techniques, time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron spin echo (NSE), we de- couple the dynamic information in both the coherently and incoherently scattered signal from this system. We take advantage of the different intensity ratio of the two signals, as detected by each of the techniques, to achieve this decoupling. By using heavy water as the sol- vent, the tetrabutylammonium cation is the only hydrogen-containing species in the system and gives rise to a significant incoherent scattered intensity. The dynamic analysis of the incoherent signal (measured by TOF) leads to a translational diffusion coefficient of the cation as that is in good agreement with previous NMR, neutron scattering and tracer diffusion measurements. The dynamic analysis of the coherent signal observed at wave-vectors < 0.6 angstrom^(-1) (measu...

  15. High resolution 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An optimized method for continuous wave 2-dimensional (2-D) upconversion of incoherent or thermal light is demonstrated and quantified. Using standard resolution targets a resolution of 200×1000 pixels is obtained. The suggested method is viewed in scope of modern CCD cameras operating in the near...... CCD detectors. Furthermore, we discuss the exceptionally good depth of field possible for imaging systems based on the proposed method....

  16. Are Ascriptions of Intentionality to the Brain Incoherent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presskorn-Thygesen, Thomas

    The ascriptions of ‘agency’ or ‘intentionality’ to the brain has long been regarded with suspicion from social scientists and philosophers. In the talk, I will argue that this suspicion is perfectly legitimate and that the standard response from the defenders of cognitive neuroscience is illegiti...... to the brain are conceptually incoherent because it commits a mereological fallacy (Bennett&Hacker 2001, 2007)....

  17. Incoherent photoproduction of {eta} mesons from the deuteron near threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibirtsev, A.; Elster, Ch.; Haidenbauer, J.; Speth, J.

    2001-08-01

    Incoherent photoproduction of the {eta} meson on the deuteron is studied for photon energies from threshold to 800 MeV. The dominant contribution, the {gamma}N-{eta}N amplitude, is described within an isobar model. The final state interaction derived from the CD-Bonn potential is included and found to be important for the description of the production cross section close to threshold. Possible effects from the {eta}N final state interaction are discussed.

  18. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  19. Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Gary; Siegel, Nisan; Wang, Victor; Rosen, Joseph

    2011-03-14

    Fresnel Incoherent Correlation Holography (FINCH) enables holograms and 3D images to be created from incoherent light with just a camera and spatial light modulator (SLM). We previously described its application to microscopic incoherent fluorescence wherein one complex hologram contains all the 3D information in the microscope field, obviating the need for scanning or serial sectioning. We now report experiments which have led to the optimal optical, electro-optic, and computational conditions necessary to produce holograms which yield high quality 3D images from fluorescent microscopic specimens. An important improvement from our previous FINCH configurations capitalizes on the polarization sensitivity of the SLM so that the same SLM pixels which create the spherical wave simulating the microscope tube lens, also pass the plane waves from the infinity corrected microscope objective, so that interference between the two wave types at the camera creates a hologram. This advance dramatically improves the resolution of the FINCH system. Results from imaging a fluorescent USAF pattern and a pollen grain slide reveal resolution which approaches the Rayleigh limit by this simple method for 3D fluorescent microscopic imaging.

  20. Electromagnetically induced two-dimensional grating assisted by incoherent pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Yuan; Liu, Zhuan-Zhuan; Wan, Ren-Gang, E-mail: wrg@snnu.edu.cn

    2017-04-25

    We propose a scheme for realizing electromagnetically induced two-dimensional grating in a double-Λ system driven simultaneously by a coherent field and an incoherent pump field. In such an atomic configuration, the absorption is suppressed owing to the incoherent pumping process and the probe can be even amplified, while the refractivity is mainly attributed to the dynamically induced coherence. With the help of a standing-wave pattern coherent field, we obtain periodically modulated refractive index without or with gain, and therefore phase grating or gain-phase grating which diffracts a probe light into high-order direction efficiently can be formed in the medium via appropriate manipulation of the system parameters. The diffraction efficiency attainable by the present gratings can be controlled by tuning the coherent field intensity or the interaction length. Hence, the two-dimensional grating can be utilized as all-optical splitter or router in optical networking and communication. - Highlights: • Two-dimensional grating is coherently induced in four-level atoms. • Phase and gain-phase gratings are obtained assisted by incoherent pump. • The diffraction power is improved due to the enhanced refraction modulation. • The gratings can be utilized as multi-channel all-optical splitter and router.

  1. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  2. A resolution insensitive to geometrical aberrations by using incoherent illumination and interference imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Peng; Fink, Mathias; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Claude Boccara, A.

    2017-05-01

    This contribution is another opportunity to acknowledge the influence of Roger Maynard on our research work when he pushed one of us (ACB) to explore the field of waves propagating in complex media rather than limiting ourselves to the wavelength scale of thermal waves or near field phenomena. Optical tomography is used for imaging in-depth scattering media such as biological tissues. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) plays an important role in imaging biological samples. Coupling OCT with adaptive optics (AO) in order to correct eye aberrations has led to cellular imaging of the retina. By using our approach called Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) we show that, with spatially incoherent illumination, the width of the point-spread function (PSF) that governs the resolution is not affected by aberrations that induce only a reduction of the signal level. We will describe our approach by starting with the PSF experimental data followed by a simple theoretical analysis, and numerical calculations. Finally full images obtained through or inside scattering and aberrating media will be shown.

  3. A Seasonal Trend of Single Scattering Albedo in Southern African Biomass-burning Particles: Implications for Satellite Products and Estimates of Emissions for the World's Largest Biomass-burning Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; hide

    2013-01-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from approx.. 0.84 in July to approx. 0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Angstrom exponent (440-870 nm; r(exp 2) = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r(exp 2) = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  4. Subluminal and superluminal light propagation via interference of incoherent pump fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, M. [Department of Physics, Zanjan University, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: mahmoudi@iasbs.ac.ir; Sahrai, M. [Department of Physics, Zanjan University, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, Tabriz University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tajalli, H. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, Tabriz University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-08-28

    We investigate the dispersion and the absorption properties of a weak probe field in a four-level atomic system by using the incoherent pumping fields. It is shown that the slope of the dispersion changes from positive to negative with the interference of incoherent pumping process. It is also demonstrated that the group velocity of the light pulse can be controlled with the rates of incoherent pumping fields.

  5. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  6. Towards a nonequilibrium thermodynamic description of incoherent nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picozzi, Antonio

    2007-07-09

    Focus Serial: Frontiers of Nonlinear Optics This concise review is aimed at providing an introduction to the kinetic theory of partially coherent optical waves propagating in nonlinear media. The subject of incoherent nonlinear optics received a renewed interest since the first experimental demonstration of incoherent solitons in slowly responding photorefractive crystals. Several theories have been successfully developed to provide a detailed description of the novel dynamical features inherent to partially coherent nonlinear optical waves. However, such theories leave unanswered the following important question: Which is the long term (spatiotemporal) evolution of a partially incoherent optical field propagating in a nonlinear medium? In complete analogy with kinetic gas theory, one may expect that the incoherent field may evolve, owing to nonlinearity, towards a thermodynamic equilibrium state. Weak-turbulence theory is shown to describe the essential properties of this irreversible process of thermal wave relaxation to equilibrium. Precisely, the theory describes an irreversible evolution of the spectrum of the field towards a thermodynamic equilibrium state. The irreversible behavior is expressed through the H-theorem of entropy growth, whose origin is analogous to the celebrated Boltzmann's H-theorem of kinetic gas theory. It is shown that thermal wave relaxation to equilibrium may be characterized by the existence of a genuine condensation process, whose thermodynamic properties are analogous to those of Bose-Einstein condensation, despite the fact that the considered optical wave is completely classical. In spite of the formal reversibility of optical wave propagation, the condensation process occurs by means of an irreversible evolution of the field towards a homogeneous plane-wave (condensate) with small-scale fluctuations superimposed (uncondensed particles), which store the information necessary for the reversible propagation. As a remarkable result, an

  7. An Improved InSAR Image Co-Registration Method for Pairs with Relatively Big Distortions or Large Incoherent Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-registration is one of the most important steps in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR data processing. The standard offset-measurement method based on cross-correlating uniformly distributed patches takes no account of specific geometric transformation between images or characteristics of ground scatterers. Hence, it is inefficient and difficult to obtain satisfying co-registration results for image pairs with relatively big distortion or large incoherent areas. Given this, an improved co-registration strategy is proposed in this paper which takes both the geometric features and image content into consideration. Firstly, some geometric transformations including scale, flip, rotation, and shear between images were eliminated based on the geometrical information, and the initial co-registration polynomial was obtained. Then the registration points were automatically detected by integrating the signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR thresholds and the amplitude information, and a further co-registration process was performed to refine the polynomial. Several comparison experiments were carried out using 2 TerraSAR-X data from the Hong Kong airport and 21 PALSAR data from the Donghai Bridge. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method brings accuracy and efficiency improvements for co-registration and processing abilities in the cases of big distortion between images or large incoherent areas in the images. For most co-registrations, the proposed method can enhance the reliability and applicability of co-registration and thus promote the automation to a higher level.

  8. Coherence and incoherence collective behavior in financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shangmei; Xie, Qiuchao; Lu, Qing; Jiang, Xin; Chen, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Financial markets have been extensively studied as highly complex evolving systems. In this paper, we quantify financial price fluctuations through a coupled dynamical system composed of phase oscillators. We find that a Financial Coherence and Incoherence (FCI) coexistence collective behavior emerges as the system evolves into the stable state, in which the stocks split into two groups: one is represented by coherent, phase-locked oscillators, the other is composed of incoherent, drifting oscillators. It is demonstrated that the size of the coherent stock groups fluctuates during the economic periods according to real-world financial instabilities or shocks. Further, we introduce the coherent characteristic matrix to characterize the involvement dynamics of stocks in the coherent groups. Clustering results on the matrix provides a novel manifestation of the correlations among stocks in the economic periods. Our analysis for components of the groups is consistent with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS) classification and can also figure out features for newly developed industries. These results can provide potentially implications on characterizing the inner dynamical structure of financial markets and making optimal investment into tragedies.

  9. QR code optical encryption using spatially incoherent illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Krasnov, V. V.; Rodin, V. G.; Starikov, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Optical encryption is an actively developing field of science. The majority of encryption techniques use coherent illumination and suffer from speckle noise, which severely limits their applicability. The spatially incoherent encryption technique does not have this drawback, but its effectiveness is dependent on the Fourier spectrum properties of the image to be encrypted. The application of a quick response (QR) code in the capacity of a data container solves this problem, and the embedded error correction code also enables errorless decryption. The optical encryption of digital information in the form of QR codes using spatially incoherent illumination was implemented experimentally. The encryption is based on the optical convolution of the image to be encrypted with the kinoform point spread function, which serves as an encryption key. Two liquid crystal spatial light modulators were used in the experimental setup for the QR code and the kinoform imaging, respectively. The quality of the encryption and decryption was analyzed in relation to the QR code size. Decryption was conducted digitally. The successful decryption of encrypted QR codes of up to 129  ×  129 pixels was demonstrated. A comparison with the coherent QR code encryption technique showed that the proposed technique has a signal-to-noise ratio that is at least two times higher.

  10. Thermal diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D.; D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Van Dyck, D. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); LeBeau, J.M. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    In conventional transmission electron microscopy, thermal scattering significantly affects the image contrast. It has been suggested that not accounting for this correctly is the main cause of the Stobbs factor, the ubiquitous, large contrast mismatch found between theory and experiment. In the case where a hard aperture is applied, we show that previous conclusions drawn from work using bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy and invoking the principle of reciprocity are reliable in the presence of thermal scattering. In the aperture-free case it has been suggested that even the most sophisticated mathematical models for thermal diffuse scattering lack in their numerical implementation, specifically that there may be issues in sampling, including that of the contrast transfer function of the objective lens. We show that these concerns can be satisfactorily overcome with modest computing resources; thermal scattering can be modelled accurately enough for the purpose of making quantitative comparison between simulation and experiment. Spatial incoherence of the source is also investigated. Neglect or inadequate handling of thermal scattering in simulation can have an appreciable effect on the predicted contrast and can be a significant contribution to the Stobbs factor problem. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determine the numerical requirements for accurate simulation of TDS in CTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TDS can be simulated to high precision using the Born-Oppenheimer model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such calculations establish the contribution of TDS to the Stobbs factor problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treating spatial incoherence using envelope functions increases image contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous treatment of spatial incoherence significantly reduces image contrast.

  11. A high-power incoherent light source for ultra-precise optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittko, Robert; Mazurenko, Anton; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The ability to engineer arbitrary optical potentials using spatial light modulation has opened up exciting possibilities in ultracold quantum gas experiments. Yet, despite the high trap quality currently achievable, interference-induced distortions caused by scattering along the optical path continue to impede more sensitive measurements. We present a design of a high-power, spatially and temporally incoherent light source that dramatically reduces the impact of such distortions. The device is based on an array of non-lasing semiconductor emitters mounted on a single chip, whose optical output is coupled into a multi-mode fiber. The fiber is used to populate a large number of transverse modes, each of which experiences a different optical path length. This effect, combined with the small coherence length of the light, dramatically reduces the spatial coherence of the output. In addition to theoretical calculations showcasing the feasibility of this approach, we present various experimental measurements verifying the low degree of spatial coherence exhibited by the source, including a detailed analysis of the speckle contrast at the fiber end.

  12. A fiber-coupled incoherent light source for ultra-precise optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Tim; Schittko, Robert; Mazurenko, Anton; Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Kaufman, Adam M.; Greiner, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The ability to engineer arbitrary optical potentials using spatial light modulation has opened up exciting possibilities in ultracold quantum gas experiments. Yet, despite the high trap quality currently achievable, interference-induced distortions caused by scattering along the optical path continue to impede more sensitive measurements. We present a design of a high-power, spatially and temporally incoherent light source that bears the potential to reduce the impact of such distortions. The device is based on an array of non-lasing semiconductor emitters mounted on a single chip whose optical output is coupled into a multi-mode fiber. By populating a large number of fiber modes, the low spatial coherence of the input light is further reduced due to the differing optical path lengths amongst the modes and the short coherence length of the light. In addition to theoretical calculations showcasing the feasibility of this approach, we present experimental measurements verifying the low degree of spatial coherence achievable with such a source, including a detailed analysis of the speckle contrast at the fiber end. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative, an Air Force Office of Scientific Research MURI program and an Army Research Office MURI program.

  13. Reflective Metasurfaces for Incoherent Light To Bring Computer Graphics Tricks to Optical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minovich, Alexander E; Peter, Manuel; Bleckmann, Felix; Becker, Manuel; Linden, Stefan; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2017-07-12

    The normal mapping technique is widely used in computer graphics to visualize three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a flat screen. Taking advantage of optical properties of metasurfaces, which provide a highly efficient approach for manipulation of incident light wavefront, we have designed a metasurface to implement diffuse reflection and used the concept of normal mapping to control its scattering properties. As a proof of principle, we have fabricated and characterized a flat diffuse metasurface imitating lighting and shading effects of a 3D cube. The 3D image is displayed directly on the illuminated metasurface and it is brighter than a standard white paper by up to 2.4 times. The designed structure performs equally well under coherent and incoherent illumination. The normal mapping approach based on metasurfaces can complement traditional optical engineering methods of surface profiling and gradient refractive index engineering in the design of 3D security features, high-performance planar optical diffusers, novel optical elements, and displays.

  14. The Precautionary Principle Has Not Been Shown to Be Incoherent: A Reply to Peterson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer-Kassem, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    In this journal, I have objected to Peterson's 2006 claim that the precautionary principle is an incoherent decision rule. I defend my objections to Peterson's recent replies, and I still claim that the precautionary principle has not been shown to be incoherent. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Formation of the angular dependence of intensity of the light scattered on the optically dense atomic ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Larionov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The probe light scattering on the cold optically dense atomic ensemble is studied theoretically in the paper. In order to describe multiple scattering of light in the context of quantum electrodynamics, the Konstantinov–Perel–Keldysh diagram technique has been used. This technique allows to rewrite the considered case of light scattering in terms of diagram series where each term describes incoherent scattering of certain order. Decoding these terms allowed us to obtain the explicit analytical expression for the cross-section of multiple incoherent scattering for the case of stationary two-level atoms (transition Jg = 0 → Je = 1. The numerical analysis of this expression carried out by applying the Monte-Carlo simulation made it possible to find an influence of different orders of scattering on forming the angular dependence of scattered light intensity.

  16. Evaluation of the OMI cloud pressures derived from rotational Raman scattering by comparisons with other satellite data and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Joiner, Joanna; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Levelt, Pieternel; Stephens, Graeme

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we examine differences between cloud pressures retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the ultraviolet rotational Raman scattering (RRS) algorithm and those from the thermal infrared (IR) Aqua/MODIS. Several cloud data sets are currently being used in OMI trace gas retrieval algorithms including climatologies based on IR measurements and simultaneous cloud parameters derived from OMI. From a validation perspective, it is important to understand the OMI retrieved cloud parameters and how they differ with those derived from the IR. To this end, we perform radiative transfer calculations to simulate the effects of different geophysical conditions on the OMI RRS cloud pressure retrievals. We also quantify errors related to the use of the Mixed Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept as currently implemented of the OMI algorithms. Using properties from the Cloudsat radar and MODIS, we show that radiative transfer calculations support the following: (1) The MLER model is adequate for single-layer optically thick, geometrically thin clouds, but can produce significant errors in estimated cloud pressure for optically thin clouds. (2) In a two-layer cloud, the RRS algorithm may retrieve a cloud pressure that is either between the two cloud decks or even beneath the top of the lower cloud deck because of scattering between the cloud layers; the retrieved pressure depends upon the viewing geometry and the optical depth of the upper cloud deck. (3) Absorbing aerosol in and above a cloud can produce significant errors in the retrieved cloud pressure. (4) The retrieved RRS effective pressure for a deep convective cloud will be significantly higher than the physical cloud top pressure derived with thermal IR.

  17. Evaluation of the OMI Cloud Pressures Derived from Rotational Raman Scattering by Comparisons with other Satellite Data and Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Joiner, Joanna; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Levelt, Pieternel; Stephens, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine differences between cloud pressures retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the ultraviolet rotational Raman scattering (RRS) algorithm and those from the thermal infrared (IR) Aqua/MODIS. Several cloud data sets are currently being used in OMI trace gas retrieval algorithms including climatologies based on IR measurements and simultaneous cloud parameters derived from OMI. From a validation perspective, it is important to understand the OMI retrieved cloud parameters and how they differ with those derived from the IR. To this end, we perform radiative transfer calculations to simulate the effects of different geophysical conditions on the OMI RRS cloud pressure retrievals. We also quantify errors related to the use of the Mixed Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept as currently implemented of the OMI algorithms. Using properties from the Cloudsat radar and MODIS, we show that radiative transfer calculations support the following: (1) The MLER model is adequate for single-layer optically thick, geometrically thin clouds, but can produce significant errors in estimated cloud pressure for optically thin clouds. (2) In a two-layer cloud, the RRS algorithm may retrieve a cloud pressure that is either between the two cloud decks or even beneath the top of the lower cloud deck because of scattering between the cloud layers; the retrieved pressure depends upon the viewing geometry and the optical depth of the upper cloud deck. (3) Absorbing aerosol in and above a cloud can produce significant errors in the retrieved cloud pressure. (4) The retrieved RRS effective pressure for a deep convective cloud will be significantly higher than the physical cloud top pressure derived with thermal IR.

  18. Pulse timing-jitter reduction by incoherent addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Hidemi

    2003-03-01

    A new technique is proposed and demonstrated for reducing the timing jitter of a mode-locked laser diode by use of fiber-optic interferometers with an optical path difference much longer than the laser's coherence length. At the output of the interferometer the intensities of the two pulse trains are incoherently added, giving rise to the cancellation of timing noise at specific Fourier frequencies determined by the path difference. The timing jitter of pulse trains emitted by a 19.444-GHz mode-locked laser is reduced to 0.991 and 0.874 ps for 100-kHz-18-MHz bandwidth after the pulse trains pass through a cascaded Mach-Zehnder and a ring interferometer, respectively.

  19. Coherent and Incoherent Rogue Waves in Seeded Supercontinuum Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2013-01-01

    (1090.6 nm) that increases more rapidly with wavelength. This causes a fast breakup of the temporal pulse, where the individual temporal fringes generate fundamental solitons in a controlled fashion that almost resembles soliton fission. The most powerful solitons are still generated near the center...... that the solitons are mainly generated from the pulse center where the peak power is highest. The solitons have time to redshift before the cascade is amplified and the dynamics are relatively turbulent. In contrast to this, pumping further from the ZDW [Fig. 1(b)] gives a much larger gain at the seed wavelength...... of the pulse where the power is highest. These powerful rogue solitons only collide with the smaller solitons generated from the trailing edge of the pulse. Interestingly, a closer inspection reveals that the rogue soliton is generated incoherently when pumping close to the ZDW, but coherently when the pump...

  20. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy Using Incoherent Light: Theoretical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Daniel B; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2012-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I(4) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and opp...

  1. Multiparameter quantum metrology of incoherent point sources: Towards realistic superresolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řehaček, J.; Hradil, Z.; Stoklasa, B.; Paúr, M.; Grover, J.; Krzic, A.; Sánchez-Soto, L. L.

    2017-12-01

    We establish the multiparameter quantum Cramér-Rao bound for simultaneously estimating the centroid, the separation, and the relative intensities of two incoherent optical point sources using a linear imaging system. For equally bright sources, the Cramér-Rao bound is independent of their separation, which confirms that the Rayleigh resolution limit is just an artifact of the conventional direct imaging and can be overcome with an adequate strategy. For the general case of unequally bright sources, the amount of information one can gain about the separation falls to zero, but we show that there is always a quadratic improvement in an optimal detection in comparison with the intensity measurements. This advantage can be of utmost importance in realistic scenarios, such as observational astronomy.

  2. Assembling particle clusters with incoherent 3D magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilian, Rasam; Abdi, Hamed; Maloney, Craig E; Erb, Randall M

    2017-11-13

    Directed assembly of particle suspensions in massively parallel formats, such as with magnetic fields, has application in rheological control, smart drug delivery, and active colloidal devices from optical materials to microfluidics. At the heart of these applications lies a control optimization problem for driving the assembly and dissolution of highly monodisperse particle clusters. For magnetic field control, most attention to-date has been centered around in-phase coherent magnetic fields. Instead, we investigate a family of incoherent 3D magnetic fields that are capable of creating controlled and tunable particle assemblies such as dimers, trimers, and quadramers. These field functions can be tuned to assemble monodisperse clusters with long term stability and can quickly switch the clusters between different states. This subset of three-dimensional field functions that we have studied demonstrates the rich phase space available to tune colloidal suspensions with magnetic fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Coherent/incoherent metal transition in a holographic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Kim, Kyung Kiu [School of Physics and Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology,Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Yunseok [Research Institute for Natural Science, Hanyang University,Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sin, Sang-Jin [Department of Physics, Hanyang University,Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-29

    We study AC electric (σ), thermoelectric (α), and thermal (κ-bar) conductivities in a holographic model, which is based on 3+1 dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-scalar action. There is momentum relaxation due to massless scalar fields linear to spatial coordinate. The model has three field theory parameters: temperature (T), chemical potential (μ), and effective impurity (β). At low frequencies, if β<μ, all three AC conductivities (σ,α,κ-bar) exhibit a Drude peak modified by pair creation contribution (coherent metal). The parameters of this modified Drude peak are obtained analytically. In particular, if β≪μ the relaxation time of electric conductivity approaches to 2√3μ/β{sup 2} and the modified Drude peak becomes a standard Drude peak. If β>μ the shape of peak deviates from the Drude form (incoherent metal). At intermediate frequencies (T<ω<μ), we have analysed numerical data of three conductivities (σ,α,κ-bar) for a wide variety of parameters, searching for scaling laws, which are expected from either experimental results on cuprates superconductors or some holographic models. In the model we study, we find no clear signs of scaling behaviour.

  4. Higher derivative corrections to incoherent metallic transport in holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Goutéraux, Blaise; Kiritsis, Elias; Li, Wei-Jia

    2017-03-01

    Transport in strongly-disordered, metallic systems is governed by diffusive processes. Based on quantum mechanics, it has been conjectured that these diffusivities obey a lower bound D/v 2 ≳ ℏ /k B T , the saturation of which provides a mechanism for the T-linear resistivity of bad metals. This bound features a characteristic velocity v, which was later argued to be the butterfly velocity v B , based on holographic models of transport. This establishes a link between incoherent metallic transport, quantum chaos and Planckian timescales. Here we study higher derivative corrections to an effective holographic action of homogeneous disorder. The higher derivative terms involve only the charge and translation symmetry breaking sector. We show that they have a strong impact on the bound on charge diffusion D c / ν B 2 ≳ ℏ/ k B T, by potentially making the coefficient of its right-hand side arbitrarily small. On the other hand, the bound on energy diffusion is not affected.

  5. Long-working-distance incoherent-light interference microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B; de Boer, Maarten P; Corwin, Alex D

    2005-12-20

    We describe the design and operation of a long-working-distance, incoherent light interference microscope that has been developed to address the growing demand for new microsystem characterization tools. The design of the new microscope is similar to that of a Linnik interference microscope and thus preserves the full working distance of the long-working-distance objectives utilized. However, in contrast to a traditional Linnik microscope, the new microscope does not rely on the use of matched objectives in the sample and the reference arms of the interferometer. An adjustable optical configuration has been devised that allows the total optical path length, wavefront curvature, and dispersion of the reference arm to be matched to the sample arm of the interferometer. The reference arm configuration can be adjusted to provide matching for 5x, 10x, and 20x long-working-distance objectives in the sample arm. In addition to retaining the full working distance of the sample arm objectives, the new design allows interference images to be acquired in situations in which intervening windows are necessary, such as occur with packaged microsystems, microfluidic devices, and cryogenic, vacuum, or environmental chamber studies of microsystem performance. The interference microscope is compatible with phase-shifting interferometry, vertical scanning interferometry, and stroboscopic measurement of dynamic processes.

  6. Higher derivative corrections to incoherent metallic transport in holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona,The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology,Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Goutéraux, Blaise [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Varian Laboratory of Physics, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité (UMR du CNRS 7164),Bâtiment Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité (UMR du CNRS 7164),Bâtiment Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Li, Wei-Jia [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology,Dalian University of Technology, 214 School of Physics,2 Linggong road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2017-03-31

    Transport in strongly-disordered, metallic systems is governed by diffusive processes. Based on quantum mechanics, it has been conjectured that these diffusivities obey a lower bound D/v{sup 2}≳ℏ/k{sub B}T, the saturation of which provides a mechanism for the T-linear resistivity of bad metals. This bound features a characteristic velocity v, which was later argued to be the butterfly velocity v{sub B}, based on holographic models of transport. This establishes a link between incoherent metallic transport, quantum chaos and Planckian timescales. Here we study higher derivative corrections to an effective holographic action of homogeneous disorder. The higher derivative terms involve only the charge and translation symmetry breaking sector. We show that they have a strong impact on the bound on charge diffusion D{sub c}/v{sub B}{sup 2}≳ℏ/k{sub B}T, by potentially making the coefficient of its right-hand side arbitrarily small. On the other hand, the bound on energy diffusion is not affected.

  7. Near-Threshold Incoherent φ Photoproduction on the Deuteron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiswandhi, Alvin; Yang, Shin Nan; Dong, Yu Bing

    We study the near-threshold incoherent φ photoproduction on the deuteron based on a model of γ N to φ N, consisting of Pomeron, (π ,η ) exchanges, and a JP = 3/2- resonance, which describes the low energy γ p to φ p LEPS data well. The calculation is done up to double rescatterings, by including the spin dependence of the elementary γ N to φ N amplitude, Fermi motion, and final-state interactions (FSI). The couplings of the resonance to γ n and φ n channels are estimated with the help of a constituent quark model. The LEPS and CLAS data are described reasonably well except at very low energies and low momentum transfer regions. It is found that the contributions of Fermi motion, pn FSI, and resonance are all indispensable. The off-shell rescattering is found to be important as well. No peak is found as it gets smeared out by the Fermi motion and the FSI between the outgoing nucleons. The problem at very low energy region hints at the possible contributions from other mechanisms and should be studied with the use of the recent γ p to φ p data from CLAS.

  8. Electromagnetic scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. F.; Farrell, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering theory is discussed with emphasis on the general stochastic variational principle (SVP) and its applications. The stochastic version of the Schwinger-type variational principle is presented, and explicit expressions for its integrals are considered. Results are summarized for scalar wave scattering from a classic rough-surface model and for vector wave scattering from a random dielectric-body model. Also considered are the selection of trial functions and the variational improvement of the Kirchhoff short-wave approximation appropriate to large size-parameters. Other applications of vector field theory discussed include a general vision theory and the analysis of hydromagnetism induced by ocean motion across the geomagnetic field. Levitational force-torque in the magnetic suspension of the disturbance compensation system (DISCOS), now deployed in NOVA satellites, is also analyzed using the developed theory.

  9. Seeded Supercontinuum Generation - Modulation Instability Gain, Coherent and Incoherent Rogue Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic supercontinuum can be generated by seeding the modulation instability-induced pulse break-up. We investigate the influence of the modulation instability gain on seeding and demonstrate the generation of coherent and incoherent rogue waves.......Deterministic supercontinuum can be generated by seeding the modulation instability-induced pulse break-up. We investigate the influence of the modulation instability gain on seeding and demonstrate the generation of coherent and incoherent rogue waves....

  10. Effects of Oscillatory Deformations on the Coherent and Incoherent Quantum Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Naghi; Ahansaz, Bahram

    2017-11-01

    Inspired by the works of Caruso (New J. Phys. 16, 055015 (2014) and Scholak et al. (J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44, 184012 2011), which state that for a large class of complex noisy networks, the optimal efficiency of quantum transport is universally obtained by mixing coherent (Hamiltonian) and incoherent (noisy) parts where the contribution of the coherent part is strictly more than the incoherent one, we examine the effect of oscillatory deformations on two simple prototypes in order to study their effects on the efficiency of coherent and incoherent energy transport. The prototypes are interchangeable to each other only by a simple phase modulation, such that the dynamics for the first type is only coherent, while for the second one the coherent evolution is completely suppressed and the evolution of the system is only incoherent (noisy). In this regard, it is shown that there exist a special deformation by which the efficiency of incoherent transport becomes better than the coherent one. This result suggests that in the noisy networks with collective harmonic motions, the optimality of transport can be occurred in such a way that the contribution of incoherent term is more than the coherent one.

  11. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  12. Strong fluctuation theory for scattering, attenuation, and transmission of microwaves through snowfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.-Q.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The strong fluctuation theory is applied to the study of the atmospheric snowfall which is modeled as a layer of random discrete-scatterers medium. As functions of size distribution, fractional volume, and radius of scatterers, the relationship is illustrated between the reflectivity factor and precipitation rate, the attenuation of the centimeter and millimeter waves, and the line-of-sight transmission of coherent and incoherent wave components. The theoretical results are shown to match favorably with experimental data.

  13. Enhancement of conductance fluctuations in a mesoscopic system of strong scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinyuk, V. V.; Rogozkin, D. B.

    2017-10-01

    We study how the conductance fluctuations change in a disordered ensemble of strongly scattering (non-Born) centers. Diagrammatic calculations of the conductance variance are carried out beyond the standard Born definition for the Hikami vertex. For a system of strong pointlike scatterers, the enhancement of the conductance fluctuations is found in the crossover between ballistic and diffusive regimes. The incoherent contribution arising from random spatial variations in the scatterer concentration is primarily responsible for the enhancement of fluctuations. In the limit of resonant scatterers, the coherent contribution to the conductance variance also peaks in the crossover regime and its maximum exceeds the UCF value.

  14. Incoherent Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Recurrences and Unconstrained Thermalization Mediated by Strong Phase Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasoni, M.; Garnier, J.; Rumpf, B.; Sugny, D.; Fatome, J.; Amrani, F.; Millot, G.; Picozzi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The long-standing and controversial Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem addresses fundamental issues of statistical physics, and the attempt to resolve the mystery of the recurrences has led to many great discoveries, such as chaos, integrable systems, and soliton theory. From a general perspective, the recurrence is commonly considered as a coherent phase-sensitive effect that originates in the property of integrability of the system. In contrast to this interpretation, we show that convection among a pair of waves is responsible for a new recurrence phenomenon that takes place for strongly incoherent waves far from integrability. We explain the incoherent recurrence by developing a nonequilibrium spatiotemporal kinetic formulation that accounts for the existence of phase correlations among incoherent waves. The theory reveals that the recurrence originates in a novel form of modulational instability, which shows that strongly correlated fluctuations are spontaneously created among the random waves. Contrary to conventional incoherent modulational instabilities, we find that Landau damping can be completely suppressed, which unexpectedly removes the threshold of the instability. Consequently, the recurrence can take place for strongly incoherent waves and is thus characterized by a reduction of nonequilibrium entropy that violates the H theorem of entropy growth. In its long-term evolution, the system enters a secondary turbulent regime characterized by an irreversible process of relaxation to equilibrium. At variance with the expected thermalization described by standard Gibbsian statistical mechanics, our thermalization process is not dictated by the usual constraints of energy and momentum conservation: The inverse temperatures associated with energy and momentum are zero. This unveils a previously unrecognized scenario of unconstrained thermalization, which is relevant to a variety of weakly dispersive wave systems. Our work should stimulate the development of new

  15. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dheenathayalan, P.; Small, D.; Schubert, A.; Hanssen, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy

  16. Satellite reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloor, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    The potential of the observation equipment in remote sensing satellites is described. United States meteorology, land use and oceanography satellites and the major US Earth observation programs are listed. Imaging satellite systems are described such as: visible light and near infrared, thermal IR window, and microwave window. It is concluded that a geometrical resolution between 10 and 40 m can be expected. In order to reduce the data flow from the satellite system the input side of the system (the object-sensor interaction) has to be known. Satellites with synthetic aperture radar are increasingly important, but satellites can never fully replace observations with aircraft and drones.

  17. Hierarchy in chaotic scattering in Hill's problem

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, Z

    1997-01-01

    Hierarchic properties of chaotic scattering in a model of satellite encounters, studied first by Petit and Henon, are examined by decomposing the dwell time function and comparing scattering trajectories. The analysis reveals an (approximate) ternary organization in the chaotic set of bounded orbits and the presence of a stable island. The results can open the way for a calculation of global quantities characterizing the scattering process by using tools of the thermodynamic formalism.

  18. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M F; Cunha, M Terra; Chaves, R; Carvalho, A R R

    2012-04-27

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that, when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify this by showing how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  19. Thomson Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wave vector is much larger than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  20. Scattering properties of electromagnetic waves from metal object in the lower terahertz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Dang, H. X.; Hu, T. Y.; Su, Xiang; Lv, R. C.; Li, Hao; Tan, X. M.; Cui, T. J.

    2018-01-01

    An efficient hybrid algorithm is proposed to analyze the electromagnetic scattering properties of metal objects in the lower terahertz (THz) frequency. The metal object can be viewed as perfectly electrical conducting object with a slightly rough surface in the lower THz region. Hence the THz scattered field from metal object can be divided into coherent and incoherent parts. The physical optics and truncated-wedge incremental-length diffraction coefficients methods are combined to compute the coherent part; while the small perturbation method is used for the incoherent part. With the MonteCarlo method, the radar cross section of the rough metal surface is computed by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm and the proposed hybrid algorithm, respectively. The numerical results show that the proposed algorithm has good accuracy to simulate the scattering properties rapidly in the lower THz region.

  1. Non-collinear upconversion of incoherent light: designing infrared spectrometers and imaging systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    for each angle of propagation. Non-collinear phase matching has been an area of limited attention for many years due to inherent incompatibility with tightly focused laser beams typically used for most second order processes in order to achieve acceptable conversion efficiency. The development....... It is, however, straightforward to increase the incoherent power by increasing the receiving aperture of the upconversion unit i.e. the diameter of the upconversion laser beam. Hence, the optimal conversion efficiency for incoherent light is not achieved by tightly focused beams. In this paper we show...... that filling the nonlinear crystal with as large a pump beam as possible yields the best conversion as this allows for upconversion of large angles of incoming incoherent light. We present results of non-collinear mixing and how it affects spectral and spatial resolution in the image and compare against...

  2. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project`s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies.

  3. Neutron scattering investigations of the properties of the x - T phase diagram of Rb sub 1 sub - sub x (NH sub 4) sub x I mixed crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, L S; Savenko, B N

    2002-01-01

    The x - T phase diagram of Rb sub 1 sub - sub x (NH sub 4) sub x I is studied using samples with the ammonium concentration 0.01incoherent neutron scattering. The results of powder diffraction studies show that at low temperatures a phase transition from alpha-phase to beta-phase is observed at ammonium concentrations x = 0.50 and x = 0.66. Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering detects a region of the orientional glass state at ammonium concentrations 0.29

  4. Theoretical study of incoherent {phi} photoproduction on a deuteron target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekihara, T. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto (Japan); Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Martinez Torres, A.; Jido, D. [Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Oset, E. [Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    We study the photoproduction of {phi} mesons in deuteron, paying attention to the modification of the cross-section from bound protons to the free ones. For this purpose we take into account Fermi motion in single scattering and rescattering of {phi} to account for {phi} absorption on a second nucleon as well as the rescattering of the proton on the neutron. We find that the contribution of the double scattering for {phi} is much smaller than the typical cross-section of {gamma}p{yields}{phi}p in free space, which implies a very small screening of the {phi} production in deuteron. The contribution from the proton rescattering, on the other hand, is found to be not negligible compared to the cross-section of {gamma}p{yields}{phi}p in free space, and leads to a moderate reduction of the {phi} photoproduction cross-section on a deuteron at forward angles if the LEPS set-up is taken into account. The Fermi motion allows contribution of the single scattering in regions forbidden by phase-space in the free case. In particular, we find that for momentum transfer squared close to the maximum value, the Fermi motion changes drastically the shape of d{sigma}/dt, to the point that the ratio of this cross-section to the free one becomes very sensitive to the precise value of t chosen, or the size of the bin used in an experimental analysis. Hence, this particular region of t does not seem to be the most indicated to find effects of a possible {phi} absorption in the deuteron. This reaction is studied theoretically as a function of t and the results are contrasted with recent experiments at LEPS and Jefferson Lab. The effect of the experimental angular cuts at LEPS is also discussed, providing guidelines for future experimental analyses of the reaction. (orig.)

  5. Comparative analysis of numerical simulation techniques for incoherent imaging of extended objects through atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachinova, Svetlana L.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Filimonov, Grigory A.; LeMaster, Daniel A.; Trippel, Matthew E.

    2017-07-01

    Computational efficiency and accuracy of wave-optics-based Monte-Carlo and brightness function numerical simulation techniques for incoherent imaging of extended objects through atmospheric turbulence are evaluated. Simulation results are compared with theoretical estimates based on known analytical solutions for the modulation transfer function of an imaging system and the long-exposure image of a Gaussian-shaped incoherent light source. It is shown that the accuracy of both techniques is comparable over the wide range of path lengths and atmospheric turbulence conditions, whereas the brightness function technique is advantageous in terms of the computational speed.

  6. Incoherent Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry for Distributed Thermal Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Emir

    2006-01-01

    increasing frequency, after which the inverse Fourier transform is applied to the signal from the backscattered light. This technique is compared with the more conventional optical time domain reflectometry, where a short pulse is sent through the fibre, and the location of the scattering section...... developed and implemented in Matlab. The computer model is calibrated and tested, and describes the entire system with high precision. Noise analysis and digital processing of the detected signal are discussed as well. An equation describing the standard deviation of the measured temperature is derived...

  7. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  8. Global modelling study (GSM TIP of the ionospheric effects of excited N2, convection and heat fluxes by comparison with EISCAT and satellite data for 31 July 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Smilauer

    Full Text Available Near-earth plasma parameters were calculated using a global numerical self-consistent and time-dependent model of the thermosphere, ionosphere and protonosphere (GSM TIP. The model results are compared with experimental data of different origin, mainly EISCAT measurements and simultaneous satellite data (Ne and ion composition. Model runs with varying inputs of auroral FAC distributions, temperature of vibrationally excited nitrogen and photoelectron energy escape fluxes are used to make adjustments to the observations. The satellite data are obtained onboard Active and its subsatellite Magion-2 when they passed nearby the EISCAT station around 0325 and 1540 UT on 31 July 1990 at a height of about 2000 and 2200 km, respectively. A strong geomagnetic disturbance was observed two days before the period under study. Numerical calculations were performed with consideration of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules for high solar-activity conditions. The results show good agreement between the incoherent-scatter radar measurements (Ne, Te, Ti and model calculations, taking into account the excited molecular nitrogen reaction rates. The comparison of model results of the thermospheric neutral wind shows finally a good agreement with the HWM93 empirical wind model.

  9. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a half space of densely distributed dielectric scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a plane wave obliquely incident on a half space of densely distributed spherical dielectric scatterers is studied. The quasi-crystalline approximation is applied to truncate the hierarchy of multiple scattering equations, and the Percus-Yevick and the Verlet-Weis results are used to represent the pair distribution function. The coherent reflected wave is studied with these approximations. The incoherent scattered wave is calculated with the distorted Born approximation. In the low-frequency limit, closed-form expressions are obtained for the effective propagation constants, the coherent reflected wave, and the bistatic scattering coeficients. Results at higher frequencies are calculated numerically. The advantage of the present approach is that, in the low-frequency limit, it reproduces the effects of specular reflection, Fresnel reflection coefficient, Brewster angle, and Clausius-Mosotti relation. In addition to the classical results, the bistatic scattering coefficients are also calculated. The theory is also applied to match backscattering data from dry snow at microwave frequencies.

  10. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  11. Anatomically diverse butterfly scales all produce structural colours by coherent scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Quinn, Tim; Torres, Rodolfo H

    2006-02-01

    The structural colours of butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) have been attributed to a diversity of physical mechanisms, including multilayer interference, diffraction, Bragg scattering, Tyndall scattering and Rayleigh scattering. We used fibre optic spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 2D Fourier analysis to investigate the physical mechanisms of structural colour production in twelve lepidopteran species from four families, representing all of the previously proposed anatomical and optical classes of butterfly nanostructure. The 2D Fourier analyses of TEMs of colour producing butterfly scales document that all species are appropriately nanostructured to produce visible colours by coherent scattering, i.e. differential interference and reinforcement of scattered, visible wavelengths. Previously hypothesized to produce a blue colour by incoherent, Tyndall scattering, the scales of Papilio zalmoxis are not appropriately nanostructured for incoherent scattering. Rather, available data indicate that the blue of P. zalmoxis is a fluorescent pigmentary colour. Despite their nanoscale anatomical diversity, all structurally coloured butterfly scales share a single fundamental physical color production mechanism - coherent scattering. Recognition of this commonality provides a new perspective on how the nanostructure and optical properties of structurally coloured butterfly scales evolved and diversified among and within lepidopteran clades.

  12. Incoherent Effect of Space Charge and Electron Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G; Fischer, W; Zimmermann, F

    2009-01-01

    Trapping by resonances or scattering off resonances induced by space charge (SC) or electron cloud (EC) in conjunction with synchrotron motion can explain observations of slow beam loss and emittance growth, which are often accompanied by changes in the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper we review the recent progress in understanding and modeling of the underlying mechanisms, highlight the differences and similarities between space charge and electron cloud, and discuss simulation results in the light of experimental observations, e.g., at GSI, CERN, and BNL. In particular, we address the role of the pinched electrons and describe in detail the complexity of the electron pinch formation. We present simulation results within a dipole or in a field-free region of the beam pipe, which reveal the morphology and main features of this phenomenon, explain the physical origin of the complex electron structures like stripe in either field configuration, and discuss the dependence on some key parameters.

  13. Coherent imaging of a pure phase object with classical incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Magatti, D.; Gatti, A.

    2007-01-01

    A ghost imaging scheme is used to observe the diffraction pattern of a pure phase object . It is observed that when increasing the spatial coherence the diffraction pattern disappeared from the cross-correlation, while it appeared in the autocorrelation. The cross-correlation contains information...... about the phase object only when the light is spatially incoherent....

  14. Sparse Modeling with Universal Priors and Learned Incoherent Dictionaries(PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-09

    Priors and Learned Incoherent Dictionaries Ignacio Ramı́rez University of Minnesota ramir048@umn.edu, Federico Lecumberry Universidad de la República...Remark: Instead of using a Gamma prior (which actually already fits the empirical statis- tics of image data very good [26]), we can use for example the

  15. Incoherent off-axis Fourier holography for different colors using a curved mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Dilband; Nguyen, Cuong M.; Lee, Jihoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2017-06-01

    Herein we describe an incoherent off-axis Fourier holographic system that uses a curved mirror in conjunction with color filters to capture holograms. Conceptually, our system is similar to both the Fourier incoherent single channel holography (FISCH) and the incoherent off-axis Fourier holographic (IOFH) systems. Our proposed system, which is termed incoherent off-axis Fourier holography with curved mirror (IOFH-CM), is not as robust in its response to environmental changes when compared to single channel light systems because it relies on dual light pathways. However, IOFH-CM and IOFH have the same three advantages over FISCH. First, replacing the spatial light modulator (SLM) with a curved mirror makes it cost-effective and simple. Second, its light throughput is high; and the third advantage is its ability to capture holograms of samples placed on an optical axis by tilting one mirror. A fourth advantage, compared to IOFH, is its use for different colors because, IOFH-CM requires only a filter change to capture different colors and no other movements of any optical component or camera is necessary. Here, we demonstrate the holographic capabilities of IOFH-CM using three different color filters.

  16. Coherent and incoherent radiation from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is calculated based on the Lienard–Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically

  17. Coherent versus incoherent dynamics in InAs quantum-dot active wave guides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, W.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    Coherent dynamics measured by time-resolved four-wave mixing is compared to incoherent population dynamics measured by differential transmission spectroscopy on the ground-state transition at room temperature of two types of InAs-based quantum dots with different confinement energies...

  18. Dynamical narrowing of the Rayleigh scattering ring from a semiconductor microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, W.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    In resonant secondary emission of light (SE), scattering by static disorder leads to coherent resonant Rayleigh scattering (RRS), while the scattering with other quasi-particles (e.g. phonons) leads to an incoherent emission called photoluminescence (PL). For a bare quantum well (QW) the SE does....... We investigate the directional SE dynamics from a MC at 5 K consisting of an 25 nm GaAs single quantum well placed in the center of a lambda -cavity having an exciton resonance of negligible inhomogeneous broadening....

  19. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    , emerging evidence points to these structures as important hubs for dynamic, multi-faceted regulation in response to a variety of cues. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the roles of centriolar satellites in regulating centrosome functions, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis. We also...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  20. Satellite Communications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Satellite Communications. Arthur C Clarke wrote a seminal paper in 1945 in wireless world. Use three satellites in geo-synchronous orbit to enable intercontinental communications. System could be realised in '50 to 100 years'

  1. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a randomly perturbed quasiperiodic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic-wave scattering by a quasi-periodic surface with random perturbations (as in the remote sensing of plowed fields) is investigated analytically, applying the Kirchhoff approximation and modeling the plowed fields by means of Gaussian random variation, sinusoidal variation, and Gaussian random variation about the spatial frequency. Coherent and incoherent bistatic scattering coefficients are derived in closed form by evaluating the physical-optics integral and shown to be proportional, in the geometric-optics limit, to the occurrence probability of slopes which reflect the incident wave specularly in the direction of the scattered wave. Backscattering cross sections are plotted as functions of incidence angle for a number of cases, demonstrating the strong effect of row direction.

  2. Spectral bandwidth reduction of Thomson scattered light by pulse chirping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Ghebregziabher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on single particle tracking in the framework of classical Thomson scattering with incoherent superposition, we developed a relativistic, three-dimensional numerical model that calculates and quantifies the characteristics of emitted radiation when a relativistic electron beam interacts with an intense laser pulse. This model has been benchmarked against analytical expressions, based on the plane wave approximation to the laser field, derived by Esarey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 3003 (1993PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.48.3003]. For laser pulses of sufficient duration, we find that the scattered radiation spectrum is broadened due to interferences arising from the pulsed nature of the laser. We find that by appropriately chirping the scattering laser pulse, spectral broadening can be minimized, and the peak on-axis brightness of the emitted radiation is increased by a factor of approximately 5.

  3. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  4. Spectator-Tagged Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on Light Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Whitney; Arrington, John; Cloët, Ian; Freese, Adam; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hattawy, Mohammad; Riordan, Seamus; Johnston, Sereres; Potteveld, David; Reimer, Paul; Ye, Zhihong; Ball, Jacques; Defurne, Maxime; Garcon, Michel; Moutarde, Herve

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional picture of quarks and gluons in the proton is set to be revealed through Deeply virtual Compton scattering while a critically important puzzle in the one-dimensional picture remains, namely, the origins of the EMC effect. Incoherent nuclear DVCS, i.e. DVCS on a nucleon inside a nucleus, can reveal the 3D partonic structure of the bound nucleon and shed a new light on the EMC effect. However, the Fermi motion of the struck nucleon, off-shell effects and final-state intera...

  5. Functional mapping of the human visual cortex with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Federau

    Full Text Available Functional imaging with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is demonstrated. Images were acquired at 3 Tesla using a standard Stejskal-Tanner diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging sequence with multiple b-values. Cerebro-spinal fluid signal, which is highly incoherent, was suppressed with an inversion recovery preparation pulse. IVIM microvascular perfusion parameters were calculated according to a two-compartment (vascular and non-vascular diffusion model. The results obtained in 8 healthy human volunteers during visual stimulation are presented. The IVIM blood flow related parameter fD* increased 170% during stimulation in the visual cortex, and 70% in the underlying white matter.

  6. Critical Examination of Incoherent Operations and a Physically Consistent Resource Theory of Quantum Coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Eric; Gour, Gilad

    2016-07-15

    Considerable work has recently been directed toward developing resource theories of quantum coherence. In this Letter, we establish a criterion of physical consistency for any resource theory. This criterion requires that all free operations in a given resource theory be implementable by a unitary evolution and projective measurement that are both free operations in an extended resource theory. We show that all currently proposed basis-dependent theories of coherence fail to satisfy this criterion. We further characterize the physically consistent resource theory of coherence and find its operational power to be quite limited. After relaxing the condition of physical consistency, we introduce the class of dephasing-covariant incoherent operations as a natural generalization of the physically consistent operations. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived for the convertibility of qubit states using dephasing-covariant operations, and we show that these conditions also hold for other well-known classes of incoherent operations.

  7. From coherent shocklets to giant collective incoherent shock waves in nonlocal turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Vocke, D.; Faccio, D.; Garnier, J.; Roger, T.; Trillo, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding turbulent flows arising from random dispersive waves that interact strongly through nonlinearities is a challenging issue in physics. Here we report the observation of a characteristic transition: strengthening the nonlocal character of the nonlinear response drives the system from a fully turbulent regime, featuring a sea of coherent small-scale dispersive shock waves (shocklets) towards the unexpected emergence of a giant collective incoherent shock wave. The front of such global incoherent shock carries most of the stochastic fluctuations and is responsible for a peculiar folding of the local spectrum. Nonlinear optics experiments performed in a solution of graphene nano-flakes clearly highlight this remarkable transition. Our observations shed new light on the role of long-range interactions in strongly nonlinear wave systems operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium, which reveals analogies with, for example, gravitational systems, and establishes a new scenario that can be common to many turbulent flows in photonic quantum fluids, hydrodynamics and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  8. Scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of "Scattering Theory" presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is k...

  9. A simple model for 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple theoretical model for 2 dimensional (2-D) image up-conversion of incoherent light. While image upconversion has been known for more than 40 years, the technology has been hindered by very low conversion quantum efficiency (~10-7). We show that our implementation compared...... in very large wavelength acceptance. This work describes how the bandwidth acceptance can be predicted and designed. This gives promise of a new way to make infrared imaging devices with tunable spectral sensitivity....

  10. Satellite myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Roger L.; Hall, David

    2008-01-01

    Richard Corfield's article “Sputnik's legacy” (October 2007 pp23-27) states that the satellite on board the US Vanguard rocket, which exploded during launch on 6 December 1957 two months after Sputnik's successful take-off, was “a hastily put together contraption of wires and circuitry designed only to send a radio signal back to Earth”. In fact, the Vanguard satellite was developed over a period of several years and put together carefully using the best techniques and equipment available at the time - such as transistors from Bell Laboratories/Western Electric. The satellite contained not one but two transmitters, in which the crystal-controlled oscillators had been designed to measure both the temperature of the satellite shell and of the internal package.

  11. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade....... The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites....

  12. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of large amplitude motions in molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, M. [Univ. J. Fourier - Grenoble 1, Lab. de Spectrometrie Physique, Saint-Martin d`Heres (France)

    1996-12-31

    This lecture aims at giving some illustrations of the use of Incoherent Quasielastic Neutron Scattering in the investigation of motions of atoms or molecules in phases with dynamical disorder. The general incoherent scattering function is first recalled. Then the Elastic Incoherent Structure Factor is introduced. It is shown how its determination permits to deduce a particular dynamical model. Long-range translational diffusion is illustrated by some experiments carried out with liquids or with different chemical species intercalated in porous media. Examples of rotational motions are provided by solid phases where an orientational disorder of the molecules exists. The jump model is the most commonly used and yields simple scattering laws which can be easily handled. Highly disordered crystals require a description in terms of the isotropic rotational diffusion model. Many of the present studies are concerned with rather complicated systems. Considerable help is obtained either by using selectively deuterated samples or by carrying out measurements with semi-oriented samples. (author) 5 figs., 14 refs.

  13. Legendrian satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Etnyre, John; Vértesi, Vera

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study Legendrian knots in the knot types of satellite knots. In particular, we classify Legendrian Whitehead patterns and learn a great deal about Legendrian braided patterns. We also show how the classification of Legendrian patterns can lead to a classification of the associated satellite knots if the companion knot is Legendrian simple and uniformly thick. This leads to new Legendrian and transverse classification results for knots in the 3-sphere with its standard contact...

  14. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    igniters, and restrictors, can provide dozens of precision bursts of thrust upon command. Solid-rocket throttling ( vernier -thrusting) is more difficult...Here is a very straightforward micromete - oroid detector. A particle penetrates a pressurized vessel, usually a cylinder; the gas inside escapes; and a...The first Explorer satellites carried wire grids. The Micromete - oroid Satellite series used 46 cards, like those sketched in figure 11-85. Explorer

  15. Overview of techniques applicable to self-interference incoherent digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J.; Kim, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Self-interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH) retrieves the complex hologram from the object illuminated by the incoherent light. Supported by the adaptive optic feature, SIDH is readily applicable to the ocular imaging to investigate the human retinal cells. Considering the practical issues, issues related to resolution, phase-shifting, and contrast should be addressed to implement the viable SIDH system which is capable of recording the holographic information of human retinal cells under the incoherent illumination. Super resolution image reconstruction technique can be directly applied to SIDH to enhance the resolution of the system without any change of configuration. We present the improved way to incorporate the phase-shifting itself into the lateral shift required by the super resolution technique. To deal with the phase-shifting issue, we present an arbitrary phase shift retrieval algorithm which can reduce the number of phase-shift and accept the blind phase-shift. The single-shot imaging is also possible by adopting the off-axis configuration of SIDH. We will provide the detailed procedures to retrieve the complex hologram using the proposed arbitrary phase shifting algorithm and the off-axis configuration. PMID:26985327

  16. Target recognition and phase acquisition by using incoherent digital holographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Munseob; Lee, Byung-Tak

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we proposed the Incoherent Digital Holographic Imaging (IDHI) for recognition and phase information of dedicated target. Although recent development of a number of target recognition techniques such as LIDAR, there have limited success in target discrimination, in part due to low-resolution, low scanning speed, and computation power. In the paper, the proposed system consists of the incoherent light source, such as LED, Michelson interferometer, and digital CCD for acquisition of four phase shifting image. First of all, to compare with relative coherence, we used a source as laser and LED, respectively. Through numerical reconstruction by using the four phase shifting method and Fresnel diffraction method, we recovered the intensity and phase image of USAF resolution target apart from about 1.0m distance. In this experiment, we show 1.2 times improvement in resolution compared to conventional imaging. Finally, to confirm the recognition result of camouflaged targets with the same color from background, we carry out to test holographic imaging in incoherent light. In this result, we showed the possibility of a target detection and recognition that used three dimensional shape and size signatures, numerical distance from phase information of obtained holographic image.

  17. Origins of spectral broadening of incoherent waves: Catastrophic process of coherence degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Garnier, J.; Rumpf, B.; Fusaro, A.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Kudlinski, A.; Millot, G.; Picozzi, A.

    2017-08-01

    We revisit the mechanisms underlying the process of spectral broadening of incoherent optical waves propagating in nonlinear media on the basis of nonequilibrium thermodynamic considerations. A simple analysis reveals that a prerequisite for the existence of a significant spectral broadening of the waves is that the linear part of the energy (Hamiltonian) has different contributions of opposite signs. It turns out that, at variance with the expected soliton turbulence scenario, an increase of the amount of disorder (incoherence) in the system does not require the generation of a coherent soliton structure. We illustrate the idea by considering the propagation of two wave components in an optical fiber with opposite dispersion coefficients. A wave turbulence approach to the problem reveals that the increase of kinetic energy in one component is offset by the negative reduction in the other component, so that the waves exhibit, as a general rule, virtually unlimited spectral broadening. More precisely, a self-similar solution of the kinetic equations reveals that the spectra of the incoherent waves tend to relax toward a homogeneous distribution in the wake of a front that propagates in frequency space with a decelerating velocity. We discuss this catastrophic process of spectral broadening in the light of different important phenomena, in particular supercontinuum generation, soliton turbulence, wave condensation, and the runaway motion of mechanical systems composed of positive and negative masses.

  18. Open system perspective on incoherent excitation of light-harvesting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Botero, Juan D.; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-01

    The nature of excited states of open quantum systems produced by incoherent natural thermal light is analyzed based on a description of the quantum dynamical map. Natural thermal light is shown to generate long-lasting coherent dynamics because of (i) the super-Ohmic character of the radiation, and (ii) the absence of pure dephasing dynamics. In the presence of an environment, the long-lasting coherences induced by suddenly turned-on incoherent light dissipate and stationary coherences are established. As a particular application, dynamics in a subunit of the PC645 light-harvesting complex is considered where it is further shown that aspects of the energy pathways landscape depend on the nature of the exciting light and number of chromophores excited. Specifically, pulsed laser and natural broadband incoherent excitation induce significantly different energy transfer pathways. In addition, we discuss differences in perspective associated with the eigenstate versus site basis, and note an important difference in the phase of system coherences when coupled to blackbody radiation or when coupled to a phonon background. Finally, an appendix contains an open systems example of the loss of coherence as the turn-on time of the light assumes natural time scales.

  19. Improved SPGD algorithm to avoid local extremum for incoherent beam combining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guoqing; Liu, Lisheng; Jiang, Zhenhua; Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm and the fast steering mirrors (FSM) are applied for incoherent beam combining in this paper. An equation is derived to calculate the wavefront reflected from the FSM under certain control voltages and the relationship between the strength of random disturbances and the combing efficiency is discussed via simulations, indicating that the combining efficiency is inversely proportional to the square of the strength of disturbance. The maximum value of the acceptable disturbance can be determined though the fitting curve which presents an instructional way to reduce the disturbance in advance. Besides, the SPGD algorithm is improved to overcome the weakness of tending to be trapped in the local extremum in incoherent beam combining. In the proposed algorithm, pattern recognition is used to check whether the algorithm is trapped and an "additional move" can be applied to get out of local extremum. The results of simulations show that the proposed algorithm can improve the performance of the incoherent beam combining. Comparative simulations are conducted where the value of evaluation function is increased about 60% compared to the conventional algorithm under the same conditions. The threshold of disturbance also increases about 15% when the accepted value of evaluation function set to 0.8 in the normalized form showing the feasibility of the method. Also, statistical data shows the proposed method depends less on the gain coefficient.

  20. Nature of quantum states created by one photon absorption: pulsed coherent vs pulsed incoherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alex C; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2013-08-29

    We analyze electronically excited nuclear wave functions and their coherence when subjecting a molecule to the action of natural, pulsed incoherent solar-like light and to that of ultrashort coherent light assumed to have the same center frequencies and spectral bandwidths. Specifically, we compute the spatiotemporal dependence of the excited wave packets and their electronic coherence for these two types of light sources, on different electronic potential energy surfaces. The resultant excited state wave functions are shown to be dramatically different, reflecting the light source from which they originated. In addition, electronic coherence is found to decay significantly faster for incoherent light than for coherent ultrafast excitation, for both continuum and bound wave packets. These results confirm that the dynamics observed from ultrashort coherent excitation does not reflect what happens in processes induced by solar-like radiation, and conclusions drawn from one do not, in general, apply to the other. These results provide further support to the view that the dynamics observed in studies using ultrashort coherent pulses can be significantly different than those that would result from excitation with natural incoherent light.

  1. Electromagnetic Scattering from Vegetation Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    Satellite-borne imaging radar has been proposed by the remote sensing community as a potential sensor for the acquisition of quantitative information about forested area on a global scale. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop retrieved algorithms that can provide reasonable estimate of vegetation biomass, leaf moisture content, and other physical parameters of tree canopies from multifrequency/multipolarization observations of their radar backscattering coefficients. Retrieval algorithms often are called "inverse problem" because their input/output parameters are the inverse of those associated with the direct problem, which in the present case refers to the development of a radar scattering model that relates the radar response to the canopy architecture and associated parameters. This thesis provides electromagnetic solutions to several problems associated with scattering from tree canopies. The forest canopy is modelled in the form of layers comprised of randomly distributed particles with known statistical properties. In Chapters 2-8 effective scattering models for different constituent particles of vegetation canopies are developed by employing appropriate asymptotic solutions and approximations. The effects of various physical features of the particles, such as curvature and variation in thickness for planar leaves and roughness for tree trunks, on their scattering behavior are examined. In Chapter 9 the scattering problem of inhomogeneous layered media is formulated via the vector radiative transfer equations and a first-order solution for the radar scattering coefficients is obtained. The radiative transfer solution is formulated in terms of two sets of input functions: the scattering matrices of the constituent particles, which are given in Chapters 2-8, and the size and orientation distribution functions of the particles. The radar scattering model and associated input functions can be used to conduct sensitivity analyses to determine the

  2. Boomerang Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbrock, Andrew; Minton, David A.

    2017-10-01

    We recently reported that the orbital architecture of the Martian environment allows for material in orbit around the planet to ``cycle'' between orbiting the planet as a ring, or as coherent satellites. Here we generalize our previous analysis to examine several factors that determine whether satellites accreting at the edge of planetary rings will cycle. In order for the orbiting material to cycle, tidal evolution must decrease the semi-major axis of any accreting satellites. In some systems, the density of the ring/satellite material, the surface mass density of the ring, the tidal parameters of the system, and the rotation rate of the primary body contribute to a competition between resonant ring torques and tidal dissipation that prevent this from occurring, either permanently or temporarily. Analyzing these criteria, we examine various bodies in our solar system (such as Saturn, Uranus, and Eris) to identify systems where cycling may occur. We find that a ring-satellite cycle may give rise to the current Uranian ring-satellite system, and suggest that Miranda may have formed from an early, more massive Uranian ring.

  3. Coherent-form energy conservation relation for the elastic scattering of a guided mode in a symmetric scattering system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao

    2013-10-07

    We propose a coherent-form energy conservation relation (ECR) that is generally valid for the elastic transmission and reflection of a guided mode in a symmetric scattering system. In contrast with the classical incoherent-form ECR, |τ|2 + |ρ|2≤1 with τ and ρ denoting the elastic transmission and reflection coefficients of a guided mode, the coherent-form ECR is expressed as |τ + ρ|≤1, which imposes a constraint on a coherent superposition of the transmitted and reflected modes. The coherent-form ECR is rigorously demonstrated and is numerically tested by considering different types of modes in various scattering systems. Further discussions with the scattering matrix formalism indicate that two coherent-form ECRs, |τ + ρ|≤1 and |τ-ρ|≤1, along with the classical ECR |τ|2 + |ρ|2≤1 constitute a complete description of the energy conservation for the elastic scattering of a guided mode in a symmetric scattering system. The coherent-form ECR provides a common tool in terms of energy transfer for understanding and analyzing the scattering dynamics in currently interested scattering systems.

  4. Secondary relaxation in two engineering thermoplastics by neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Arrese, S; Alegria, A; Colmenero, J; Frick, B

    2002-01-01

    We present a preliminary investigation of the dynamics of glassy polycarbonate (PC) and polysulfone (PSF) by means of quasielastic neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy. Whereas the consideration of pure phenylene ring pi-flips is enough to explain the momentum-transfer (Q) dependence of the inelastic intensity measured for PSF, in the case of PC the Q dependence of both the coherent and the incoherent scattering functions reveal the existence in this polymer of some more complex motion of the phenylene ring. On the other hand, the similarity of the energy landscapes deduced from the different techniques points to a closely related molecular origin for all the relaxation/motions observed. (orig.)

  5. Turn-key module for neutron scattering with sub-micro-eV resolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgii, R.; Brandl, G.; HauBler, W.; Tischendorf, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Boni, P.; Arend, N.; Keller, T.; Lal, J. (Biosciences Division); ( MSD); (Technische Univ. Munchen); (JCNS); (MPI-FKE)

    2011-02-18

    We report the development of a compact turn-key module that boosts the resolution in quasielastic neutron scattering by several orders of magnitude down to the low sub-micro-eV range. It is based on a pair of neutron resonance spin flippers that generate a well defined temporal intensity modulation, also known as Modulation of IntEnsity by Zero Effort (MIEZE). The module may be used under versatile conditions, in particular, in applied magnetic fields and for depolarizing and incoherently scattering samples. We demonstrate the power of MIEZE in studies of the helimagnetic order in MnSi under applied magnetic fields.

  6. Satellite broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D.; Rainger, P.; Harvey, R. V.; Jennings, A.

    Questions related to direct broadcasting satellites are addressed with attention given to celestial mechanics, synchronous orbits, propagation, international plans, domestic installation, related laws and system costs. The role of the World Administrative Planning Conference (WARC) organization is discussed and contrasted with that of the regional administrative radio conference. Topics related to the field of law include coverage and overspill, regulation and control, copyrights and international organizations. Alternative ways of estimating direct broadcasting system costs are presented with consideration given to satellite costs as a function of mass, launch costs and system costs as a function of power.

  7. Critical scattering of neutrons from terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Dietrich, O.W.; Marshall, W.

    1968-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical scattering of neutrons in terbium has been measured above the Neél temperature at the (0, 0, 2−Q) satellite position. The results show that dynamic slowing down of the fluctuations does occur in a second‐order phase transition in agreement with the general theory...

  8. Spatially continuous approach to the description of incoherencies in fast reactor accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, L B

    1976-12-01

    A generalized cell-type approach is developed in which individual subassemblies are represented as a unit. By appropriate characterization of the results of separate detailed investigations, spatial variations within a cell are represented as a superposition. The advantage of this approach is that costly detailed cell-type information is generated only once or a very few times. Spatial information obtained by the cell treatment is properly condensed in order to drastically reduce the transient computation time. Approximate treatments of transient phenomena are developed based on the use of distributions of volume and reactivity worth with temperature and other reactor parameters. Incoherencies during transient are physically dependent on the detailed variations in the initial state. Therefore, stationary volumetric distributions which contain in condensed form the detailed initial incoherency information provides a proper basis for the transient treatment. Approximate transient volumetric distributions are generated by a suitable transformation of the stationary distribution to reflect the changes in the transient temperature field. Evaluation of transient changes is based on results of conventional uniform channel calculations and a superposition of lateral variations as they are derived from prior cell investigations. Specific formulations are developed for the treatment of reactivity feedback. Doppler and sodium expansion reactivity feedback is related to condensed temperature-worth distributions. Transient evaluation of the worth distribution is based on the relation between stationary and transient volumetric distributions, which contains the condensed temperature field information. Coolant voiding is similarly treated with proper distribution information. Results show that the treatments developed for the transient phase up to and including sodium boiling constitute a fast and effective simulation of inter- and intra-subassembly incoherence effects.

  9. Spatially-constrained probability distribution model of incoherent motion (SPIM) for abdominal diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the body enables characterization of the tissue microenvironment by measuring variations in the mobility of water molecules. The diffusion signal decay model parameters are increasingly used to evaluate various diseases of abdominal organs such as the liver and spleen. However, previous signal decay models (i.e., mono-exponential, bi-exponential intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and stretched exponential models) only provide insight into the average of the distribution of the signal decay rather than explicitly describe the entire range of diffusion scales. In this work, we propose a probability distribution model of incoherent motion that uses a mixture of Gamma distributions to fully characterize the multi-scale nature of diffusion within a voxel. Further, we improve the robustness of the distribution parameter estimates by integrating spatial homogeneity prior into the probability distribution model of incoherent motion (SPIM) and by using the fusion bootstrap solver (FBM) to estimate the model parameters. We evaluated the improvement in quantitative DW-MRI analysis achieved with the SPIM model in terms of accuracy, precision and reproducibility of parameter estimation in both simulated data and in 68 abdominal in-vivo DW-MRIs. Our results show that the SPIM model not only substantially reduced parameter estimation errors by up to 26%; it also significantly improved the robustness of the parameter estimates (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001) by reducing the coefficient of variation (CV) of estimated parameters compared to those produced by previous models. In addition, the SPIM model improves the parameter estimates reproducibility for both intra- (up to 47%) and inter-session (up to 30%) estimates compared to those generated by previous models. Thus, the SPIM model has the potential to improve accuracy, precision and robustness of quantitative abdominal DW-MRI analysis for clinical applications

  10. Neutron scattering of a floating heavy water bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Elmar C [Wetsus, Center of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Bitschnau, Brigitte [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Rechbauerstrasse 12, 8010 Graz (Austria); Woisetschlaeger, Jakob [Institute of Thermal Turbomachnery and Machine Dynamics, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 25A, Graz (Austria); Maier, Eugen [Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Beuneu, Brigitte; Teixeira, Jose [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS/IRAMIS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2009-03-21

    When high voltage is applied to distilled water filled into two beakers close to each other, a water connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge (Fuchs et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 6112-4, 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 185502). This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the first data on neutron scattering of a floating heavy water bridge are presented and possible interpretations are discussed. D{sub 2}O was measured instead of H{sub 2}O because of the very strong incoherent scattering of H. The obtained data support the 'bubble hypothesis' suggested earlier (Fuchs et al 2008).

  11. Máscara de espalhamento e precipitação para os canais microondas do satélite NOAA Scattering and rainfall mask for microwave channels of NOAA satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C. Carvalho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Propõe-se, com o presente trabalho, avaliar uma metodologia para identificação de pixels contaminados por precipitação e/ou espalhamento utilizando-se dados dos canais do Advanced Microwave Sensor Unit (AMSU. A aplicação de metodologias desse tipo é útil para a inferência de perfis verticais de temperatura e umidade no Brasil, em situações de céu coberto. A validação dos resultados foi feita com base em um estudo de caso, em que se aplicou uma análise subjetiva, tomando-se como modelo a comparação com imagens das bandas infravermelho, visível e microondas. Os resultados mostraram excelente concordância entre os topos de nuvens com temperaturas de brilho baixas, afetadas pelo efeito de espalhamento devido à presença de chuva e gelo, e as áreas identificadas pelo algoritmo como sendo contaminadas por este efeito. O algoritmo conseguiu identificar adequadamente os locais sob influência de precipitação e/ou espalhamento.This work presents a methodology to identify precipitation and/or scattering pixels in the Advanced Microwave Sensor Unit (AMSU channels. This procedure is useful for applications in atmospheric temperature and moisture retrievals over Brazil under cloudy sky conditions. A subjective analysis based on a case study involving comparisons with infrared, visible and microwave images was applied for validation purpose. The results show an excellent relationship of cloud tops with low brightness temperature affected by scattering due to water drops and ice and the areas identified by the algorithm as being influenced by precipitation and/or scattering effect.

  12. Third-order lensless ghost diffraction with classical fully incoherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Zhang, Chun-xi

    2010-06-15

    We theoretically demonstrate third-order lensless ghost diffraction by using a fully classical incoherent light source in which the light beam is detected by two detectors. The resolution and visibility of the obtained diffraction pattern are discussed. It is shown that the resolution of third-order ghost diffraction is determined by the transverse correlation length in the detection plane, while the visibility is affected by the ratio of the transverse length of the imaged object and the transverse size of the light source. Furthermore, we discuss the similarities and differences of second- and third-order lensless ghost diffraction.

  13. Fiber sensor identification based on incoherent Rayleigh backscatter measurements in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppel, Max; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Werzinger, Stefan; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a fiber identification method based on incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) measurements is introduced. The proposed method uses the characteristic interference pattern of IOFDR Rayleigh backscatter measurements with a broadband light source to unambiguously recognize different initially scanned fiber segments. The recognition is achieved by cross-correlating the spatially resolved Rayleigh backscatter profile of the fiber segment under test with a initially measured and stored backscatter profile. This profile was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature changes. It is shown that identification is possible even if the fiber segment in question is installed subsequent to 300m of lead fiber.

  14. Misplaced Idealism and Incoherent Realism in the Philosophy of the Refugee Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2016-01-01

    Many contributions to the philosophical debate about conceptual and normative issues raised by the refugee crisis fail to take properly account of the difference between ideal and nonideal theory. This makes several otherwise interesting and apparently plausible contributions to the philosophy...... of the refugee crisis problematic. They are problematic in the sense that they mix up ideal and nonideal aspirations and assumptions in an incoherent way undermining the proposed views. Two examples of this problem are discussed. The first example is David Miller’s contribution to the conceptual debate about how...

  15. A satellite explosion in the genome of holocentric nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Subirana

    Full Text Available Centromere sequences in the genome are associated with the formation of kinetochores, where spindle microtubules grow in mitosis. Centromere sequences usually have long tandem repeats (satellites. In holocentric nematodes it is not clear how kinetochores are formed during mitosis; they are distributed throughout the chromosomes. For this reason it appeared of interest to study the satellites in nematodes in order to determine if they offer any clue on how kinetochores are assembled in these species. We have studied the satellites in the genome of six nematode species. We found that the presence of satellites depends on whether the nematode chromosomes are holocentric or monocentric. It turns out that holocentric nematodes are unique because they have a large number of satellites scattered throughout their genome. Their number, length and composition are different in each species: they apparently have very little evolutionary conservation. In contrast, no scattered satellites are found in the monocentric nematode Trichinella spiralis. It appears that the absence/presence of scattered satellites in the genome distinguishes monocentric from holocentric nematodes. We conclude that the presence of satellites is related to the holocentric nature of the chromosomes of most nematodes. Satellites may stabilize a higher order structure of chromatin and facilitate the formation of kinetochores. We also present a new program, SATFIND, which is suited to find satellite sequences.

  16. On scattered subword complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  17. Solar satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poher, C.

    1982-01-01

    A reference system design, projected costs, and the functional concepts of a satellite solar power system (SSPS) for converting sunlight falling on solar panels of a satellite in GEO to a multi-GW beam which could be received by a rectenna on earth are outlined. Electricity transmission by microwaves has been demonstrated, and a reference design system for supplying 5 GW dc to earth was devised. The system will use either monocrystalline Si or concentrator GaAs solar cells for energy collection in GEO. Development is still needed to improve the lifespan of the cells. Currently, the cell performance degrades 50 percent in efficiency after 7-8 yr in space. Each SSPS satellite would weigh either 34,000 tons (Si) or 51,000 tons (GaAs), thereby requiring the fabrication of a heavy lift launch vehicle or a single-stage-to-orbit transport in order to minimize launch costs. Costs for the solar panels have been estimated at $500/kW using the GaAs technology, with transport costs for materials to GEO being $40/kg.

  18. Maximum-likelihood and other processors for incoherent and coherent matched-field localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, Stan E; Wilmut, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    This paper develops a series of maximum-likelihood processors for matched-field source localization given various states of information regarding the frequency and time variation of source amplitude and phase, and compares these with existing approaches to coherent processing with incomplete source knowledge. The comparison involves elucidating each processor's approach to source spectral information within a unifying formulation, which provides a conceptual framework for classifying and comparing processors and explaining their relative performance, as quantified in a numerical study. The maximum-likelihood processors represent optimal estimators given the assumption of Gaussian noise, and are based on analytically maximizing the corresponding likelihood function over explicit unknown source spectral parameters. Cases considered include knowledge of the relative variation in source amplitude over time and/or frequency (e.g., a flat spectrum), and tracking the relative phase variation over time, as well as incoherent and coherent processing. Other approaches considered include the conventional (Bartlett) processor, cross-frequency incoherent processor, pair-wise processor, and coherent normalized processor. Processor performance is quantified as the probability of correct localization from Monte Carlo appraisal over a large number of random realizations of noise, source location, and environmental parameters. Processors are compared as a function of signal-to-noise ratio, number of frequencies, and number of sensors.

  19. Femtowatt incoherent image conversion from mid-infrared light to near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nan; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Zhang, Shuan

    2017-03-01

    We report on the experimental conversion imaging of an incoherent continuous-wave dim source from mid-infrared light to near-infrared light with a lowest input power of 31 femtowatt (fW). Incoherent mid-infrared images of light emission from a heat lamp bulb with an adjustable power supply at window wavelengths ranging from 2.9 µm to 3.5 µm are used for upconversion. The sum-frequency generation is realized in a laser cavity with the resonant wavelength of 1064 nm pumped by an LD at 806 nm built around a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The converted infrared image in the wavelength range ~785 nm with a resolution of about 120  ×  70 is low-noise detected using a silicon-based camera. By optimizing the system parameters, the upconversion quantum efficiency is predicted to be 28% for correctly polarized, on-axis and phase-matching light.

  20. Removal of incoherent noise from an averaged cross-spectral matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Jørgen

    2017-08-01

    Measured cross-spectral matrices (CSMs) from a microphone array will in some cases be contaminated by severe incoherent noise signals in the individual channels. A typical example is flow noise generated in the individual microphones when measuring in a wind tunnel. Assuming stationary signals and performing long-time averaging, the contamination will be concentrated on the CSM diagonal. When the CSM is used for traditional frequency-domain beamforming, diagonal removal (DR) will avoid use of the diagonal. DR is effective at suppressing the contamination effects, but it also has some side effects. With other beamforming algorithms and in connection with acoustic holography, however, the diagonal of the CSM is needed. The present paper describes a method for removal of incoherent noise contamination from the CSM diagonal. The method formulates the problem as a semidefinite program, which is a convex optimization problem that can be solved very efficiently and with guaranteed convergence properties. A first numerical study investigates the question, whether the semidefinite program formulation will provide in all cases the desired output. A second numerical study investigates the limitations introduced by off-diagonal noise contributions due to finite averaging time. The results of that study are backed up by results from a practical measurement.

  1. Conceptual Incoherence as a Result of the use of Multiple Historical Models in School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Niklas M.; Hagberg, Mariana

    2010-08-01

    This paper explores the occurrence of conceptual incoherence in upper secondary school textbooks resulting from the use of multiple historical models. Swedish biology and chemistry textbooks, as well as a selection of books from English speaking countries, were examined. The purpose of the study was to identify which models are used to represent the phenomenon of gene function in textbooks and to investigate how these models relate to historical scientific models and subject matter contexts. Models constructed for specific use in textbooks were identified using concept mapping. The data were further analyzed by content analysis. The study shows that several different historical models are used in parallel in textbooks to describe gene function. Certain historical models were used more often then others and the most recent scientific views were rarely referred to in the textbooks. Hybrid models were used frequently, i.e. most of the models in the textbooks consisted of a number of components of several historical models. Since the various historical models were developed as part of different scientific frameworks, hybrid models exhibit conceptual incoherence, which may be a source of confusion for students. Furthermore, the use of different historical models was linked to particular subject contexts in the textbooks studied. The results from Swedish and international textbooks were similar, indicating the general applicability of our conclusions.

  2. Coherent and subsequent incoherent ringwoodite growth in olivine of shocked L6 chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Masaaki; Ohtani, Eiji; Kimura, Makoto; El Goresy, Ahmed; Ozawa, Shin; Nagase, Toshiro; Nishijima, Masahiko; Hiraga, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Pervasive replacement of original olivine grains by ringwoodite adjacent to a shock-melt vein of Yamato 791384 L6 chondrite was observed with a FEG-SEM. In these olivines, we observed three distinct olivine-ringwoodite textures arranged in a spatially successive arrangement from the wall of the shock-melt vein into the olivine grains: (1) polycrystalline ringwoodite, (2) oriented several sets of ringwoodite lamellae and (3) oriented single lamellae. TEM images show that the polycrystalline and oriented several sets of lamellae parts consist of polycrystalline ringwoodite, indicating that phase transformation from olivine to ringwoodite is controlled by incoherent growth mechanism. On the other hand, the set of oriented single lamellae consists of thin ringwoodite platelets (chondrite. However, our TEM studies revealed evidence for formation of the coherent intracrystalline lamella growth mechanism then followed by incoherent growth in the shocked chondrite in nature, thus allowing to constrain a robust time scale of the shock and at the origin of the veins.

  3. Evolution from modal to spatially incoherent emission of a broad-area VCSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandre, Shyam K; Elsässer, Wolfgang; Fischer, Ingo; Peeters, Michael; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2008-03-31

    Broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (BA-VCSELs) can exhibit a state of spatially incoherent emission, as we recently reported in [M. Peeters et al., Opt. Express, 13, 9337 (2005)]. Here, we experimentally study the evolution of a BA-VCSEL under pulsed operation from well-defined modal emission with a multitude of transverse cavity modes to such spatially incoherent emission. The transition is studied using a high-speed intensified CCD camera and differential image analysis with which single-shot measurements of the imaged nearfield, farfield, spatial coherence, and spectral emission properties are acquired. This combination of experimental characterization tools allows for a detailed description of the BA-VCSEL's emission behavior, which is necessary for an in-depth understanding of the processes involved. We find the interplay between the thermal chirp and the build-up of a spatially distributed thermal lens to be decisive for the break-up of the global cavity modes.

  4. IMPACT OF COHERENT AND INCOHERENT CROSSTALKS AND POWER PENALTY ON THE OPTICAL CROSSCONNECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna S. Patil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical cross-connects are one of the most important components in the dense wavelength division multiplexer based optical networks. The crossconnects suffer from crosstalk due to the different wavelength light path channels during the switching process leading to the deterioration in bit error rate (BER and hence in the system performance. This paper presents the study of impact of coherent and incoherent crosstalk and power penalty on the optical cross-connects in WDM Networks. The effect of accumulation of coherent crosstalk at different stages of crossconnect has been also investigated and analyzed for the blocking probabilities. Results of coherent and incoherent crosstalk are compared to identify their impact on the working of the cross-connect. The results show that the crosstalk increases with increase in either the number of wavelengths per fiber or the number of input fibers. The result also illustrates decrease in the interference penalty by correlating the crosstalk contributions with each other at the appropriate phase angle. We show that an acceptable blocking probability due to crosstalk is achievable for active wavelengths in the WDM network. The present study can be used to model the possible number of routing stages in such networks.

  5. Second-Harmonic Scattering as a Probe of Structural Correlations in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tocci, Gabriele; Wilkins, David M; Roke, Sylvie; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Second-harmonic scattering experiments of water and other bulk molecular liquids have long been assumed to be insensitive to interactions between the molecules. The measured intensity is generally thought to arise from incoherent scattering due to individual molecules. We introduce a method to compute the second-harmonic scattering pattern of molecular liquids directly from atomistic computer simulations, which takes into account the coherent terms. We apply this approach to large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water, where we show that nanosecond second-harmonic scattering experiments contain a coherent contribution arising from radial and angular correlations on a length scale of < 1 nm, much shorter than had been recently hypothesized (Shelton, D. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141). By combining structural correlations from simulations with experimental data (Shelton, D. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141), we can also extract an effective molecular hyperpolarizability in the liquid phase. This work ...

  6. Extinction of light and coherent scattering by a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Hien; Siyushev, Petr; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2017-05-01

    The efficient interaction of light and a single quantum system is required to implement a photon to spin interface. It is important to determine the amount of coherent and incoherent photons in such a scheme, since it is based on coherent scattering. In this paper an external laser field is efficiently coupled to a single nitrogen vacancy center in diamond. We detect the direct extinction signal and estimate the nitrogen vacancy's extinction cross section. The exact amount of coherent and incoherent photons is determined against the saturation parameter. This reveals the optimal point of interaction for further experiments. A theoretical model allows us to explain the deviation to an atom in free space. The introduced experimental techniques are used to determine the properties of the tight focusing in an interference experiment and allow for a direct determination of the Gouy phase in a strongly focused beam.

  7. Bidirectional optical scattering facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Goniometric optical scatter instrument (GOSI)The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) quantifies the angular distribution of light scattered from a...

  8. The manipulated left-handedness in a rare-earth-ion-doped optical fiber by the incoherent pumping field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shun-Cai; Guo, Hong-Wei; Wei, Xiao-Jing

    2017-10-01

    The left-handedness was demonstrated by the simulation with a three-level quantum system in an Er3+ -dopped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3- AlF3-NaF (ZBLAFN) optical fiber. And the left-handedness can be regulated by the incoherent pumping field. Our scheme may provide a solid candidate other than the coherent atomic vapor for left-handedness, and may extend the application of the rare-earth-ion-doped optical fiber in metamaterials and of the incoherent pumping light field in quantum optics.

  9. Spectrally resolved incoherent holography: 3D spatial and spectral imaging using a Mach-Zehnder radial-shearing interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Takeda, Mitsuo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Spatial and spectral information holds the key for characterizing incoherently illuminated or self-luminous objects, as well as for imaging fluorescence. We propose spectrally resolved incoherent holography using a multifunctional Mach-Zehnder interferometer that can introduce both a radial shear and a variable time delay between the interfering optical fields and permits the measurement of both spatial and temporal coherence functions, from which a 3D spatial and spectral image of the object is reconstructed. We propose and demonstrate the accurate 3D imaging of the object spectra by in situ calibration.

  10. Controlling the probe-absorption and -dispersion via quantum interference from incoherent pumping field in a four-level lambda-type system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahrai, M.; Nasehi, R.; Memarzadeh, M.; Hamedi, H.; Poursamad, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Absorptive and dispersive properties of a four-level Λ-type atomic system with two fold lower levels are investigated. The effect of quantum interference induced by incoherent pump and spontaneous emission upon the absorption, dispersion, and group index is them discussed. In addition, the rate of an incoherent pump field and the intensity of coupling field on light propagation is also presented.

  11. A hybrid approach to simulate multiple photon scattering in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, N. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.freud@insa-lyon.fr; Letang, J.-M. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Babot, D. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid simulation approach is proposed to compute the contribution of scattered radiation in X- or {gamma}-ray imaging. This approach takes advantage of the complementarity between the deterministic and probabilistic simulation methods. The proposed hybrid method consists of two stages. Firstly, a set of scattering events occurring in the inspected object is determined by means of classical Monte Carlo simulation. Secondly, this set of scattering events is used as a starting point to compute the energy imparted to the detector, with a deterministic algorithm based on a 'forced detection' scheme. For each scattering event, the probability for the scattered photon to reach each pixel of the detector is calculated using well-known physical models (form factor and incoherent scattering function approximations, in the case of Rayleigh and Compton scattering respectively). The results of the proposed hybrid approach are compared to those obtained with the Monte Carlo method alone (Geant4 code) and found to be in excellent agreement. The convergence of the results when the number of scattering events increases is studied. The proposed hybrid approach makes it possible to simulate the contribution of each type (Compton or Rayleigh) and order of scattering, separately or together, with a single PC, within reasonable computation times (from minutes to hours, depending on the number of pixels of the detector). This constitutes a substantial benefit, compared to classical simulation methods (Monte Carlo or deterministic approaches), which usually requires a parallel computing architecture to obtain comparable results.

  12. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  13. Light scattering by planetary-regolith analog samples: computational results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Timo; Markkanen, Johannes; Hadamcik, Edith; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Lasue, Jeremie; Blum, Jürgen; Penttilä, Antti; Muinonen, Karri

    2017-04-01

    We compute light scattering by a planetary-regolith analog surface. The corresponding experimental work is from Hadamcik et al. [1] with the PROGRA2-surf [2] device measuring the polarization of dust particles. The analog samples are low density (volume fraction 0.15 ± 0.03) agglomerates produced by random ballistic deposition of almost equisized silica spheres (refractive index n=1.5 and diameter 1.45 ± 0.06 µm). Computations are carried out with the recently developed codes entitled Radiative Transfer with Reciprocal Transactions (R2T2) and Radiative Transfer Coherent Backscattering with incoherent interactions (RT-CB-ic). Both codes incorporate the so-called incoherent treatment which enhances the applicability of the radiative transfer as shown by Muinonen et al. [3]. As a preliminary result, we have computed scattering from a large spherical medium with the RT-CB-ic using equal-sized particles with diameters of 1.45 microns. The preliminary results have shown that the qualitative characteristics are similar for the computed and measured intensity and polarization curves but that there are still deviations between the characteristics. We plan to remove the deviations by incorporating a size distribution of particles (1.45 ± 0.02 microns) and detailed information about the volume density profile within the analog surface. Acknowledgments: We acknowledge the ERC Advanced Grant no. 320773 entitled Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media (SAEMPL). Computational resources were provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd, Finland. References: [1] Hadamcik E. et al. (2007), JQSRT, 106, 74-89 [2] Levasseur-Regourd A.C. et al. (2015), Polarimetry of stars and planetary systems, CUP, 61-80 [3] Muinonen K. et al. (2016), extended abstract for EMTS.

  14. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  15. A mixed incoherent feed-forward loop contributes to the regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, Nils N; Berghoff, Bork A; Klug, Gabriele

    2013-03-01

    Living cells use a variety of regulatory network motifs for accurate gene expression in response to changes in their environment or during differentiation processes. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a complex regulatory network controls expression of photosynthesis genes to guarantee optimal energy supply on one hand and to avoid photooxidative stress on the other hand. Recently, we identified a mixed incoherent feed-forward loop comprising the transcription factor PrrA, the sRNA PcrZ and photosynthesis target genes as part of this regulatory network. This point-of-view provides a comparison to other described feed-forward loops and discusses the physiological relevance of PcrZ in more detail.

  16. Unidirectional reflection and invisibility in nonlinear media with an incoherent nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali; Oflaz, Neslihan

    2017-11-01

    We give explicit criteria for the reflectionlessness, transparency, and invisibility of a finite-range potential in the presence of an incoherent (intensity-dependent) nonlinearity that is confined to the range of the potential. This allows us to conduct a systematic study of the effects of such a nonlinearity on a locally periodic class of finite-range potentials that display perturbative unidirectional invisibility. We use our general results to examine the effects of a weak Kerr nonlinearity on the behavior of these potentials and show that the presence of nonlinearity destroys the unidirectional invisibility of these potentials. If the strength of the Kerr nonlinearity is so weak that the first-order perturbation theory is reliable, the presence of nonlinearity does not affect the unidirectional reflectionlessness and transmission reciprocity of the potential. We show that the expected violation of the latter is a second order perturbative effect.

  17. Optical information encryption based on incoherent superposition with the help of the QR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi; Gong, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel optical information encryption approach is proposed with the help of QR code. This method is based on the concept of incoherent superposition which we introduce for the first time. The information to be encrypted is first transformed into the corresponding QR code, and thereafter the QR code is further encrypted into two phase only masks analytically by use of the intensity superposition of two diffraction wave fields. The proposed method has several advantages over the previous interference-based method, such as a higher security level, a better robustness against noise attack, a more relaxed work condition, and so on. Numerical simulation results and actual smartphone collected results are shown to validate our proposal.

  18. Irreducible incoherence and intelligent design: a look into the conceptual toolbox of a pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudry, Maarten; Blancke, Stefaan; Braeckman, Johan

    2010-12-01

    The concept of Irreducible Complexity (IC) has played a pivotal role in the resurgence of the creationist movement over the past two decades. Evolutionary biologists and philosophers have unambiguously rejected the purported demonstration of "intelligent design" in nature, but there have been several, apparently contradictory, lines of criticism. We argue that this is in fact due to Michael Behe's own incoherent definition and use of IC. This paper offers an analysis of several equivocations inherent in the concept of Irreducible Complexity and discusses the way in which advocates of the Intelligent Design Creationism (IDC) have conveniently turned IC into a moving target. An analysis of these rhetorical strategies helps us to understand why IC has gained such prominence in the IDC movement, and why, despite its complete lack of scientific merits, it has even convinced some knowledgeable persons of the impending demise of evolutionary theory.

  19. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Imaging in Small Vessel Disease: Microstructural Integrity and Microvascular Perfusion Related to Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C Eleana; Wong, Sau May; Uiterwijk, Renske; Staals, Julie; Backes, Walter H; Hoff, Erik I; Schreuder, Tobien; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Jansen, Jacobus F A; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is associated with cognitive impairment. This may be because of decreased microstructural integrity and microvascular perfusion, but data on these relationships are scarce. We determined the relationship between cognition and microvascular perfusion and microstructural integrity in SVD patients, using intravoxel incoherent motion imaging-a diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique designed to determine microvascular perfusion and microstructural integrity simultaneously. Seventy-three patients with SVD and 39 controls underwent intravoxel incoherent motion imaging and neuropsychological assessment. Parenchymal diffusivity D (a surrogate measure of microstructural integrity) and perfusion-related measure fD* were calculated for the normal appearing white matter, white matter hyperintensities, and cortical gray matter. The associations between cognitive performance and D and fD* were determined. In SVD patients, multivariable analysis showed that lower fD* in the normal appearing white matter and cortical gray matter was associated with lower overall cognition (P=0.03 and P=0.002, respectively), lower executive function (P=0.04 and P=0.01, respectively), and lower information-processing speed (P=0.04 and P=0.01, respectively). D was not associated with cognitive function. In controls, no association was found between D, fD*, and cognition. In SVD patients, lower cognitive performance is associated with lower microvascular perfusion in the normal appearing white matter and cortical gray matter. Our results support recent findings that both cortical gray matter and normal appearing white matter perfusion may play a role in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in SVD. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR3786. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM histogram biomarkers for prediction of neoadjuvant treatment response in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Y. Cho

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the prognostic capabilities of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM metrics and their ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment (NAT. Additionally, to observe changes in IVIM metrics between pre- and post-treatment MRI. Methods: This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study observed 31 breast cancer patients (32 lesions. Patients underwent standard bilateral breast MRI along with diffusion-weighted imaging before and after NAT. Six patients underwent an additional IVIM-MRI scan 12–14 weeks after initial scan and 2 cycles of treatment. In addition to apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC from monoexponential decay, IVIM mean values (tissue diffusivity Dt, perfusion fraction fp, and pseudodiffusivity Dp and histogram metrics were derived using a biexponential model. An additional filter identified voxels of highly vascular tumor tissue (VTT, excluding necrotic or normal tissue. Clinical data include histology of biopsy and clinical response to treatment through RECIST assessment. Comparisons of treatment response were made using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Results: Average, kurtosis, and skewness of pseudodiffusion Dp significantly differentiated RECIST responders from nonresponders. ADC and Dt values generally increased (∼70% and VTT% values generally decreased (∼20% post-treatment. Conclusion: Dp metrics showed prognostic capabilities; slow and heterogeneous pseudodiffusion offer poor prognosis. Baseline ADC/Dt parameters were not significant predictors of response. This work suggests that IVIM mean values and heterogeneity metrics may have prognostic value in the setting of breast cancer NAT. Keywords: Breast cancer, Diffusion weighted MRI, Intravoxel incoherent motion, Neoadjuvant treatment, Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors

  1. Efficient all-solid-state UV source for satellite-based lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2003-12-01

    A satellite-based UV-DIAL measurement system would allow continuous global monitoring of ozone concentration in the upper atmosphere. However such systems remain difficult to implement because aerosol-scattering return signals for satellite-based lidars are very weak. A suitable system must produce high-energy UV pulses at multiple wavelengths with very high efficiency. For example, a nanosecond system operating at 10 Hz must generate approximately 1 J per pulse at 308-320 nm. An efficient space-qualified wavelength-agile system based on a single UV source that can meet this requirement is probably not available using current laser technology. As an alternative, we're pursuing a multi-source approach employing all-solid-state modules that individually generate 300-320 nm light with pulse energies in the range of 50-200 mJ, with transform-limited bandwidths and good beam quality. Pulses from the individual sources can be incoherently summed to obtain the required single-pulse energy. These sources use sum-frequency mixing of the 532 nm second harmonic of an Nd:YAG pump laser with 731-803 nm light derived from a recently-developed, state-of-the-art, nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. Two source configurations are under development, one using extra-cavity sum-frequency mixing, and the other intra-cavity sum-frequency mixing. In either configuration, we hope to obtain sum-frequency mixing efficiency approaching 60% by carefully matching the spatial and temporal properties of the laser and OPO pulses. This ideal balance of green and near-IR photons requires an injection-seeded Nd:YAG pump-laser with very high beam quality, and an OPO exhibiting unusually high conversion efficiency and exceptional signal beam quality. The OPO employs a singly-resonant high-Fresnel-number image-rotating self-injection-seeded nonplanar-ring cavity that achieves pump depletion > 65% and produces signal beams with M2 ~ 3 at pulse energies exceeding 50 mJ. Pump beam requirements can be

  2. The thermal neutron scattering cross section of {sup 86}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terburg, B.P.

    1992-05-01

    The availability of 27 1 STP krypton-86 gas, an isotope with unknown thermal neutron scattering cross section, was an excellent occasion to determine the (bound atom) scattering cross section and its coherent part by application of the neutron transmission method and neutron interferometry. The transmission method was applied in a diffractometer, a Larmor spectrometer and a TOF-spectrometer. In addition to {sup 86}Kr also natural krypton ({sup n}Kr) was used for sample in the diffractometer. The diffractometer measurements result in bound atom scattering cross sections {sigma}{sub s}=8.92(46) b for {sup 86}Kr and {sigma}{sub s}=7.08(95) b for {sup n}Kr. The Larmor transmission measurements lead to a final result {sigma}{sub s}=8.44(9) b for {sup 86}Kr. In the TOF-spectrometer the wavelength-dependent total cross section of water was determined. Coherent neutron scattering lengths were determined using the neutron interferometry method with a skew symmetric neutron interferometer. Scans with {sup 86}Kr and {sup n}Kr led to b{sub c}=8.07(26) fm for {sup 86}Kr and 7.72(33) fm for {sup n}Kr, corresponding to coherent scattering cross sections {sigma}{sub c}=8.18(53) b and 7.49(64) b respectively. Due to the large errors in the bound atom scattering cross section and coherent scattering cross section of {sup 86}Kr and {sup n}Kr, the incoherent cross section of both gases, {sigma}{sub i} = 0 within its inaccuracy, {sigma}{sub i}=0.26(54) b for {sup 86}Kr and {sigma}{sub i}=0.41(1.15) b for {sup n}Kr. (orig.).

  3. Geostationary Satellite (GOES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from radiometer instruments on SMS (ATS) and GOES satellites in geostationary orbit. These satellites produced...

  4. Lectures in scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, A G

    1971-01-01

    Lectures in Scattering Theory discusses problems in quantum mechanics and the principles of the non-relativistic theory of potential scattering. This book describes in detail the properties of the scattering matrix and its connection with physically observable quantities. This text presents a stationary formulation of the scattering problem and the wave functions of a particle found in an external field. This book also examines the analytic properties of the scattering matrix, dispersion relations, complex angular moments, as well as the separable representation of the scattering amplitude. Th

  5. A new SERS: scattering enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can be used to obtain detailed chemical information about a system without the need for chemical markers. It has been widely used for a variety of applications such as cancer diagnosis and material characterization. However, Raman scattering is a highly inefficient process, where only one in 1011 scattered photons carry the needed information. Several methods have been developed to enhance this inherently weak effect, including surface enhanced Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. These techniques suffer from drawbacks limiting their commercial use, such as the need for spatial localization of target molecules to a `hot spot', or the need for complex laser systems. Here, we present a simple instrument to enhance spontaneous Raman scattering using elastic light scattering. Elastic scattering is used to substantially increase the interaction volume. Provided that the scattering medium exhibits very low absorption in the spectral range of interest, a large enhancement factor can be attained in a simple and inexpensive setting. In our experiments, we demonstrate an enhancement of 107 in Raman signal intensity. The proposed novel device is equally applicable for analyzing solids, liquids, and gases.

  6. Detailed analysis of Rouse mode and dynamic scattering function of highly entangled polymer melts in equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Kremer, Kurt

    2017-03-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for a coarse-grained model of polymer melts in equilibrium. From detailed Rouse mode analysis we show that the time-dependent relaxation of the autocorrelation function (ACF) of modes p can be well described by the effective stretched exponential function due to the crossover from Rouse to reptation regime. The ACF is independent of chain sizes N for N/p reptation regime. We have also provided evidence that the incoherent dynamic scattering function follows the same crossover scaling behavior of the mean square displacement of monomers at the corresponding characteristic time scales. The decay of the coherent dynamic scattering function is slowed down and a plateau develops as chain sizes increase at the intermediate time and wave length scales. The tube diameter extracted from the coherent dynamic scattering function is equivalent to the previous estimate from the mean square displacement of monomers.

  7. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John; Kamhawi, Hani; Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort to mature an iodine propulsion system while reducing risk and increasing fidelity of a technology demonstration mission concept. 1 The FY 2014 tasks include investments leveraged throughout NASA, from multiple mission directorates, as a partnership with NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Technology Investment Project, and an Air Force partnership. Propulsion technology is often a critical enabling technology for space missions. NASA is investing in technologies to enable high value missions with very small and low-cost spacecraft, even CubeSats. However, these small spacecraft currently lack any appreciable propulsion capability. CubeSats are typically deployed and drift without any ability to transfer to higher value orbits, perform orbit maintenance, or deorbit. However, the iodine Hall system can allow the spacecraft to transfer into a higher value science orbit. The iodine satellite (iSAT) will be able to achieve a (Delta)V of >500 m/s with 1,300 s. The iSAT spacecraft, illustrated in figure 1, is currently a 12U CubeSat. The spacecraft chassis will be constructed from aluminum with a finish to prevent iodine-driven corrosion. The iSAT spacecraft includes full three-axis control using wheels, magnetic torque rods, inertial management unit, and a suite of sensors and optics. The spacecraft will leverage heat generated by spacecraft components and radiators for a passive thermal control system.

  8. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forward Scattering Radar (FSR is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS, FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology used in forward scattering RCS, FSR detection, and Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging and key problems such as the statistical characteristics of forward scattering clutter, accurate parameter estimation, and multitarget discrimination are then analyzed. Subsequently, the current research progress in FSR detection and SISAR imaging are described in detail, including the theories and experiments. In addition, with reference to the BeiDou navigation satellite, the results of forward scattering experiments in civil aircraft detection are shown. Finally, this paper considers future developments in FSR target detection and imaging and presents a new, promising technique for stealth target detection.

  9. The measurement of self-diffusion coefficients in liquid metals with quasielastic neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering (QENS has proven to be a versatile tool to study self diffusion of atoms in liquid metals. Here it is shown, that coherent contributions to the signal in the small q limit appear as a flat and energy independent constant to the QENS signal in single-component liquid metals even for systems with a small incoherent scattering cross section, like aluminum. Container-less processing via electromagnetic or electrostatic levitation devices, especially designed for QENS, enables the in-situ measurement on liquid metallic droplets of sizes between 5 mm to 10 mm in diameter. This gives access to the study of chemically reactive, refractory metallic melts and extends the accessible temperature range to undercoolings of several hundred Kelvin below the respective melting point. Compared to experiments using a thin-walled crucible giving hollow-cylindrical sample geometry it is shown that multiple scattering on levitated droplets is negligible for the analysis of the self-diffusion coefficient. QENS results of liquid germanium and 73germanium isotope mixtures, titanium, nickel, copper and aluminum are reviewed. The self-diffusion coefficients of these systems are best described by an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence around their respective melting points.

  10. Nonlinear magneto-optical Kerr effect in hyper-Rayleigh scattering from layer-by-layer assembled films of yttrium iron garnet nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzina, T. V.; Nikulin, A. A.; Aktsipetrov, O. A.; Ostrander, J. W.; Mamedov, A. A.; Kotov, N. A.; Devillers, M. A. C.; Roark, J.

    2001-08-01

    Magnetization-induced second-harmonic generation (SHG) in layer-by-layer assembled films containing yttrium iron garnet nanoparticles is observed. The SHG intensity, including its magnetoinduced component, linearly increases with the number of self-assembling layers, which indicates along with diffuseness of the SHG radiation that SHG occurs in its incoherent form: hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS). The nonlinear magneto-optical Kerr effect in HRS has a noticeable magnetic contrast brought about by the internal homodyne mechanism.

  11. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Array Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System for the CTBT differ greatly in size and geometry, with apertures ranging from below 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high frequency phases since signals are often incoherent between sensors. Many such phases, typically from events at regional distances, remain undetected since pipeline algorithms often consider only frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing. High frequency phases that are detected are frequently attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates and are consequently not associated with the correct event hypotheses. This can lead to missed events both due to a lack of contributing phase detections and by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. Continuous spectral estimation can be used for phase detection and parameter estimation on the largest aperture arrays, with phase arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity and the ability to estimate backazimuth and slowness requires that the spatial extent of the array is large enough to resolve time-delays between envelopes with a period of approximately 4 or 5 seconds. The NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK arrays have apertures in excess of 20 km and spectrogram beamforming on these stations provides high quality slowness estimates for regional phases without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with aperture between 10 and 20 km (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 second period signal. The MJAR array in Japan recorded high SNR Pn signals for both the 2006 and 2009 North Korea

  12. Impulsive Light Scattering by Coherent Phonons in LaAlO3: Disorder and Boundary Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Frenkel, A.; Garrett, G. A.; Whitaker, J. F.; Fahy, S.; Uher, C.; Merlin, R.

    1995-07-01

    Pump-probe measurements of coherent-phonon-induced changes of refractive index in LaAlO3 are dominated by normally weak boundary effects. Atomic displacements in the range 50-500 μÅ were generated and probed by femtosecond laser pulses through impulsive Raman scattering. The absence of a bulk contribution is ascribed to phase mismatch due to domain disorder. Selection rules are consistent with a Raman model considering reflection and transmission at interfaces. Intensities and phonon parameters as a function of temperature agree well with incoherent Raman data.

  13. Analysis of the Quasi-Elastic Scattering of Neutrons in Hydrogenous Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porohit, S.N. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Dept., Rensselaer Polytechnique Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1966-11-15

    A critical discussion of the quasi-elastic scattering of neutrons by incoherent (hydrogenous) liquids is presented. Using the line shape expression a comparative discussion of several phenomenological models has been carried out. Extension of the Singwi-Sjoelander zero phonon expression, for the jump-diffusion model, so as to include the one phonon expression has also been given. For a delayed diffusion model a complete treatment of S(K, {omega}) is presented. Along the lines of the macroscopic diffusion cooling, a microscopic diffusion cooling effect in fluids is speculated.

  14. Dynamics of flexible counter-ions in conducting polyaniline a quasielastic neutron-scattering study

    CERN Document Server

    Bee, M; Djurado, D; Marque, D; Combet, J; Rannou, P; Dufour, B

    2002-01-01

    Conducting polyaniline protonated with sulphonic flexible counter-ions was investigated by quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering. In addition to their role in electrical properties, the flexible counter-ions also increase the elasticity of the samples. As in the case of more rigid counter-ions, polymer chains appear as very stiff objects whose dynamics is completely outside the investigated time scale. Conversely, the counter-ion dynamics was proved to be of major importance in charge transport since a dynamical transition is observed precisely in the temperature range where the electronic properties change from a metallic to a semiconducting regime. (orig.)

  15. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  16. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion: Model-Free Determination of Tissue Type in Abdominal Organs Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciritsis, Alexander; Rossi, Cristina; Wurnig, Moritz C; Phi Van, Valerie; Boss, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    For diffusion data sets including low and high b-values, the intravoxel incoherent motion model is commonly applied to characterize tissue. The aim of the present study was to show that machine learning allows a model-free approach to determine tissue type without a priori assumptions on the underlying physiology. In 8 healthy volunteers, diffusion data sets were acquired using an echo-planar imaging sequence with 16 b-values in the range between 0 and 1000 s/mm. Using the k-nearest neighbors technique, the machine learning algorithm was trained to distinguish abdominal organs (liver, kidney, spleen, muscle) using the signal intensities at different b-values as training features. For systematic variation of model complexity (number of neighbors), performance was assessed by calculation of the accuracy and the kappa coefficient (κ). Most important b-values for tissue discrimination were determined by principal component analysis. The optimal trade-off between model complexity and overfitting was found in the range between K = 11 to 13. On "real-world" data not previously applied to optimize the algorithm, the k-nearest neighbors algorithm was capable to accurately distinguish tissue types with best accuracy of 94.5% and κ = 0.92 reached for intermediate model complexity (K = 11). The principal component analysis showed that most important b-values are (with decreasing importance): b = 1000 s/mm, b = 970 s/mm, b = 750 s/mm, b = 20 s/mm, b = 620 s/mm, and b = 40 s/mm. Applying a reduced set of 6 most important b-values, still a similar accuracy was achieved on the real-world data set with an average accuracy of 93.7% and a κ coefficient of 0.91. Machine learning allows for a model-free determination of tissue type using intra voxel incoherent motion signal decay curves as features. The technique may be useful for segmentation of abdominal organs or distinction between healthy and pathological tissues.

  17. Feasibility of microminiature satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryouichi

    1991-07-01

    A conceptual study is conducted on technical problems and system design techniques to accomplish higher performance microminiature satellites by smaller systems. Applications of microminiature satellite technology to practical satellite mission are mentioned. Concepts of microminiature satellites, measures to miniaturize satellites, and micro-miniaturization technologies for communication and data processing, electric solar power paddle, attitude and orbit control, structure, thermal control, propulsion, and instrumentation systems are outlined. Examples of miniaturizing satellite missions such as planet exploration, low-altitude communication networks, space positioning system, low-altitude earth observation mission, clustered satellites, tethered satellites, and timely observation are described. Satellite miniaturizing technology can also be used to launch systems by lasers, and superconductive linear catapults (space escalator). It is pointed out that keys to promote satellite miniaturization are electronics, precision machining, raw material, electric power source technologies, and system design technology to integrate those technologies.

  18. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  19. Free evolution of an incoherent mixture of states: a quantum mechanical approach to the van Cittert–Zernike theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, I.; Navarrete, F.; Sarkadi, L.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2018-01-01

    We study the time evolution of an incoherent mixture of quantum states and demonstrate, in very simple terms, a quantum mechanical equivalent of van Cittert–Zernike theorem, which can be easily explained to Quantum Physics students with a basic knowledge of the density matrix theory. Finally, we exemplify this result by applying it to the quantitative analysis of the coherence of a beam of particles in atomic collisions.

  20. {eta}N final-state interaction in incoherent photoproduction of {eta}-mesons from the deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; Sibirtsev, A.; Haidenbauer, J.; Krewald, S.; Speth, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425, Juelich (Germany); Elster, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Ohio University, OH 45701, Athens (United States)

    2003-11-01

    An analysis of incoherent photoproduction of {eta}-mesons from the deuteron is presented. We concentrate here on the threshold region. The dominant contribution, the {gamma}N-{eta}N amplitude is described within an isobar model. Effects of the final-state interaction in the NN as well as the {eta}N systems are included by employing models derived within a meson-exchange approach. (orig.)

  1. Laser driven plasmas based incoherent x-ray sources at PALS and ELI Beamlines (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlová, Michaela

    2017-05-01

    We will present data on a various X-ray production schemes from laser driven plasmas at the PALS Research Center and discuss the plan for the ELI Beamlines project. One of the approaches, how to generate ultrashort pulses of incoherent X-ray radiation, is based on interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with solid or liquid targets. So-called K-alpha source depending on used targets emits in hard X-ray region from micrometric source size. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. Detailed characterization of various sources including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented. Other method, known as laser wakefield electron acceleration (LWFA), can produce up to GeV electron beams emitting radiation in collimated beam with a femtosecnond pulse duration. This approach was theoretically and experimentally examined at the PALS Center. The parameters of the PALS Ti:S laser interaction were studied by extensive particle-in-cell simulations with radiation post-processors in order to evaluate the capabilities of our system in this field. The extensions of those methods at the ELI Beamlines facility will enable to generate either higher X-ray energies or higher repetition rate. The architecture of such sources and their considered applications will be proposed.

  2. Efficient compressed sensing SENSE parallel MRI reconstruction with joint sparsity promotion and mutual incoherence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il Yong Chun; Adcock, Ben; Talavage, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a key modality for the future as it offers several advantages, including the use of non-ionizing radiation and having no known side effects on the human body, and has recently begun to serve as a key component of multi-modal neuroimaging. However, two major intrinsic problems exist: slow acquisition and intrusive acoustic noise. Parallel MRI (pMRI) techniques accelerate acquisition by reducing the duration and coverage of conventional gradient encoding. The under-sampled k-space data is detected with several receiver coils surrounding the object, using distinct spatial encoding information for each coil element to reconstruct the image. However, this scanning remains slow compared to typical clinical imaging (e.g. X-ray CT). Compressed Sensing (CS), a sampling theory based on random sub-sampling, has potential to further reduce the sampling used in pMRI, accelerating acquisition further. In this work, we propose a new CS SENSE pMRI reconstruction model promoting joint sparsity across channels and enhancing mutual incoherence to improve reconstruction accuracy from limited k-space data. For fast image reconstruction and fair comparisons, all reconstructions are computed with split-Bregman and variable splitting techniques. Numerical results show that, with the introduced methods, reconstruction performance can be crucially improved with limited amount of k-space data.

  3. Noise processing by microRNA-mediated circuits: The Incoherent Feed-Forward Loop, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Grigolon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression is usually mitigated in higher eukaryotes by post-transcriptional regulation channels that stabilise the output layer, most notably protein levels. The discovery of small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs in specific motifs of the genetic regulatory network has led to identifying noise buffering as the possible key function they exert in regulation. Recent in vitro and in silico studies have corroborated this hypothesis. It is however also known that miRNA-mediated noise reduction is hampered by transcriptional bursting in simple topologies. Here, using stochastic simulations validated by analytical calculations based on van Kampen's expansion, we revisit the noise-buffering capacity of the miRNA-mediated Incoherent Feed Forward Loop (IFFL, a small module that is widespread in the gene regulatory networks of higher eukaryotes, in order to account for the effects of intermittency in the transcriptional activity of the modulator gene. We show that bursting considerably alters the circuit's ability to control static protein noise. By comparing with other regulatory architectures, we find that direct transcriptional regulation significantly outperforms the IFFL in a broad range of kinetic parameters. This suggests that, under pulsatile inputs, static noise reduction may be less important than dynamical aspects of noise and information processing in characterising the performance of regulatory elements.

  4. Electron beam bunch length characterizations using incoherent and coherent radiation on the APS SASE FEL project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, W. J.; Happek, U.; Lewellen, J. W.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Sereno, N. S.; Yang, B. X.

    1999-08-28

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac has been reconfigured with a low-emittance rf thermionic gun and a photocathode (PC) rf gun to support self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) experiments. One of the most critical parameters for optimizing SASE performance (gain length) is the electron beam peak current, which requires a charge measurement and a bunch length measurement capability. We report here initial measurements of the latter using both incoherent optical transition radiation (OTR) and coherent transition radiation (CTR), A visible light Hamarnatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera was used to measure the thermionic rf gun beam's bunch length ({sigma} {approximately}2 to 3ps) via OTR generated by the beam at 220 MeV and 200 mA macropulse average current. In addition, a CTR monitor (Michelson Interferometer) based on a Golay cell as the far infrared (FIR) detector has been installed at the 40-MeV station in the beamline. Initial observation s of CTR signal strength variation with gun a-magnet current and interferograms have been obtained. Progress in characterizing the beam at these locations and a comparison to other bunch length determinations will be presented.

  5. Incoherent Dictionary Learning Method Based on Unit Norm Tight Frame and Manifold Optimization for Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongZhong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing the mutual coherence of a learned dictionary plays an important role in sparse representation and compressed sensing. In this paper, a efficient framework is developed to learn an incoherent dictionary for sparse representation. In particular, the coherence of a previous dictionary (or Gram matrix is reduced sequentially by finding a new dictionary (or Gram matrix, which is closest to the reference unit norm tight frame of the previous dictionary (or Gram matrix. The optimization problem can be solved by restricting the tightness and coherence alternately at each iteration of the algorithm. The significant and different aspect of our proposed framework is that the learned dictionary can approximate an equiangular tight frame. Furthermore, manifold optimization is used to avoid the degeneracy of sparse representation while only reducing the coherence of the learned dictionary. This can be performed after the dictionary update process rather than during the dictionary update process. Experiments on synthetic and real audio data show that our proposed methods give notable improvements in lower coherence, have faster running times, and are extremely robust compared to several existing methods.

  6. An incoherent feed-forward loop mediates robustness and tunability in a plant immune network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Akira; Nobori, Tatsuya; Salazar-Rondon, Maria C; Winkelmüller, Thomas M; Anver, Shajahan; Becker, Dieter; Tsuda, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    Immune signaling networks must be tunable to alleviate fitness costs associated with immunity and, at the same time, robust against pathogen interferences. How these properties mechanistically emerge in plant immune signaling networks is poorly understood. Here, we discovered a molecular mechanism by which the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana achieves robust and tunable immunity triggered by the microbe-associated molecular pattern, flg22. Salicylic acid (SA) is a major plant immune signal molecule. Another signal molecule jasmonate (JA) induced expression of a gene essential for SA accumulation, EDS5 Paradoxically, JA inhibited expression of PAD4, a positive regulator of EDS5 expression. This incoherent type-4 feed-forward loop (I4-FFL) enabled JA to mitigate SA accumulation in the intact network but to support it under perturbation of PAD4, thereby minimizing the negative impact of SA on fitness as well as conferring robust SA-mediated immunity. We also present evidence for evolutionary conservation of these gene regulations in the family Brassicaceae Our results highlight an I4-FFL that simultaneously provides the immune network with robustness and tunability in A. thaliana and possibly in its relatives. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Intravoxel incoherent motion MRI: emerging applications for nasopharyngeal carcinoma at the primary site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shui-xing; Jia, Qian-jun; Liang, Chang-hong; Chen, Wen-bo; Qiu, Qian-hui; Li, He [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Prov. (China); Zhang, Zhong-ping [Applied Science Lab, Guangzhou, Guangdong Prov. (China)

    2014-08-15

    We compared pure molecular diffusion (D), perfusion-related diffusion (D*), perfusion fraction (f) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) based on intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) theory in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty-five consecutive patients (48 men) with suspected NPC were examined using a 3.0-T MR system. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with 13 b values (range, 0-800 s/mm{sup 2}). We regarded the result of endoscopy and biopsy as the gold standard for detection. D, D* and f were compared between patients with primary NPC and enlarged adenoids. IVIM DWI was successful in 37 of 40 NPC and 23 of 25 enlarged adenoids cases. D (P = 0.001) and f (P < 0.0001) were significantly lower in patients with NPC than in patients with enlarged adenoids, whereas D* was significantly higher (P < 0.0001). However, the ADC was not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for D was 0.849 and was significantly larger than that for ADC (P < 0.05). IVIM DWI is a feasible technique for investigating primary NPC. D was significantly decreased in primary NPC, and increased D* reflected increased blood vessel generation and parenchymal perfusion in primary NPC. (orig.)

  8. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-weighted Imaging: Evaluation of the Differentiation of Solid Hepatic Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Luo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM–related parameters could be used to differentiate malignant from benign focal liver lesions (FLLs and to improve diagnostic efficiency. METHODS: Seventy-four patients with 75 lesions, including 51 malignant FLLs and 24 benign FLLs, underwent liver 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for routine examination sequences. IVIM diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI with 11 b values (0-800 s/mm2 was also acquired concurrently. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCtotal and IVIM-derived parameters, such as the pure diffusion coefficient (D, the pseudodiffusion coefficient (D⁎, and the perfusion fraction (f, were calculated and compared between the two groups. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to assess their diagnostic value. RESULTS: ADCtotal, D, and f were significantly lower in the malignant group than in the benign group, whereas D⁎ did not show a statistical difference. D had a larger area under the curve value (0.968 and higher sensitivity (92.30% for differentiation. CONCLUSION: IVIM is a useful method to differentiate malignant and benign FLLs. The D value showed higher efficacy to detect hepatic solid lesions.

  9. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging to predict vesicoureteral reflux in children with urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Yang Shin; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kee Hwan [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Bo-Kyung [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kiefer, Berthold [Oncology Application Development, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To compare the diffusion parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) between the ''reflux'' and the ''non-reflux'' kidneys, and to evaluate the feasibility of using IVIM DWI to predict vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children with a urinary tract infection (UTI). Eighty-three kidneys from 57 pediatric patients with a UTI were classified into ''reflux'' and ''non-reflux'' groups according to voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) results. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (PF) were measured and compared in the renal pelvis of both groups. Four indices (D*/ADC, PF/ADC, D*/D, and PF/D) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. VURs were detected on VCUG in 21 kidneys. PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' group than in the ''non-reflux'' group. The indices were all significantly higher. The PF/D index showed the best diagnostic performance in predicting VUR in children with UTI (A{sub z} = 0.864). PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' kidney than in the ''non-reflux'' kidney. Our new index (PF/D) could prove useful for predicting VUR. (orig.)

  10. Total variation-based method for generation of intravoxel incoherent motion parametric images in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chieh; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Siao-Lan; Huang, Hsuan-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Total variation (TV) method has been used widely for image restoration and reconstruction. In this work, we propose a TV-based algorithm for parametric image generation in intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). We used simulated and real data to investigate whether the proposed TV-based method can provide reliable parametric images. Parametric images of IVIM parameters including perfusion fraction (PF), diffusion coefficient (D), and pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*) were estimated using DW-MRI data and TV through fitting the IVIM model. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method, which has often been used in the context of IVIM analysis, was employed as the standard method for comparison of the resulting parametric images. The simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms the LM algorithm in terms of precision, providing a 40-81%, 90-93%, and 68-84% improvement for PF, D and D*, respectively, at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 30. For real data, the proposed method showed an average five-fold, three-fold, and four-fold improvement in the SNR for PF, D and D*, respectively. We introduced the use of TV to produce parametric images, and demonstrated that the proposed TV-based method is effective in improving the parametric image quality. Magn Reson Med 78:1383-1391, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Sparse synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements (S-SAFE) using digital incoherent holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashter, Yuval; Rivenson, Yair; Stern, Adrian; Rosen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Creating a large-scale synthetic aperture makes it possible to break the resolution boundaries dictated by the wave nature of light of common optical systems. However, their implementation is challenging, since the generation of a large size continuous mosaic synthetic aperture composed of many patterns is complicated in terms of both phase matching and time-multiplexing duration. In this study we present an advanced configuration for an incoherent holographic imaging system with super resolution qualities that creates a partial synthetic aperture. The new system, termed sparse synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements (S-SAFE), enables significantly decreasing the number of the recorded elements, and it is free from positional constrains on their location. Additionally, in order to obtain the best image quality we propose an optimal mosaicking structure derived on the basis of physical and numerical considerations, and introduce three reconstruction approaches which are compared and discussed. The super-resolution capabilities of the proposed scheme and its limitations are analyzed, numerically simulated and experimentally demonstrated. PMID:26367947

  12. Incoherent digital holograms acquired by interferenceless coded aperture correlation holography system without refractive lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Vijayakumar, A; Rosen, Joseph

    2017-09-14

    We present a lensless, interferenceless incoherent digital holography technique based on the principle of coded aperture correlation holography. The acquired digital hologram by this technique contains a three-dimensional image of some observed scene. Light diffracted by a point object (pinhole) is modulated using a random-like coded phase mask (CPM) and the intensity pattern is recorded and composed as a point spread hologram (PSH). A library of PSHs is created using the same CPM by moving the pinhole to all possible axial locations. Intensity diffracted through the same CPM from an object placed within the axial limits of the PSH library is recorded by a digital camera. The recorded intensity this time is composed as the object hologram. The image of the object at any axial plane is reconstructed by cross-correlating the object hologram with the corresponding component of the PSH library. The reconstruction noise attached to the image is suppressed by various methods. The reconstruction results of multiplane and thick objects by this technique are compared with regular lens-based imaging.

  13. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion for Identification of Breast Malignant and Benign Tumors Using Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengnong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to identify the breast malignant and benign lesions using the features of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, perfusion fraction f, pseudodiffusion coefficient D⁎, and true diffusion coefficient D from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM. There are 69 malignant cases (including 9 early malignant cases and 35 benign breast cases who underwent diffusion-weighted MRI at 3.0 T with 8 b-values (0~1000 s/mm2. ADC and IVIM parameters were determined in lesions. The early malignant cases are used as advanced malignant and benign tumors, respectively, so as to assess the effectiveness on the result. A predictive model was constructed using Support Vector Machine Binary Classification (SVMBC, also known Support Vector Machine Discriminant Analysis (SVMDA and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA and compared the difference between them both. The D value and ADC provide accurate identification of malignant lesions with b=300, if early malignant tumor was considered as advanced malignant (cancer. The classification accuracy is 93.5% for cross-validation using SVMBC with ADC and tissue diffusivity only. The sensitivity and specificity are 100% and 87.0%, respectively, r2cv=0.8163, and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV is 0.043. ADC and IVIM provide quantitative measurement of tissue diffusivity for cellularity and are helpful with the method of SVMBC, getting comprehensive and complementary information for differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions.

  14. L 1 generalized inverse beam-forming algorithm resolving coherent/incoherent, distributed and multipole sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takao

    2011-11-01

    To resolve coherent/incoherent, distributed/compact, and multipole aerodynamic-sound sources with phased-array pressure data, a new source-detection algorithm is developed based on L1 generalized inverse techniques. To extract each coherent signal, a cross spectral matrix is decomposed into eigenmodes. Subsequently, the complex source-amplitude distribution that recovers each eigenmode is solved using generalized inverse techniques with reference solutions which include multipoles as well as a monopole. Namely, the source distribution consisting of pre-defined source types is solved as an L1 norm problem using iteratively re-weighted least squares (IRLS). The capabilities of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated using various benchmark problems to compare the results with several existing beam-forming algorithms, and it is found that distributed sources as well as dipoles with arbitrary orientation can be identified regardless of coherency with another source. The resolution is comparable to existing deconvolution techniques, such as DAMAS or CLEAN, and the computational cost is only several times more than that of DAMAS2. The proposed algorithm is also examined using previous model-scale test data taken in an open-jet wind-tunnel for a study on jet-flap interaction, and some indication of dipole radiation is discerned near the flap edge.

  15. Implementation of an incoherent 3D patterned illumination design in a structured illumination microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. V.; Taylor, C.; Doblas, A.; Shabani, H.; Patwary, N.; Saavedra, G.; Preza, C.

    2017-02-01

    A novel 3D patterned illumination system using an incoherent light source has potential benefits for structured illumination microscopy (SIM) such as lowered intensity requirements and tunable modulating frequency. The illumination system, based on a coherent source, a set of parallel slits and a beam-splitting Fresnel biprism, generates localized interference fringes with a continuously-tunable range of lateral and axial spatial frequency combinations that are not easily accessible using other existing methods of generating structured illumination. Here we present adaptation of this system to a wide-field fluorescence microscope that tests its suitability for SIM imaging. Numerical simulations and experimental data are used to compare theoretical and practical system properties. Results demonstrate that theoretically predicted illumination properties can be used to select system design parameters and accurately produce specific illumination properties at the microscope sample plane. As part of an imaging system, this illumination approach may improve the applicability of super-resolution SIM to a greater variety of samples.

  16. Blood volume fraction imaging of the human lung using intravoxel incoherent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, Flavio; Meyer, Cord; Phys, Dipl; Breuer, Felix A; Triphan, Simon; Choli, Morwan; Phys, Dipl; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-05-01

    To present a technique for non-contrast-enhanced in vivo imaging of the blood volume fraction of the human lung. The technique is based on the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) approach. However, a substantial novelty is introduced here: the need for external diffusion sensitizing gradients is eliminated by exploiting the internal magnetic field gradients typical of the lung tissue, due to magnetic susceptibility differences at air/tissue interfaces. A single shot turbo spin-echo sequence with stimulated-echo preparation and electrocardiograph synchronization was used for acquisition. Two images were acquired in a single breath-hold of 10 seconds duration: one reference image and one blood-suppressed image. The blood volume fraction was quantified using a two-compartment signal decay model, as given by the IVIM theory. Experiments were performed at 1.5T in eight healthy volunteers. Values of the blood volume fraction obtained within the lung parenchyma (36 ± 16%) are in good agreement with previous reports, obtained using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (33%), and show relatively good reproducibility. The presented technique offers a robust way to quantify the blood volume fraction of the human lung parenchyma without using contrast agents. Image acquisition can be accomplished in a single breath-hold and could be suitable for clinical applications on patients with lung diseases. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2015;41:1454-1464. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Scattering matrix analysis for evaluating the photocurrent in hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon-based thin film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myunghun; Lee, Seong Hyun; Lim, Jung Wook; Yun, Sun Jin

    2014-11-01

    A scattering matrix (S-matrix) analysis method was developed for evaluating hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based thin film solar cells. In this approach, light wave vectors A and B represent the incoming and outgoing behaviors of the incident solar light, respectively, in terms of coherent wave and incoherent intensity components. The S-matrix determines the relation between A and B according to optical effects such as reflection and transmission, as described by the Fresnel equations, scattering at the boundary surfaces, or scattering within the propagation medium, as described by the Beer-Lambert law and the change in the phase of the propagating light wave. This matrix can be used to evaluate the behavior of angle-incident coherent and incoherent light simultaneously, and takes into account not only the light scattering process at material boundaries (haze effects) but also nonlinear optical processes within the material. The optical parameters in the S-matrix were determined by modeling both a 2%-gallium-doped zinc oxide transparent conducting oxide and germanium-compounded a-Si:H (a-SiGe:H). Using the S-matrix equations, the photocurrent for an a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H tandem cell and the optical loss in semitransparent a-Si:H solar cells for use in building-integrated photovoltaic applications were analyzed. The developed S-matrix method can also be used as a general analysis tool for various thin film solar cells.

  18. Hilbert-space treatment of incoherent, time-resolved spectroscopy. I. Formalism, a tensorial classification of high-order orientational gratings and generalized MUPPETS "echoes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Mark A

    2010-04-14

    Time-resolved spectroscopy that uses more than one incoherent excitation, and thus has multiple periods of time evolution, is becoming more common. A recent example is multiple population-period transient spectroscopy (MUPPETS), which is implemented as a high-order transient grating. In this paper, a formalism is developed to treat these types of incoherent spectroscopy in a manner that parallels the Liouville-pathway formalism used to treat multidimensional coherent spectroscopy. A Hilbert space of incoherent (population) states is defined and general expressions for transition and time-evolution operators acting on these states are derived from the corresponding quantum operators. This formalism describes incoherent experiments that involve an arbitrary number of temporal dimensions in terms of pathways through the Hilbert space. Each pathway is associated with a multiple-time rate-correlation function. Previous work has shown that these multiple-time correlation functions can measure heterogeneity in electronic-relaxation rates. Thus, they are an analog of coherent "echo" experiments, which measure heterogeneity in frequencies. We show that similar "MUPPETS echo" experiments can be done on any incoherent variable. For a dilute molecular solute, the Hilbert-space method leads to a systematic treatment of multidimensional transient gratings. The extension of irreducible-tensor methods to the incoherent Hilbert space results in a classification of orientational gratings of arbitrary order. The general methods developed in this paper are applied more specifically to single-photon, dipole transitions in the following paper.

  19. PERSISTENT SCATTERER INTERFEROMETRY USING SENTINEL-1 DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crosetto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on deformation monitoring using a Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique and the interferometric SAR data acquired by the Sentinel-1 satellite of the European Space Agency. The first part of the paper describes the procedure used to process and analyze Sentinel-1 interferometric SAR data. Two main approaches are described. The first one is a simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach that exploits two key properties of the Sentinel-1 data: the high coherence of the 12-day interferograms and the reduced orbital tube. The second approach is a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach, where a more sophisticate data treatment is employed. The second part of the paper illustrates the results obtained with the two processing approaches. Two case studies are described. The first one concerns landslide detection and monitoring. In this case, the simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used. The second one regards the deformation monitoring of an urban area. In this case, a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used.

  20. Scattering anomaly in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    In time-reversal invariant electronic systems the scattering matrix is anti-symmetric. This property enables an effect, designated here as "scattering anomaly", such that the electron transport does not suffer from back reflections, independent of the specific geometry of the propagation path or the presence of time-reversal invariant defects. In contrast, for a generic time-reversal invariant photonic system the scattering matrix is symmetric and there is no similar anomaly. Here, it is theoretically proven that despite these fundamental differences there is a wide class of photonic platforms - in some cases formed only by time-reversal invariant media - in which the scattering anomaly can occur. It is shown that an optical system invariant under the action of the composition of the time-reversal, parity and duality operators is characterized by an anti-symmetric scattering matrix. Specific examples of photonic platforms wherein the scattering anomaly occurs are given, and it is demonstrated with full wave n...

  1. Scattering of Skyrmions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Foster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a detailed study of Skyrmion–Skyrmion scattering for two B=1 Skyrmions in the attractive channel where we observe two different scattering regimes. For large separation, the scattering can be approximated as interacting dipoles. We give a qualitative estimate when this approximation breaks down. For small separations we observe an additional short-range repulsion which is qualitatively similar to monopole scattering. We also observe the interesting effect of “rotation without rotating” whereby two Skyrmions, whose orientations remain constant while well-separated, change their orientation after scattering. We can explain this effect by following preimages through the scattering process, thereby measuring which part of an in-coming Skyrmion forms part of an out-going Skyrmion. This leads to a new way of visualising Skyrmions. Furthermore, we consider spinning Skyrmions and find interesting trajectories.

  2. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of this ground breaking reference work was the most comprehensive reference source available about the key aspects of the satellite applications field. This updated second edition covers the technology, the markets, applications and regulations related to satellite telecommunications, broadcasting and networking—including civilian and military systems; precise satellite navigation and timing networks (i.e. GPS and others); remote sensing and meteorological satellite systems. Created under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, this brand new edition is now expanded to cover new innovative small satellite constellations, new commercial launching systems, innovation in military application satellites and their acquisition, updated appendices, a useful glossary and more.

  3. Satellite orbit predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  4. Introduction to neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    We give here an introduction to the theoretical principles of neutron scattering. The relationship between scattering- and correlation-functions is particularly emphasized. Within the framework of linear response theory (justified by the weakness of the basic interaction) the relation between fluctuation and dissipation is discussed. This general framework explains the particular power of neutron scattering as an experimental method. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  5. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheenathayalan, Prabu; Small, David; Schubert, Adrian; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scatterers in a 2D radar coordinate system, after compensating for atmosphere and tidal effects, is in the order of centimeters for TerraSAR-X (TSX) spotlight images. However, the absolute positioning in 3D and its quality description are not well known. Here, we exploit time-series interferometric SAR to enhance the positioning capability in three dimensions. The 3D positioning precision is parameterized by a variance-covariance matrix and visualized as an error ellipsoid centered at the estimated position. The intersection of the error ellipsoid with objects in the field is exploited to link radar scatterers to real-world objects. We demonstrate the estimation of scatterer position and its quality using 20 months of TSX stripmap acquisitions over Delft, the Netherlands. Using trihedral corner reflectors (CR) for validation, the accuracy of absolute positioning in 2D is about 7 cm. In 3D, an absolute accuracy of up to ˜ 66 cm is realized, with a cigar-shaped error ellipsoid having centimeter precision in azimuth and range dimensions, and elongated in cross-range dimension with a precision in the order of meters (the ratio of the ellipsoid axis lengths is 1/3/213, respectively). The CR absolute 3D position, along with the associated error ellipsoid, is found to be accurate and agree with the ground truth position at a 99 % confidence level. For other non-CR coherent scatterers, the error ellipsoid concept is validated using 3D building models. In both cases, the error ellipsoid not only serves as a quality descriptor, but can also help to associate radar scatterers to real-world objects.

  6. True-time delay line with separate carrier tuning using dual-parallel MZM and stimulated Brillouin scattering-induced slow light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhu, Ning Hua; Wang, Li Xian; Wang, Jia Sheng; Liu, Jian Guo; Liu, Yu; Qi, Xiao Qiong; Xie, Liang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xin; Han, Wei

    2011-06-20

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel tunable true-time delay line with separate carrier tuning using dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator and stimulated Brillouin scattering-induced slow light. The phase of the optical carrier can be continuously and precisely controlled by simply adjusting the dc bias of the dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator. In addition, both the slow light and single-sideband modulation can be simultaneously achieved in the stimulated Brillouin scattering process with three types of configuration. Finally, the true-time delay technique is clearly verified by a two-tap incoherent microwave photonic filter as the free spectral range of the filter is changed.

  7. Collective stimulated Brillouin scatter

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, Alexander O; Rose, Harvey A

    2011-01-01

    We develop a statistical theory of stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new collective regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. We identify two contributions to BSBS convective instability increment. The first is collective with intensity threshold independent of the laser correlation time and controlled by diffraction. The second is independent of diffraction, it grows with increase of the correlation time and does not have an intensity threshold. The instability threshold is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF). We also find that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be large enough to allow additional suppression of BSBS.

  8. Elastic scattering phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackintosh, R.S. [The Open University, School of Physical Sciences, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    We argue that, in many situations, fits to elastic scattering data that were historically, and frequently still are, considered ''good'', are not justifiably so describable. Information about the dynamics of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering is lost when elastic scattering phenomenology is insufficiently ambitious. It is argued that in many situations, an alternative approach is appropriate for the phenomenology of nuclear elastic scattering of nucleons and other light nuclei. The approach affords an appropriate means of evaluating folding models, one that fully exploits available empirical data. It is particularly applicable for nucleons and other light ions. (orig.)

  9. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  10. Effect of multiple perfusion components on pseudo-diffusion coefficient in intravoxel incoherent motion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Zi-Xiang; Liu, Wan-Yu; Zhu, Yue-Min

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of multiple perfusion components on the pseudo-diffusion coefficient D * in the bi-exponential intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model. Simulations were first performed to examine how the presence of multiple perfusion components influences D *. The real data of livers (n  =  31), spleens (n  =  31) and kidneys (n  =  31) of 31 volunteers was then acquired using DWI for in vivo study and the number of perfusion components in these tissues was determined together with their perfusion fraction and D *, using an adaptive multi-exponential IVIM model. Finally, the bi-exponential model was applied to the real data and the mean, standard variance and coefficient of variation of D * as well as the fitting residual were calculated over the 31 volunteers for each of the three tissues and compared between them. The results of both the simulations and the in vivo study showed that, for the bi-exponential IVIM model, both the variance of D * and the fitting residual tended to increase when the number of perfusion components was increased or when the difference between perfusion components became large. In addition, it was found that the kidney presented the fewest perfusion components among the three tissues. The present study demonstrated that multi-component perfusion is a main factor that causes high variance of D * and the bi-exponential model should be used only when the tissues under investigation have few perfusion components, for example the kidney.

  11. The role of incoherent microRNA-mediated feedforward loops in noise buffering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Osella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding RNAs which negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding genes in plants and animals. They are known to play an important role in several biological processes and, together with transcription factors, form a complex and highly interconnected regulatory network. Looking at the structure of this network, it is possible to recognize a few overrepresented motifs which are expected to perform important elementary regulatory functions. Among them, a special role is played by the microRNA-mediated feedforward loop in which a master transcription factor regulates a microRNA and, together with it, a set of target genes. In this paper we show analytically and through simulations that the incoherent version of this motif can couple the fine-tuning of a target protein level with an efficient noise control, thus conferring precision and stability to the overall gene expression program, especially in the presence of fluctuations in upstream regulators. Among the other results, a nontrivial prediction of our model is that the optimal attenuation of fluctuations coincides with a modest repression of the target expression. This feature is coherent with the expected fine-tuning function and in agreement with experimental observations of the actual impact of a wide class of microRNAs on the protein output of their targets. Finally, we describe the impact on noise-buffering efficiency of the cross-talk between microRNA targets that can naturally arise if the microRNA-mediated circuit is not considered as isolated, but embedded in a larger network of regulations.

  12. Detection of active sacroiliitis with ankylosing spondylitis through intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ying-hua [Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Academy of Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Shao-lin; Zhao, Xiang-cheng; Hu, Shao-yong; Liu, Zhen-hua [Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Academy of Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Zai-yi; Chen, Xin; Liang, Chang-hong [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Mei Ms, Ying-jie [Philips Healthcare, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Electronics Hong Kong Ltd, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-09-15

    To confirm feasibility and assess intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) to differentiate active sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis. Forty-one patients were divided into two groups, an active group (n = 20) and a chronic group (n = 21), according to the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and laboratory parameters. In addition, 21 healthy volunteers were chosen as the control group. Tissue diffusivity (D{sub slow}), perfusion fraction (f), and pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sub fast}) values were obtained for all three groups. One-way analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed for all parameters. There was good interobserver agreement on the measurements between the two observers. The optimal cut-off values (with respective AUC, sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio) between active and chronic groups were D{sub slow} = 0.53 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (0.976, 90 %, 95.2 %, 18.9, 0.10) and f = 0.09 (0.545, 20 %, 95.5 %, 4.2, 0.84), and between chronic and control groups were D{sub slow} = 0.22 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (0.517, 9.52 %, 100 %, no number, 0.9) and f = 0.09 (0.935, 95.24 %, 80.95 %, 5, 0.059). D{sub slow} and f of IVIM diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI in AS show a significant difference in the values of diffusion of water molecules and fractional perfusion-related volume among the three groups. (orig.)

  13. Prostate cancer: correlation of intravoxel incoherent motion MR parameters with Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Sang Won; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Won, Kyu Yeoun; Lim, Sung Jig; Oh, Jang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging to predict histological prognostic parameters by investigating whether IVIM parameters correlate with Gleason score. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and informed consent was waived. A total of 41 patients with histologically proven prostate cancer who underwent prostate MRI using a 3T MRI machine were included. For eight diffusion-weighted imaging b-values (0, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 800s/mm(2)), a spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence was performed. D, f, D(⁎), and ADCfit values were compared among three groups of patients with prostate cancer: Gleason score 6 (n=9), 7 (n=16), or 8 or higher (n=16). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for D, f, D(⁎), and ADCfit to assess the ability of each parameter to distinguish cancers with low Gleason scores from cancers with intermediate or high Gleason scores. Pearson's coefficient analysis revealed significant negative correlations between Gleason score and ADCfit (r=-0.490, P=.001) and Gleason score and D values (r=-0.514, P=.001). Gleason score was poorly correlated with f (r=0.168, P=.292) and D(⁎) values (r=-0.108, P=.500). The ADCfit and D values of prostate cancers with Gleason scores 7 or ≥8 were significantly lower than values for prostate cancers with Gleason score 6 (PGleason score 6 from cancers with Gleason scores 7 or ≥8. Areas under the curve were 0.671 to 0.974. ADCfit and D yielded the highest Az value (0.960-0.956), whereas f yielded the lowest Az value (0.633). The pure molecular diffusion parameter, D, was the IVIM parameter that best discriminated prostate cancers with low Gleason scores from prostate cancers with intermediate or high Gleason scores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Sauer, Alexander; Koestler, Herbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Holl-Wieden, Annette [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany); Neubauer, Henning [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    MRI of synovitis relies on use of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) visualises thickened synovium but is of limited use in the presence of joint effusion. To investigate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted MRI with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for diagnosing synovitis in the knee joint of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Twelve consecutive children with confirmed or suspected juvenile idiopathic arthritis (10 girls, median age 11 years) underwent MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and DWI at 1.5 T. Read-out segmented multi-shot DWI was acquired at b values of 0 s/mm{sup 2}, 200 s/mm{sup 2}, 400 s/mm{sup 2} and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. We calculated the IVIM parameters perfusion fraction (f) and tissue diffusion coefficient (D). Diffusion-weighted images at b=800 s/mm{sup 2}, f parameter maps and post-contrast T1-weighted images were retrospectively assessed by two independent readers for synovitis using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system. Seven (58%) children showed synovial hypertrophy on contrast-enhanced imaging. Diagnostic ratings for synovitis on DWI and on f maps were fully consistent with contrast-enhanced imaging, the diagnostic reference. Two children had equivocal low-confidence assessments on DWI. Median f was 6.7±2.0% for synovitis, 2.1±1.2% for effusion, 5.0±1.0% for muscle and 10.6±5.7% for popliteal lymph nodes. Diagnostic confidence was higher based on f maps in three (25%) children and lower in one child (8%), as compared to DWI. DWI with IVIM reliably visualises synovitis of the knee joint. Perfusion fraction maps differentiate thickened synovium from joint effusion and hence increase diagnostic confidence. (orig.)

  15. Intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in acute stroke: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federau, C.; Becce, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) and University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sumer, S.; Wintermark, M. [University of Virginia, Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); O' Brien, K. [University of Geneva, Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging is an MRI perfusion technique that uses a diffusion-weighted sequence with multiple b values and a bi-compartmental signal model to measure the so-called pseudo-diffusion of blood caused by its passage through the microvascular network. The goal of the current study was to assess the feasibility of IVIM perfusion fraction imaging in patients with acute stroke. Images were collected in 17 patients with acute stroke. Exclusion criteria were onset of symptoms to imaging >5 days, hemorrhagic transformation, infratentorial lesions, small lesions <0.5 cm in minimal diameter and hemodynamic instability. IVIM imaging was performed at 3 T, using a standard spin-echo Stejskal-Tanner pulsed gradients diffusion-weighted sequence, using 16 b values from 0 to 900 s/mm{sup 2}. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists, and quantitative analysis was performed in regions of interest placed in the stroke area, defined by thresholding the apparent diffusion coefficient maps, as well as in the contralateral region. IVIM perfusion fraction maps showed an area of decreased perfusion fraction f in the region of decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. Quantitative analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in both IVIM perfusion fraction f (0.026 ± 0.019 vs. 0.056 ± 0.025, p = 2.2 . 10{sup -6}) and diffusion coefficient D compared with the contralateral side (3.9 ± 0.79 . 10{sup -4} vs. 7.5 ± 0.86 . 10{sup -4} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 1.3 . 10{sup -20}). IVIM perfusion fraction imaging is feasible in acute stroke. IVIM perfusion fraction is significantly reduced in the visible infarct. Further studies should evaluate the potential for IVIM to predict clinical outcome and treatment response. (orig.)

  16. Numerical Studies of Scattering Properties of Leaves and Leaf Moisture Influences on the Scattering at Microwave Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Min, Qilong

    2008-01-01

    This study uses 3-dimensional finite difference time domain method to accurately calculate single-scattering properties of randomly orientated leaves and evaluate the influences of vegetation water content (VWC) on these properties at 19 and 37 GHz frequencies. The studied leaves are assumed to be thin elliptic disks with two different sizes and have various VWC values. Although the leaf moisture produces considerable absorption during scattering processes, the effective efficiencies of extinction and scattering of leaves still near-linearly increase with VWC. Calculated asymmetry factors and phase functions indicate that there are significant amounts of scattering at large scattering angles in microwave wavelengths, which provides good opportunities for off-nadir microwave remote sensing of forests. This study lays a basic foundation in future quantifications of the relations between satellite measurements and physical properties of vegetation canopies.

  17. Simulating Microwave Scattering for Wetland Vegetation in Poyang Lake, Southeast China, Using a Coherent Scattering Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjuan Liao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We developed a polarimetric coherent electromagnetic scattering model for Poyang Lake wetland vegetation. Realistic canopy structures including curved leaves and the lodging situation of the vegetation were taken into account, and the situation at the ground surface was established using an Advanced Integral Equation Model combined with Oh’s 2002 model. This new model can reasonably describe the coherence effect caused by the phase differences of the electromagnetic fields scattered from different particles by different scattering mechanisms. We obtained good agreement between the modeling results and C-band data from the Radarsat-2 satellite. A simulation of scattering from the vegetation in Poyang Lake showed that direct vegetation scattering and the single-ground-bounce mechanism are the dominant scattering mechanisms in the C-band and L-band, while the effects of the double-ground-bounce mechanism are very small. We note that the curvature of the leaves and the lodging characteristics of the vegetation cannot be ignored in the modeling process. Monitoring soil moisture in the Poyang Lake wetland with the C-band data was not feasible because of the density and depth of Poyang Lake vegetation. When the density of Poyang Lake Carex increases, the backscattering coefficient either decreases or remains stable.

  18. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  19. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  20. A theoretical investigation of super-resolution CARS imaging via coherent and incoherent saturation of transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, W.P.; Beeker, Willem; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, Petra; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2011-01-01

    We review two approaches to achieving sub-diffraction-limited resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy (Beeker et al., Opt. Express, 2009, 17, 22632 and Beeker et al., J. Herek, Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 012507). We performed a numerical investigation, based on the density

  1. Spatial observations by the CUTLASS coherent scatter radar of ionospheric modification by high power radio waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Bond

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from an experimental campaign in April 1996, in which the new CUTLASS (Co-operative UK twin-located Auroral Sounding System coherent scatter radar was employed to observe artificial field aligned irregularities (FAI generated by the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter heating facility at Tromsø, Norway. The distribution of backscatter intensity from within the heated region has been investigated both in azimuth and range with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the first observations of artificial irregularities by the Iceland radar are also presented. The heated region has been measured to extend over a horizontal distance of 170±50km, which by comparison with a model of the heater beam pattern corresponds to a threshold electric field for FAI of between 0.1 and 0.01V/m. Differences between field-aligned and vertical propagation heating are also presented.

  2. Spatial observations by the CUTLASS coherent scatter radar of ionospheric modification by high power radio waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Bond

    Full Text Available Results are presented from an experimental campaign in April 1996, in which the new CUTLASS (Co-operative UK twin-located Auroral Sounding System coherent scatter radar was employed to observe artificial field aligned irregularities (FAI generated by the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter heating facility at Tromsø, Norway. The distribution of backscatter intensity from within the heated region has been investigated both in azimuth and range with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the first observations of artificial irregularities by the Iceland radar are also presented. The heated region has been measured to extend over a horizontal distance of 170±50km, which by comparison with a model of the heater beam pattern corresponds to a threshold electric field for FAI of between 0.1 and 0.01V/m. Differences between field-aligned and vertical propagation heating are also presented.

  3. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Paganin, David M; Hall, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Purely bianisotropic scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albooyeh, M.; Asadchy, V. S.; Alaee, R.; Hashemi, S. M.; Yazdi, M.; Mirmoosa, M. S.; Rockstuhl, C.; Simovski, C. R.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The polarization response of molecules or meta-atoms to external electric and magnetic fields, which defines the electromagnetic properties of materials, can either be direct (electric field induces electric moment and magnetic field induces magnetic moment) or indirect (magnetoelectric coupling in bianisotropic scatterers). Earlier studies suggest that there is a fundamental bound on the indirect response of all passive scatterers: It is believed to be always weaker than the direct one. In this paper, we prove that there exist scatterers which overcome this bound substantially. Moreover, we show that the amplitudes of electric and magnetic polarizabilities can be negligibly small as compared to the magnetoelectric coupling coefficients. However, we prove that if at least one of the direct-excitation coefficients vanishes, magnetoelectric coupling effects in passive scatterers cannot exist. Our findings open a way to a new class of electromagnetic scatterers and composite materials.

  5. Theory of geostationary satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Zee, Chong-Hung

    1989-01-01

    Geostationary or equatorial synchronous satellites are a daily reminder of our space efforts during the past two decades. The nightly television satellite weather picture, the intercontinental telecommunications of television transmissions and telephone conversations, and the establishrnent of educational programs in remote regions on Earth are constant reminders of the presence of these satellites. As used here, the term 'geo­ stationary' must be taken loosely because, in the long run, the satellites will not remain 'stationary' with respect to an Earth-fixed reference frame. This results from the fact that these satellites, as is true for all satellites, are incessantly subject to perturbations other than the central-body attraction of the Earth. Among the more predominant pertur­ bations are: the ellipticity of the Earth's equator, the Sun and Moon, and solar radiation pressure. Higher harmonics of the Earth's potential and tidal effects also influence satellite motion, but they are of second­ order whe...

  6. Meteorological satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Su-Yin

    2014-01-01

    “Meteorological Satellite Systems” is a primer on weather satellites and their Earth applications. This book reviews historic developments and recent technological advancements in GEO and polar orbiting meteorological satellites. It explores the evolution of these remote sensing technologies and their capabilities to monitor short- and long-term changes in weather patterns in response to climate change. Satellites developed by various countries, such as U.S. meteorological satellites, EUMETSAT, and Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Indian satellite platforms are reviewed. This book also discusses international efforts to coordinate meteorological remote sensing data collection and sharing. This title provides a ready and quick reference for information about meteorological satellites. It serves as a useful tool for a broad audience that includes students, academics, private consultants, engineers, scientists, and teachers.

  7. All-fiber incoherent frequency-to-time mapping method for microwave signal generation with baseband transmission and multicasting support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Company Torres, Victor; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Lancis, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    , we synthesize the spectral density function of sliced ASE noise from an EDFA with a periodic Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer optical filter. By using external intensity modulation combined with propagation in an optical fiber, after photodetection, the resultant averaged temporal pulse profile...... resembles the shape of the incoherent source. The photodetected signal contains both the baseband data and an up-frequency converted copy with central wavelength for the microwave carrier into the ultra-wideband range and tuning capability by selection of the fiber length. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights...

  8. Generation and spectroscopic signatures of a fractional quantum Hall liquid of photons in an incoherently pumped optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umucalılar, R. O.; Carusotto, I.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate theoretically a driven dissipative model of strongly interacting photons in a nonlinear optical cavity in the presence of a synthetic magnetic field. We show the possibility of using a frequency-dependent incoherent pump to create a strongly correlated ν =1 /2 bosonic Laughlin state of light: Due to the incompressibility of the Laughlin state, fluctuations in the total particle number and excitation of edge modes can be tamed by imposing a suitable external potential profile for photons. We further propose angular-momentum-selective spectroscopy of the emitted light as a tool to obtain unambiguous signatures of the microscopic physics of the quantum Hall liquid of light.

  9. Coherent and incoherent phase transformation from olivine to ringwoodite and the time scale for shock events on asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, M.; Ohtani, E.; Kimura, M.; El Goresy, A.; Ozawa, S.; Nagase, T.; Nishijima, M.; Hiraga, K.

    2009-12-01

    Phase transformation mechanism from olivine to its high-pressure polymorph, ringwoodite has been studied in the past with high-pressure apparatus and TEM in order to explore the phase transformation mechanisms and their affect on the dynamics of the Earth’s interior transition zone. These studies propose that the phase transformation takes place in solid-state as follows; (1) incoherent grain-boundary nucleation and growth and (2) coherent intra-crystalline ({111}Rgt//(100)Ol) growth. The phase transformation from olivine to ringwoodite was also observed in shock-melt veins of ordinary chondrites. Such investigation is a very important clue to evaluate a time scale for shock events on asteroids. Previous TEM investigations indicate that only incoherent growth mechanism was active during the transformation in the shocked chondrite. However, our FIB-TEM studies brought the first evidence for coherent intra-crystalline growth from the shock-melt veins of Yamato 791384 L6 chondrite. Most original olivines (Fa24-26) entrained in the shock-melt veins are completely transformed to polycrystalline ringwoodite. In comparison, olivines adjacent to the shock-melt veins revealed heterogeneous olivine to ringwoodite transformation textures. We observed in these olivines three distinct textures: (1) polycrystalline, (2) oriented several sets of lamellae, and (3) a single oriented set of lamellae. The polycrystalline parts are near the shock-melt veins (ringwoodite lamellae are more dominant with increasing distance from the veins. The oriented several sets of lamellae occur along or parallel to fractures. The single oriented set of lamellae (width ringwoodite (grain-size ringwoodite, suggesting that incoherent mechanism takes place along fractures. The single oriented set of lamellae consist of ringwoodite platelets unambiguously depicting coherent crystallographic orientation: (100)Ol//{111}Rgt, indicating a coherent intergrowth. We estimated a time scale for the shock events

  10. Optical memory system based on incoherent recorder and coherent reader of multiplexed computer generated one-dimensional Fourier transform holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinokov, Sergey; Zlokazov, Evgenii; Donchenko, Sergey; Verenikina, Nina

    2017-09-01

    The present article highlights the development results of archive memory holographic system based on application of computer generated Fourier holograms. The proposed idea allows realization of holographic principles of digital data record using simple and compact optical devices. Special interest is paid to synthesis and multiplexed record of one-dimensional Fourier transform holograms. The principal schemes of constructed prototypes of incoherent data recorder and coherent data reader are described in the present paper. The results of experimental implementation of the constructed devices are presented.

  11. Assessment of cervical cancer with a parameter-free intravoxel incoherent motion imaging algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Anton S.; Wurnig, Moritz C.; Boss, Andreas; Ghafoor, Soleen [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Perucho, Jose A.; Khong, Pek Lan; Lee, Elaine Y. P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of a parameter-free intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) approach in cervical cancer, to assess the optimal b-value threshold, and to preliminarily examine differences in the derived perfusion and diffusion parameters for different histological cancer types. After Institutional Review Board approval, 19 female patients (mean age, 54 years; age range, 37–78 years) gave consent and were enrolled in this prospective magnetic resonance imaging study. Clinical staging and biopsy results were obtained. Echo-planar diffusion weighted sequences at 13 b-values were acquired at 3 tesla field strength. Single-sliced region-of-interest IVIM analysis with adaptive b-value thresholds was applied to each tumor, yielding the optimal fit and the optimal parameters for pseudodiffusion (D*), perfusion fraction (Fp) and diffusion coefficient (D). Monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated for comparison with D. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and adenocarcinoma in 9. The b-value threshold (median [interquartile range]) depended on the histological type and was 35 (22.5–50) s/mm{sup 2} in squamous cell carcinoma and 150 (100–150) s/mm{sup 2} in adenocarcinoma (p < 0.05). Comparing squamous cell vs. adenocarcinoma, D* (45.1 [25.1–60.4] × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 12.4 [10.5–21.2] × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) and Fp (7.5% [7.0–9.0%] vs. 9.9% [9.0–11.4%]) differed significantly between the subtypes (p < 0.02), whereas D did not (0.89 [0.75–0.94] × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 0.90 [0.82–0.97] × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 0.27). The residuals did not differ (0.74 [0.60–0.92] vs. 0.94 [0.67–1.01], p = 0.32). The ADC systematically underestimated the magnitude of diffusion restriction compared to D (p < 0.001). The parameter-free IVIM approach is feasible in cervical cancer. The b-value threshold and perfusion-related parameters depend on the tumor histology type.

  12. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  13. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found. (orig.)

  14. Self-diffusion and microscopic dynamics in a gold-silicon liquid investigated with quasielastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Zach; Yang, Fan; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Meyer, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We use incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering to study the atomic dynamics of gold in a eutectic Au81Si19 melt. Despite the glass-forming nature of this system, the gold self-diffusivity displays an Arrhenius behavior with a low activation energy characteristic of simple liquids. At high temperatures, long-range transport of gold atoms is well described by hydrodynamic theory with a simple exponential decay of the self-correlation function. On cooling towards the melting temperature, structural relaxation crosses over to a highly stretched exponential behavior. This suggests the onset of a heterogeneous dynamics, even in the equilibrium melt, and is indicative of a very fragile liquid.

  15. Manipulating scattering features by metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review on manipulations of electromagnetic scattering features by using metamaterials or metasurfaces. Several approaches in controlling the scattered fields of objects are presented, including invisibility cloaks and radar illusions based on transformation optics, carpet cloak using gradient metamaterials, dc cloaks, mantle cloaks based on scattering cancellation, “skin” cloaks using phase compensation, scattering controls with coding/programmable metasurfaces, and scattering reductions by multilayered structures. Finally, the future development of metamaterials on scattering manipulation is predicted.

  16. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering.......The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  17. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...

  18. Spontaneous and stimulated Brillouin scattering in single-mode silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniay, Aydin

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of Brillouin scattering in silica based single mode optical fibers at IR communication wavelengths (λ = 1550nm). We have investigated the scattering process in spontaneous and stimulated regimes by taking into account of the gain spectrum evolution, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) threshold and polarization properties using laser sources with different spectral lineshapes. We have shown that several acoustic resonance modes, depending on the waveguide properties, exist in the spontaneous regime, but they decay as the process becomes stimulated. In the stimulated regime, only the main Brillouin peak persists with a linewidth approximately 10 times narrower than that in the spontaneous regime. Our results on the linewidth narrowing are in an agreement with the theory, which considers thermal noise fluctuations as the origin of Brillouin scattering in undepleted-pump regime. Moreover, we have found that the lineshape of the SBS light is identical to the input laser lineshape, with a resolution bandwidth that is equal to the SBS linewidth of the medium (7-12 MHz), which makes SBS a practical tool for laser linewidth measurements. In the study of polarization properties of Brillouin scattering, we specifically determined the SBS threshold and Degree of Polarization (DOP) of Brillouin light with respect to the state of polarization (SOP) and DOP of the input laser source. It is found that, for linearly polarized input signal (100% DOP); Rayleigh and Spontaneous Brillouin scattered signals have the DOP of 33%, while the Stimulated Brillouin scattered light has a DOP of 95%. On the other hand, for a depolarized input signal (DOP of 0%); Rayleigh, Spontaneous and Stimulated Brillouin scattered light have the same DOP of 5%. We also found that the depolarized signal yields 1dB higher SBS threshold than the polarized signal as oppose to earlier prediction of 3dB. A possible explanation for the discrepancy is given by

  19. Scattering from randomly oriented scatterers with strong permittivity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, S. H.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Strong permittivity fluctuation theory is used to solve the problem of scattering from a medium composed of completely randomly oriented scatterers under a low frequency limit. Gaussian statistics are not assumed for the renormalized scattering sources. Numerical results on effective permittivity are illustrated for oblate and prolate spheroidal scatterers and compared with the results for spherical scatterers. The results are consistent with discrete scatterer theory. The effective permittivity of a random medium embedded with nonspherical scatterers shows a higher imaginary part than the spherical scatterer case with equal correlation volume. Under the distorted Born approximation, the polarimetric covariance matrix for the backscattered electric field is calculated for half-space randomly oriented scatterers. The nonspherical geometry of the scatterers shows significant effects on the cross-polarized backscattering returns, and the correlation coefficient between HH and VV returns. The polarimetric backscattering coefficients can provide useful information in distinguishing the geometry of scatterers.

  20. Symmetry-derived selection rules for plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorio, Ado; Mueller, Niclas S.; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    We show how to obtain the symmetry-imposed selection rules for plasmonic enhancement in surface- (SERS) and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). Plasmon-enhanced light scattering is described as a higher-order Raman process, which introduces a series of Hamiltonians representing the interaction between light, plasmons, electrons, and phonons. Using group theory, we derive the active representations for point group symmetries of exemplary plasmonic nanostructures. The phonon representations that are enhanced by SERS and TERS are then found as induced representations for the symmetry group of the molecule or another Raman probe. The selection rules are discussed for graphene that is coupled to a nanodisk dimer as an example for SERS and coupled to a tip as a TERS example. The phonon eigenmodes that are enhanced depend on the symmetry breaking when combining the plasmonic structures with graphene. We show that the most prominent optical phonon modes (E2 g and A1 g) are allowed in all scattering configurations when using a nanodimer as a plasmonic hotspot. We predict the activation of the silent B2 g as well as infrared-active A2 u and E1 u modes in SERS for crossed configurations of the incoming and scattered light. There is a systematic difference between spatially coherent and incoherent plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering, which is responsible for a dependence of TERS on the phonon coherence length.

  1. Applied electromagnetic scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Andrey A

    2017-01-01

    Besides classical applications (radar and stealth, antennas, microwave engineering), scattering and diffraction are enabling phenomena for some emerging research fields (artificial electromagnetic materials or metamaterials, terahertz technologies, electromagnetic aspects of nano-science). This book is a tutorial for advanced students who need to study diffraction theory. The textbook gives fundamental knowledge about scattering and diffraction of electromagnetic waves and provides some working examples of solutions for practical high-frequency scattering and diffraction problems. The book focuses on the most important diffraction effects and mechanisms influencing the scattering process and describes efficient and physically justified simulation methods - physical optics (PO) and the physical theory of diffraction (PTD) - applicable in typical remote sensing scenarios. The material is presented in a comprehensible and logical form, which relates the presented results to the basic principles of electromag...

  2. Gravitational Bhabha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2017-10-01

    Gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM) as a theory for gravity has been developed similar to the electromagnetic field theory. A weak field approximation of Einstein theory of relativity is similar to GEM. This theory has been quantized. Traditional Bhabha scattering, electron-positron scattering, is based on quantized electrodynamics theory. Usually the amplitude is written in terms of one photon exchange process. With the development of quantized GEM theory, the scattering amplitude will have an additional component based on an exchange of one graviton at the lowest order of perturbation theory. An analysis will provide the relative importance of the two amplitudes for Bhabha scattering. This will allow an analysis of the relative importance of the two amplitudes as the energy of the exchanged particles increases.

  3. Neutron scattering in dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudel, H. U.; Furrer, A.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    Insulating compounds containing dimers of transition metal and rare earth ions have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Energy splittings can be directly determined, and the corresponding parameters are easily extracted from the experimental data. The intensities of dimer excitati......Insulating compounds containing dimers of transition metal and rare earth ions have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Energy splittings can be directly determined, and the corresponding parameters are easily extracted from the experimental data. The intensities of dimer...

  4. Grasping the mechanisms of narratives' incoherence in schizophrenia: an analysis of the temporal structure of patients' life story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allé, M C; Gandolphe, M-C; Doba, K; Köber, C; Potheegadoo, J; Coutelle, R; Habermas, T; Nandrino, J-L; Danion, J-M; Berna, F

    2016-08-01

    Life narratives of patients with schizophrenia are characterized by impaired coherence so that the listener has often difficulties to grasp the life trajectory of the patients. In order to better understand what causes this reduced temporal coherence, we investigated the temporal structure of patients' life narratives through different temporal narrative elements (elaboration of beginnings and endings, local temporal indicators and temporal deviations from a linear order), across two complementary studies. Life narratives were collected by means of two different methods; a free recall in study 1 and a more structured protocol, aiming at reducing the cognitive task demands in study 2. All narratives from the two studies were analyzed using the same validated method. Both studies showed that global temporal coherence is significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia (ps.02). This is mainly due to their stronger tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order without marking the deviation as such. We also observed significant correlations in the patient groups between global temporal coherence and executive dysfunction (p=.008) or their higher tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order in their life narratives (p<.001). These results shed light on narrative correlates of temporal narrative incoherence in schizophrenia and highlight the central role of executive dysfunction in this incoherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. BCL-3 attenuation of TNFA expression involves an incoherent feed-forward loop regulated by chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walker

    Full Text Available Induction of genes is rarely an isolated event; more typically occurring as part of a web of parallel interactions, or motifs, which act to refine and control gene expression. Here, we define an Incoherent Feed-forward Loop motif in which TNFα-induced NF-κB signalling activates expression of the TNFA gene itself and also controls synthesis of the negative regulator BCL-3. While sharing a common inductive signal, the two genes have distinct temporal expression profiles. Notably, while the TNFA gene promoter is primed to respond immediately to activated NF-κB in the nucleus, induction of BCL3 expression only occurs after a time delay of about 1h. We show that this time delay is defined by remodelling of the BCL3 gene promoter, which is required to activate gene expression, and characterise the chromatin delayed induction of BCL3 expression using mathematical models. The models show how a delay in inhibitor production effectively uncouples the rate of response to inflammatory cues from the final magnitude of inhibition. Hence, within this regulatory motif, a delayed (incoherent feed-forward loop together with differential rates of TNFA (fast and BCL3 (slow mRNA turnover provide robust, pulsatile expression of TNFα . We propose that the structure of the BCL-3-dependent regulatory motif has a beneficial role in modulating expression dynamics and the inflammatory response while minimising the risk of pathological hyper-inflammation.

  6. BCL-3 attenuation of TNFA expression involves an incoherent feed-forward loop regulated by chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas; Adamson, Antony; Jackson, Dean A

    2013-01-01

    Induction of genes is rarely an isolated event; more typically occurring as part of a web of parallel interactions, or motifs, which act to refine and control gene expression. Here, we define an Incoherent Feed-forward Loop motif in which TNFα-induced NF-κB signalling activates expression of the TNFA gene itself and also controls synthesis of the negative regulator BCL-3. While sharing a common inductive signal, the two genes have distinct temporal expression profiles. Notably, while the TNFA gene promoter is primed to respond immediately to activated NF-κB in the nucleus, induction of BCL3 expression only occurs after a time delay of about 1h. We show that this time delay is defined by remodelling of the BCL3 gene promoter, which is required to activate gene expression, and characterise the chromatin delayed induction of BCL3 expression using mathematical models. The models show how a delay in inhibitor production effectively uncouples the rate of response to inflammatory cues from the final magnitude of inhibition. Hence, within this regulatory motif, a delayed (incoherent) feed-forward loop together with differential rates of TNFA (fast) and BCL3 (slow) mRNA turnover provide robust, pulsatile expression of TNFα . We propose that the structure of the BCL-3-dependent regulatory motif has a beneficial role in modulating expression dynamics and the inflammatory response while minimising the risk of pathological hyper-inflammation.

  7. Scattering Effects of Solar Panels on Space Station Antenna Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, Robert J.; Ngo, John C.; Hwu, Shian U.; Johnson, Larry A.; Elmore, James D.; Lu, Ba P.; Kelley, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Characterizing the scattering properties of the solar array panels is important in predicting Space Station antenna performance. A series of far-field, near-field, and radar cross section (RCS) scattering measurements were performed at S-Band and Ku-Band microwave frequencies on Space Station solar array panels. Based on investigation of the measured scattering patterns, the solar array panels exhibit similar scattering properties to that of the same size aluminum or copper panel mockup. As a first order approximation, and for worse case interference simulation, the solar array panels may be modeled using perfect reflecting plates. Numerical results obtained using the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) modeling technique are presented for Space Station antenna pattern degradation due to solar panel interference. The computational and experimental techniques presented in this paper are applicable for antennas mounted on other platforms such as ship, aircraft, satellite, and space or land vehicle.

  8. Effective atomic number of some sugars and amino acids for scattering of (241)Am and (137)Cs gamma rays at low momentum transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinaykumar, L; Umesh, T K

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the effective atomic number of some H, C, N and O based sugars and amino acids. These have been determined by using a handy expression which is based on the theoretical angle integrated small angle (coherent+incoherent) scattering cross sections of seven elements of Z≤13 in four angular ranges of (0-4°), (0-6°), (0-8°) and (0-10°)for (241)Am (59.54 keV) and (137)Cs (661.6 keV) gamma rays. The theoretical scattering cross sections were computed by a suitable numerical integration of the atomic form factor and incoherent scattering function compilations of Hubbell et al. (1975) which make use of the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock (NRHF) model for the atomic charge distribution of the elements in the angular ranges of interest. The angle integrated small angle scattering cross sections of the H, C, N and O based sugars and amino acids measured by a new method reported recently by the authors were used in the handy expression to derive their effective atomic number. The results are compared with the other available data and discussed. Possible conclusions are drawn based on the present study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proof of the Feasibility of Coherent and Incoherent Schemes for Pumping a Gamma-Ray Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Scattering cross seccions , stopping powers, and various other material data are prepared 1by another program called PEGS (pre-ECS). Tlhe PEGS data...F. the ratio of populations would become10 1 \\(-’-• Ro ___ 4 10 0o 1 2 3 4 5 6 - Rl -=2, + I exp •-F:tT) (9) ASSUMED GATEWAY ENERGY [MeV] Rio 2i 5...o reported in Norman (1984). where Ill. EITECT1VE liALF-LIFE OF 1 "’Lu a=Ro4 -Ru -R, - Rio . The ground and isomeric slates of "𔃻 Lu can be considered

  10. Small angle scattering of 59.54 keV photons by elemental samples in the atomic number region 13 ≤ Z ≤ 82

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vinaykumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we report the angle integrated coherent scattering cross sections of some elements at low momentum transfer over four angular ranges for some elements in the atomic number range 13≤Z≤82 for 241Am (59.54 keV gamma rays. The coherent scattering cross sections were derived from the experimentally measured total (Coherent + incoherent scattering cross sections for the elements at the energy of interest by subtracting separately the small contribution of the corresponding angle integrated incoherent scattering cross sections. The theoretical angle integrated incoherent scattering cross sections were computed by numerically integrating the values provided in the compilations based on the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock (NRHF model and the modified form factor (MFF model for the charge distribution within the atom. The present values of the angle integrated coherent scattering cross sections of the elements Al, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn and Pb at 59.54 keV in the angular ranges of (0∘−4∘, (0∘−6∘, (0∘−8∘ and (0°–10° so obtained are compared with the corresponding theoretical S-matrix data within the range of experimental errors. The root mean square error on the measured cross sections was found to be the lowest for Al at 4.1% and the highest for Pb at 4.9%. For the other elements the error was in between these two values. Possible conclusions are drawn based on the present study.

  11. Dynamics of Different Functional Parts of Bacteriorhodopsin: H-2H Labeling and Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reat, Valerie; Patzelt, Heiko; Ferrand, Michel; Pfister, Claude; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    1998-04-01

    We show that dynamics of specific amino acids within a protein can be characterized by neutron spectroscopy and hydrogen-deuterium labeling, and we present data on the motions of a selected set of groups within bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the retinal-based proton pump in the purple membrane of halophilic Archaea. Elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments allow the definition of motions in the nano- to picosecond time scale and have revealed a dynamical transition from a harmonic to a softer, anharmonic atomic fluctuation regime in the global behavior of proteins. Biological activity in proteins is correlated with this transition, suggesting that flexibility is required for function. Elastic incoherent neutron scattering is dominated by H atom scattering, and to study the dynamics of a selected part of BR, fully deuterated purple membrane with BR containing H-retinal, H-tryptophan, and H-methionine was prepared biosynthetically in Halobacterium salinarum. These amino acids cluster in the functional center of the protein. In contrast to the protein globally, the thermal motions of the labeled atoms were found to be shielded from solvent melting effects at 260 K. Above this temperature, the labeled groups appear as more rigid than the rest of the protein, with a significantly smaller mean square amplitude of motion. These experimental results quantify the dynamical heterogeneity of BR (which meets the functional requirements of global flexibility), on the one hand, to allow large conformational changes in the molecule and of a more rigid region in the protein, on the other, to control stereo-specific selection of retinal conformations.

  12. Scattering of radio frequency waves by turbulence in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2016-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments and incoherent fluctuations due to turbulence are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, there are telltale signs, arising from differences between results from simulations and from experiments, that fluctuations can modify the spectrum of RF waves. Any effect on RF waves in the scrape-off layer can have important experimental consequences. For example, electron cyclotron waves are expected to stabilize the deleterious neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in ITER. Spectral and polarization changes due to scattering will modify the spatial location and profile of the current driven by the RF waves, thereby affecting the control of NTMs. Pioneering theoretical studies and complementary computer simulations have been pursued to elucidate the impact of fluctuations on RF waves. From the full complement of Maxwell's equations for cold, magnetized plasmas, it is shown that the Poynting flux in the wake of filaments develops spatial structure due to diffraction and shadowing. The uniformity of power flow into the plasma is affected by side-scattering, modifications to the wave spectrum, and coupling to plasma waves other than the incident RF wave. The Snell's law and the Fresnel equations have been reformulated within the context of magnetized plasmas. They are distinctly different from their counterparts in scalar dielectric media, and reveal new and important physical insight into the scattering of RF waves. The Snell's law and Fresnel equations are the basis for the Kirchhoff approximation necessary to determine properties of the scattered waves. Furthermore, this theory is also relevant for studying back-scattering

  13. Planets and satellites galore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, B. G.

    1980-10-01

    The facts and controversies surrounding the discoveries of Uranus, Neptune, Pluto and their satellites are reviewed. Earth-approaching and earth-crossing minor planets are discussed with attention to the work of Helin and Giclas. The problems attending satellite discoveries are examined, and the criteria for 1978 P 1 is evaluated.

  14. Satellite Communications Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Ariane $loom SAJAC 1 Hughes Satellite Japan 06/94 $150m SAJAC 2 Hughes Satellite Japan -- (spare) $150m SatcomHl GE GE Americom /95 $50m SOLIDARIDAD ...1 Hughes SCT (Mexico) 11/93 Ariane $loom SOLIDARIDAD 2 Hughes SCT (Mexico) /94 $loom Superbird Al Loral Space Com Gp (Jap) 11/92 Ariane $175m

  15. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  16. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus......We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  17. Quantum Optical Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær

    . In the first part we use a scattering-matrix formalism combined with results from random-matrix theory to investigate the interference of quantum optical states on a multiple scattering medium. We investigate a single realization of a scattering medium thereby showing that it is possible to create entangled...... states by interference of squeezed beams. Mixing photon states on the single realization also shows that quantum interference naturally arises by interfering quantum states. We further investigate the ensemble averaged transmission properties of the quantized light and see that the induced quantum...... interference survives even after disorder averaging. The quantum interference manifests itself through increased photon correlations. Furthermore, the theoretical description of a measurement procedure is presented. In this work we relate the noise power spectrum of the total transmitted or reflected light...

  18. Λ scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade de São Paulo,Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Santiago de Cali,Calle 5 62-00 Barrio Pampalinda, Cali, Valle (Colombia)

    2016-06-17

    The CHY representation of scattering amplitudes is based on integrals over the moduli space of a punctured sphere. We replace the punctured sphere by a double-cover version. The resulting scattering equations depend on a parameter Λ controlling the opening of a branch cut. The new representation of scattering amplitudes possesses an enhanced redundancy which can be used to fix, modulo branches, the location of four punctures while promoting Λ to a variable. Via residue theorems we show how CHY formulas break up into sums of products of smaller (off-shell) ones times a propagator. This leads to a powerful way of evaluating CHY integrals of generic rational functions, which we call the Λ algorithm.

  19. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  20. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  1. Satellite Sign: A Poor Outcome Predictor in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Yoshiteru; Ohtomo, Satoru; Arai, Hiroaki; Okada, Ken; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-01-01

    The presence of high-density starry dots around the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which we termed as a satellite sign, is occasionally observed in CT. The relationship between ICH with a satellite sign and its functional outcome has not been identified. This study aimed to determine whether the presence of a satellite sign could be an independent prognostic factor for patients with ICH. Patients with acute spontaneous ICH were retrospectively identified and their initial CT scans were reviewed. A satellite sign was defined as scattered high-density lesions completely separate from the main hemorrhage in at least the single axial slice. Functional outcome was evaluated using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at discharge. Poor functional outcome was defined as mRS scores of 3-6. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to assess the presence of a satellite sign and its association with poor functional outcome. A total of 241 patients with ICH were enrolled in the study. Of these, 98 (40.7%) had a satellite sign. Patients with a satellite sign had a significantly higher rate of poor functional outcome (95.9%) than those without a satellite sign (55.9%, p satellite sign (OR 13.5; 95% CI 4.42-53.4; p satellite sign was significantly related with higher systolic blood pressure (p = 0.0014), higher diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.0117), shorter activated partial thromboplastin time (p = 0.0427), higher rate of intraventricular bleeding (p satellite sign in the initial CT scan is associated with a significantly worse functional outcome in ICH patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  3. Risk and Resilience Factors in Coping with Daily Stress in Adulthood: The Role of Age, Self-Concept Incoherence, and Personal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Manfred; Hay, Elizabeth L.

    2010-01-01

    This study observed young, middle-aged, and older adults (N = 239; M[subscript age] = 49.6 years; range = 18-89 years) for 30 consecutive days to examine the association between daily stress and negative affect, taking into account potential risk (i.e., self-concept incoherence) and resilience (i.e., age, perceived personal control) factors.…

  4. Influence of incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical properties of β-Ga2O3 layers homoepitaxially grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, A.; Schewski, R.; Baldini, M.; Galazka, Z.; Wagner, G.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.

    2017-10-01

    We present a quantitative model that addresses the influence of incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical properties in β-Ga2O3. This model can explain the mobility collapse below a threshold electron concentration of 1 × 1018 cm-3 as well as partly the low doping efficiency in β-Ga2O3 layers grown homoepitaxially by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on (100) substrates of only slight off-orientation. A structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals a high density of twin lamellae in these layers. In contrast to the coherent twin boundaries parallel to the (100) plane, the lateral incoherent twin boundaries exhibit one dangling bond per unit cell that acts as an acceptor-like electron trap. Since the twin lamellae are thin, we consider the incoherent twin boundaries to be line defects with a density of 1011-1012 cm-2 as determined by TEM. We estimate the influence of the incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical transport properties by adapting Read's model of charged dislocations. Our calculations quantitatively confirm that the mobility reduction and collapse as well as partly the compensation are due to the presence of twin lamellae.

  5. Diagnosis of cirrhosis with intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI alone and in combination: preliminary experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, J.; Sigmund, E.E.; Rusinek, H.; Oei, M.T.H.; Babb, J.S.; Taouli, B.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report our preliminary experience with the use of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI alone and in combination for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty subjects (16

  6. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging and Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuankai Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas grading is important for treatment plan; we aimed to investigate the application of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in gliomas grading, by comparing with the three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (3D pCASL. 24 patients (13 high grade gliomas and 11 low grade gliomas underwent IVIM DWI and 3D pCASL imaging before operation; maps of fast diffusion coefficient (D∗, slow diffusion coefficient (D, fractional perfusion-related volume (f, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF were calculated and then coregistered to generate the corresponding parameter values. We found CBF and D∗ were higher in the high grade gliomas, whereas ADC, D, and f were lower (all P0.05. IVIM DWI showed more efficiency than 3D pCASL but less validity than conventional DWI in differentiating the high from low grade gliomas.

  7. Reflection and transmission calculations in a multilayer structure with coherent, incoherent, and partially coherent interference, using the transmission line method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, N A; Savaidis, S P; Botsialas, A; Ioannidis, Z C; Georgiadou, D G; Vasilopoulou, M; Pagiatakis, G

    2015-02-20

    A generalized transmission line method (TLM) that provides reflection and transmission calculations for a multilayer dielectric structure with coherent, partial coherent, and incoherent layers is presented. The method is deployed on two different application fields. The first application of the method concerns the thickness measurement of the individual layers of an organic light-emitting diode. By using a fitting approach between experimental spectral reflectance measurements and the corresponding TLM calculations, it is shown that the thickness of the films can be estimated. The second application of the TLM concerns the calculation of the external quantum efficiency of an organic photovoltaic with partially coherent rough interfaces between the layers. Numerical results regarding the short circuit photocurrent for different layer thicknesses and rough interfaces are provided and the performance impact of the rough interface is discussed in detail.

  8. Simulation of spatially varying ground motions including incoherence, wave‐passage and differential site‐response effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konakli, Katerina; Der Kiureghian, Armen

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for simulating arrays of spatially varying ground motions, incorporating the effects of incoherence, wave passage, and differential site response. Non‐stationarity is accounted for by considering the motions as consisting of stationary segments. Two approaches are developed....... In the first, simulated motions are consistent with the power spectral densities of a segmented recorded motion and are characterized by uniform variability at all locations. Uniform variability in the array of ground motions is essential when synthetic motions are used for statistical analysis of the response...... of multiply‐supported structures. In the second approach, simulated motions are conditioned on the segmented record itself and exhibit increasing variance with distance from the site of the observation. For both approaches, example simulated motions are presented for an existing bridge model employing two...

  9. Deterministic simulation of first-order scattering in virtual X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, N. E-mail: nicolas.freud@insa-lyon.fr; Duvauchelle, P.; Pistrui-Maximean, S.A.; Letang, J.-M.; Babot, D

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm is proposed to compute the contribution of first-order Compton- and Rayleigh-scattered radiation in X-ray imaging. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named virtual X-ray imaging. The physical models chosen to account for photon scattering are the well-known form factor and incoherent scattering function approximations, which are recalled in this paper and whose limits of validity are briefly discussed. The proposed algorithm, based on a voxel discretization of the inspected object, is presented in detail, as well as its results in simple configurations, which are shown to converge when the sampling steps are chosen sufficiently small. Simple criteria for choosing correct sampling steps (voxel and pixel size) are established. The order of magnitude of the computation time necessary to simulate first-order scattering images amounts to hours with a PC architecture and can even be decreased down to minutes, if only a profile is computed (along a linear detector). Finally, the results obtained with the proposed algorithm are compared to the ones given by the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and found to be in excellent accordance, which constitutes a validation of our algorithm. The advantages and drawbacks of the proposed deterministic method versus the Monte Carlo method are briefly discussed.

  10. Benchmarking a first-principles thermal neutron scattering law for water ice with a diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jesse; Zerkle, Michael; Heinrichs, David

    2017-09-01

    The neutron scattering properties of water ice are of interest to the nuclear criticality safety community for the transport and storage of nuclear materials in cold environments. The common hexagonal phase ice Ih has locally ordered, but globally disordered, H2O molecular orientations. A 96-molecule supercell is modeled using the VASP ab initio density functional theory code and PHONON lattice dynamics code to calculate the phonon vibrational spectra of H and O in ice Ih. These spectra are supplied to the LEAPR module of the NJOY2012 nuclear data processing code to generate thermal neutron scattering laws for H and O in ice Ih in the incoherent approximation. The predicted vibrational spectra are optimized to be representative of the globally averaged ice Ih structure by comparing theoretically calculated and experimentally measured total cross sections and inelastic neutron scattering spectra. The resulting scattering kernel is then supplied to the MC21 Monte Carlo transport code to calculate time eigenvalues for the fundamental mode decay in ice cylinders at various temperatures. Results are compared to experimental flux decay measurements for a pulsed-neutron die-away diffusion benchmark.

  11. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry, polarimetry and Thomson scattering measurements in burning plasmas (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Brower, D. L.; Hartog, D. J. Den; Ding, W. X.; Duff, J.; Parke, E.

    2014-11-01

    At anticipated high electron temperatures in ITER, the effects of electron thermal motion on Thomson scattering (TS), toroidal interferometer/polarimeter (TIP), and poloidal polarimeter (PoPola) diagnostics will be significant and must be accurately treated. The precision of the previous lowest order linear in τ = Te/mec2 model may be insufficient; we present a more precise model with τ2-order corrections to satisfy the high accuracy required for ITER TIP and PoPola diagnostics. The linear model is extended from Maxwellian to a more general class of anisotropic electron distributions that allows us to take into account distortions caused by equilibrium current, ECRH, and RF current drive effects. The classical problem of the degree of polarization of incoherent Thomson scattered radiation is solved analytically exactly without any approximations for the full range of incident polarizations, scattering angles, and electron thermal motion from non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic. The results are discussed in the context of the possible use of the polarization properties of Thomson scattered light as a method of Te measurement relevant to ITER operational scenarios.

  12. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry, polarimetry and Thomson scattering measurements in burning plasmas (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Hartog, D. J. Den; Duff, J.; Parke, E. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin - Madison and the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    At anticipated high electron temperatures in ITER, the effects of electron thermal motion on Thomson scattering (TS), toroidal interferometer/polarimeter (TIP), and poloidal polarimeter (PoPola) diagnostics will be significant and must be accurately treated. The precision of the previous lowest order linear in τ = T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2} model may be insufficient; we present a more precise model with τ{sup 2}-order corrections to satisfy the high accuracy required for ITER TIP and PoPola diagnostics. The linear model is extended from Maxwellian to a more general class of anisotropic electron distributions that allows us to take into account distortions caused by equilibrium current, ECRH, and RF current drive effects. The classical problem of the degree of polarization of incoherent Thomson scattered radiation is solved analytically exactly without any approximations for the full range of incident polarizations, scattering angles, and electron thermal motion from non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic. The results are discussed in the context of the possible use of the polarization properties of Thomson scattered light as a method of T{sub e} measurement relevant to ITER operational scenarios.

  13. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  14. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  15. Critical fluid light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to measure the decay rates of critical density fluctuations in a simple fluid (xenon) very near its liquid-vapor critical point using laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. Such experiments were severely limited on Earth by the presence of gravity which causes large density gradients in the sample when the compressibility diverges approaching the critical point. The goal is to measure fluctuation decay rates at least two decades closer to the critical point than is possible on earth, with a resolution of 3 microK. This will require loading the sample to 0.1 percent of the critical density and taking data as close as 100 microK to the critical temperature. The minimum mission time of 100 hours will allow a complete range of temperature points to be covered, limited by the thermal response of the sample. Other technical problems have to be addressed such as multiple scattering and the effect of wetting layers. The experiment entails measurement of the scattering intensity fluctuation decay rate at two angles for each temperature and simultaneously recording the scattering intensities and sample turbidity (from the transmission). The analyzed intensity and turbidity data gives the correlation length at each temperature and locates the critical temperature. The fluctuation decay rate data from these measurements will provide a severe test of the generalized hydrodynamic theories of transport coefficients in the critical regions. When compared to equivalent data from binary liquid critical mixtures they will test the universality of critical dynamics.

  16. Inelastic magnon scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert de Mello Koch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the worldsheet S-matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS5×S5. The D-brane is either a giant graviton or a dual giant graviton. In the gauge theory, the operators we consider belong to the su(2|3 sector of the theory. Magnon excitations of open strings can exhibit both elastic (when magnons in the bulk of the string scatter and inelastic (when magnons at the endpoint of an open string participate scattering. Both of these S-matrices are determined (up to an overall phase by the su(2|22 global symmetry of the theory. In this note we study the S-matrix for inelastic scattering. We show that it exhibits poles corresponding to boundstates of bulk and boundary magnons. A crossing equation is derived for the overall phase. It reproduces the crossing equation for maximal giant gravitons, in the appropriate limit. Finally, scattering in the su(2 sector is computed to two loops. This two loop result, which determines the overall phase to two loops, will be useful when a unique solution to the crossing equation is to be selected.

  17. Inelastic magnon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; van Zyl, Hendrik J. R.

    2017-05-01

    We study the worldsheet S-matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS5 ×S5. The D-brane is either a giant graviton or a dual giant graviton. In the gauge theory, the operators we consider belong to the su (2 | 3) sector of the theory. Magnon excitations of open strings can exhibit both elastic (when magnons in the bulk of the string scatter) and inelastic (when magnons at the endpoint of an open string participate) scattering. Both of these S-matrices are determined (up to an overall phase) by the su(2 | 2) 2 global symmetry of the theory. In this note we study the S-matrix for inelastic scattering. We show that it exhibits poles corresponding to boundstates of bulk and boundary magnons. A crossing equation is derived for the overall phase. It reproduces the crossing equation for maximal giant gravitons, in the appropriate limit. Finally, scattering in the su (2) sector is computed to two loops. This two loop result, which determines the overall phase to two loops, will be useful when a unique solution to the crossing equation is to be selected.

  18. Satellite Operations in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreller, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous observational challenges exist across Alaska impacting National Weather Service (NWS) forecast operations and providing decision support services (DSS) to critical core partners and customers. These observational challenges range from limited utility of GOES imagery at higher latitudes, scarcity of observing platforms, to limited radar coverage. Although we are fortunate to receive these valuable and limited data sets, there still remain extensive spatial and temporal data gaps across Alaska. Many forecast challenges in Alaska are similar to those in the CONUS with the detection and monitoring of wildfire conditions, severe thunderstorms, river flooding, and coastal flooding, etc. There are additional unique DSS provided in Alaska including sea ice forecasting, ivu (ice shoves onshore), coastal erosion due to permafrost melt, and extreme hazardous winter conditions (temperatures as low as -80F). In addition to the observational and forecast challenges, the sheer size of the area of responsibility in Alaska is a challenge. NWS operations have always heavily relied on satellite imagery to quickly assess the current weather situation and provide forecast guidance. NWS operations have established several partnerships with the satellite community to help with these challenges. In particular the GOES-R and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) OCONUS Satellite Proving Ground (PG) Programs have not only improved Alaska's observational challenges, but continue to identify new capabilities with the next generation geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products.. For example, River ice and flood detection products derived from the Suomi-NPP VIIRS satellite imagery with the support of the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program. This presentation will provide examples of how new satellite capabilities are being used in NWS Alaska forecast operations to support DSS, with emphasis on JPSS satellite products. Future satellite utilization or operational needs

  19. Evidence of hydrocarbon pollution in soil exploiting satellite optical and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Galvan-Pineda, J.; Espinosa-Hernandez, A.; Jimenez-Escalona, J. C.; Ramos-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    includes field measurements collecting soil samples at depths of 0-30 cm and 30-60 cm, the implementation of an algorithm to exploit Landsat 5 and 7 images to identify polluted zones, and the implementation of an algorithm using Envisat ASAR and an incoherent scattering model to delineate the polluted soil. The laboratory analysis of the soil samples showed that in all cases the most contaminated region of the soil is the deeper layer (30-60 cm). The processing of the optical images identifies contaminated regions mainly for bare soils and short vegetation. For highly vegetated regions, the optical images do not detect the polluted soils because the wavelength of observation cannot penetrate vegetation. The radar algorithm indicates that the most contaminated zones showed the lowest backscattering coefficient in comparison to clean zones. Unlike optical images, the Envisat images allowed the identification of polluted zones even under high vegetation conditions.

  20. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  1. Rayleigh's Scattering Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiets, Sergey; Gorelik, Andrey

    This report is devoted to a discussion of applicability limits of Rayleigh’s scattering model. Implicitly, Rayleigh’s ideas are being used in a wide range of remote sensing applications. To begin with it must be noted that most techniques which have been developed to date for measurements by means of active instruments for remote sensing in case of the target is a set of distributed moving scatters are only hopes, to say so, on measurements per se. The problem is that almost all of such techniques use a priori information about the microstructure of the object of interest during whole measurement session. As one can find in the literature, this approach may happily be applied to systems with identical particles. However, it is not the case with respect to scattering targets that consist of particles of different kind or having a particle size distribution. It must be especially noted that the microstructure of most of such targets changes significantly with time and/or space. Therefore, the true measurement techniques designed to be applicable in such conditions must be not only adaptable in order to take into account a variety of models of an echo interpretation, but also have a well-developed set of clear-cut criteria of applicability and exact means of accuracy estimation. So such techniques will require much more parameters to be measured. In spite of the fact that there is still room for some improvements within classical models and approaches, it is multiwavelength approach that may be seen as the most promising way of development towards obtaining an adequate set of the measured parameters required for true measurement techniques. At the same time, Rayleigh’s scattering is an invariant in regard to a change of the wavelength as it follows from the point of view dominating nowadays. In the light of such an idea, the synergy between multivawelength measurements may be achieved - to a certain extent - by means of the synchronous usage of Rayleigh’s and

  2. Light scattering reviews 8 radiative transfer and light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Light scattering review (vol 8) is aimed at the presentation of recent advances in radiative transfer and light scattering optics. The topics to be covered include: scattering of light by irregularly shaped particles suspended in atmosphere (dust, ice crystals), light scattering by particles much larger as compared the wavelength of incident radiation, atmospheric radiative forcing, astrophysical radiative transfer, radiative transfer and optical imaging in biological media, radiative transfer of polarized light, numerical aspects of radiative transfer.

  3. The SAGA Survey. I. Satellite Galaxy Populations around Eight Milky Way Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geha, Marla; Wechsler, Risa H.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Tollerud, Erik J.; Weiner, Benjamin; Bernstein, Rebecca; Hoyle, Ben; Marchi, Sebastian; Marshall, Phil J.; Muñoz, Ricardo; Lu, Yu

    2017-09-01

    We present the survey strategy and early results of the “Satellites Around Galactic Analogs” (SAGA) Survey. The SAGA Survey’s goal is to measure the distribution of satellite galaxies around 100 systems analogous to the Milky Way down to the luminosity of the Leo I dwarf galaxy ({M}rsatellite luminosity functions for eight Milky-Way-analog galaxies between 20 and 40 Mpc. These systems have nearly complete spectroscopic coverage of candidate satellites within the projected host virial radius down to {r}osatellite galaxies: 14 new satellite galaxies meet our formal criteria around our complete host systems, plus 11 additional satellites in either incompletely surveyed hosts or below our formal magnitude limit. Combined with 13 previously known satellites, there are a total of 27 satellites around 8 complete Milky-Way-analog hosts. We find a wide distribution in the number of satellites per host, from 1 to 9, in the luminosity range for which there are 5 Milky Way satellites. Standard abundance matching extrapolated from higher luminosities predicts less scatter between hosts and a steeper luminosity function slope than observed. We find that the majority of satellites (26 of 27) are star-forming. These early results indicate that the Milky Way has a different satellite population than typical in our sample, potentially changing the physical interpretation of measurements based only on the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies.

  4. FDTD scattered field formulation for scatterers in stratified dispersive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkonen, Juuso

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a simple scattered field (SF) technique that enables finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of light scattering from dispersive objects residing in stratified dispersive media. The introduced SF technique is verified against the total field scattered field (TFSF) technique. As an application example, we study surface plasmon polariton enhanced light transmission through a 100 nm wide slit in a silver film.

  5. Small Satellite Transporter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective is to determine whether this small satellite transporter is capable of transporting at least four 6U CubeSats is possible for a given set of...

  6. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Top space experts from around the world have collaborated to produce this comprehensive, authoritative, and clearly illustrated reference guide to the fast growing, multi-billion dollar field of satellite applications and space communications. This handbook, done under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, addresses not only system technologies but also examines market dynamics, technical standards and regulatory constraints. The handbook is a completely multi-disciplinary reference book that covers, in an in-depth fashion, the fields of satellite telecommunications, Earth observation, remote sensing, satellite navigation, geographical information systems, and geosynchronous meteorological systems. It covers current practices and designs as well as advanced concepts and future systems. It provides a comparative analysis of the common technologies and design elements for satellite application bus structures, thermal controls, power systems, stabilization techniques, telemetry, com...

  7. Multiple Satellite Trajectory Optimization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendy Jr, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    This thesis develops and validates a satellite trajectory optimization model. A summary is given of the general mathematical principles of dynamic optimal control to minimize fuel consumed or transfer time...

  8. Electromagnetic scattering from random media

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    - ;The book develops the dynamical theory of scattering from random media from first principles. Its key findings are to characterize the time evolution of the scattered field in terms of stochastic differential equations, and to illustrate this framework

  9. Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 took this photo of Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles) away. The photo shows that Phoebe is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) in diameter, about twice the size of Earth-based measurements; and dark, with five percent reflectivity -- much darker than any other Saturnian satellite. That, and information from Earth-based observations, indicates Phoebe is almost certainly a captured asteroid, and did not form in the original Saturn nebula as Saturn's other satellites did. Phoebe is the only Saturnian satellite that does not always show the same face to Saturn: Its orbital period is 550 days. Its rotation period (length of day), determined from Voyager 2 observations, is nine to ten hours. Other ground-based observations that indicate that Phoebe is a captured asteroid: It orbits Saturn in the ecliptic plane (the plane in which Earth and most other planets orbit the Sun), rather than in Saturn's equatorial plane as the other Saturn satellites do. And Phoebe's orbit is retrograde -- in the direction opposite to that of the other satellites. Voyager is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Steady, Near-exponential Galaxy Disks Produced by Scattering Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Curtis; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Exponential surface brightness profiles are ubiquitous in galaxy disks over a wide range of Hubble types and masses. Radial migration and scattering via bars, waves, clumps and satellites have been discussed as causes, but most of these cannot account for the full range of the phenomenon. Numerical models of clump scattering show that this process can produce near-exponential or core-Sérsic profiles in a variety of circumstances, also suggesting a connection to bulge and elliptical galaxy profiles. Density profile forms do not depend on the specifics of the scattering processes, but stellar kinematics and profile evolution rates do. Analytic models, with a power-law times a Sérsic profile form, can satisfy Jeans equations in cases dominated by either halo potentials (outer disk) or self-gravity (inner disk).

  11. Questions arising for future surface diffusion studies using scattering techniques-the case of benzene diffusion on graphite basal plane surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo-Almazan, Irene; Seydel, Tilo; Fouquet, Peter, E-mail: fouquet@ill.e [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-08-04

    This paper gives a review of recent work on benzene diffusion on graphitic carbon surfaces using neutron and helium scattering spectroscopy as well as computational modelling. Recent spin-echo spectroscopy measurements have demonstrated that benzene/graphite displays almost perfect Brownian diffusion and that it can be used as a tool to study dynamic friction. Incoherent neutron backscattering measurements, on the other hand, reveal a jump diffusion behaviour, related to the molecular rotational modes of the benzene rings. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have delivered a very detailed picture of the adsorbate dynamics. We use this review to illustrate the open questions and possible future directions of this research field.

  12. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  13. Double parton scattering theory overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diehl, Markus; Gaunt, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of double hard scattering in proton-proton collisions is quite involved compared with the familiar case of single hard scattering. In this contribution, we review our theoretical understanding of double hard scattering and of its interplay with other reaction mechanisms.

  14. Induction studies with satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    1999-01-01

    satellites. The results of several induction studies with scalar satellite data (from the POGO satellites) and with vector data (from the Magsat mission) demonstrate the ability to probe the Earth's conductivity from space. However, compared to the results obtained with ground data the satellite results...

  15. Seamount acoustic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  16. Scattering problems in elastodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Diatta, Andre; Wegener, Martin; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    In electromagnetism, acoustics, and quantum mechanics, scattering problems can routinely be solved numerically by virtue of perfectly matched layers (PMLs) at simulation domain boundaries. Unfortunately, the same has not been possible for general elastodynamic wave problems in continuum mechanics. In this paper, we introduce a corresponding scattered-field formulation for the Navier equation. We derive PMLs based on complex-valued coordinate transformations leading to Cosserat elasticity-tensor distributions not obeying the minor symmetries. These layers are shown to work in two dimensions, for all polarizations, and all directions. By adaptative choice of the decay length, the deep subwavelength PMLs can be used all the way to the quasi-static regime. As demanding examples, we study the effectiveness of cylindrical elastodynamic cloaks of the Cosserat type and approximations thereof.

  17. Advanced sources and optical components for the McStas neutron scattering instrument simulation package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhi, E.; Monzat, C.; Arnerin, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present new McStas components Virtual_mcnp_input and Virtual_tripoli4_input, Virtual_mcnp_output and Virtual_tripoli_output to be used as interface for the MCNP and Tripoli neutron transport codes. Similarly, the new Lens component can be used to describe any refracting material set......-up, including lenses and prisms. A new library for McStas adds the ability to describe any geometrical arrangement as a set of polygons. This feature has been implemented in most sample scattering components such as Single_crystal, Incoherent, Isotropic_Sqw (liquids/amorphous/powder), PowderN as well...... as in Guide_anyshape component for reflecting or absorbing complex set-up. The PSD_Detector component models a neutron absorbing gas volume, taking into account for instance the penetration depth and the associated parallax effect, the charge cloud generated at the absorption location. This gas volume can...

  18. Molecular mobility in Medicago truncatula seed during early stage of germination: Neutron scattering and NMR investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falourd, Xavier; Natali, Francesca; Peters, Judith; Foucat, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    First hours of Medicago truncatula (MT) seeds germination were investigated using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), to follow respectively how macromolecular motions and water mobility evolve when water permeates into the seed. From EINS results, it was shown that there is an increase in macromolecular mobility with the water uptake. Changes in NMR relaxation parameters reflected microstructural changes associated with the recovery of the metabolic processes. The EINS investigation of the effect of temperature on macromolecular motions showed that there is a relationship between the amount of water in the seeds and the effect of freezing-thawing cycle. The NMR relaxometry results obtained at 253 K allowed establishing possible link between the freezing of water molecules tightly bound to macromolecules and their drastic motion restriction around 250 K, as observed with EINS at the highest water content.

  19. Evidence for hard scattering of hadronic constituents of photons in photon-photon collisions at TRISTAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, R.; Kojima, T.; Sasaki, T.; Tomioka, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; McNeil, R.R.; Myung, S.S.; Cheng, C.P.; Gao, W.X.; Gu, P.; Yan, W.G.; Ye, M.H.; Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Lai, A.Z.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S.; Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Fry, C.A.; Breedon, R.E.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Rowe, J.; Smith, J.R.; Stuart, D.; Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kurihara, Y.; Maki, A.; Nozaki, T.; Omori, T.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takaiwa, Y.; Terada, S.; Walker, R.; Blanis, D.; Bodek, A.; Kanda, S.; Kim, B.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kumita, T.; Li, Y.K.; Olsen, S.L.; Sill, A.; Ueno, K.; Velisarris, C.; Kajino, F.; Poling, R.; Thomas, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Bacala, A.; Kim, S.K.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Vinson, J.; Araki, E.; Kobayashi, S.; Murakami, A.; Yoshinaka, H.; Kang, J.S.; Lee, M.H.; Choi, S.K.; Son, D.; AMY Collaboration

    1992-02-27

    We present results of an experimental study of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}+hadrons in the kinematic regime for which the process is interpreted as hadron production in collisions of almost-real photons. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 27.5 pb{sup -1} and covers center-of-mass energies from 55 to 61.4 GeV. We observe more events than expected from the incoherent sum of quark-parton and vector-meson-dominance models, and we give a quantitative explanation of the excess by including the hard scattering of the hadronic constituents of the photons calculated with QCD. (orig.).

  20. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  1. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laulumaa Saara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  2. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, F.; Longo, M.; Orecchini, A.; Comez, L.; De Francesco, A.; Muthmann, M.; Teixeira, S. C. M.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Paciaroni, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG3(T2AG3)3 has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  3. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Longo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Elettra—Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); De Francesco, A. [CNR-IOM OGG c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Muthmann, M. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Teixeira, S. C. M. [EPSAM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Institut Laue–Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  4. Molecular-beam scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  5. Means on scattered compacta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banakh, T.; Bonnet, R.; Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2014), s. 5-10 ISSN 2299-3231 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0290 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : scattered compact space * mean operation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/taa.2014.2.issue-1/taa-2014-0002/taa-2014-0002. xml

  6. K sup + - scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Farhan, A M

    2002-01-01

    A prescription is given to construct an effective interaction that may describe the scattering of K sup + by spin-zero nuclei in a more reliable way. This prescription is based on the Lorentz invariant representation of the meson-nucleon amplitude and the use of the Klein-Gordon equation of motion. Good results for K sup + - sup 1 sup 2 C as well as K sup + - D total cross sections at various energies have been obtained. (author)

  7. Progress of Thomson scattering diagnostic on HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z.; Wang, Y. Q.; Hou, Z. P.; Ren, L. L.; Liu, C. H.; Luo, C. W.; Huang, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Some efforts have been made to promote the performance of incoherent Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic on HL-2A tokamak. Motorized stages are used to adjust the reflecting mirrors and focusing lens of the input laser beam optics, by which it is easy to control the laser beam pass through the narrow throats of the lower and upper closed divertors. Spectral calibration has been refined. Hardware of Si-APD detector electronics is improved, which provides two output signal channels. In one channel, only the rapid TS signal is output after deducting the influence of plasma light. In the other, both the rapid TS signal and the background signal of slow-varying plasma light are output. In this 2017 experiment campaign, the new developed electronics are tested and TS signals can be obtained from the two channels, which are digitized by 1GS-12bit transient recorders. In data processing, the TS pulse shape is fitted with different functions output from the two different channels. The statistical estimation of Te data is also optimized. More channels of high-speed digitizers and more positions of Te and ne measurement are planned and are in constructions.

  8. ISDN - The case for satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, J. N.; McDougal, P. J.

    1987-05-01

    The role of satellites in the proposed Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) is examined. ISDN is to be a unified global network providing international telecommunication services. The delay time connected with satellite communications is considered. The advantages of using satellites in ISDN are: (1) the digital services available with satellites (time-division multiple access, intermediate data rate, and Intelsat business services); (2) satellite networking features; (3) flexibility; and (4) global interconnectivity. It is noted that with the use of powerful transmitters on satellites, the growth of small earth stations, and developments in band switching and intersatellite links that satellites are applicable to ISDN.

  9. Visualization of Small-Diameter Vessels by Reduction of Incoherent Reverberation With Coherent Flow Power Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You Leo; Hyun, Dongwoon; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Willmann, Juergen Karl; Dahl, Jeremy J

    2016-11-01

    Power Doppler (PD) imaging is a widely used technique for flow detection. Despite the wide use of Doppler ultrasound, limitations exist in the ability of Doppler ultrasound to assess slow flow in the small-diameter vasculature, such as the maternal spiral arteries and fetal villous arteries of the placenta and focal liver lesions. The sensitivity of PD in small vessel detection is limited by the low signal produced by slow flow and the noise associated with small vessels. The noise sources include electronic noise, stationary or slowly moving tissue clutter, reverberation clutter, and off-axis scattering from tissue, among others. In order to provide more sensitive detection of slow flow in small diameter vessels, a coherent flow imaging technique, termed coherent flow PD (CFPD), is characterized and evaluated with simulation, flow phantom experiment studies, and an in vivo animal small vessel detection study. CFPD imaging was introduced as a technique to detect slow blood flow. It has been demonstrated to detect slow flow below the detection threshold of conventional PD imaging using identical pulse sequences and filter parameters. In this paper, we compare CFPD with PD in the detection of blood flow in small-diameter vessels. The results from the study suggest that CFPD is able to provide a 7.5-12.5-dB increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over PD images for the same physiological conditions and is less susceptible to reverberation clutter and thermal noise. Due to the increase in SNR, CFPD is able to detect small vessels in high channel noise cases, for which PD was unable to generate enough contrast to observe the vessel.

  10. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  11. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  12. Neutron Scattering of Residual Hydrogen in 1,4-Dioxane-D8 Liquid. Understanding Measurements with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Hongjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herwig, Kenneth W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kidder, Michelle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-25

    That incoherent scattering from protiated molecular liquids adds a constant background to the measured scattering intensity is well known, but less appreciated is the fact that coherent scattering is also induced by the presence of hydrogen in a deuterated liquid. In fact, the scattering intensity can be very sensitive, in the small-q region, with respect to the amounts and distribution of residual H in the system. We used 1,4-dioxane liquid to demonstrate that the partial structure factors of the HD and DD atom pairs contribute significantly to inter-molecular scattering and that uncertainty in the extent of deuteration account for discrepancies between simulations and measurements. Both contributions to uncertainty have similar magnitudes: scattering interference of the hydrogen-deuterium pair, and complementary interference from the deuterium-deuterium pair by virtue of chemical inhomogeneity. This situation arises in practice since deuteration of liquids is often 99% or less. A combined experimental and extensive computational study of static thermal neutron scattering of 1,4-dioxane demonstrates the foregoing. We show, through simulations, that the reason for the differences is the content of protiated dioxane (vendors quote 1%). We estimate that up to 5% (at 298K and at 343K) protiated mole fraction may be involved in generating the scattering differences. Finally, we find that the particular distribution of hydrogen in the protiated molecules affects the results significantly; here we considered molecules to be either fully protiated or fully deuterated. This scenario best reconciles the computational and experimental results, and leads us to speculate that the deuteration synthesis process tends to leave a molecule either fully deuterated or fully protiated. Although we have used 1,4-dioxane as a model liquid, the effects described in this study extend to similar liquids and similar systematic experimental/computational studies can be performed to either

  13. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  14. Role of incoherent pumping field on absorption-dispersion properties of probe pulse in a graphene nanostructure under external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Hamedi, H. R.; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of weak probe light based on quantum coherence and interference in Landau-quantized graphene nanostructure driven by two coherent fields and incoherent pumping field is investigated. The linear dynamical properties of the graphene by means of density matrix method and perturbation theory are discussed. It is found that under certain condition and for appropriate choosing the parameters of the medium, the absorption, dispersion, group index of the weak probe light can be controlled. Moreover, it is shown that by means of incoherent pumping field the superluminal light propagation in the system is accompanied by amplification to make sure that the probe field is amplified as it passes through the system. Moreover, it is observed that the probe amplification can be obtained in the presence or absence of population inversion by properly choosing of system's parameters. We hope that these results may have useful in the future quantum communicational system and networks.

  15. Stimulated Brillouin scattering during electron gyro-harmonic heating at EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Fu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations of secondary radiation, stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE, produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based, high-power, high-frequency (HF radio waves are considered. The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility is capable of generating narrowband SEE in the form of stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter (SIBS in the SEE spectrum. Such narrowband SEE spectral lines have not been reported using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT heater facility before. This work reports the first EISCAT results of narrowband SEE spectra and compares them to SEE previously observed at HAARP during electron gyro-harmonic heating. An analysis of experimental SEE data shows observations of emission lines within 100 Hz of the pump frequency, interpreted as SBS, during the 2012 July EISCAT campaign. Experimental results indicate that SBS strengthens as the pump frequency approaches the third electron gyro-harmonic. Also, for different heater antenna beam angles, the CUTLASS radar backscatter induced by HF radio pumping is suppressed near electron gyro-harmonics, whereas electron temperature enhancement weakens as measured by EISCAT/UHF radar. The main features of these new narrowband EISCAT observations are generally consistent with previous SBS measurements at HAARP.

  16. Beamstop-based low-background ptychography to image weakly scattering objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Juliane; Hoppe, Robert; Hofmann, Georg; Damsgaard, Christian D; Patommel, Jens; Baumbach, Christoph; Baier, Sina; Rochet, Amélie; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Falkenberg, Gerald; Schroer, Christian G

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, X-ray ptychography has been established as a valuable tool for high-resolution imaging. Nevertheless, the spatial resolution and sensitivity in coherent diffraction imaging are limited by the signal that is detected over noise and over background scattering. Especially, coherent imaging of weakly scattering specimens suffers from incoherent background that is generated by the interaction of the central beam with matter along its propagation path in particular close to and inside of the detector. Common countermeasures entail evacuated flight tubes or detector-side beamstops, which improve the experimental setup in terms of background reduction or better coverage of high dynamic range in the diffraction patterns. Here, we discuss an alternative approach: we combine two ptychographic scans with and without beamstop and reconstruct them simultaneously taking advantage of the complementary information contained in the two scans. We experimentally demonstrate the potential of this scheme for hard X-ray ptychography by imaging a weakly scattering object composed of catalytic nanoparticles and provide the analysis of the signal-to-background ratio in the diffraction patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of phonon-like excitation in hydrated protein powders by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang (Rosie); Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Kolesnikov, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Detecting the phonon dispersion relations in proteins is essential for understanding the intra-protein dynamical behavior. Such study has been attempted by X-ray in recent years. However, for such detections, neutrons have significant advantages in resolution and time-efficiency compare to X-rays. Traditionally the collective motions of atoms in protein molecules are hard to detect using neutrons, because of high incoherent scattering background from intrinsic hydrogen atoms in the protein molecules. The recent availability of a fully deuterated green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesized by the Bio-deuteration Lab at ORNL opens new possibilities to probe collective excitations in proteins using inelastic neutron scattering. Using a direct time-of-flight Fermi chopper neutron spectrometer, we obtained a full map of the meV phonon-like excitations in the fully deuterated protein. The Q range of the observed excitations corresponds to the length scale close to the size of the secondary structures of proteins and reflects the collective intra-protein motions. Our results show that hydration of GFP seems to harden, not soften, the collective motions. This result is counterintuitive but in agreement with the observations by previous neutron scattering experiments. Sample preparation was supported by facilities operated by the Center for Structural Molecular Biology at ORNL which is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Project ERKP291.

  18. Geostationary satellites collocation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hengnian

    2014-01-01

    Geostationary Satellites Collocation aims to find solutions for deploying a safe and reliable collocation control. Focusing on the orbital perturbation analysis, the mathematical foundations for orbit and control of the geostationary satellite are summarized. The mathematical and physical principle of orbital maneuver and collocation strategies for multi geostationary satellites sharing with the same dead band is also stressed. Moreover, the book presents some applications using the above algorithms and mathematical models to help readers master the corrective method for planning station keeping maneuvers. Engineers and scientists in the fields of aerospace technology and space science can benefit from this book. Hengnian Li is the Deputy Director of State Key Laboratory of Astronautic Dynamics, China.

  19. Solar Power Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Flournoy, Don M

    2012-01-01

    Communication satellites are a $144 billion industry. Is there any space-based industry that could possibly beat that market? 'Solar Power Satellites' shows why and how the space satellite industry will soon begin expanding its market from relaying signals to Earth to generating energy in space and delivering it to the ground as electricity. In all industrialized nations, energy demand is growing exponentially. In the developing world, the need for energy is as basic as food and water. The Sun's energy is available everywhere, and it is non-polluting. As business plans demonstrate its technical feasibility, commercial potential, and environmental acceptability, every country on Earth will look to space for the power it needs.

  20. Barrier distributions and scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, H.; Leigh, J.R.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Mein, J.C.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Austria); Rowley, N. [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, 23 Rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg CEDEX 2 (France); Stefanini, A.M.; Ackermann, D.; Corradi, L.; He, J.H. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F. [Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The extraction of representations of the fusion barrier distribution from backward-angle, quasi-elastic, elastic and transfer excitation functions is discussed. Such excitation functions have been measured for {sup 16}O, {sup 32}S and {sup 40}Ca projectiles incident on a variety of targets. The results are compared with representations obtained from fusion excitation functions. Varying in their sensitivity, all representations show evidence of the barrier structure. Differences between the scattering and the fusion representations can be related to the effects of coupling to residual, weak reaction channels. (author)

  1. Wave propagation scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, M Sh

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this collection were written primarily by members of the St. Petersburg seminar in mathematical physics. The seminar, now run by O. A. Ladyzhenskaya, was initiated in 1947 by V. I. Smirnov, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. The papers in the collection are devoted mainly to wave propagation processes, scattering theory, integrability of nonlinear equations, and related problems of spectral theory of differential and integral operators. The book is of interest to mathematicians working in mathematical physics and differential equations, as well as to physicists studying va

  2. Raman scattering in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Phase-coherence classification: A new wavelet-based method to separate local field potentials into local (in)coherent and volume-conducted components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Papen, M; Dafsari, H; Florin, E; Gerick, F; Timmermann, L; Saur, J

    2017-11-01

    Local field potentials (LFP) reflect the integrated electrophysiological activity of large neuron populations and may thus reflect the dynamics of spatially and functionally different networks. We introduce the wavelet-based phase-coherence classification (PCC), which separates LFP into volume-conducted, local incoherent and local coherent components. It allows to compute power spectral densities for each component associated with local or remote electrophysiological activity. We use synthetic time series to estimate optimal parameters for the application to LFP from within the subthalamic nucleus of eight Parkinson patients. With PCC we identify multiple local tremor clusters and quantify the relative power of local and volume-conducted components. We analyze the electrophysiological response to an apomorphine injection during rest and hold. Here we show medication-induced significant decrease of incoherent activity in the low beta band and increase of coherent activity in the high beta band. On medication significant movement-induced changes occur in the high beta band of the local coherent signal. It increases during isometric hold tasks and decreases during phasic wrist movement. The power spectra of local PCC components is compared to bipolar recordings. In contrast to bipolar recordings PCC can distinguish local incoherent and coherent signals. We further compare our results with classification based on the imaginary part of coherency and the weighted phase lag index. The low and high beta band are more susceptible to medication- and movement-related changes reflected by incoherent and local coherent activity, respectively. PCC components may thus reflect functionally different networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  5. X-ray resonant scattering study of the quadrupolar order in UPd3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMorrow, D.F.; McEwen, K.A.; Steigenberger, U.

    2001-01-01

    Quadrupolar ordering in a 5f electron system has been observed directly for the first time, using x-ray scattering techniques. In UPd(3) at low temperatures satellite peaks appear at (1, 0, l) (orthorhombic notation) with I odd and even. Both sets of peaks show a resonant enhancement...... of the scattering at the M(IV) edge of U. At resonance, the dominant scattering of the 1 odd peaks occurs in the unrotated polarization channel, whereas for I even a significant rotated component is found. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the antiferroquadrupolar phases....

  6. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging of breast cancer: association with histopathological features and subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunju; Ko, Kyounglan; Kim, Daehong; Min, Changki; Kim, Sungheon G; Joo, Jungnam; Park, Boram

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the associations between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-derived parameters and histopathological features and subtypes of breast cancer. Pre-operative MRI from 275 patients with unilateral breast cancer was analyzed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and IVIM parameters [tissue diffusion coefficient (Dt), perfusion fraction (fp) and pseudodiffusion coefficient] were obtained from cancer and normal tissue using diffusion-weighted imaging with b-values of 0, 30, 70, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 800 s mm(-2). We then compared the IVIM parameters of tumours with different histopathological features and subtypes. The ADC and Dt were lower and fp was higher in cancers than in normal tissues (p cancer than in low Ki-67 cancer (p = 0.019), whereas ADC showed no significant difference (p = 0.309). Luminal B [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative] cancer showed lower ADC (p = 0.003) and Dt (p = 0.001) than other types. We found low tissue diffusivity in high Ki-67 cancer and luminal B (HER2-negative) cancer using IVIM imaging. Low tissue diffusivity is more clearly shown in high Ki-67 tumours and luminal B (HER2-negative) tumours with the IVIM model.

  7. The intravoxel incoherent motion MRI of lateral pterygoid muscle: a quantitative analysis in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamsom, Supak; Nakamura, Shin; Sakamoto, Junichiro; Kotaki, Shinya; Tetsumura, Akemi; Kurabayashi, Tohru

    2017-07-01

    To quantitatively evaluate diffusion and perfusion status of lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging and to correlate with findings on temporomandibular joints (TMJs) by conventional MRI. 42 patients with TMD underwent MRI. To assess IVIM parameters, diffusion-weighted imaging was obtained by spin-echo-based single-shot echoplanar imaging. Regions of interest were created on all diffusion-weighted images of the superior belly of the lateral pterygoid (SLP) and inferior belly of the lateral pterygoid (ILP) at b-values 0-500 s mm-2. Then, IVIM parameters, diffusion (D) and perfusion (f) were calculated using biexponential fittings. The correlation of these values with conventional MRI findings on TMJs was investigated. For SLP, the f parameter in TMJs with anterior disc displacement without reduction was significantly higher than that in normal ones (p = 0.015). It was also significantly higher in TMJs with joint effusion than in those without (p = 0.016). On the other hand, for both SLP and ILP, the D parameter significantly increased in TMJs with osteoarthritis compared with those without (p = 0.015 and p = 0.022, respectively). Pathological changes of LPM in patients with TMD may be quantitatively evaluated by IVIM parameters.

  8. Assessing hepatic fibrosis: comparing the intravoxel incoherent motion in MRI with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chih-Horng; Liang, Po-Chin; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Ho, Ming-Chih; Hu, Rey-Heng; Lai, Hong-Shiee [National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Jeng, Yung-Ming [National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Taipei (China)

    2015-12-15

    This study compared the diagnostic performance of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) in ultrasound (US) for liver fibrosis (LF) evaluation. A total of 49 patients scheduled for liver surgery were recruited. LF in the non-tumorous liver parenchyma at the right lobe was estimated using a slow diffusion coefficient, fast diffusion coefficient (D{sub fast}), perfusion fraction (f) of the IVIM parameters, the total apparent diffusion coefficient of conventional diffusion-weighted imaging and the shear wave velocity (Vs) of ARFI. LF was graded using the Metavir scoring system on histological examination. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient for correlation and analysis of variance was used for determining difference. The diagnostic performance was compared using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. LF exhibited significant correlation with the three parameters D{sub fast}, f, and Vs (r = -0.528, -0.337, and 0.481, respectively, P < 0.05). The D{sub fast} values in the F4 group were significantly lower than those in the F0, F1 and F2 groups. D{sub fast} exhibited a non-inferior performance for diagnosing all fibrosis grades compared with that of Vs. Both IVIM and ARFI provide reliable estimations for the noninvasive assessment of LF. (orig.)

  9. The cost of sensitive response and accurate adaptation in networks with an incoherent type-1 feed-forward loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ganhui; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-10-06

    The incoherent type-1 feed-forward loop (I1-FFL) is ubiquitous in biological regulatory circuits. Although much is known about the functions of the I1-FFL motif, the energy cost incurred in the network and how it affects the performance of the network have not been investigated. Here, we study a generic I1-FFL enzymatic reaction network modelled after the GEF-GAP-Ras pathway responsible for chemosensory adaptation in eukaryotic cells. Our analysis shows that the I1-FFL network always operates out of equilibrium. Continuous energy dissipation is necessary to drive an internal phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle that is crucial in achieving strong short-time response and accurate long-time adaptation. In particular, we show quantitatively that the energy dissipated in the I1-FFL network is used (i) to increase the system's initial response to the input signals; (ii) to enhance the adaptation accuracy at steady state; and (iii) to expand the range of such accurate adaptation. Moreover, we find that the energy dissipation rate, the catalytic speed and the maximum adaptation accuracy in the I1-FFL network satisfy the same energy-speed-accuracy relationship as in the negative-feedback-loop (NFL) networks. Because the I1-FFL and NFL are the only two basic network motifs that enable accurate adaptation, our results suggest that a universal cost-performance trade-off principle may underlie all cellular adaptation processes independent of the detailed biochemical circuit architecture.

  10. A Unified approach for nucleon knock-out, coherent and incoherent pion production in neutrino interactions with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, M.; Chanfray, G.; Marteau, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a theory of neutrino interactions with nuclei aimed at the description of the partial cross-sections, namely quasi-elastic and multi-nucleon emission, coherent and incoherent single pion production. For this purpose, we use the theory of nuclear responses treated in the random phase approximation, which allows a unified description of these channels. It is particularly suited for the coherent pion production where collective effects are important whereas they are moderate in the other channels. We also study the evolution of the neutrino cross-sections with the mass number from carbon to calcium. We compare our approach to the available neutrino experimental data on carbon. We put a particular emphasis on the multi-nucleon channel, which at present is not easily distinguishable from the quasi-elastic events. This component turns out to be quite relevant for the interpretation of experiments (K2K, MiniBooNE, SciBooNE). It can account in particular for the unexpected behavior of the quasi-elastic cro...

  11. A comparative simulation study of bayesian fitting approaches to intravoxel incoherent motion modeling in diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    While, Peter T

    2017-12-01

    To assess the performance of various least squares and Bayesian modeling approaches to parameter estimation in intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modeling of diffusion-weighted MRI data. Simulated tissue models of different type (breast/liver) and morphology (discrete/continuous) were used to generate noisy data according to the IVIM model at several signal-to-noise ratios. IVIM parameter maps were generated using six different approaches, including full nonlinear least squares (LSQ), segmented least squares (SEG), Bayesian modeling with a Gaussian shrinkage prior (BSP) and Bayesian modeling with a spatial homogeneity prior (FBM), plus two modified approaches. Estimators were compared by calculating the median absolute percentage error and deviation, and median percentage bias. The Bayesian modeling approaches consistently outperformed the least squares approaches, with lower relative error and deviation, and provided cleaner parameter maps with reduced erroneous heterogeneity. However, a weakness of the Bayesian approaches was exposed, whereby certain tissue features disappeared completely in regions of high parameter uncertainty. Lower error and deviation were generally afforded by FBM compared with BSP, at the cost of higher bias. Bayesian modeling is capable of producing more visually pleasing IVIM parameter maps than least squares approaches, but their potential to mask certain tissue features demands caution during implementation. Magn Reson Med 78:2373-2387, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. A comparison of fitting algorithms for diffusion-weighted MRI data analysis using an intravoxel incoherent motion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Petrillo, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a modified VARiable PROjection (VARPRO) algorithm specifically tailored for fitting the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data from locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The proposed algorithm is compared with classical non-linear least squares (NLLS) analysis using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm and with two recently proposed algorithms for 'segmented' analysis. These latter two comprise two consecutive steps: first, a subset of parameters is estimated using a portion of data; second, the remaining parameters are estimated using the whole data and the previous estimates. The comparison between the algorithms was based on the [Formula: see text] goodness-of-fit measure: performance analysis was carried out on real data obtained by DW-MRI on 40 LARC patients. The performance of the proposed algorithm was higher than that of LM in 64 % of cases; 'segmented' methods were poorer than our algorithm in 100 % of cases. The proposed modified VARPRO algorithm can lead to better fit of the IVIM model to LARC DW-MRI data compared to other techniques.

  13. Integrated fiber optic incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy detector for near-IR absorption measurements of nanoliter samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Anthony L; Renzi, Ronald F; Fruetel, Julia A; Bambha, Ray P

    2012-05-10

    An integrated fiber-optic sensor is described that uses incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for sensitive detection of aqueous samples in nanoliter volumes. Absorption was measured in a 100 µm gap between the ends of two short segments of multimode graded-index fiber that were integrated into a capillary using a precision machined V-grooved fixture that allowed for passive fiber alignment. The other ends of the fibers were coated with dielectric mirrors to form a 9.5 cm optical resonator. Light from a fiber-coupled superluminescent diode was directly coupled into one end of the cavity, and transmission was measured using a fiber-coupled silicon photodiode. Dilute aqueous solutions of near infrared dye were used to determine the minimum detectable absorption change of 2.4×10(-4) under experimental conditions in which pressure fluctuations limited performance. We also determined that the absolute minimum detectable absorption change would be 1.6×10(-5) for conditions of constant pressure in which absorption measurement is limited by electronic and optical noise. Tolerance requirements for alignment are also presented.

  14. An ESPRIT-Based Approach for 2-D Localization of Incoherently Distributed Sources in Massive MIMO Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anzhong; Lv, Tiejun; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Shaoshi

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, an approach of estimating signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT) is proposed for two-dimensional (2-D) localization of incoherently distributed (ID) sources in large-scale/massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. The traditional ESPRIT-based methods are valid only for one-dimensional (1-D) localization of the ID sources. By contrast, in the proposed approach the signal subspace is constructed for estimating the nominal azimuth and elevation direction-of-arrivals and the angular spreads. The proposed estimator enjoys closed-form expressions and hence it bypasses the searching over the entire feasible field. Therefore, it imposes significantly lower computational complexity than the conventional 2-D estimation approaches. Our analysis shows that the estimation performance of the proposed approach improves when the large-scale/massive MIMO systems are employed. The approximate Cram\\'{e}r-Rao bound of the proposed estimator for the 2-D localization is also derived. Numerical results demonstrate that albeit the proposed estimation method is comparable with the traditional 2-D estimators in terms of performance, it benefits from a remarkably lower computational complexity.

  15. The histogram analysis of diffusion-weighted intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging for differentiating the gleason grade of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Wang, Qing; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin [First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Liu, Hui [Siemens Healthcare, MR Collaborations NE Asia, Shanghai (China)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate histogram analysis of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for discriminating the Gleason grade of prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 48 patients pathologically confirmed as having clinically significant PCa (size > 0.5 cm) underwent preoperative DW-MRI (b of 0-900 s/mm{sup 2}). Data was post-processed by monoexponential and IVIM model for quantitation of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs), perfusion fraction f, diffusivity D and pseudo-diffusivity D*. Histogram analysis was performed by outlining entire-tumour regions of interest (ROIs) from histological-radiological correlation. The ability of imaging indices to differentiate low-grade (LG, Gleason score (GS) ≤6) from intermediate/high-grade (HG, GS > 6) PCa was analysed by ROC regression. Eleven patients had LG tumours (18 foci) and 37 patients had HG tumours (42 foci) on pathology examination. HG tumours had significantly lower ADCs and D in terms of mean, median, 10th and 75th percentiles, combined with higher histogram kurtosis and skewness for ADCs, D and f, than LG PCa (p < 0.05). Histogram D showed relatively higher correlations (n = 0.641-0.668 vs. ADCs: 0.544-0.574) with ordinal GS of PCa; and its mean, median and 10th percentile performed better than ADCs did in distinguishing LG from HG PCa. It is feasible to stratify the pathological grade of PCa by IVIM with histogram metrics. D performed better in distinguishing LG from HG tumour than conventional ADCs. (orig.)

  16. Interferenceless coded aperture correlation holography-a new technique for recording incoherent digital holograms without two-wave interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, A; Rosen, Joseph

    2017-06-12

    Recording digital holograms without wave interference simplifies the optical systems, increases their power efficiency and avoids complicated aligning procedures. We propose and demonstrate a new technique of digital hologram acquisition without two-wave interference. Incoherent light emitted from an object propagates through a random-like coded phase mask and recorded directly without interference by a digital camera. In the training stage of the system, a point spread hologram (PSH) is first recorded by modulating the light diffracted from a point object by the coded phase masks. At least two different masks should be used to record two different intensity distributions at all possible axial locations. The various recorded patterns at every axial location are superposed in the computer to obtain a complex valued PSH library cataloged to its axial location. Following the training stage, an object is placed within the axial boundaries of the PSH library and the light diffracted from the object is once again modulated by the same phase masks. The intensity patterns are recorded and superposed exactly as the PSH to yield a complex hologram of the object. The object information at any particular plane is reconstructed by a cross-correlation between the complex valued hologram and the appropriate element of the PSH library. The characteristics and the performance of the proposed system were compared with an equivalent regular imaging system.

  17. Class of variational Ansätze for the spin-incoherent ground state of a Luttinger liquid coupled to a spin bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanieh-ha, Mohammad; Feiguin, Adrian E.

    2012-11-01

    Interacting one-dimensional electron systems are generally referred to as “Luttinger liquids,” after the effective low-energy theory in which spin and charge behave as separate degrees of freedom with independent energy scales. The “spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid” describes a finite-temperature regime that is realized when the temperature is very small relative to the Fermi energy, but larger than the characteristic spin energy scale. Similar physics can take place in the ground state, when a Luttinger liquid is coupled to a spin bath, which effectively introduces a “spin temperature” through its entanglement with the spin degree of freedom. We show that the spin-incoherent state can be written as a factorized wave function, with a spin wave function that can be described within a valence bond formalism. This enables us to calculate exact expressions for the momentum distribution function and the entanglement entropy. This picture holds not only for two antiferromagnetically coupled t-J chains, but also for the t-J-Kondo chain with strongly interacting conduction electrons. We argue that this theory is quite universal and may describe a family of problems that could be dubbed “spin incoherent.”

  18. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  19. Interrelating meteorite and asteroid spectra at UV-Vis-NIR wavelengths using novel multiple-scattering methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Julia; Penttilä, Antti; Gritsevich, Maria; Muinonen, Karri

    2017-10-01

    Asteroids have remained mostly the same for the past 4.5 billion years, and provide us information on the origin, evolution and current state of the Solar System. Asteroids and meteorites can be linked by matching their respective reflectance spectra. This is difficult, because spectral features depend strongly on the surface properties, and meteorite surfaces are free of regolith dust present in asteroids. Furthermore, asteroid surfaces experience space weathering which affects their spectral features.We present a novel simulation framework for assessing the spectral properties of meteorites and asteroids and matching their reflectance spectra. The simulations are carried out by utilizing a light-scattering code that takes inhomogeneous waves into account and simulates light scattering by Gaussian-random-sphere particles large compared to the wavelength of the incident light. The code uses incoherent input and computes phase matrices by utilizing incoherent scattering matrices. Reflectance spectra are modeled by combining olivine, pyroxene, and iron, the most common materials that dominate the spectral features of asteroids and meteorites. Space weathering is taken into account by adding nanoiron into the modeled asteroid spectrum. The complex refractive indices needed for the simulations are obtained from existing databases, or derived using an optimization that utilizes our ray-optics code and the measured spectrum of the material.We demonstrate our approach by applying it to the reflectance spectrum of (4) Vesta and the reflectance spectrum of the Johnstown meteorite measured with the University of Helsinki integrating-sphere UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer.Acknowledgments. The research is funded by the ERC Advanced Grant No. 320773 (SAEMPL).

  20. Rotation of Synchronous Satellites: Application to the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Jacques; Schwanen, Gabriel

    2004-03-01

    An analytical theory of the rotation of a synchronous satellite is developed for the application to the rotation of the Galilean satellites. The theory is developed in the framework of Hamiltonian mechanics, using Andoyer variables. Special attention is given to the frequencies of libration as functions of the moments of inertia of the satellite.

  1. Electromagnetic Scattering and Material Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Omar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Based on the author's more-than 30 years of experience, this first-of-its-kind volume presents a comprehensive and systematic analysis of electromagnetic fields and their scattering by material objects. The book considers all three categories of scattering environments commonly used for material measurements – unbounded regions, waveguides, and cavity resonators. The book covers such essential topics as electromagnetic field propagation, radiation, and scattering, containing mathematically rigorous approaches for the computation of electromagnetic fields and the explanation of their behavior.

  2. Cibola flight experiment satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P.; Liddle, Doug; Paffett, John; Sweeting, Martin; Curiel, A.; Sun, Wei; Eves, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    In order to achieve an "economy of scale" with respect to payload capacity the major trend in telecommunications satellites is for larger and larger platforms. With these large platforms the level of integration between platform and payload is increasing leading to longer delivery schedules. The typical lifecycle for procurement of these large telecommunications satellites is now 3-6 years depending on the level of non-recurring engineering needed. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has designed a low-cost platform aimed at telecommunications and navigation applications. SSTL's Geostationary Minisatellite Platform (GMP) is a new entrant addressing the lower end of the market with payloads up to 250kg requiring less than 1.5 kW power. The British National Space Centre through the MOSAIC Small Satellite Initiative supported the development of GMP. The main design goals for GMP are low-cost for the complete mission including launch and operations and a platform allowing flexible payload accommodation. GMP is specifically designed to allow rapid development and deployment with schedules typically between 1 and 2 years from contract signature to flight readiness. GMP achieves these aims by a modular design where the level of integration between the platform and payload is low. The modular design decomposes the satellite into three major components - the propulsion bay, the avionics bay and the payload module. Both the propulsion and avionics bays are reusable, largely unchanged, and independent of the payload configuration. Such a design means that SSTL or a 3rd party manufacturer can manufacture the payload in parallel to the platform with integration taking place quite late in the schedule. In July 2003 SSTL signed a contract for ESA's first Galileo navigation satellite known as GSTBV2/A. The satellite is based on GMP and ESA plan to launch it into a MEO orbit late in 2005. The second flight of GMP is likely to be in 2006 carrying a geostationary payload

  3. Advances in total scattering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proffen, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Hyunjeong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of the total scattering pattern has become an invaluable tool to study disordered crystalline and nanocrystalline materials. Traditional crystallographic structure determination is based on Bragg intensities and yields the long range average atomic structure. By including diffuse scattering into the analysis, the local and medium range atomic structure can be unravelled. Here we give an overview of recent experimental advances, using X-rays as well as neutron scattering as well as current trends in modelling of total scattering data.

  4. Light scattering by small particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hulst, H C van de

    1981-01-01

    ""A must for researchers using the techniques of light scattering."" ? S. C. Snowdon, Journal of the Franklin InstituteThe measurement of light scattering of independent, homogeneous particles has many useful applications in physical chemistry, meteorology and astronomy. There is, however, a sizeable gap between the abstract formulae related to electromagnetic-wave-scattering phenomena, and the computation of reliable figures and curves. Dr. van de Hulst's book enables researchers to bridge that gap. The product of twelve years of work, it is an exhaustive study of light-scattering properties

  5. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  6. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites collect visible and infrared cloud imagery as well as monitoring the atmospheric, oceanographic,...

  7. Satellite Ocean Heat Content Suite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains an operational Satellite Ocean Heat Content Suite (SOHCS) product generated by NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information...

  8. CDDIS_GNSS_satellite_data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data consists of the U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS)...

  9. Satellite transmission of oceanographic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.; Desai, R.G.P.; DeSa, E.J.

    Oceanographic data collected on a research vessel has been transmitted to a shore laboratory using the INMARSAT maritime satellite The system configuration used, consisted of Satellite Communication Terminals interfaced to desk top computers...

  10. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  11. Elliptic scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona, Carlos [Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University,Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China); Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade de São Paulo,Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Santiago de Cali,Calle 5 62-00 Barrio Pampalinda, Cali, Valle (Colombia)

    2016-06-16

    Recently the CHY approach has been extended to one loop level using elliptic functions and modular forms over a Jacobian variety. Due to the difficulty in manipulating these kind of functions, we propose an alternative prescription that is totally algebraic. This new proposal is based on an elliptic algebraic curve embedded in a ℂP{sup 2} space. We show that for the simplest integrand, namely the n−gon, our proposal indeed reproduces the expected result. By using the recently formulated Λ−algorithm, we found a novel recurrence relation expansion in terms of tree level off-shell amplitudes. Our results connect nicely with recent results on the one-loop formulation of the scattering equations. In addition, this new proposal can be easily stretched out to hyperelliptic curves in order to compute higher genus.

  12. Perfusion and diffusion characteristics of cervical cancer based on intravoxel incoherent motion MR imaging-a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Elaine Yuen Phin; Yu, Xue; Khong, Pek-Lan [The University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Mandy Man Yee; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung [The University of Hong Kong, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Siu, Steven Wai Kwan [Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Hong Kong (China); Soong, Inda Sung [Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-07-15

    To investigate the tissue characteristics of cervical cancer based on the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model and to assess the IVIM parameters in tissue differentiation in the female pelvis. Sixteen treatment-naive cervical cancer and 17 age-matched healthy subjects were prospectively recruited for diffusion-weighted (b = 0-1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) and standard pelvic MRI. Bi-exponential analysis was performed to derive the perfusion parameters f (perfusion fraction) and D* (pseudodiffusion coefficient) as well as the diffusion parameter D (true molecular diffusion coefficient) in cervical cancer (n = 16), normal cervix (n = 17), myometrium (n = 33) and leiomyoma (n = 14). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated. Kruskal-Wallis test and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used. Cervical cancer had the lowest f (14.9 ± 2.6 %) and was significantly different from normal cervix and leiomyoma (p < 0.05). The D (0.86 ± 0.16 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s) was lowest in cervical cancer and was significantly different from normal cervix and myometrium (p < 0.05) but not leiomyoma. No difference was observed in D*. D was consistently lower than ADC in all tissues. ROC curves indicated that f < 16.38 %, D < 1.04 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and ADC < 1.13 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s could differentiate cervical cancer from non-malignant tissues (AUC 0.773-0.908). Cervical cancer has low perfusion and diffusion IVIM characteristics with promising potential for tissue differentiation. (orig.)

  13. Measuring Cerebral Hypoperfusion Induced by Hyperventilation Challenge With Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavilla, Aude; Arrigo, Alessandro; Mejdoubi, Mehdi; Duvauferrier, Régis; Gambarota, Giulio; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility to assess cerebral hypoperfusion with a hyperventilation (HV) challenge protocol using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed on 10 healthy volunteers at 1.5 T, with a diffusion IVIM magnetic resonance imaging protocol using a set of b-values optimized by Cramer-Rao Lower Bound analysis. Hypoperfusion was induced by an HV maneuver. Measurements were performed in normoventilation and HV conditions. Biexponential curve fitting was used to obtain the perfusion fraction (f), pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*), and the product fD* in gray matter (GM) regions of interest (ROIs). Regional cerebral blood flow in the same ROIs was also assessed with arterial spin labeling. The HV challenge led to a diminution of IVIM perfusion-related parameters, with a decrease of f and fD* in the cerebellum (P = 0.03 for f; P = 0.01 for fD*), thalamus GM (P = 0.09 for f; P = 0.01 for fD*), and lenticular nuclei (P = 0.03 for f; P = 0.02 for fD*). Mean GM cerebral blood flow (in mL/100 g tissue/min) measured with arterial spin labeling averaged over all ROIs also decreased (normoventilation: 42.7 ± 4.1 vs HV: 33.2 ± 2.2, P = 0.004) during the HV challenge. The optimized IVIM protocol proposed in the current study allows for measurements of cerebral hypoperfusion that might be of great interest for pathologies diagnosis such as ischemic stroke.

  14. Intravoxel incoherent motion MRI as a biomarker of sorafenib treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, Natsuhiko; Saito, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Takara, Kenichi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2016-01-29

    To evaluate the association between the therapeutic outcomes of sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM). Nine patients were evaluated prospectively. All patients were Child-Pugh score A. The mean dimension of the lesion was 32 mm (range: 15-74 mm). MR images were obtained using a 1.5-Tesla superconductive MRI system. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed under breath-holding using b-values of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 400, and 800 s/mm(2). The following IVIM parameters were calculated: apparent diffusion coefficient, true diffusion coefficient (DC), pseudo-diffusion coefficient, and perfusion fraction. MRI was performed before treatment and at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after beginning treatment. Tumor response at 4 weeks was assessed by CT or MRI using modified RECIST. IVIM parameters of the treatment responders and non-responders were compared. The DC of responders at baseline was significantly higher than that of the non-responders. The sensitivity and specificity, when a DC of 0.8 (10(-3) mm(2)/s) or higher was considered to be a responder, were 100 % and 67 %, respectively. No significant differences were found in the other parameters between the responders and the non-responders. All IVIM parameters of the responders and non-responders did not change significantly after treatment. The DC before treatment may be a useful parameter for predicting the therapeutic outcome of sorafenib for advanced HCC.

  15. Compact, Light-weight and Cost-effective Microscope based on Lensless Incoherent Holography for Telemedicine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudanyali, Onur; Tseng, Derek; Oh, Chulwoo; Isikman, Serhan O.; Sencan, Ikbal; Bishara, Waheb; Oztoprak, Cetin; Seo, Sungkyu; Khademhosseini, Bahar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the rapid progress in optical imaging, most of the advanced microscopy modalities still require complex and costly set-ups that unfortunately limit their use beyond well equipped laboratories. In the meantime, microscopy in resource-limited settings has requirements significantly different from those encountered in advanced laboratories, and such imaging devices should be cost-effective, compact, light-weight and appropriately accurate and simple to be usable by minimally trained personnel. Furthermore, these portable microscopes should ideally be digitally integrated as part of a telemedicine network that connects various mobile health-care providers to a central laboratory or hospital. Toward this end, here we demonstrate a lensless on-chip microscope weighing ~46 grams with dimensions smaller than 4.2cm × 4.2cm × 5.8cm that achieves sub-cellular resolution over a large field of view of ~24 mm2. This compact and light-weight microscope is based on digital in-line holography and does not need any lenses, bulky optical/mechanical components or coherent sources such as lasers. Instead, it utilizes a simple light-emitting-diode (LED) and a compact opto-electronic sensor-array to record lensless holograms of the objects, which then permits rapid digital reconstruction of regular transmission or differential interference contrast (DIC) images of the objects. Because this lensless incoherent holographic microscope has orders-of-magnitude improved light collection efficiency and is very robust to mechanical misalignments it may offer a cost-effective tool especially for telemedicine applications involving various global health problems in resource limited settings. PMID:20401422

  16. Histological Grading of Hepatocellular Carcinomas with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-weighted Imaging: Inconsistent Results Depending on the Fitting Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Shintaro; Motosugi, Utaroh; Hernando, Diego; Morisaka, Hiroyuki; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Masanori; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2017-08-16

    To compare the abilities of three intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging approximation methods to discriminate the histological grade of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Fifty-eight patients (60 HCCs) underwent IVIM imaging with 11 b-values (0-1000 s/mm2). Slow (D) and fast diffusion coefficients (D*) and the perfusion fraction (f) were calculated for the HCCs using the mean signal intensities in regions of interest drawn by two radiologists. Three approximation methods were used. First, all three parameters were obtained simultaneously using non-linear fitting (method A). Second, D was obtained using linear fitting (b = 500 and 1000), followed by non-linear fitting for D* and f (method B). Third, D was obtained by linear fitting, f was obtained using the regression line intersection and signals at b = 0, and non-linear fitting was used for D* (method C). A receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to reveal the abilities of these methods to distinguish poorly-differentiated from well-to-moderately-differentiated HCCs. Inter-reader agreements were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The measurements of D, D*, and f in methods B and C (Az-value, 0.658-0.881) had better discrimination abilities than did those in method A (Az-value, 0.527-0.607). The ICCs of D and f were good to excellent (0.639-0.835) with all methods. The ICCs of D* were moderate with methods B (0.580) and C (0.463) and good with method A (0.705). The IVIM parameters may vary depending on the fitting methods, and therefore, further technical refinement may be needed.

  17. Dynamic measurement of forward scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rusch, W.

    1975-01-01

    A dynamic method for the measurement of forward scattering in a radio anechoic chamber is described. The quantity determined is the induced-field-ratio (IFR) of conducting cylinders. The determination of the IFR is highly sensitive to 1) multiple scattering between the cylinder and the obpring...

  18. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    2009-01-01

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including V(x):=−γ|x|−μ with 0quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using appropriate modifiers of the Isozaki–Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the whole continuous spectrum...

  19. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including with , we study the quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using modifiers of the Isozaki--Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the {\\it whole} continuous spectrum of the Hamiltonian...

  20. Light scattering in ophthalmic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    1994-06-01

    In the overview optical models of cornea, sclera, and crystalline lens humor will be presented. On the basis of these models eye tissue transmittance spectra and scattering indicatrices for the main informative elements of the mueller matrix will be analyzed. This paper will discuss some problems of eye tissue optical characteristics control, and possibilities and perspectives of elastic scattering spectroscopy in cataract diagnostics.

  1. Quantum scattering in one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlette, Vania E. [Centro Universitario Franciscano, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Leite, Marcelo M. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Adhikari, Sadhan K. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-09-01

    A self-contained discussion of non-relativistic quantum scattering is presented in the case of central potentials in one space dimension, which will facilitate the understanding of the more complex scattering theory in two and three dimensions. The present discussion illustrates in a simple way the concepts of partial-wave decomposition, phase shift, optical theorem and effective-range expansion. (author)

  2. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... determine the charge density distributions of short-lived exotic nuclei by elastic electron scattering. The first collision ... Electron scattering of highly unstable nuclei is not easy because it is difficult to produce ... both ends form a mirror potential to keep the ions longitudinally inside the SCRIT device, and the ...

  3. Light scattering by soap films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrij, A.

    A theory is constructed describing the scattering from a liquid film (e.g., a soap film) of a light beam polarized normal to the plane of incidence. This scattering is due to the small irregular corrugations caused by thermal motion. The interference of the reflected incident beam with its multiple

  4. Surface scattering from ceramic phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Peters, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Scattering from phosphor converters and epitaxial surfaces is critical for solid state lighting device performance. Volume and surface scattering in solid state lighting devices can play a critical role in efficiency/efficacy, color points, and color angular consistency. Surface scattering in particular has not been well characterized in solid state lighting devices and can be complex to model. Because large angle scattering is important in lighting applications, surface scattering models generally require vector electromagnetic theory to avoid ambiguities often associated with scalar theory at these angles. Furthermore, surface features are often on the order of a few wavelengths, bringing ray tracing approaches into question. In this work, experimental angular scattering measurements are made on ceramic phosphor components where surface scattering dominates. The surface ceramic grain structure is responsible for the scattering. The results are compared to approximate statistical vector theory predictions that use the height autocorrelation functions as input. The autocorrelation measurements were derived from atomic-force microscopy topography measurements. Resulting predictions are in fairly good agreement with measurements.

  5. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  6. Expert systems for satellite stationkeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaru, M. M.; Wright, M. A.

    The feasibility of implementing artificial intelligence on satellites is evaluated, with the aim of using an onboard expert system to perform effective stationkeeping functions without assistance from the ground. The Defense Satellite Communication System (DSCS III) is used as an example. The cost for implementing a satellite stationkeeping expert system is analyzed. A ground-based expert system could reduce the current number of support personnel for the stationkeeping task. Results of analyzing a possible flight system are quite promising. An expert system for satellite stationkeeping seems feasible, appears cost-effective, and offers increased satellite endurance through autonomous operations.

  7. Thematic mapping from satellite imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Denègre, J

    2013-01-01

    Thematic Mapping from Satellite Imagery: A Guidebook discusses methods in producing maps using satellite images. The book is comprised of five chapters; each chapter covers one stage of the process. Chapter 1 tackles the satellite remote sensing imaging and its cartographic significance. Chapter 2 discusses the production processes for extracting information from satellite data. The next chapter covers the methods for combining satellite-derived information with that obtained from conventional sources. Chapter 4 deals with design and semiology for cartographic representation, and Chapter 5 pre

  8. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  9. Direct observation of electronic and nuclear ground state splitting in external magnetic field by inelastic neutron scattering on oxidized ferrocene and ferrocene containing polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Elbert, Johannes; Gallei, Markus; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical splitting of states by interaction of a magnetic moment with an external magnetic field is well known, e.g., as Zeeman effect in optical transitions, and is also often seen in magnetic neutron scattering. We report excitations observed in inelastic neutron spectroscopy on the redox-responsive polymer poly(vinylferrocene). They are interpreted as splitting of the electronic ground state in the organometallic ferrocene units attached to the polymer chain where a magnetic moment is created by oxidation. In a second experiment using high resolution neutron backscattering spectroscopy we observe the hyperfine splitting, i.e., interaction of nuclear magnetic moments with external magnetic fields leading to sub-μeV excitations observable in incoherent neutron spin-flip scattering on hydrogen and vanadium nuclei.

  10. Direct observation of electronic and nuclear ground state splitting in external magnetic field by inelastic neutron scattering on oxidized ferrocene and ferrocene containing polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appel Markus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical splitting of states by interaction of a magnetic moment with an external magnetic field is well known, e.g., as Zeeman effect in optical transitions, and is also often seen in magnetic neutron scattering. We report excitations observed in inelastic neutron spectroscopy on the redox-responsive polymer poly(vinylferrocene. They are interpreted as splitting of the electronic ground state in the organometallic ferrocene units attached to the polymer chain where a magnetic moment is created by oxidation. In a second experiment using high resolution neutron backscattering spectroscopy we observe the hyperfine splitting, i.e., interaction of nuclear magnetic moments with external magnetic fields leading to sub-μeV excitations observable in incoherent neutron spin-flip scattering on hydrogen and vanadium nuclei.

  11. ASPEC: Solar power satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The solar power satellite (SPS) will provide a clean, reliable source of energy for large-scale consumption. The system will use satellites in geostationary orbits around the Earth to capture the Sun's energy. The intercepted sunlight will be converted to laser beam energy that can be transmitted to the Earth's surface. Ground systems on the Earth will convert the transmissions from space into electric power. The preliminary design for the SPS consists of one satellite in orbit around the Earth transmitting energy to a single ground station. The SPS design uses multilayer solar cell technology arranged on a 20 km squared planar array to intercept sunlight and convert it to an electric voltage. Power conditioning devices then send the electricity to a laser, which transmits the power to the surface of the Earth. A ground station will convert the beam into electricity. Typically, a single SPS will supply 5 GW of power to the ground station. Due to the large mass of the SPS, about 41 million kg, construction in space is needed in order to keep the structural mass low. The orbit configuration for this design is to operate a single satellite in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The GEO allows the system to be positioned above a single receiving station and remain in sunlight 99 percent of the time. Construction will take place in low Earth orbit (LEO); array sections, 20 in total, will be sailed on solar wind out to the GEO location in 150 days. These individual transportation sections are referred to as solar sailing array panels (SSAP's). The primary truss elements used to support the array are composed of composite tubular members in a pentahedral arrangement. Smart segments consisting of passive and active damping devices will increase the control of dynamic SPS modes.

  12. Laser satellite power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  13. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1990-10-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  14. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  15. BeiDou satellite's differential code biases estimation based on uncombined precise point positioning with triple-frequency observable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Li, Min; Wang, Cheng; Shi, Chuang

    2017-02-01

    The differential code bias (DCB) of BeiDou satellite is an important topic to make better use of BeiDou system (BDS) for many practical applications. This paper proposes a new method to estimate the BDS satellite DCBs based on triple-frequency uncombined precise point positioning (UPPP). A general model of both triple-frequency UPPP and Geometry-Free linear combination of Phase-Smoothed Range (GFPSR) is presented, in which, the ionospheric observable and the combination of triple-frequency satellite and receiver DCBs (TF-SRDCBs) are derived. Then the satellite and receiver DCBs (SRDCBs) are estimated together with the ionospheric delay that is modeled at each individual station in a weighted least-squares estimator, and the satellite DCBs are determined by introducing the zero-mean condition of all available BDS satellites. To validate the new method, 90 day's real tracking GNSS data (from January to March in 2014) collected from 9 Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) stations (equipped with Trimble NETR9 receiver) is used, and the BDS satellite DCB products from German Aerospace Center (DLR) are taken as reference values for comparison. Results show that the proposed method is able to precisely estimate BDS satellite DCBs: (1) the mean value of the day-to-day scattering for all available BDS satellites is about 0.24 ns, which is reduced in average by 23% when compared with the results derived by only GFPSR. Moreover, the mean value of the day-to-day scattering of IGSO satellites is lower than that of GEO and MEO satellites; (2) the mean value of RMS of the difference with respect to DLR DCB products is about 0.39 ns, which is improved by an average of 11% when compared with the results derived by only GFPSR. Besides, the RMS of IGSO and MEO satellites is at the same level which is better than that of GEO satellites.

  16. A Rejection Sampling Based Method for Determining Thermal Scattering Angle and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Carl C.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2017-09-01

    Most high performance computing systems being deployed currently and envisioned for the future are based on making use of heavy parallelism across many computational nodes and many concurrent cores. These types of heavily parallel systems often have relatively little memory per core but large amounts of computing capability. This places a significant constraint on how data storage is handled in many Monte Carlo codes. This is made even more significant in fully coupled multiphysics simulations, which requires simulations of many physical phenomena be carried out concurrently on individual processing nodes, which further reduces the amount of memory available for storage of Monte Carlo data. As such, there has been a move towards on-the-fly nuclear data generation to reduce memory requirements associated with interpolation between pre-generated large nuclear data tables for a selection of system temperatures. Methods have been previously developed and implemented in MIT’s OpenMC Monte Carlo code for both the resolved resonance regime and the unresolved resonance regime, but are currently absent for the thermal energy regime. While there are many components involved in generating a thermal neutron scattering cross section on-the-fly, this work will focus on a proposed method for determining the energy and direction of a neutron after a thermal incoherent inelastic scattering event. This work proposes a rejection sampling based method using the thermal scattering kernel to determine the correct outgoing energy and angle. The goal of this project is to be able to treat the full S (a, ß) kernel for graphite, to assist in high fidelity simulations of the TREAT reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The method is, however, sufficiently general to be applicable in other thermal scattering materials, and can be initially validated with the continuous analytic free gas model.

  17. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  18. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensson, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Obstacles is to give a theoretical treatment of the scattering phenomena, and to illustrate numerical computations of some canonical scattering problems for different geometries and materials.

  19. The Fate of Debris Launched from the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Zeehandelaar, D. B.

    2006-06-01

    A small fraction of interplanetary material moving at high speeds through the jovian system is intercepted by the Galilean satellites; the resulting energetic collisions chip bits of material off the moons and populate a diffuse torus of circumplanetary debris. We investigate the fate of this ejected material, focusing on both the transport probabilities between satellites and the steady-state spatial distribution of the material itself. Our goals are twofold. First we hope to quantify processes that deliver exotic compounds to satellite surfaces (e.g. sulfur from Io and possible organics from Europa). In addition, we seek an explanation for the 5-10 micron dust grains detected at high jovian latitudes by the two Pioneer spacecraft. We find that large dust grains (> 20 microns) tend to keep either their pericenter or apocenter distances tied to the orbital radius of a Galilean satellite, while smaller micron-sized grains, dominated by strong non-gravitational forces including electromagnetism and radiation pressure, spread more evenly throughout the jovian system. Typical lifetimes for these grains are a few hundred years; large grains are typically lost to the satellites, while many small grains are also transferred to Jupiter. We find transitions to both interior and exterior satellites, although the former occur more readily. Our integrations show that roughly 80%-90% of gravitationally-dominated ejecta returns to the source while the bulk of the remaining material is transferred to the nearest neighboring satellites. Particles of all sizes are scattered to high latitudes, and the 5-10 micron debris forms a distribution that readily accounts for the Pioneer detections.

  20. Light scattering reviews 9 light scattering and radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book details modern methods of the radiative transfer theory. It presents recent advances in light scattering (measurements and theory) and highlights the newest developments in remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties.

  1. Re-Analysis of the Solar Phase Curves of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah; Verbiscer, Anne

    1997-01-01

    Re-analysis of the solar phase curves of the icy Galilean satellites demonstrates that the quantitative results are dependent on the single particle scattering function incorporated into the photometric model; however, the qualitative properties are independent. The results presented here show that the general physical characteristics predicted by a Hapke model (B. Hapke, 1986, Icarus 67, 264-280) incorporating a two parameter double Henyey-Greenstein scattering function are similar to the predictions given by the same model incorporating a three parameter double Henyey-Greenstein scattering function as long as the data set being modeled has adequate coverage in phase angle. Conflicting results occur when the large phase angle coverage is inadequate. Analysis of the role of isotropic versus anisotropic multiple scattering shows that for surfaces as bright as Europa the two models predict very similar results over phase angles covered by the data. Differences arise only at those phase angles for which there are no data. The single particle scattering behavior between the leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa and Ganymede is commensurate with magnetospheric alterations of their surfaces. Ion bombardment will produce more forward scattering single scattering functions due to annealing of potential scattering centers within regolith particles (N. J. Sack et al., 1992, Icarus 100, 534-540). Both leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa are consistent with a high porosity model and commensurate with a frost surface. There are no strong differences in predicted porosity between the two hemispheres of Callisto, both are consistent with model porosities midway between that deduced for Europa and the Moon. Surface roughness model estimates predict that surface roughness increases with satellite distance from Jupiter, with lunar surface roughness values falling midway between those measured for Ganymede and Callisto. There is no obvious variation in predicted surface

  2. Degradation of spatial resolution in thin-foil x-ray microchemical analysis due to plural scattering of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twigg, Mark Erickson [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based Monte Carlo simulation of incoherent plural scattering of electrons has been developed in order to estimate the broadening of an electron probe as it propagates through a solid. By applying this approach to modeling the spreading of a fine (50 A) probe focused on a thin foil in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we have estimated the spatial resolution of the compositional analysis obtainable using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Specifically, an attempt has been made to determine how the apparent microchemistry of a feature of finer dimensions than the broadened beam differs from the actual composition of the given feature. The apparent Ge concentration profile in the vicinity of a 200 A wide Ge platelet in a 5000 A thick Al foil was measured, using STEM and EDS, and compared with the profile predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Results are presented and discussed.

  3. Coherent band excitations in CePd 3 : A comparison of neutron scattering and ab initio theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goremychkin, Eugene A.; Park, Hyowon; Osborn, Raymond; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Castellan, John-Paul; Fanelli, Victor R.; Christianson, Andrew D.; Stone, Matthew B.; Bauer, Eric D.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Byler, Darrin D.; Lawrence, Jon M.

    2018-01-11

    In common with many strongly correlated electron systems, intermediate valence compounds are believed to display a crossover from a high-temperature regime of incoherently fluctuating local moments to a low-temperature regime of coherent hybridized bands. We show that inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of CePd3 provides a benchmark for ab initio calculations based on dynamical mean field theory. The magnetic response is strongly momentum dependent thanks to the formation of coherent f-electron bands at low temperature, with an amplitude that is strongly enhanced by local particle-hole interactions. The agreement between experiment and theory shows that we have a robust first-principles understanding of the temperature dependence of f-electron coherence.

  4. Application of input amplitude masks in image encryption with spatially incoherent illumination for increase of decrypted images signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Molodtsov, Dmitriy Y.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Shifrina, Anna V.

    2016-04-01

    The majority of existing methods of optical encryption use not only light intensity distribution, easily registered with photosensors, but also its phase distribution. This provides best encryption strength for fixed quantities of elements and phase levels in a mask. Downsides are holographic registration scheme used in order to register not only light intensity distribution but also its phase distribution and speckle noise occurring due to coherent illumination. That factors lead to very poor decryption quality when it comes from computer simulations to optical implementations. Method of optical encryption with spatially incoherent illumination does not have drawbacks inherent to coherent systems, however, as only light intensity distribution is considered, mean value of image to be encrypted is always above zero which leads to intensive zero spatial frequency peak in image spectrum. Therefore, in case of spatially incoherent illumination, image spectrum, as well as encryption key spectrum, cannot be white. If encryption is based on convolution operation, no matter coherent light used or not, Fourier spectrum amplitude distribution of encryption key should overlap Fourier spectrum amplitude distribution of image to be encrypted otherwise loss of information is unavoidable. Another factor affecting decrypted image quality is original image spectrum. Usually, most part of image energy is concentrated in area of low frequencies. Consequently, only this area in encrypted image contains information about original image, while other areas contain only noise. We propose to use additional encoding of input scene to increase size of the area containing useful information. This provides increase of signal-to-noise ratio in encrypted image and consequentially increases quality of decrypted images. Results of computer simulations of test images optical encryption with spatially incoherent illumination and additional input amplitude masks are presented.

  5. Olivine to Ringwoodite and Wadsleyte Phase Transformation Mechanisms in Naturally Shocked Chondritic Meteorites: Clues to Incoherent, Coherent Growths and Retrograde Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Goresy, A.

    2006-12-01

    Olivine crystals entrained in shock-melt veins in chondrites display partial to complete transformation to ringwoodite and wadsleyite [1-4]. A crucial issue is if the olivine-ringwoodite inversion was exclusively incoherent by grain boundary nucleation and growth, or if coherent intracrystalline mechanisms were also active. The incoherent mechanism is at least three orders of magnitude faster than the coherent [5,6]. We report two ringwoodite growth textures in chondritic olivines entrained in shock-melt veins in Sixiangkou chondrite (1) polycrystalline grain-boundary growth in small olivines [1], and (2) intracrystalline ringwoodite lamellae in large olivines. The first type is reminiscent of the incoherent mechanism [5,6]. (2) TEM investigations reveal that ringwoodite lamellae in olivine entrained in veins are polycrystalline. Some ringwoodite crystallites at the two-phase boundary depict coherent olivine/ringwoodite intergrowth: (3-11) ringwoodite (130) olivine. This is the first report of coherent intergrowth in meteoritic olivine. Olivine grains entrained in melt veins of Peace River meteorite (Fa22-25) depict phase transition to ringwoodite and wadsleyite with spectacular textures and stark contrasting compositions: (1) Ringwoodite (Fa32-36) occurs as grain boundary crystallites in the outer regions of olivine, whereas wadsleyite (Fa12-14), occupies the olivine cores. (2) Two well-oriented sets of zoned ringwoodite lamellae (ringwoodite to both secondary wadsleyite and olivine, respectively. Synchrotron XRF mapping shows depletion of both ringwoodite and wadsleyite in Mn and Zn due to back diffusion to olivine. References: [1] Chen M. et al. (1996) Science, 271, 1570. [2] Chen M. et al. (2004) PNAS, 101, 15033. [3] Ohtani E. et al. (2004) EPSL, 227, 505. [4] Beck P. et al. (2005) Nature, 435, 1071. [5] Kerschhofer L. (2000), Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 121, 59. [6] Mosenfelder J. L. et al. (2001) Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 127, 165.

  6. Importance of light scattering properties of cloud particles on calculating the earth energy cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letu, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishimoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    hexagonal ice crystals. Lisas/GOM and IGOM methods are efficient for calculating the single scattering properties of the ice crystal when size parameter is large enough, while exact solution such as FDTD and Lisas/SIEMM methods are efficient for calculating the light scattering properties of the non-spherical partical when size parameter is small. However, to develop the compact light scattering database for satellite remote sensing application, it is important to optimize the scattering database based on the specification of the satellite sensor. Letu et al. (2012) optimized the ice crystal scattering database for Cirrus cloud remote sensing of the GCOM-C/SGLI satellite mission of JAXA, Japan and radiative transfer calculation in earth atmospheric system. Based on the above optimization results, we developed the ice crystal scattering database for GCOM-C/SGLI satellite mission with hexagonal, plate and aggregate shapes determined by in-situ observation for radiative transfer calculation and satellite remote sensing retrieval. Futuermore, radiance flux, alculated by RSTAR radiative transfer code with scattering database of the water cloud and the Cirrus particle is compared both at the earth surface and at the top of atmosphere. Furthermore, calculation uncertainty caused by different cloud particle scattering database was discussed.

  7. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  8. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  9. A Discrete Scatterer Technique for Evaluating Electromagnetic Scattering from Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Developing sensing capabilities for the detection of ground targets concealed in a forest environment...scatterer simulation are 369 MB and 33 min/frequency, respectively, on a Dell Precision T7500 workstation with Intel Xeon CPU of 2.67 GHz, while those...2. Thirion L, Colin E, Dahon C. Capabilities of a forest coherent scattering model applied to radiometry, interferometry, and polarimetry at P

  10. Multiple Volume Scattering in Random Media and Periodic Structures with Applications in Microwave Remote Sensing and Wave Functional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shurun

    The objective of my research is two-fold: to study wave scattering phenomena in dense volumetric random media and in periodic wave functional materials. For the first part, the goal is to use the microwave remote sensing technique to monitor water resources and global climate change. Towards this goal, I study the microwave scattering behavior of snow and ice sheet. For snowpack scattering, I have extended the traditional dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) approach to include cyclical corrections that give rise to backscattering enhancements, enabling the theory to model combined active and passive observations of snowpack using the same set of physical parameters. Besides DMRT, a fully coherent approach is also developed by solving Maxwell's equations directly over the entire snowpack including a bottom half space. This revolutionary new approach produces consistent scattering and emission results, and demonstrates backscattering enhancements and coherent layer effects. The birefringence in anisotropic snow layers is also analyzed by numerically solving Maxwell's equation directly. The effects of rapid density fluctuations in polar ice sheet emission in the 0.5˜2.0 GHz spectrum are examined using both fully coherent and partially coherent layered media emission theories that agree with each other and distinct from incoherent approaches. For the second part, the goal is to develop integral equation based methods to solve wave scattering in periodic structures such as photonic crystals and metamaterials that can be used for broadband simulations. Set upon the concept of modal expansion of the periodic Green's function, we have developed the method of broadband Green's function with low wavenumber extraction (BBGFL), where a low wavenumber component is extracted and results a non-singular and fast-converging remaining part with simple wavenumber dependence. We've applied the technique to simulate band diagrams and modal solutions of periodic structures, and to

  11. Neutron Scattering in Chemistry: Experiments, Models and Statistical Description of Physical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Cuesta, Timmy

    Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy is a very powerful technique that requires the use of ab-initio models to interpret the experimental data. Albeit not exact the information obtained from the models gives very valuable insight into the dynamics of atoms in solids and molecules, that, in turn, provides unique access to the vibrational density of states. It is extremely sensitive to hydrogen since the neutron cross section of hydrogen is the largest of all chemical elements. Hydrogen, being the lightest element highlights quantum effects more pronounced than the rest of the elements.In the case of non-crystalline or disordered materials, the models provide partial information and only a reduced sampling of possible configurations can be done at the present. With very large computing power, as exascale computing will provide, a new opportunity arises to study these systems and introduce a description of statistical configurations including energetics and dynamics characterization of configurational entropy. As part of the ICE-MAN project, we are developing the tools to manage the workflows, visualize and analyze the results. To use state of the art computational methods and most neutron scattering that using atomistic models for interpretation of experimental data This work is supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD 8237) program of the UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Molecular mobility in Medicago truncatula seed during early stage of germination: Neutron scattering and NMR investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falourd, Xavier [UR1268 Biopolymères Interactions Assemblages, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France); Natali, Francesca [CNR-IOM-OGG, c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Peters, Judith [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Université Joseph Fourier UFR PhITEM, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institut de Biologie Structurale, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Foucat, Loïc, E-mail: Loic.Foucat@nantes.inra.fr [UR1268 Biopolymères Interactions Assemblages, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Neutron scattering and NMR approaches were used to characterize seed germination. • A parallel between macromolecular motions and water dynamics was established. • Freezing/thawing cycle revealed a hysteresis connected to the seed hydration level. - Abstract: First hours of Medicago truncatula (MT) seeds germination were investigated using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), to follow respectively how macromolecular motions and water mobility evolve when water permeates into the seed. From EINS results, it was shown that there is an increase in macromolecular mobility with the water uptake. Changes in NMR relaxation parameters reflected microstructural changes associated with the recovery of the metabolic processes. The EINS investigation of the effect of temperature on macromolecular motions showed that there is a relationship between the amount of water in the seeds and the effect of freezing–thawing cycle. The NMR relaxometry results obtained at 253 K allowed establishing possible link between the freezing of water molecules tightly bound to macromolecules and their drastic motion restriction around 250 K, as observed with EINS at the highest water content.

  13. Satellite Laser Ranging Satellite Orbit Product from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SLR Satellite Orbit solutions available from the Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS). Precise Orbit Determination (POD) solutions in Standard Product 3...

  14. Laser light scattering basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Benjamin

    1994-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, this text introduces the interdisciplinary area of laser light scattering, focusing chiefly on theoretical concepts of quasielastic laser scattering.

  15. Discriminant Incoherent Component Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgakis, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    Face images convey rich information which can be perceived as a superposition of low-complexity components associated with attributes, such as facial identity, expressions, and activation of facial action units (AUs). For instance, low-rank components characterizing neutral facial images are

  16. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  17. The Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. Shown from left to right in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, the Europa images in September 1996, and the Callisto images in November 1997.Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission

  18. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fan, Shiwei; Yu, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2017, held during 23th-25th May in Shanghai, China. The theme of CSNC2017 is Positioning, Connecting All. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2017, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  19. Understanding satellite navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    This book explains the basic principles of satellite navigation technology with the bare minimum of mathematics and without complex equations. It helps you to conceptualize the underlying theory from first principles, building up your knowledge gradually using practical demonstrations and worked examples. A full range of MATLAB simulations is used to visualize concepts and solve problems, allowing you to see what happens to signals and systems with different configurations. Implementation and applications are discussed, along with some special topics such as Kalman Filter and Ionosphere. W

  20. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Fan, Shiwei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2016, held during 18th-20th May in Changsha, China. The theme of CSNC2016 is Smart Sensing, Smart Perception. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2016, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  1. Microwave retrievals of terrestrial precipitation over snow-covered surfaces: A lesson from the GPM satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebtehaj, A. M.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2017-06-01

    Satellites are playing an ever-increasing role in estimating precipitation over remote areas. Improving satellite retrievals of precipitation requires increased understanding of its passive microwave signatures over different land surfaces. Snow-covered surfaces are notoriously difficult to interpret because they exhibit both emission from the land below and scattering from the ice crystals. Using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite, we demonstrate that microwave brightness temperatures of rain and snowfall transition from a scattering to an emission regime from summer to winter, due to expansion of less emissive snow cover. Evidence suggests that the combination of low- (10-19 GHz) and high-frequency (89-166 GHz) channels provides the maximum amount of information for snowfall detection. The results demonstrate that, using a multifrequency matching method, the probability of snowfall detection can even be higher than rainfall—chiefly because of the information content of the low-frequency channels that respond to the (near) surface temperature.

  2. Collision matrix for Leo satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Darren; Lorenzen, Gary

    The Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is becoming cluttered with thousands of satellites, rocket bodies, and a variety of space garbage. This collection of objects crossing paths at speeds on the order of 10 km/s is creating an increasing collision hazard to many operational systems. The effect that the destruction of LEO satellites will have on other users of the near-Earth environment is of great concern. A model is examined which quantifies the effect of one satellite fragmentation on neighboring satellites. This model is used to evaluate the interdependent hazard to a series of satellite systems. A number of space system fragmentation events are numerically simulated and the collision hazard to each is tabulated. Once all satellites in the matrix have been fragmented separately, a complete collision hazard representation can be depicted. This model has potential for developing an enhanced understanding of a number of aspects of the growing debris hazard in LEO.

  3. Multiple scattering modeling pipeline for spectroscopy and photometry of airless Solar System objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Antti; Väisänen, Timo; Markkanen, Johannes; Martikainen, Julia; Gritsevich, Maria; Muinonen, Karri

    2017-10-01

    We combine numerical tools to analyze the reflectance spectra of granular materials. Our motivation comes from the lack of tools when it comes to intimate mixing of materials and modeling space-weathering effects with nano- or micron-sized inclusions. The current practice is to apply a semi-physical models such as the Hapke models (e.g., Icarus 195, 2008). These are expressed in a closed form so that they are fast to apply. The problem is that the validity of the model is not guaranteed, and the derived properties related to particle scattering can be unrealistic (JQSRT 113, 2012).Our pipeline consists of individual scattering simulation codes and a main program that chains them together. The chain for analyzing a macroscopic target with space-weathered mineral would go as: (1) Scattering properties of small inclusions inside a host matrix are derived using exact Maxwell equation solvers. From the scattering properties, we use the so-called incoherent fields and Mueller matrices as input for the next step; (2) Scattering by a regolith grain is solved using a geometrical optics method with surface reflections, internal absorption, and internal diffuse scattering; (3) The radiative transfer simulation is executed inputting the regolith grains from the previous step as the scatterers in a macroscopic planar volume element.For the most realistic asteroid reflectance model, the chain would produce the properties of a planar surface element. Then, a shadowing simulation over the surface elements would be considered, and finally the asteroid phase function would be solved by integrating the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the planar element over the object's realistic shape model.The tools in the proposed chain already exist, and practical task for us is to tie these together into an easy-to-use public pipeline. We plan to open the pipeline as a web-based open service a dedicated server, using Django application server and Python environment for the

  4. Scattering of light by crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, William

    2012-01-01

    This authoritative graduate-level text describes inelastic light scattering by crystals and its use in the investigation of solid-state excitation, with experimental techniques common to all types of excitation. 1978 edition.

  5. Integration rules for scattering equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baadsgaard, Christian; Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Damgaard, Poul H. [Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center,Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2015-09-21

    As described by Cachazo, He and Yuan, scattering amplitudes in many quantum field theories can be represented as integrals that are fully localized on solutions to the so-called scattering equations. Because the number of solutions to the scattering equations grows quite rapidly, the contour of integration involves contributions from many isolated components. In this paper, we provide a simple, combinatorial rule that immediately provides the result of integration against the scattering equation constraints for any Möbius-invariant integrand involving only simple poles. These rules have a simple diagrammatic interpretation that makes the evaluation of any such integrand immediate. Finally, we explain how these rules are related to the computation of amplitudes in the field theory limit of string theory.

  6. Light Scattering in Solid IX

    CERN Document Server

    Cardona, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    This is the ninth volume of a well-established series in which expert practitioners discuss topical aspects of light scattering in solids. It reviews recent developments concerning mainly semiconductor nanostructures and inelastic x-ray scattering, including both coherent time-domain and spontaneous scattering studies. In the past few years, light scattering has become one of the most important research and characterization methods for studying carbon nanotubes and semiconducting quantum dots, and a crucial tool for exploring the coupled exciton--photon system in semiconductor cavities. Among the novel techniques discussed in this volume are pump--probe ultrafast measurements and those which use synchrotron radiation as light source. The book addresses improvements in the intensity, beam quality and time synchronization of modern synchrotron sources, which made it possible to measure the phonon dispersion in very small samples and to determine electronic energy bands as well as enabling real-time observations...

  7. Compton scattering at high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinzl@plymouth.ac.u [University of Plymouth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    High-intensity Compton scattering takes place when an electron beam is brought into collision with a high power laser. We briefly review the main intensity signatures using the formalism of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

  8. Neutron scattering and models: Titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental titanium were measured from 4.5 {r_arrow} 10.0 MeV in incident energy increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each energy the measurements were made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured for observed excitations of 0.975 {+-} 0.034, 1.497 {+-} 0.033, 2.322 {+-} 0.058, 3.252 {+-} 0.043, 3.700 {+-} 0.093, 4.317 {+-} 0.075 and 4.795 {+-} 0.100 MeV. All of the observed inelastically-scattered neutron groups were composites of contributions from several isotopes and/or levels. The experimental results were used to develop energy-average optical, statistical and coupled-channels models.

  9. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  10. Public Service Communication Satellite Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed NASA Public Service Communication Satellite Program consists of four different activities designed to fulfill the needs of public service sector. These are: interaction with the users, experimentation with existing satellites, development of a limited capability satellite for the earliest possible launch, and initiation of an R&D program to develop the greatly increased capability that future systems will require. This paper will discuss NASA efforts in each of these areas.

  11. Living antennas on communication satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumholt, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Crises change the global pattern of communication. The communications problems occur because the satellites are optimized to cover specific geographic areas, and these areas cannot be altered once the satellites are in Earth orbit. An effective solution to the problem is to equip communication...... satellites with "living" antennas that can adjust their radiation coverage areas according to the new demands. The development of living antennas is, therefore, among the focus areas identified and supported by the European Space Agency, ESA....

  12. Radar interferometry persistent scatterer technique

    CERN Document Server

    Kampes, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the Persistent Scatterer Technique, the latest development in radar interferometric data processing. It is the only book on Permanent Scatterer (PS) technique of radar interferometry, and it details a newly developed stochastic model and estimator algorithm to cope with possible problems for the application of the PS technique. The STUN (spatio-temporal unwrapping network) algorithm, developed to cope with these issues in a robust way, is presented and applied to two test sites.

  13. Isogeometric analysis of acoustic scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Venås, Jon Vegard

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic scattering has been thoroughly analyzed with the use of finite element analysis (FEA). The problem at hand is a coupled fluid-structure interaction problem on an unbounded domain, where an object of elastic material is surrounded by fluid. Using physical assumptions, the fluid is described by the wave equation which is transformed to the Helmholtz equation. That is, the frequency domain is considered instead of the time domain. In particular one is interested in the scattered pressur...

  14. Double parton scattering in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sunar Cerci, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Recent results on the double parton scattering measurements performed using the proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS detector are presented. The observables, which are sensitive to double parton scattering, are investigated after being corrected for detector effects and selection efficiencies. Multivariate analysis techniques are used for increasing the sensitivity. The effective cross section, $\\sigma_{eff}$ is also extracted using different processes at various center-of-mass energies.

  15. Jupiter's Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    Jupiter's Galilean satellites Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto encompass some of the most bizarre environments known in the solar system, spanning that of Io, the most volcanically active and perhaps the most inhospitable body known, to Europa, currently the focus of a search for life in the solar system because of its subsurface ocean. One of the premier areas of scientific return in solar system research in the past 10 years, due in large part to the Galileo mission and observations by the Hubble Space Telescope, has been a remarkable increase in our knowledge about these satellites. Discoveries have been made of tenuous molecular oxygen atmospheres on Europa and Ganymede, a magnetic field and accompanying auroral emissions at the poles of Ganymede, and of ozone and sulfur dioxide embedded in the surfaces of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Io's unusual sulfur dioxide atmosphere, including its volcanic plumes and strong electrodynamic interaction with magnetospheric plasma, has finally been quantitatively characterized. This talk will present highlights from the recent discoveries and advances in our understanding of these fascinating objects.

  16. Magnetic Satellite Missions and Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Although the first satellite observations of the Earth’s magnetic field were already taken more than 50 years ago, continuous geomagnetic measurements from space are only available since 1999. The unprecedented time-space coverage of this recent data set opened revolutionary new possibilities...... for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space. In this chapter we discuss characteristics of satellites measuring the geomagnetic field and report on past, present and upcoming magnetic satellite missions. We conclude with some basics about space magnetic gradiometry as a possible path for future...... exploration of Earth’s magnetic field with satellites....

  17. Scattered light characterization of FORTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Carter, Anna; Redwine, Keith; Teste, Stephane; Pelton, Russell; Hagopian, John; Kutyrev, Alexander; Li, Mary J.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2017-08-01

    We describe our efforts to build a Wide-Field Lyman alpha Geocoronal simulator (WFLaGs) for characterizing the end-to-end sensitivity of FORTIS (Far-UV Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) to scattered Lyman α emission from outside of the nominal (1/2 degree)2 field-of-view. WFLaGs is a 50 mm diameter F/1 aluminum parabolic collimator fed by a hollow cathode discharge lamp with a 80 mm clear MgF2 window housed in a vacuum skin. It creates emission over a 10 degree FOV. WFLaGS will allow us to validate and refine a recently developed scattered light model and verify our scatter light mitigation strategies, which will incorporate low scatter baffle materials, and possibly 3-d printed light traps, covering exposed scatter centers. We present measurements of scattering intensity of Lyman alpha as a function of angle with respect to the specular reflectance direction for several candidate baffle materials. Initial testing of WFLaGs will be described.

  18. Landslide inventory updating by means of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI: the Setta basin (Italy case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frangioni Sara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the contribution of Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry (PSInSAR technique to landslide detection, using interferometric data acquired in C-band by European remote-sensing satellite (ERS 1/2 and environmental satellite (ENVISAT satellites. The main purpose is to update a pre-existing landslide inventory map, by changing or confirming the landslide geometry and state of activity and eventually, identifying new phenomena.This work presents an application of satellite remote sensing to analyse ground displacement movements in the Setta basin, located on the northern Appennine (Bologna province, Italy and extended up 268 km2.The proposed methodology, resting upon pre-existing works already consolidated in the scientific community, combines interferometric measures with aerial imagery and other auxiliary data, in order to detect landslide indicators, finally validated with field surveys. The use of an activity matrix allows the identification of the state of activity of landslide phenomena with respect to the velocity of the radar displacement rates. Field validations are carried out in the areas that are more relevant because of the highest ground velocities and the presence of structures extensively affected by ground movements.The final updated landslide database of the Setta basin, based on Persistent Scatterer Interferometry analysis and in situ checks, consists of 1550 landslides, 236 of which have persistent scatterer information.

  19. Gigabit Satellite Network for NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoder, Douglas; Bergamo, Marcos

    1996-01-01

    The advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) gigabit satellite network provides long-haul point-to-point and point-to-multipoint full-duplex SONET services over NASA's ACTS. at rates up to 622 Mbit/s (SONET OC-12), with signal quality comparable to that obtained with terrestrial fiber networks. Data multiplexing over the satellite is accomplished using time-division multiple access (TDMA) techniques coordinated with the switching and beam hopping facilities provided by ACTS. Transmissions through the satellite are protected with Reed-Solomon encoding. providing virtually error-free transmission under most weather conditions. Unique to the system are a TDMA frame structure and satellite synchronization mechanism that allow: (a) very efficient utilization of the satellite capacity: (b) over-the-satellite dosed-loop synchronization of the network in configurations with up to 64 ground stations: and (c) ground station initial acquisition without collisions with existing signalling or data traffic. The user interfaces are compatible with SONET standards, performing the function of conventional SONET multiplexers and. as such. can be: readily integrated with standard SONET fiber-based terrestrial networks. Management of the network is based upon the simple network management protocol (SNMP). and includes an over-the-satellite signalling network and backup terrestrial internet (IP-based) connectivity. A description of the ground stations is also included.

  20. Altitude Registration of Limb-Scattered Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of +/-200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a approx. 300 to 400m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally +/-100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of approx. 200m over 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of 100m outside the polar regions.