WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite free-air gravity

  1. Maine Offshore Free-air Anomaly Gravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (5,363 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity parameters...

  2. The free-air gravity constraint on subcontinental mantle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Giovanni; Peltier, W. Richard

    1996-12-01

    An outstanding geophysical issue concerns the nature, and dynamical role in the mantle general circulation, of the seismically fast body wave anomalies that have been tomographically imaged beneath coatinents. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities that these seismologically imaged "roots" represent either neutrally buoyant, chemically distinct material or cold, negatively buoyant, upper mantle and transition zone downwelling flow. In assessing these alternatives, we first construct disaggregated models of the seismic heterogeneity in which a component associated with subcontinental fast anomalies is isolated from the global tomographic models either by employing the "continent function" or a new "craton function". We find that the use of the new craton function leads to geophysically more realistic chemical models of subcontinental heterogeneity. The thermal and chemical density fields reconstructed from the disaggregated tomographic models are employed to compute the long-wavelength nonhydrostatic geoid, the free-air gravity field and the upper mantle radial flow pattern within the framework of an anelastically compressible internal loading theory. We find that the radial component of flow velocity provides useful insight into the dynamical implications of the alternative density models. However, since this field is not directly observable, we consider the geoid and free-air gravity anomaly as possible diagnostic discriminants and show that the free-air gravity anomaly provides a sensitive discriminant of the gravitational differences that characterize the chemical and thermal models, whereas the geoid does not. By focusing on the free-air gravity low over the Hudson Bay region of Canada, we are able to rule out the hypothesis that positively or neutrally buoyant subcontinental material that is chemically distinct from the surrounding mantle exists below the Laurentian craton. However, when the fast body wave anomaly is mapped into a high

  3. Assessment of EGM2008 using GPS/levelling and free-air gravity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ge

    This paper carries out an initial assessment of EGM2008 over Nairobi County and its evirons using observed free-air gravity anomalies and GPS/levelling geoid undulations. ... Surveys, United Nations Geothermal Project, British Petroleum, Burmah Oil ... research. A compilation of such gravity data sets would improve geoid ...

  4. 3D free-air gravity anomaly modeling for the Southeast Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Chiara; Heyde, Ingo; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed the free-air gravity anomalies measured on the northwestern part of the Southeast Indian Ridge (hereafter SEIR) during the BGR cruise INDEX2012 with RV FUGRO GAUSS. The survey area covered the ridge from the Rodriguez Triple Junction along about 500 km towards the SSE direction. Gravity and magnetic data were measured along 65 profiles with a mean length of 60 km running approximately perpendicular to the ridge axis. The final gravity data were evaluated every 20 seconds along each profile. This results in a sampling interval of about 100 m. The mean spacing of the profiles is about 7 km. Together with the geophysical data also the bathymetry was measured along all profiles with a Kongsberg Simrad EM122 multibeam echosounder system. Previous studies reveal that the part of the ridge covered by the high resolution profiles is characterized by young geologic events (the oldest one dates back to 1 Ma) and that the SEIR is an intermediate spreading ridge. We extended the length of each profile to the area outside the ridge, integrating INDEX2012 high resolution gravity and bathymetric data with low resolution data derived from satellite radar altimeter measurements. The 3D forward gravity modeling made it possible to reconstruct a rough crustal density model for an extended area (about 250000 km2) of the SEIR. We analyzed the gravity signal along those 2D sections which cross particular geological features (uplifted areas, accommodation zones, hydrothermal fields and areas with hints for extensional processes e.g. OCCs) in order to establish a correlation between the gravity anomaly signal and the surface geology. We started with a simple "layer-cake" geologic model consisting of four density bodies which represent the sea, upper oceanic crust, lower oceanic crust and the upper mantle. Considering that in the study area the oceanic crust is young, we did not include the sediment layer. We assumed the density values of these bodies considering

  5. Crustal Structure of the Iceland Region from Spectrally Correlated Free-air and Terrain Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, T. E.; vonFrese, R. R. B.; Potts, L. V.; Roman, D. R.; Taylor, P. T.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic refraction studies have provided critical, but spatially restricted constraints on the structure of the Icelandic crust. To obtain a more comprehensive regional view of this tectonically complicated area, we spectrally correlated free-air gravity anomalies against computed gravity effects of the terrain for a crustal thickness model that also conforms to regional seismic and thermal constraints. Our regional crustal thickness estimates suggest thickened crust extends up to 500 km on either side of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge with the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge crust being less extended and on average 3-5 km thinner than the crust of the Greenland-Iceland Ridge. Crustal thickness estimates for Iceland range from 25-35 km in conformity with seismic predictions of a cooler, thicker crust. However, the deepening of our gravity-inferred Moho relative to seismic estimates at the thermal plume and rift zones of Iceland suggests partial melting. The amount of partial melting may range from about 8% beneath the rift zones to perhaps 20% above the plume core where mantle temperatures may be 200-400 C above normal. Beneath Iceland, areally limited regions of partial melting may also be compositionally and mechanically layered and intruded. The mantle plume appears to be centered at (64.6 deg N, 17.4 deg W) near the Vatnajokull Glacier and the central Icelandic neovolcanic zones.

  6. ISOSTATICALLY DISTURBED TERRAIN OF NORTHWESTERN ANDES MOUNTAINS FROM SPECTRALLY CORRELATED FREE-AIR AND GRAVITY TERRAIN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández P Orlando

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently revised models on global tectonics describe the convergence of the North Andes, Nazca, Caribbean and South American Plates and their seismicity, volcanism, active faulting and extreme
    topography. The current plate boundaries of the area are mainly interpreted from volcanic and seismic datasets with variable confidence levels. New insights on the isostatic state and plate boundaries of
    the northwestern Andes Mountains can be obtained from the spectral analysis of recently available gravity and topography data.
    Isostatically disturbed terrain produces free-air anomalies that are highly correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain gravity effects (TGE and free air gravity anomalies (FAGA of the
    Andes mountains spectral correlation data confirms that these mountains are isostatically disturbed. Strong negative terrain-correlated FAGA along western South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles are consistent with anomalously deepened mantle displaced by subducting oceanic plates.

    Inversion of the compensated terrain gravity effects (CTGE reveals plate subduction systems with alternating shallower and steeper subduction angles. The gravity modeling highlights crustal
    deformation from plate collision and subduction and other constraints on the tectonism of the plate boundary zones for the region.

  7. Global detailed gravimetric geoid. [based on gravity model derived from satellite tracking and surface gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 deg-by-1 deg mean free air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is + or - 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Australia.

  8. Lithospheric stretching and the long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly of the Eastern Continental margin of India and the 85 degree E Ridge, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajesh, S.; Majumdar, T.J.; Krishna, K.S.

    Among the submarine ridge systems in the northern Indian Ocean, the 85 degree E Ridge in the Bay of Bengal is more enigmatic owing to its peculiar anomalous negative free-air gravity. In general, this has been attributed to the isostatic...

  9. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Jinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper. Two topics are discussed: Firstly, the concept, development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced; Secondly, some problems of theory and method, which must be considered in the study of the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data, are expounded.

  10. New Bouguer Gravity Maps of Venezuela: Representation and Analysis of Free-Air and Bouguer Anomalies with Emphasis on Spectral Analyses and Elastic Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sanchez-Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new gravity data compilation for Venezuela was processed and homogenized. Gravity was measured in reference to the International Gravity Standardization Net 1971, and the complete Bouguer anomaly was calculated by using the Geodetic Reference System 1980 and 2.67 Mg/m3. A regional gravity map was computed by removing wavelengths higher than 200 km from the Bouguer anomaly. After the anomaly separation, regional and residual Bouguer gravity fields were then critically discussed in term of the regional tectonic features. Results were compared with the previous geological and tectonic information obtained from former studies. Gravity and topography data in the spectral domain were used to examine the elastic thickness and depths of the structures of the causative measured anomaly. According to the power spectrum analysis results of the gravity data, the averaged Moho depths for the massif, plains, and mountainous areas in Venezuela are 42, 35, and 40 km, respectively. The averaged admittance function computed from the topography and Free-Air anomaly profiles across Mérida Andes showed a good fit for a regional compensation model with an effective elastic thickness of 15 km.

  11. Satellite Elevation Magnetic and Gravity Models of Major South American Plate Tectonic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Lidiak, E. G.; Keller, G. R. (Principal Investigator); Longacre, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some MAGSAT scalar and vector magnetic anomaly data together with regional gravity anomaly data are being used to investigate the regional tectonic features of the South American Plate. An initial step in this analysis is three dimensional modeling of magnetic and gravity anomalies of major structures such as the Andean subduction zone and the Amazon River Aulacogen at satellite elevations over an appropriate range of physical properties using Gaus-Legendre quadrature integration method. In addition, one degree average free-air gravity anomalies of South America and adjacent marine areas are projected to satellite elevations assuming a spherical Earth and available MAGSAT data are processed to obtain compatible data sets for correlation. Correlation of these data sets is enhanced by reduction of the MAGSAT data to radial polarization because of the profound effect of the variation of the magnetic inclination over South America.

  12. Satellite Elevation Magnetic and Gravity Models of Major South American Plate Tectonic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Lidiak, E. G.; Keller, G. R. (Principal Investigator); Longacre, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some MAGSAT scalar and vector magnetic anomaly data together with regional gravity anomaly data are being used to investigate the regional tectonic features of the South American Plate. An initial step in this analysis is three dimensional modeling of magnetic and gravity anomalies of major structures such as the Andean subduction zone and the Amazon River Aulacogen at satellite elevations over an appropriate range of physical properties using Gaus-Legendre quadrature integration method. In addition, one degree average free-air gravity anomalies of South America and adjacent marine areas are projected to satellite elevations assuming a spherical Earth and available MAGSAT data are processed to obtain compatible data sets for correlation. Correlation of these data sets is enhanced by reduction of the MAGSAT data to radial polarization because of the profound effect of the variation of the magnetic inclination over South America.

  13. Chameleon gravity and satellite geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, J R

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility of the detection of a chameleon effect by an earth orbiting satellite such as LAGEOS, and possible constraints that might be placed on chameleon model parameters. Approximate constraints presented here result from using a simple monopole approximation for the gravitational field of the earth, along with results from the Khoury-Weltman chameleon model, solar system constraints obtained from the Cassini mission, and parameter bounds obtained from the LAGEOS satellite. It is furthermore suggested that a comparison of ground-based and space-based multipole moments of the geopotential could reveal a possible chameleon effect.

  14. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  15. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-02-11

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  16. The Gravity Fields of the Saturnian Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.

    2011-12-01

    In its tour of the Saturnian system, begun on July 1st, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft had many close flybys of Saturn's main satellites. However, due to impossibility to carry out simultaneously remote sensing observations and microwave tracking from ground, only a small fraction of those flybys could be exploited for gravity measurements. So far, the quadrupole field has been mapped only for Titan, Rhea and Enceladus, while for Hyperion and Iapetus the mass was the only accessible parameter. For Titan and Enceladus, the only satellites targeted more than once for gravity observations, also a rough geoid to degree and order 3 has been determined. Satellite gravity investigations rely upon accurate measurements of the spacecraft range rate, enabled by coherent, two-way radio links at X and Ka band (8.4 and 32.5 GHz). The use of hydrogen masers frequency standards at the ground station and the consid-erable suppression of plasma noise at X and Ka band frequen-cies provide range rate accuracies of 10-30 micron/s at integra-tion times of 60 s. Thanks to the higher frequency of the radio link, these measurement accuracies are in the average a factor of 10 better than those attained by Galileo in its tour of the Jovian system. However, in order to attain a reliable determination of the low degree field, good measurements must be combined with appropriate flyby geometries and adequate sampling, a condition that necessarily requires multiple flybys. We review the main results obtained so far by Cassini for Titan, Rhea and Enceladus, and discuss the methods of analysis used by the Radio Science Team.

  17. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NingJinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper.Two topics are discussed:Firstly,the comcept,development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced;Secondly,some problems of theory and method,which must be considered in the study lf the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data,are expounded.

  18. Gravitacijske satelitske misije : Satellite gravity missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medžida Mulić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sila teže se smatra osnovnom fizikalnom silom u prirodi. Savremene satelitske misije: CHAMP, GRACE i GOCE omogućile su dobivanje globalnih modela polja sile teže s veoma visokom tačnošću, kao i njegovih prostornih i temporalnih varijacija. U ovom radu istaknuti su ciljevi, karakteristike i rezultati navedenih misija, te iznesena očekivanja u budućnosti, kao i njihov značaj i doprinos za geodetsku praksu kao i istraživanja u oblasti geodezije, geofizike i hidrologije. : Gravity is considered as the basic physical force in the nature. Modern satellite missions: CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE allowed modeling of the global gravity field with very high accuracy, as well as its spatial and temporal variations. This paper describes the main objectives, characteristics, the latest results of these missions, as well as the expectations of the future observations, and their importance and contributions for the surveying and geodetic practice, and scientific achievements as well, in geodesy, geophysics and hydrology.

  19. Comparison of marine gravity from shipboard and high-density satellite altimetry along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30.5-35.5 deg S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Sandwell, David

    1993-01-01

    We compare new marine gravity fields derived from satellite altimetry with shipboard measurements over a region of more than 120,000 sq km in the central South Atlantic. Newly declassified satellite data were employed to construct free-air anomaly maps on 0.05 degree grids. An extensive gravity and bathymetry data set from four cruises along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from 30.5-35.5 deg S provides a benchmark for testing the 2D resolution and accuracy of the satellite measurements where their crosstrack spacing is near their widest. The satellite gravity signal is coherent with bathymetry in this region down to wavelengths of 26 km, compared to 12.5 km for shipboard gravity. Residuals between the shipboard and satellite data sets have a roughly normal distribution. The standard deviation of satellite gravity with respect to shipboard measurements is nearly 7 mGal in a region of 140 mGal total variation, whereas the internal standard deviation at crossovers for GPS-navigated shipboard data is 1.8 mGal. The differences between shipboard and satellite data are too large to use satellite gravity to determine crustal thickness variations within a typical ridge segment.

  20. Global gravity field recovery from the ARISTOTELES satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.

    1994-02-01

    One of the primary objectives of the future ARISTOTELES satellite mission is to map Earth's gravity field with high resolution and accuracy. In order to achieve this objective, the ARISTOTELES satellite will be equipped with a gravity gradiometer and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Global gravity field error analyses have been performed for several combinations of gradiometer and GPS observations. These analyses indicated that the bandwidth limitation of the gradiometer prevents a stable high-accuracy, high-resolution gravity solution if no additional information is available. However, with the addition of high-accuracy GPS observations, a stable gravity field solution can be obtained. A combination of the measurements acquired by the high-quality GPS receiver and the bandwidth-limited gradiometer on board ARISTOTELES will yield a global gravity field model with a resolution of less than 100 km and with an accuracy of better than 5 mGal for gravity anomalies and 10 cm for geoid undulations.

  1. A METHOD FOR ESTABLISHING MEAN FREE-AIR GRAVITY ANOMALY BASED ON ISOSTATIC THEORY%基于均衡理论构建区域平均空间重力异常方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 李姗姗; 马彪; 高新兵

    2013-01-01

    The method of establishing the mean free-air gravity anomaly reference field with rare gravity data has been studied based on the Airy and Heiskanen isostatic theory.The numerical model of the mean free-air gravity anomalies has been established using the regional high-resolution topographic data; then for the problem that the systematic errors existed in the computational area,a few of gravimetric points have been chosen as constraint points in order to eliminate errors.Finally,the comparisons have been made among the gravity field model of EGM2008 and interpolation using separate points.As a result,the method could get better precision than two other methods as well as could reduce workloads in gravity measurement in the fields,the method is suitable for establishing the mean free-air gravity anomalies in difficult conditions.%研究基于Airy-Heiskanen均衡理论构建重力控制点稀少区域平均空间重力异常参考场的方法.利用区域高分辨率地形数据构建平均空间重力异常数值模型;针对均衡理论构建重力异常存在系统性误差的问题,研究了布设少量重力观测点作为约束,对所构建的平均空间重力异常数值模型的系统性误差进行修正,并与基于EGM2008重力场模型以及基于少量离散点直接内插推估构建区域平均空间重力异常的方法进行对比.结果表明,该方法得到的计算值精度明显优于后两者,同时能大大减少重力测量的工作量,且适宜于困难地区平均空间重力异常的填补.

  2. Validation of GOCE Satellite Gravity Gradient Observations by Orbital Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P.

    The upcoming European Space Agency ESA Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circular Explorer GOCE mission foreseen to be launched in 2007 will carry a highly sensitive gradiometer consisting of 3 orthogonal pairs of ultra-sensitive accelerometers A challenging calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the gradiometer not only before launch by a series of on-ground tests but also after launch by making use of on-board cold-gas thrusters to provoke a long series of gradiometer shaking events which will provide observations for its calibration This calibration can be checked by a combined analysis of GPS Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking SST and Satellite Gravity Gradient SGG observations An assessment has been made of how well SGG calibration parameters can be estimated in a combined orbit and gravity field estimation from these observations

  3. Gravity Fields and Interiors of the Saturnian Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, N. J.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, Sami W.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.; Somenzi, L.; Zingoni, F.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gravity Science Objectives and accomplishments of the Cassini Radio Science Team: (1) Mass and density of icy satellites (2) Quadrupole field of Titan and Rhea (3) Dynamic Love number of Titan (4) Moment of inertia of Titan (in collaboration with the Radar Team) (5) Gravity field of Saturn. The proposed measurements for the extended tour are: (1) Quadrupole field of Enceladus (2) More accurate measurement of Titan k2 (3) Local gravity/topography correlations for Iapetus (4) Verification/disproof of "Pioneer anomaly".

  4. Advancements in satellite gravity gradient data for crustal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbing, J.; Bauman, J.; Fuchs, M.; Lieb, V.; Haagmans, R.; Meekes, J.A.C.; Abdul Fattah, R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, global gravity models, both based only on satellite data and from combination with terrestrial data, are increasingly available and particularly useful to construct regional models before more local interpretations on the exploration scale are carried out. Often it is challenging to

  5. Advancements in satellite gravity gradient data for crustal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbing, J.; Bauman, J.; Fuchs, M.; Lieb, V.; Haagmans, R.; Meekes, J.A.C.; Abdul Fattah, R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, global gravity models, both based only on satellite data and from combination with terrestrial data, are increasingly available and particularly useful to construct regional models before more local interpretations on the exploration scale are carried out. Often it is challenging to

  6. Progress on the use of satellite technology for gravity exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Ding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the technological progress on Chinese gravity exploration satellites is presented. Novel features such as ultra-stable structure, high accurate thermal control, drag-free and attitude control, micro-thrusters, aerodynamic configuration, the ability to perform micro-vibration analyses, microwave ranging system and mass center trimmer are described.

  7. Shallow-earth rheology from glacial isostasy and satellite gravity: a sensitivity analysis for GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotman, H.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, satellite gravity missions have been launched that probe the earth's long- to mediumwavelength (1000 - 500 km) gravity field. The upcoming ESA satellite gravity mission GOCE is predicted to measure the gravity field with an accuracy of a few centimeters at spatial scales of 100 km.

  8. Bathymetry Prediction in Shallow Water by the Satellite Altimetry-Derived Gravity Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Bae; Yun, Hong Sik

    2017-04-01

    The satellite altimetry-derived free-air gravity anomalies (SAFAGAs) are correlated with undulations of crustal density variations under the seafloor. In this study, shipborne bathymetry from the Korea Rural Community Corporation (KRC) and the SAFAGAs from Scripps Institution of Oceanography were combined to predict bathymetry in shallow water. Density contrast of 5.0 g/cm3 estimated by the check points method of the gravity-geologic method (GGM) between seawater and the seafloor topographic mass was applied to predict bathymetry in shallow water areas outside of the Saemangeum Seawall located on the southwest coast of the Korean peninsula. Bathymetry predicted by the GGM was compared with depth measurements on the shipborne locations to analyze the bathymetry accuracy. The root mean square error (RMSE) of the differences of bathymetry between GGM and KRC on the KRC shipborne tracks in shallow water around the Saemangeum Seawall is 0.55 m. The topographic effects in off-tracks extracted from SAFAGAs in the GGM can be effectively utilized to predict bathymetry by combining with shipborne depth data in shallow water where shipborne depth data are limited. In addition, bathymetry and the SAFAGAs have a linear correlation in the 20 160 km wavelength. The coherency analysis was performed by computing the cross-spectral coherence between satellite altimetry derived bathymetry and the SAFAGAs. Acknowledgement This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2016R1A6A3A11931032).

  9. Time-variable gravity fields from satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas; Cheng, Minkang; Ries, John

    2014-05-01

    At the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR), we routinely deliver time-series of Earth's gravity field variations, some of it spanning more than two decades. These time-series are derived - in a consistent manner - from satellite laser ranging (SLR) data, from low-Earth orbiters tracked using GPS, and from low-low satellite to satellite tracking data from GRACE. In this paper, we review the information content in the gravity field time-series derived from each of these methods. We provide a comparison of the time-series at the decadal and annual time-scales, and identify the spatial modes of variability that are well or poorly estimated by each of the observing systems. The results have important bearing on the prospects of extending GRACE time-variable gravity time-series in the event of gaps between dedicated gravity missions, and for extending the time-series into the past. Support for this research from joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission, the NASA MEASURs program, and the NASA ROSES/GRACE Science Team is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Parameter sensitivity in satellite-gravity-constrained geothermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorutti, Alberto; Braitenberg, Carla

    2017-04-01

    The use of satellite gravity data in thermal structure estimates require identifying the factors that affect the gravity field and are related to the thermal characteristics of the lithosphere. We propose a set of forward-modelled synthetics, investigating the model response in terms of heat flow, temperature, and gravity effect at satellite altitude. The sensitivity analysis concerns the parameters involved, as heat production, thermal conductivity, density and their temperature dependence. We discuss the effect of the horizontal smoothing due to heat conduction, the superposition of the bulk thermal effect of near-surface processes (e.g. advection in ground-water and permeable faults, paleoclimatic effects, blanketing by sediments), and the out-of equilibrium conditions due to tectonic transients. All of them have the potential to distort the gravity-derived estimates.We find that the temperature-conductivity relationship has a small effect with respect to other parameter uncertainties on the modelled temperature depth variation, surface heat flow, thermal lithosphere thickness. We conclude that the global gravity is useful for geothermal studies.

  11. Secular Gravity Gradients in Non-Dynamical Chern-Simons Modified Gravity for Satellite Gradiometry Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Li-E

    2016-01-01

    With continuous advances in related technologies, relativistic gravitational experiments with orbiting gradiometers becomes feasible, which could naturally be incorporated into future satellite gravity missions. Tests of Chern-Simons modified gravity are meaningful since such a modification gives us insights into (possible) parity-violations in gravitation. In this work, we derive, at the post-Newtonian level, the new observables of secular gradients from the non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which will greatly improve the constraint on the mass scale $M_{CS}$ that may be drawn from satellite gradiometry measurements. For superconducting gradiometers, a strong bound $M_{CS}\\geq 10^{-7}\\ eV$ could in principle be obtained. For future optical gradiometers based on similar technologies from the LISA PathFinder mission, a even stronger bound $M_{CS}\\geq 10^{-5}\\ eV$ might be expected.

  12. High resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Pavlis, Nikolaos K.; Wang, Yan M.

    1992-01-01

    Spherical harmonic expansions to degree 360 have been developed that combine satellite potential coefficient information, terrestrial gravity data, satellite altimeter information as a direct tracking data type and topographic information. These models define improved representations of the Earth's gravitational potential beyond that available from just satellite or terrestrial data. The development of the degree 360 models, however, does not imply a uniform accuracy in the determination of the gravity field as numerous geographic areas are devoid of terrestrial data or the resolution of such data is limited to, for example, 100 km. This paper will consider theoretical and numerical questions related to the combination of the various data types. Various models of the combination process are discussed with a discussion of various correction terms for the different models. Various sources of gravity data will be described. The new OSU91 360 model will be discussed with comparisons made to previous 360 models and to other potential coefficient models that are complete to degree 50. Future directions in high degree potential coefficient models will be discussed.

  13. The gravity field of the Saturnian satellites Enceladus and Dione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-12-01

    Enceladus and Dione are the innermost moons of the Saturnian system visited by the spacecraft Cassini for gravity investigations. The small surface gravity (0.11 and 0.23 m/s2 respectively for Enceladus and Dione), the short duration of the gravitational interaction and the small number of available flybys (three for Enceladus and just one for Dione) make the determination of their gravity field particularly challenging. In spite of these limitations, we have measured the low degree gravity field of both satellites with sufficient accuracy to draw preliminary geophysical conclusions. The estimation relied primarily on precise range rate data, whose accuracy reached 10 micron/s at 60 s integration times under favorable conditions. In order to disentangle the effects of the spacecraft orbit, the satellite orbit and the satellite gravity, tracking coverage is required not only across closest approach, but also days before and after the flyby. The dynamical model used for the fits includes all relevant gravitational perturbations and the main non-gravitational accelerations (Cassini RTG's anisotropic thermal emission, solar radiation pressure). In addition to the gravity field coefficients a correction to the orbit of the spacecraft and the satellites was also estimated. The first and so far only Dione's flyby with tracking at closest approach occurred on December 12, 2011, at an altitude of 99 km. (A second gravity flyby is scheduled in 2015.) Although the low solar elongation angle caused a significant increase of the plasma noise in Doppler data, the low spacecraft altitude at closest approach and the otherwise favorable geometry allowed an estimation of the harmonic coefficients J2 and C22 to a relative accuracy below 2%. We have produced, in addition to an unconstrained estimate, a second solution where the quadrupole field is constrained by the requirement of hydrostaticity. Doppler residuals are unbiased and consistent with the expected noise in both cases. When

  14. Contribution of satellite laser ranging to combined gravity field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, A.; Krauss, S.; Hausleitner, W.; Baur, O.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of satellite-only gravity field modeling, satellite laser ranging (SLR) data is typically exploited to recover long-wavelength features. This contribution provides a detailed discussion of the SLR component of GOCO02S, the latest release of combined models within the GOCO series. Over a period of five years (January 2006 to December 2010), observations to LAGEOS-1, LAGEOS-2, Ajisai, Stella, and Starlette were analyzed. We conducted a series of closed-loop simulations and found that estimating monthly sets of spherical harmonic coefficients beyond degree five leads to exceedingly ill-posed normal equation systems. Therefore, we adopted degree five as the spectral resolution for real data analysis. We compared our monthly coefficient estimates of degree two with SLR and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) time series provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) at Austin, Texas. Significant deviations in C20 were noted between SLR and GRACE; the agreement is better for the non-zonal coefficients. Fitting sinusoids together with a linear trend to our C20 time series yielded a rate of (-1.75 ± 0.6) × 10-11/yr; this drift is equivalent to a geoid change from pole to equator of 0.35 ± 0.12 mm/yr or an apparent Greenland mass loss of 178.5 ± 61.2 km3/yr. The mean of all monthly solutions, averaged over the five-year period, served as input for the satellite-only model GOCO02S. The contribution of SLR to the combined gravity field model is highest for C20, and hence is essential for the determination of the Earth's oblateness.

  15. Merging of airborne gravity and gravity derived from satellite altimetry: Test cases along the coast of greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Tscherning, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    for the use of gravity data especially, when computing geoid models in coastal regions. The presence of reliable marine gravity data for independent control offers an opportunity to study procedures for the merging of airborne and satellite data around Greenland. Two different merging techniques, both based...... on collocation, are investigated in this paper. Collocation offers a way of combining the individual airborne gravity observation with either the residual geoid observations derived from satellite altimetry or with gravity derived from these data using the inverse Stokes method implemented by Fast Fourier...

  16. The use of satellites in gravity field determination and model adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Petrus Nicolaas Anna Maria

    1992-06-01

    Methods to improve gravity field models of the Earth with available data from satellite observations are proposed and discussed. In principle, all types of satellite observations mentioned give information of the satellite orbit perturbations and in conjunction the Earth's gravity field, because the satellite orbits are affected most by the Earth's gravity field. Therefore, two subjects are addressed: representation forms of the gravity field of the Earth and the theory of satellite orbit perturbations. An analytical orbit perturbation theory is presented and shown to be sufficiently accurate for describing satellite orbit perturbations if certain conditions are fulfilled. Gravity field adjustment experiments using the analytical orbit perturbation theory are discussed using real satellite observations. These observations consisted of Seasat laser range measurements and crossover differences, and of Geosat altimeter measurements and crossover differences. A look into the future, particularly relating to the ARISTOTELES (Applications and Research Involving Space Techniques for the Observation of the Earth's field from Low Earth Orbit Spacecraft) mission, is given.

  17. A gravity gradient stabilized solar power satellite design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a solar power satellite (SPS) is reviewed, and a design proposed for such a satellite taking advantage of solar radiation pressure and gravity gradient forces to eliminate much of the structure from the baseline configuration. The SPS design consists of a solar cell array lying in the orbital plane and a free floating mirror above to reflect sunlight down onto it. The structural modes of the solar cell array are analyzed and found to be well within control limitations. Preliminary calculations concerning the free floating mirror and its position-keeping propellant requirements are also performed. A numerical example is presented, which shows that, even in terms of mass only, this configuration is a competitive design when compared to the conventional Department of Energy reference design. Other advantages, such as easier assembly in orbit, lower position-keeping propellant requirements, possibilities for decreasing necessary solar cell area, and longer solar cell life, may make this design superior.

  18. On the spectral combination of satellite gravity model, terrestrial and airborne gravity data for local gravimetric geoid computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yan Ming

    2016-12-01

    One of the challenges for geoid determination is the combination of heterogeneous gravity data. Because of the distinctive spectral content of different data sets, spectral combination is a suitable candidate for its solution. The key to have a successful combination is to determine the proper spectral weights, or the error degree variances of each data set. In this paper, the error degree variances of terrestrial and airborne gravity data at low degrees are estimated by the aid of a satellite gravity model using harmonic analysis. For higher degrees, the error covariances are estimated from local gravity data first, and then used to compute the error degree variances. The white and colored noise models are also used to estimate the error degree variances of local gravity data for comparisons. Based on the error degree variances, the spectral weights of satellite gravity models, terrestrial and airborne gravity data are determined and applied for geoid computation in Texas area. The computed gravimetric geoid models are tested against an independent, highly accurate geoid profile of the Geoid Slope Validation Survey 2011 (GSVS11). The geoid computed by combining satellite gravity model GOCO03S and terrestrial (land and DTU13 altimetric) gravity data agrees with GSVS11 to ±1.1 cm in terms of standard deviation along a line of 325 km. After incorporating the airborne gravity data collected at 11 km altitude, the standard deviation is reduced to ±0.8 cm. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility of spectral combination in geoid computation and the contribution of airborne gravity in an area of high quality terrestrial gravity data. Using the GSVS11 data and the spectral combination, the degree of correctness of the error spectra and the quality of satellite gravity models can also be revealed.

  19. Local gravity disturbance estimation from multiple-high-single-low satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekeli, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    The idea of satellite-to-satellite tracking in the high-low mode has received renewed attention in light of the uncertain future of NASA's proposed low-low mission, Geopotential Research Mission (GRM). The principal disadvantage with a high-low system is the increased time interval required to obtain global coverage since the intersatellite visibility is often obscured by Earth. The U.S. Air Force has begun to investigate high-low satellite-to-satellite tracking between the Global Positioning System (GPS) of satellites (high component) and NASA's Space Transportation System (STS), the shuttle (low component). Because the GPS satellites form, or will form, a constellation enabling continuous three-dimensional tracking of a low-altitude orbiter, there will be no data gaps due to lack of intervisibility. Furthermore, all three components of the gravitation vector are estimable at altitude, a given grid of which gives a stronger estimate of gravity on Earth's surface than a similar grid of line-of-sight gravitation components. The proposed Air Force mission is STAGE (Shuttle-GPS Tracking for Anomalous Gravitation Estimation) and is designed for local gravity field determinations since the shuttle will likely not achieve polar orbits. The motivation for STAGE was the feasibility to obtain reasonable accuracies with absolutely minimal cost. Instead of simulating drag-free orbits, STAGE uses direct measurements of the nongravitational forces obtained by an inertial package onboard the shuttle. The sort of accuracies that would be achievable from STAGE vis-a-vis other satellite tracking missions such as GRM and European Space Agency's POPSAT-GRM are analyzed.

  20. Merging of airborne gravity and gravity derived from satellite altimetry: Test cases along the coast of greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Tscherning, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre - Denmark (KMS) has for several years produced gravity anomaly maps over the oceans derived from satellite altimetry. During the last four years, KMS has also conducted airborne gravity surveys along the coast of Greenland dedicated to complement the existing onsh...

  1. Geodynamics implication of GPS and satellite altimeter and gravity observations to the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled H. Zahran

    2012-06-01

    Results show important zones of mass discontinuity in this region correlated with the seismological activities and temporal gravity variations agree with the crustal deformation obtained from GPS observations. The current study indicates that satellite gravity data is a valuable source of data in understanding the geodynamical behavior of the studied region and that satellite gravity data is an important contemporary source of data in the geodynamical studies.

  2. 1-deg x 1-deg Terrestrial Mean Free-Air Anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1x1 degree Terrestrial Mean Free-Air Gravity Anomaly and Geoid Undulations Data Base was compiled and developed by the Ohio State University. This data base was...

  3. 30-min x 30-min Terrestrial Mean Free-Air Anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 30-min x 30-min Terrestrial Mean Free-Air Gravity Anomaly and Geoid Undulations Data Base was compiled and developed by the Ohio State University. This data base...

  4. South China Sea crustal thickness and lithosphere thinning from satellite gravity inversion incorporating a lithospheric thermal gravity anomaly correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Gozzard, Simon; Alvey, Andy

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of ocean crust and lithosphere within the South China Sea (SCS) are controversial. Sea-floor spreading re-orientation and ridge jumps during the Oligocene-Miocene formation of the South China Sea led to the present complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust, micro-continents and volcanic ridges. We determine Moho depth, crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning (1- 1/beta) for the South China Sea using a gravity inversion method which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir, 2008). The gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition structure and continent-ocean boundary location which is independent of ocean isochron information. A correction is required for the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly in order to determine Moho depth accurately from gravity inversion; the elevated lithosphere geotherm of the young oceanic and rifted continental margin lithosphere of the South China Sea produces a large lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly which in places exceeds -150 mGal. The gravity anomaly inversion is carried out in the 3D spectral domain (using Parker 1972) to determine 3D Moho geometry and invokes Smith's uniqueness theorem. The gravity anomaly contribution from sediments assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. The gravity inversion includes a parameterization of the decompression melting model of White & McKenzie (1999) to predict volcanic addition generated during continental breakup lithosphere thinning and seafloor spreading. Public domain free air gravity anomaly, bathymetry and sediment thickness data are used in this gravity inversion. Using crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor maps with superimposed shaded-relief free-air gravity anomaly, we improve the determination of pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy, rift orientation and sea-floor spreading trajectory. SCS conjugate margins

  5. The German joint research project "concepts for future gravity satellite missions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubelt, Tilo; Sneeuw, Nico; Fichter, Walter; Müller, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Within the German joint research project "concepts for future gravity satellite missions", funded by the Geotechnologies programme of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, options and concepts for future satellite missions for precise (time-variable) gravity field recovery are investigated. The project team is composed of members from science and industry, bringing together experts in geodesy, satellite systems, metrology, sensor technology and control systems. The majority of team members already contributed to former gravity missions. The composition of the team guarantees that not only geodetic aspects and objectives are investigated, but also technological and financial constraints are considered. Conversely, satellite, sensor and system concepts are developed and improved in a direct exchange with geodetic and scientific claims. The project aims to develop concepts for both near and mid-term future satellite missions, taking into account e.g. advanced satellite formations and constellations, improved orbit design, innovative metrology and sensor systems and advances in satellite systems.

  6. Demonstration on the indexes design of gravity satellite orbit parameters in the low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaogang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Combining with the exigent demand of the development of satellite gravimetry system in China, aiming at the determination of technical indexes of gravity satellite orbit parameters, on the basis of the numerical experiments and results analysis, the design indexes of gravity satellite orbit height, inter-satellite range and the orbit inclination are analyzed and calculated, and the issues towards twin gravity satellites such as coherence requirement of the orbit semi-major axes, control requirement of the pitch angle and time interval requirement to keep twin satellites formation in mobility are discussed. Results show that the satellite orbit height is 400 km to 500 km, the inter-satellite range is about 220 km, the satellite orbit inclination is between polar orbit and sun-synchronous orbit, the semi-major axes difference of twin satellites orbit is within ±70. 146 m, the pitch angle of twin satellites is about 0.9 degree, and the time interval to keep twin satellites formation in mobility is 7 days to 15 days.

  7. Antarctic marine gravity field from high-density satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    High-density (about 2-km profile spacing) Geosat/GM altimetry profiles were obtained for Antarctic waters (6-deg S to 72 deg S) and converted to vertical gravity gradient, using Laplace's equation to directly calculate gravity gradient from vertical deflection grids and Fourier analysis to construct gravity anomalies from two vertical deflection grids. The resultant gravity grids have resolution and accuracy comparable to shipboard gravity profiles. The obtained gravity maps display many interesting and previously uncharted features, such as a propagating rift wake and a large 'leaky transform' along the Pacific-Antarctic Rise.

  8. Spectral assessment of isostatic gravity models against CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE satellite-only and combined gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoulis, Dimitrios; Patlakis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    The availability of digital elevation databases representing the topographic and bathymetric relief with global homogeneous coverage and increasing resolution permits the computation of crust-related Earth gravity models, the so-called topographic/isostatic Earth gravity models (henceforth T/I models). Although expressing the spherical harmonic content of the topographic masses, the interpretation purpose of T/I models has not been given the attention it deserves, apart from the fact that they express some degree of compensation to the observed spectrum of the topographic heights, depending on the kind of the applied compensation mechanism. The present contribution attempts to improve the interpretation aspects of T/I Earth gravity models. To this end, a rigorous spectral assessment is performed to a standard Airy/Heiskanen T/I model against different CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), Gravity field and steadystate Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite-only, and combined gravity models. Different correlation bandwidths emerge for these four groups of satellite-based gravity models. The band-limited forward computation of the models using these bandwidths reproduces nicely the main features of the applied T/I model.

  9. Changing inclination of earth satellites using the gravity of the moon

    OpenAIRE

    Karla de Souza Torres; Prado, A. F. B. A.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the problem of the orbital control of an Earth's satellite using the gravity of the Moon. The main objective is to study a technique to decrease the fuel consumption of a plane change maneuver to be performed in a satellite that is in orbit around the Earth. The main idea of this approach is to send the satellite to the Moon using a single-impulsive maneuver, use the gravity field of the Moon to make the desired plane change of the trajectory, and then return the satellite to its n...

  10. The role of satellite altimetry in gravity field modelling in coastal areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2000-01-01

    During recent years altimetry from the two geodetic missions of GEOSAT and ERS-1 has enabled the derivation of high resolution near global gravity field from altimetry [Andersen and Knudsen, 1995, 1996; Sandwell and Smith, 1997]. Altimetric gravity fields are unique in the sense that they provide...... global uniform gravity information with very high resolution, and these global marine gravity fields are registered on a two by two minute grid corresponding to 4 by 4 kilometres at the equator. In this presentation several coastal complications in deriving the marine gravity field from satellite...... altimetry will be investigated using the KMS98 gravity field. Comparison with other sources of gravity field information like airborne and marine gravity observations will be carried out and two fundamentally different test areas (Azores and Skagerak) will be studied to investigated the different role...

  11. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy - a 30 year adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    The first information on the Earth's gravitational field from artificial satellite observations was published in 1958. The next years have seen a dramatic improvement in the resolution and accuracy of the series representation of the Earth's gravity field. The improvements have taken place slowly taking advantage of improved measurement accuracy and the increasing number of satellites. The proposed ARISTOTELES mission would provide the opportunity to take a significant leap in improving our knowledge of the Earth's gravity field.

  12. Efficient GOCE satellite gravity field recovery based on least-squares using QR decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, O.; Austen, G.; Kusche, J.

    2007-01-01

    We develop and apply an efficient strategy for Earth gravity field recovery from satellite gravity gradiometry data. Our approach is based upon the Paige-Saunders iterative least-squares method using QR decomposition (LSQR). We modify the original algorithm for space-geodetic applications: firstly,

  13. Antarctic outlet glacier mass change resolved at basin scale from satellite gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Fuchs, M.; Ivins, E.; Van der Wal, W.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Horwath, M.

    2014-01-01

    The orbit and instrumental measurement of the Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission offer the highest ever resolution capabilities for mapping Earth's gravity field from space. However, past analysis predicted that GOCE would not detect changes in ice

  14. Antarctic outlet glacier mass change resolved at basin scale from satellite gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Fuchs, M.; Ivins, E.; Van der Wal, W.; Schrama, E.J.O.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Horwath, M.

    2014-01-01

    The orbit and instrumental measurement of the Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission offer the highest ever resolution capabilities for mapping Earth's gravity field from space. However, past analysis predicted that GOCE would not detect changes in ice she

  15. A climatology of gravity wave parameters based on satellite limb soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Gravity waves are one of the main drivers of atmospheric dynamics. The resolution of most global circulation models (GCMs) and chemistry climate models (CCMs), however, is too coarse to properly resolve the small scales of gravity waves. Horizontal scales of gravity waves are in the range of tens to a few thousand kilometers. Gravity wave source processes involve even smaller scales. Therefore GCMs/CCMs usually parametrize the effect of gravity waves on the global circulation. These parametrizations are very simplified, and comparisons with global observations of gravity waves are needed for an improvement of parametrizations and an alleviation of model biases. In our study, we present a global data set of gravity wave distributions observed in the stratosphere and the mesosphere by the infrared limb sounding satellite instruments High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). We provide various gravity wave parameters (for example, gravity variances, potential energies and absolute momentum fluxes). This comprehensive climatological data set can serve for comparison with other instruments (ground based, airborne, or other satellite instruments), as well as for comparison with gravity wave distributions, both resolved and parametrized, in GCMs and CCMs. The purpose of providing various different parameters is to make our data set useful for a large number of potential users and to overcome limitations of other observation techniques, or of models, that may be able to provide only one of those parameters. We present a climatology of typical average global distributions and of zonal averages, as well as their natural range of variations. In addition, we discuss seasonal variations of the global distribution of gravity waves, as well as limitations of our method of deriving gravity wave parameters from satellite data.

  16. The study of gravity gradient effect on attitude of low earth orbit satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Nor Hazadura; Yaacob, Sazali; Muthusamy, Hariharan; Hamzah, Norhizam; Ghazali, Najah

    2013-04-01

    Simulations and mathematical models are increasingly used to assist the process of decision making in engineering design. The objective of this paper is to simulate the linear attitude dynamics of small satellites under gravity gradient torque which is inherent in low earth orbit. The equations were first derived in their nonlinear form, and then manipulated and simulated in their linear form. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of choosing the appropriate values of satellite's moment of inertia in designing phase of a satellite.

  17. The zero gravity curve and surface and radii for geostationary and geosynchronous satellite orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjöberg L.E.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A geosynchronous satellite orbits the Earth along a constant longitude. A special case is the geostationary satellite that is located at a constant position above the equator. The ideal position of a geostationary satellite is at the level of zero gravity, i.e. at the geocentric radius where the gravitational force of the Earth equals the centrifugal force. These forces must be compensated for several perturbing forces, in particular for the lunisolar tides. Considering that the gravity field of the Earth varies not only radially but also laterally, this study focuses on the variations of zero gravity not only on the equator (for geostationary satellites but also for various latitudes. It is found that the radius of a geostationary satellite deviates from its mean value of 42164.2 km only within ±2 m, mainly due to the spherical harmonic coefficient J22, which is related with the equatorial flattening of the Earth. Away from the equator the zero gravity surface deviates from the ideal radius of a geosynchronous satellite, and more so for higher latitudes. While the radius of the former surface increases towards infinity towards the poles, the latter decreases about 520 m from the equator to the pole. Tidal effects vary these radii within ±2.3 km.

  18. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy: A 30 year adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    The history of research in the Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy is described and limitations of existing geopotential models are indicated. Although current solutions have made outstanding achievements, their limited accuracy restricts their use for some oceanographic applications. An example is discussed where there appears to be an incompatibility of the long wavelength geoid undulation obtained through satellite analysis with independent estimates that have become available. The future Aristoteles mission is seen as providing a significant leap in Earth gravity field knowledge improvement.

  19. A GOCE only gravity model GOSG01S and the validation of GOCE related satellite gravity models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We compile the GOCE-only satellite model GOSG01S complete to spherical harmonic degree of 220 using Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG data and the Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST observations along the GOCE orbit based on applying a least-squares analysis. The diagonal components (Vxx, Vyy, Vzz of the gravitational gradient tensor are used to form the system of observation equations with the band-pass ARMA filter. The point-wise acceleration observations (ax, ay, az along the orbit are used to form the system of observation equations up to the maximum spherical harmonic degree/order 130. The analysis of spectral accuracy characteristics of the newly derived gravitational model GOSG01S and the existing models GOTIM04S, GODIR04S, GOSPW04S and JYY_GOCE02S based on their comparison with the ultra-high degree model EIGEN-6C2 reveals a significant consistency at the spectral window approximately between 80 and 190 due to the same period SGG data used to compile these models. The GOCE related satellite gravity models GOSG01S, GOTIM05S, GODIR05S, GOTIM04S, GODIR04S, GOSPW04S, JYY_GOCE02S, EIGEN-6C2 and EGM2008 are also validated by using GPS-leveling data in China and USA. According to the truncation at degree 200, the statistic results show that all GGMs have very similar differences at GPS-leveling points in USA, and all GOCE related gravity models have better performance than EGM2008 in China. This suggests that all these models provide much more information on the gravity field than EGM2008 in areas with low terrestrial gravity coverage. And STDs of height anomaly differences in China for the selected truncation degrees show that GOCE has improved the accuracy of the global models beyond degree 90 and the accuracies of the models improve from 24 cm to 16 cm. STDs of geoid height differences in USA show that GOSG01S model has best consistency comparing with GPS-leveling data for the frequency band of the degree between 20 and 160.

  20. Drag-Free Motion Control of Satellite for High-Precision Gravity Field Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    , sensors, actuators and environmental disturbances to the required micro-Newton accuracy. A control system is designed to compensate the non-gravitational disturbances on the satellite in three axes using an H∞-design. Performance is validated against mission requirements. Keywords: Spacecraft Attitude......High precision mapping of the geoid and the Earth's gravity field are of importance to a wide range of ongoing studies in areas like ocean circulation, solid Earth physics and ice sheet dynamics. Using a satellite in orbit around the Earth gives the opportunity to map the Earth's gravity field in 3...... dimensions with much better accuracy and spatial resolution than ever accomplished. To reach the desired quality of measurements, the satellite must fly in a low Earth orbit where disturbances from atmospheric drag and the Earth's magnetic field will perturb the satellite's motion. These effects...

  1. Gravity Anomalies and Estimated Topography Derived from Satellite Altimetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In many areas of the global ocean, the depth of the seafloor is not well known because survey lines by ships are hundreds of kilometers apart. Satellites carrying...

  2. Satellite Gravity Transforms Unmask Tectonic Pattern of Arabian-African Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Katz, Youri

    2017-04-01

    Satellite derived geophysical gravity data are the modern powerful tool of regional tectono-geophysical examination of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. It is well known that regional long-term seismological prognosis, strategy of searching economic deposits and many other important geological-geophysical problems are based mainly on constructions derived from the combined tectono-geophysical zonation. Some authors' experience of the tectono-geophysical zonation in the Eastern Mediterranean (both sea and land) with satellite derived gravity field (Eppelbaum and Katz, 2015a, 2015b) indicates a high effectiveness of the data employment for delineation of different tectono-structural units. Therefore, on the basis of the previous successive application, satellite derived gravity field analysis was applied for a giant (covering > 10 mln. km2) and complex Arabian-African region (including Zagros Mts.). The gravity field retracked from the Geosat and ERS-1 altimetry (e.g., Sandwell and Smith, 2009) was processed by the use of different mathematical apparatus employment enabling to underline these or those tectonic (geodynamic) features of the region under study. The main goals of present investigation are following: (1) employment of a new powerful regional geophysical tool - satellite derived gravity data and its transforms for unmasking some buried tectonic and geodynamic peculiarities of the study area, (2) finding definite relationships between the novel tectonic map and the gravity field transformations, (3) development of a novel tectonic map of this area (on the basis of careful examination of and generalization of available geological and geophysical (mostly satellite gravity) data). The compiled gravity map (for the map compiling more than 4 mln. observations were utilized) with the main tectonic features shows the intricate gravity pattern of the investigated area. An initial analysis of the gravity field behavior enabled to separate two main types of

  3. Interpretation of free-air gravity anomaly data for determining the crustal structure across the continental margins and aseismic ridges: Some examples from Indian continental margins and deep-sea basins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.

    of Alaska and Japan trench, east of the Japanese Islands. Gravity anomalies across continental margins Continental margins are at or near to the transition zone between continental and oceanic crusts. Passive margins are commonly in isostatic.... Generalized bathymetry map of the Indian continental margins After Mishra et al., (2004) The western and eastern margins of India are classified under passive/Atlantic type continental margins, and the structural architecture is similar to any...

  4. Detailed gravity anomalies from GEOS-3 satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalapillai, G. S.; Mourad, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for deriving mean gravity anomalies from dense altimetry data was developed. A combination of both deterministic and statistical techniques was used. The basic mathematical model was based on the Stokes' equation which describes the analytical relationship between mean gravity anomalies and geoid undulations at a point; this undulation is a linear function of the altimetry data at that point. The overdetermined problem resulting from the excessive altimetry data available was solved using Least-Squares principles. These principles enable the simultaneous estimation of the associated standard deviations reflecting the internal consistency based on the accuracy estimates provided for the altimetry data as well as for the terrestrial anomaly data. Several test computations were made of the anomalies and their accuracy estimates using GOES-3 data.

  5. The DNSC08GRA global marine gravity field from double retracked satellite altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Berry, P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite radar altimetry has been monitoring the earth's oceans from space for several decades. However, only the GEOSAT and ERS-1 geodetic mission data recorded more than a decade ago provide altimetry with adequate spatial coverage to derive a high-resolution marine gravity field. The original...

  6. Energy integral method for gravity field determination from satellite orbit coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.N.A.M.; Sneeuw, N.; Gerlach, C.

    2003-01-01

    A fast iterative method for gravity field determination from low Earth satellite orbit coordinates has been developed and implemented successfully. The method is based on energy conservation and avoids problems related to orbit dynamics and initial state. In addition, the particular geometry of a re

  7. Error analysis for satellite gravity field determination based on two-dimensional Fourier methods

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Lin; Hsu, Houtse; Gao, Fang; Zhu, Zhu; Luo, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The time-wise and space-wise approaches are generally applied to data processing and error analysis for satellite gravimetry missions. But both the approaches, which are based on least-squares collocation, address the whole effect of measurement errors and estimate the resolution of gravity field models mainly from a numerical point of indirect view. Moreover, requirement for higher accuracy and resolution gravity field models could make the computation more difficult, and serious numerical instabilities arise. In order to overcome the problems, this study focuses on constructing a direct relationship between power spectral density of the satellite gravimetry measurements and coefficients of the Earth's gravity potential. Based on two-dimensional Fourier transform, the relationship is analytically concluded. By taking advantage of the analytical expression, it is efficient and distinct for parameter estimation and error analysis of missions. From the relationship and the simulations, it is analytically confir...

  8. Ice Mass Change in Greenland and Antarctica Between 1993 and 2013 from Satellite Gravity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpe, Matthieu J.; Nerem, R. Steven; Forootan, Ehsan; Schmidt, Michael; Lemoine, Frank G.; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Landerer, Felix W.

    2017-01-01

    We construct long-term time series of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet mass change from satellite gravity measurements. A statistical reconstruction approach is developed based on a principal component analysis (PCA) to combine high-resolution spatial modes from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission with the gravity information from conventional satellite tracking data. Uncertainties of this reconstruction are rigorously assessed; they include temporal limitations for short GRACE measurements, spatial limitations for the low-resolution conventional tracking data measurements, and limitations of the estimated statistical relationships between low- and high-degree potential coefficients reflected in the PCA modes. Trends of mass variations in Greenland and Antarctica are assessed against a number of previous studies. The resulting time series for Greenland show a higher rate of mass loss than other methods before 2000, while the Antarctic ice sheet appears heavily influenced by interannual variations.

  9. Performance analysis of satellite constellations for the next generation of gravity missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, J.; Flechtner, F.; Löcher, A.; Kusche, J.

    2011-12-01

    The GOCE and GRACE gravity missions have dramatically improved the knowledge of the Earth's static and time-variable gravity field due to their highly precise on-board instrumentation. This resulted in new information about the mass distribution and transport within or around the Earth system to be used in solid Earth geophysics, oceanography and sea level studies, hydrology, ice mass budget investigations and geodesy. GFZ Potsdam and IGG Bonn, with partners from German industry and universities, have conducted several studies in order to develop a concept for a future gravity mission based on low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, but realized with laser metrology. In our poster we summarize the performance of different mission scenarios through full-scale simulations and their capacity to reach the science objectives.

  10. MPI Parallel Algorithm in Satellite Gravity Field Model Inversion on the Basis of Least Square Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Hao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the intensive computing tasks and high memory demand problem in satellite gravity field model inversion on the basis of huge amounts of satellite gravity observations, the parallel algorithm for high truncated order and degree satellite gravity field model inversion with least square method on the basis of MPI was introduced. After analyzing the time and space complexity of each step in the solving flow, the parallel I/O, block-organized storage and block-organized computation algorithm on the basis of MPI are introduced to design the parallel algorithm for building design matrix, establishing and solving normal equation, and the simulation results indicate that the parallel efficiency of building design matrix, establishing and solving normal equation can reach to 95%, 68%and 63% respectively. In addition, on the basis of GOCE simulated orbits and radial disturbance gravity gradient data(518 400 epochs in total, two earth gravity models truncated to degree and order 120, 240 are inversed, and the relative computation time and memory demand are only about 40 minutes and 7 hours, 290 MB and 1.57 GB respectively. Eventually, a simulation numerical calculation for earth gravity field model inversion with the simulation data, which has the equivalent noise level with GRACE and GOCE mission, is conducted. The accuracy of inversion model has a good consistent with current released model, and the combined mode can complement the spectral information of each individual mission, which indicates that the parallel algorithm in this paper can be applied to inverse the high truncated degree and order earth gravity model efficiently and stably.

  11. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Negro, Ciro; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-10-30

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 - December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption.

  12. Orbit Determination of the SELENE Satellites Using Multi-Satellite Data Types and Evaluation of SELENE Gravity Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Noda, H.; Araki, H.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2011-01-01

    The SELENE mission, consisting of three separate satellites that use different terrestrial-based tracking systems, presents a unique opportunity to evaluate the contribution of these tracking systems to orbit determination precision. The tracking data consist of four-way Doppler between the main orbiter and one of the two sub-satellites while the former is over the far side, and of same-beam differential VLBI tracking between the two sub-satellites. Laser altimeter data are also used for orbit determination. The contribution to orbit precision of these different data types is investigated through orbit overlap analysis. It is shown that using four-way and VLBI data improves orbit consistency for all satellites involved by reducing peak values in orbit overlap differences that exist when only standard two-way Doppler and range data are used. Including laser altimeter data improves the orbit precision of the SELENE main satellite further, resulting in very smooth total orbit errors at an average level of 18m. The multi-satellite data have also resulted in improved lunar gravity field models, which are assessed through orbit overlap analysis using Lunar Prospector tracking data. Improvements over a pre-SELENE model are shown to be mostly in the along-track and cross-track directions. Orbit overlap differences are at a level between 13 and 21 m with the SELENE models, depending on whether l-day data overlaps or I-day predictions are used.

  13. A geopotential model from satellite tracking, altimeter, and surface gravity data: GEM-T3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Marshall, J. A.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.; Williamson, R. G.; Chinn, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An improved model of Earth's gravitational field, Goddard Earth Model T-3 (GEM-T3), has been developed from a combination of satellite tracking, satellite altimeter, and surface gravimetric data. GEM-T3 provides a significant improvement in the modeling of the gravity field at half wavelengths of 400 km and longer. This model, complete to degree and order 50, yields more accurate satellite orbits and an improved geoid representation than previous Goddard Earth Models. GEM-T3 uses altimeter data from GEOS 3 (1975-1976), Seasat (1978) and Geosat (1986-1987). Tracking information used in the solution includes more than 1300 arcs of data encompassing 31 different satellites. The recovery of the long-wavelength components of the solution relies mostly on highly precise satellite laser ranging (SLR) data, but also includes Tracking Network (TRANET) Doppler, optical, and satellite-to-satellite tracking acquired between the ATS 6 and GEOS 3 satellites. The main advances over GEM-T2 (beyond the inclusion of altimeter and surface gravity information which is essential for the resolution of the shorter wavelength geoid) are some improved tracking data analysis approaches and additional SLR data. Although the use of altimeter data has greatly enhanced the modeling of the ocean geoid between 65 deg N and 60 deg S latitudes in GEM-T3, the lack of accurate detailed surface gravimetry leaves poor geoid resolution over many continental regions of great tectonic interest (e.g., Himalayas, Andes). Estimates of polar motion, tracking station coordinates, and long-wavelength ocean tidal terms were also made (accounting for 6330 parameters). GEM-T3 has undergone error calibration using a technique based on subset solutions to produce reliable error estimates. The calibration is based on the condition that the expected mean square deviation of a subset gravity solution from the full set values is predicted by the solutions' error covariances. Data weights are iteratively adjusted until

  14. Changing inclination of earth satellites using the gravity of the moon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla de Souza Torres

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the problem of the orbital control of an Earth's satellite using the gravity of the Moon. The main objective is to study a technique to decrease the fuel consumption of a plane change maneuver to be performed in a satellite that is in orbit around the Earth. The main idea of this approach is to send the satellite to the Moon using a single-impulsive maneuver, use the gravity field of the Moon to make the desired plane change of the trajectory, and then return the satellite to its nominal semimajor axis and eccentricity using a bi-impulsive Hohmann-type maneuver. The satellite is assumed to start in a Keplerian orbit in the plane of the lunar orbit around the Earth and the goal is to put it in a similar orbit that differs from the initial orbit only by the inclination. A description of the close-approach maneuver is made in the three-dimensional space. Analytical equations based on the patched conics approach are used to calculate the variation in velocity, angular momentum, energy, and inclination of the satellite. Then, several simulations are made to evaluate the savings involved. The time required by those transfers is also calculated and shown.

  15. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  16. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  17. Global thermochemical inversion of seismic waveforms, gravity satellite data, and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, J.; Lebedev, S.; Martinec, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Conventional methods of seismic tomography, topography, gravity and electromagnetic data analysis and geodynamic modelling constrain distributions of seismic velocity, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity at depth, all depending on temperature and composition of Earth's rocks. However, modelling and interpretation of multiple data provide a multifaceted image of the true thermochemical structure of the Earth that needs to be consistently integrated. A simple combination of gravity, electromagnetic, geodynamics, petrological and seismic models alone is insufficient due to the non-uniqueness and different sensitivities of these models, and the internal consistency relationships that must connect all the intermediate parameters describing the Earth. In fact, global Earth models based on different observables often lead to rather different images of the Earth. A breakthrough in global and consistent imaging of the fine-scale thermochemical hydrous and rheological structure of the Earth's lithosphere and underlying mantle is needed. Thermodynamic and petrological links between seismic velocities, density, electrical conductivity, viscosity, melt, water, temperature, pressure and composition within the Earth can now be modelled accurately using new methods of computational petrology and data from laboratory experiments. The growth of very large terrestrial and satellite geophysical data over the last few years, together with the advancement of petrological and geophysical modelling techniques, now present an opportunity for global, thermochemical and deformation 3D imaging of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle with unprecedented resolution. Here we present a method for self-consistent joint inversion of multiple data sets, including seismic, satellite gravity and surface topography data, applied to obtain a detailed and robust global thermochemical image of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle. This project combines state-of-the-art seismic

  18. Understanding data noise in gravity field recovery on the basis of inter-satellite ranging measurements acquired by the satellite gravimetry mission GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditmar, P.; Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Hashemi Farahani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral analysis of data noise is performed in the context of gravity field recovery from inter-satellite ranging measurements acquired by the satellite gravimetry mission GRACE. The motivation of the study is two-fold: (i) to promote a further improvement of GRACE data processing techniques and

  19. Gravity Station Data for Portugal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 3064 records. This data base was received in April 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  20. Interior Alaska Gravity Station Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 9416 records. This data base was received in March 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  1. Gravity Station Data for Spain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data total 28493 records. This data base was received in April 1997. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air Anomalies which have been...

  2. Time variable gravity retrieval and treatment of temporal aliasing using optical two-way links between GALILEO and LEO satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Markus; Pail, Roland; Murböck, Michael; Schlicht, Anja

    2016-04-01

    For the determination of temporal gravity fields satellite missions such as GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) or CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) were used in the last decade. These missions improved the knowledge of atmospheric, oceanic and tidal mass variations. The most limiting factor of temporal gravity retrieval quality is temporal aliasing due to the undersampling of high frequency signals, especially in the atmosphere and oceans. This kind of error causes the typical stripes in spatial representations of global gravity fields such as from GRACE. As part of the GETRIS (Geodesy and Time Reference in Space) mission, that aims to establish a geodetic reference station and precise time- and frequency reference in space by using optical two-way communication links between geostationary (GEO) and low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, a possible future gravity field mission can be set up. By expanding the GETRIS space segment to the global satellite navigation systems (GNSS) the optical two-way links also connect the GALILEO satellites among themselves and to LEO satellites. From these links between GALILEO and LEO satellites gravitational information can be extracted. In our simulations inter-satellite links between GALILEO and LEO satellites are used to determine temporal changes in the Earth's gravitational field. One of the main goals of this work is to find a suitable constellation together with the best analysis method to reduce temporal aliasing errors. Concerning non-tidal aliasing, it could be shown that the co-estimation of short-period long-wavelength gravity field signals, the so-called Wiese approach, is a powerful method for aliasing reduction (Wiese et al. 2013). By means of a closed loop mission simulator using inter-satellite observations as acceleration differences along the line-of-sight, different mission scenarios for GALILEO-LEO inter-satellite links and different functional models like the Wiese approach are analysed.

  3. Satellite Galaxy Velocity Dispersions in the SDSS and Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Moffat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. The precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler velocities, allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.

  4. Inversion of marine gravity anomalies over southeastern China seas from multi-satellite altimeter vertical deflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengjun; Sandwell, David T.; Jin, Taoyong; Li, Dawei

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy and resolution of marine gravity field derived from satellite altimetry mainly depends on the range precision and dense spatial distribution. This paper aims at modeling a regional marine gravity field with improved accuracy and higher resolution (1‧ × 1‧) over Southeastern China Seas using additional data from CryoSat-2 as well as new data from AltiKa. Three approaches are used to enhance the precision level of satellite-derived gravity anomalies. Firstly we evaluate a suite of published retracking algorithms and find the two-step retracker is optimal for open ocean waveforms. Secondly, we evaluate the filtering and resampling procedure used to reduce the full 20 or 40 Hz data to a lower rate having lower noise. We adopt a uniform low-pass filter for all altimeter missions and resample at 5 Hz and then perform a second editing based on sea surface slope estimates from previous models. Thirdly, we selected WHU12 model to update the corrections provided in geophysical data record. We finally calculated the 1‧ × 1‧ marine gravity field model by using EGM2008 model as reference field during the remove/restore procedure. The root mean squares of the discrepancies between the new result and DTU10, DTU13, V23.1, EGM2008 are within the range of 1.8- 3.9 mGal, while the verification with respect to shipboard gravity data shows that the accuracy of the new result reached a comparable level with DTU13 and was slightly superior to V23.1, DTU10 and EGM2008 models. Moreover, the new result has a 2 mGal better accuracy over open seas than coastal areas with shallow water depth.

  5. A new regard on the tectonic map of the Arabian-African region inferred from the satellite gravity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Katz, Youri

    2017-07-01

    Satellite gravimetry is a powerful and reliable tool for regional tectono-geodynamic zonation. The studied region contains intricate geodynamical features (high seismological indicators, active rift systems and collision processes), richest structural arrangement (existence of mosaic blocks of oceanic and continental Earth's crust of various age), and a number of high-amplitude gravity anomalies and complex magnetic pattern. The most hydrocarbon reserves of the world and other important economic deposits occur in this region. Comprehensive analysis of satellite gravity data with application of different approaches was used to develop a sequence of maps specifying crucial properties of the region deep structure. Careful examination of numerous geological sources and their combined examination with satellite gravity (main), magnetic, GPS, seismic, seismological and some other geophysical data enabled to develop a new tectonic map of the Arabian-African region. Integrated analysis of series of gravity map transformations and certain geological indicators allowed to reveal significant geodynamic features of the region.

  6. Lithospheric bending at subduction zones based on depth soundings and satellite gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Daniel A.; Sandwell, David T.

    1995-01-01

    A global study of trench flexure was performed by simultaneously modeling 117 bathymetric profiles (original depth soundings) and satellite-derived gravity profiles. A thin, elastic plate flexure model was fit to each bathymetry/gravity profile by minimization of the L(sub 1) norm. The six model parameters were regional depth, regional gravity, trench axis location, flexural wavelength, flexural amplitude, and lithospheric density. A regional tilt parameter was not required after correcting for age-related trend using a new high-resolution age map. Estimates of the density parameter confirm that most outer rises are uncompensated. We find that flexural wavelength is not an accurate estimate of plate thickness because of the high curvatures observed at a majority of trenches. As in previous studies, we find that the gravity data favor a longer-wavelength flexure than the bathymetry data. A joint topography-gravity modeling scheme and fit criteria are used to limit acceptable parameter values to models for which topography and gravity yield consistent results. Even after the elastic thicknesses are converted to mechanical thicknesses using the yield strength envelope model, residual scatter obscures the systematic increase of mechanical thickness with age; perhaps this reflects the combination of uncertainties inherent in estimating flexural wavelength, such as extreme inelastic bending and accumulated thermoelastic stress. The bending moment needed to support the trench and outer rise topography increases by a factor of 10 as lithospheric age increases from 20 to 150 Ma; this reflects the increase in saturation bending moment that the lithosphere can maintain. Using a stiff, dry-olivine rheology, we find that the lithosphere of the GDH1 thermal model (Stein and Stein, 1992) is too hot and thin to maintain the observed bending moments. Moreover, the regional depth seaward of the oldest trenches (approximately 150 Ma) exceeds the GDH1 model depths by about 400 m.

  7. Deep and shallow structures in the Arctic region imaged by satellite magnetic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Carmen; Panet, Isabelle; Shephard, Grace

    2016-07-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in geoscientific data collection, which, together with available and older classified data made publicly available, is contributing to increasing our knowledge about Earth's structure and evolution. Despite this development, there are many gaps in data coverage in remote, hard-to-access regions. Satellite data have the advantage of acquiring measurements steadily and covering the entire globe. From a tectonics point of view, the specific heights of various satellites allow for the identification of moderate to large tectonic features, and can shed light on Earth's lower crust and lithosphere structure. In this contribution I discuss the use of magnetic and gravity models based on satellite data in deciphering the tectonic structure of remote areas. The present day Circum-Arctic region comprises a variety of tectonic settings: from active seafloor spreading in the North Atlantic and Eurasian Basin, and subduction in the North Pacific, to long-lived stable continental platforms in North America and Asia. A series of rifted margins, abandoned rifted areas and presumably extinct oceanic basins fringe these regions. Moreover, rifting- and seafloor spreading-related processes formed many continental splinters and terranes that were transported and docked at higher latitudes. Volcanic provinces of different ages have also been identified, from the Permian-Triassic Siberian traps at ca. 251 Ma to the (presumably) Cretaceous HALIP and smaller Cenozoic provinces in northern Greenland and the Barents Sea. We inspect global lithospheric magnetic data in order to identify the signature of the main volcanic provinces in the High Arctic. One of the most striking features in the Arctic domain is the strong magnetic anomaly close to the North Pole that correlates with a large, igneous oceanic plateau called the Alpha Mendeleev Ridge. The intensity and extent of the magnetic anomalies recorded by aircraft or satellites point towards a very thick

  8. Bathymetric Inversion of South China Sea from Satellite Altimetry Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of ocean bathymetric inversion from satellite altimeter data by using FFT technique.In this study,the free-air gravity anomalies over the South China Sea are determined by the satellite altimeter data of GEOSAT,ERS-1,ERS-2 and T/P.And the 2.5′×2.5′ bathymetry model in South China Sea is calculated from the gravity anomalies with the inversion model given.After the analysis of the inversion and the comparison between the results,some conclusions can be drawn.

  9. Tests of daily time variable Earth gravity field solutions for precise orbit determination of altimetry satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Sergei; Gruber, Christian

    2016-04-01

    This study makes use of current GFZ monthly and daily gravity field products from 2002 to 2014 based on radial basis functions (RBF) instead of time variable gravity field modeling for precise orbit determination of altimetry satellites. Since some monthly solutions are missing in the GFZ GRACE RL05a solution and in order to reach a better quality for the precise orbit determination, daily generated RBF solutions obtained from Kalman filtered GRACE data processing and interpolated in case of gaps have been used. Moreover, since the geopotential coefficients of low degrees are better determined using SLR observations to geodetic satellites like Lageos, Stella, Starlette and Ajisai than from GRACE observations, these terms are co-estimated in the RBF solutions by using apriori SLR-derived values up to degree and order 4. Precise orbits for altimetry satellites Envisat (2002-2012), Jason-1 (2002-2013) and Jason-2 (2008-2014) are then computed over the given time intervals using this approach and compared with the orbits obtained when using other models such as EIGEN-6S4. An analysis of the root-mean-square values of the observation fits of SLR and DORIS observations and the orbit arcs overlaps will allow us to draw a conclusion on the quality of the RBF solution and to use these new trajectories for sea level trend estimates and geophysical application.

  10. Latitude variability of acoustic-gravity waves in the upper atmosphere based on satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, A. K.; Bespalova, A. V.; Zhuk, I. T.; Kryuchkov, E. I.

    2017-07-01

    Based on satellite measurements, we investigated the properties of acoustic-gravity waves in different geographical areas of the Earth's upper atmosphere. To study wave activity at high latitudes, we used the concentration of neutral particles measured by the low-altitude polar satellite Dynamic Explorer 2 and measurements from the equatorial satellite Atmosphere Explorer-E for analysis of waves at low latitudes. In the range of heights 250-400 km, there are observed latitudinal variations of amplitudes, together with variations in the morphological and spectral properties of acoustic-gravity waves. In the polar regions of thermosphere, the wave amplitudes amount to 3-10% in terms of relative variations of density and do not exceed 3% at low and middle latitudes. At low latitudes, regular fluctuations induced by the solar terminator are clearly seen with a predominant wave mode moving synchronously with terminator. Moreover, at low and middle latitudes, there are observed sporadic local wave packets of small amplitudes (1-2%) that can have origins of various natures. We also investigated the relation between some of the observed wave trains and the earthquakes.

  11. Mapping the mass distribution of Earth's mantle using satellite-derived gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panet, Isabelle; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Greff-Lefftz, Marianne; Métivier, Laurent; Diament, Michel; Mandea, Mioara

    2014-02-01

    The dynamics of Earth's mantle are not well known. Deciphering mantle flow patterns requires an understanding of the global distribution of mantle density. Seismic tomography has been used to derive mantle density distributions, but converting seismic velocities into densities is not straightforward. Here we show that data from the GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) mission can be used to probe our planet's deep mass structure. We construct global anomaly maps of the Earth's gravitational gradients at satellite altitude and use a sensitivity analysis to show that these gravitational gradients image the geometry of mantle mass down to mid-mantle depths. Our maps highlight north-south-elongated gravity gradient anomalies over Asia and America that follow a belt of ancient subduction boundaries, as well as gravity gradient anomalies over the central Pacific Ocean and south of Africa that coincide with the locations of deep mantle plumes. We interpret these anomalies as sinking tectonic plates and convective instabilities between 1,000 and 2,500km depth, consistent with seismic tomography results. Along the former Tethyan Margin, our data also identify an east-west-oriented mass anomaly likely in the upper mantle. We suggest that by combining gravity gradients with seismic and geodynamic data, an integrated dynamic model for Earth can be achieved.

  12. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Ciro Del; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 – December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption. PMID:24169569

  13. Haxby Worldwide Gravity Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1985, Dr. William F. Haxby of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University prepared this data base of free-air gravity anomalies, based on the...

  14. Flight results from the gravity-gradient-controlled RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The in-orbit dynamics of a large, flexible spacecraft has been modeled with a computer simulation, which was used for designing the control system, developing a deployment and gravity-gradient capture procedure, predicting the steady-state behavior, and designing a series of dynamics experiments for the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) satellite. This flexible body dynamics simulator permits three-dimensional, large-angle rotation of the total spacecraft and includes effects of orbit eccentricity, thermal bending, solar pressure, gravitational accelerations, and the damper system. Flight results are consistent with the simulator predictions and are presented for the deployment and capture phases, the steady-state mission, and the dynamics experiments.

  15. Satellite traces, range spread-F occurrence, and gravity wave propagation at the southern anomaly crest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, M.A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Tucuman (Argentina). CIASUR, Facultad Regional Tucuman; Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina). Lab. de Ionosfera; Pezzopane, M.; Zuccheretti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Ezquer, R.G. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Tucuman (Argentina). CIASUR, Facultad Regional Tucuman; Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina). Lab. de Ionosfera; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-07-01

    Range spread-F (RSF) and occurrence of ''satellite'' traces prior to RSF onset were studied at the southern peak of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly (EA). Ionograms recorded in September 2007 at the new ionospheric station of Tucuman, Argentina (26.9 S, 294.6 E, dip latitude 15.5 S), by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS) developed at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), were considered. Satellite traces (STs) are confirmed to be a necessary precursor to the appearance of an RSF trace on the ionograms. Moreover, an analysis of isoheight contours of electron density seems to suggest a relationship between RSF occurrence and gravity wave (GW) propagation. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of the Lunar Gravity Field by Using GL0660B Model and Its Effect on Lunar Satellite Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Kunxue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The lunar gravity field provides a way to research moon's evolution and probes the interior structure of the moon. It is an important factor influencing the lunar satellite precise orbit determination as well. The new lunar gravity model GL0660B from GRAIL mission dramatically improves the gravity spectrum and spectral ranges. Using the model GL0660B, it can be computed that the corresponding degree-wise RMS and correlation of topography, with which the quality of model GL0660B can be analyzed. Then different characters of the lunar gravity field comparing with other lunar gravity fields are analyzed. Besides, gravity anomaly distribution figures at different height of the models are given, and the character and difference of the lunar gravity models at different height are compared. In addition, lunar satellite orbit revolutionary at different height are modeled by GEODYN. The result shows that the trend of lunar satellite eccentricity changes is a complex and long cycle of change trend. It is different affected by the perturbation of the mascons of different height, which causes different changes of apolune, perilune and eccentricity.

  17. Long-term groundwater variations in Northwest India from satellite gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianli; Li, Jin; Zhang, Zizhan; Ni, Shengnan

    2014-05-01

    Satellite gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides quantitative measures of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change at large spatial scales. Combining GRACE-observed TWS changes and model estimates of water storage changes in soil and snow at the surface offers a means for measuring groundwater storage change. In this study, we re-assess long-term groundwater storage variation in the Northwest India (NWI) region using an extended record of GRACE time-variable gravity measurements, and a fully unconstrained global forward modeling method. Our new assessments based on the GRACE release-5 (RL05) gravity solutions indicate that during the 10 year period January 2003 to December 2012, the NWI groundwater depletion remains pronounced, especially during the first 5 years (01/2003-12/2007). The newly estimated depletion rates are ~ 20.4 ± 7.1 Gigatonne (Gt)/yr averaged over the 10 year period, and 29.4 ± 8.4 Gt/yr during the first 5 years. The yearly groundwater storage changes in the NWI region are strongly correlated with yearly precipitation anomalies. In 2009, the driest season of the decade, the groundwater depletion reaches nearly 80 Gt, while in the two relatively wet seasons, 2008 and 2011, the groundwater storages even see net increases of about 24 and 35 Gt, respectively. The estimated mean groundwater depletion rates for the first 5 years are significantly higher than previous assessments. The larger depletion rates may reflect the benefits from improved data quality of GRACE RL05 gravity solutions, and improved data processing method, which can more effectively reduce leakage error in GRACE estimates. Our analysis indicates that the neighboring Punjab Province of Pakistan (especially Northern Punjab) apparently also experiences significant groundwater depletion during the same period, which has partly contributed to the new regional groundwater depletion estimates.

  18. Impact Of GOCE On The Nordic Gravity Field Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yidiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    GOCE level-2 Tzz and Txx gravity gradients at satellite altitude are used in combination as input data to predict surface free air gravity anomalies over the Nordic region using Least Square Collocation. We test the performance of using covariance functions created separately from Tzz gradients a...... Surface model, both the NKG-2004 quasi-geoid model of the Nordic and Baltic Area and the one obtained using second generation GOCE spherical harmonic coefficients based on time-wise method can successfully reproduce the higher level of the Baltic Sea relative to the Atlantic Ocean....

  19. Satellites Seek Gravity Signals for Remote Sensing the Seismotectonic Stresses in Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Chen, J.; Li, J.

    2003-12-01

    The ability of the mantle to withstand stress-difference due to superimposed loads would appear to argue against flow in the Earth's mantle, but the ironic fact is that the satellite determined gravity variations are the evidence of density differences associated with mantle flow. The type of flow which is most likely to be involved concerns convection currents. For the past 4 decades, models of mantle convection have made remarkable advancements. Although a large body of evidence regarding the seafloor depth, heat flow, lithospheric strength and forces of slab-pull and swell-push has been obtained, the global seismotectonic stresses in the Earth are yet to be determined. The problem is that no one has been able to come up with a satisfactory scenario that must characterize the stresses in the Earth which cause earthquakes and create tectonic features. The stress generated by mantle convection under the crust are inferable from high degree (n>=13) spherical harmonics of the geopotential. Therefore, satellite gravity missions may be able to seek the Earth's gravity signals for investigating the seismotectonic effect of these subcrustal stresses. It is well known that subcrustal stress patterns for (137.0 from 1976 to 2000 is also given for reference. The intense seismicity in the subcrustal stress concentration belt (the ring of fire around the Pacific) is expected. A broad band of seismicity extends from southern Europe to southeast Europe to southeast Asia; this is associated with the subcrustal stress concentration belts in Europe, Africa, Arabian, and Asia. These results seem to provide significant insights into the origin of the earthquakes and formation of the world.

  20. Alaska Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' gravity anomaly grid for Alaska is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models the 1.1 million terrestrial...

  1. Explaining the thick crust in Paraná basin, Brazil, with satellite GOCE gravity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizia; Braitenberg, Carla; Ussami, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Seismologic observations in the last decades have shown that the crustal thickness in Paraná basin locally is over 40 km thick, which is a greater value than expected by the simple isostatic model considering the topographic load. The goal of this work is to explain this apparent discrepancy by modeling the internal crustal density anomalies through the gravity field. We use the latest Earth Gravity Model derived from the observations of the GOCE satellite mission, to retrieve the gravity anomaly and correct it for topographic effects, thus obtaining the Bouguer field. We then model the gravity effect of known stratigraphic units and of the seismological crustal thickness. The large Paraná basin comprises over 3500 m of Paleozoic sedimentary sequence with density between 2400 and 2600 kg/m3. During the Early Cretaceous the same basin was affected by a large amount of igneous activity with a volume of over 0.1 Mkm3. The flood basalt volcanism is known as the Serra Geral Formation, and has a maximum thickness of 1500 m. The stratigraphic units of the basin are topped by post-volcanic deposits of the Bauru Group, of about 300 m thickness, located in the northern part of the basin. The density and thickness of the sedimentary sequence are constrained by sonic logs of drill-holes and exploration seismic. We use the crustal thickness estimated from the newest seismological results for South America to calculate its gravity effect. Further we model the isostatic crustal thickness variation, allowing the comparison between a seismological Moho, an isostatic Moho, and a gravity-based Moho. We find that there is a clear positive Bouguer residual anomaly located in the northern and southern part of the Paraná basin, indicating the presence of a hidden mass, not considered up to now. We propose a model that explains this mass as magmatic rock, probably gabbro in lower crust, with density contrast of 200 kg/m3 and thickness of more than 10 km, thus demonstrating that the

  2. Gravity Data for portions of Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1,037 records) were compiled by Doctor Stierman. This data base was received in June 1992. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  3. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Prentice Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (898 records) were compiled by Professor Ervin. This data base was received in January 1987. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  4. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Marshfield Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (8388 records) were compiled by Professor Ervin. This data base was received in April 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  5. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Rhinelader Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (195 records) were compiled by Barbara Eckstein. This data base was received in January 1987. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  6. Gravity Data for Indiana (300 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (300 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in February 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  7. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Sawyers Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (3814 records) were compiled by Professor Ervin. This data base was received in April 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  8. Global gravity field models from the GPS positions of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezděk, A.; Sebera, J.; Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our work is to generate Earth's gravity field models from the GPS positions of low Earth orbiters. We will present our inversion method and numerical results based on the real-world data of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites. The presented inversion method is based on Newton's second law of motion, which relates the observed acceleration of the satellite with the forces acting on it. The vector of the observed acceleration is obtained through a numerical second-derivative filter applied to the time series of the kinematic positions. Forces other than those due to the geopotential are either modelled (lunisolar perturbations, tides) or provided by the onboard measurements (nongravitational perturbations). Then the observation equations are formulated using the gradient of the spherical harmonic expansion of the geopotential. From this linear system the harmonic coefficients are directly obtained. We do not use any a priori gravity field model. Although the basic scheme of the acceleration approach is straightforward, the implementation details play a crucial role in obtaining reasonable results. The numerical derivative of noisy data (here the GPS positions) strongly amplifies the high frequency noise and creates autocorrelation in the observation errors. We successfully solve both of these problems by using the generalized least squares method, which defines a linear transformation of the observation equations. In the transformed variables the errors become uncorrelated, so the ordinary least squares estimation may be used to find the regression parameters with correct estimates of their uncertainties. The digital filter of the second derivative is an approximation to the analytical operation. We will show how different the results might be depending on the particular choice of the parameters defining the filter. Another problem is the correlation of the errors in the GPS positions. Here we use the tools from time series analysis. The systematic behaviour

  9. Mexico Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity anomaly grid for Mexico, North-Central America and the Western Caribbean Sea is NOT the input data set used in the development of the MEXICO97 model....

  10. Determination of the Earth gravity Field Parameters in Persian Gulf and Oman Sea with the Satellite Altimetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, S. R.; Najafi-Alamardi, M.; Toosi, K. N.; Sedighi, M.; Nankali, H. R.

    2006-07-01

    Satellite altimetry provides continuous, accur ate, and homogenous data ser ies in marine areas .Th e Sea Surf ace Heigh ts (SSH) ex tracted from altimetry data w as used in a method sear ching for the least squares of the sea surface topography to simultaneously d etermine the geoidal height and the sea surface topography as well in the Persian Gulf and the Oman sea. This is contrary to th e methods wh ich r equire the knowledge of one parameter to estimate the other. The North and East componen ts of the deflections of vertical w ere also estimated by differentiating the der ived geoid al heights in the corresponding directions, and finally the free- air grav ity anomalies w ere computed utilizing the inverse V ening- Meinesz integral.

  11. Smoothing impact of isostatic crustal thickness models on local integral inversion of satellite gravity gradiometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2011-10-01

    The effects of topographic masses on satellite gradiometric data are large and in order to reduce the magnitude of these effects some compensation mechanisms should be considered. Here we use the isostatic hypotheses of Airy-Heiskanen and the recent Vening Meinesz-Moritz for compensating these effects and to smooth the data prior to their downward continuation to gravity anomaly. The second-order partial derivatives of extended Stokes' formula are used for the continuations over a topographically rough territory like Persia. The inversions are performed and compared based on two schemes of the remove-compute-restore technique and direct downward continuation. Numerical results show that the topographic-isostatic effect based on Vening Meinesz-Mortiz's hypothesis smoothes the data better than that based on Airy-Heiskanen's hypothesis. Also the quality of inversions of the smoothed data by this mechanism is twice better than that of the nonsmoothed ones.

  12. Offset of a Drag-Free Sensor from the Center of Gravity of Its Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott R.

    2003-01-01

    The drag-free satellite is one that encloses a proof mass, shielding it from atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure (SRP). By sensing the location of the proof mass in the body and using thrusters to force the spacecraft to follow the proof mass in a closed-loop fashion, the effects of drag and SRP may be eliminated from the spacecraft orbit. Thus, several benefits may be gained, including improved ephemeris propagation and reduced operational costs. The package including the proof mass and the location sensing equipment may be considered as a single sensor; if generalized, such a sensor could be manufactured and used more easily in satellite designs, similar to how current missions use, for example, rate gyros and magnetometers. The flight heritage of the technology has been such that the proof mass sensor is a primary facet of the mission, allowing it to dominate design considerations. In particular, this paper discusses the effects that may be expected if a generalized drag-free sensor is placed some distance away from the spacecraft center of gravity. The proof mass will follow a given gravitational orbit, and a separation from the spacecraft center of gravity places the spacecraft itself in a different orbit from the proof mass, requiring additional fuel just to maintain function of the drag- free sensor. Conclusions include some guiding principles for determining whether certain mission characteristics may restrict or preclude the use of drag-free sensors for that mission. These principles may be used both by mission planners considering drag-free missions and by hardware designers considering or pursuing the development of such generalized sensors.

  13. Satellite gravity measurement monitoring terrestrial water storage change and drought in the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hang; Wen, Lianxing

    2016-01-01

    We use satellite gravity measurements in the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) change in the continental United States (US) from 2003 to 2012, and establish a GRACE-based Hydrological Drought Index (GHDI) for drought monitoring. GRACE-inferred TWS exhibits opposite patterns between north and south of the continental US from 2003 to 2012, with the equivalent water thickness increasing from -4.0 to 9.4 cm in the north and decreasing from 4.1 to -6.7 cm in the south. The equivalent water thickness also decreases by -5.1 cm in the middle south in 2006. GHDI is established to represent the extent of GRACE-inferred TWS anomaly departing from its historical average and is calibrated to resemble traditional Palmer Hydrological Drought Index (PHDI) in the continental US. GHDI exhibits good correlations with PHDI in the continental US, indicating its feasibility for drought monitoring. Since GHDI is GRACE-based and has minimal dependence of hydrological parameters on the ground, it can be extended for global drought monitoring, particularly useful for the countries that lack sufficient hydrological monitoring infrastructures on the ground.

  14. Observations of gravity waves from satellite and implications for the wave driving of the SAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics at low latitudes in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere is governed by an interplay of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal wind. It is known that tropical dynamics has significant influence on the atmosphere over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. For example, QBO and SAO effects are seen in the MLT region, and there is a significant influence of the QBO on surface weather and climate in the Northern Hemisphere during winter. Still, global models have large difficulties in simulating a realistic QBO and SAO. One main uncertainty is the wave driving of these oscillations, in particular the driving by gravity waves (GWs). We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from over three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite data in the stratopause region. These observations are compared with the SAO driving due to planetary waves, as well as the zonal wind tendencies, both determined from the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis. HIRDLS satellite observations and ERAI support the general assumption that, due to selective filtering of the GW spectrum by the QBO in the stratosphere, GWs mainly contribute to the SAO momentum budget during SAO eastward wind shear. However, during SAO westward wind shear the GW contribution is usually smaller, and the wave driving is dominated by planetary waves, probably of extratropical origin. Still, we find indications in both satellite observations and ERAI that sometimes GW drag is important also during SAO westward wind shear.

  15. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gamow, George

    2003-01-01

    A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own draw

  16. Signature of range observable in non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity and the measurements with satellite-satellite tracking missions. Theoretical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Li-E

    2014-01-01

    Having great accuracy in the range and range rate measurements, the operating GRACE mission and the planed GRACE Follow On mission can in principle be employed to place strong constraints on certain relativistic gravity theories. In this paper, we work out in details the range observable in the non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity for these Satellite-Satellite Tracking measurements. We find out that an characteristic time accumulating signal appears in the range observable in the non-dynamical Chern-Simons gravity, which has no analogy found in the standard metric theories of gravity. The magnitude of this Chern-Simons range signal will reach to a few times of $(\\frac{\\dot{\\theta}}{100r})meters$ for each free flight of these SST missions, here $\\dot{\\theta}$ measures the length scale of the theory and $r$ denotes the orbital radius of the SST mission. Therefore, with the 12 years data from the GRACE mission and the proper data analysis methods, one expects that the mass scale of the non-dynamical CS gr...

  17. Prediction of bathymetry from satellite altimeter based gravity in the Arabian Sea: Mapping of two unnamed deep seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, B.; Kurian, P. J.; Swain, D.; Tyagi, A.; Ravindra, R.

    2012-06-01

    This work attempts to predict bathymetry from satellite altimeter based gravity in the Arabian Sea. A collocated match-up database (n = 17,016) was created on Multibeam Echosounder (MBES) bathymetry and satellite gravity values (˜1 min spatial resolution) derived from remote sensing satellites. A Radial Basis Function (RBF) based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model was developed to predict bathymetry from satellite gravity values. The ANN model was trained with variable undersea features such as seamount, knoll, abyssal plain, hill, etc. to familiarize the network with all possible geomorphic features as inputs through learning and the corresponding target outputs. The performance of the predictive model was evaluated by comparing bathymetric values with MBES datasets that were not used during the training and verification steps of the ANN model formulation. The model was then compared with MBES surveyed seamount observations (those were not used during ANN analysis) and global model bathymetry products. Results demonstrate better performance of ANN model compared to global model products for mapping of two unnamed seamounts in the Arabian Sea. These two unnamed seamounts have been predicted, mapped and their morphology is reported for the first time through this work.

  18. Atmospheric inertia-gravity waves retrieved from level-2 data of the satellite microwave limb sounder Aura/MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Klemens; Lainer, Martin; Moreira, Lorena; Hagen, Jonas; Fernandez Vidal, Susana; Schranz, Franziska

    2016-09-01

    The temperature profiles of the satellite experiment Aura/MLS are horizontally spaced by 1.5° or 165 km along the satellite orbit. These level-2 data contain valuable information about horizontal fluctuations in temperature, which are mainly induced by inertia-gravity waves. Wave periods of 2-12 h, horizontal wavelengths of 200-1500 km, and vertical wavelengths of 6-30 km efficiently contribute to the standard deviation of the horizontal temperature fluctuations. The study retrieves and discusses the global distributions of inertia-gravity waves in the stratosphere and mesosphere during July 2015 and January 2016. We find many patterns that were previously present in data of TIMED/SABER, Aura/HIRDLS, and ECMWF analysis. However, it seems that Aura/MLS achieves a higher vertical resolution in the gravity wave maps since the maps are derived from the analysis of horizontal fluctuations along the orbit of the sounding volume. The zonal mean of the inertia-gravity wave distribution shows vertical modulations with scales of 10-20 km. Enhanced wave amplitudes occur in regions of increased zonal wind or in the vicinity of strong wind gradients. Further, we find a banana-like shape of enhanced inertia-gravity waves above the Andes in the winter mesosphere. We find areas of enhanced inertia-gravity wave activity above tropical deep convection zones at 100 hPa (z ˜ 13 km). Finally, we study the temporal evolution of inertia-gravity wave activity at 100 hPa in the African longitude sector from December 2015 to February 2016.

  19. A decadal satellite record of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere to study polar stratospheric cloud formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; Orr, Andrew; Alexander, M. Joan; Holt, Laura A.; Stein, Olaf

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves yield substantial small-scale temperature fluctuations that can trigger the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). This paper introduces a new satellite record of gravity wave activity in the polar lower stratosphere to investigate this process. The record is comprised of observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite from January 2003 to December 2012. Gravity wave activity is measured in terms of detrended and noise-corrected 15 µm brightness temperature variances, which are calculated from AIRS channels that are the most sensitive to temperature fluctuations at about 17-32 km of altitude. The analysis of temporal patterns in the data set revealed a strong seasonal cycle in wave activity with wintertime maxima at mid- and high latitudes. The analysis of spatial patterns indicated that orography as well as jet and storm sources are the main causes of the observed waves. Wave activity is closely correlated with 30 hPa zonal winds, which is attributed to the AIRS observational filter. We used the new data set to evaluate explicitly resolved temperature fluctuations due to gravity waves in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis. It was found that the analysis reproduces orographic and non-orographic wave patterns in the right places, but that wave amplitudes are typically underestimated by a factor of 2-3. Furthermore, in a first survey of joint AIRS and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite observations, nearly 50 gravity-wave-induced PSC formation events were identified. The survey shows that the new AIRS data set can help to better identify such events and more generally highlights the importance of the process for polar ozone chemistry.

  20. Final state predictions for J2 gravity perturbed motion of the Earth’s artificial satellites using Bispherical coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sharaf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, initial value problem for dynamical astronomy will be established using Bispherical coordinates. A computational algorithm is developed for the final state predictions for J2 gravity perturbed motion of the Earth’s artificial satellites. This algorithm is important in targeting, rendezvous maneuvers as well for scientific researches. The applications of the algorithm are illustrated by numerical examples of some test orbits of different eccentricities. The numerical results are extremely accurate and efficient.

  1. Groundwater storage changes in the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas revealed from GRACE satellite gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longwei; Wang, Hansheng; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Jia, Lulu; Jiang, Liming; Shen, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding groundwater storage (GWS) changes is vital to the utilization and control of water resources in the Tibetan Plateau. However, well level observations are rare in this big area, and reliable hydrology models including GWS are not available. We use hydro-geodesy to quantitate GWS changes in the Tibetan Plateau and surroundings from 2003 to 2009 using a combined analysis of satellite gravity and satellite altimetry data, hydrology models as well as a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Release-5 GRACE gravity data are jointly used in a mascon fitting method to estimate the terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes during the period, from which the hydrology contributions and the GIA effects are effectively deducted to give the estimates of GWS changes for 12 selected regions of interest. The hydrology contributions are carefully calculated from glaciers and lakes by ICESat-1 satellite altimetry data, permafrost degradation by an Active-Layer Depth (ALD) model, soil moisture and snow water equivalent by multiple hydrology models, and the GIA effects are calculated with the new ICE-6G_C (VM5a) model. Taking into account the measurement errors and the variability of the models, the uncertainties are rigorously estimated for the TWS changes, the hydrology contributions (including GWS changes) and the GIA effect. For the first time, we show explicitly separated GWS changes in the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas except for those to the south of the Himalayas. We find increasing trend rates for eight basins: + 2.46 ± 2.24 Gt/yr for the Jinsha River basin, + 1.77 ± 2.09 Gt/yr for the Nujiang-Lancangjiang Rivers Source Region, + 1.86 ± 1.69 Gt/yr for the Yangtze River Source Region, + 1.14 ± 1.39 Gt/yr for the Yellow River Source Region, + 1.52 ± 0.95 Gt/yr for the Qaidam basin, + 1.66 ± 1.52 Gt/yr for the central Qiangtang Nature Reserve, + 5.37 ± 2.17 Gt/yr for the Upper Indus basin and + 2.77 ± 0.99 Gt/yr for the Aksu River basin. All these

  2. Satellite observations of middle atmosphere gravity wave absolute momentum flux and of its vertical gradient during recent stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Kaufmann, Martin; Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Zhu, Yajun; Gille, John C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III; Schwartz, Michael J.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are circulation anomalies in the polar region during winter. They mostly occur in the Northern Hemisphere and affect also surface weather and climate. Both planetary waves and gravity waves contribute to the onset and evolution of SSWs. While the role of planetary waves for SSW evolution has been recognized, the effect of gravity waves is still not fully understood, and has not been comprehensively analyzed based on global observations. In particular, information on the gravity wave driving of the background winds during SSWs is still missing.We investigate the boreal winters from 2001/2002 until 2013/2014. Absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave dissipation (potential drag) are estimated from temperature observations of the satellite instruments HIRDLS and SABER. In agreement with previous work, we find that sometimes gravity wave activity is enhanced before or around the central date of major SSWs, particularly during vortex-split events. Often, SSWs are associated with polar-night jet oscillation (PJO) events. For these events, we find that gravity wave activity is strongly suppressed when the wind has reversed from eastward to westward (usually after the central date of a major SSW). In addition, gravity wave potential drag at the bottom of the newly forming eastward-directed jet is remarkably weak, while considerable potential drag at the top of the jet likely contributes to the downward propagation of both the jet and the new elevated stratopause. During PJO events, we also find some indication for poleward propagation of gravity waves. Another striking finding is that obviously localized gravity wave sources, likely mountain waves and jet-generated gravity waves, play an important role during the evolution of SSWs and potentially contribute to the triggering of SSWs by preconditioning the shape of the polar vortex. The distribution of these hot spots is highly variable and strongly depends on the zonal and

  3. Pseudofaults and associated seamounts in the conjugate Arabian and Eastern Somali basins, NW Indian Ocean- New constraints from high-resolution satellite-derived gravity data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Chaubey, A; Mishra, A; Kumar, S.; Rajawat, A

    is characterized by a gravity low and rugged basement. The refined satellite gravity image of the Arabian Basin also revealed three seamounts in close proximity to the pseudofaults, which were not reported earlier. In the Eastern Somali Basin, seamounts are aligned...

  4. A multi-subwaveform parametric retracker of the radar satellite altimetric waveform and recovery of gravity anomalies over coastal oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HWANG; CheinWay

    2010-01-01

    The quality of satellite radar altimetric data is very important in studies of geodesy,geophysics,and oceanography.Over coastal oceans,altimeter waveforms are contaminated by the terrain and physical environments so that the accuracy of altimeter data is lower than that over open oceans.Here we develop a new multi-subwaveform parametric retracker(MSPR) to improve the quality of altimeter data for the recovery of gravity anomaly in coastal oceans.The least squares collocation method is used to recover the residual gravity anomaly over the coastal water from altimetric data.The waveform data records from Geosat/GM around Taiwan Island are practically retracked with MSPR.When compared with the Taiwan geoid height,the results retracked by MSPR are more accurate than those retracked by the well-known β-5-parmeter method and from the geophysical data records(GDRs).The gravity anomalies over Taiwan coastal waters are calculated from the retracked altimeter data with the least squares collocation.When we compared gravity anomalies computed using altimeter GDRs with the ship-borne gravity data over Taiwan coastal ocean,we found that the results from retracked data are more accurate than those from GDRs.

  5. Gravity anomalies and crustal structure of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V; Krishna, K.S.; Murthy, I.V; Sarma, K.V.L; Desa, M.; Ramana, M.V; KameshRaju, K.A.

    The Bengal Fan is covered afresh by systematic geological and geophysical investigations by National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), India and a detailed free-air gravity map of the fan is prepared. The map shows two strong gravity lows - one...

  6. Gravity Data for Indiana-over 10,000 records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (10,629 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in December 1989. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  7. Wisconsin Gravity Data for the Wisconsin Rapids Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (7102 records) were compiled by Professor Ervin. This data base was received in April 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-Air...

  8. Limb and gravity-darkening coefficients for the TESS satellite at several metallicities, surface gravities, and microturbulent velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, A.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We present new gravity and limb-darkening coefficients for a wide range of effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, and microturbulent velocities. These coefficients can be used in many different fields of stellar physics as synthetic light curves of eclipsing binaries and planetary transits, stellar diameters, line profiles in rotating stars, and others. Methods: The limb-darkening coefficients were computed specifically for the photometric system of the space mission tess and were performed by adopting the least-square method. In addition, the linear and bi-parametric coefficients, by adopting the flux conservation method, are also available. On the other hand, to take into account the effects of tidal and rotational distortions, we computed the passband gravity-darkening coefficients y(λ) using a general differential equation in which we consider the effects of convection and of the partial derivative (∂lnI(λ) /∂lng)Teff. Results: To generate the limb-darkening coefficients we adopt two stellar atmosphere models: atlas (plane-parallel) and phoenix (spherical, quasi-spherical, and r-method). The specific intensity distribution was fitted using five approaches: linear, quadratic, square root, logarithmic, and a more general one with four terms. These grids cover together 19 metallicities ranging from 10-5 up to 10+1 solar abundances, 0 ≤ log g ≤ 6.0 and 1500 K ≤Teff ≤ 50 000 K. The calculations of the gravity-darkening coefficients were performed for all plane-parallel ATLAS models. Tables 2-29 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A30

  9. Gravity wave driving of the QBO estimated from satellite observations and ERA-Interim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Ploeger, Felix; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics. The QBO has effect on atmospheric dynamics over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found, for example, in the mesosphere, and selective filtering of upward propagating waves plays an important role for the stratopause semiannual oscillation (SAO). The QBO also influences the extratropics and even surface weather and climate. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. Atmospheric waves play an important role in the driving of the QBO. Both global scale waves and mesoscale gravity waves (GWs) contribute. We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and from 11 years of Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite data. These observations are compared with the drag that is still missing in the tropical momentum budget of the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms, and the drag due to resolved global-scale waves. Being strongly constrained by data assimilation, the meteorological fields of ERAI are quite realistic. Therefore this missing drag can be attributed to small scale GWs not resolved by the model. We find good qualitative agreement between observed GW drag and the missing drag due to waves not resolved in ERAI. During eastward QBO wind shear even the magnitude of observed and ERAI missing drag are in good agreement. During westward shear, however, observed drag is much weaker than the ERAI missing drag. This asymmetry might hint at uncertainties in the advection terms of ERAI. Further, observed GW spectra indicate that QBO-related GW dissipation is mainly due to critical level filtering.

  10. ‘DEOS CHAMP-01C 70’: a model of the Earth’s gravity field computed from accelerations of the CHAMP satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditmar, P.G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Van Eck van der Sluis, A.A.; Schrama, E.; Klees, R.

    2005-01-01

    Performance of a recently proposed technique for gravity field modeling has been assessed with data from the CHAMP satellite. The modeling technique is a variant of the acceleration approach. It makes use of the satellite accelerations that are derived from the kinematic orbit with the 3-point

  11. Lithospheric analysis of satellite geopotential anomalies of East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li

    Satellite gravity and magnetic anomalies are used to study the lithosphere of East Asia. Free-air gravity anomalies are decomposed into terrain-correlated, mantle/core and intracrustal components by spectral correlation analysis of the free-air gravity anomalies and terrain gravity effects. Compensated terrain gravity anomalies are obtained by removing the terrain-correlated free-air gravity anomalies. They are used to estimate the Moho undulation and crustal thickness by Gauss-Legendre quadrature (GLQ) inversion techniques assuming a Airy-Heiskanen model of crustal compensation. These results are used to develop enhanced reduction procedures to generate an improved Magsat magnetic anomaly map for East Asia. A degree 12 core field is removed from the data that are updated for the crustal components in the core field differences between degree 14 and 12. These components are estimated by using spectral correlation analysis to compare the Magsat anomalies to the magnetic effect of the crust that is available from the first vertical derivative of the terrain-correlated free-air gravity anomalies via Poisson's theorem. External field effects are separated using pass-by-pass correlation analysis of the dusk and dawn data sets and their spectral reconstruction. Coherent components in the dusk and dawn maps are combined to estimate the magnetic anomalies of the lithosphere. Long wavelength magnetic features related to lower crustal thickness variations are converted into effective magnetization contrasts by a new GLQ inversion technique. Effective magnetization contrasts of the lower crust range over ±4 A/m in accordance petrological studies. Finally, a new GLQ integration formula for triangular wedge sources is derived for modeling of satellite-altitude geopotential field anomalies from arbitrarily shaped sources. Detailed magnetization and density contrasts for central India, the Tibetan Plateau, and the Bengal Gulf region are modeled by this new formula. Positive

  12. Investigation on pre-seismic equatorial ionospheric anomaly and its possible association with the gravity wave using satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, K.; Oyama, K. I.; Sun, Y. Y.; Liu, T. J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Some examples of the equatorial plasma density measured by DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) increased before some large earthquakes are introduced. Previous examples of the pre-seismic equatorial ionization anomalies (EIA) associated with the northern Sumatra earthquake of 2005, Wenchuan earthquake of 2008, Pisco earthquake of 2007, and Kuril Island earthquake of 2007, commonly accompanied conspicuous precursory EIA enhancements distinct from the longitudinal asymmetric variation which is known as a result of ionospheric interaction with the thermospheric tidal modulation generating wave structure in the global ionospheric density profile in the dayside local time. The physical mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric coupling manifested as the enhanced EIA intensity can be ascribed either to the gravity wave or static electric field generated by the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling, which is still in debate because of lack in confident observational evidences. Molucca sea earthquake of 2007 which accompanied dominant-ever precursory EIA enhancement was selected as a case study to investigate whether the seismo-ionospheric coupling was originated from the gravity wave propagating from the mesosphere to the thermosphere using the SABER satellite data. The gravity wave intensity according to the frequency was derived by applying the s-transform to the atmospheric neutral temperature profile measured by SABER limb-scanning method. The initial analysis results of the ionospheric plasma condition and thermospheric gravity wave derived from DEMETER, CHAMP, and SABER are introduced and the possible association between the physical conditions are discussed.

  13. Applications of acoustic-gravity waves numerical modelling to tsunami signals observed by gravimetry satellites in very low orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Sladen, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground all the way to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a high-order finite- difference time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). We present applications of these simulations to the propagation of gravity waves generated by tsunamis for realistic cases for which atmospheric models are extracted from empirical models including 3D variations of atmospheric parameters, and tsunami forcing at the ocean surface is extracted from finite-fault dislocation simulations. We describe the specific difficulties induced by the size of the simulation, the boundary conditions and the spherical geometry and compare the simulation outputs to data gathered by gravimetric satellites crossing gravity waves generated by tsunamis.

  14. A Test of General Relativity Using the LARES and LAGEOS Satellites and a GRACE Earth's Gravity Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth's gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth's gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity.

  15. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific. [Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Data from an additional 50 satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) passes were combined with earlier measurements of the high degree and order (n, m, 12) gravity in the central Pacific. A composite map was produced which shows good agreement with conventional GEM models. Data from the Seasat altimeter was reduced and found to agree well with both the SST and the GEM fields. The maps are dominated especially in the east, by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Further comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkably close correlation with plate age. Each anomaly band is framed by those major fracture zones having large offsets. The regular spacing of these fractures seems to account for the fabric in the gravity fields. Other anomalies are accounted for by hot spots. The source of part of these anomalies is in the lithosphere itself. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration is considered. Previously announced in STAR as N84-11559

  16. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density......We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity-density...

  17. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition. (author)

  18. Mapping the earth's magnetic and gravity fields from space Current status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, M.; Taranik, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    The principal magnetic fields encountered by earth orbiting spacecraft include the main (core) field, external fields produced by electrical currents within the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and the crustal (anomaly) field generated by variations in the magnetization of the outermost portions of the earth. The first orbital field measurements which proved to be of use for global studies of crustal magnetization were obtained by a series of three satellites launched and operated from 1965 to 1971. Each of the satellites, known as a Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO), carried a rubidium vapor magnetometer. Attention is also given to Magsat launched in 1979, the scalar anomaly field derived from the Magsat measurements, satellite tracking studies in connection with gravity field surveys, radar altimetry, the belt of positive free air gravity anomalies situated along the edge of the Pacific Ocean basin, future technological capabilities, and information concerning data availability.

  19. The orbits of the uranian satellites and rings, the gravity field of the uranian system, and the orientation of the pole of Uranus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, R. A., E-mail: robert.jacobson@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    French et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian rings, the orientation of the pole of Uranus, and the gravity harmonics of Uranus from Earth-based and Voyager ring occultations. Jacobson et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian satellites and the masses of Uranus and its satellites from Earth-based astrometry and observations acquired with the Voyager 2 spacecraft; they used the gravity harmonics and pole from French et al. Jacobson and Rush reconstructed the Voyager 2 trajectory and redetermined the Uranian system gravity parameters, satellite orbits, and ring orbits in a combined analysis of the data used previously augmented with additional Earth-based astrometry. Here we report on an extension of that work that incorporates additional astrometry and ring occultations together with improved data processing techniques.

  20. Evaluating the hydrological consistency of evaporation products using satellite-based gravity and rainfall data

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Oliver; Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew Francis

    2017-01-01

    Advances in space-based observations have provided the capacity to develop regional- to global-scale estimates of evaporation, offering insights into this key component of the hydrological cycle. However, the evaluation of large-scale evaporation retrievals is not a straightforward task. While a number of studies have intercompared a range of these evaporation products by examining the variance amongst them, or by comparison of pixel-scale retrievals against ground-based observations, there is a need to explore more appropriate techniques to comprehensively evaluate remote-sensing-based estimates. One possible approach is to establish the level of product agreement between related hydrological components: for instance, how well do evaporation patterns and response match with precipitation or water storage changes? To assess the suitability of this consistency-based approach for evaluating evaporation products, we focused our investigation on four globally distributed basins in arid and semi-arid environments, comprising the Colorado River basin, Niger River basin, Aral Sea basin, and Lake Eyre basin. In an effort to assess retrieval quality, three satellite-based global evaporation products based on different methodologies and input data, including CSIRO-PML, the MODIS Global Evapotranspiration product (MOD16), and Global Land Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology (GLEAM), were evaluated against rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) along with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) water storage anomalies. To ensure a fair comparison, we evaluated consistency using a degree correlation approach after transforming both evaporation and precipitation data into spherical harmonics. Overall we found no persistent hydrological consistency in these dryland environments. Indeed, the degree correlation showed oscillating values between periods of low and high water storage changes, with a phase difference of about 2-3 months

  1. GOCE and Future Gravity Missions for Geothermal Energy Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorutti, Alberto; Braitenberg, Carla; Pivetta, Tommaso; Mariani, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    Geothermal energy is a valuable renewable energy source the exploitation of which contributes to the worldwide reduction of consumption of fossil fuels oil and gas. The exploitation of geothermal energy is facilitated where the thermal gradient is higher than average leading to increased surface heat flow. Apart from the hydrologic circulation properties which depend on rock fractures and are important due to the heat transportation from the hotter layers to the surface, essential properties that increase the thermal gradient are crustal thinning and radiogenic heat producing rocks. Crustal thickness and rock composition form the link to the exploration with the satellite derived gravity field, because both induce subsurface mass changes that generate observable gravity anomalies. The recognition of gravity as a useful investigation tool for geothermal energy lead to a cooperation with ESA and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) that included the GOCE derived gravity field in the online geothermal energy investigation tool of the IRENA database. The relation between the gravity field products as the free air gravity anomaly, the Bouguer and isostatic anomalies and the heat flow values is though not straightforward and has not a unique relationship. It is complicated by the fact that it depends on the geodynamical context, on the geologic context and the age of the crustal rocks. Globally the geological context and geodynamical history of an area is known close to everywhere, so that a specific known relationship between gravity and geothermal potential can be applied. In this study we show the results of a systematic analysis of the problem, including some simulations of the key factors. The study relies on the data of GOCE and the resolution and accuracy of this satellite. We also give conclusions on the improved exploration power of a gravity mission with higher spatial resolution and reduced data error, as could be achieved in principle by flying

  2. Simultaneous Antarctic Gravity Wave Observations in PMCs from the AIM Satellite and PMSE Observations from PANSY Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzanowicz, M. E.; Yue, J.; Russell, J. M., III; Sato, K.; Kohma, M.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) are high-altitude ice clouds that form in the cold summer mesopause region due to adiabatic cooling caused by an upwelling induced by the global meridional circulation, which is driven by gravity wave dissipation and forcing. Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) are strong coherent echoes also observed in the polar summer mesosphere and are considered to be related to ionization and the small-scale structure associated with PMCs, with their origins thought to be strongly related. The peak PMSE height can be located slightly below the summer mesopause temperature minimum but above the PMC altitude. Upward propagating atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) are usually considered to be the cause of the wave patterns seen in PMCs. Monitoring PMCs and PMSEs will provide important tools in detecting climate change in the upper atmosphere and a better understanding of the earth-climate system. The science goal I plan to accomplish is to investigate the possibility of a connection between gravity wave perturbation characteristics in PMCs from the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) satellite and PMSE structures observed by PANSY (program of the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS radar). Data from the CIPS instrument onboard AIM, PANSY, and AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) will be used. AIM provides a two-dimensional horizontal view of the atmosphere dynamics embedded in PMCs, while PANSY provides a vertical view of PMSEs and gravity waves with high temporal resolution. The combination of AIM and PANSY will provide a three-dimensional view of the atmosphere, AGWs, PMCs and PMSEs. AIRS provides information about AGWs in the stratosphere. Wave analysis of the Fast Fourier Transform or a wavelet analysis will be used to complete the science goal. AIRS will be used to examine how lower atmosphere meteorology may impact the PMC and PMSE structures.

  3. 最小二乘法求解三类卫星重力梯度边值问题%Solving Three Types of Satellite Gravity Gradient Boundary Value Problems by Least-Squares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新禹; 李建成; 邹贤才; 褚永海

    2007-01-01

    The principle and method for solving three types of satellite gravity gradient boundary value problems by least-squares are discussed in detail. Also, kernel function expressions of the least-squares solution of three geodetic boundary value problems with the observations {Γzz},{Γxz,Γyz} and {Γzz -Γyy,2Γxy} are presented. From the results of recovering gravity field using simulated gravity gradient tensor data, we can draw a conclusion that satellite gravity gradient integral formulas derived from least-squares are valid and rigorous for recovering the gravity field.

  4. A contrastive study on the influences of radial and three-dimensional satellite gravity gradiometry on the accuracy of the Earth's gravitational field recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wei; Hsu Hou-Tse; Zhong Min; Yun Mei-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of the Earth's gravitational field measured from the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE),up to 250 degrees,influenced by the radial gravity gradient Vzz and three-dimensional gravity gradient Vij from the satellite gravity gradiometry (SGG) are contrastively demonstrated based on the analytical error model and numerical simulation,respectively.Firstly,the new analytical error model of the cumulative geoid height,influenced by the radial gravity gradient Vzz and three-dimensional gravity gradient Vij are established,respectively.In 250 degrees,the GOCE cumulative geoid height error measured by the radial gravity gradient Vzz is about 21/2 times higher than that measured by the three-dimensional gravity gradient Vij. Secondly,the Earth's gravitational field from GOCE completely up to 250 degrees is recovered using the radial gravity gradient Vzz and three-dimensional gravity gradient Vij by numerical simulation,respectively.The study results show that when the measurement errorof the gravity gradient is 3 × 10-12/s2,the cumulative geoid height errors using the radial gravity gradient Vzz and three-dimensional gravity gradient Vij are 12.319 cm and 9.295 cm at 250 degrees,respectively.The accuracy of the cumulative geoid height using the three-dimensional gravity gradient Vij is improved by 30%-40% on average compared with that using the radial gravity gradient Vzz in 250 degrees.Finally,by mutual verification of the analytical error model and numerical simulation,the orders of magnitude from the accuracies of the Earth's gravitational field recovery make no substantial differences based on the radial and three-dimensional gravity gradients,respectively.Therefore,it is feasible to develop in advance a radial cold-atom interferometric gradiometer with a measurement accuracy of 10-13/s2-10-15/s2 for precisely producing the next-generation GOCE Follow-On Earth gravity field model with a high spatial resolution.

  5. Modeling tectonic heat flow and source rock maturity in the Rub' Al-Khali Basin (Saudi Arabia), with the help of GOCE satellite gravity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul Fattah, R.; Meekes, S.; Bouman, J.; Ebbing, J.; Haagmans, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D basin modeling study was carried out to reconstruct the regional heat flow and source rock maturity in the Rub'al-Khali basin. Gravity gradient data from the GOCE satellite were used to model deep structures, such as the Moho interface. Tectonic heat flow was modeled using the GOCE-based Moho i

  6. GRACE Gravity Satellite Observations of Terrestrial Water Storage Changes for Drought Characterization in the Arid Land of Northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a complex natural hazard which can have negative effects on agriculture, economy, and human life. In this paper, the primary goal is to explore the application of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE gravity satellite data for the quantitative investigation of the recent drought dynamic over the arid land of northwestern China, a region with scarce hydrological and meteorological observation datasets. The spatiotemporal characteristics of terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC were first evaluated based on the GRACE satellite data, and then validated against hydrological model simulations and precipitation data. A drought index, the total storage deficit index (TSDI, was derived on the basis of GRACE-recovered TWSC. The spatiotemporal distributions of drought events from 2003 to 2012 in the study region were obtained using the GRACE-derived TSDI. Results derived from TSDI time series indicated that, apart from four short-term (three months drought events, the study region experienced a severe long-term drought from May 2008 to December 2009. As shown in the spatial distribution of TSDI-derived drought conditions, this long-term drought mainly concentrated in the northwestern area of the entire region, where the terrestrial water storage was in heavy deficit. These drought characteristics, which were detected by TSDI, were consistent with local news reports and other researchers’ results. Furthermore, a comparison between TSDI and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI implied that GRACE TSDI was a more reliable integrated drought indicator (monitoring agricultural and hydrological drought in terms of considering total terrestrial water storages for large regions. The GRACE-derived TSDI can therefore be used to characterize and monitor large-scale droughts in the arid regions, being of special value for areas with scarce observations.

  7. Refinements in the Combined Adjustment of Satellite Altimetry and Gravity Anomaly Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-12

    of the areas covered by the GEOS-3 satellite when compared with the earlier reported results of the AFGL computer program SARRA ^(Short Arc Reduc...in the partial derivatives may be illustrated as follows. A small set of satellite altimetry data was adjusted by the AFGL program SARRA (Short Arc...1 l+2^(a/rf 2^(C cos mX + S sin mX)P ( sine ) n^2v m=0 nm nm nm i + h u>2r0r 3 co326/(kM) , (4.1) which yields dr (r0/r oo n )^n(a

  8. Hawaiian Islands Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity anomaly grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models the...

  9. PR/VI Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity anomaly grid for the Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models...

  10. Expansion of the South China Sea basin: Constraints from magnetic anomaly stripes, sea floor topography, satellite gravity and submarine geothermics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The widely distributed E–W-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the central basin and the N–E-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the southwest sub-basin provide the most important evidence for Neogene expansion of the South China Sea. The expansion mechanism remains, however, controversial because of the lack of direct drilling data, non-systematic marine magnetic survey data, and irregular magnetic anomaly stripes with two obvious directions. For example, researchers have inferred different ages and episodes of expansion for the central basin and southwest sub-basin. Major controversy centers on the order of basinal expansion and the mechanism of expansion for the entire South China Sea basin. This study attempts to constrain these problems from a comprehensive analysis of the seafloor topography, magnetic anomaly stripes, regional aeromagnetic data, satellite gravity, and submarine geothermics. The mapped seafloor terrain shows that the central basin is a north-south rectangle that is relatively shallow with many seamounts, whereas the southwest sub-basin is wide in northeast, gradually narrows to the southwest, and is relatively deeper with fewer seamounts. Many magnetic anomaly stripes are present in the central basin with variable dimensions and directions that are dominantly EW-trending, followed by the NE-, NW- and NS-trending. Conversely such stripes are few in the southwest sub-basin and mainly NE-trending. Regional magnetic data suggest that the NW-trending Ailaoshan-Red River fault extends into the South China Sea, links with the central fault zone in the South China Sea, which extends further southward to Reed Tablemount. Satellite gravity data show that both the central basin and southwest sub-basin are composed of oceanic crust. The Changlong seamount is particularly visible in the southwest sub-basin and extends eastward to the Zhenbei seamount. Also a low gravity anomaly zone coincides with the central fault zone in the sub

  11. Preliminary interpretation of satellite gravity and magnetic anomalies in the region of the Philippine Sea Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Hu, Z.; Du, J.; Wang, Q.

    2011-12-01

    The Philippine Sea, situated in the northwestern Pacific, is one of the largest marginal seas on the Earth. Analysis of the Philippine Sea's intraplate fault tectonic systems and lithosphere's density and magnetism structures has a significant contribution to understanding not only the dynamic principles of subduction and convergence zones but also effect of plate subduction on back-arc area. It is also important to have cognizance for structure evolution of the ocean crust, the tension and extending progress of marginal sea basins and the mechanisms of geodynamics. Meanwhile, it can be a significant approach for researching the evolution of the East China Sea and the South China Sea. Using high-precision gravity forwarding method based on spatial domain in spherical coordinate, we have calculated the Bouguer gravity disturbance (BGD) in the Philippine Sea based on the ETOPO1 1 arc-minute topography & bathymetry data and the gravity field model EIGEN-6C. After removing the gravity effect of the sediments and deep abnormal materials, we make spherical cap harmonic analysis of the residual anomaly and obtain the topography of Moho and apparent-density's distribution of our study area by alternate iteration inversion method. Then, we calculate the distributions of the study area's magnetic anomalies based on the Earth magnetic model NGDC720, reduce to the pole of the study area's magnetic anomalies by the equivalent source method based on spherical prism magnetic forwarding, inverse the processed magnetic anomalies with spherical cap harmonic analysis to obtain the topography of Curie surface and the apparent magnetic susceptibility distribution. Finally, we divide the Philippine Sea block into tectonic units and derive the faults distributions through the analysis of gravity magnetic anomalies' linear characteristics. The results show that West Philippine Basin is divided by Central Basin Ridge into two block units, the tectonic trend of the north block is south

  12. Global surface density of water mass variations by using a two-step inversion by cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frédéric; Seoane, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission, these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrological mass changes is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources is composed of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics lower than 2). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~100,000 km x km (or equivalently 330 km by 330 km) are defined to be of equal areas over the terrestrial sphere. However they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of improving time and space resolutions for ocean and land studies that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  13. Science Instrument Support Electronics Systems for the Relativity Mission Satellite, Gravity Probe B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, W. J.; Brumley, R. W.; Buchman, S.; Clarke, B.; Hipkins, D. N.; Farley, R.; Shestople, P.; Meriwether, D.; Gray, C.

    The Relativity Mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B), uses four redundant high precision electrostatically suspended mechanical gyroscopes for measuring the relativistic precessions of the frame of reference in a 640 km polar orbit. The two precessions to be measured are predicted in General Relativity are the geodetic effect, 6.6 arcsec/year, and the frame dragging effect, 0.042 arcsec/year. The Science Instrument Support Electronics or Payload Electronics Package enables this measurement to be performed by providing the necessary control and monitoring functions for the Science Instrument Assembly that contains the four gyroscopes and reference star tracking telescope. This paper describes the overall architecture of the Payload Electronics system and the design and operation of its component parts: 1) the SQUID Readout electronics (SRE) for gyroscope orientation measurement, 2) The Gyroscope Suspension System (GSS) for gyroscope electrostatic suspension and spin axis alignment, 3) the Telescope Readout Electronics (TRE) for measurement of the reference star location, 4) the Experiment Control Unit (ECU) for heater, valve, and rotor electrostatic charge control and thermometry, 5) the custom GPS receiver for orbital position determination and time reference generation, and 6) the Gas Management Assembly (GMA) that controls and routes the gaseous helium used for initial gyroscope spin-up. Contingent upon a successful launch of Gravity Probe on April 17 2004, preliminary performance results will be presented along side the predicated performance estimates derived from system analysis and test on the ground prior to launch.

  14. Pseudofaults and associated seamounts in the conjugate Arabian and Eastern Somali basins, NW Indian Ocean - New constraints from high-resolution satellite-derived gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Chaubey, A. K.; Mishra, Akhil; Kumar, Shravan; Rajawat, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Marine gravity data derived from satellite altimeters are effective tools in mapping fine-scale tectonic features of the ocean basins such as pseudofaults, fracture zones and seamounts, particularly when the ocean basins are carpeted with thick sediments. We use high-resolution satellite-generated gravity and seismic reflection data to map boundaries of pseudofaults and transferred crust related to the Paleocene spreading ridge propagation in the Arabian and its conjugate Eastern Somali basins. The study has provided refinement in the position of previously reported pseudofaults and their spatial extensions in the conjugate basins. It is observed that the transferred crustal block bounded by inner pseudofault and failed spreading ridge is characterized by a gravity low and rugged basement. The refined satellite gravity image of the Arabian Basin also revealed three seamounts in close proximity to the pseudofaults, which were not reported earlier. In the Eastern Somali Basin, seamounts are aligned along NE-SW direction forming ∼300 km long seamount chain. Admittance analysis and Flexural model studies indicated that the seamount chain is isostatically compensated locally with Effective Elastic Thickness (Te) of 3-4 km. Based on the present results and published plate tectonic models, we interpret that the seamounts in the Arabian Basin are formed by spreading ridge propagation and are associated with pseudofaults, whereas the seamount chain in the Eastern Somali Basin might have probably originated due to melting and upwelling of upper mantle heterogeneities in advance of migrating/propagating paleo Carlsberg Ridge.

  15. Satellite observations of atmosphere-ionosphere vertical coupling by gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thai; Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's thermosphere/ionosphere (T/I) is strongly influenced by various processes from above as well as from below. One of the most important processes from below is vertical coupling by atmospheric waves. Among these waves, gravity waves (GWs) excited in the lower atmosphere, mainly in the troposphere and tropopause region, are likely essential for the mean state of the T/I system. The penetration of GWs into the T/I system is however not well understood in modeling as well as observations. In this work, we analyze the correlation between different GW parameters at lower altitudes (below 90 km) and GW induced perturbations in the T/I. At lower altitudes, GW parameters are derived from temperature observations of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). In the T/I, GW induced perturbations of neutral density measured by Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) and CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) are analyzed. Interestingly, we find positive correlations between the spatial distributions at low altitudes (i.e. below 90km) and the spatial distributions of GW-induced density fluctuations in the T/I (at 200km and above), which suggests that many waves seen in the T/I have their origins in the troposphere or lower stratosphere. It is also indicated that mountain waves generated near the Andes and Antarctic Peninsula propagate up to the T/I. Strong positive correlations between GW perturbations in the T/I and GW parameters at 30 km are mainly found at mid latitudes, which may be an indicator of propagation of convectively generated GWs. Increase of correlation starting from 70 km in many cases shows that filtering of the GW distribution by the background atmosphere is very important. Processes that are likely involved are GW dissipation, generation of secondary GWs, as well as horizontal propagation of GWs. Limitations of our method and of the observations are also discussed.

  16. Coseismic and post-seismic signatures of the Sumatra 2004 December and 2005 March earthquakes in GRACE satellite gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panet, I.; Mikhailov, V.; Diament, M.; Pollitz, F.; King, G.; de Viron, O.; Holschneider, M.; Biancale, R.; Lemoine, J.-M.

    2007-01-01

    The GRACE satellite mission has been measuring the Earth's gravity field and its temporal variations since 2002 April. Although these variations are mainly due to mass transfer within the geofluid envelops, they also result from mass displacements associated with phenomena including glacial isostatic adjustment and earthquakes. However, these last contributions are difficult to isolate because of the presence of noise and of geofluid signals, and because of GRACE's coarse spatial resolution (>400 km half-wavelength). In this paper, we show that a wavelet analysis on the sphere helps to retrieve earthquake signatures from GRACE geoid products. Using a wavelet analysis of GRACE geoids products, we show that the geoid variations caused by the 2004 December (Mw = 9.2) and 2005 March (Mw = 8.7) Sumatra earthquakes can be detected. At GRACE resolution, the 2004 December earthquake produced a strong coseismic decrease of the gravity field in the Andaman Sea, followed by relaxation in the area affected by both the Andaman 2004 and the Nias 2005 earthquakes. We find two characteristic timescales for the relaxation, with a fast variation occurring in the vicinity of the Central Andaman ridge. We discuss our coseismic observations in terms of density changes of crustal and upper-mantle rocks, and of the vertical displacements in the Andaman Sea. We interpret the post-seismic signal in terms of the viscoelastic response of the Earth's mantle. The transient component of the relaxation may indicate the presence of hot, viscous material beneath the active Central Andaman Basin. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  17. U.S. Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity anomaly grid for the conterminous United States is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models the 1.7...

  18. A case study of the energy dissipation of the gravity wave field based on satellite altimeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Parsons, C. L.; Long, S. R.; Bliven, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Wave breaking is proposed as the primary energy dissipation mechanism for the gravity wave field. The energy dissipation rate is calculated based on the statistical model proposed by Longuet-Higgins (1969) with a modification of the breaking criterion incorporating the surface stress according to Phillips and Banner (1974). From this modified model, an analytic expression is found for the wave attenuation rate and the half-life time of the wave field which depend only on the significant slope of the wave field and the ratio of friction velocity to initial wave phase velocity. These expressions explain why the freshly generated wave field does not last long, but why swells are capable of propagating long distances without substantial change in energy density. It is shown that breaking is many orders of magnitude more effective in dissipating wave energy than the molecular viscosity, if the significant slope is higher than 0.01. Limited observational data from satellite and laboratory are used to compare with the analytic results, and show good agreement.

  19. Long Range River Discharge Forecasting Using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite to Predict Conditions for Endemic Cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of conditions of an impending disease outbreak remains a challenge but is achievable if the associated and appropriate large scale hydroclimatic process can be estimated in advance. Outbreaks of diarrheal diseases such as cholera, are related to episodic seasonal variability in river discharge in the regions where water and sanitation infrastructure are inadequate and insufficient. However, forecasting river discharge, few months in advance, remains elusive where cholera outbreaks are frequent, probably due to non-availability of geophysical data as well as transboundary water stresses. Here, we show that satellite derived water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Forecasting (GRACE) sensors can provide reliable estimates on river discharge atleast two months in advance over regional scales. Bayesian regression models predicted flooding and drought conditions, a prerequisite for cholera outbreaks, in Bengal Delta with an overall accuracy of 70% for upto 60 days in advance without using any other ancillary ground based data. Forecasting of river discharge will have significant impacts on planning and designing intervention strategies for potential cholera outbreaks in the coastal regions where the disease remain endemic and often fatal.

  20. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  1. 低轨卫星精密定轨中重力场模型误差的补偿%Reducing Influence of Gravity Model Error in Precise Orbit Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭金来; 胡敏; 赵齐乐; 郭道玉

    2007-01-01

    Based on the orbit integration and orbit fitting method, the influence of the characters of the gravity model, with different precisions, on the movement of low Earth orbit satellites was studied. The way and the effect of absorbing the influence of gravity model error on CHAMP and GRACE satellite orbits, using linear and periodical empirical acceleration models and the so-called "pseudo-stochastic pulses" model, were also analyzed.

  2. Processing Marine Gravity Data Around Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Choi, K.; Kim, Y.; Ahn, Y.; Chang, M.

    2008-12-01

    In Korea currently 4 research ships are under operating in Korea, after the first research vessel equipped shipborne gravity meter was introduced in 1990s. These are Onnuri(launch 1991) of KORDI(Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute), Haeyang2000(launch 1996), Badaro1(launch 2002) of NORI(National Oceanographic Research Institute) and Tamhae2(launch 1997) of KIGAM(Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources). Those of research vessel, Haeyang2000 have observed marine gravity data over 150,000 points each year from year 1996 to year 2003. Haeyang2000, about 2,500 tons, is unable to operate onshore so NORI has constructed another 600 tons research ship Badaro1 that has observed marine gravity data onshore since year 2002. Haeyang2000 finished observing marine gravity data offshore within Korean territorial waters until year 2003. Currently Badaro1 is observing marine gravity data onshore. These shipborne gravity data will be very useful and important on geodesy and geophysics research also those data can make a contribution to developing these studies. In this study NORI's shipbrne gravity data from 1996 to 2007 has been processed for fundamental data to compute Korean precise geoid. Marine gravity processing steps as followed. 1. Check the time sequence, latitude and longitude position, etc. of shipborne gravity data 2. Arrangement of the tide level below the pier and meter drift correction of each cruise. 3. Elimination of turning points. 4. The time lag correction. 5. Computation of RV's velocities, Heading angles and the Eötvös correction. 6. Kalman filtering of GPS navigation data using cross-over points. 7. Cross-over correction using least square adjustment. About 2,058,000 points have been processed with NORI's marine gravity data from 1996 to 2007 in this study. The distribution of free-air anomalies was -41.0 mgal to 136.0 mgal(mean 8.90mgal) within Korean territorial waters. The free-air anomalies processed with the marine gravity data are

  3. Gravity study of the Pitcairn-Easter hotline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, M.; Dehghani, G. A.; Diament, M.; Francheteau, J.; Stoffers, P.

    1994-11-01

    Shipboard free air gravity and bathymetric anomalies with an extension of 400 km were identified across the Pitcairn-Easter hotline in the South Pacific. The anomalies are associated with one of the positive geoid undulations observed in the area from satellite data. Several smaller topographic features, volcano-tectonic ridges oriented N 65 deg E, are superimposed on the topographic hig. Admittance computations and direct modeling show that the swell topography is compensated by a low density zone within the lithosphere, 4 to 8 km below the crust. The volcano tectonic ridges are locally compensated in a classical Airy sense. The swell and the associated ridges were probably created by the action of a thermal anomaly resulting from the interaction of the Easter Island hotspot and of the Easter Microplate accretion centers.

  4. Radial and tangential gravity rates from GRACE in areas of glacial isostatic adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Kurtenbach, Enrico; Kusche, Jürgen; Vermeersen, Bert

    2011-11-01

    In areas dominated by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), the free-air gravity anomaly rate can be converted to uplift rate to good approximation by using a simple spectral relation. We provide quantitative comparisons between gravity rates derived from monthly gravity field solutions (GFZ Potsdam, CSR Texas, IGG Bonn) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission with uplift rates measured by GPS in these areas. The band-limited gravity data from the GRACE satellite mission can be brought to very good agreement with the point data from GPS by using scaling factors derived from a GIA model (the root-mean-square of differences is 0.55 mm yr-1 for a maximum uplift rate signal of 10 mm yr-1). The root-mean-square of the differences between GRACE derived uplift rates and GPS derived uplift rates decreases with increasing GRACE time period to a level below the uncertainty that is expected from GRACE observations, GPS measurements and the conversion from gravity rate to uplift rate. With the current length of time-series (more than 8 yr) applying filters and a hydrology correction to the GRACE data does not reduce the root-mean-square of differences significantly. The smallest root-mean-square was obtained with the GFZ solution in Fennoscandia and with the CSR solution in North America. With radial gravity rates in excellent agreement with GPS uplift rates, more information on the GIA process can be extracted from GRACE gravity field solutions in the form of tangential gravity rates, which are equivalent to a rate of change in the deflection of the vertical scaled by the magnitude of gravity rate vector. Tangential gravity rates derived from GRACE point towards the centre of the previously glaciated area, and are largest in a location close to the centre of the former ice sheet. Forward modelling showed that present day tangential gravity rates have maximum sensitivity between the centre and edge of the former ice sheet, while radial gravity

  5. Spherical earth gravity and magnetic anomaly analysis by equivalent point source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates potential field anomalies to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal anomalies, pseudo-anomalies, vector anomaly components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity anomalies of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  6. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Lecce (Italy); Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Museo della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Rome (Italy); Pavlis, Erricos C. [University of Maryland, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), Baltimore County (United States); Koenig, Rolf [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Ries, John [University of Texas at Austin, Center for Space Research, Austin (United States); Gurzadyan, Vahe; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Matzner, Richard [University of Texas at Austin, Theory Center, Austin (United States); Penrose, Roger [University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom); Sindoni, Giampiero [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity. (orig.)

  7. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model: Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  8. Economic impacts of the Pueblo Smoke-Free Air Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Walter F; Szychowski, Jeffery; Karp, Shelley; Liu, Lucia; Diedrich, Robert T

    2010-03-01

    On July 1, 2003, the city of Pueblo CO enacted a smokefree ordinance (Pueblo Smoke-Free Air Act [PSFAA]) that prohibited smoking in public places and workplaces, including taverns and restaurants. Opponents to this ordinance argued that it would have a negative impact on tavern and restaurant sales. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the PSFAA had a negative economic impact on tavern and restaurant sales tax revenues. With data gathered in 2007, this study implemented an interrupted time-series model in 2008, using 42 months of pre- and post-intervention sales tax revenue data for Pueblo to determine whether implementation of this ordinance had an effect on tavern and restaurant sales tax revenues. Ratios of tavern and restaurant openings to closings were also computed for the pre- and post-intervention periods. Pre-post sales tax revenue data showed slight losses in sales tax revenue for taverns, and gains for restaurants, which more than offset the tavern losses. After adjusting for the consumer price index, the city of Pueblo experienced a 20.3% gain in combined tavern and restaurant sales tax revenues from the pre-ordinance period to the post-ordinance period. The ratio of tavern openings to closings improved from 1:1 pre-period to 3.3:1 post-period and the restaurant ratio remained unchanged at approximately 1.78:1 from pre- to post-period. There is no evidence that the PSFAA had a negative economic impact on consumer price index-adjusted tavern and restaurant sales tax revenues. From a fiscal policy perspective, this ordinance may have contributed to a net increase in sales tax revenues for the city of Pueblo. The business openings/closings data suggest that the confidence Pueblo's business sector had in the local hospitality industry was not negatively influenced by the PSFAA. Copyright (c) 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antarctic Crustal Thickness from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The continental lithosphere thinning distribution, used to define the initial thermal model temperature perturbation is derived from the gravity inversion and uses no a priori isochron information; as a consequence the gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition location, which is independent of ocean isochron information. The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the most recent Bedmap2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south (Fretwell et al., 2013) and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica penetrated by narrow continental rifts that feature relatively thinner crust. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS) is a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. This is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system. Intermediate crustal thickness with an inferred linear rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica

  10. Main methods of trajectory synthesis for scenarios of space missions with gravity assist maneuvers in the system of Jupiter and with landing on one of its satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Yu. F.; Tuchin, A. G.; Grushevskii, A. V.; Koryanov, V. V.; Tuchin, D. A.; Morskoy, I. M.; Simonov, A. V.; Dobrovolskii, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a methodology for designing trajectories of spacecraft intended for the contact and remote studies of Jupiter and its natural satellites is considered. This methodology should take into account a number of specific features. Firstly, in order to maintain the propellant consumption at an acceptable level, the flight profile, ensuring the injection of the spacecraft into orbit around the Jovian moon, should include a large number of gravity assist maneuvers both in the interplanetary phase of the Earth-to-Jupiter flight and during the flight in the system of the giant planet. Secondly, the presence of Jupiter's powerful radiation belts also imposes fairly strict limitations on the trajectory parameters.

  11. REDUCTION AND GRIDDED PROCESSING OF SATELLITE GRAVITY GRADIENT DATA%卫星重力梯度数据的归算与格网化处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟波; 刘华亮; 罗志才; 李振海

    2011-01-01

    Satellite gravity gradient data reduction and gridding are indispensable steps for recovering the Earth' s gravity field with space-wise method. The second-order radial correction formula for gravity gradient data reduction is given, and the results show that the use of high-precision reference gravity field model can effectively reduce the reduction errors. The gridding accuracy and applicability of weighted average method, Shepard surface fitting and least squares collocation method are compared. As a test, the radial gravity gradient data that added with different types of noises are gridded with the above three gridding methods. The results show that the LSC method has obvious advantages compared with the weighted average and Shepard surface fitting methods, and it can be used for high-accuracy Earth' s gravity field recovery, so the LSC method is recommended for GOCE gravity gradient data gridded processing.%给出引力梯度数据归算的二阶径向改正公式,计算结果表明选用高精度参考重力场模型可以有效控制归算误差的影响.比较加权平均法、Shepard曲面拟合法和最小二乘配置法用于卫星重力梯度数据格网化处理的精度和适用性,采用不同噪声背景的径向引力梯度数据进行格网化处理,计算结果表明:最小二乘配置法相比加权平均法和Shepard曲面拟合法具有明显优势,其格网化精度可满足高精度重力场恢复的需要,建议在实际计算中采用最小二乘配置法进行格网化处理.

  12. Galathea-3: A global marine gravity profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strykowski, Gabriel; Cordua, Knud Skou; Forsberg, René

    2012-01-01

    topography. This paper reports on the second experiment in which a continuous marine gravity profile along the ship’s route was measured. The focus of the paper is on the practical aspects of such large scale world wide operation and on the challenges of the data processing. Furthermore, the processed free......-air gravity values are compared to 3 global models: EGM96, EGM08 and DNSC08. Even though the along-track resolution of marine data is higher than the resolution in any global gravity model (which influences the direct comparison of the collected marine data to the model) the statistics for the residual free......-air gravity anomalies show, that EGM08 and DNSC08 are better models than EGM96 for all Galathea-3 legs. Some areas along the ships route are quite challenging for modellers....

  13. Tectonics of the Bay of Bengal: New insights from satellite-gravity and ship-borne geophysical data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, C.; Thakur, N.K.; Rao, T.G.; Khanna, R.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.

    the Rajmahal and Sylhet Traps and volcanics in the Bengal and Mahanadi basins, almost on the scale of the Deccan volcanic province along the west coast, can be envisaged taking into account the occurrences of intrusive rocks around the age of 117 Ma. Gravity...

  14. Application of satellite gravity information fusion to refine regional quasi-geoid%卫星重力信息融合及区域似大地水准面精化应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋雷; 陈晓华; 胡伍生; 王德宝; 王牧龙

    2013-01-01

    为改善地面重力数据缺乏区域似大地水准面的精度和分辨率,提出利用神经网络融合卫星重力信息应用于似大地水准面精化的方法,通过融合不同时期CHAMP卫星数据计算的重力场模型和GPS/水准数据中区域重力场信息,进行区域似大地水准面精化并进行精度统计,结果表明:融合卫星重力信息将区域似大地水准面模型的精度由0.4702 m提高至0.2038 m,验证了神经网络技术融合卫星重力信息并应用于区域似大地水准面精化是有效的.%In order to improve the precision and resolution of quasi-geoid in the region of lacking ground gravity data, the method of satellite gravity information fusion using neural network to refine regional quasi-geoid is proposed.The regional quasi-geoid is refined by fusing the gravity informa-tion of CHAMP ( challenging mini-satellite payload ) gravity field models at different periods and GPS/leveling, and then the precision of quasi-geoid is estimated.The results show that the satellite gravity information fusion can improve the precision of regional quasi-geoid from 0.470 2 m to 0.203 8 m, which verify that satellite gravity information fusion using neural network to refine re-gional quasi-geoid is effective.

  15. Stability results of a free air ionization chamber in standard mammography beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are absolute dosimeters, because they can measure basic physical quantities directly without the need of their calibration in a standard radiation beam. They are used for measuring exposure and air kerma in X and gamma radiation beams. The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN has a free air ionization chamber of the cylindrical type for low energies. The characterization of this ionization chamber was already performed and reported in a previous study. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder devices, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the new alignment protocol of the free air ionization chamber in low energies of X-ray beams of standard mammography qualities, assuring the positioning reproducibility, and new results of stability tests performed with the application of this protocol will be presented. (author)

  16. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energy X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N. F.; Xavier, M.; Vivolo, V.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition.

  17. Geoid undulations and gravity anomalies over the Aral Sea, the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea from a combined GEOS-3/SEASAT/GEOSAT altimeter data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Andrew Y.; Brown, Richard D.; Welker, Jean E.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite-based altimetric data taken by GOES-3, SEASAT, and GEOSAT over the Aral Sea, the Black Sea, and the Caspian Sea are analyzed and a least squares collocation technique is used to predict the geoid undulations on a 0.25x0.25 deg. grid and to transform these geoid undulations to free air gravity anomalies. Rapp's 180x180 geopotential model is used as the reference surface for the collocation procedure. The result of geoid to gravity transformation is, however, sensitive to the information content of the reference geopotential model used. For example, considerable detailed surface gravity data were incorporated into the reference model over the Black Sea, resulting in a reference model with significant information content at short wavelengths. Thus, estimation of short wavelength gravity anomalies from gridded geoid heights is generally reliable over regions such as the Black Sea, using the conventional collocation technique with local empirical covariance functions. Over regions such as the Caspian Sea, where detailed surface data are generally not incorporated into the reference model, unconventional techniques are needed to obtain reliable gravity anomalies. Based on the predicted gravity anomalies over these inland seas, speculative tectonic structures are identified and geophysical processes are inferred.

  18. Determination of Antarctic geoid by using global gravity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With Chinese latest global gravity field model WDM94, the authors providethe geoid height and mean free-air gravity anomaly of Antarctica (The range of latitude is from—60° to—90°). In order to conclude and analyze the characters of Antarctic geoid roundly, the authors collect the latest oversea global gravity field model OSU91 (to degree and order 360) and JGMOSU (to degree and order 360), get the corresponding geoid height and mean free-air gravity anomaly. The results arecompared with the results got from WDM94, thus we get the difference. The standard deviation of geoid height between WDM94 and OSU91 is ± 1.90 re;the deviation of geoid between WDM9 and JGMOSU is ± 2.09 m. The standard deviation of mean gravity anomaly are±8.97 mGal and ± 9.32 mGal respectively.

  19. New analytic solutions for modeling vertical gravity gradient anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Sep; Wessel, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Modern processing of satellite altimetry for use in marine gravimetry involves computing the along-track slopes of observed sea-surface heights, projecting them into east-west and north-south deflection of the vertical grids, and using Laplace's equation to algebraically obtain a grid of the vertical gravity gradient (VGG). The VGG grid is then integrated via overlapping, flat Earth Fourier transforms to yield a free-air anomaly grid. Because of this integration and associated edge effects, the VGG grid retains more short-wavelength information (e.g., fracture zone and seamount signatures) that is of particular importance for plate tectonic investigations. While modeling of gravity anomalies over arbitrary bodies has long been a standard undertaking, similar modeling of VGG anomalies over oceanic features is not commonplace yet. Here we derive analytic solutions for VGG anomalies over simple bodies and arbitrary 2-D and 3-D sources. We demonstrate their usability in determining mass excess and deficiency across the Mendocino fracture zone (a 2-D feature) and find the best bulk density estimate for Jasper seamount (a 3-D feature). The methodologies used herein are implemented in the Generic Mapping Tools, available from gmt.soest.hawaii.edu.

  20. Free Air Intraperitoneally During Chemotherapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia : Consider Pneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, Ellis; Hulscher, Jan B. F.; Timmer, Bert; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; Broens, Paul M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Intraperitoneal free air in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with induction chemotherapy is an ominous sign suspective of gastrointestinal perforation. We report a case of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) with free intraperitoneal air without bowel perforation in a chi

  1. Free Air Intraperitoneally During Chemotherapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia : Consider Pneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, Ellis; Hulscher, Jan B. F.; Timmer, Bert; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; Broens, Paul M. A.

    Intraperitoneal free air in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with induction chemotherapy is an ominous sign suspective of gastrointestinal perforation. We report a case of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) with free intraperitoneal air without bowel perforation in a

  2. World Gravity Map: a set of global complete spherical Bouguer and isostatic anomaly maps and grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvalot, S.; Balmino, G.; Briais, A.; Kuhn, M.; Peyrefitte, A.; Vales, N.; Biancale, R.; Gabalda, G.; Reinquin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Intelligence Agency (NGA) (Pavlis et al., 2008) and the DTU10 (Andersen, 2010) who represents the best up-to-date global gravity models (including surface gravity measurements from land, marine and airborne surveys as well as gravity and altimetry satellite measurements). The surface free-air anomaly is computed at the Earth's surface in the context of Molodensky theory and includes corrections from the mass of the atmosphere. The way gravity anomalies are computed on a worldwide basis slightly differs from the classical usage, but meets modern concerns which tend to take into account of the real Earth. The resulting anomaly maps and grids will be distributed for scientific and education purposes by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) (http://ccgm.free.fr) and by the Bureau Gravimetrique International (BGI) (http://bgi.omp.obs-mip.fr). Upgraded versions might be done as soon as new global gravity model will be available (including satellite GOCE data for instance). Institutions who are interested to contribute with new datasets of surface gravity measurements (i.e. ground, marine or airborne gravity data) are also invited to contact BGI bgi@cnes.fr.

  3. 月球重力场环境对月球卫星轨道影响分析%The effect of lunar gravity environment on lunar satellite orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童科伟; 李文清; 刘伟; 高朝辉; 王俊峰

    2012-01-01

    文章分析了月球复杂的重力场环境对月球卫星轨道运行的影响。通过月球卫星冻结轨道与地球卫星冻结轨道的对比分析,结果表明月球重力场存在较大异常,并由此引起月球卫星轨道发生较大漂移。另外,月球冻结轨道在带谐项影响下还存在中等周期的漂移,仅简单考虑带谐项系数无法求得完美的月球冻结系数。由于月球重力场异常对绕月卫星的影响与地球轨道卫星情况相比存在很大差异,因此月球轨道卫星的长期运行与控制策略的设计必须充分考虑此影响%The effect of lunar gravity environment on the lunar satellite orbit is analyzed. The differences between the frozen orbit for lunar and earth satellites are compared first. It is shown that the lunar gravity anomaly is responsible for a large drift to the lunar satellite orbit, the lunar tesseral harmonics are responsible for a moderate period drift to the lunar frozen orbit. Because the effect of lunar gravity anomaly on lunar satellites is quite different from the case for the earth, so for the long-term orbit operation and control for lunar satellites, a different strategy must be adopted than the traditional methods designed for the earth satellite orbit.

  4. Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to Explore the Relation between Smoke-Free Air Laws and Quitting Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Jonathan T.; Middlestadt, Susan E.; Seo, Dong-Chul; Kolbe, Lloyd J.; Jay, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Smoke-free air policies have been shown to reduce smoking, but the mechanism of behavior change is not well understood. The authors used structural equation modeling to conduct a theory of planned behavior analysis with data from 395 smokers living in seven Texas cities, three with a comprehensive smoke-free air law and four without a…

  5. Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to Explore the Relation between Smoke-Free Air Laws and Quitting Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Jonathan T.; Middlestadt, Susan E.; Seo, Dong-Chul; Kolbe, Lloyd J.; Jay, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Smoke-free air policies have been shown to reduce smoking, but the mechanism of behavior change is not well understood. The authors used structural equation modeling to conduct a theory of planned behavior analysis with data from 395 smokers living in seven Texas cities, three with a comprehensive smoke-free air law and four without a…

  6. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10(-23) Hz(-1/2) above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  8. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  9. The impact of the new Earth gravity models on the measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect with a new satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the opportunities offered by the new Earth gravity models from the dedicated CHAMP and, especially, GRACE missions to the project of measuring the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect with a new Earth's artificial satellite. It turns out that it would be possible to abandon the stringent, and expensive, requirements on the orbital geometry of the originally prosed LARES mission (same semimajor axis a=12270 km of the existing LAGEOS and inclination i=70 deg) by inserting the new spacecraft in a relatively low, and cheaper, orbit (a=7500-8000 km, i\\sim 70 deg) and suitably combining its node Omega with those of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II in order to cancel out the first even zonal harmonic coefficients of the multipolar expansion of the terrestrial gravitational potential J_2, J_4 along with their temporal variations. The total systematic error due to the mismodelling in the remaining even zonal harmonics would amount to \\sim 1% and would be insensitive to departures of the inclinat...

  10. Gravity field modelling and gravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krynski Jan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The summary of research activities concerning gravity field modelling and gravimetric works performed in Poland in the period of 2011-2014 is presented. It contains the results of research on geoid modelling in Poland and other countries, evaluation of global geopotential models, determination of temporal variations of the gravity field with the use of data from satellite gravity space missions, absolute gravity surveys for the maintenance and modernization of the gravity control in Poland and overseas, metrological aspects in gravimetry, maintenance of gravimetric calibration baselines, and investigations of the nontidal gravity changes. The bibliography of the related works is given in references.

  11. The incidence of "silent" free air and aspiration pneumonia detected by CT after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Jiro; Tomita, Toshihiko; Toyoshima, Fumihiko; Sakurai, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Asano, Haruki; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Okugawa, Takuya; Tanaka, Junji; Daimon, Takashi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Hori, Kazutoshi; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-12-01

    Although endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is feasible as a treatment for early gastric cancer, it requires great skill to perform and may place patients at increased risk of a number of complications, including perforation and aspiration pneumonia. To investigate the incidence of "silent" free air without endoscopic perforation and aspiration pneumonia detected by CT after ESD and risk factors for the development of these 2 conditions. Prospective cohort study. Single academic center. This study involved 87 patients with a total of 91 malignancies. All patients underwent chest and abdominal CT and blood biochemistry analysis before and 1 day after ESD. The incidence of silent free air and aspiration pneumonia after ESD and the related risk factors. Silent free air was identified in 37.3% of patients without perforation. Tumor location (the upper portion of the stomach), the presence of a damaged muscular layer during ESD, and procedure time, but not specimen size, were significantly associated with silent free air (P = .006, P = .04, P = .02, and P = .53, respectively). According to the receiver-operating characteristic analysis, the resulting cutoff value of the procedure time for silent free air was 105 minutes (67.7% sensitivity, 65.4% specificity). Only procedure time (≥ 105 minutes) was an independent predictor of silent free air development (odds ratio 3.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-8.64; P = .02). On the other hand, aspiration pneumonia was seen in 6.6% of patients. Silent free air and aspiration pneumonia did not affect hospitalization. Single center and small number of patients. Silent free air is frequently observed after ESD, and longer procedure time (≥ 105 minutes) was an independent risk factor for silent free air. However, silent free air and aspiration pneumonia detected by CT are not associated with clinically significant complications. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  12. PTRAC File Utilization for Calculation of Free-Air Ionization Chamber Correction Factors by MCNPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2014-06-01

    A free-air ionization chamber is used as a standard of photon air-kerma. Several correction factors are applied to the air-kerma value. Correction factors for electron loss (kloss) and for additional ionization current caused by photon scatter (ksc), photon fluorescence (kfl), photon transmission through diaphragm edge (kdtr), and photon scatter from the surface of the diaphragm aperture (kdsc) were determined by the MCNPX code utilizing information stored in Particle Track (PTRAC) output files. Individual steps of the procedure are described and the calculated values of the correction factors are presented. The values are in agreement with the correction factors published in a literature for similar free-air chambers.

  13. A free-air ionization chamber with a large aperture diaphragm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, N., E-mail: n.takata@aist.go.j [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2010-07-21

    Calculations of the electric field distributions in free-air ionization chambers reveal that the distortion of the charge collection volume is small even for wide X-ray beam passage if the diaphragm and the X-ray shielding box are kept at a potential equal to half that applied to the high-voltage electrode. Applying this potential to the diaphragm and the shielding box permits a larger aperture diaphragm to be used. This will allow a wider X-ray beam to enter the chamber, thus generating a larger signal. In addition, the distance between the diaphragm and the charge collection volume can be shortened to reduce the amount of X-ray attenuation. It is also possible to calibrate a dosimeter against a free-air ionization chamber that has a diaphragm whose aperture size is equal to the size of the dosimeter in an X-ray field that is collimated to the same size. This is important since free-air ionization chambers are not sensitive to X-rays that are incident at large angles, such as those scattered by the collimator, filters and air.

  14. Geological Mapping of Sabah, Malaysia, Using Airborne Gravity Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauzi Nordin, Ahmad; Jamil, Hassan; Noor Isa, Mohd;

    2016-01-01

    using airborne gravity surveys. Airborne gravity data over land areas of Sabah has been combined with the marine airborne gravity data to provide a seamless land-to-sea gravity field coverage in order to produce the geological mapping. Free-air and Bouguer anomaly maps (density 2.67 g/cm3) have been......Airborne gravimetry is an effective tool for mapping local gravity fields using a combination of airborne sensors, aircraft and positioning systems. It is suitable for gravity surveys over difficult terrains and areas mixed with land and ocean. This paper describes the geological mapping of Sabah...... gravity data were 5-6 km. The airborne gravity survey database for landand marine areas has been compiled using ArcGIS geodatabase format in order to produce the update geological map of Sabah....

  15. High-resolution residual geoid and gravity anomaly data of the northern Indian Ocean - An input to geological understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Rajesh, S.; Majumdar, T. J.; Srinivasa Rao, G.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K. S.; Rajawat, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Geoid data are more sensitive to density distributions deep within the Earth, thus the data are useful for studying the internal processes of the Earth leading to formation of geological structures. In this paper, we present much improved version of high resolution (1' × 1') geoid anomaly map of the northern Indian Ocean generated from the altimeter data obtained from Geodetic Missions of GEOSAT and ERS-1 along with ERS-2, TOPEX/POSIDEON and JASON satellites. The geoid map of the Indian Ocean is dominated by a significant low of -106 m south of Sri Lanka, named as the Indian Ocean Geoid Low (IOGL), whose origin is not clearly known yet. The residual geoid data are retrieved from the geoid data by removing the long-wavelength core-mantle density effects using recent spherical harmonic coefficients of Earth Gravity Model 2008 (EGM2008) up to degree and order 50 from the observed geoid data. The coefficients are smoothly rolled off between degrees 30-70 in order to avoid artifacts related to the sharp truncation at degree 50. With this process we observed significant improvement in the residual geoid data when compared to the previous low-spatial resolution maps. The previous version was superposed by systematic broad regional highs and lows (like checker board) with amplitude up to ±12 m, though the trends of geoid in general match in both versions. These methodical artifacts in the previous version may have arisen due to the use of old Rapp's geo-potential model coefficients, as well as sharp truncation of reference model at degree and order 50. Geoid anomalies are converted to free-air gravity anomalies and validated with cross-over corrected ship-borne gravity data of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The present satellite derived gravity data matches well with the ship-borne data with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 5.1-7.8 mGal, and this is found to be within the error limits when compared with other globally available satellite data. Spectral analysis of

  16. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, D.B.T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and

  17. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, T.; Visser, P.; Vermeersen, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and steady-st

  18. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, D.B.T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and steady-st

  19. Modelling airborne gravity data by means of adapted Space-Wise approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro, Daniele; Capponi, Martina; Hamdi Mansi, Ahmed; Gatti, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Regional gravity field modelling by means of remove - restore procedure is nowadays widely applied to predict grids of gravity anomalies (Bouguer, free-air, isostatic, etc.) in gravimetric geoid determination as well as in exploration geophysics. Considering this last application, due to the required accuracy and resolution, airborne gravity observations are generally adopted. However due to the relatively high acquisition velocity, presence of atmospheric turbulence, aircraft vibration, instrumental drift, etc. airborne data are contaminated by a very high observation error. For this reason, a proper procedure to filter the raw observations both in the low and high frequency should be applied to recover valuable information. In this work, a procedure to predict a grid or a set of filtered along track gravity anomalies, by merging GGM and airborne dataset, is presented. The proposed algorithm, like the Space-Wise approach developed by Politecnico di Milano in the framework of GOCE data analysis, is based on a combination of along track Wiener filter and Least Squares Collocation adjustment and properly considers the different altitudes of the gravity observations. Among the main differences with respect to the satellite application of the Space-Wise approach there is the fact that, while in processing GOCE data the stochastic characteristics of the observation error can be considered a-priori well known, in airborne gravimetry, due to the complex environment in which the observations are acquired, these characteristics are unknown and should be retrieved from the dataset itself. Some innovative theoretical aspects focusing in particular on the theoretical covariance modelling are presented too. In the end, the goodness of the procedure is evaluated by means of a test on real data recovering the gravitational signal with a predicted accuracy of about 0.25 mGal.

  20. Gravity anomalies over a segment of Pratap ridge and adjoining shelf margin basin, western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Rao, D.G.; Ramprasad, T.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Rao, M.G.

    Bathymetric and gravity data totalling 2000 line km on the continental margin off Goa and Mulki, west of India have been studied. The free-air gravity anomalies vary between -60 to 25 mgals with prominent NNW-SSE trends in the outer shelf region...

  1. Polar gravity fields from GOCE and airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Yidiz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Airborne gravity, together with high-quality surface data and ocean satellite altimetric gravity, may supplement GOCE to make consistent, accurate high resolution global gravity field models. In the polar regions, the special challenge of the GOCE polar gap make the error characteristics...... of combination models especially sensitive to the correct merging of satellite and surface data. We outline comparisons of GOCE to recent airborne gravity surveys in both the Arctic and the Antarctic. The comparison is done to new 8-month GOCE solutions, as well as to a collocation prediction from GOCE gradients...... in Antarctica. It is shown how the enhanced gravity field solutions improve the determination of ocean dynamic topography in both the Arctic and in across the Drake Passage. For the interior of Antarctica, major airborne gravity programs are currently being carried out, and there is an urgent need...

  2. Study on Multi-scale Temporal Gravity Field in the Eastern Margin of Tibetan Plateau Based on Satellite Gravity%基于卫星重力的青藏高原东缘多尺度时变重力场研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜永涛; 张永志; 王帅; 刘国仕

    2014-01-01

    In this paper,we calculate annual satellite gravity changes in the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau from 2003 to 2012 by using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)time-variable gravity field models with decorrelated filtering.By contraposing the three strong earthquakes that occurred recently in this region,including the Wenchuan MS8.0,Yushu MS 7.1,and Ya’an MS 7.0 earthquakes,we analyze the changes in satellite gravity field features re-lated to the strong earthquakes with the annual gravity changes before and after each earthquake. For analyzing the relationship between these earthquakes and the gravity change mode in detail, we also caculate the monthly gravity change for the Wenchuan MS 8.0 and Yushu MS 7.1 earth-quakes.Moreover,we use the recently relesed weekly GRACE gravity models to caculate the point-wise gravity change near Longmenshan fault for the Wenchuan MS 8.0 earthquake.The re-gional annual differentiated dynamic gravity changes image indicates that all three earthquakes oc-curred in a period of small gravity change,which means a small migration of crust-mantle material occurred according to the mantle convection theory.The same feature is indicated in the regional annual cumulative dynamic gravity changes image.These gravity changes likely indicate a medi-um-short term earthquake precursor.In the monthly differentiated dynamic gravity changes im-age,the gravity change mode shows significant changes in both the Wenchuan MS 8.0 earthquake and the Yushu MS 7.1 earthquake,which indicates that the gravity gradient change direction al-tered from perpendicular to the plane of a fault to parallel.These change in the gravity change mode may confirm the theory of post-earthquake potential field restoration.The nine points of the weekly gravity change sequences in Longmenshan fault area that occurred during 2008 indicate that a nearly nine-week contrary gravity change trend occurred between the eastern and western areas of the fault

  3. Space-Wise approach for airborne gravity data modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro, D.; Capponi, M.; Mansi, A. H.; Gatti, A.; Marchetti, P.; Sansò, F.

    2017-05-01

    Regional gravity field modelling by means of remove-compute-restore procedure is nowadays widely applied in different contexts: it is the most used technique for regional gravimetric geoid determination, and it is also used in exploration geophysics to predict grids of gravity anomalies (Bouguer, free-air, isostatic, etc.), which are useful to understand and map geological structures in a specific region. Considering this last application, due to the required accuracy and resolution, airborne gravity observations are usually adopted. However, due to the relatively high acquisition velocity, presence of atmospheric turbulence, aircraft vibration, instrumental drift, etc., airborne data are usually contaminated by a very high observation error. For this reason, a proper procedure to filter the raw observations in both the low and high frequencies should be applied to recover valuable information. In this work, a software to filter and grid raw airborne observations is presented: the proposed solution consists in a combination of an along-track Wiener filter and a classical Least Squares Collocation technique. Basically, the proposed procedure is an adaptation to airborne gravimetry of the Space-Wise approach, developed by Politecnico di Milano to process data coming from the ESA satellite mission GOCE. Among the main differences with respect to the satellite application of this approach, there is the fact that, while in processing GOCE data the stochastic characteristics of the observation error can be considered a-priori well known, in airborne gravimetry, due to the complex environment in which the observations are acquired, these characteristics are unknown and should be retrieved from the dataset itself. The presented solution is suited for airborne data analysis in order to be able to quickly filter and grid gravity observations in an easy way. Some innovative theoretical aspects focusing in particular on the theoretical covariance modelling are presented too

  4. Space-Wise approach for airborne gravity data modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro, D.; Capponi, M.; Mansi, A. H.; Gatti, A.; Marchetti, P.; Sansò, F.

    2016-12-01

    Regional gravity field modelling by means of remove-compute-restore procedure is nowadays widely applied in different contexts: it is the most used technique for regional gravimetric geoid determination, and it is also used in exploration geophysics to predict grids of gravity anomalies (Bouguer, free-air, isostatic, etc.), which are useful to understand and map geological structures in a specific region. Considering this last application, due to the required accuracy and resolution, airborne gravity observations are usually adopted. However, due to the relatively high acquisition velocity, presence of atmospheric turbulence, aircraft vibration, instrumental drift, etc., airborne data are usually contaminated by a very high observation error. For this reason, a proper procedure to filter the raw observations in both the low and high frequencies should be applied to recover valuable information. In this work, a software to filter and grid raw airborne observations is presented: the proposed solution consists in a combination of an along-track Wiener filter and a classical Least Squares Collocation technique. Basically, the proposed procedure is an adaptation to airborne gravimetry of the Space-Wise approach, developed by Politecnico di Milano to process data coming from the ESA satellite mission GOCE. Among the main differences with respect to the satellite application of this approach, there is the fact that, while in processing GOCE data the stochastic characteristics of the observation error can be considered a-priori well known, in airborne gravimetry, due to the complex environment in which the observations are acquired, these characteristics are unknown and should be retrieved from the dataset itself. The presented solution is suited for airborne data analysis in order to be able to quickly filter and grid gravity observations in an easy way. Some innovative theoretical aspects focusing in particular on the theoretical covariance modelling are presented too

  5. Galathea-3: A global marine gravity profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strykowski, Gabriel; Cordua, Knud Skou; Forsberg, René

    2012-01-01

    -air gravity values are compared to 3 global models: EGM96, EGM08 and DNSC08. Even though the along-track resolution of marine data is higher than the resolution in any global gravity model (which influences the direct comparison of the collected marine data to the model) the statistics for the residual free......-air gravity anomalies show, that EGM08 and DNSC08 are better models than EGM96 for all Galathea-3 legs. Some areas along the ships route are quite challenging for modellers....... topography. This paper reports on the second experiment in which a continuous marine gravity profile along the ship’s route was measured. The focus of the paper is on the practical aspects of such large scale world wide operation and on the challenges of the data processing. Furthermore, the processed free...

  6. Final Technical Report: Science and technology reviews of FACE[Free Air Carbon Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, Boyd R.

    1998-03-23

    The purpose of this grant was to bring together the principals of all known facilities that had been developed, principals who had submitted proposals to develop FACE facilities, and principals who want to develop proposals for facilities. In addition, critical program personnel from potential funding agencies and a few high level science administrators were invited to observe the proceedings and to visit a working FACE facility. The objectives of this study are to conduct a three-day international meeting on scientific aspects of research with the new and developing free air carbon enrichment (FACE) technology. Immediately following the science meeting, conduct a two-day international meeting on experimental protocols to be applied in FACE research. To conduct a four day international meeting on the assessment of the responses of forest ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. The three meetings supported by this grant were all highly successful meetings and resulted in the formation of an organized and identified working group with the acronym InterFACE (International Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) working group.

  7. Modeling forest C and N allocation responses to free-air CO2 enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luus, Kristina; De Kauwe, Martin; Walker, Anthony; Werner, Christian; Iversen, Colleen; McCarthy, Heather; Medlyn, Belinda; Norby, Richard; Oren, Ram; Zak, Donald; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation allocation patterns and soil-vegetation partitioning of C and N are predicted to change in response to rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2. These allocation responses to rising CO2 have been examined at the ecosystem level through through free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments, and their global implications for the timing of progressive N limitation (PNL) and C sequestration have been predicted for ~100 years using a variety of ecosystem models. However, recent FACE model-data syntheses studies [1,2,3] have indicated that ecosystem models do not capture the 5-10 year site-level ecosystem allocation responses to elevated CO2. This may be due in part to the missing representation of the rhizosphere interactions between plants and soil biota in models. Ecosystem allocation of C and N is altered by interactions between soil and vegetation through the priming effect: as plant N availability diminishes, plants respond physiologically by altering their tissue allocation strategies so as to increase rates of root growth and rhizodeposition. In response, either soil organic material begins to accumulate, which hastens the onset of PNL, or soil microbes start to decompose C more rapidly, resulting in increased N availability for plant uptake, which delays PNL. In this study, a straightforward approach for representing rhizosphere interactions in ecosystem models was developed through which C and N allocation to roots and rhizodeposition responds dynamically to elevated CO2 conditions, modifying soil decomposition rates without pre-specification of the direction in which soil C and N accumulation should shift in response to elevated CO2. This approach was implemented in a variety of ecosystem models ranging from stand (G'DAY), to land surface (CLM 4.5, O-CN), to dynamic global vegetation (LPJ-GUESS) models. Comparisons against data from three forest FACE sites (Duke, Oak Ridge & Rhinelander) indicated that representing rhizosphere interactions allowed

  8. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  9. The gravity field and GGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sideris, M.G.; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The gravity field of the earth is a natural element of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). Gravity field quantities are like spatial geodetic observations of potential very high accuracy, with measurements, currently at part-per-billion (ppb) accuracy, but gravity field quantities are also...... unique as they can be globally represented by harmonic functions (long-wavelength geopotential model primarily from satellite gravity field missions), or based on point sampling (airborne and in situ absolute and superconducting gravimetry). From a GGOS global perspective, one of the main challenges...... is to ensure the consistency of the global and regional geopotential and geoid models, and the temporal changes of the gravity field at large spatial scales. The International Gravity Field Service, an umbrella "level-2" IAG service (incorporating the International Gravity Bureau, International Geoid Service...

  10. Correction factors for the INER-improved free-air ionization chambers calculated with the Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Uei-Tyng; Chu, Chien-Hau

    2006-05-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the correction factors for electron loss and scattered photons for two improved cylindrical free-air ionization chambers (FACs) constructed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The method is based on weighting correction factors for mono-energetic photons with X-ray spectra. The newly obtained correction factors for the medium-energy free-air chamber were compared with the current values, which were based on a least-squares fit to experimental data published in the NBS Handbook 64 [Wyckoff, H.O., Attix, F.H., 1969. Design of free-air ionization chambers. National Bureau Standards Handbook, No. 64. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, pp. 1-16; Chen, W.L., Su, S.H., Su, L.L., Hwang, W.S., 1999. Improved free-air ionization chamber for the measurement of X-rays. Metrologia 36, 19-24]. The comparison results showed the agreement between the Monte Carlo method and experimental data is within 0.22%. In addition, mono-energetic correction factors for the low-energy free-air chamber were calculated. Average correction factors were then derived for measured and theoretical X-ray spectra at 30-50 kVp. Although the measured and calculated spectra differ slightly, the resulting differences in the derived correction factors are less than 0.02%.

  11. A comment on ''A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model'', by I. Ciufolini et al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Lorenzo [Ministero dell' Istruzione Univ. della Ricerca (M.I.U.R.), Bari (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Recently, Ciufolini et al. reported on a test of the general relativistic gravitomagnetic Lense-Thirring effect by analyzing about 3.5 years of laser ranging data to the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II, LARES geodetic satellites orbiting the Earth. By using the GRACE-based GGM05S Earth's global gravity model and a linear combination of the nodes Ω of the three satellites designed to remove the impact of errors in the first two even zonal harmonic coefficients J{sub 2}, J{sub 4} of the multipolar expansion of the Newtonian part of the Earth's gravitational potential, they claimed an overall accuracy of 5% for the Lense-Thirring caused node motion. We show that the scatter in the nominal values of the uncancelled even zonals of degree l = 6, 8, 10 from some of the most recent global gravity models does not yet allow to reach unambiguously and univocally the expected ∼1% level, being large up to

  12. Application of linear inverse theory to borehole gravity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1991-09-01

    Traditional borehole gravity interpretations are based upon an earth model which assumes horizontal, laterally infinite, uniformly thick, and constant density layers. I apply discrete stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the density distribution directly from borehole gravity observations that have been corrected for drift, tide, and terrain. The stabilization is the result of including a priori data about the free-air gradient and the density structure in the inversion process. The discrete generalized linear inverse approach enables one to solve for a density distribution using all of the borehole gravity data. Moreover, the data need not be free-air corrected. An important feature of the approach is that density estimates are not required to be density averages between adjacent borehole gravity observations as in the traditional method. This approach further permits the explicit incorporation of independent density information from gamma-gamma logging tools or laboratory core measurements. Finally, explicit linear constraints upon the density and/or free-air gradient can also be handled. The non-uniqueness of the density structure determined by the inversion process is represented in a resolution matrix. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Effect of free-air CO2 enrichment on nematode communities in a Chinese farmland ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qi; LIANG Wen-ju; JIANG Yong; ZHU Jian-guo; KONG Chui-hua

    2005-01-01

    At a rice-wheat rotational free-air CO2 enrichment(FACE) platform, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil nematode communities in a farmland ecosystem was studied. Wheat plots were exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 (ambient 370 μl/L + 200 μl/L).32 families and 40 genera of nematode were observed in soil suspensions during the study period. Under FACE treatment, the numbers of total nematodes, bacterivores and fungivores exhibited an increasing trend. Because of the seasonal variation of soil temperature and moisture, the effectof elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil nematodes was only observed under favorable conditions. The response of nematode communities to elevated atmospheric CO2 may indicate the change of soil food web.

  14. Menthol and non-menthol smoking: the impact of prices and smoke-free air laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauras, John A; Levy, David; Chaloupka, Frank J; Villanti, Andrea; Niaura, Raymond S; Vallone, Donna; Abrams, David B

    2010-12-01

    To examine the relationship between menthol and non-menthol prices and smoke-free air laws and the choice between menthol and non-menthol cigarettes among current smokers. Data were extracted from the nationally representative (USA) 2003 and 2006/07 Tobacco Use Supplements to the Current Population Survey. A total of 57,383 adult smokers (aged 18+) were examined. A regression model was used to estimate the probability of being a menthol smoker conditional on being a current smoker who had a distinct preference for either non-menthol or menthol cigarettes. Cigarette prices, smoke-free air laws and socio-economic and demographic characteristics were examined as covariates. The prices of menthol and non-menthol cigarettes were associated with the choice between menthol and non-menthol cigarettes. However, smokers did not find menthol and non-menthol cigarettes to be close substitutes for one another. Non-menthol cigarettes were found to be less of a substitute for menthol cigarettes than vice versa. Young adults and African Americans were less responsive to prices with respect to switching between menthol and non-menthol cigarettes than were older adults and non-African Americans, respectively. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is grappling with the issue of whether or not to ban menthol cigarettes. The findings from this study suggest that smokers do not find menthol and non-menthol cigarettes to be close substitutes. The strong preference for mentholated cigarettes may serve as a lever to reduce smoking prevalence when combined with increased access to effective cessation treatments. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Analyses of multichannel seismic reflection, gravity and magnetic data along a regional profile across the central-western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.; Rao, D.G.; Srinivas, K.; Ramprasad, T.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.

    of Oceanography, Goa to obtain stacked sections. The gravity data were acquired using the Bo«denseewerk sea gravimeter system KSS-30. The free-air gravity anomalies werecomputedusingtheIGA1967international gravityformulaandbyapplyingtheEo«tvo«scor- rection. Total...

  16. Design and preliminary test of a free-air ionization chamber for low-energy X-ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jin-Jie; YANG Yuan-Di; WANG Pei-Wei; CHEN Jing; LIU Jia-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    A free-air ionization chamber in low-energy X-ray has been designed and manufactured at theNational Institute of Metrology (NIM, China) according to the defination of alr-kerma. The results of a preliminary test show that the leakage current of ionization chamber is around 2×10A, and the correction factor of ion recombination for the ionization chamber is also obtained. The free-air ionization chamber is suitable for the primary standard in low-energy X-rays.

  17. The estimation of 550 km x 550 km mean gravity anomalies. [from free atmosphere gravimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, M. R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation of 550 km X 550 km mean gravity anomalies from 1 degree X 1 degree mean free-air gravimetry data is discussed. The block estimate procedure developed by Kaula was used, and estimates for 1452 of the 1654 blocks were obtained.

  18. Net carbon storage in a popular plantation (POPFACE) after three years of free-air CO2 enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, B.; Calfapietra, C.; Lukac, M.; Wittig, V.E.; Angelis, de P.; Janssens, I.A.; Moscatelli, M.C.; Grego, S.; Cotrufo, M.F.; Godbold, D.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Long, S.; Miglietta, F.; Polle, A.; Bernacchi, C.; Davey, P.A.; Ceulemans, R.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G.

    2005-01-01

    A high-density plantation of three genotypes of Populus was exposed to an elevated concentration of carbon dioxide ([CO2]; 550 µmol mol¿1) from planting through canopy closure using a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technique. The FACE treatment stimulated gross primary productivity by 22 and 11% in

  19. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) enhances biomass production in a short-rotation poplar plantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calfapietra, C.; Gielen, B.; Galema, A.N.J.; Lukac, M.; Angelis, de P.; Moscatelli, M.C.; Ceulemans, R.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the possible contribution of Short Rotation Cultures (SRC) to carbon sequestration in both current and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). A dense poplar plantation (1 x 1 m) was exposed to a [CO2] of 550 ppm in Central Italy using the free-air CO2 enrichment (FA

  20. Measurement of carbon dioxide fluxes in a free-air carbon dioxide enrichment experiment using the closed flux chamber technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsted, Merete Bang; Ambus, Per; Michelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, composing net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and soil respiration (SR) were measured in a temperate heathland exposed to elevated CO2 by the FACE (free-air carbon enrichment) technique, raising the atmospheric CO2 concentration from c. 380 μmol...

  1. Design and preliminary test of a free-air ionization chamber for low-energy X-ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴金杰; 杨元第; 王培玮; 陈靖; 柳加成

    2011-01-01

    A free-air ionization chamber in low-energy X-ray has been designed and manufactured at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM, China) according to the defination of air-kerma. The results of a preliminary test show that the leakage current of ionizatio

  2. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) enhances biomass production in a short-rotation poplar plantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calfapietra, C.; Gielen, B.; Galema, A.N.J.; Lukac, M.; Angelis, de P.; Moscatelli, M.C.; Ceulemans, R.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the possible contribution of Short Rotation Cultures (SRC) to carbon sequestration in both current and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). A dense poplar plantation (1 x 1 m) was exposed to a [CO2] of 550 ppm in Central Italy using the free-air CO2 enrichment (FA

  3. Gravity data from the San Pedro River Basin, Cochise County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Winester, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Arizona Water Science Center in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geodetic Survey has collected relative and absolute gravity data at 321 stations in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona since 2000. Data are of three types: observed gravity values and associated free-air, simple Bouguer, and complete Bouguer anomaly values, useful for subsurface-density modeling; high-precision relative-gravity surveys repeated over time, useful for aquifer-storage-change monitoring; and absolute-gravity values, useful as base stations for relative-gravity surveys and for monitoring gravity change over time. The data are compiled, without interpretation, in three spreadsheet files. Gravity values, GPS locations, and driving directions for absolute-gravity base stations are presented as National Geodetic Survey site descriptions.

  4. The Crustal Thickness of the Philippine Sea Plate Derived from Gravity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Yuan Yen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a new free-air gravity anomaly map of the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP using ship-tracked gravity data from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC. Our results show that the isogals trend correlates well with the tectonic structures in the PSP. After removing the gravity induced by sea water from the free-air gravity data, we obtained the regional Bouguer gravity anomaly, which is later used to compute the Moho geometry in the PSP by applying the Parker-Oldenburg iterative method. Our results indicate that in the southern part of the West Philippine Basin (WPB the crustal thickness is nearly homogeneous with a value of about 5 km, which implies that the WPB is quite stable. The low-amplitude and near-zero free-air gravity anomalies clearly indicate that the whole WPB, except at trenches and island arcs, is nearly in a state of isostatic equilibrium. The average crustal thickness of the Palau Kyushu Ridge (PKR is more than 10 km. In the eastern PSP the crustal thickness gradually increases eastward. Our results also imply that a relatively thin and low density mantle exists beneath the Parece Vela Basin (PVB as a consequence of back-arc spreading and serpentinized upwells of the thin crustal thickness.

  5. Canopy carbon budget of Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata) sapling under free air ozone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Makoto; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of ozone (O3) on the canopy carbon budget, we investigated photosynthesis and respiration of leaves of Siebold's beech saplings under free air O3 exposure (60 nmol mol(-1), during daytime) in relation to the within-canopy light gradient; we then calculated the canopy-level photosynthetic carbon gain (PCG) and respiratory carbon loss (RCL) using a canopy photosynthesis model. Susceptibilities of photosynthesis and respiration to O3 were greater in leaves of upper canopy than in the lower canopy. The canopy net carbon gain (NCG) was reduced by O3 by 12.4% during one growing season. The increased RCL was the main factor for the O3-induced reduction in NCG in late summer, while contributions of the reduced PCG and the increased RCL to the NCG were almost the same in autumn. These results indicate contributions of changes in PCG and RCL under O3 to NCG were different between seasons.

  6. Responses of rice growth to copper stress under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The responses of rice to the second degree contamination of copper were studied by pot experiments under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) with 570 μmol·mol-1 of CO2. The results showed that the content of copper in rice leaves was reduced with the CO2 concentration reaching 570 μmol·mol-1 and this happened more significantly under the second degree contamination of copper. Under FACE, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme in rice leaves treated by copper contamination were induced, whereas the contents of glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) had no significant difference from the control. In the presence of ambient CO2, activities of SOD enzyme treated by copper pollution were suppressed during the whole rice growth, however, the contents of GSH and GSSG were induced at tillering and jointing stages, and then restored to the control levels in later growth under the second degree contamination of copper. With the rice growing, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) rises continuously, but there had been no significant difference between the treatments at the same growth stage. Further studies are needed on the response mechanism of rice to Cu stress under elevated CO2.

  7. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment on phosphine emission from rice field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yang, Xiao-Di; Geng, Jin-Ju; Hong, Yu-Ning; Gu, Xue-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Rong; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Jian-Guo

    2009-09-15

    Phosphine, a trace gas, has been proved to commonly exist in environment. Under free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) condition, the phosphine fluxes were investigated on the function of different nitrogen fertilizer application, NN (normal N, 250 kg/hm2) and LN (low N, 125 kg/hm2). Results showed that phosphine fluxes and concentrations in flourishing stages, both tillering stage and elongation stage, were higher than in slowly growing stages. The highest phosphine flux of (155.2 +/- 22.71) ng/(m2 x h) was observed in tillering stage in NN zone of the FACE area. The highest average phosphine flux of (41.72 +/- 7.006) ng/(m2 x h) was observed in NN zone of FACE area, while the lowest average phosphine flux of (- 1.485 +/- 6.229) ng/(m2 x h) could be detected in LN zone of the ambient area. CO2 enrichment can obviously improve the phospine emission. The nitrogen fertilizing level doesn't play an important role in phosphine emission. Both net fluxes and concentrations of phosphine had obviously positive correlation with temperature. A one-day phosphine flux and concentration experiment was carried out in ripening stage. The result showed that light was the prominent factor influencing phosphine concentration in daytime.

  8. Photosynthesis, chloroplast pigments, and antioxidants in Pinus canariensis under free-air ozone fumigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Then, Ch. [Federal Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Unit of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Science Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Herbinger, K. [Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Graz, Schubertstr. 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Luis, V.C. [Fundacion Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterraneo (CEAM) Dpto, Restauracion Forestal, University of Alicante, Department of Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Ap 99, Ctra. San Vicente del Raspeig s/n, San Vicente del Raspeig 03690, Alicante (Spain); Heerdt, C. [Ecoclimatology, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, R. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Science Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wieser, G. [Federal Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Unit of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: gerhard.wieser@uibk.ac.at

    2009-02-15

    High O{sub 3} levels, driving uptake and challenging defense, prevail on the Canary Islands, being associated with the hot and dry summers of the Mediterranean-type climate. Pinus canariensis is an endemic conifer species that forms forests across these islands. We investigated the effects of ozone on photosynthesis and biochemical parameters of P. canariensis seedlings exposed to free-air O{sub 3} fumigation at Kranzberg Forest, Germany, where ambient O{sub 3} levels were similar to those at forest sites in the Canary Islands. The twice-ambient O{sub 3} regime (2xO{sub 3}) neither caused visible injury-like chlorotic or necrotic spots in the needles nor significantly affected violaxanthin, antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin levels and the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle. In parallel, stomatal conductance for water vapour, net photosynthesis, intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, as well as antioxidant levels were hardly affected. It is concluded that presently prevailing O{sub 3} levels do not impose severe stress on P. canariensis seedlings. - Twice-ambient ozone does not significantly affect the physiological behavior of Pinus canariensis seedlings.

  9. The economic impact of state cigarette taxes and smoke-free air policies on convenience stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-03-01

    To investigate whether increasing state cigarette taxes and/or enacting stronger smoke-free air (SFA) policies have negative impact on convenience store density in a state, a proxy that is determined by store openings and closings, which reflects store profits. State-level business count estimates for convenience stores for 50 states and District of Columbia from 1997 to 2009 were analysed using two-way fixed effects regression techniques that control for state-specific and year-specific determinants of convenience store density. The impact of tax and SFA policies was examined using a quasi-experimental research design that exploits changes in cigarette taxes and SFA policies within a state over time. Taxes are found to be uncorrelated with the density of combined convenience stores and gas stations in a state. Taxes are positively correlated with the density of convenience stores; however, the magnitude of this correlation is small, with a 10% increase in state cigarette taxes associated with a 0.19% (pincrease in the number of convenience stores per million people in a state. State-level SFA policies do not correlate with convenience store density in a state, regardless whether gas stations were included. These results are robust across different model specifications. In addition, they are robust with regard to the inclusion/exclusion of other state-level tobacco control measures and gasoline prices. Contrary to tobacco industry and related organisations' claims, higher cigarette taxes and stronger SFA policies do not negatively affect convenience stores.

  10. Prediction of free air space in initial composting mixtures by a statistical design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Micaela A R; Quina, Margarida J; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa

    2013-10-15

    Free air space (FAS) is a physical parameter that can play an important role in composting processes to maintain favourable aerobic conditions. Aiming to predict the FAS of initial composting mixtures, specific materials proportions ranged from 0 to 1 were tested for a case study comprising industrial potato peel, which is characterized by low air void volume, thus requiring additional components for its composting. The characterization and prediction of FAS for initial mixtures involving potato peel, grass clippings and rice husks (set A) or sawdust (set B) was accomplished by means of an augmented simplex-centroid mixture design approach. The experimental data were fitted to second order Scheffé polynomials. Synergistic or antagonistic effects of mixture proportions in the FAS response were identified from the surface and response trace plots in the FAS response. Moreover, a good agreement was achieved between the model predictions and supplementary experimental data. Moreover, theoretical and empirical approaches for estimating FAS available in literature were compared with the predictions generated by the mixture design approach. This study demonstrated that the mixture design methodology can be a valuable tool to predict the initial FAS of composting mixtures, specifically in making adjustments to improve composting processes containing primarily potato peel.

  11. Simulation of climate change impacts on grain sorghum production grown under free air CO2 enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tongcheng; Ko, Jonghan; Wall, Gerard W.; Pinter, Paul J.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Ottman, Michael J.; Kim, Han-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Potential impacts of climate change on grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) productivity were investigated using the CERES-sorghum model in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer v4.5. The model was first calibrated for a sorghum cultivar grown in a free air CO2 enrichment experiment at the University of Arizona, Maricopa, Arizona, USA in 1998. The model was then validated with an independent dataset collected in 1999. The simulated grain yield, growth, and soil water of sorghum for the both years were in statistical agreement with the corresponding measurements, respectively. Neither simulated nor measured yields responded to elevated CO2, but both were sensitive to water supply. The validated model was then applied to simulate possible effects of climate change on sorghum grain yield and water use efficiency in western North America for the years 2080-2100. The projected CO2 fertilizer effect on grain yield was dominated by the adverse effect of projected temperature increases. Therefore, temperature appears to be a dominant driver of the global climate change influencing future sorghum productivity. These results suggest that an increase in water demand for sorghum production should be anticipated in a future high-CO2 world.

  12. Carbon Turnover in a Crop Rotation Under Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. J. WEIGEL; K. LEWIN; J. NAGY; A. PACHOLSKI; S. BURKART; M. HELAL; O. HEINEMEYER; B. KLEIKAMP; R. MANDERSCHEID; C. FR(U)HAUF; G. F. HENDREY

    2005-01-01

    Mostly based on assumptions derived from controlled-environment studies, predicted future atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] are expected to have considerable impacts on carbon (C) turnover in agro-ecosystems. In order to allow the in situ examination of C-transformations in the plant-soil system of arable crop rotations under future [CO2], a free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) experiment (550 μmol mol-1 CO2) was started at Braunschweig, Germany in 1999.The crop rotation under investigation comprised winter barley, a cover crop (ryegrass), sugar beets and winter wheat.Assessments of CO2 effects included the determination of above- and belowground biomass production, measurements of canopy CO2- and H2O- fluxes, soil microbial biomass and in situ soil respiration. The results obtained during the 1st crop rotation cycle (3 years) showed that for the selected crops elevated [CO2] entailed significant positive effects (P<0.05) on aboveground (6%-14% stimulation) and belowground biomass production (up to 90% stimulation), while canopy evapotranspiration was reduced. This resulted in increased soil water content. Also, depending on crop type and season, high CO2 stimulated in situ soil respiration (up to 30%), while soil microbial biomass did not show significant respoases to elevated [CO2] during the first rotation cycle.

  13. Massive Gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP...

  14. Massive gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia de Rham

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  15. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  16. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  17. Spinfoam Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Eugenio

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Topological Field Theory and Gravity * Classical Spinfoam Gravity: Degrees of Freedom and Foams * Unitary Representations of the Rotation and the Lorentz Group * Boundary Variables and the Loop Quantum Gravity Hilbert Space * Spinfoam Partition Function and the Vertex Amplitude * Cellular Quantum Geometry: A Single Atom of Space * Cellular Quantum Geometry: Coherent Spin-networks * Vertex-amplitude Asymptotics and Regge Gravity * Reconstructing a Semiclassical Spacetime * Conclusions * References

  18. Attitude Perturbation of Spin-Stabilized Satellites Caused by Gravity Gradient Moment%重力梯度力矩引起的自旋稳定卫星姿态摄动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋起胜; 袁建平; 姜宇

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical method for attitude perturbation of spin-stabilized satellites are presented. With highlight on gravity gradient moment, the precession angle, nutation angle, longitude and latitude of the spin axis in the earth-centered inertial frame are computed and analyzed. The attitude perturbation of spin-stabilized satellites caused by gravity gradient moment is studied. The paper points out that with the attitude perturbation of the gravity gradient moment, precession of the spin axis follows the normal line of the orbital plane and the nutation velocity is much smaller than the precession velocity. If the orbital velocity augments, the precession velocity and nutation velocity of the spin axis relative to the earth-centered inertial frame will increase and the longitude and latitude of the spin axis in the earth-centered inertial frame will increase. If the spin velocity augments, the rate of change of the longitude and latitude of the spin axis will decrease and the precession velocity and nutation velocity of the spin axis relative to the earth-centered inertial frame will decrease.%建立了自旋稳定卫星姿态摄动的数值分析方法及模型,对重力梯度力矩作用下自旋卫星自旋轴相对于地心惯性系进动和章动以及赤经和赤纬的变化进行了仿真分析.对重力梯度力矩引起的自旋稳定卫星姿态摄动的演化规律进行了研究.指出在重力梯度力矩的作用下:自旋轴指向绕轨道面法线进动;章动角速度远小于进动角速度;轨道角速度越大,星体相对于地心惯性系的进动角速度和章动角速度越大,赤经和赤纬的变化率越大;自旋角速度越大,星体相对于地心惯性系的进动角速度和章动角速度越小,赤经和赤纬的变化率越小.

  19. Influence of free air space on microbial kinetics in passively aerated compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shouhai; Clark, O Grant; Leonard, Jerry J

    2009-01-01

    The influence of free air space (FAS) on passively aerated composting has been reported, but the quantitative relationship between FAS and the microbial kinetics in passively aerated compost has not been investigated. This relationship was studied by composting dairy manure and straw in an enclosed, passively aerated, cylindrical vessel. Based on this experimental system, conceptual and numerical models were developed in which the compost bed was considered to consist of layered elements, each being physically and chemically homogeneous. The microbial activity in each layer was represented in order to predict oxygen and substrate consumption and the release of water and heat. Convective transport of air, moisture, and heat through the layers was represented. Microbial growth and substrate consumption rates were described using modified first-order kinetics for each of the mesophilic and thermophilic temperature regimes. The values of the microbial kinetic parameters were adjusted for each layer based on an innovative, non-linear, statistical analysis of temperature histories recorded at different layers in the compost bed during three treatments (i.e., FAS values of 0.45, 0.52, and 0.65). Microbial kinetic rate constants were found to follow a sigmoid relationship with FAS, with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.97 for the mesophilic stage and 0.96 for the thermophilic stage. Temperature histories and airflow measurements from a fourth treatment (FAS value of 0.57) were used as an independent check of the model's performance. Simulation results indicate that the model could predict the general trend of temperature development. A plot of the residuals shows that the model is biased, however, possibly because many parameters in the model were not measured directly but instead were estimated from literature. The result from this study demonstrates a new method for describing the relationship between microbial kinetics (k(max)) and substrate FAS, which could be used

  20. Global Lunar Gravity Field Recovery from SELENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Heki, Kosuke; Hanada, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation are presented to examine the global gravity field recovery capability of the Japanese lunar exploration project SELENE (Selenological and Engineering Explorer) which will be launched in 2005. New characteristics of the SELENE lunar gravimetry include four-way satellite-to-satellite Doppler tracking of main orbiter and differential VLBI tracking of two small free-flier satellites. It is shown that planned satellites configuration will improve lunar gravity field in wide range of wavelength as well as far-side selenoid.

  1. Comparison of Present SST Gravity Field Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; SHI Chuang; ZOU Xiancai; WANG Haihong

    2006-01-01

    Taking the main land of Europe as the region to be studied, the potential of the new satellite gravity technique: satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) and improving the accuracy of regional gravity field model with the SST models are investigated. The drawbacks of these models are discussed. With GPM98C as the reference, the gravity anomaly residuals of several other models, the latest SST global gravity field models (EIGEN series and GGM series), were computed and compared. The results of the comparison show that in the selected region, some systematic errors with periodical properties exist in the EIGEN and GGM's S series models in the high degree and order. Some information that was not shown in the classic gravity models is detected in the low and middle degree and order of EIGEN and GGM's S series models. At last, the effective maximum degrees and orders of SST models are suggested.

  2. Free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, designed for medium energy X-ray dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The primary standard for X-ray photons is based on parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber (FAC). Therefore, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is tried to design and build the free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, for low and medium energy X-ray dosimetry. The main aim of the present work is to investigate specification of the FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber and design it. FAC-IR-300 dosimeter is composed of two parallel plates, a high voltage (HV) plate and a collector plate, along with a guard electrode that surrounds the collector plate. The guard plate and the collector were separated by an air gap. For obtaining uniformity in the electric field distribution, a group of guard strips was used around the ionization chamber. These characterizations involve determining the exact dimensions of the ionization chamber by using Monte Carlo simulation and introducing correction factors.

  3. Glacier mass balance in high-arctic areas with anomalous gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, A.; Rieser, D.; Nikolskiy, D.

    2012-04-01

    All known glaciological models describing the evolution of Arctic land- and sea-ice masses in changing climate treat the Earth's gravity as horizontally constant, but it isn't. In the High Arctic, the strength of the gravitational field varies considerably across even short distances under the influence of a density gradient, and the magnitude of free air gravity anomalies attains 100 mGal and more. On long-term base, instantaneous deviations of gravity can have a noticeable effect on the regime and mass budget of glaciological objects. At best, the gravity-induced component of ice mass variations can be determined on topographically smooth, open and steady surfaces, like those of arctic planes, regular ice caps and landfast sea ice. The present research is devoted to studying gravity-driven impacts on glacier mass balance in the outer periphery of four Eurasian shelf seas with a very cold, dry climate and rather episodic character of winter precipitation. As main study objects we had chosen a dozen Russia's northernmost insular ice caps, tens to hundreds of square kilometres in extent, situated in a close vicinity of strong gravity anomalies and surrounded with extensive fields of fast and/or drift ice for most of the year. The supposition about gravitational forcing on glacioclimatic settings in the study region is based on the results of quantitative comparison and joint interpretation of existing glacier change maps and available data on the Arctic gravity field and solid precipitation. The overall mapping of medium-term (from decadal to half-centennial) changes in glacier volumes and quantification of mass balance characteristics in the study region was performed by comparing reference elevation models of study glaciers derived from Russian topographic maps 1:200,000 (CI = 20 or 40 m) representing the glacier state as in the 1950s-1980s with modern elevation data obtained from satellite radar interferometry and lidar altimetry. Free-air gravity anomalies were

  4. Toward Joint Inversion of Gravity and Dyanamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, W. R.

    To better understand geodynamic processes as seafloor spreading, plumes, subduction, and isostatic adjustment, gravity is inverted with "a prioriinformation from topography/bathymetry, seismic structure and dynamic models. Examples are subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate below Vancouver Island, the passive Black Sea­Turkey margin and Iceland ridge-plume interaction. Gravity and other data are averaged 50 km wide strips. Mass balances are estimated (showing also that the free air anomaly is misleading for narrow structures). The mass balances represent plate forces and plate bending, affecting the gravity signals and the isostatic state of continental margins and ridge-plume effects, which are highly correlated in space and cannot be separated without a priori information from modelling. The examples from widely different tectonic situations demonstrate that the art of regional-scale gravity inversion requires extensive background knowledge and inclusion of dynamic processes. It is difficult to conceive any formal, globally applicable procedure taking care of this; it is even a question, what is data, what a priori information? They are not distinguishable if all are included as foreward routines. The "accuracy" of models cannot be perfectly determined, if the "real" mass distribution is not known ­ if known, gravity inversion would be unnecessary. In reality only guesses are possible on the basis of observations and physical laws governing geodynamics. A priori information and gravity data limit the resolution of gravity inversion. Different model types are indistinguishable because adjustments within their parameter uncertainties permit a good fit. But gravity excludes wrong models (Karl Popper: science evolves by falsification of wrong models), and precise gravity guides and defines aims, targets and strategies for new observations.

  5. Improving GOCE cross-track gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemes, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The GOCE gravity gradiometer measured highly accurate gravity gradients along the orbit during GOCE's mission lifetime from March 17, 2009, to November 11, 2013. These measurements contain unique information on the gravity field at a spatial resolution of 80 km half wavelength, which is not provided to the same accuracy level by any other satellite mission now and in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the gravity gradient in cross-track direction is heavily perturbed in the regions around the geomagnetic poles. We show in this paper that the perturbing effect can be modeled accurately as a quadratic function of the non-gravitational acceleration of the satellite in cross-track direction. Most importantly, we can remove the perturbation from the cross-track gravity gradient to a great extent, which significantly improves the accuracy of the latter and offers opportunities for better scientific exploitation of the GOCE gravity gradient data set.

  6. Gravity, geoid and the oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    Plate tectonics and its contribution to progress in studies of the Earth's gravitational field is discussed. In acquisition, the development of forced feedback accelerometers, satellite navigation, and satellite radar altimetry significantly improved the accuracy and coverage of gravity data over the oceans. In interpretation, gravity and geoid anomalies are used to determine information on the thermal and mechanical properties of the oceanic lithosphere and the forces that drive plate motions.

  7. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment on rice canopy microlimate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weihong; Mayumi, Yoshimoto; Dai, Jianfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Han, Yong; Liu, Gan

    2002-10-01

    In this study, the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system (setup at at Anzhen, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province in 2001) was used to investigate the effects of FACE on rice canopy microclimate. The rice canopy microclimate observations were carried out from August 26 to October 13, 2001, when the rice crops were at the heading to maturing development stage. The results showed that FACE reduced the rice leaf stomatal conductance. The rice leaf stomatal conductance difference between FACE and ambient was larger among upper layer leaves than among lower layer leaves and at heading and milk filling stages than at maturing stage. FACE increased daytime rice canopy temperature but had little effect on nighttime rice canopy temperature. The daytime rice canopy temperature difference between FACE and ambient was larger at heading and milk filling stages than at maturing stage. From heading to flowering, the daily maximum rice canopy temperature difference between FACE and ambient reached 1.2 degrees C under fine weather condition. The average daytime rice canopy temperature from flowering to maturing stage was about 0.43 degree C. Daytime air temperature inside rice canopy was also affected by FACE. Daytime air temperature inside rice canopy was higher in FACE plot than in ambient plot. The value of daytime air temperature difference between FACE and ambient increased with the increase of solar radiation and varied with height. The maximum daytime air temperature difference between FACE and ambient varied between 0.47-1.2 degrees C and 0.37-0.8 degree C at middle of canopy and canopy height, respectively. Air humidity and nighttime air temperature inside rice canopy were not significantly affected by FACE. These results indicate that FACE reducing rice leaf stomatal conductance was the major cause of the increase of canopy temperature and inside canopy air temperature in FACE plot. The higher canopy temperature and inside canopy air temperature in FACE plot resulted in the earlier

  8. Crustal structure and kinematics of the TAMMAR propagating rift system on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from seismic refraction and satellite altimetry gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Richard L.; Tilmann, Frederik; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The TAMMAR segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge forms a classic propagating system centred about two degrees south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The segment is propagating to the south at a rate of 14 mm yr-1, 15 per cent faster than the half-spreading rate. Here, we use seismic refraction data across the propagating rift, sheared zone and failed rift to investigate the crustal structure of the system. Inversion of the seismic data agrees remarkably well with crustal thicknesses determined from gravity modelling. We show that the crust is thickened beneath the highly magmatic propagating rift, reaching a maximum thickness of almost 8 km along the seismic line and an inferred (from gravity) thickness of about 9 km at its centre. In contrast, the crust in the sheared zone is mostly 4.5-6.5 km thick, averaging over 1 km thinner than normal oceanic crust, and reaching a minimum thickness of only 3.5 km in its NW corner. Along the seismic line, it reaches a minimum thickness of under 5 km. The PmP reflection beneath the sheared zone and failed rift is very weak or absent, suggesting serpentinisation beneath the Moho, and thus effective transport of water through the sheared zone crust. We ascribe this increased porosity in the sheared zone to extensive fracturing and faulting during deformation. We show that a bookshelf-faulting kinematic model predicts significantly more crustal thinning than is observed, suggesting that an additional mechanism of deformation is required. We therefore propose that deformation is partitioned between bookshelf faulting and simple shear, with no more than 60 per cent taken up by bookshelf faulting.

  9. Satellite observations of ground water changes in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2002 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. GRACE consists of two satellites with a separation of about 200 km.  By accurately measuring the separation between the twin satellites, the differences in the gravity field can be determined. Monthly observ...

  10. Gravity and geoid model for South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitzkow, Denizar; Oliveira Cancoro de Matos, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento Guimarães, Gabriel; Pacino, María Cristina; Andrés Lauría, Eduardo; Nunes, Marcelo; Castro Junior, Carlos Alberto Correia e.; Flores, Fredy; Orihuela Guevara, Nuris; Alvarez, Ruber; Napoleon Hernandez, José

    2016-04-01

    In the last 20 years, South America Gravity Studies (SAGS) project has undertaken an ongoing effort in establishing the fundamental gravity network (FGN); terrestrial, river and airborne relative gravity densifications; absolute gravity surveys and geoid (quasi-geoid) model computation for South America. The old FGN is being replaced progressively by new absolute measurements in different countries. In recent years, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay and Venezuela organizations participated with relative gravity surveys. Taking advantage of the large amount of data available, GEOID2015 model was developed for 15°N and 57°S latitude and 30 ° W and 95°W longitude based on EIGEN-6C4 until degree and order 200 as a reference field. The ocean area was completed with mean free air gravity anomalies derived from DTU10 model. The short wavelength component was estimated using FFT. The global gravity field models EIGEN-6C4, DIR_R5 were used for comparison with the new model. The new geoid model has been evaluated against 1,319 GPS/BM, in which 592 are located in Brazil and the reminder in other countries. The preliminary RMS difference between GPS/BM and GEOID2015 throughout South America and in Brazil is 46 cm and 17 cm, respectively. New activities are carrying out with the support of the IGC (Geographic and Cartographic Institute) under the coordination of EPUSP/LTG and CENEGEO (Centro de Estudos de Geodesia). The new project aims to establish new gravity points with the A-10 absolute gravimeter in South America. Recent such surveys occurred in São Paulo state, Argentina and Venezuela.

  11. Gravity investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healey, D.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The gravity field and GGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sideris, M.G.; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    unique as they can be globally represented by harmonic functions (long-wavelength geopotential model primarily from satellite gravity field missions), or based on point sampling (airborne and in situ absolute and superconducting gravimetry). From a GGOS global perspective, one of the main challenges...

  13. Nonlocal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Relativity theory is based on a postulate of locality, which means that the past history of the observer is not directly taken into account. This book argues that the past history should be taken into account. In this way, nonlocality---in the sense of history dependence---is introduced into relativity theory. The deep connection between inertia and gravitation suggests that gravity could be nonlocal, and in nonlocal gravity the fading gravitational memory of past events must then be taken into account. Along this line of thought, a classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed. A significant consequence of this theory is that the nonlocal aspect of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. According to nonlocal gravity theory, what astronomers attribute to dark matter should instead be due to the nonlocality of gravitation. Nonlocality dominates on the scale of galaxies and beyond. Memory fades with time; therefore, the nonlocal aspect of gravity becomes wea...

  14. Gravity Anomaly Assessment Using Ggms and Airborne Gravity Data Towards Bathymetry Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugi, A.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, K. M.; Mardi, A. S.; Som, Z. A. M.; Omar, A. H.; Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Yazid, N.

    2016-09-01

    The Earth's potential information is important for exploration of the Earth's gravity field. The techniques of measuring the Earth's gravity using the terrestrial and ship borne technique are time consuming and have limitation on the vast area. With the space-based measuring technique, these limitations can be overcome. The satellite gravity missions such as Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), and Gravity-Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer Mission (GOCE) has introduced a better way in providing the information on the Earth's gravity field. From these satellite gravity missions, the Global Geopotential Models (GGMs) has been produced from the spherical harmonics coefficient data type. The information of the gravity anomaly can be used to predict the bathymetry because the gravity anomaly and bathymetry have relationships between each other. There are many GGMs that have been published and each of the models gives a different value of the Earth's gravity field information. Therefore, this study is conducted to assess the most reliable GGM for the Malaysian Seas. This study covered the area of the marine area on the South China Sea at Sabah extent. Seven GGMs have been selected from the three satellite gravity missions. The gravity anomalies derived from the GGMs are compared with the airborne gravity anomaly, in order to figure out the correlation (R2) and the root mean square error (RMSE) of the data. From these assessments, the most suitable GGMs for the study area is GOCE model, GO_CONS_GCF_2_TIMR4 with the R2 and RMSE value of 0.7899 and 9.886 mGal, respectively. This selected model will be used in the estimating the bathymetry for Malaysian Seas in future.

  15. GRAVITY ANOMALY ASSESSMENT USING GGMS AND AIRBORNE GRAVITY DATA TOWARDS BATHYMETRY ESTIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tugi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s potential information is important for exploration of the Earth’s gravity field. The techniques of measuring the Earth’s gravity using the terrestrial and ship borne technique are time consuming and have limitation on the vast area. With the space-based measuring technique, these limitations can be overcome. The satellite gravity missions such as Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE, and Gravity-Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer Mission (GOCE has introduced a better way in providing the information on the Earth’s gravity field. From these satellite gravity missions, the Global Geopotential Models (GGMs has been produced from the spherical harmonics coefficient data type. The information of the gravity anomaly can be used to predict the bathymetry because the gravity anomaly and bathymetry have relationships between each other. There are many GGMs that have been published and each of the models gives a different value of the Earth’s gravity field information. Therefore, this study is conducted to assess the most reliable GGM for the Malaysian Seas. This study covered the area of the marine area on the South China Sea at Sabah extent. Seven GGMs have been selected from the three satellite gravity missions. The gravity anomalies derived from the GGMs are compared with the airborne gravity anomaly, in order to figure out the correlation (R2 and the root mean square error (RMSE of the data. From these assessments, the most suitable GGMs for the study area is GOCE model, GO_CONS_GCF_2_TIMR4 with the R2 and RMSE value of 0.7899 and 9.886 mGal, respectively. This selected model will be used in the estimating the bathymetry for Malaysian Seas in future.

  16. Gravity and the geoid in the Nepal Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Materials within the Himalaya are rising due to convergence between India and Asia. If the rate of erosion is comparable to the rate of uplift the mean surface elevation will remain constant. Any slight imbalance in these two processes will lead to growth or attrition of the Himalaya. The process of uplift of materials within the Himalaya coupled with surface erosion is similar to the advance of a glacier into a region of melting. If the melting rate exceeds the rate of downhill motion of the glacier then the terminus of the glacier will receed up-valley despite the downhill motion of the bulk of the glacier. Thus although buried rocks, minerals and surface control points in the Himalaya are undoubtably rising, the growth or collapse of the Himalaya depends on the erosion rate which is invisible to geodetic measurements. Erosion rates are currently estimated from suspended sediment loads in rivers in the Himalaya. These typically underestimate the real erosion rate since bed-load is not measured during times of heavy flood, and it is difficult to integrate widely varying suspended load measurements over many years. An alternative way to measure erosion rate is to measure the rate of change of gravity in a region of uplift. If a control point moves vertically it should be accompanied by a reduction in gravity as the point moves away from the Earth's center of mass. There is a difference in the change of gravity between uplift with and without erosion corresponding to the difference between the free-air gradient and the gradient in the acceleration due to gravity caused by a corresponding thickness of rock. Essentially gravity should change precisely in accord with a change in elevation of the point in a free-air gradient if erosion equals uplift rate. We were funded by NASA to undertake a measurement of absolute gravity simultaneously with measurements of GPS height within the Himalaya. Since both absolute gravity and time are known in an absolute sense to 1 part in

  17. Development of a new generation gravity map of Antarctica: ADGRAV Antarctic Digital Gravity Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Arko

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF has agreed to support the development of a new generation gravity map of Antarctica (ADGRAV - Antarctic Digital Gravity Synthesis, funding the development of a web based access tool. The goal of this project is the creation of an on-line Antarctic gravity database which will facilitate access to improved high resolution satellite gravity models, in conjunction with shipboard, airborne, and land based gravity measurements for the continental regions. This database will complement parallel projects underway to develop new continental bedrock (BEDMAP and magnetic (ADMAP maps of Antarctica.

  18. Development of a new generation gravity map of Antarctica. ADGRAV Antarctic Digital Gravity Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.E.; Small, C.; Arko, R.A. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

    1999-04-01

    The United States National Science Foundation (NSF) has agreed to support the development of a new generation gravity map of Antarctica (ADGRAW-Antarctic Digital Gravity Synthesis), funding the development of a web based access tool. The goal of this project is the creation of an on-line Antarctic gravity database which will facilitate access to improved high resolution satellite gravity models, in conjunction with shipboard, airborne, and land based gravity measurements for the continental regions. This database will complement parallel projects underway to develop new continental bedrock (BEDMAP) and magnetic (ADMAP) maps of Antarctica.

  19. Gravity Disturbances at Altitude and at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, T.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is committed to redefining the nation's vertical datum by 2022. In support of the new vertical datum, NGS is collecting high-altitude airborne gravity data across the United States through the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project. GRAV-D (as of August 2013) has publicly released full-field gravity products from these high-altitude flights for >15% of the country. The full-field gravity (FFG) at altitude product is versatile because it allows the user to calculate any disturbance or anomaly that is appropriate for their application- based on any datum and height above the datum desired. However, conventional geophysical methods for calculating gravity disturbances assume very low altitudes above the ellipsoid. This presentation addresses the differences between several conventional and non-conventional methods for calculating gravity disturbances, from the perspective of altitudes as high as 40,000 ft. The methods for calculating a disturbance at altitude apply different corrections to the FFG for: 1. Normal gravity at the surface of the ellipsoid and the free-air reduction (1st order, 2nd order, and higher order approximations); 2. Normal gravity at the surface of the ellipsoid, upward continued to flight height; 3. Normal gravity at flight altitude above the ellipsoid from Heiskanen and Moritz (1967)'s closed equations; 4. Normal gravity at flight altitude above the ellipsoid from spherical and ellipsoidal harmonic coefficients of the ellipsoid. Initial results indicate that these methods produce gravity disturbances that are 10s of mGals different at altitude. This presentation will also investigate disturbances calculated at the surface of the ellipsoid, by downward continuing the results of the above methods. Gravity disturbances continued from airborne flight heights down to the surface are desired for comparison to terrestrial and marine gravity data.

  20. It's All Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, P. A.

    2003-01-01

    Newtonian gravitation adequately predicts planet and satellite motion. Gravitational anomalies and the wish to travel at relativistic speeds, however, imply that gravity should be integrated within a unification framework that may include electricity and magnetism. Thus, new theories are needed that predict currently accepted phenomenon as well as anomalies to prepare the necessary groundwork for experimental validation needed for advanced technology propulsion schemes and far-term missions. A primary deficiency is that we are obviously limited within the confines of our own solar system and a different gravity model may be applicable elsewhere in the cosmos. The model proposed here follows previous ideas proposed by Murad, Dyatlov, and Jefimenko for a universal gravitation model with an intrinsic radial force term coupled with angular momentum. Including angular momentum may explain several spin symmetries seen in some anomalous gyroscopic experiments and throughout the universe regarding planets that orbit around the sun: moons that orbit larger planetary bodies: and the rotation about each planetary axis.

  1. Artificial Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term reduced gravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity, which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by short-radius human centrifuge devices within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient

  2. Gravity field determination and error assessment techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, D. N.; Shum, C. K.; Tapley, B. D.

    1989-01-01

    Linear estimation theory, along with a new technique to compute relative data weights, was applied to the determination of the Earth's geopotential field and other geophysical model parameters using a combination of satellite ground-based tracking data, satellite altimetry data, and the surface gravimetry data. The relative data weights for the inhomogeneous data sets are estimated simultaneously with the gravity field and other geophysical and orbit parameters in a least squares approach to produce the University of Texas gravity field models. New techniques to perform calibration of the formal covariance matrix for the geopotential solution were developed to obtain a reliable gravity field error estimate. Different techniques, which include orbit residual analysis, surface gravity anomaly residual analysis, subset gravity solution comparisons and consider covariance analysis, were applied to investigate the reliability of the calibration.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Antarctic Ice Sheet Mass Trends, Glacio-Isostatic Adjustment, and Surface Processes from a Joint Inversion of Satellite Altimeter, Gravity, and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Espanol, Alba; Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Clarke, Peter J.; Flament, Thomas; Helm, Veit; King, Matt A.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Petrie, Elizabeth; Remy, Frederique; Schon, Nana; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present spatiotemporal mass balance trends for the Antarctic Ice Sheet from a statistical inversion of satellite altimetry, gravimetry, and elastic-corrected GPS data for the period 2003-2013. Our method simultaneously determines annual trends in ice dynamics, surface mass balance anomalies, and a time-invariant solution for glacio-isostatic adjustment while remaining largely independent of forward models. We establish that over the period 2003-2013, Antarctica has been losing mass at a rateof -84 +/- 22 Gt per yr, with a sustained negative mean trend of dynamic imbalance of -111 +/- 13 Gt per yr. West Antarctica is the largest contributor with -112 +/- 10 Gt per yr, mainly triggered by high thinning rates of glaciers draining into the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a dramatic increase in mass loss in the last decade, with a mean rate of -28 +/- 7 Gt per yr and significantly higher values for the most recent years following the destabilization of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula around 2010. The total mass loss is partly compensated by a significant mass gain of 56 +/- 18 Gt per yr in East Antarctica due to a positive trend of surface mass balance anomalies.

  4. Gravity brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  5. Gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David

    1987-02-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  6. Advances in understanding ozone impact on forest trees: Messages from novel phytotron and free-air fumigation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyssek, R., E-mail: matyssek@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Karnosky, D.F. [Michigan Technological University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences, Houghton, MI 49931-129 (United States); Wieser, G. [Federal Research and Trainings Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Dept. of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Percy, K. [K.E. Percy Air Quality Effects Consulting Ltd., 207-230 Wilson Drive, Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 0A4 (Canada); Oksanen, E. [Faculty of Biosciences, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FIN 80101 Joensuu (Finland); Grams, T.E.E. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Kubiske, M. [Institute for Applied Ecosystem Studies, US Forest Service, Northern Research Station, 5985 Hwy K, Rhinelander, WI 54501 (United States); Hanke, D. [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, CB2 3EA (United Kingdom); Pretzsch, H. [Forest Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Recent evidence from novel phytotron and free-air ozone (O{sub 3}) fumigation experiments in Europe and America on forest tree species is highlighted in relation to previous chamber studies. Differences in O{sub 3} sensitivity between pioneer and climax species are examined and viewed for trees growing at the harsh alpine timberline ecotone. As O{sub 3} apparently counteracts positive effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and mitigates productivity increases, response is governed by genotype, competitors, and ontogeny rather than species per se. Complexity in O{sub 3} responsiveness increased under the influence of pathogens and herbivores. The new evidence does not conflict in principle with previous findings that, however, pointed to a low ecological significance. This new knowledge on trees' O{sub 3} responsiveness beyond the juvenile stage in plantations and forests nevertheless implies limited predictability due to complexity in biotic and abiotic interactions. Unravelling underlying mechanisms is mandatory for assessing O{sub 3} risks as an important component of climate change scenarios. - Novel phytotron and free-air O{sub 3} exposure studies on forest trees communicate sensitivity to be governed by genotype, ontogeny and biotic agents rather than species per se.

  7. Gravity field, geoid and ocean surface by space techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderle, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Knowledge of the earth's gravity field continued to increase during the last four years. Altimetry data from the GEOS-3 satellite has provided the geoid over most of the ocean to an accuracy of about one meter. Increasing amounts of laser data has permitted the solution for 566 terms in the gravity field with which orbits of the GEOS-3 satellite have been computed to an accuracy of about one to two meters. The combination of satellite tracking data, altimetry and gravimetry has yielded a solution for 1360 terms in the earth's gravity field. A number of problems remain to be solved to increase the accuracy of the gravity field determination. New satellite systems would provide gravity data in unsurveyed areas and correction for topographic features of the ocean and improved computational procedures together with a more extensive laser network will considerably improve the accuracy of the results.

  8. Accuracy Analysis for SST Gravity Field Model in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; LUO Zhicai; ZOU Xiancai; WANG Haihong

    2006-01-01

    Taking China as the region for test, the potential of the new satellite gravity technique, satellite-to-satellite tracking for improving the accuracy of regional gravity field model is studied. With WDM94 as reference, the gravity anomaly residuals of three models, the latest two GRACE global gravity field model (EIGEN_GRACE02S, GGM02S) and EGM96, are computed and compared. The causes for the differences among the residuals of the three models are discussed. The comparison between the residuals shows that in the selected region, EIGEN_GRACE02S or GGM02S is better than EGM96 in lower degree part (less than 110 degree). Additionally, through the analysis of the model gravity anomaly residuals, it is found that some systematic errors with periodical properties exist in the higher degree part of EIGEN and GGM models, the results can also be taken as references in the validation of the SST gravity data.

  9. Models for Near-Ridge Seamounts Constrained by Gravity Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostlan, M.; McClain, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    In an analysis of the seamount chain centered at 105°20’W, 9°05’N, west of the East Pacific Rise and south of the Clipperton transform fault, we compared measured free air gravity anomaly values with modeled gravity anomaly values. The seamount chain contains approximately ten seamounts trending roughly east-west, perpendicular to the mid-ocean ridge axis. They lie on lithosphere between 1.5 and 2.7 Ma in age. Based on its position and age, the seamount chain appears to be associated with the 9°03’N overlapping spreading center (OSC). This OSC includes several associated seamount chains, aligned generally east-west, and of varying ages. The observed data include both free air gravity anomalies and bathymetry of the seamount chain, provided by the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC), and was selected because the gravity measurements are relatively well covered. We used a series of different structural models of the oceanic crust and mantle to generate gravity anomalies associated with the sea mounts. The models utilize Parker’s algorithm to generate these free air gravity anomalies. We compute a gravity residual by subtracting the calculated anomalies from the observed anomalies. The models include one with a crust of a constant thickness (6 km), while another introduces a constant-thickness Layer 2A. In contrast, a third model included a variable thickness crust, where the thickness is governed by Airy compensation. The calculations show that the seamounts must be partly compensated, because the constant-thickness models predict a high negative residual (or they produce an anomaly which is too high). In contrast, the Airy compensation model produces an anomaly that is too low at the longer wavelengths, indicating that the lithosphere must have some strength, and that flexure must be supporting part of the load of the seamount chain. This contrasts with earlier studies that indicate young, near-ridge seamounts do not result in flexure of the thin

  10. $BF$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Celada, Mariano; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-01-01

    $BF$ gravity comprises all the formulations of gravity that are based on deformations of $BF$ theory. Such deformations consist of either constraints or potential terms added to the topological $BF$ action that turn some of the gauge degrees of freedom into physical ones, particularly giving rise to general relativity. The $BF$ formulations have provided new and deep insights into many classical and quantum aspects of the gravitational field, setting the foundations for the approach to quantum gravity known as spinfoam models. In this review, we present a self-contained and unified treatment of the $BF$ formulations of $D$-dimensional general relativity and other related models, focusing on the classical aspects of them and including some new results.

  11. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  12. BF gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Mariano; González, Diego; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-11-01

    BF gravity comprises all the formulations of gravity that are based on deformations of BF theory. Such deformations consist of either constraints or potential terms added to the topological BF action that turn some of the gauge degrees of freedom into physical ones, particularly giving rise to general relativity. The BF formulations have provided new and deep insights into many classical and quantum aspects of the gravitational field, setting the foundations for the approach to quantum gravity known as spinfoam models. In this review, we present a self-contained and unified treatment of the BF formulations of D-dimensional general relativity and other related models, focusing on the classical aspects of them and including some new results.

  13. Gravity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Clifton, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions that exist in nature. It also has the distinction of being the oldest, weakest, and most difficult force to quantize. Understanding gravity is not only essential for understanding the motion of objects on Earth, but also the motion of all celestial objects, and even the expansion of the Universe itself. It was the study of gravity that led Einstein to his profound realizations about the nature of space and time. Gravity is not only universal, it is also essential for understanding the behavior of the Universe, and all astrophysical bodies within it. In this Very Short Introduction Timothy Clifton looks at the development of our understanding of gravity since the early observations of Kepler and Newtonian theory. He discusses Einstein's theory of gravity, which now supplants Newton's, showing how it allows us to understand why the frequency of light changes as it passes through a gravitational field, why GPS satellites need their clocks corrected as they orbi...

  14. Advances in understanding ozone impact on forest trees: messages from novel phytotron and free-air fumigation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyssek, R; Karnosky, D F; Wieser, G; Percy, K; Oksanen, E; Grams, T E E; Kubiske, M; Hanke, D; Pretzsch, H

    2010-06-01

    Recent evidence from novel phytotron and free-air ozone (O3) fumigation experiments in Europe and America on forest tree species is highlighted in relation to previous chamber studies. Differences in O3 sensitivity between pioneer and climax species are examined and viewed for trees growing at the harsh alpine timberline ecotone. As O3 apparently counteracts positive effects of elevated CO2 and mitigates productivity increases, response is governed by genotype, competitors, and ontogeny rather than species per se. Complexity in O3 responsiveness increased under the influence of pathogens and herbivores. The new evidence does not conflict in principle with previous findings that, however, pointed to a low ecological significance. This new knowledge on trees' O3 responsiveness beyond the juvenile stage in plantations and forests nevertheless implies limited predictability due to complexity in biotic and abiotic interactions. Unravelling underlying mechanisms is mandatory for assessing O3 risks as an important component of climate change scenarios.

  15. Determining smoking level of hospital employees and the evaluation of the smoke-free air zone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Meltem Koç

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of this study is to define the health knowledge, cigarette smoking behaviors, attempts and successes to quit smoking and obstacles indicated by the ones who still smoke among a Training and Research Hospital staff four years after the application of the law “Smoke Free Air Zone”. Methods: A questionnaire developed by the researchers is used for this cross sectional research. It questions the sociodemographic features and thoughts and attitudes about the “Smoke Free Air Zone” and “Smoke Free Hospital” applications. Fagerstrom Nicotine Dependence Test is also applied to the smoking attendants to define the level of dependence. Results:It was found that 29.6% of the participants still smoke. Among the still smoking ones; 29.4% did not ever attempt to quit, 28.2% attempted before starting work in the hospital, 20% attempted after starting work in the hospital and 22.4% attempted on both periods. Regarding the questions about application of “Smoke Free Hospital” it was found that 70.7% of the hospital staff support the application, 53.3% think that violators should be punished with a penalty, 48.1% think that it should be punished by the administration, 30.1% think that passive smoking is an intrusion to the personal rights and 59.1% think that quitters increased with this application. Conclusion: Reducing the smoking rates among healthcare staff is extremely important in the struggle against smoking. Establishment of applications with institutional education programs and easing access to the related services may be helpful for healthcare personnel quit smoking. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (1: 33-39

  16. Topics in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamon, Raphael

    2010-06-29

    . Furthermore, we succeed in solving the quantum Gauss constraint. In the second part of the thesis we introduce some aspects of phenomenological quantum gravity and their possible detectable signatures. The goal of phenomenological quantum gravity is to derive conclusions and make predictions from expected characteristics of a full theory of quantum gravity. One possibility is an energy-dependent speed of light arising from a quantized space such that the propagation time of two photons differs. However, the amount of these corrections is very small such that only cosmological distances can be considered. Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are ideal candidates as they are short but very luminous bursts of gamma-rays taking place at distances billions of light-years away. We study GRBs detected by the European satellite INTEGRAL and develop a new method to analyze unbinned data. A {chi}{sup 2}-test will provide a lower bound for quantum gravity corrections, which will be nevertheless well below the Planck mass. Then we shall study the sensibility of NASA's new satellite Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and conclude that it is well suited to detect corrections. This prediction has just been confirmed when Fermi detected a very energetic photon emanating from GRB 090510 which highly constrains models with linear corrections to the speed of light. However, as it is shown at the end of this thesis, more bursts are needed in order to definitely falsify such models. (orig.)

  17. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  18. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  19. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  20. F(R) gravity and inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastiani, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this short review, we revisit inflation in F(R)-gravity. We find several F(R)-models for viable inflation by applying some reconstruction techniques. A special attention is payed in the reproduction of the last Planck satellite data. The possible generalizations of Starobinsky- like inflation are found and discussed. The early-time acceleration is analyzed in a higher- derivative quantum gravitational model which mainly reduces to F(R)-gravity.

  1. Prediction of Gravity Anomalies Over the South China and Philippine Seas from Multi-satellite Altimeter Sea Surface Heights%根据多卫星高度计海面高数据推算南中国海及菲律宾海域重力异常

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isaac Dadzie; 李建成; 褚永海

    2008-01-01

    Gravity anomalies on a 2.5×2.5 arc-minute grid in a non-tidal system were derived over the South China and Philippine Seas from multi-satellite altimetry data. North and east components of deflections of the vertical were computed from altimeter-derived sea surface heights at crossover locations, and gridded onto a 2.5×2.5 arc-minute resolution grid. EGM96-derived components of deflections of the vertical and gravity anomalies gridded into 2.5×2.5 arc-minute resolutions were then used as reference global geopotential model quantities in a remove-restore procedure to implement the Inverse Vening Meinesz formula via the 1D-FFT technique to predict the gravity anomalies over the South China and Philippine Seas from the gridded altimeter-derived Components of deflections of the vertical. Statistical comparisons between the altime-ter-derived and the shipboard gravity anomalies showed that there is a root-mean-square agreement of 5.7 mgals between them.

  2. Stochastic gravity: beyond semiclassical gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdaguer, E [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and CER en Astrofisica, Fisica de Particules i Cosmologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    The back-reaction of a classical gravitational field interacting with quantum matter fields is described by the semiclassical Einstein equation, which has the expectation value of the quantum matter fields stress tensor as a source. The semiclassical theory may be obtained from the quantum field theory of gravity interacting with N matter fields in the large N limit. This theory breaks down when the fields quantum fluctuations are important. Stochastic gravity goes beyond the semiclassical limit and allows for a systematic and self-consistent description of the metric fluctuations induced by these quantum fluctuations. The correlation functions of the metric fluctuations obtained in stochastic gravity reproduce the correlation functions in the quantum theory to leading order in an 1/N expansion. Two main applications of stochastic gravity are discussed. The first, in cosmology, to obtain the spectrum of primordial metric perturbations induced by the inflaton fluctuations, even beyond the linear approximation. The second, in black hole physics, to study the fluctuations of the horizon of an evaporating black hole.

  3. Future Satellite Gravimetry and Earth Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flury, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    Currently, a first generation of dedicated satellite missions for the precise mapping of the Earth’s gravity field is in orbit (CHAMP, GRACE, and soon GOCE). The gravity data from these satellite missions provide us with very new information on the dynamics of planet Earth. In particular, on the mass distribution in the Earth’s interior, the entire water cycle (ocean circulation, ice mass balance, continental water masses, and atmosphere), and on changes in the mass distribution. The results are fascinating, but still rough with respect to spatial and temporal resolution. Technical progress in satellite-to-satellite tracking and in gravity gradiometry will allow more detailed results in the future. In this special issue, Earth scientists develop visions of future applications based on follow-on high-precision satellite gravimetry missions.

  4. 基于激光干涉星间测距原理的下一代月球卫星重力测量计划需求论证%Demonstration of Requirement for Future Lunar Satellite Gravity Exploration Mission Based on Interferometric Laser Intersatellite Ranging Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑伟; 许厚泽; 钟敏; 员美娟

    2011-01-01

    月球卫星重力测量是21世纪国际开展深空探测的发展趋势和追逐热点.月球重力场的精密测量是国际探月计划的重要组成部分,它决定着月球探测器的轨道优化设计和载人登月飞船月面理想着陆点的合适选取.本文首先介绍未来国际GRAIL(Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory)月球重力场探测双星计划的总体概述、关键载荷以及科学目标和研究方向.其次,重点阐述月球卫星观测模式可行性论证、月球卫星关键载荷的优化选取、卫星轨道参数的优化设计、仿真模拟研究的先期开展等我国将来月球卫星重力测量计划的实施建议.第一,由于高低/低低卫星跟踪卫星结合多普勒和甚长基线干涉系统观测模式(SST-HL/LL-Doppler-VLBI)对中长波月球重力场的探测精度较高,技术要求相对较低,月球重力场测定速度快、代价低和效益高,可借鉴地球重力卫星GRACE(Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment)系统的成功经验,对定轨精度的要求较低,而且可有效探测远月面区域的月球重力场信号,因此我国将来首期月球卫星重力测量计划采用SST-HI/LL-Doppler-VLBI观测模式较优.第二,我国应先期开展高精度的月球重力卫星关键载荷(激光干涉星间测距仪、非保守力补偿系统等)和地面Doppler-VLBI系统的研制工作.第三,月球卫星轨道高度(50~100 km)和星间距离(100±50 km)的优化设计是成功实施将来我国月球卫星重力测量计划的重要保证.第四,建议我国将仿真技术应用于月球重力卫星的方案论证、系统设计、部件研制、产品检验、实际应用、故障分析等研制和运行的全过程.本文的研究不仅对我国将来首期月球卫星重力测量计划的成功实施具有重要的参考价值,同时对未来国际太阳系行星重力探测的发展方向具有广泛的指导意义.%The lunar satellite gravity exploration is the international

  5. Updated Hungarian Gravity Field Solution Based on Fifth Generation GOCE Gravity Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Gyula; Foldvary, Lorant

    2015-03-01

    With the completion of the ESA's GOCE satellite's mission fifth generation gravity field models are available from the ESA's GOCE High Processing Facility. Our contribution is an updated gravity field solution for Hungary using the latest DIR R05 GOCE gravity field model. The solution methodology is least squares gravity field parameter estimation using Spherical Radial Base Functions (SRBF). Regional datasets include deflections of the vertical (DOV), gravity anomalies and quasigeoid heights by GPS/levelling. The GOCE DIR R05 model has been combined with the EGM20008 model and has been evaluated in comparison with the EGM2008 and EIGEN-6C3stat models to assess the performance of our regional gravity field solution.

  6. Gravity anomalies, flexure and mantle rheology seaward of circum-Pacific trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J.; Watts, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    We have used ensemble averages of satellite-derived free-air gravity anomaly data, together with inverse modelling techniques, to determine the effective elastic thickness, Te, of circum-Pacific subducting oceanic lithosphere and its relationship to plate age. Synthetic modelling tests show that Te can be recovered best using gravity anomaly, rather than bathymetry, data and profiles that are at least 750 km long. Inverse modelling based on a uniform Te elastic plate suggests that Te increases with age of the subducting oceanic lithosphere and is given approximately by the depth to the 390 ± 10 °C oceanic isotherm based on a cooling plate model. Misfits between the observed and calculated gravity anomalies are significantly improved if a mechanically weak zone is included between the trench axis and the outer rise. This weak zone is coincident with observations of bend-faulting and seismicity. Inverse modelling shows that Te landward of the outer rise is generally 40-65 per cent less than the Te seaward of the outer rise. Both landward and seaward Te increases with age of the lithosphere and are given by the depth to the 342-349 °C and 671-714 °C oceanic isotherm, respectively. A dependence of Te on age is consistent with models for the cooling of oceanic lithosphere as it moves away from a mid-ocean ridge and the temperature-dependent ductile creep of oceanic lithospheric minerals such as olivine. By comparing the observed Te to the predicted Te based on laboratory-derived yield strength envelopes and an assumption of elastic-perfectly plastic deformation, we have attempted to constrain the rheology of oceanic lithosphere. Regardless of the assumed friction coefficient, the dry-olivine low-temperature plasticity flow laws of Goetze, Evans & Goetze, Raterron et al. and Mei et al. all provide quite a good fit to the observed Te at circum-Pacific subduction zones. This result contrasts with the Hawaiian Islands, where these flow laws are generally too strong to

  7. Gravity anomalies, flexure and mantle rheology seaward of Circum-Pacific trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J.; Watts, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    We have used ensemble averages of satellite-derived free-air gravity anomaly data, together with inverse modelling techniques, to determine the effective elastic thickness, Te, of circum-Pacific subducting oceanic lithosphere and its relationship to plate age. Synthetic modelling tests show that Te can be recovered best using gravity anomaly, rather than bathymetry, data and profiles that are at least 750 km long. Inverse modeling based on a uniform Te elastic plate suggests that Te increases with age of the subducting oceanic lithosphere and is given approximately by the depth to the 390 ± 10°C oceanic isotherm based on a cooling plate model. Misfits between the observed and calculated gravity anomalies are significantly improved if a mechanically weak zone is included between the trench axis and the outer rise. This weak zone is coincident with observations of bend-faulting and seismicity. Inverse modelling shows that Te landward of the outer rise is generally 40-65% less than the Te seaward of the outer rise. Both landward and seaward Te increases with age of the lithosphere and are given by the depth to the 342-349°C and 671-714°C oceanic isotherm respectively. A dependence of Te on age is consistent with models for the cooling of oceanic lithosphere as it moves away from a mid-ocean ridge and the temperature-dependent ductile creep of oceanic lithospheric minerals such as olivine. By comparing the observed Te to the predicted Te based on laboratory-derived yield strength envelopes and an assumption of elastic-perfectly plastic deformation, we have attempted to constrain the rheology of oceanic lithosphere. Regardless of the assumed friction coefficient, the dry-olivine low-temperature plasticity flow laws of Goetze (1978), Evans & Goetze (1979), Raterron et al. (2004) and Mei et al. (2010) all provide quite a good fit to the observed Te at circum-Pacific subduction zones. This result contrasts with the Hawaiian Islands, where these flow laws are generally

  8. GEOSAT44: High-Accuracy, High-Resolution Gravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This satellite altimeter data base contains precise geoid and gravity anomaly profiles which were constructed from the average of 44 repeat cycles of Geosat. The...

  9. GEOSAT 44: High-Accuracy, High-Resolution Gravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This satellite altimeter data base contains precise geoid and gravity anomaly profiles which were constructed from the average of 44 repeat cycles of Geosat. The...

  10. Empirical Foundations of Relativistic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, W T

    2005-01-01

    In 1859, Le Verrier discovered the mercury perihelion advance anomaly. This anomaly turned out to be the first relativistic-gravity effect observed. During the 141 years to 2000, the precisions of laboratory and space experiments, and astrophysical and cosmological observations on relativistic gravity have been improved by 3 orders of magnitude. In 1999, we envisaged a 3-6 order improvement in the next 30 years in all directions of tests of relativistic gravity. In 2000, the interferometric gravitational wave detectors began their runs to accumulate data. In 2003, the measurement of relativistic Shapiro time-delay of the Cassini spacecraft determined the relativistic-gravity parameter gammaγ with a 1.5-order improvement. In October 2004, Ciufolini and Pavlis reported a measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect on the LAGEOS and LAGEOS2 satellites to 10 percent of the value predicted by general relativity. In April 2004, Gravity Probe B was launched and has been accumulating science data for more than ...

  11. Gravity and geoid anomalies of the Philippine Sea: Evidence on the depth of compensation for the negative residual water depth anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowin, C.

    1982-01-01

    A negative free-air gravity anomaly which occurs in the central part of the Philippine Sea was examined to determine the distribution and nature of possible regional mass excesses or deficiencies. Geoid anomalies from GEOS-3 observation were positive. A negative residual geoid anomaly consistent with the area of negative free-air gravity anomalies were found. Theoretical gravity-topography and geoid-topography admittance functions indicated that high density mantle at about 60 km dept could account for the magnitudes of the gravity and residual geoid anomaly and the 1 km residual water depth anomaly in the Philippine Sea. The negative residual depth anomaly may be compensated for by excess density in the uppermost mantle, but the residual geoid and regional free-air gravity anomalies and a slow surface wave velocity structure might result from low-density warm upper mantle material lying beneath the zone of high-density uppermost mantle. From a horizontal disk approximation, the depth of the low-density warm mantle was estimated to be on the order of 200 km.

  12. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  13. Analyses on Origin of positive gravity anomalies of sedimentary basins of the Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinyao; Yang, Chunguo; Ji, Fei; Wang, Wei; Shen, Zhongyan

    2017-04-01

    We have adopted gridded products describing surface elevation, ice-thickness and the sea floor and subglacial bed elevation south of 60◦ S from Bedmap2 and north of 60◦ S from JGP95E to calculate Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomaly of the Ross Sea region based on the DTU10 free-air gravity anomaly.Taking a view of the free-air, Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies, it is unusual that high values overlay the Victoria Land Basin, Central Trough, Northern Basin and Northern Central Trough while basement highs are associated with low value. A number of studies have attributed the high gravity anomalies across the depocenters to high-density volcanics deep within the basins or magmatic intrusions within the region of the thinned crust or upper mantle (e. g., Edwards et al., 1987). According to the conclusion from Karner et al. (2005), the anticorrelation of gravity anomalies with sediment basement can be reproduced if the flexural strength of the lithosphere during the late Cretaceous rifting is significantly lower than the flexural strength of the lithosphere at the Oligocene and Neogene time of sedimentation. We note that the isostatic gravity anomalies are higher than the free-air gravity anomalies adjacent to the Transantarctic Mountains, and vice versa away from the Transantarctic Mountains. We may ignore the constraints offered by the tranditional isostasy in the local gravity studies of the Ross Sea basins, especially advancing the concept of high density material in the lower crust or upper mantle. In particular, the modeled gravity does not laterally integrate to zero, due to the existence of unbalanced forces induced by mantle. Along the outer shelf uplift zone surrouding Antarctica, the positive gravity belt has higher values in free-air gravity anomalies than those in isostatic gravity anomalies. Meanwhile, the positive gravity belt of isostatic gravity anomalies almost disappears in the background anomalies of 20 mGal to 10 mGal facing the

  14. Autonomous orbit determination via Kalman filtering of gravity gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Sun; Chen,De; Macabiau, Christophe; Han

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Spaceborne gravity gradients are proposed in this paper to provide autonomous orbit determination capabilities for near Earth satellites. The gravity gradients contain useful position information which can be extracted by matching the observations with a precise gravity model. The extended Kalman filter is investigated as the principal estimator. The stochastic model of orbital motion, the measurement equation and the model configuration are discussed for the filter de...

  15. The absolute gravity measurement by FG5 gravimeter at Great Wall Station, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gravity measurement is of great importance to the height datum in Antarctica.The absolute gravity measurement was carried out at Great Wall Station, Antarctica, using FG5 absolute gravity instrument.The gravity data was processed with corrections of earth tide, ocean tide, polar motion and the atmospher, and the RMS is within +3 x 10 -s ms-2.The vertical and horizontal gravity gradients were measured using 2 LaCoaste & Romberg (LCR) gravimeters.The absolute gravity measurement provides the fundamental data for the validation and calibration of the satellite gravity projects such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE, and for the high accuracy geoid model.

  16. Limitations to soybean photosynthesis at elevated carbon dioxide in free-air enrichment and open top chamber systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, James A

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that the stimulation of soybean photosynthesis by elevated CO2 was less in free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems than in open top chambers (OTC), which might explain smaller yield increases at elevated CO2 in FACE systems. However, this has not been tested using the same cultivars grown in the same location. I tested whether soybean photosynthesis at high light and elevated CO2 (ambient+180 μmol mol(-1)) was limited by electron transport (J) in FACE systems but by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylation capacity (VCmax) in OTC. FACE systems with daytime and continuous CO2 enrichment were also compared. The results indicated that in both cultivars examined, midday photosynthesis at high light was always limited by VCmax, both in the FACE and in the OTC systems. Daytime only CO2 enrichment did not affect photosynthetic parameters or limitations, but did result in significantly smaller yields in both cultivars than continuous elevation. Photosynthesis measured at low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) was not higher at elevated than at ambient CO2, because of an acclimation to elevated CO2 which was only evident at low measurement PPFDs.

  17. Scattering study at free air ionization chamber diaphragm; Estudo do espalhamento no diafragma da camara de ionizacao de ar livre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Alexandre Lo Bianco dos

    2011-07-01

    The maim of this work consisted in the assessment of the correction factor for air kerma, due to scattered radiation in the diaphragm of the free-air ionization chamber model 481. LNMRl measurements were made to acquire x-ray spectra corresponding to the Qualities RQR-M, described in IEC 61627 standards (2005). These spectra were used as input data in the MC simulations. The operational range of energy spectra provide up to 35 keV. This energy range is typically used in diagnostic radiology, although there is not primary standard for air kerma. The determination of this factor is a fundamental process in the primary standardization of the air kerma. These factors were obtained by computer simulation using the Penelope code. The results are k{sub RQR-M1}=0,9946, k{sub RQR} {sub -M2}=0,9932, k{sub RQR-M3}=0,9978 and k{sub RQR-M4}=0,9885; with uncertainties of 0,007 and coverage factor equal to 2. lt can be concluded that, with respect to the diaphragm, the chamber can be used in the primary standard of air kerma. (author)

  18. Development of improved free-air ionisation chamber as absolute dosimetry standard for low-energy X rays in INER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chien-Hau; Kuan, Wei-Peng; Kurosawa, T; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Chen, Ing-Jane; Chen, Wei-Li

    2010-02-01

    The National Radiation Standard Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) designed and constructed an improved Attix style free-air ionisation chamber (FAC) for low-energy X-ray measurements. Clinically, X rays in this energy range are used in mammography radiology. This chamber is also used to perform air-kerma measurements. The original Attix two-sectional design was redesigned by INER using the piston design. The correction factors were determined experimentally for volume estimation, ion recombination and air attenuation. The aperture transmission, wall transmission, electron loss and photon scatter correction factors were determined using Monte Carlo calculations. INER established the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) X-ray beam code and performed a comparison of secondary standard air-kerma calibration factors for 10-50 kV low- energy X rays to verify the experimental accuracy and measurement consistency of the improved chamber. The INER-NMIJ/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) experimental results comparison using a transfer chamber yielded a difference energy X-ray calibration services in Taiwan and even forming a basis for the future mammography X-ray air-kerma primary standard.

  19. Model-data synthesis for the next generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Richard J; De Kauwe, Martin G; Domingues, Tomas F; Duursma, Remko A; Ellsworth, David S; Goll, Daniel S; Lapola, David M; Luus, Kristina A; MacKenzie, A Rob; Medlyn, Belinda E; Pavlick, Ryan; Rammig, Anja; Smith, Benjamin; Thomas, Rick; Thonicke, Kirsten; Walker, Anthony P; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments has successfully provided deeper understanding about how forests respond to an increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Located in aggrading stands in the temperate zone, they have provided a strong foundation for testing critical assumptions in terrestrial biosphere models that are being used to project future interactions between forest productivity and the atmosphere, despite the limited inference space of these experiments with regards to the range of global ecosystems. Now, a new generation of FACE experiments in mature forests in different biomes and over a wide range of climate space and biodiversity will significantly expand the inference space. These new experiments are: EucFACE in a mature Eucalyptus stand on highly weathered soil in subtropical Australia; AmazonFACE in a highly diverse, primary rainforest in Brazil; BIFoR-FACE in a 150-yr-old deciduous woodland stand in central England; and SwedFACE proposed in a hemiboreal, Pinus sylvestris stand in Sweden. We now have a unique opportunity to initiate a model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design and to address a set of cross-site science questions on topics including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity. © UT-Battelle, LLC New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Global Gravity from Satellite Altimetry (Geosat, ERS-1, Envisat, Jason-1, and CryoSat-2) from 2010-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0150966)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gravity models are powerful tools for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by...

  1. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three......-axis magnetometer, three piezoelectric gyros, and four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. The operation of the spacecraft is fully autonomous. The data flow between the transducers and the onboard computer placed physically outside the satellite is provided by a radio link. The purpose...

  2. Gravity gradient for Greenland and its tectonic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushinsky, Andrew N.

    2013-04-01

    Gravity gradient is the indicator of the stress conditions in the lithosphere. The axis of gradient signs changing indicates the boundary of blocks exposed to different tensions. The lines of maxima and minima of gravity gradient correspondingly marked the boundary of zones of compression and expansion. Four various types of the gravity anomalies was calculated: in free air, Bouguer's, Glennie's and isostatic. And then was calculated their gradients. The preliminary analysis of gradients shows, that its qualitative behavior for all types of gravity anomalies is very closely and, therefore, conclusions about the stress conditions in the lithosphere of the considering region are definite. Range of the changing for gradients of gravity in free air anomalies - from -96.1 to 135.8 eötvös, and for gradients of gravity Bouguer's anomalies - from -122.6 to 141.9 eötvös. Range of the changing for gradients of gravity Glennie's and isostatic anomalies are substantially smaller, for gradients of gravity Glennie's anomalies - from -27.6 to 25.5 eötvös, and for gradients of gravity isostatic anomalies - from -19.2 to 21.2 eötvös. This difference in the gradient values, evidently, connects with the difference in the thoroughness and the degree of averaging of the anomalies. Analysis of gravity gradient shown the following: 1. In the western part of the researching region are distinguished three linear structures (two maxima and one minimum), which marked rift zone of the Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. This disappeared rift characterized by depressed zone, lengthened from Nares strait along the west sea coast of Greenland. In the south part of this zone localized deep fault, which northward become lesser expressed. To the north and north-east from the Nares strait lengthened to the North Pole zone of compression, blocked up existing previously rift, by which the rotation of the Greenland part of Canadian shield from its cardinal part happened. Center of this rotation

  3. Mariana Arc structure inferred from gravity and seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W. W.

    1980-10-01

    A two-dimensional gravity model of the lithosphere was constructed along a seismic refraction line near 18°N latitude. Included in the model are crustal layers constrained by seismic refraction results, an estimate of the gravity anomaly caused by the subducting slab, and a model of the low-density mantle beneath the Mariana Trough. With a reasonable anomaly assumed for the slab it is shown that the gravity anomaly caused by the low-density mantle is greatest over the axial bathymetric high and tapers off to the sides. With the bottom of the low-density mantle set at 200 km the density contrast is -0.033 g/cm3. Other depths and densities are tried as well. Several notable anomalies are found on the crustal layers. East of the trench, the crust has been thinned slightly to account for an outer gravity high. Behind the landward wall of the trench, a small, low-density body is modeled to explain a slight offset of the minimum of the free air anomaly from the trench axis. A 50-mGal jump on the observed gravity over the volcanic line is explained by an unusual configuration of the frontal arc Moho.

  4. Southern Africa Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data base (14,559 records) was received in January 1986. Principal gravity parameters include elevation and observed gravity. The observed gravity values are...

  5. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  6. Effects of gravity on transpiration of plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki

    2009-04-01

    To clarify effects of gravity on the water vapor exchange between plants and the ambient air, we evaluated the transpiration rate of plant leaves at 0.01, 1.0, and 2.0 g for 20 s each during parabolic airplane flights. The transpiration rates of a strawberry leaf and a replica leaf made of wet cloth were determined using a chamber method with humidity sensors. Absolute humidity at 3 and 8 mm below the lower surface of leaves was measured to evaluate the effect of gravity on humidity near leaves and estimate their transpiration rate. The transpiration rate of the replica leaf decreased by 42% with decreasing gravity levels from 1.0 to 0.01 g and increased by 31% with increasing gravity levels from 1.0 to 2.0 g. Absolute humidity near the intact strawberry leaf was 5 g m(-3) at ambient absolute humidity of 2.3 g m(-3) and gravity of 1.0 g. The absolute humidity increased by 2.5 g m(-3) with decreasing gravity levels from 1.0 to 0.01 g. The transpiration rate of the intact leaf decreased by 46% with decreasing gravity levels from 1.0 to 0.01 g and increased by 32% with increasing gravity levels from 1.0 to 2.0 g. We confirmed that the transpiration rate of leaves was suppressed by retarding the water vapor transfer due to restricted free air convection under microgravity conditions.

  7. Gravity Probe B:. Launch and Initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, G. M.; Bencze, W. J.; Brumley, R. W.; Buchman, S.; Clarke, B.; Debra, D.; Everitt, C. W. F.; Green, G.; Heifetz, M. I.; Hipkins, D. N.; Holmes, T.; Li, J.; Mester, J.; Muhlfelder, B.; Murray, D.; Ohshima, Y.; Parkinson, B. W.; Salomon, M.; Santiago, D.; Shestople, P.; Silbergleit, A. S.; Solomonik, V.; Taber, M.; Turneaure, J. P.

    2005-04-01

    The scientific instrument and the major subsystems of the Gravity Probe B satellite are described. Following launch, the initial on-orbit operations were designed to check the operations of each of these major subsystems, provide an initial on-orbit calibration of the scientific instrument, set up the instrument in its operational mode, and spin up and align each of the four gyroscopes.

  8. Preprocessing of gravity gradients at the GOCE high-level processing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Rispens, S.; Gruber, T.; Koop, R.; Schrama, E.; Visser, P.; Tscherning, C.C.; Veicherts, M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the products derived from the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) observations are the gravity gradients. These gravity gradients are provided in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and are calibrated in-flight using satellite shaking and star sensor data. To

  9. GRACE, time-varying gravity, Earth system dynamics and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, B.; Bonin, J.A.; Chambers, D.P.; Riva, R.E.M.; Sasgen, I.; Wahr, J.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous observations of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field have recently become available at an unprecedented resolution of a few hundreds of kilometers. The gravity field is a product of the Earth's mass distribution, and these data—provided by the satellites of the Gravity Recover

  10. Preprocessing of gravity gradients at the GOCE high-level processing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Rispens, S.; Gruber, T.; Koop, R.; Schrama, E.; Visser, P.; Tscherning, C.C.; Veicherts, M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the products derived from the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) observations are the gravity gradients. These gravity gradients are provided in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and are calibrated in-flight using satellite shaking and star sensor data. To us

  11. Analysis of the Lunar Gravity Field by Using GL0660B Model and Its Effect on Lunar Satellite Orbit%月球重力场模型GL0660B特征分析及其对绕月卫星轨道的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄昆学; 常晓涛; 朱广彬; 李武东

    2016-01-01

    The lunar gravity field provides a way to research moon’s evolution and probes the interior structure of the moon.It is an important factor influencing the lunar satellite precise orbit determination as well.The new lunar gravity model GL0660B from GRAIL mission dramatically improves the gravity spectrum and spectral ranges.Using the model GL0660B,it can be computed that the corresponding degree-wise RMS and correlation of topography,with which the quality of model GL0660B can be analyzed.Then different characters of the lunar gravity field comparing with other lunar gravity fields are analyzed. Besides,gravity anomaly distribution figures at different height of the models are given,and the character and difference of the lunar gravity models at different height are compared.In addition,lunar satellite orbit revolutionary at different height are modeled by GEODYN.The result shows that the trend of lunar satellite eccentricity changes is a complex and long cycle of change trend.It is different affected by the perturbation of the mascons of different height,which causes different changes of apolune,perilune and eccentricity.%月球重力场可用来研究月球演化过程和内部结构,是影响绕月卫星精密定轨的重要因素。基于GRAIL任务数据解算的GL0660B重力场模型,极大提高了月球重力场空间频谱信号的强度和范围。本文首先通过计算相应重力场的阶方差和地形相关性分析,对GL0660B模型进行了精度分析;其次,利用GL0660B模型和其他几个月球重力场模型进行比较,对月球重力场的特征进行了分析;然后通过绘制GL0660B模型和 LP150Q模型在月球外部不同高度处的重力异常图,分析比较了月球重力场模型在不同高度上所反映的月球重力场的特征和差异;最后,利用 GEODYN 软件模拟计算了不同高度卫星的轨道变化。可以看出绕月卫星离心率随时间的变化,以及周期性变化趋势,而且

  12. Gravity anomalies and basement structure in Osaka plain; Osaka heiya no juryoku ijo to kiban kozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, N.; Nakagawa, K. [Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science; Ryoki, K. [Osaka Polytechnical College, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Many kinds of new information about the underground structure are necessary for elucidating problems on the distribution characteristics of the structural damage and the ground failure due to the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake. The gravity anomalies in and around the Osaka sedimentary basin, which is mainly composed of Mesozoic granitic basement and post Tertiary sedimentary layers covering the basement, has been compiled with the data additional gravity measurements in the Hanshin-Osaka area. Basement configuration plays the important role in concentration or dispersion of seismic waves. In general, trends of the gravity anomalies should be removed from obtained gravity anomalies in order to estimate the sub-surface structures. The local free-air anomalies, which are residual anomalies obtained by applying regression technique to regional trends, exhibit linear relationship with the depth to the basement surface. In this study, therefore, the underground structure of the Osaka basin was estimated from the local free-air anomalies. First approximate model of basement surface was constructed by means of the method mentioned above, based upon the two layer (basement rock and the sedimentary cover) model. Further three dimensional model was developed based on the characteristic distribution of density inferred from seismic exploration analysis. 19 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [Effects of O3-FACE(ozone-free air control enrichment) on gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of rice leaf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Zeng, Qing; Zhu, Jian-Guo; Zhu, Chun-Wu; Cao, Ji-Ling; Xie, Zu-Bin; Liu, Gang; Tang, Hao-Ye

    2010-04-01

    O3-FACE (Ozone-free air control enrichment) platform has been established for observing the effect of elevated tropospheric ozone concentration on the gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of two rice varieties (Wuyunjing 21 and Liangyoupeijiu). The results showed that high ozone concentration decreased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and transpiration rate (Tr) of rice leaves. After 76d fumigation the decline in them for Wuyunjing 21 was as follows: 21.7%, 26.64% and 24.74% respectively, and that for Liangyoupeijiu was as follows: 25.53%, 30.31% and 25.48% respectively; however, no significant impact on leaf intercellular CO2 concentration was observed. Chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics parameters changed as can be seen by the decrease in F0 (initial fluorescence in the dark), ETR (The apparent electron transfer rate) and psiPSII (actual photochemical efficiency of PS II in the light), and the increase in NPQ (non-photochemical quenching). After 76 days of O3 treatment, the NPQ of Wuyunjing 21 and Liangyoupeijiu was enhanced by 16.37% and 11.77%, respectively. The impact of ozone on rice was a cumulative effect, and the extent of variation in the above parameters and the differences between the two varieties were enlarged as the O3 treatment time increased; At the same time because the rice leaf intercellular CO2 concentration did not significantly reduce, the inferred decrease in net photosynthetic rate was restricted by non-stomatal factors. The results of this experiment indicated that Liangyoupeijiu was more susceptible to ozone than Wuyunjing 21.

  14. BIFoR FACE: A Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility in old-growth temperate deciduous woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Rob; Thomas, Rick; Ellsworth, David; Hemming, Debbie; Crous, Kristine; Blaen, Phillip; Poynter, Alex; Blenkhorn, Daniel; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forest research (BIFoR) focuses on fundamental physical, biological, ecological, social and cultural research of direct relevance to forested landscapes worldwide. A core platform for BIFoR is a Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility, with which we study the ten-year response of a mature temperate deciduous forest ecosystem to a 150-ppmv step-change in atmospheric [CO2]. BIFoR FACE is being established in Mill Haft, a mature (~150 year-old) oak (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) coppice-with-standards woodland in central England, UK. The facility enables elevated CO2 (eCO2) treatments to be introduced in 30 m diameter rings (3 treatment plots, 3 fully-replicated control plots, and 3 unmodified ambient controls). Primary research questions focus on carbon uptake and storage, corresponding nutrient limitations, and biodiversity and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2. Here we describe the facility and experimental design, and present baseline data collected through the growing season of 2015. These data include: biophysical tree properties; atmospheric CO2/H2O fluxes; airborne and ground laser scatterometry; leaf area index; geophysical survey data; canopy phenology; soil and water chemical and physical properties; and invertebrate surveys. Data from an intensive campaign conducted during august 2015 are also shown, including in- and above- canopy characterisation of biogenic VOCs using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, aerosol loading including bioaerosols, and air quality. Further campaign results are presented from leaf level photosynthetic carbon-dioxide response curve (A/Ci) performed at different canopy heights on oak trees, and on the dominant understory species - hazel and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) across the site. BIFoR FACE is intended to be an international facility for forest science - ideas for collaborations are encouraged. Please see http

  15. Epiphytic Terrestrial Algae (Trebouxia sp.) as a Biomarker Using the Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide-Enrichment (FACE) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Asmida; Marzuki, Sarah Diyana; Mohd Yusof, Nordiana Bakti; Buyong, Faeiza; Mohd Said, Mohd Nizam; Sigh, Harinder Rai; Zulkifli, Amyrul Rafiq

    2017-01-01

    The increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has caused significant environmental changes, particularly to the lower plants such as terrestrial algae and lichens that alter species composition, and therefore can contribute to changes in community landscape. A study to understand how increased CO2 in the atmosphere will affect algal density with minimal adjustment on its natural ecosystem, and the suitability of the algae to be considered as a biomarker, has been conducted. The current work was conducted in the Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide-Enrichment (FACE) system located in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Malaysia. CO2 was injected through special valves located along the ring surrounding specimen trees where 10 × 10 cm quadrats were placed. A total of 16 quadrats were randomly placed on the bark of 16 trees located inside the FACE system. This system will allow data collection on the effect of increased CO2 without interfering or changing other parameters of the surrounding environment such as the wind speed, wind direction, humidity, and temperature. The initial density Trebouxia sp. was pre-determined on 1 March 2015, and the final density was taken slightly over a year later, on 15 March 2016. The exposure period of 380 days shed some light in understanding the effect of CO2 on these non-complex, short life cycle lower plants. The results from this research work showed that the density of algae is significantly higher after 380 days exposure to the CO2-enriched environment, at 408.5 ± 38.5 × 104 cells/cm2, compared to the control site at 176.5 ± 6.9 × 104 cells/cm2 (independent t-test, p useful data in understanding the positive effect of CO2 on algal density, in a natural environment, and suggests the use of epiphytic terrestrial algae as a biomarker. PMID:28272328

  16. Second Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Patrick Lee

    2010-01-01

    A theory of a new gravitational interaction is described. This theory follows naturally from a new Lagrangian formulation of Maxwell's theory for photons and electrons (and positrons) whose associated Euler Lagrange equations imply the conventional Maxwell equations, but which possesses new \\textbf{\\emph{bosonic}} spinor degrees of freedom that may be associated with a new type of fundamental gravitational interaction. The precise character of this gravitational interaction with a photon vector potential is explicitly defined in terms of a local U(1)-invariant Lagrangian in Eq.[\\ref{Lagrangian3}]. However in Section \\ref{ssec:Simple-Cosmolo-Model}, in order to parallel the well known Friedmann model in cosmology, a phenomenological description of the new gravitational interaction coupled to Newton-Einstein gravity that is sourced by an ideal fluid is discussed. % % To lay the foundation for a description of the new gravitational interaction our new formulation of Maxwell's theory must first be described. It i...

  17. Gravity's Rainbow

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Smolin, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Non-linear special relativity (or doubly special relativity) is a simple framework for encoding properties of flat quantum space-time. In this paper we show how this formalism may be generalized to incorporate curvature (leading to what might be called ``doubly general relativity''). We first propose a dual to non-linear realizations of relativity in momentum space, and show that for such a dual the space-time invariant is an energy-dependent metric. This leads to an energy-dependent connection and curvature, and a simple modification to Einstein's equations. We then examine solutions to these equations. We find the counterpart to the cosmological metric, and show how cosmologies based upon our theory of gravity may solve the ``horizon problem''. We discuss the Schwarzchild solution, examining the conditions for which the horizon is energy dependent. We finally find the weak field limit.

  18. Network Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lombard, John

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the construction of a new framework for probing discrete emergent geometry and boundary-boundary observables based on a fundamentally a-dimensional underlying network structure. Using a gravitationally motivated action with Forman weighted combinatorial curvatures and simplicial volumes relying on a decomposition of an abstract simplicial complex into realized embeddings of proper skeletons, we demonstrate properties such as a minimal volume-scale cutoff, the necessity of a positive-definite cosmological constant as a regulator for non-degenerate geometries, and naturally emergent simplicial structures from Metropolis network evolution simulations with no restrictions on attachment rules or regular building blocks. We see emergent properties which echo results from both the spinfoam formalism and causal dynamical triangulations in quantum gravity, and provide analytical and numerical results to support the analogy. We conclude with a summary of open questions and intent for future work in develop...

  19. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  20. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  1. CSR Gravity Field Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2014-05-01

    The joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission has successfully operated for nearly 12 years, and has provided a remarkable record of global mass flux due to a large variety of geophysical and climate processes at various spatio-temporal scales. The University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) hosts the mission PI, and is responsible for delivery of operational (presently denoted as Release-05 or RL05) gravity field data products. In addition, CSR generates and distributes a variety of other gravity field data products, including products generated from the use of satellite laser ranging data. This poster will provide an overview of all these data products, their relative quality, potential applications, and future plans for their development and delivery.

  2. The combined effect of behavioral intention and exposure to a smoke-free air law on taking measures to quit smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlestadt, Susan E; Macy, Jonathan T; Seo, Dong-Chul; Jay, Stephen J; Kolbe, Lloyd J

    2012-07-01

    Because of the large burden of disease attributable to cigarette smoking, a variety of tobacco control interventions, some focused on changing individual behavior and others focused on influencing societal norms, have been introduced. The current study tested the combined effect of behavioral intention and exposure to a comprehensive smoke-free air law as a prospective predictor of taking measures to quit smoking. Participants were 187 adults living in 7 Texas cities, 3 with a comprehensive smoke-free air law and 4 without such a law, who reported current cigarette smoking at baseline and completed a 1-month follow-up interview. Data were collected by telephone administration of a questionnaire. Results showed that, compared with smokers with low behavioral intention to take measures to quit smoking and no exposure to a comprehensive smoke-free air law, the smokers with high behavioral intention and exposure to a comprehensive law had the greatest odds of taking measures to quit smoking. This longitudinal study provides further evidence that the most successful smoking cessation campaigns will be multifaceted addressing individual factors with educational strategies designed to change beliefs and intentions and environmental factors with policy-based interventions.

  3. Lineal gravity from planar gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Achúcarro, A

    1993-01-01

    We show how to obtain the two-dimensional black hole action by dimensional reduction of the three-dimensional Einstein action with a non-zero cosmological constant. Starting from the Chern-Simons formulation of 2+1 gravity, we obtain the 1+1 dimensional gauge formulation given by Verlinde. Remarkably, the proposed reduction shares the relevant features of the formulation of Cangemi and Jackiw, without the need for a central charge in the algebra. We show how the Lagrange multipliersin these formulations appear naturally as the remnants of the three dimensional connection associated to symmetries that have been lostin the dimensional reduction. The proposed dimensional reduction involves a shift in the three dimensional connection whose effect is to make the length of the extra dimension infinite.

  4. Microclimatic performance of a free-air warming and CO2 enrichment experiment in windy Wyoming, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel LeCain

    Full Text Available In order to plan for global changing climate experiments are being conducted in many countries, but few have monitored the effects of the climate change treatments (warming, elevated CO2 on the experimental plot microclimate. During three years of an eight year study with year-round feedback-controlled infra-red heater warming (1.5/3.0°C day/night and growing season free-air CO2 enrichment (600 ppm in the mixed-grass prairie of Wyoming, USA, we monitored soil, leaf, canopy-air, above-canopy-air temperatures and relative humidity of control and treated experimental plots and evaluated ecologically important temperature differentials. Leaves were warmed somewhat less than the target settings (1.1 & 1.5°C day/night but soil was warmed more creating an average that matched the target settings extremely well both during the day and night plus the summer and winter. The site typically has about 50% bare or litter covered soil, therefore soil heat transfer is more critical than in dense canopy ecosystems. The Wyoming site commonly has strong winds (5 ms(-1 average and significant daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations (as much as 30°C daily but the warming system was nearly always able to maintain the set temperatures regardless of abiotic variation. The within canopy-air was only slightly warmed and above canopy-air was not warmed by the system, therefore convective warming was minor. Elevated CO2 had no direct effect nor interaction with the warming treatment on microclimate. Relative humidity within the plant canopy was only slightly reduced by warming. Soil water content was reduced by warming but increased by elevated CO2. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring the microclimate in manipulative field global change experiments so that critical physiological and ecological conclusions can be determined. Highly variable energy demand fluctuations showed that passive IR heater warming systems will not maintain desired warming for

  5. Influence of invasive earthworm activity on carbon dynamics in soils from the Aspen Free Air CO2 Enrichment Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T. R.; Top, S. M.; Hopkins, F. M.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of CO2-driven increase in net primary productivity on soil organic carbon accrual has received considerable emphasis in ecological literature with conclusions varying from positive, to neutral, to negative. What has been understudied is the coupled role of soil fauna, such as earthworms, in controlling the ultimate fate of new above and below ground plant carbon under elevated CO2. Such considerations are particularly relevant considering that in most northern North American forests earthworms are an exotic organism known to cause significant changes to forest floor chemistry and soil structure, possibly increasing nutrient loss from both soil and leaf litter and mixing litter and humus deep into the mineral soil. The impact of these exotic earthworms on overall soil carbon stabilization is largely unknown but likely a function of both species composition and edaphic soil properties. In this paper we present the initial results of a carbon isotope study (13C, 14C) conducted at the Aspen free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) site, Rhinelander, WI, USA to track allocation and redistribution within the soil of plant litter and root carbon (bulk and biopolymer). Along with litter and soil to 25 cm depth, earthworm populations were quantified, and their gut contents collected for isotopic and plant biopolymer chemistry analysis. Contributions of root vs. leaf input to soil and earthworm fecal matter were derived from differences in the chemical and isotope composition of alkaline CuO-derived lignin and substituted fatty acids (SFA) from cutin and suberin. Our investigation demonstrates the presence of invasive European earthworms, of both litter and surface soil dwelling (epigeic) and deep soil dwelling (endogeic) varieties, whose abundance increases under elevated CO2 conditions. Additionally, the different species show selective vertical movement of new and pre-FACE plant biopolymers indicating dynamics in root and leaf decomposition and burial (down to 30 cm

  6. Free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment of wheat: leaf flavonoid concentration throughout the growth cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estiarte, M.; Penuelas, J. [Univ. Autonoma Barcelona, Facultat de ciencies, Centre de Recerca Ecologica i Aplicacions Forestals, Bellaterra (Spain); Kimball, B.A.; Pinter, P.J. Jr.; Wall, G.W.; LaMorte, R.L.; Hunsaker, D.J. [US Water Conservation Lab., Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Hendrix, D.L. [Western Cotton Research Lab., Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    1999-06-01

    To test the predictions that plants will have a larger flavonoid concentration in a future world with a CO{sub 2}-enriched atmosphere, wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) was grown in a field experiment using FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) technology under two levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration: ambient (370 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) and enriched (550 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}), and under two levels of irrigation: well-watered (100% replacement of potential evapotranspiration) and half-watered. We also studied the effects of CO{sub 2} on the concentration of total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) and nitrogen (N), two parameters hypothesized to be linked to flavonoid metabolism. Throughout the growth cycle the concentration of isoorientin, the most abundant flavonoid, decreased by 62% (from an average of 12.5 mg g{sup -1} on day of year (DOY) 41 to an average of 4.8 mg g{sup -1} on DOY 123), whereas the concentration of tricin, another characteristic flavone, increased by two orders of magnitude (from an average of 0.007 mg g{sup -1} of isoorientin equivalents on DOY 41 to an average of 0.6 mg g{sup -1} of isoorientin equivalents on DOY 123). Although flavonoid concentration was dependent on growth stage, the effects of treatments on phenology did not invalidate the comparisons between treatments. CO{sub 2}-enriched plants had higher flavonoid concentrations (14% more isoorientin, an average of 7.0 mg g{sup -1} for ambient CO{sub 2} vs an average of 8.0 mg g{sup -1} for enriched CO{sub 2}), higher TNC concentrations and lower N concentrations in upper canopy leaves throughout the growth cycle. Well-irrigated plants had higher flavonoid concentrations (11% more isoorientin, an average of 7.1 mg g{sup -1} for half watered vs an average of 7.9 mg g{sup -1} for well-watered) throughout the growth cycle, whereas the effect of irrigation treatments on TNC and N was more variable. (au)

  7. Microclimatic performance of a free-air warming and CO2 enrichment experiment in windy Wyoming, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCain, Daniel; Smith, David; Morgan, Jack; Kimball, Bruce A; Pendall, Elise; Miglietta, Franco

    2015-01-01

    In order to plan for global changing climate experiments are being conducted in many countries, but few have monitored the effects of the climate change treatments (warming, elevated CO2) on the experimental plot microclimate. During three years of an eight year study with year-round feedback-controlled infra-red heater warming (1.5/3.0°C day/night) and growing season free-air CO2 enrichment (600 ppm) in the mixed-grass prairie of Wyoming, USA, we monitored soil, leaf, canopy-air, above-canopy-air temperatures and relative humidity of control and treated experimental plots and evaluated ecologically important temperature differentials. Leaves were warmed somewhat less than the target settings (1.1 & 1.5°C day/night) but soil was warmed more creating an average that matched the target settings extremely well both during the day and night plus the summer and winter. The site typically has about 50% bare or litter covered soil, therefore soil heat transfer is more critical than in dense canopy ecosystems. The Wyoming site commonly has strong winds (5 ms(-1) average) and significant daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations (as much as 30°C daily) but the warming system was nearly always able to maintain the set temperatures regardless of abiotic variation. The within canopy-air was only slightly warmed and above canopy-air was not warmed by the system, therefore convective warming was minor. Elevated CO2 had no direct effect nor interaction with the warming treatment on microclimate. Relative humidity within the plant canopy was only slightly reduced by warming. Soil water content was reduced by warming but increased by elevated CO2. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring the microclimate in manipulative field global change experiments so that critical physiological and ecological conclusions can be determined. Highly variable energy demand fluctuations showed that passive IR heater warming systems will not maintain desired warming for much of the

  8. Smoke-free air laws and quit attempts: Evidence for a moderating role of spontaneous self-affirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoskie, Alexander; Ferrer, Rebecca A; Taber, Jennifer M; Klein, William M P; Parascandola, Mark; Harris, Peter R

    2015-09-01

    In addition to their primary goal of protecting nonsmokers from secondhand smoke, smoke-free air laws may also encourage intentions to quit smoking, quit attempts, and cessation among smokers. However, laws may not encourage quitting if smokers feel threatened by them and react defensively. This study examined whether spontaneous self-affirmation - the extent to which people think about their values or strengths when they feel threatened - may reduce smokers' reactance to smoke-free laws, enhancing the ability of the laws to encourage quitting. We linked state-level information on the comprehensiveness of U.S. smoke-free laws (compiled in January, 2013 by the American Lung Association) with data from a U.S. health survey (Health Information National Trends Survey) collected from September-December, 2013 (N = 345 current smokers; 587 former smokers). Smoke-free laws interacted with self-affirmation to predict quit attempts in the past year and intentions to quit in the next six months: Smokers higher in self-affirmation reported more quit attempts and quit intentions if they lived in states with more comprehensive smoke-free laws. There was some evidence of a "boomerang" effect (i.e., less likelihood of making a quit attempt) among smokers low in self-affirmation if living in states with more comprehensive smoke-free laws, but this effect was significant only among smokers extremely low in self-affirmation. For quit intentions, there was no evidence for a boomerang effect of smoke-free laws even among smokers extremely low in self-affirmation. More comprehensive smoke-free laws were not associated with smoking status (former vs. current smoker) or average amount smoked per day, nor did they interact with self-affirmation to predict these outcomes. The impact of smoke-free policies on quit attempts and quit intentions may be moderated by psychological characteristics such as the tendency to spontaneously self-affirm. Follow-ups should experimentally manipulate self

  9. Rice grain yield and quality responses to free-air CO2 enrichment combined with soil and water warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Tokida, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2016-03-01

    Rising air temperatures are projected to reduce rice yield and quality, whereas increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2 ]) can increase grain yield. For irrigated rice, ponded water is an important temperature environment, but few open-field evaluations are available on the combined effects of temperature and [CO2 ], which limits our ability to predict future rice production. We conducted free-air CO2 enrichment and soil and water warming experiments, for three growing seasons to determine the yield and quality response to elevated [CO2 ] (+200 μmol mol(-1) , E-[CO2 ]) and soil and water temperatures (+2 °C, E-T). E-[CO2 ] significantly increased biomass and grain yield by approximately 14% averaged over 3 years, mainly because of increased panicle and spikelet density. E-T significantly increased biomass but had no significant effect on the grain yield. E-T decreased days from transplanting to heading by approximately 1%, but days to the maximum tiller number (MTN) stage were reduced by approximately 8%, which limited the panicle density and therefore sink capacity. On the other hand, E-[CO2 ] increased days to the MTN stage by approximately 4%, leading to a greater number of tillers. Grain appearance quality was decreased by both treatments, but E-[CO2 ] showed a much larger effect than did E-T. The significant decrease in undamaged grains (UDG) by E-[CO2 ] was mainly the result of an increased percentage of white-base grains (WBSG), which were negatively correlated with grain protein content. A significant decrease in grain protein content by E-[CO2 ] accounted in part for the increased WBSG. The dependence of WBSG on grain protein content, however, was different among years; the slope and intercept of the relationship were positively correlated with a heat dose above 26 °C. Year-to-year variation in the response of grain appearance quality demonstrated that E-[CO2 ] and rising air temperatures synergistically reduce grain appearance quality of

  10. Epiphytic Terrestrial Algae (Trebouxia sp. as a Biomarker Using the Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide-Enrichment (FACE System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmida Ismail

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has caused significant environmental changes, particularly to the lower plants such as terrestrial algae and lichens that alter species composition, and therefore can contribute to changes in community landscape. A study to understand how increased CO2 in the atmosphere will affect algal density with minimal adjustment on its natural ecosystem, and the suitability of the algae to be considered as a biomarker, has been conducted. The current work was conducted in the Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide-Enrichment (FACE system located in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Malaysia. CO2 was injected through special valves located along the ring surrounding specimen trees where 10 × 10 cm quadrats were placed. A total of 16 quadrats were randomly placed on the bark of 16 trees located inside the FACE system. This system will allow data collection on the effect of increased CO2 without interfering or changing other parameters of the surrounding environment such as the wind speed, wind direction, humidity, and temperature. The initial density Trebouxia sp. was pre-determined on 1 March 2015, and the final density was taken slightly over a year later, on 15 March 2016. The exposure period of 380 days shed some light in understanding the effect of CO2 on these non-complex, short life cycle lower plants. The results from this research work showed that the density of algae is significantly higher after 380 days exposure to the CO2-enriched environment, at 408.5 ± 38.5 × 104 cells/cm2, compared to the control site at 176.5 ± 6.9 × 104 cells/cm2 (independent t-test, p < 0.001. The distance between the trees and the injector valves is negatively correlated. Quadrats located in the center of the circular ring recorded lower algal density compared to the ones closer to the CO2 injector. Quadrat 16, which was nearing the end of the CO2 valve injector, showed an exceptionally high algal density—2-fold higher

  11. E-gravity theory

    OpenAIRE

    Linker, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A couple of quantum gravity theories were proposed to make theoretical predictions about the behavior of gravity. The most recent approach to quantum gravity, called E-theory, is proposed mathematical, but there is not formulated much about what dynamics of gravity this theory proposes. This research paper treats the main results of the application of E-theory to General relativity involving conservation laws and scattering of particles in presence of gravity. Also the low-energy limit of thi...

  12. Chicxulub impact basin: Gravity characteristics and implications for basin morphology and deep structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, Virgil L.; Burke, Kevin; Hall, Stuart A.; Lee, Scott; Marin, Luis E.; Suarez, Gerardo; Quezada-Muneton, Juan Manuel; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    1993-01-01

    The K-T-aged Chicxulub Impact Structure is buried beneath the Tertiary carbonate rocks of the Northern Yucatan Platform. Consequently its morphology and structure are poorly understood. Reprocessed Bouguer (onshore) and Free Air (offshore) gravity data over Northern Yucatan reveal that Chicxulub may be a 200-km-diameter multi-ring impact basin with at least three concentric basin rings. The positions of these rings follow the square root of 2 spacing rule derived empirically from analysis of multi-ring basins on other planets indicating that these rings probably correspond to now-buried topographic basin rings. A forward model of the gravity data along a radial transect from the southwest margin of the structure indicates that the Chicxulub gravity signature is compatible with this interpretation. We estimate the basin rim diameter to be 204 +/- 16 km and the central peak ring diameter (D) is 104 +/- 6 km.

  13. Principal facts for gravity stations in Dixie; Fairview, and Stingaree valleys, Churchill and Pershing counties, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.; Duffrin, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    During March through July 1979, gravity measurements were made at 300 stations in Dixie Valley, Nevada. In December 1981, 45 additional stations were added--7 in Dixie Valley, 23 in Fairview Valley, and 15 in Stingaree Valley. Most altitudes were determined by using altimeters or topographic maps. The gravity observations were made with a Worden temperature-controlled gravimeter with an initial scale factor of 0.0965 milliGal/scale division. Principal facts for each of the 345 stations are tabulated; they consist of latitude, longitude, altitude, observed gravity, free-air anomaly, terrain correction, and Bouguer anomaly values at a bedrock density of 2.67 grams/cu cm. (Lantz-PTT)

  14. GRAIL Gravity Observations of the Transition from Complex Crater to Peak-Ring Basin on the Moon: Implications for Crustal Structure and Impact Basin Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Bierson, Carver J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission provide the opportunity to analyze the detailed gravity and crustal structure of impact features in the morphological transition from complex craters to peak-ring basins on the Moon. We calculate average radial profiles for free-air anomalies and Bouguer anomalies for peak-ring basins, proto-basins, and the largest complex craters. Complex craters and proto-basins have free-air anomalies that are positively correlated with surface topography, unlike the prominent lunar mascons (positive free-air anomalies in areas of low elevation) associated with large basins. The Bouguer gravity anomaly profiles of complex craters are highly irregular, with central positive anomalies that are generally absent or not clearly tied to interior morphology. In contrast, gravity profiles for peak-ring basins (approx. 200 km to 580 km) are much more regular and are highly correlated with surface morphology. A central positive Bouguer anomaly is confined within the peak ring and a negative Bouguer anomaly annulus extends from the edge of the positive anomaly outward to about the rim crest. A number of degraded basins lacking interior peak rings have diameters and gravity patterns similar to those of well-preserved peak-ring basins. If these structures represent degraded peak-ring basins, the number of peak-ring basins on the Moon would increase by more than a factor of two to 34. The gravity anomalies within basins are interpreted to be due to uplift of the mantle confined within the peak ring and an annulus of thickened crust between the peak ring and rim crest. We hypothesize that mantle uplift is influenced by interaction between the transient cavity and the mantle. Further, mascon formation is generally disconnected from the number of basin rings formed and occurs over a wide range of basin sizes. These observations have important implications for models of basin and mascon formation on the

  15. GRAIL gravity observations of the transition from complex crater to peak-ring basin on the Moon: Implications for crustal structure and impact basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Bierson, Carver J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-08-01

    High-resolution gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission provide the opportunity to analyze the detailed gravity and crustal structure of impact features in the morphological transition from complex craters to peak-ring basins on the Moon. We calculate average radial profiles of free-air anomalies and Bouguer anomalies for peak-ring basins, protobasins, and the largest complex craters. Complex craters and protobasins have free-air anomalies that are positively correlated with surface topography, unlike the prominent lunar mascons (positive free-air anomalies in areas of low elevation) associated with large basins. The Bouguer gravity anomaly profiles of complex craters are highly irregular, with central positive anomalies that are generally absent or not clearly tied to interior morphology. In contrast, gravity profiles for peak-ring basins (∼200 km to 580 km) are much more regular and are highly correlated with surface morphology. A central positive Bouguer anomaly is confined within the peak ring and a negative Bouguer anomaly annulus extends from the edge of the positive anomaly outward to about the rim crest. A number of degraded basins lacking interior peak rings have diameters and gravity patterns similar to those of well-preserved peak-ring basins. If these structures represent degraded peak-ring basins, the number of peak-ring basins on the Moon would increase by more than a factor of two to 34. The gravity anomalies within basins are interpreted to be due to uplift of the mantle confined within the peak ring and an annulus of thickened crust between the peak ring and rim crest. We hypothesize that mantle uplift is influenced by interaction between the transient cavity and the mantle. Further, mascon formation is generally disconnected from the number of basin rings formed and occurs over a wide range of basin sizes. These observations have important implications for models of basin and mascon formation on the Moon

  16. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...

  17. Future missions for observing Earth's changing gravity field: a closed-loop simulation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    The GRACE mission has successfully demonstrated the observation from space of the changing Earth's gravity field at length and time scales of typically 1000 km and 10-30 days, respectively. Many scientific communities strongly advertise the need for continuity of observing Earth's gravity field from space. Moreover, a strong interest is being expressed to have gravity missions that allow a more detailed sampling of the Earth's gravity field both in time and in space. Designing a gravity field mission for the future is a complicated process that involves making many trade-offs, such as trade-offs between spatial, temporal resolution and financial budget. Moreover, it involves the optimization of many parameters, such as orbital parameters (height, inclination), distinction between which gravity sources to observe or correct for (for example are gravity changes due to ocean currents a nuisance or a signal to be retrieved?), observation techniques (low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, satellite gravity gradiometry, accelerometers), and satellite control systems (drag-free?). A comprehensive tool has been developed and implemented that allows the closed-loop simulation of gravity field retrievals for different satellite mission scenarios. This paper provides a description of this tool. Moreover, its capabilities are demonstrated by a few case studies. Acknowledgments. The research that is being done with the closed-loop simulation tool is partially funded by the European Space Agency (ESA). An important component of the tool is the GEODYN software, kindly provided by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  18. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a five-year period of measurements (2008–2012 showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI (about 45% that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data (about 30% that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological

  19. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a 5-year period of measurements (2008–2012 showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological studies of stratospheric

  20. High-Resolution Gravity and Time-Varying Gravity Field Recovery using GRACE and CHAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work conducted under NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards Program 1998 (SENH98) entitled High Resolution Gravity and Time Varying Gravity Field Recovery Using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Package for Geophysical Research and Applications), which included a no-cost extension time period. The investigation has conducted pilot studies to use the simulated GRACE and CHAMP data and other in situ and space geodetic observable, satellite altimeter data, and ocean mass variation data to study the dynamic processes of the Earth which affect climate change. Results from this investigation include: (1) a new method to use the energy approach for expressing gravity mission data as in situ measurements with the possibility to enhance the spatial resolution of the gravity signal; (2) the method was tested using CHAMP and validated with the development of a mean gravity field model using CHAMP data, (3) elaborate simulation to quantify errors of tides and atmosphere and to recover hydrological and oceanic signals using GRACE, results show that there are significant aliasing effect and errors being amplified in the GRACE resonant geopotential and it is not trivial to remove these errors, and (4) quantification of oceanic and ice sheet mass changes in a geophysical constraint study to assess their contributions to global sea level change, while the results improved significant over the use of previous studies using only the SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging)-determined zonal gravity change data, the constraint could be further improved with additional information on mantle rheology, PGR (Post-Glacial Rebound) and ice loading history. A list of relevant presentations and publications is attached, along with a summary of the SENH investigation generated in 2000.

  1. Cosmological Hints of Modified Gravity ?

    CERN Document Server

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The recent measurements of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies made by the Planck satellite have provided impressive confirmation of the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. However interesting hints of slight deviations from $\\Lambda$CDM have been found, including a $95 \\%$ c.l. preference for a "modified gravity" structure formation scenario. In this paper we confirm the preference for a modified gravity scenario from Planck 2015 data, find that modified gravity solves the so-called $A_{lens}$ anomaly in the CMB angular spectrum, and constrains the amplitude of matter density fluctuations to $\\sigma_8=0.815_{-0.048}^{+0.032}$, in better agreement with weak lensing constraints. Moreover, we find a lower value for the reionization optical depth of $\\tau=0.059\\pm0.020$ (to be compared with the value of $\\tau= 0.079 \\pm 0.017$ obtained in the standard scenario), more consistent with recent optical and UV data. We check the stability of this result by considering possible degeneraci...

  2. Revised estimation of 550-km times 550-km mean gravity anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation of 550-km x 550-km mean gravity anomalies from 1 degree x 1 degree mean free-air gravimetry data is discussed. The block estimate procedure developed by Kaula is used to obtain 1,504 of the 1,654 possible mean block anomalies. The estimated block anomalies calculated from 1 deg x 1 deg mean anomalies referred to the reference ellipsoid and from 1 degree x 1 degree mean anomalies referred to a 24th-degree-and-order field are compared.

  3. Upward continuation of Dome-C airborne gravity and comparison with GOCE gradients at orbit altitude in east Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2017-01-01

    An airborne gravity campaign was carried out at the Dome-C survey area in East Antarctica between the 17th and 22nd of January 2013, in order to provide data for an experiment to validate GOCE satellite gravity gradients. After typical filtering for airborne gravity data, the cross-over error...

  4. Effects of Free-air CO2 Enrichment on Root Characteristics and C:N Ratio of Rice at the Heading Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gai-ping; CHENG Lei; ZHU Jian-guo; PANG Jing; XIE Zu-bin; ZENG Qing

    2006-01-01

    A hydroponics experiment was conducted to investigate the rice root growth in FACE (free-air carbon dioxide enrichment). The root biomass, root volume, ratio of root/shoot, number of adventitious roots and root diameter significantly increased under FACE conditions, while the CO2 enrichment decreased the N concentration in rice roots without any change in the C content, leading to an increase in root C:N ratio, Moreover, the elevated CO2 resulted in a remarkable decrease of root activity,expressed as per unit root dry weight, which might be responsible for decreased N concentration in roots.

  5. Urine specific gravity test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  6. Idaho State Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (24,284 records) were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey. This data base was received on February 23, 1993. Principal gravity...

  7. Northern Oklahoma Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (710 records) were compiled by Professor Ahern. This data base was received in June 1992. Principal gravity parameters include latitude,...

  8. Andes 1997 Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Andes gravity data (6,151 records) were compiled by Professor Gotze and the MIGRA Group. This data base was received in April, 1997. Principal gravity...

  9. DNAG Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) gravity grid values, spaced at 6 km, were used to produce the Gravity Anomaly Map of North America (1987; scale...

  10. Cadiz, California Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (32 records) were gathered by Mr. Seth I. Gutman for AridTech Inc., Denver, Colorado using a Worden Prospector gravity meter. This data base...

  11. Classical Weyl Transverse Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally-invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields,...

  12. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  13. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  14. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  15. Halo Scale Predictions of Symmetron Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clampitt, Joseph; Khoury, Justin

    2011-01-01

    We offer predictions of symmetron modified gravity in the neighborhood of realistic dark matter halos. The predictions for the fifth force are obtained by solving the nonlinear symmetron equation of motion in the spherical NFW approximation. In addition, we compare the three major known screening mechanisms: Vainshtein, Chameleon, and Symmetron around such dark matter sources, emphasizing the significant differences between them and highlighting observational tests which exploit these differences. Finally, we demonstrate the host halo environmental screening effect ("blanket screening") on smaller satellite halos by solving for the modified forces around a density profile which is the sum of satellite and approximate host components.

  16. Covariant w∞ gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Pope, C.N.; Stelle, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the notion of higher-spin covariance in w∞ gravity. We show how a recently proposed covariant w∞ gravity action can be obtained from non-chiral w∞ gravity by making field redefinitions that introduce new gauge-field components with corresponding new gauge transformations.

  17. Linking Oceanic Tsunamis and Geodetic Gravity Changes of Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuning; Song, Y. Tony; Gross, Richard S.

    2017-08-01

    Large earthquakes at subduction zones usually generate tsunamis and coseismic gravity changes. These two independent oceanic and geodetic signatures of earthquakes can be observed individually by modern geophysical observational networks. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment twin satellites can detect gravity changes induced by large earthquakes, while altimetry satellites and Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis buoys can observe resultant tsunamis. In this study, we introduce a method to connect the oceanic tsunami measurements with the geodetic gravity observations, and apply it to the 2004 Sumatra Mw 9.2 earthquake, the 2010 Maule Mw 8.8 earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.0 earthquake. Our results indicate consistent agreement between these two independent measurements. Since seafloor displacement is still the largest puzzle in assessing tsunami hazards and its formation mechanism, our study demonstrates a new approach to utilizing these two kinds of measurements for better understanding of large earthquakes and tsunamis.

  18. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, microscopically visible granules that cluster around centrosomes. These structures, which contain numerous proteins directly involved in centrosome maintenance, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis, have traditionally been viewed as vehicles for protein trafficking...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  19. Satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  20. Globally covering a-priori regional gravity covariance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arabelos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity anomaly data generated using Wenzel’s GPM98A model complete to degree 1800, from which OSU91A has been subtracted, have been used to estimate covariance functions for a set of globally covering equal-area blocks of size 22.5° × 22.5° at Equator, having a 2.5° overlap. For each block an analytic covariance function model was determined. The models are based on 4 parameters: the depth to the Bjerhammar sphere (determines correlation, the free-air gravity anomaly variance, a scale factor of the OSU91A error degree-variances and a maximal summation index, N, of the error degree-variances. The depth of Bjerhammar-sphere varies from -134km to nearly zero, N varies from 360 to 40, the scale factor from 0.03 to 38.0 and the gravity variance from 1081 to 24(10µms-22. The parameters are interpreted in terms of the quality of the data used to construct OSU91A and GPM98A and general conditions such as the occurrence of mountain chains. The variation of the parameters show that it is necessary to use regional covariance models in order to obtain a realistic signal to noise ratio in global applications.Key words. GOCE mission, Covariance function, Spacewise approach`

  1. Seasonal differences and within-canopy variations of antioxidants in mature spruce (Picea abies) trees under elevated ozone in a free-air exposure system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Nora; Alexou, Maria [Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Heerdt, Christian [Bioclimatology and Air Pollution Research, Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Science Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Loew, Markus [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Werner, Herbert [Bioclimatology and Air Pollution Research, Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Science Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, Rainer [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Rennenberg, Heinz [Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Haberer, Kristine [Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: kristine.haberer@biologie.uni-freiburg.de

    2008-07-15

    The effect of free-air ozone fumigation and crown position on antioxidants were determined in old-growth spruce (Picea abies) trees in the seasonal course of two consecutive years (2003 and 2004). Levels of total ascorbate and its redox state in the apoplastic washing fluid (AWF) were increased under double ambient ozone concentrations (2 x O{sub 3}), whilst ascorbate concentrations in needle extracts were unchanged. Concentrations of apoplastic and symplastic ascorbate were significantly higher in 2003 compared to 2004 indicating a combined effect of the drought conditions in 2003 with enhanced ozone exposure. Elevated ozone had only weak effects on total glutathione levels in needle extracts, phloem exudates and xylem saps. Total and oxidised glutathione concentrations were higher in 2004 compared to 2003 and seemed to be more affected by enhanced ozone influx in the more humid year 2004 compared to the combined effect of elevated ozone and drought in 2003 as observed for ascorbate. - Antioxidant defence in sun and shade needles of Picea abies under free-air ozone fumigation in the seasonal course of two consecutive years.

  2. Quantization of Emergent Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as spacetime admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic spacetime becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC spacetime, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely new quantization scheme where quantum gravity is defined by quantizing spacetime itself, leading to a dynamical NC spacetime. Therefore the quantization of emergent gravity is radically different from the conventional approach trying to quantize a phase space of metric fields. This approach for quantum gravity allows a background independent formulation where spacetime as well as matter fields is equally emergent from a universal vacuum of quantum gravity.

  3. Quantization of emergent gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2015-02-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as space-time admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic space-time becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC space-time, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely new quantization scheme where quantum gravity is defined by quantizing space-time itself, leading to a dynamical NC space-time. Therefore the quantization of emergent gravity is radically different from the conventional approach trying to quantize a phase space of metric fields. This approach for quantum gravity allows a background-independent formulation where space-time and matter fields are equally emergent from a universal vacuum of quantum gravity.

  4. CHAMP gravity field recovery using the energy balance approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Gerlach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early days of satellite geodesy energy balance based methods for gravity field determination have been considered. If non-conservative forces are known the Hamiltonian along the orbit is a constant of the motion. Thus the gravity field can be determined if position and velocity of the satellite are known and accelerometer measurements are available to model the non-conservative part. CHAMP is the first satellite that provides the user with those three kinds of data nearly continuously. Numerical investigations using real CHAMP data are presented to show the feasibility of the method. Using a semi-analytical approach the gravity field can be determined efficiently by a 2D-Fourier method. Those fast computations also give way to application of the method not only to a full gravity field recovery but also, e.g. for quick-look and validation of SST observations for satellite missions like CHAMP, GRACE or GOCE. The method can also be used for estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters.Key words. gravity field, energy balance, Jacobi-integral, non-conservative forces, accelerometer calibration, CHAMP

  5. Multi-scale gravity field modeling in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The Earth constantly deforms as it undergoes dynamic phenomena, such as earthquakes, post-glacial rebound and water displacement in its fluid envelopes. These processes have different spatial and temporal scales and are accompanied by mass displacements, which create temporal variations of the gravity field. Since 2002, the GRACE satellite missions provide an unprecedented view of the gravity field spatial and temporal variations. Gravity models built from these satellite data are essential to study the Earth's dynamic processes (Tapley et al., 2004). Up to present, time variations of the gravity field are often modelled using spatial spherical harmonics functions averaged over a fixed period, as 10 days or 1 month. This approach is well suited for modeling global phenomena. To better estimate gravity related to local and/or transient processes, such as earthquakes or floods, and adapt the temporal resolution of the model to its spatial resolution, we propose to model the gravity field using localized functions in space and time. For that, we build a model of the gravity field in space and time with a four-dimensional wavelet basis, well localized in space and time. First we design the 4D basis, then, we study the inverse problem to model the gravity field from the potential differences between the twin GRACE satellites, and its regularization using prior knowledge on the water cycle. Our demonstration of surface water mass signals decomposition in time and space is based on the use of synthetic along-track gravitational potential data. We test the developed approach on one year of 4D gravity modeling and compare the reconstructed water heights to those of the input hydrological model. Perspectives of this work is to apply the approach on real GRACE data, addressing the challenge of a realistic noise, to better describe and understand physical processus with high temporal resolution/low spatial resolution or the contrary.

  6. Precise Relative Orbit Determination of Twin GRACE Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qile; HU Zhigang; GUO Jing; LI Min; GE Maorong

    2010-01-01

    When formation flying spacecrafts are used as platform to gain earth oriented observation, precise baselines between these spacecrafts are always essential. Gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) mission is aimed at mapping the global gravity field and its variation. Accurate baseline of GRACE satellites is necessary for the gravity field modeling. The determination of kinematic and reduced dynamic relative orbits of twin satellites has been studied in this paper, and an accuracy of 2 mm for dynamic relative orbits and 5 mm for kinematic ones can be obtained, whereby most of the double difference onboard GPS ambiguities are resolved.

  7. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  8. Retrieving hydrological signals from current and future gravity field missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, Roland; Horvath, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System is formed by three pillars: Changes in Earth's shape, gravity field and rotation. Dedicated satellite missions are crucial in the determination and monitoring of the Earth's gravity field. Monitoring the gravity field and studying mass transport phenomena, responsible for the temporal variability of the gravity field, are of high interest. Especially the hydrology is of importance since the mechanisms of water redistribution and unexpected events like floods and droughts can have significant socio-economic impact. The presented study investigates in the possibilities and limits of current space geodetic missions like GRACE to observe such effects. The main target of the study is to determine the potential gain in accuracy as well as spatial and temporal resolution of target signals like hydrological events, whilst operating future mission scenarios. The results from a series of comprehensive simulation runs are presented to demonstrate the benefits to society operating dedicated future space geodetic gravity field missions.

  9. Cocos plate gravity lineaments due to thermal contraction cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-09-01

    Gravity lineaments, narrow strips of stronger gravity, were first observed on the ocean floor in the south central Pacific several decades ago, but scientists still debate their origin. Because the south central Pacific gravity lineaments align with the tectonic plate motion, some scientists have suggested that they were created through small-scale convection cells below the lithosphere that become elongated as the plate moved. Other proposed explanations have included flow of low-viscosity material along the base of the the lithosphere and cracking of the lithosphere due to thermal contraction. Newly recognized gravity lineaments on the Cocos plate, which lies beneath the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Central America, could help scientists figure out how such lineaments form. Cormier et al. identified the lineaments using satellite altimetry data. They used gravity, bathymetric, and magnetic data to investigate the physical characteristics of the lineaments and how they changed over time. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, doi:10.1029/2011GC003573, 2011)

  10. Development of a network RTK positioning and gravity-surveying application with gravity correction using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsoo; Lee, Youngcheol; Cha, Sungyeoul; Choi, Chuluong; Lee, Seongkyu

    2013-07-12

    This paper proposes a smartphone-based network real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning and gravity-surveying application (app) that allows semi-real-time measurements using the built-in Bluetooth features of the smartphone and a third-generation or long-term evolution wireless device. The app was implemented on a single smartphone by integrating a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) controller, a laptop, and a field-note writing tool. The observation devices (i.e., a GNSS receiver and relative gravimeter) functioned independently of this system. The app included a gravity module, which converted the measured relative gravity reading into an absolute gravity value according to tides; meter height; instrument drift correction; and network adjustments. The semi-real-time features of this app allowed data to be shared easily with other researchers. Moreover, the proposed smartphone-based gravity-survey app was easily adaptable to various locations and rough terrain due to its compact size.

  11. Diagnostic value of abdominal free air detection on a plain chest radiograph in the early postoperative period: a prospective study in 648 consecutive patients who have undergone abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Marco; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Maietta, Paola; Sosa Fernandez, Loredana Maria; Musella, Mario; Iaccarino, Vittorio; Buccelli, Claudio; Nappi, Carmine; Milone, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the predictive value of free air (on a plain radiograph) for bowel perforation in a large prospective cohort of surgical patients. All consecutive patients undergoing abdominal surgery between January 2011 and June 2012 were screened for this study. We performed an upright chest radiograph on the second and third postoperative day. Thereafter, additional radiographic evaluations were performed every 2 days until the disappearance of abdominal free air. Of the 648 subjects enrolled in our study, free abdominal air was found in 65 subjects on the first radiographic evaluation (2 days after surgery), 51 on the second (3 days after surgery), three on the third (5 days after surgery), and none on the fourth (7 days after surgery). The presence of free abdominal air was associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal perforation. The presence of free air was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 21.54 (95% CI 9.66-48.01, pSensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 70, 93, 33, and 98%, respectively, at 2 days after surgery, and similar results were confirmed at 3 days after surgery. We believe that the presence of free air at 3 days after surgery should not be considered a common finding. Here, we demonstrate that the detection of free air has a remarkable predictive value for gastrointestinal perforation, which has been overestimated in previous experience.

  12. Calculating the Marine Gravity Anomaly of the South China Sea based on the Inverse Stokes Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Jiang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Shanwei; Zheng, Lei; Zang, Jinxia; Zhang, Xuehua; Liu, Longfei

    2016-11-01

    Marine gravity field information has a great significance for the resource, environment and military affairs. As a new way to get marine gravity data, the satellite altimetry technique makes up for what ship measuring means lack. The paper carries out the researches on how altimeter data applied for calculating marine gravity anomaly based on inverse Stokes formula. In the article, the editing of 14-track Jason-1 data over South China Sea for 7 years is for collinear processing and cross-point adjustment. The inverse Stokes formula and fast Flourier transform technique are applied to calculate marine gravity anomaly of the region (0°∼23°N, 103°∼120°E), and to draw gravity anomaly map. Compared with the gravity anomaly by ship observation, RMS is 12.6mGal, and single altimetry satellite has a good precision.

  13. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  14. Demonstrating Martian Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pirkola, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The surface gravity on Mars is smaller than the surface gravity on Earth, resulting in longer falling times. This effect can be simulated on Earth by taking advantage of air resistance and buoyancy, which cause low density objects to fall slowly enough to approximate objects falling on the surface of Mars. We describe a computer simulation based on an experiment that approximates Martian gravity, and verify our numerical results by performing the experiment.

  15. Is Gravity Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjia Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available If we assume that the source of thermodynamic system, ρ and p, are also the source of gravity, then either thermal quantities, such as entropy, temperature, and chemical potential, can induce gravitational effects, or gravity can induce thermal effects. We find that gravity can be seen as entropic force only for systems with constant temperature and zero chemical potential. The case for Newtonian approximation is discussed.

  16. Combinatorial Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2016-01-01

    In a recently developed approach, geometry is modelled as an emergent property of random networks. Here I show that one of these models I proposed is exactly quantum gravity defined in terms of the combinatorial Ricci curvature recently derived by Ollivier. Geometry in the weak (classical) gravity regime arises in a phase transition driven by the condensation of short graph cycles. The strong (quantum) gravity regime corresponds to "small world" random graphs with logarithmic distance scaling.

  17. Anomalies and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W

    2006-01-01

    Anomalies in Yang-Mills type gauge theories of gravity are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the relation between the Dirac spin, the axial current j_5 and the non-covariant gauge spin C. Using diagrammatic techniques, we show that only generalizations of the U(1)- Pontrjagin four--form F^ F= dC arise in the chiral anomaly, even when coupled to gravity. Implications for Ashtekar's canonical approach to quantum gravity are discussed.

  18. Can a Gravitational Lens Magnify Gravity? A Possible Solar System Test

    CERN Document Server

    Nemiroff, R J

    2005-01-01

    Can a gravitational lens magnify gravity? Leading theories of gravity likely indicate "no", but the possibility might be testable by using our Sun as a gravitational lens and carefully aligning a satellite past the minimum transparent focal distance of about 25 AU. Here the magnitude of a maximal effect is estimated and found potentially observable.

  19. Electric field variations measured continuously in free air over a conductive thin zone in the tilted Lias-epsilon black shales near Osnabrück, Northwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurk, M.; Bosch, F. P.; Tougiannidis, N.

    2013-04-01

    Common studies on the static electric field distribution over a conductivity anomaly use the self-potential method. However, this method is time consuming and requires nonpolarizable electrodes to be placed in the ground. Moreover, the information gained by this method is restricted to the horizontal variations of the electric field. To overcome the limitation in the self-potential technique, we conducted a field experiment using a non conventional technique to assess the static electric field over a conductivity anomaly. We use two metallic potential probes arranged on an insulated boom with a separation of 126 cm. When placed into the electric field of the free air, a surface charge will be induced on each probe trying to equalize with the potential of the surrounding atmosphere. The use of a plasma source at both probes facilitated continuous and quicker measurement of the electric field in the air. The present study shows first experimental measurements with a modified potential probe technique (MPP) along a 600-meter-long transect to demonstrate the general feasibility of this method for studying the static electric field distribution over shallow conductivity anomalies. Field measurements were carried out on a test site on top of the Bramsche Massif near Osnabrück (Northwest Germany) to benefit from a variety of available near surface data over an almost vertical conductivity anomaly. High resolution self-potential data served in a numerical analysis to estimate the expected individual components of the electric field vector. During the experiment we found more anomalies in the vertical and horizontal components of the electric field than self-potential anomalies. These contrasting findings are successfully cross-validated with conventional near surface geophysical methods. Among these methods, we used self-potential, radiomagnetotelluric, electric resistivity tomography and induced polarization data to derive 2D conductivity models of the subsurface in

  20. Has the impact of rising CO2 on plants been exaggerated by meta-analysis of free air CO2 enrichment studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Haworth

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analysis is extensively used to synthesise the results of free air CO2 enrichment (FACE studies to produce an average effect size, which is then used to model likely plant response to rising [CO2]. The efficacy of meta-analysis is reliant upon the use of data that characterises the range of responses to a given factor. Previous meta-analyses of the effect of FACE on plants have not incorporated the potential impact of reporting bias in skewing data. By replicating the methodology of these meta-analytic studies, we demonstrate that meta-analysis of FACE has likely exaggerated the effect size of elevated [CO2] on plants by 20 to 40%; having significant implications for predictions of food security and vegetation response to climate change. Incorporation of the impact of reporting bias did not affect the significance or the direction of the [CO2] effect.

  1. Carbon and Binder-Free Air Electrodes Composed of Co3O 4 Nanofibers for Li-Air Batteries with Enhanced Cyclic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Kyu; Park, Yong Joon

    2015-12-01

    In this study, to fabricate a carbon free (C-free) air electrode, Co3O4 nanofibers were grown directly on a Ni mesh to obtain Co3O4 with a high surface area and good contact with the current collector (the Ni mesh). In Li-air cells, any C present in the air electrode promotes unwanted side reactions. Therefore, the air electrode composed of only Co3O4 nanofibers (i.e., C-free) was expected to suppress these side reactions, such as the decomposition of the electrolyte and formation of Li2CO3, which would in turn enhance the cyclic performance of the cell. As predicted, the Co3O4-nanofiber electrode successfully reduced the accumulation of reaction products during cycling, which was achieved through the suppression of unwanted side reactions. In addition, the cyclic performance of the Li-air cell was superior to that of a standard electrode composed of carbonaceous material.

  2. Has the Impact of Rising CO2 on Plants been Exaggerated by Meta-Analysis of Free Air CO2 Enrichment Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Matthew; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Killi, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis is extensively used to synthesize the results of free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) studies to produce an average effect size, which is then used to model likely plant response to rising [CO2]. The efficacy of meta-analysis is reliant upon the use of data that characterizes the range of responses to a given factor. Previous meta-analyses of the effect of FACE on plants have not incorporated the potential impact of reporting bias in skewing data. By replicating the methodology of these meta-analytic studies, we demonstrate that meta-analysis of FACE has likely exaggerated the effect size of elevated [CO2] on plants by 20 to 40%; having significant implications for predictions of food security and vegetation response to climate change. Incorporation of the impact of reporting bias did not affect the significance or the direction of the [CO2] effect.

  3. Gravity Independent Compressor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and demonstrate a small, gravity independent, vapor compression refrigeration system using a linear motor compressor which effectively...

  4. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Ichiro [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a ''fake'' symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions. (orig.)

  5. influence of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Mukherjee

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Based upon Biot's [1965] theory of initial stresses of hydrostatic nature produced by the effect of gravity, a study is made of surface waves in higher order visco-elastic media under the influence of gravity. The equation for the wave velocity of Stonely waves in the presence of viscous and gravitational effects is obtained. This is followed by particular cases of surface waves including Rayleigh waves and Love waves in the presence of viscous and gravity effects. In all cases the wave-velocity equations are found to be in perfect agreement with the corresponding classical results when the effects of gravity and viscosity are neglected.

  6. Wave Propagation in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Jan Ø; Mota, David F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the non-linear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within General Relativity such approximation is good and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and non-linearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated to the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that t...

  7. 湍流空气自由射流引射特性的比较研究%Comparison of Entrainment Characteristics of Turbulent Free Air Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩东升; 王海兴; 陈熙

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, four different turbulence models in commercial CFD software were used to compare the entrainment characteristics of turbulent free air jet and the predicted results from these four different turbulence models were compared to experimental results reported in the literature. It shows that the entrained mass flow rates of the turbulent free jet obtained by standard K -ε turbulence model were close to the reported experimental results. This paper also conducted some preliminary modelling with K-ε turbulence model on the entrainment characteristics of under-expanded supersonic turbulent free air jet.%对商用CFD软件中的四种湍流模型给出的湍流空气自由射流引射特性计算结果进行了比较,并将采用四种湍流模型计算获得的射流引射量计算数据与文献报道的采用多孔壁技术获得的射流引射量实验数据进行了对比,结果表明:在四种湍流模型中,标准K—ε湍流模型给出的湍流空气自由射流引射规律与实验数据较好符合。本文还选用标准K—ε湍流模型对欠膨胀超声速湍流空气自由射流的引射特性进行了初步的探索研究。

  8. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  9. Satellite (Natural)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  10. 嫦娥三号姿轨控过程中GRAIL重力场模型的应用%Application of GRAIL Lunar Gravity Field Model in Attitude and Orbit Control for CE-3 Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段建锋; 张宇; 陈明; 曹建峰; 王健

    2014-01-01

    嫦娥三号(CE-3)利用发动机力偶模式下喷气进行姿态控制,这对轨道的影响具有累积效应.GRAIL (Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory,重力恢复与内部实验室)月球重力场模型是美国国家航空航天局进行GRAIL探月计划的科学成果.为与LP(Lunar Prospector,月球勘探者)等月球重力场模型的定轨精度进行比较,利用重叠弧段法,分别选取CE-3环月段100 km×100 km圆轨道及100 km×15 km椭圆轨道各约1d的重叠弧段,使用LP重力场模型及GRAIL重力场模型进行定轨分析,比较重叠弧段精度.结果表明:使用GRAIL重力场模型可以明显降低定轨测距残差RMS(Root Mean Square,均方根)值,同时可以使重叠弧段精度提高1个量级.

  11. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  12. Superconducting gravity gradiometer and a test of inverse square law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M. V.; Paik, Ho Jung

    1989-01-01

    The equivalence principle prohibits the distinction of gravity from acceleration by a local measurement. However, by making a differential measurement of acceleration over a baseline, platform accelerations can be cancelled and gravity gradients detected. In an in-line superconducting gravity gradiometer, this differencing is accomplished with two spring-mass accelerometers in which the proof masses are confined to motion in a single degree of freedom and are coupled together by superconducting circuits. Platform motions appear as common mode accelerations and are cancelled by adjusting the ratio of two persistent currents in the sensing circuit. The sensing circuit is connected to a commercial SQUID amplifier to sense changes in the persistent currents generated by differential accelerations, i.e., gravity gradients. A three-axis gravity gradiometer is formed by mounting six accelerometers on the faces of a precision cube, with the accelerometers on opposite faces of the cube forming one of three in-line gradiometers. A dedicated satellite mission for mapping the earth's gravity field is an important one. Additional scientific goals are a test of the inverse square law to a part in 10(exp 10) at 100 km, and a test of the Lense-Thirring effect by detecting the relativistic gravity magnetic terms in the gravity gradient tensor for the earth.

  13. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  14. Hybrid theory of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Nahomi; Maki, Takuya; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a model of gravity in which a General Relativity metric tensor and an effective metric generated from a single scalar formulated in geometric scalar gravity are mixed. We show that the model yields the exact Schwarzschild solution, along with accelerating behavior of scale factors in cosmological solutions.

  15. No consistent bimetric gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Waldron, A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for a consistent, nonlinear, partially massless (PM), gauge symmetry of bimetric gravity (BMG). Just as for single metric massive gravity, ultimate consistency of both BMG and the putative PM BMG theory relies crucially on this gauge symmetry. We argue, however, that it does not exist.

  16. Self-Dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Self-dual gravity is a diffeomorphism invariant theory in four dimensions that describes two propagating polarisations of the graviton and has a negative mass dimension coupling constant. Nevertheless, this theory is not only renormalisable but quantum finite, as we explain. We also collect various facts about self-dual gravity that are scattered across the literature.

  17. Gravity Driven Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Flowing global gravitation initially produced space without time or mass. Space-time and mass are properties of flowing global gravitation. From its fabric, primal mass spins spontaneously giving rise to local gravitational space-time curvatures. Global gravity is the unifying background field. Gravity began flowing from its singularity with a big whoosh. It curves with angular rotational precession, creating a spatial geometry similar to the windings of a ball of string. Three-dimensional global gravity swirls locally into massive densities. Concurrently with these densities, local gravity curvatures of space-time arise. The expanse between celestial objects is not completely empty, void space as generally believed; it is antecedent gravity, a prerequisite associated field necessary for originating the first quantum particles. Gravity is dark energy; gravity's spin, as the second fundamental force, is electromagnetic dark matter. Electromagnetic masses attract then gravity compresses hot, dense and small---then bang, the first hydrogen star of which there are many. There may have been many big bangs, but no Big Bang that ultimately created the universe.

  18. Measured and modelled absolute gravity changes in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Emil; Forsberg, René; Strykowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In glaciated areas, the Earth is responding to the ongoing changes of the ice sheets, a response knownas glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). GIA can be investigated through observations of gravity change.For the ongoing assessment of the ice sheets mass balance, where satellite data are used, the...

  19. Autonomous Orbit Determination via Kalman Filtering of Gravity Gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiucong; Macabiau, Christophe; Han, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Spaceborne gravity gradients are proposed in this paper to provide autonomous orbit determination capabilities for near Earth satellites. The gravity gradients contain useful position information which can be extracted by matching the observations with a precise gravity model. The extended Kalman filter is investigated as the principal estimator. The stochastic model of orbital motion, the measurement equation and the model configuration are discussed for the filter design. An augmented state filter is also developed to deal with unknown significant measurement biases. Simulations are conducted to analyze the effects of initial errors, data-sampling periods, orbital heights, attitude and gradiometer noise levels, and measurement biases. Results show that the filter performs well with additive white noise observation errors. Degraded observability for the along-track position is found for the augmented state filter. Real flight data from the GOCE satellite are used to test the algorithm. Radial and cross-track...

  20. Measuring the Change in Water Table with Gravity Methods - a Controlled Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, S; Christiansen, Lars; Andersen, O. B.;

    2009-01-01

    Gravity changes linearly with the change in soil water content. With the GRACE satellite mission the interest for ground-based gravity methods in hydrology has gained new attention. Time-lapse gravity data have the potential to constrain hydrological model parameters in a calibration scheme...... in water content, a controlled experiment was set up in 30 m by 20 m basin. The water table was lowered 0.69 m within 1½ hours and the corresponding gravity signal measured using two different approaches: a time series measurements at one location and a gravity network measurement including four points....... Both where in agreement with the calculated maximum theoretical gravity change of 27*10^-8 m/s^2. Uncertainties on the change in gravity in the network measurements where 4*10^-8 m/s^2 (one standard deviation). This corresponds to an infinite horizontal slab of water with a thickness of 0.1 m. The time...

  1. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  2. Gradients from GOCE reveal gravity changes before Pisagua Mw=8.2 and Iquique Mw=7.7 large megathrust earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, O; Nacif, S.; S. Spagnotto; A. Folguera; Gimenez, M.; Chlieh, Mohamed; C. Braitenberg

    2015-01-01

    Considerable improvements in the measurement of the Earth gravity field from GOCE satellite mission have provided global gravity field models with homogeneous coverage, high precision and good spatial resolution. In particular, the vertical gravity gradient (Tzz), in comparison to the classic Bouguer anomaly, defines more accurately superficial mass heterogeneities. Moreover, the correction of these satellite-derived data from the effect of Earth topographic masses by means of new techniques ...

  3. Nonlocal Gravity and Structure in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Park, Sohyun [Penn State U., University Park, IGC

    2014-08-26

    The observed acceleration of the Universe can be explained by modifying general relativity. One such attempt is the nonlocal model of Deser and Woodard. Here we fix the background cosmology using results from the Planck satellite and examine the predictions of nonlocal gravity for the evolution of structure in the universe, confronting the model with three tests: gravitational lensing, redshift space distortions, and the estimator of gravity $E_G$. Current data favor general relativity (GR) over nonlocal gravity: fixing primordial cosmology with the best fit parameters from Planck leads to weak lensing results favoring GR by 5.9 sigma; redshift space distortions measurements of the growth rate preferring GR by 7.8 sigma; and the single measurement of $E_G$ favoring GR, but by less than 1-sigma. The significance holds up even after the parameters are allowed to vary within Planck limits. The larger lesson is that a successful modified gravity model will likely have to suppress the growth of structure compared to general relativity.

  4. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    followed Hale’s into orbit. In 1879, Jules Verne wrote about launching small satellites with a gun possessing a muzzle velocity of 10 000 m/sec (ref. 3...was activated in 1950.11 It was located only a few tens of miles from the spot where Jules Verne had his Baltimore Gun Club fire a manned projectile to...principle, satellites can be launched by a single impulse applied at the Earth’s surface-say, with a large cannon, & la Jules Verne (sec. 8-3). In

  5. Titan's gravity: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, D.; Iess, L.; Racioppa, P.; Armstrong, J. W.; Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2016-12-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn in 2004, Cassini performed nine flybys devoted to the determination of Titan's gravity field and its tidal variations. The last gravity flyby of the mission (T122) took place on Aug. 10, 2016. We will present an updated gravity solution, based on all available data. These include also an additional flyby (T110, March 2015, primarily devoted to the imaging Titan's north polar lakes) carried out with the low gain antenna. This flyby was particularly valuable because closest approach occurred at high latitude (75°N), over an area not previously sampled. Published gravity results (Iess et al., 2012) indicated that Titan is subject to large eccentricity tides in response to Saturn's time varying forcing field. The magnitude of the response quadrupole field, controlled by the Love number k2, was used to infer the existence of an internal ocean. The new gravity field determination provides a better estimate of k2, to a level of a few percent. In addition to a full 3x3 field, the new solution includes also higher degree and order harmonic coefficients (such as J4) and offers an improved map of gravity anomalies. The updated geoid and its associated uncertainty could be used to refine the gravity-altimetry correlative analysis and for improved interpretation of radar altimetric data.

  6. Free surface flows under compensated gravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, Miachel E

    2007-01-01

    This book considers the behavior of fluids in a low-gravity environment with special emphasis on application in PMD (propellant management device) systems . In the compensated gravity environment of a spacecraft, the hydrostatic pressure decreases to very low values depending on the residual acceleration, and surface tension forces become dominant. Consequently, surface tension can be used to transport and position liquids if the residual acceleration and the resulting hydrostatic pressure are small compared to the capillary pressure. One prominent application is the use of PMDs in surface-tension satellite tanks. PMDs must ensure that the tank outlet is covered with liquid whenever outflow is demanded. Furthermore, PMDs are used to ensure expulsion and refilling of tanks for liquids and gases for life support, reactants, and experiment supplies. Since most of the PMD designs are not testable on ground and thus rely on analytical or numerical concepts, this book treats three different flow problems with analy...

  7. Subduction zones seen by GOCE gravity gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Švarc, Mario; Herceg, Matija; Cammarano, Fabio

    and used as starting point for analysis based on image processing. On obtained maps, locations of known subduction zones were represented with characteristic elongated patterns and cross-sections. Cross sections of well-known subduction zones were used as input patterns for pattern recognition method....... Few pattern recognition methods were tested on all 6 gravity gradient tensor components represented as global scale maps with resolution of 100km (corresponds to the resolution of the GOCE satellite data). By adjusting pattern recognition methods’ features and optimizing various input patterns......, the best method was applied. That is a combination of methods based on SURF (Speeded Up Robust Features) and MSER (Maximally Stable Extremal Regions) algorithms provided in MATLAB’s Computer Vision System Toolbox. Based on 6 gravity gradient components, the global gradient anomaly maps were produced...

  8. The GRADIO spaceborne gravity gradiometer: Development and accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, A.

    1989-06-01

    The European ARISTOTELES mission aims at the determination of the Earth's gravity field at short wavelength with a global coverage. Gravity gradient measurements will be achieved during six months by the GRADIO instrument onboard a dedicated satellite in a near dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 200 km. The objective is an accuracy of better than 5 mgals for gravity anomalies, at ground level for blocks of 1 x 1 deg. According to present knowledge of the potential, the recovery of higher spherical harmonics (degree and order greater than 30) is of main importance. This leads to focus on the variations of the measured components T(sub ij) of the gravity gradient tensor, at frequencies greater than 5 x 10(exp -3) Hz. The resolution, required for the gradiometer is 10(exp -2) Eotvos (i.e., 10(exp -11)/s squared) with an averaging time of 4 s.

  9. Global inter-annual gravity changes from GRACE: Early results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Hinderer, J.

    2005-01-01

    with an accuracy of 0.4 muGal corresponding to 9 mm water thickness on spatial scales longer than 1300 km. Four of the most widely used global hydrological models have been investigated for their spatial comparison with GRACE observations of inter-annual gravity field variations due to changes in continental water...... storage. The Global Land Data Assimilation System model has a spatial correlation coefficient with GRACE observations of 0.65 over the northern hemisphere. This demonstrates that the observed gravity field changes on these scales are largely related to changes in continental water storage.......Fifteen monthly gravity field solutions from the GRACE twin satellites launched more than two years ago have been studied to estimate gravity field changes between 2002 and 2003. The results demonstrate that GRACE is capable of capturing the changes in ground water on inter-annual scales...

  10. Low-Earth Orbit Determination from Gravity Gradient Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiucong; Macabiau, Christophe; Han, Chao

    2016-01-01

    An innovative orbit determination method which makes use of gravity gradients for Low-Earth-Orbiting satellites is proposed. The measurement principle of gravity gradiometry is briefly reviewed and the sources of measurement error are analyzed. An adaptive hybrid least squares batch filter based on linearization of the orbital equation and unscented transformation of the measurement equation is developed to estimate the orbital states and the measurement biases. The algorithm is tested with the actual flight data from the European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer. The orbit determination results are compared with the GPS-derived orbits. The radial and cross-track position errors are on the order of tens of meters, whereas the along-track position error is over one order of magnitude larger. The gravity gradient based orbit determination method is promising for potential use in GPS-denied spacecraft navigation.

  11. World gravity standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotila, U. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to use gravity anomalies in geodetic computations and geophysical interpretations, the observed gravity values from which anomalies are derived should be referred to one consistent world wide system. The International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 was adapted by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics at Moscow in 1971, the network was result of extensive cooperation by many organizations and individuals around the world. The network contains more than 1800 stations around the world. The data used in the adjustment included more than 25,000 gravimetry, pendulum and absolute measurements.

  12. Phenomenological Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    If the history of science has taught us anything, it's that persistence and creativity makes the once impossible possible. It has long been thought experimental tests of quantum gravity are impossible. But during the last decade, several different approaches have been proposed that allow us to test, if not the fundamental theory of quantum gravity itself, so at least characteristic features this theory can have. For the first time we can probe experimentally domains in which quantum physics and gravity cohabit, in spite of our failure so far to make a convincing marriage of them on a theoretical level.

  13. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Honecker, Johanna

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved...... gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from...

  14. Earth rotation parameters from satellite techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Daniela; Beutler, Gerhard; Jäggi, Adrian; Meindl, Michael; Dach, Rolf; Sosnica, Krzysztof; Baumann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated since several years that satellite techniques are capable of determining Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) with a daily or even sub-daily resolution. Especially Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with their huge amount of observations can determine time series of polar motion (PM) and length of day (LOD) rather well. But also SLR with its spherical satellites whose orbital motions are easy to model and that allow long orbital arc lengths can deliver valuable contributions to Earth rotation. We analyze GNSS solutions (using GPS and GLONASS) and SLR solutions (using LAGEOS) regarding their potential of estimating polar motion and LOD with daily and subdaily temporal resolution. A steadily improving modeling applied in the analysis of space-geodetic data aims at improved time series of geodetic parameters, e.g., the ERPs. The Earth's gravity field and especially its temporal variations are one point of interest for an improved modeling for satellite techniques. For modeling the short-periodic gravity field variations induced by mass variations in the atmosphere and the oceans the GRACE science team provides the Atmosphere and Ocean Dealiasing (AOD) products. They contain 6-hourly gravity fields of the atmosphere and the oceans. We apply these corrections in the analysis of satellite-geodetic data and show the impact on the estimated ERPs. It is well known that the degree-2 coefficients of the Earth's gravity field are correlated with polar motion and LOD. We show to what extent temporal variations in the degree-2 coefficients are influencing the ERP estimates.

  15. Stratospheric gravity wave observations of AIRS and HIRDLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars; Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Thai

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides stratospheric temperature observations for a variety of scientific analyses. However, the horizontal resolution of the operational temperature retrievals is generally not sufficient for studies of gravity waves. The AIRS high-resolution retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual satellite footprint and therefore has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data. The retrieval configuration is optimized so that the results provide a trade-off between spatial resolution and retrieval noise that is considered optimal for gravity wave analysis. To validate the AIRS data we performed an intercomparison with stratospheric temperature measurements of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Selected case studies of gravity wave events are analyzed. AIRS and HIRDLS utilize rather different measurement geometries (nadir and limb) and have different sensitivities to gravity wave horizontal and vertical wavelengths, as indicated by their observational filters. Nevertheless, the wave structures found in the stratosphere in AIRS and HIRDLS data are often in remarkably good agreement. The three-dimensional temperature fields from AIRS allow us to derive the horizontal orientation of the phase fronts, which is a limiting factor for gravity wave analyses based on limb measurements today. In addition, a statistical comparison focuses on temperature variances due to stratospheric gravity wave activity at 20-60 km altitude. The analysis covers monthly zonal averages and time series for the HIRDLS measurement time period (January 2005-March 2008). We found good agreement in the seasonal and latitudinal patterns of gravity wave activity. Time series of gravity wave variances show a strong annual cycle at high latitudes with maxima during wintertime and minima during summertime. Largest variability is found at 60°S during austral

  16. Topological Induced Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton's coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the FRW universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological qu...

  17. Gravity Data for Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (55,907 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. This data base was received...

  18. Causal Newton Gravity Law

    CERN Document Server

    Zinoviev, Yury M

    2012-01-01

    The equations of the relativistic causal Newton gravity law for the planets of the solar system are studied in the approximation when the Sun rests at the coordinates origin and the planets do not iteract between each other.

  19. Infrared Modifications Of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rombouts, J

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we study theories that modify gravity at very large distances. Motivated by recent observations in cosmology, such as the dimming of type Ia supernovae and flattening of rotation curves of galaxies, we study two classes of theories that attempt to explain these observations as due to a change in the laws of gravity at large distances rather than due to the presence of new forms of exotic energy and matter. The first class of theories is massive gravity, obtained by adding a mass term to the action for the gravitational fluctuation in Einstein's general relativity. The second class of models we study are braneworlds that provide infrared modified gravity, in specific the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model and its extension to higher codimensional branes. We stress in our discussion the field theoretical consistency, both classically and quantum-mechanically, of these models.

  20. Extended Theories of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Extended Theories of Gravity can be considered a new paradigm to cure shortcomings of General Relativity at infrared and ultraviolet scales. They are an approach that, by preserving the undoubtedly positive results of Einstein's Theory, is aimed to address conceptual and experimental problems recently emerged in Astrophysics, Cosmology and High Energy Physics. In particular, the goal is to encompass, in a self-consistent scheme, problems like Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Large Scale Structure and, first of all, to give at least an effective description of Quantum Gravity. We review the basic principles that any gravitational theory has to follow. The geometrical interpretation is discussed in a broad perspective in order to highlight the basic assumptions of General Relativity and its possible extensions in the general framework of gauge theories. Principles of such modifications are presented, focusing on specific classes of theories like f (R)-gravity and scalar-tensor gravity in the metric and Pala...

  1. DMA Antarctic Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (65,164 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. The data base was received...

  2. Einsteinian cubic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.

    2016-11-01

    We drastically simplify the problem of linearizing a general higher-order theory of gravity. We reduce it to the evaluation of its Lagrangian on a particular Riemann tensor depending on two parameters, and the computation of two derivatives with respect to one of those parameters. We use our method to construct a D -dimensional cubic theory of gravity which satisfies the following properties: (1) it shares the spectrum of Einstein gravity, i.e., it only propagates a transverse and massless graviton on a maximally symmetric background; (2) it is defined in the same way in general dimensions; (3) it is neither trivial nor topological in four dimensions. Up to cubic order in curvature, the only previously known theories satisfying the first two requirements are the Lovelock ones. We show that, up to cubic order, there exists only one additional theory satisfying requirements (1) and (2). Interestingly, this theory is, along with Einstein gravity, the only one which also satisfies (3).

  3. Gravity Data for Egypt

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (71 records) were gathered by various governmental organizations (and academia) using a variety of methods. This data base was received in...

  4. Phenomenological Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kimberly, D; Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joao

    2005-01-01

    These notes summarize a set of lectures on phenomenological quantum gravity which one of us delivered and the other attended with great diligence. They cover an assortment of topics on the border between theoretical quantum gravity and observational anomalies. Specifically, we review non-linear relativity in its relation to loop quantum gravity and high energy cosmic rays. Although we follow a pedagogic approach we include an open section on unsolved problems, presented as exercises for the student. We also review varying constant models: the Brans-Dicke theory, the Bekenstein varying $\\alpha$ model, and several more radical ideas. We show how they make contact with strange high-redshift data, and perhaps other cosmological puzzles. We conclude with a few remaining observational puzzles which have failed to make contact with quantum gravity, but who knows... We would like to thank Mario Novello for organizing an excellent school in Mangaratiba, in direct competition with a very fine beach indeed.

  5. Euclidean gravity attracts

    CERN Document Server

    De Bakker, B V; Bakker, Bas de; Smit, Jan

    1994-01-01

    We look at gravitational attraction in simplicial gravity using the dynamical triangulation method. On the dynamical triangulation configurations we measure quenched propagators of a free massive scalar field. The masses measured from these propagators show that gravitational attraction is present.

  6. GRACE Gravity Field Product Description and Mission Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettadpur, S.; Flechtner, F.; Watkins, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    A time sequence of approximately monthly estimates of the Earth's gravity field, derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Mission (GRACE) science data, have been recently made available to the user community. In addition to these monthly estimates, a long-term mean gravity field has also been made available. These gravity field products are generated by the GRACE Science Data System team elements at the UT-CSR, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and at GFZ-Potsdam. In this presentation, we briefly describe the gravity field processing standards and methodology in use at UT-CSR. The traditional linearized least-squares implementation of gravity field determination from GRACE tracking data is reviewed with particular attention the to a-priori gravitational force models in use. The evolution of GRACE mission since its launch in March 2002 is then discussed. The main mission events, and the flight dynamic profile (pointing, inter-satellite separation, ground-track evolution, etc) are presented - with the purpose of aiding the interpretation and assessment of the gravity field product quality. The presentation closes with the description of the likely future evolution of the flight profile.

  7. Developments in Lunar Gravity Field Recovery Within the Project GRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirnsberger, Harald; Klinger, Beate; Krauss, Sandro; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    The project GRAZIL addresses the highly accurate recovery of the lunar gravity field using intersatellite Ka-band ranging (KBR) measurements collected by the Lunar Gravity Ranging System (LGRS) of the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. Dynamic precise orbit determination is an indispensable task in order to recover the lunar gravity field based on LGRS measurements. The concept of variational equations is adopted to determine the orbit of the two GRAIL satellites based on radio science data. In this contribution we focus on the S-band two-way Doppler data collected by the Deep Space Network.As far as lunar gravity field recovery is concerned, we apply an integral equation approach using short orbital arcs. In this contribution we demonstrate the progress of Graz lunar gravity field models (GrazLGM) from the beginning, till the end of the projet GRAZIL. For the latest GrazLGM version special attention is given to the refinement of our processing strategy in conjunction with an increase of the spectral resolution. Furthermore, we present the first GrazLGM based on KBR observations during the primary and the extended mission phase. Our results are validated against state of the art lunar gravity field models computed at NASA-GSFC and NASA-JPL.

  8. Spectral Representation and Analysis of the KBR Precision Based on the Earth Gravity Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; NING Jinsheng; LUO Zhicai

    2005-01-01

    Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking in low-low model (SST-ll) is a new technique to resolve the series of problems met in the determination of the earths gravity field. As the key technique of SST-ll, KBR canget SST-ll measurements directly. So the KBR performance analysis is the first step in SST-ll design. In this paper, assuming that the satellite pairs of SST-ll are in near circle polar orbits, the spectrum relationship between the earth gravity field and KBR is established using analytic method. And then some examples are analyzed, the suggestions and conclusions are drawn from these examples. The research results could be taken as a reference for future satellite gravity project of China.

  9. The earth's shape and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, G D; Wilson, J T

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Shape and Gravity focuses on the progress of the use of geophysical methods in investigating the interior of the earth and its shape. The publication first offers information on gravity, geophysics, geodesy, and geology and gravity measurements. Discussions focus on gravity measurements and reductions, potential and equipotential surfaces, absolute and relative measurements, and gravity networks. The text then elaborates on the shape of the sea-level surface and reduction of gravity observations. The text takes a look at gravity anomalies and structures in the earth's crust; interp

  10. `Iconoclastic', Categorical Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Raptis, I

    2005-01-01

    This is a two-part, `2-in-1' paper. In Part I, the introductory talk at `Glafka--2004: Iconoclastic Approaches to Quantum Gravity' international theoretical physics conference is presented in paper form (without references). In Part II, the more technical talk, originally titled ``Abstract Differential Geometric Excursion to Classical and Quantum Gravity'', is presented in paper form (with citations). The two parts are closely entwined, as Part I makes general motivating remarks for Part II.

  11. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, F.F. [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Purely affine Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2014-01-01

    We develop a topological theory of gravity with torsion where metric has a dynamical rather than a kinematical origin. This approach towards gravity resembles pre-geometrical approaches in which a fundamental metric does not exist, but the affine connection gives place to a local inertial structure. Such feature reminds us of Mach's principle, that assumes the inertial forces should have dynamical origin. Additionally, a Newtonian gravitational force is obtained in the non-relativistic limit of the theory.

  13. Enhanced ozone strongly reduces carbon sink strength of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) - Resume from the free-air fumigation study at Kranzberg Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyssek, R., E-mail: matyssek@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wieser, G. [Dept. Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Federal Office and Research Centre for Forests, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ceulemans, R. [Dept. of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Rennenberg, H. [Tree Physiology, Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Pretzsch, H. [Forest Growth and Yield Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Haberer, K. [Tree Physiology, Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Loew, M.; Nunn, A.J. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Werner, H. [Ecoclimatology (formerly: Bioclimatology and Air Pollution Research), Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wipfler, P. [Forest Growth and Yield Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Osswald, W. [Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Nikolova, P. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Hanke, D.E. [Dept. Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA (United Kingdom); Kraigher, H. [Slovenian Forestry Institute, Forest Biology, Ecology and Technology, Vecna pot 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tausz, M. [Dept. of Forest and Ecosystem Science, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, Water Street, Creswick Vic 3363 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Ground-level ozone (O{sub 3}) has gained awareness as an agent of climate change. In this respect, key results are comprehended from a unique 8-year free-air O{sub 3}-fumigation experiment, conducted on adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) at Kranzberg Forest (Germany). A novel canopy O{sub 3} exposure methodology was employed that allowed whole-tree assessment in situ under twice-ambient O{sub 3} levels. Elevated O{sub 3} significantly weakened the C sink strength of the tree-soil system as evidenced by lowered photosynthesis and 44% reduction in whole-stem growth, but increased soil respiration. Associated effects in leaves and roots at the gene, cell and organ level varied from year to year, with drought being a crucial determinant of O{sub 3} responsiveness. Regarding adult individuals of a late-successional tree species, empirical proof is provided first time in relation to recent modelling predictions that enhanced ground-level O{sub 3} can substantially mitigate the C sequestration of forests in view of climate change. - Empirical proof corroborates substantial mitigation of carbon sequestration in the tree-soil system of a forest site under enhanced O{sub 3} impact for adult beech.

  14. Effects of free air carbon dioxide enrichment and drought stress on the feed value of maize silage fed to sheep at different thermal regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohölter, Malte; Meyer, Ulrich; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Erbs, Martin; Flachowsky, Gerhard; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-08-01

    Information about the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and drought on the feed value of maize silage and interactions with the thermal environment during feeding is limited. A free air carbon dioxide enrichment facility was operated in a maize field to generate an elevated CO2 concentration of 550 ppm. Drought was induced by the exclusion of precipitation in one half of all experimental plots. Plants were harvested, chopped and ensiled. In a balance experiment on sheep, the nutrient digestibility was determined for three climatic treatments (temperate, temperature humidity index (THI) 57-63; mild heat, THI 68-71; severe heat, THI 75-80). The CO2 concentration and drought did not alter the crude nutrient content of silage dry matter (DM) or nutrient and organic matter (OM) digestibility. Drought increased the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON, p maize silage due to increased atmospheric CO2 and drought. Enriched CO2 may decrease DON contaminations during drought. The thermal environment during the balance experiment did not interact with feeding maize silage grown under elevated CO2, but may affect cell wall and OM digestibility.

  15. Stomatal uptake of O3 in aspen and aspen-birch forests under free-air CO2 and O3 enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddling, Johan; Hogg, Alan J; Teclaw, Ronald M; Carroll, Mary Anne; Ellsworth, David S

    2010-06-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) may alleviate the toxicological impacts of concurrently rising tropospheric ozone (O3) during the present century if higher CO2 is accompanied by lower stomatal conductance (gs), as assumed by many models. We investigated how elevated concentrations of CO2 and O3, alone and in combination, affected the accumulated stomatal flux of O3 (AFst) by canopies and sun leaves in closed aspen and aspen-birch forests in the free-air CO2-O3 enrichment experiment near Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Stomatal conductance for O3 was derived from sap flux data and AFst was estimated either neglecting or accounting for the potential influence of non-stomatal leaf surface O3 deposition. Leaf-level AFst (AFst(l)) was not reduced by elevated CO2. Instead, there was a significant CO2 x O(3) interaction on AFst(l), as a consequence of lower values of gs in control plots and the combination treatment than in the two single-gas treatments. In addition, aspen leaves had higher AFst(l) than birch leaves, and estimates of AFst(l) were not very sensitive to non-stomatal leaf surface O3 deposition. Our results suggest that model projections of large CO2-induced reductions in gs alleviating the adverse effect of rising tropospheric O3 may not be reasonable for northern hardwood forests.

  16. Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment on adventitious root development of rice under low and normal soil nitrogen levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Sun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Free air CO2 enrichment (FACE and nitrogen (N have marked effects on rice root growth, and numerical simulation can explain these effects. To further define the effects of FACE on root growth of rice, an experiment was performed, using the hybrid indica cultivar Xianyou 63. The effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2], 200 μmol mol− 1 higher than ambient, on the growth of rice adventitious roots were evaluated, with two levels of N: low (LN, 125 kg ha− 1 and normal (NN, 250 kg ha− 1. The results showed a significant increase in both adventitious root number (ARN and adventitious root length (ARL under FACE treatment. The application of nitrogen also increased ARN and ARL, but these increases were smaller than that under FACE treatment. On the basis of the FACE experiment, numerical models for rice adventitious root number and length were constructed with time as the driving factor. The models illustrated the dynamic development of rice adventitious root number and length after transplanting, regulated either by atmospheric [CO2] or by N application. The simulation result was supported by statistical tests comparing experimental data from different years, and the model yields realistic predictions of root growth. These results suggest that the models have strong predictive potential under conditions of atmospheric [CO2] rises in the future.

  17. Changes in soil C-isotopic composition in an agroecosystem under Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) treatment during a crop rotation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesemann, Anette

    2005-01-01

    FACE (Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment) has been used since 1999 to evaluate the effects of future atmospheric CO(2) concentrations on an arable crop agroecosystem. The experiment conducted at the Institute of Agroecology at the Federal Research Centre in Braunschweig consists of a typical local crop rotation of winter barley, a cover crop, sugar beet and winter wheat. The atmospheric CO2 concentration of ambient air is about 375 ppm with a delta13C value of -7 to -9 per thousand, and 550 ppm (delta13C value = -20.2 per thousand) during daylight hours in the rings fumigated with additional CO2. Thus, the surplus C can be traced in the agricultural system. Over the course of the first experimental period (3-year crop rotation period), the C-isotopic composition and the C concentration in soil were monitored monthly. Plant samples were analysed according to the relevant developmental stages of the crop under cultivation. A 13C depletion was observed in plant parts, as well as in soil samples from the FACE rings under CO2 enrichment, indicating that labelled C has reached both respective ecosystem compartments. Albeit farming management practice (especially ploughing) leads to a mixing of 'old' and 'new' C compounds throughout all soil horizons down to the end of the ploughing layer and resulted in a heterogeneous distribution of newly formed C compounds in the soil, isotope analysis of soil C reflected where the surplus C went.

  18. Enhanced ozone strongly reduces carbon sink strength of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica)--resume from the free-air fumigation study at Kranzberg Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Ceulemans, R; Rennenberg, H; Pretzsch, H; Haberer, K; Löw, M; Nunn, A J; Werner, H; Wipfler, P; Osswald, W; Nikolova, P; Hanke, D E; Kraigher, H; Tausz, M; Bahnweg, G; Kitao, M; Dieler, J; Sandermann, H; Herbinger, K; Grebenc, T; Blumenröther, M; Deckmyn, G; Grams, T E E; Heerdt, C; Leuchner, M; Fabian, P; Häberle, K-H

    2010-08-01

    Ground-level ozone (O(3)) has gained awareness as an agent of climate change. In this respect, key results are comprehended from a unique 8-year free-air O(3)-fumigation experiment, conducted on adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) at Kranzberg Forest (Germany). A novel canopy O(3) exposure methodology was employed that allowed whole-tree assessment in situ under twice-ambient O(3) levels. Elevated O(3) significantly weakened the C sink strength of the tree-soil system as evidenced by lowered photosynthesis and 44% reduction in whole-stem growth, but increased soil respiration. Associated effects in leaves and roots at the gene, cell and organ level varied from year to year, with drought being a crucial determinant of O(3) responsiveness. Regarding adult individuals of a late-successional tree species, empirical proof is provided first time in relation to recent modelling predictions that enhanced ground-level O(3) can substantially mitigate the C sequestration of forests in view of climate change.

  19. The photosynthetic and stomatal response of Medicago sativa cv. saranac to free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (F.A.C.E.) and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridson, N.P.

    1996-08-01

    Plots of Medicago sativa cv. saranac were grown in the field at ambient (355 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) or elevated (600{mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) CO{sub 2} concentrations. High (200kg yr{sup -1}) or low (20kg yr{sup -1}) nitrogen levels were applied to two isogeneic lines, one able and one unable to use nitrogen fixing bacteria. Plants were in the second year of field growth. Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} was via a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment System (FACE). Elevated CO{sub 2} increased diurnal assimilation by between 12% and 92%. Analysis of A/C{sub i} responses showed that effective nitrogen fertilisation was more important to rubisCO and RuBP activity than elevated CO{sub 2}. No acclimation was consistently observed. Leaves lower down the canopy were found to have lower Vc{sub max} and J{sub max} values, though age may be the cause of the latter effect. FACE conditions have only a small effect on these responses. There was some evidence found for the down-regulation of photosynthesis in the late afternoon. The FACE conditions had no affect on stomatal density but did increase epidermal cell density.

  20. Characteristics of a miniature parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for measuring the intensity of synchrotron radiation from an undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2004-09-01

    In order to develop an absolute intensity monitor for synchrotron radiation from an undulator, the characteristics of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber with a plate separation of 4.2 mm, which was considered to be as narrow as possible, were investigated using 8-30 keV monoenergetic photons at SPring-8. Using a Si-PIN photodiode as the reference monitor, saturation was confirmed at 8-30 keV at a photon intensity of an order of 1013 photons/s. The collection efficiency became almost unity at 8 and 10 keV within 3.8% and 1.1%, respectively, which gradually decreased with increasing energy and attained 0.52 at 30 keV because some of the high-energy electrons escaped from the sensitive volume. When the pair of electrodes was transferred from the upper and lower sides to the left and right sides of the beam axis in order to investigate the influence of linear polarization of synchrotron radiation, a decrease in the collection efficiency was observed. Monte Carlo simulations considering linear polarization showed that the plate separation required for no electron loss was 26, 14, and 8 mm for 30, 20, and 15 keV photons, respectively. For 20 keV photons, saturation characteristics were investigated using an ionization chamber with 14 mm plate separation.

  1. Nitrogen-Doped Co3 O4 Mesoporous Nanowire Arrays as an Additive-Free Air-Cathode for Flexible Solid-State Zinc-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Wang, Zhengke; Hou, Cheng; Wang, Zilong; Liang, Chaolun; Zhao, Cunyuan; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong; Yang, Shihe

    2017-02-10

    The kinetically sluggish rate of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the cathode side is one of the main bottlenecks of zinc-air batteries (ZABs), and thus the search for an efficient and cost-effective catalyst for ORR is highly pursued. Co3 O4 has received ever-growing interest as a promising ORR catalyst due to the unique advantages of low-cost, earth abundance and decent catalytic activity. However, owing to the poor conductivity as a result of its semiconducting nature, the ORR activity of the Co3 O4 catalyst is still far below the expectation. Herein, we report a controllable N-doping strategy to significantly improve the catalytic activity of Co3 O4 for ORR and demonstrate these N doped Co3 O4 nanowires as an additive-free air-cathode for flexible solid-state zinc-air batteries. The results of experiments and DFT calculations reveal that the catalytic activity is promoted by the N dopant through a combined set of factors, including enhanced electronic conductivity, increased O2 adsorption strength and improved reaction kinetics. Finally, the assembly of all-solid-state ZABs based on the optimized cathode exhibit a high volumetric capacity of 98.1 mAh cm(-3) and outstanding flexibility. The demonstration of such flexible ZABs provides valuable insights that point the way to the redesign of emerging portable electronics.

  2. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetz, J-E; Ounoughi, N; Mavon, C; Belafrites, A; Fromm, M

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™ and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  3. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetz, J.-E., E-mail: jegroetz@univ-fcomte.fr; Mavon, C.; Fromm, M. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Ounoughi, N. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Rayonnements et Applications, Université de Jijel, B.P. 98 Ouled Aissa, Jijel 18000 (Algeria); Belafrites, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Rayonnements et Applications, Université de Jijel, B.P. 98 Ouled Aissa, Jijel 18000 (Algeria)

    2014-08-15

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  4. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetz, J.-E.; Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Fromm, M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  5. Investigating the Multiple Food Sources and N Chemistry of Invasive Earthworms at the Rhinelander, WI, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 can directly and indirectly alter biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems through changes to plant productivity, tissue chemistry, and associated feedbacks to microbial and faunal communities. At the Rhinelander free air CO2 enrichment site (FACE), Rhinelander WI, we examined the consumption and movement of plant tissue and soil by invasive earthworm species using a multi-proxy stable isotope and amino acid chemistry analysis of plant and soil, as well as fecal matter extracted from invasive earthworms present at the site. Using an isotopic mixing model that exploits the 13C-depleted CO2 source and a previous 15N labeling in the FACE experiment, we determined potential sources to the earthworm fecal matter and the movement of amino compounds. For epigeic, surface dwelling earthworms, the stable isotope modeling showed the largest contribution to the C and N in fecal matter was from leaf litter (up to 80%) which was depleted in amino acid C under elevated CO2 conditions. Fecal matter from the endogeic, mineral soil dwelling earthworms was primarily derived from 0-5 cm soil (up to 56%) and fine root tissue (up to 70%). Additionally, amino acid C in this group of earthworms had a proportionately greater relative concentration compared to the epigeic species and the 0-5cm soil. Here we demonstrate that earthworms are incorporating multiple sources (leaf litter, root, and soil) into their fecal matter, which then get deposited throughout the soil profile, where nutrients could become available for plant use.

  6. Effects of warming on uptake and translocation of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in a contaminated soil-rice system under Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li-Qiang; Cang, Long; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Global warming has received growing attentions about its potential threats to human in recent, however little is known about its effects on transfer of heavy metals in agro-ecosystem, especially for Cd in rice. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate Cd/Cu translocation in a contaminated soil-rice system under Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI). The results showed that warming gradually decreased soil porewater pH and increased water-soluble Cd/Cu concentration, reduced formation of iron plaque on root surface, and thus significantly increased total uptake of Cd/Cu by rice. Subsequently, warming significantly promoted Cd translocation from root to shoot, and increased Cd distribution percentage in shoot, while Cu was not significantly affected. Enhanced Cd uptake and translocation synergistically resulted in higher rice grain contamination with increasing concentration from 0.27 to 0.65 and 0.14-0.40 mg kg(-1) for Indica and Japonica rice, respectively. However increase of Cu in brown grain was only attributed to its uptake enhancement under warming. Our study provides a new understanding about the food production insecurity of heavy metal contaminated soil under the future global warming.

  7. Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment on adventitious root development of rice under low and normal soil nitrogen levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengming; Sun; Lijian; Wang; Tao; Liu; Doudou; Guo; Yingying; Chen; Wei; Wu; Yulong; Wang; Jianguo; Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Free air CO2 enrichment(FACE) and nitrogen(N) have marked effects on rice root growth,and numerical simulation can explain these effects. To further define the effects of FACE on root growth of rice, an experiment was performed, using the hybrid indica cultivar Xianyou63. The effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2], 200 μmol mol-1higher than ambient, on the growth of rice adventitious roots were evaluated, with two levels of N: low(LN, 125 kg ha-1) and normal(NN, 250 kg ha-1). The results showed a significant increase in both adventitious root number(ARN) and adventitious root length(ARL) under FACE treatment. The application of nitrogen also increased ARN and ARL, but these increases were smaller than that under FACE treatment. On the basis of the FACE experiment, numerical models for rice adventitious root number and length were constructed with time as the driving factor. The models illustrated the dynamic development of rice adventitious root number and length after transplanting, regulated either by atmospheric [CO2] or by N application.The simulation result was supported by statistical tests comparing experimental data from different years, and the model yields realistic predictions of root growth. These results suggest that the models have strong predictive potential under conditions of atmospheric [CO2] rises in the future.

  8. Soil Organic C and N Destabilization and Decline Following a Decade of Free-air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) in an Aridland Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahm, B. D.; Sparks, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Arid and semiarid environments constitute ~40% of the earth’s land surface and are expected to be particularly susceptible to global change factors. As a result, there may be dramatic shifts in the biogeochemistry of soil C and N in these systems that will have implications on productivity and long-term C sink/source dynamics. We have observed a 14-32% decrease in soil organic C and N concentrations in response to a decade of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) in the Mojave Desert at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility. The variability in the magnitude of change is largely driven by cover type. Soils under the dominant forms of vegetative cover, Larrea tridentata and Lycium sp. contained up to an order of magnitude more organic C and N than adjacent areas of bare ground, often colonized by biological soil crusts, and exhibited much larger shifts in the bioavailability of these pools in response to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Although elevated CO2 resulted in a nearly universal decrease in active cycling organic C and N (40-88%) across all cover types, a decrease of up to 28% was observed in the resistant, or slowly cycling, organic C and N pools under the dominant vegetation. Such changes suggest that predicted future atmospheric CO2 concentrations may contribute to the significant destabilization of soil organic C and N stocks in arid ecosystems, resulting in declines in productivity and negative feedbacks to rising atmospheric C concentrations.

  9. Where does the carbon go? A model-data intercomparison of vegetation carbon allocation and turnover processes at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi; Jain, Atul K; El-Masri, Bassil; Hickler, Thomas; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William J; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Prentice, I Colin; Asao, Shinichi; Smith, Benjamin; McCarthy, Heather R; Iversen, Colleen M; Hanson, Paul J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) has the potential to increase vegetation carbon storage if increased net primary production causes increased long-lived biomass. Model predictions of eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage depend on how allocation and turnover processes are represented. We used data from two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments to evaluate representations of allocation and turnover in 11 ecosystem models. Observed eCO2 effects on allocation were dynamic. Allocation schemes based on functional relationships among biomass fractions that vary with resource availability were best able to capture the general features of the observations. Allocation schemes based on constant fractions or resource limitations performed less well, with some models having unintended outcomes. Few models represent turnover processes mechanistically and there was wide variation in predictions of tissue lifespan. Consequently, models did not perform well at predicting eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage. Our recommendations to reduce uncertainty include: use of allocation schemes constrained by biomass fractions; careful testing of allocation schemes; and synthesis of allocation and turnover data in terms of model parameters. Data from intensively studied ecosystem manipulation experiments are invaluable for constraining models and we recommend that such experiments should attempt to fully quantify carbon, water and nutrient budgets.

  10. New Views of Earth's Gravity Field from GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Map 1Map 2Gravity and the Earth's Shape Gravity is the force that is responsible for the weight of an object and is determined by how the material that makes up the Earth is distributed throughout the Earth. Because gravity changes over the surface of the Earth, the weight of an object changes along with it. One can define standard gravity as the value of gravity for an perfectly smooth 'idealized' Earth, and the gravity 'anomaly' is a measure of how actual gravity deviates from this standard. Gravity reflects the Earth's surface topography to a high degree and is associated with features that most people are familiar with such as large mountains and deep ocean trenches.Progress in Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field Through GRACE Prior to GRACE, the Earth's gravity field was determined using measurements of varying quality from different satellites and of incomplete coverage. Consequently the accuracy and resolution of the gravity field were limited. As is shown in Figure 1, the long wavelength components of the gravity field determined from satellite tracking were limited to a resolution of approximately 700 km. At shorter wavelengths, the errors were too large to be useful. Only broad geophysical features of the Earth's structure could be detected (see map 1).In contrast, GRACE, by itself, has provided accurate gravity information with a resolution of 200 km. Now, much more detail is clearly evident in the Earth's geophysical features (see map 2). High resolution features detected by GRACE that are representative of geophysical phenomena include the Tonga/Kermadec region (a zone where one tectonic plate slides under another), the Himalayan/Tibetan Plateau region (an area of uplift due to colliding plates), and the mid-Atlantic ridge (an active spreading center in the middle of the Atlantic ocean where new crust is being created). Future GRACE gravity models are

  11. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  12. High-resolution Moho model for Greenland from EIGEN-6C4 gravity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Strykowski, Gabriel; Lund, Björn

    2017-01-01

    are difficult to obtain. Here, we take advantage of the global gravity model EIGEN-6C4, together with the Parker-Oldenburg algorithm, to estimate the depth to the Moho beneath Greenland and surroundings. The available free-air gravity data are corrected for the topographic effect and the effect of sedimentary...... basins. We also correct for the effect on gravity due to the weight of the ice sheet and the accompanying deflection of the Earth's surface, which has not previously been taken into account in gravity studies of currently glaciated regions. Our final Moho depth model for Greenland has an associated...... uncertainty of ±4.5 km for areas with sedimentary basins and ±4 km for areas without sedimentary basins. The model shows maximum Moho depths below east Greenland of up to 55 km and values less than 20 km offshore east Greenland. There is a marked increase in Moho depth of 10–15 km from northern to central...

  13. Estimation of Bouguer Density Precision: Development of Method for Analysis of La Soufriere Volcano Gravity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Gunawan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no3.20084The precision of topographic density (Bouguer density estimation by the Nettleton approach is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. The other method, the Parasnis approach, is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and Bouguer correction. The precision of Bouguer density estimates was investigated by both methods on simple 2D syntetic models and under an assumption free-air anomaly consisting of an effect of topography, an effect of intracrustal, and an isostatic compensation. Based on simulation results, Bouguer density estimates were then investigated for a gravity survey of 2005 on La Soufriere Volcano-Guadeloupe area (Antilles Islands. The Bouguer density based on the Parasnis approach is 2.71 g/cm3 for the whole area, except the edifice area where average topography density estimates are 2.21 g/cm3 where Bouguer density estimates from previous gravity survey of 1975 are 2.67 g/cm3. The Bouguer density in La Soufriere Volcano was uncertainly estimated to be 0.1 g/cm3. For the studied area, the density deduced from refraction seismic data is coherent with the recent Bouguer density estimates. New Bouguer anomaly map based on these Bouguer density values allows to a better geological intepretation.    

  14. The origin of lunar mascons - Analysis of the Bouguer gravity associated with Grimaldi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. J.; Dvorak, J.

    Grimaldi is a relatively small multi-ringed basin located on the western limb of the moon. Spacecraft free-air gravity data reveal a mascon associated with the inner ring of this structure, and the topographic correction to the local lunar gravity field indicates a maximum Bouguer anomaly of +90 milligals at an altitude of 70 kilometers. Approximately 20% of this positive Bouguer anomaly can be attributed to the mare material lying within the inner ring of this basin. From a consideration of the Bouguer gravity and structure of large lunar craters comparable in size to the central basin of Grimaldi, it is suggested that the remaining positive Bouguer anomaly is due to a centrally uplifted plug of lunar mantle material. The uplift was caused by inward crustal collapse which also resulted in the formation of the concentric outer scarp of Grimaldi. In addition, an annulus of low density material, probably a combination of ejecta and in situ breccia, is required to fully reproduce the Bouguer gravity signature across this basin. It is proposed that Grimaldi supplies a critical test in the theory of mascon formation: crustal collapse by ring faulting and central uplift to depths of the crust-mantle boundary are requisites

  15. Estimation of Bouguer Density Precision: Development of Method for Analysis of La Soufriere Volcano Gravity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Gunawan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no3.20084The precision of topographic density (Bouguer density estimation by the Nettleton approach is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and topography. The other method, the Parasnis approach, is based on a minimum correlation of Bouguer gravity anomaly and Bouguer correction. The precision of Bouguer density estimates was investigated by both methods on simple 2D syntetic models and under an assumption free-air anomaly consisting of an effect of topography, an effect of intracrustal, and an isostatic compensation. Based on simulation results, Bouguer density estimates were then investigated for a gravity survey of 2005 on La Soufriere Volcano-Guadeloupe area (Antilles Islands. The Bouguer density based on the Parasnis approach is 2.71 g/cm3 for the whole area, except the edifice area where average topography density estimates are 2.21 g/cm3 where Bouguer density estimates from previous gravity survey of 1975 are 2.67 g/cm3. The Bouguer density in La Soufriere Volcano was uncertainly estimated to be 0.1 g/cm3. For the studied area, the density deduced from refraction seismic data is coherent with the recent Bouguer density estimates. New Bouguer anomaly map based on these Bouguer density values allows to a better geological intepretation.    

  16. Evaluation of the third- and fourth-generation GOCE Earth gravity field models with Australian terrestrial gravity data in spherical harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexer, Moritz; Hirt, Christian; Pail, Roland; Claessens, Sten

    2014-04-01

    In March 2013, the fourth generation of European Space Agency's (ESA) global gravity field models, DIR4 (Bruinsma et al. in Proceedings of the ESA living planet symposium, 28 June-2 July, Bergen, ESA, Publication SP-686, 2010b) and TIM4 (Migliaccio et al. in Proceedings of the ESA living planet symposium, 28 June-2 July, Bergen, ESA, Publication SP-686, 2010), generated from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) gravity observation satellite was released. We evaluate the models using an independent ground truth data set of gravity anomalies over Australia. Combined with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity, a new gravity model is obtained that is used to perform comparisons with GOCE models in spherical harmonics. Over Australia, the new gravity model proves to have significantly higher accuracy in the degrees below 120 as compared to EGM2008 and seems to be at least comparable to the accuracy of this model between degree 150 and degree 260. Comparisons in terms of residual quasi-geoid heights, gravity disturbances, and radial gravity gradients evaluated on the ellipsoid and at approximate GOCE mean satellite altitude ( km) show both fourth generation models to improve significantly w.r.t. their predecessors. Relatively, we find a root-mean-square improvement of 39 % for the DIR4 and 23 % for TIM4 over the respective third release models at a spatial scale of 100 km (degree 200). In terms of absolute errors, TIM4 is found to perform slightly better in the bands from degree 120 up to degree 160 and DIR4 is found to perform slightly better than TIM4 from degree 170 up to degree 250. Our analyses cannot confirm the DIR4 formal error of 1 cm geoid height (0.35 mGal in terms of gravity) at degree 200. The formal errors of TIM4, with 3.2 cm geoid height (0.9 mGal in terms of gravity) at degree 200, seem to be realistic. Due to combination with GRACE and SLR data, the DIR models, at satellite altitude, clearly

  17. The Geodesy of the Main Saturnian Satellites from Range Rate Measurements of the Cassini Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, M.; Iess, L.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Jacobson, R. A.; Lunine, J. I.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-03-01

    During Cassini's eight-year tour in the saturnian system, the gravity field of the main satellites was inferred from range rate measurements of the spacecraft. Here we present our latest results and an overview of our analysis methods.

  18. Changes of Groundwater Storage in the Heihe River Basin Derived from GRACE Gravity Satellite Data%利用GRACE重力卫星数据反演黑河流域地下水变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹艳萍; 南卓铜; 胡兴林

    2012-01-01

    Water scarcity is becoming an increasingly severe problem in arid and semiarid regions because of limitation of available surface water resources and over exploitation of groundwater.As a typical inland river basin in the arid and semiarid regions of Northwest China,the Heihe River basin is facing the same trouble of water resources.Because there is limited and unevenly distributed groundwater monitoring wells within the basin,monitoring groundwater change is hard.In this paper,it is intended to derive temporal and spatial groundwater variation in the Heihe River basin for the period of 2003—2008 from GRACE recovery satellite data,which will be useful for better understanding groundwater resources changing characteristics in the basin.The study also offers a feasible approach to monitor groundwater variation of a river basin only with a small number of(or even without site) groundwater data.To verify the approach,only the groundwater data in the upper and middle reaches of the river was used.The correlation between the derived groundwater variation and the measured one is relatively high,which consequently shows the applicability of GRACE in the river basin to some extent.Based upon preliminary verifications,the method is applied to the entire Heihe River basin.It is found that the groundwater amount decreased,with a small magnitude,in the entire basin during 2003—2004.In 2005 summer groundwater increasing reached a highest rate,and then the increasing magnitude began to decrease,and no more increase in 2008.Spatially,in the upper reaches of the river,groundwater showed decline in 2003—2004,with a slight increase in 2005,no increase in 2006 and a small increase in 2007—2008.In the middle reaches of the river,groundwater slightly increased in 2005,and then declined in the following three years.In the lower reaches of the river,groundwater kept increase in the total 6 study years.%干旱区地表水资源有限,地下水资源被超采利用,黑河流域

  19. The Bransfield Gravity Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrà, Pablo; Stegner, Alexander; Hernández-Arencibia, Mónica; Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Salinas, Carolina; Aguiar-González, Borja; Henríquez-Pastene, Cristian; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ data and laboratory experiments, we show that the circulation of the Bransfield Current (BC) around the South Shetland Islands (SSI) may be characterized in terms of a propagating buoyant gravity current. First, we describe the SSI hydrography and some drifter trajectories, paying special attention to the recirculation of the BC at the northeastern tip and northern slopes of the SSI. We observed that when the northeastward-flowing BC reaches the northeastern tip of the SSI, it recirculates around an anticyclonic mesoscale eddy that has not previously been reported in this region. Part of this recirculating water then proceeds southwest along the northern SSI shelf break as a narrow baroclinic jet and another part join the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Consequently, the cross-slope gradients of properties strengthen, and the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current becomes a nearly submesoscale ( 10 km) front. Second, we compare the observations with buoyant gravity current laboratory experiments in an open basin setup where the SSI topographic barrier is represented by a central wall. The resulting circulation of the buoyant gravity current around the wall mirrors our in situ observations. First, a narrow buoyant gravity current flows northeastward along the southern boundary of the wall. Once the head of the buoyant gravity current reaches the tip of the wall, a recirculating anticyclonic vortex is generated, and the buoyant gravity current then proceeds westward along the north side of the wall. This circulation of the BC around the SSI as a buoyant gravity current may contribute to the fertilization of the waters around the SSI, as suggested by previously reported distributions of nutrients and phytoplankton.

  20. Application of Satellite Gravimetry for Water Resource Vulnerability Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The force of Earth's gravity field varies in proportion to the amount of mass near the surface. Spatial and temporal variations in the gravity field can be measured via their effects on the orbits of satellites. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) is the first satellite mission dedicated to monitoring temporal variations in the gravity field. The monthly gravity anomaly maps that have been delivered by GRACE since 2002 are being used to infer changes in terrestrial water storage (the sum of groundwater, soil moisture, surface waters, and snow and ice), which are the primary source of gravity variability on monthly to decadal timescales after atmospheric and oceanic circulation effects have been removed. Other remote sensing techniques are unable to detect water below the first few centimeters of the land surface. Conventional ground based techniques can be used to monitor terrestrial water storage, but groundwater, soil moisture, and snow observation networks are sparse in most of the world, and the countries that do collect such data rarely are willing to share them. Thus GRACE is unique in its ability to provide global data on variations in the availability of fresh water, which is both vital to life on land and vulnerable to climate variability and mismanagement. This chapter describes the unique and challenging aspects of GRACE terrestrial water storage data, examples of how the data have been used for research and applications related to fresh water vulnerability and change, and prospects for continued contributions of satellite gravimetry to water resources science and policy.

  1. Global Ray Tracing Simulations of the SABER Gravity Wave Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    for the lower strato - sphere [e.g., Wang et al., 2005; Vaughan and Worthington, 2007] and falling sphere data for the mid and upper stratosphere [e.g...12a and 12b. D08126 PREUSSE ET AL.: GRAVITY WAVES BY SATELLITE AND RAYTRACER 19 of 25 D08126 definitively address the relative role of the different...2006JD008126. Dunkerton, T. J. (1997), The role of gravity waves in the quasi-biennial oscillation, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 26,053–26,076. Eckermann, S

  2. Next Generation Gravity Mission: a Step Forward in the Earth's Gravity Field Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrin, P.; Aguirre, M.; Massotti, L.; Cesare, S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper concerns with the "System Support to Laser Interferometry Tracking Technology Development for Gravity Field Monitoring" study of the European Space Agency, a mission study for monitoring the variations of Earth's gravity field at high resolution (up to harmonic degree 200) over a long time period (>5 years). The mission exploits the use of a heterodyne laser interferometer for the high-resolution measurement of the displacement between two satellites flying at low altitude (around 325 km). More in details, employing a formation of two co-orbiting satellites at 10 km relative distance, a resolution of about 1 nm rms is needed in the inter-satellite distance measurement, and the non gravitational accelerations must be measured with a resolution of about 10-10 m/s2 rms to achieve geoid height variation rate error equal to 0.1 mm/year at degree 200. Starting from the geophysical phenomena to be investigated, a detailed derivation of the mission requirements on the orbit, satellite formation and control, measurement instruments (laser interferometer and accelerometer) was performed using analytical models and numerical simulations, and the satellite GNC (Guidance, Navigation & Control) was approached through different techniques. A possible solution for the optical metrology suitable for the realization of a Next-Generation Gravimetric Mission has been identified, designed, breadboarded and tested to a level of detail sufficient to assess its feasibility. The main elements of this optical metrology are: 1) a Michelson-type heterodyne laser interferometer for measuring the distance variation between the retro-reflectors installed on two satellites. The innovative feature of the interferometer consists in chopping the laser beam with a frequency related to the satellite distance. This enables its proper functioning with a retro-reflector placed at large distances (around 10 km) from the source; 2) an optical device consisting of three small telescopes endowed

  3. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the Earth¡¦s crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The Earth¡¦s gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  4. Ensemble Averaged Gravity Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Khosravi, Nima

    2016-01-01

    We put forward the idea that all the theoretically consistent models of gravity have a contribution to the observed gravity interaction. In this formulation each model comes with its own Euclidean path integral weight where general relativity (GR) automatically has the maximum weight in high-curvature regions. We employ this idea in the framework of Lovelock models and show that in four dimensions the result is a specific form of $f(R,G)$ model. This specific $f(R,G)$ satisfies the stability conditions and has self-accelerating solution. Our model is consistent with the local tests of gravity since its behavior is same as GR for high-curvature regimes. In low-curvature regime the gravity force is weaker than GR which can interpret as existence of a repulsive fifth force for very large scales. Interestingly there is an intermediate-curvature regime where the gravity force is stronger in our model than GR. The different behavior of our model in comparison with GR in both low- and intermediate-curvature regimes ...

  5. Gravity anomalies and lithospheric flexure around the Longmen Shan deduced from combinations of in situ observations and EGM2008 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Yawen; Fu, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuohua; Liu, Tai; Xu, Changyi; Jin, Honglin

    2016-10-01

    The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. These new FGAs show pairs of positive and negative anomalies along the eastern edges of the Tibetan Plateau. The FGAs are used to calculate effective elastic thickness ( T e) and load ratios ( F) of the lithosphere. Admittance analysis indicates the T e of Longmen Shan (LMS) to be 6 km, and profile analysis indicates that the T e of the Sichuan Basin excesses 30 km. The load ratio ( F 1 = 1) confirms that the lithospheric flexure of the LMS area can be attributed solely to the surface load of the crust. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. With the new FGAs data, the lithospheric strength of the study area is studied by the authors, and they also give a combined model to illustrate the uplift mechanism of this area.

  6. Application of Gravity Gradients in the Process of GOCE Orbit Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobojć Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE mission satellite orbit using gravity gradient observations was investigated. The orbit improvement is performed by a dedicated software package, called the Orbital Computation System (OCS, which is based on the classical least squares method. The corrections to the initial satellite state vector components are estimated in an iterative process, using dynamic models describing gravitational perturbations. An important component implemented in the OCS package is the 8th order Cowell numerical integration procedure, which directly generates the satellite orbit. Taking into account the real and simulated GOCE gravity gradients, different variants of the solution of the orbit improvement process were obtained. The improved orbits were compared to the GOCE reference orbits (Precise Science Orbits for the GOCE satellite provided by the European Space Agency using the root mean squares (RMS of the differences between the satellite positions in these orbits. The comparison between the improved orbits and the reference orbits was performed with respect to the inertial reference frame (IRF at J2000.0 epoch. The RMS values for the solutions based on the real gravity gradient measurements are at a level of hundreds of kilometers and more. This means that orbit improvement using the real gravity gradients is ineffective. However, all solutions using simulated gravity gradients have RMS values below the threshold determined by the RMS values for the computed orbits (without the improvement. The most promising results were achieved when short orbital arcs with lengths up to tens of minutes were improved. For these short arcs, the RMS values reach the level of centimeters, which is close to the accuracy of the Precise Science Orbit for the GOCE satellite. Additional research has provided requirements for efficient orbit improvement in terms of the accuracy and

  7. Gravity Science with The JUICE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, M.; Finocchiaro, S.; Iess, L.

    2012-04-01

    JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) is a European mission to the Jovian system, proposed in the frame of the ESA Cosmic Vision program. The spacecraft will reach the Jovian system and fly several times by the moons Callisto and Europa before being inserted in a nearly circular, polar orbit around Ganymede. After its arrival in 2030, the mission timeline entails two Europa flybys (2030), twelve Callisto flybys (2031) and the orbital phase at Ganymede (2033) [1]. Gravity measurements will provide crucial information on the interior structure of the three satellites. If the bodies are in hydrostatic equilibrium, the radial density distribution may be constrained from their moment of inertia factor and low-degree gravity field coefficients [2]. Furthermore, the determination of the high-degree harmonics will provide the distribution of gravity anomalies. Evidence for subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto, one of the main scientific goals of the mission, will be obtained by the determination of the tidal Love number k2 as part of a global solution for the static and variable gravity field. Gravity fields and tidal deformations will be determined by means of precise Doppler tracking of the spacecraft in Ka-band (32.5-34 GHz). The Radio Science Instrument (RSI) is enabled by a Ka-band transponder which, complemented by suitable ground instrumentation, will enable a radio link with a very high phase stability. The main observable quantity for gravity field determination is the range rate (to 3 micron/s at 1000 s integration time, two-way). The spacecraft range (accurate to 20 cm, two-way) will be used to improve the ephemerides of the Jupiter system. Gravity science at Ganymede will be carried out during the orbital phase. According to the mission profile (subject to change), the first 102 days will be spent at an altitude of 500 km. The orbit will be lowered to 200 km in the last 32 days of the mission. If the spacecraft will be endowed with a steerable medium gain

  8. Comparisons of atmospheric data and reduction methods for the analysis of satellite gravimetry observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forootan, E.; Didova, O.; Kusche, J.; Löcher, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived gravity solutions contain errors mostly due to instrument noise, anisotropic spatial sampling, and temporal aliasing. Improving the quality of satellite gravimetry observations, in terms of using more sensitive sensors and/or increasing the

  9. Comparisons of atmospheric data and reduction methods for the analysis of satellite gravimetry observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forootan, E.; Didova, O.; Kusche, J.; Löcher, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived gravity solutions contain errors mostly due to instrument noise, anisotropic spatial sampling, and temporal aliasing. Improving the quality of satellite gravimetry observations, in terms of using more sensitive sensors and/or increasing the

  10. Estimation of mass change trends in the Earth’s system on the basis of GRACE satellite data, with application to Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, C.; Ditmar, P.; Riva, E.M.; Slobbe, D.C.; Liu, X.L.; Farahani, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission measures the Earth’s gravity field since March 2002. We propose a new filtering procedure for post-processing GRACE-based monthly gravity field solutions provided in the form of spherical harmonic coefficients. The procedure is tu

  11. Does climate warming stimulate or inhibit soil protist communities? A test on testate amoebae in high-arctic tundra with free-air temperature increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, Andrey N; Nijs, Ivan; Beyens, Louis

    2011-04-01

    Soil testate amoebae assemblages in a grassland area at Zackenberg (Northeast Greenland) were subjected to simulated climate-warming during the growing season using the Free-Air Temperature Increase technique. Samples were collected in upper (0 - 3cm) and deeper (3 - 6cm) soil horizons. Mean temperature elevations at 2.5 and 7.5 cm depth were 2.58 ± SD 1.11 and 2.13±SD 0.77°C, respectively, and did not differ significantly. Soil moisture in the top 11cm was not affected by the warming. During the manipulation, the densities of living amoebae and empty shells were higher in the experimental plots but only in the upper layer. Possibly, testate amoebae in the deeper layer were limited by other factors, suggesting that warming enhances the carrying capacity only in favourable conditions. Species richness, on the other hand, was only increased in the deeper horizon. Warming did not change the percentage of individuals belonging to small-sized species in any of the living assemblages, contrary to our expectation that those species would quickly increase their density. However, in the empty shell assemblages, the proportion of small-sized individuals in the experimental plots was higher in both layers, indicating a rapid, transient increase in small amoebae before the first sampling date. Changes in successional state of testate amoebae assemblages in response to future climate change might thus be ephemeral, whereas alterations in density and species richness might be more sustained.

  12. Leaf and canopy conductance in aspen and aspen-birch forests under free-air enrichment of carbon dioxide and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddling, Johan; Teclaw, Ronald M; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Ellsworth, David S

    2009-11-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) have the potential to affect tree physiology and structure, and hence forest feedbacks on climate. Here, we investigated how elevated concentrations of CO2 (+45%) and O3 (+35%), alone and in combination, affected conductance for mass transfer at the leaf and canopy levels in pure aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and in mixed aspen and birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) forests in the free-air CO2-O3 enrichment experiment near Rhinelander, Wisconsin (Aspen FACE). The study was conducted during two growing seasons, when steady-state leaf area index (L) had been reached after > 6 years of exposure to CO2- and O3-enrichment treatments. Canopy conductance (g(c)) was estimated from stand sap flux, while leaf-level conductance of sun leaves in the upper canopy was derived by three different and independent methods: sap flux and L in combination with vertical canopy modelling, leaf 13C discrimination methodology in combination with photosynthesis modelling and leaf-level gas exchange. Regardless of the method used, the mean values of leaf-level conductance were higher in trees growing under elevated CO2 and/or O3 than in trees growing in control plots, causing a CO2 x O3 interaction that was statistically significant (P aspen and mixed aspen-birch communities. These results demonstrate that short-term primary stomatal closure responses to elevated CO2 and O3 were completely offset by long-term cumulative effects of these trace gases on tree and stand structure in determining canopy- and leaf-level conductance in pure aspen and mixed aspen-birch forests. Our results, together with the findings from other long-term FACE experiments with trees, suggest that model assumptions of large reductions in stomatal conductance under rising atmospheric CO2 are very uncertain for forests.

  13. Comprehensive ecosystem model-experiment synthesis using multiple datasets at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment experiments: model performance and compensating biases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Anthony P [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; DeKauwe, Martin G [Macquarie University; Medlyn, Belinda [Macquarie University; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Asao, Shinichi [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hickler, Thomas [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; Huntinford, Chris [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lomas, Mark [University of Sheffield; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Prentice, I. Collin [Macquarie University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Shusen [Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS); Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Warlind, David [Lund University, Sweden; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Woodward, F. Ian [University of Sheffield; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a remarkable wealth of data to test the sensitivities of terrestrial ecosystem models (TEMs). In this study, a broad set of 11 TEMs were compared to 22 years of data from two contrasting FACE experiments in temperate forests of the south eastern US the evergreen Duke Forest and the deciduous Oak Ridge forest. We evaluated the models' ability to reproduce observed net primary productivity (NPP), transpiration and Leaf Area index (LAI) in ambient CO2 treatments. Encouragingly, many models simulated annual NPP and transpiration within observed uncertainty. Daily transpiration model errors were often related to errors in leaf area phenology and peak LAI. Our analysis demonstrates that the simulation of LAI often drives the simulation of transpiration and hence there is a need to adopt the most appropriate of hypothesis driven methods to simulate and predict LAI. Of the three competing hypotheses determining peak LAI (1) optimisation to maximise carbon export, (2) increasing SLA with canopy depth and (3) the pipe model the pipe model produced LAI closest to the observations. Modelled phenology was either prescribed or based on broader empirical calibrations to climate. In some cases, simulation accuracy was achieved through compensating biases in component variables. For example, NPP accuracy was sometimes achieved with counter-balancing biases in nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen uptake. Combined analysis of parallel measurements aides the identification of offsetting biases; without which over-confidence in model abilities to predict ecosystem function may emerge, potentially leading to erroneous predictions of change under future climates.

  14. The effect of free air carbon dioxide enrichment and nitrogen fertilisation on the chemical composition and nutritional value of wheat and barley grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Hüther, Liane; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Wätzig, Hermann; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-08-01

    A rising atmospheric CO2 concentration might influence the nutrient composition of feedstuffs and consequently the nutritional value for livestock. The present study investigates the effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on the chemical composition and nutritional value of winter wheat cv. "Batis" and winter barley cv. "Theresa". Both cereals were grown at two different atmospheric CO2 concentrations (ambient CO2 [AMBI]: 380 ppm and enriched CO2 [free air carbon dioxide enrichment, FACE]: 550 ppm) for two growing seasons. The influence of two different nitrogen (N) fertilisation levels (adequate N supply [N100] and nearly 50% of adequate N supply [N50]) were studied as well. A significant effect was observed for the crude protein content, which declined at FACE condition in a range of 8-16 g kg(-1) in wheat and of 10-20 g kg(-1) in barley. A reduced N fertilisation level resulted in a strong reduction of crude protein concentration in both cereal species. In wheat, a decrease in N supply significantly enhanced the concentration of starch and crude fibre. In barley, only the concentration of fructose increased under FACE condition and reduced N fertilisation. The FACE did not have major effects on the concentrations of minerals, while the influence of N fertilisation was different for both cereals. Whereas no effects could be observed for barley, a reduced N supply caused a significant reduction in concentrations of zinc, manganese and iron in wheat. Furthermore, an undirected effect of atmospheric CO2 and N fertilisation levels were found for the amino acid concentrations. Based on these results, future scenarios of climate change would have an impact on the nutritional value of cereal grains.

  15. Do the rich always become richer? Characterizing the leaf physiological response of the high-yielding rice cultivar Takanari to free-air CO2 enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles P; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Tokida, Takeshi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2014-02-01

    The development of crops which are well suited to growth under future environmental conditions such as higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) is essential to meeting the challenge of ensuring food security in the face of the growing human population and changing climate. A high-yielding indica rice variety (Oryza sativa L. cv. Takanari) has been recently identified as a potential candidate for such breeding, due to its high productivity in present [CO2]. To test if it could further increase its productivity under elevated [CO2] (eCO2), Takanari was grown in the paddy field under season-long free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE, approximately 200 µmol mol(-1) above ambient [CO2]) and its leaf physiology was compared with the representative japonica variety 'Koshihikari'. Takanari showed consistently higher midday photosynthesis and stomatal conductance than Koshihikari under both ambient and FACE growth conditions over 2 years. Maximum ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and electron transport rates were higher for Takanari at the mid-grain filling stage in both years. Mesophyll conductance was higher in Takanari than in Koshihikari at the late grain-filling stage. In contrast to Koshihikari, Takanari grown under FACE conditions showed no decrease in total leaf nitrogen on an area basis relative to ambient-grown plants. Chl content was higher in Takanari than in Koshihikari at the same leaf nitrogen level. These results indicate that Takanari maintains its superiority over Koshihikari in regards to its leaf-level productivity when grown in elevated [CO2] and it may be a valuable resource for rice breeding programs which seek to increase crop productivity under current and future [CO2].

  16. BIFoR FACE: A ten-year Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Experiment in Old Growth Deciduous English Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Ellsworth, D.; Hemming, D.; Crous, K.; Pope, F.; Blaen, P.; Poynter, A.; Hamilton, L.; Blenkhorn, D.; Jarvis-Rouse, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forest research (BIFoR) will perform fundamental physical, biological, ecological, social and cultural research of direct relevance to forested landscapes worldwide. A core platform for BIFoR to study the ten-year response of a mature temperate deciduous forest ecosystem to against a large step-change in atmospheric [CO2] is the BIFoR Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment. BIFoR FACE is being established in Mill Haft, a mature (~150 year-old) oak (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) coppice-with-standards woodland in central England. The facility will enable elevated CO2 (eCO2) treatments to be introduced in 30 m diameter rings (3 treatment and 6 control plots), commencing in spring 2016. Under eCO2 conditions primary research questions will investigate carbon uptake and storage, corresponding nutrient limitations, and biodiversity and ecosystem responses. As well as describing the facility and experimental design, we present baseline data collected throughout 2015, prior to fumigation. These data include: biophysical tree properties; atmospheric CO2/H2O fluxes; airborne and ground laser scatterometry; leaf area index; geophysical survey data; phenology camera derivatives; soil and water chemical and physical properties; and invertebrate surveys. Data from an intensive campaign conducted during august 2015 are also shown, including in- and above- canopy characterisation of biogenic VOCs using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, aerosol loading including bioaerosols, and enhanced atmospheric chemistry. Further campaign results are presented from leaf level photosynthetic carbon-dioxide response curve (A/Ci) performed at different canopy heights on oak trees, and on the dominant understory species - hazel and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatinus) across the site. BIFoR FACE is an exciting new international facility for forest science - ideas for collaborations are encouraged. Please see http

  17. Soil and water warming accelerates phenology and down-regulation of leaf photosynthesis of rice plants grown under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Minaco; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Matsunami, Toshinori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Ryoji; Okada, Masumi

    2014-02-01

    To enable prediction of future rice production in a changing climate, we need to understand the interactive effects of temperature and elevated [CO2] (E[CO2]). We therefore examined if the effect of E[CO2] on the light-saturated leaf photosynthetic rate (Asat) was affected by soil and water temperature (NT, normal; ET, elevated) under open-field conditions at the rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Shizukuishi, Japan, in 2007 and 2008. Season-long E[CO2] (+200 µmol mol(-1)) increased Asat by 26%, when averaged over two years, temperature regimes and growth stages. The effect of ET (+2°C) on Asat was not significant at active tillering and heading, but became negative and significant at mid-grain filling; Asat in E[CO2]-ET was higher than in ambient [CO2] (A[CO2])-NT by only 4%. Photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2] also became apparent at mid-grain filling; Asat compared at the same [CO2] in the leaf cuvette was significantly lower in plants grown in E[CO2] than in those grown in A[CO2]. The additive effects of E[CO2] and ET decreased Asat by 23% compared with that of A[CO2]-NT plants. Although total crop nitrogen (N) uptake was increased by ET, N allocation to the leaves and to Rubisco was reduced under ET and E[CO2] at mid-grain filling, which resulted in a significant decrease (32%) in the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation on a leaf area basis. Because the change in N allocation was associated with the accelerated phenology in E[CO2]-ET plants, we conclude that soil and water warming accelerates photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2].

  18. The photosynthetic response of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in its fifth year of free-air CO(sub 2) enrichment (FACE) at Eschikon, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.P.; Long, S.P.; Williams, J.

    1998-12-31

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv.Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}) [CO{sub 2}], high (560 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) or low (140 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) nitrogen addition and were harvested five times a year during the growing season. The plants were sown during 1992, additional plots being sown during 1995. These were in their fifth year and second year of growth respectively. Exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] was carried out with a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most realistic system of fumigation currently available. Elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased diurnal CO{sub 2} uptake by between 40 to 83% while reducing stomatal conductance by between 1 and 38% in all of the 1992 grown plants measured at high [CO{sub 2}]. Analysis of the A/c{sub i} response of 1992 grown plants showed no acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}] - both V{sub c,max} (a measure of the maximum in vivo rate of carboxylation) and J{sub max} (a measure of the maximum capacity for the regeneration of RuBP) showed no significant change during any of the periods of regrowth. In contrast the leaves of 1995 grown plants, appeared to be experiencing an acclimatory change in their photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. However, this negative response seemed to be removed directly after a harvest when the source:sink balance had increased. The apparent lack of an acclimatory response after almost 5 years of growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}], suggests that L. perenne may be close to achieving the appropriate photosynthetic adjustments which would allow it to attain a significantly higher photosynthetic potential.

  19. THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSE OF THE PERENNIAL RYEGRASS (LOLIUM PERENNE) IN ITS FIFTH YEAR OF FREE-AIR CO{sub 2} ENRICHMENT (FACE) AT ESCHIKON, SWITZERLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,J.P.; LONG,STEPHEN,P.; WILLIAMS,J.

    1998-12-31

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv.Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}) [CO{sub 2}], high (560 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) or low (140 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) nitrogen addition and were harvested five times a year during the growing season. The plants were sown during 1992, additional plots being sown during 1995. These were in their fifth year and second year of growth respectively. Exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] was carried out with a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most realistic system of fumigation currently available. Elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased diurnal CO{sub 2} uptake by between 40 to 83% while reducing stomatal conductance by between 1 and 38% in all of the 1992 grown plants measured at high [CO{sub 2}]. Analysis of the A/c{sub i} response of 1992 grown plants showed no acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]--both V{sub c,max} (a measure of the maximum in vivo rate of carboxylation) and J{sub max} (a measure of the maximum capacity for the regeneration of RuBP) showed no significant change during any of the periods of regrowth. In contrast the leaves of 1995 grown plants, appeared to be experiencing an acclimatory change in their photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. However, this negative response seemed to be removed directly after a harvest when the source:sink balance had increased. The apparent lack of an acclimatory response after almost 5 years of growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}], suggests that L. perenne may be close to achieving the appropriate photosynthetic adjustments which would allow it to attain a significantly higher photosynthetic potential.

  20. Effects of elevated CO2 on grain yield and quality of wheat: results from a 3-year free-air CO2 enrichment experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högy, P; Wieser, H; Köhler, P; Schwadorf, K; Breuer, J; Franzaring, J; Muntifering, R; Fangmeier, A

    2009-11-01

    Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. TRISO) was grown for three consecutive seasons in a free-air carbon dioxide (CO(2)) enrichment (FACE) field experiment in order to examine the effects on crop yield and grain quality. CO(2) enrichment promoted aboveground biomass (+11.8%) and grain yield (+10.4%). However, adverse effects were predominantly observed on wholegrain quality characteristics. Although the thousand-grain weight remained unchanged, size distribution was significantly shifted towards smaller grains, which may directly relate to lower market value. Total grain protein concentration decreased significantly by 7.4% under elevated CO(2), and protein and amino acid composition were altered. Corresponding to the decline in grain protein concentration, CO(2) enrichment resulted in an overall decrease in amino acid concentrations, with greater reductions in non-essential than essential amino acids. Minerals such as potassium, molybdenum and lead increased, while manganese, iron, cadmium and silicon decreased, suggesting that adjustments of agricultural practices may be required to retain current grain quality standards. The concentration of fructose and fructan, as well as amounts per area of total and individual non-structural carbohydrates, except for starch, significantly increased in the grain. The same holds true for the amount of lipids. With regard to mixing and rheological properties of the flour, a significant increase in gluten resistance under elevated CO(2) was observed. CO(2) enrichment obviously affected grain quality characteristics that are important for consumer nutrition and health, and for industrial processing and marketing, which have to date received little attention.

  1. Gravity field recovery in the framework of a Geodesy and Time Reference in Space (GETRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Markus; Schlicht, Anja; Pail, Roland; Murböck, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The study ;Geodesy and Time Reference in Space; (GETRIS), funded by European Space Agency (ESA), evaluates the potential and opportunities coming along with a global space-borne infrastructure for data transfer, clock synchronization and ranging. Gravity field recovery could be one of the first beneficiary applications of such an infrastructure. This paper analyzes and evaluates the two-way high-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking as a novel method and as a long-term perspective for the determination of the Earth's gravitational field, using it as a synergy of one-way high-low combined with low-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking, in order to generate adequate de-aliasing products. First planned as a constellation of geostationary satellites, it turned out, that an integration of European Union Global Navigation Satellite System (Galileo) satellites (equipped with inter-Galileo links) into a Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) constellation would extend the capability of such a mission constellation remarkably. We report about simulations of different Galileo and Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) satellite constellations, computed using time variable geophysical background models, to determine temporal changes in the Earth's gravitational field. Our work aims at an error analysis of this new satellite/instrument scenario by investigating the impact of different error sources. Compared to a low-low satellite-to-satellite-tracking mission, results show reduced temporal aliasing errors due to a more isotropic error behavior caused by an improved observation geometry, predominantly in near-radial direction within the inter-satellite-links, as well as the potential of an improved gravity recovery with higher spatial and temporal resolution. The major error contributors of temporal gravity retrieval are aliasing errors due to undersampling of high frequency signals (mainly atmosphere, ocean and ocean tides). In this context, we investigate adequate methods to reduce these errors. We

  2. Gravity model development for TOPEX/POSEIDON: Joint gravity models 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; Lerch, F. J.; Marshall, J. A.; Pavlis, E. C.; Putney, B. H.; Tapley, B. D.; Eanes, R. J.; Ries, J. C.; Schutz, B. E.; Shum, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) prelaunch Joint Gravity Model-1 (JGM-1) and the postlaunch JGM-2 Earth gravitational models have been developed to support precision orbit determination for T/P. Each of these models is complete to degree 70 in spherical harmonics and was computed from a combination of satellite tracking data, satellite altimetry, and surface gravimetry. While improved orbit determination accuracies for T/P have driven the improvements in the models, the models are general in application and also provide an improved geoid for oceanographic computations. The postlaunch model, JGM-2, which includes T/P satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite (DORIS) tracking data, introduces radial orbit errors for T/P that are only 2 cm RMS with the commission errors of the marine geoid for terms to degree 70 being +/- 25 cm. Errors in modeling the nonconservative forces acting on T/P increase the total radial errors to only 3-4 cm root mean square (RMS), a result much better than premission goals. While the orbit accuracy goal for T/P has been far surpassed geoid errors still prevent the absolute determination of the ocean dynamic topography for wavelengths shorter than about 2500 km. Only a dedicated gravitational field satellite mission will likely provide the necessary improvement in the geoid.

  3. Tidal Models In A New Era of Satellite Gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Rowlings, David D.; Edbert, G. D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The high precision gravity measurements to be made by recently launched (and recently approved) satellites place new demands on models of Earth, atmospheric, and oceanic tides. The latter is the most problematic. The ocean tides induce variations in the Earth's geoid by amounts that far exceed the new satellite sensitivities, and tidal models must be used to correct for this. Two methods are used here to determine the standard errors in current ocean tide models. At long wavelengths these errors exceed the sensitivity of the GRACE mission. Tidal errors will not prevent the new satellite missions from improving our knowledge of the geopotential by orders of magnitude, but the errors may well contaminate GRACE estimates of temporal variations in gravity. Solar tides are especially problematic because of their long alias periods. The satellite data may be used to improve tidal models once a sufficiently long time series is obtained. Improvements in the long-wavelength components of lunar tides are especially promising.

  4. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN08 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusettes, Maine, and Canada collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity...

  5. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN01 (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Canada, and Lake Ontario collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  6. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alabama and Florida collected in 2008 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  7. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CN02 (2013 & 2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Nebraska collected in 2013 & 2014 over 3 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  8. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CS03 (2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Texas and Louisiana collected in 2009 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  9. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for TS01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands collected in 2009 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  10. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN04 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Michigan and Lake Huron collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American...

  11. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for AN03 (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Alaska collected in 2010 and 2012 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  12. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN06 (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Maine, Canada, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2012 over 2 surveys. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  13. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN05 (2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the...

  14. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for PN01 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for California and Oregon collected in 2011 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical...

  15. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for ES01 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Florida, the Bahamas, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of...

  16. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for CN03 (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Nebraska collected in 2014 over one survey. This data set is part of the Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum...

  17. Cosmological Tests of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2010-01-01

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the universe. We review recent developments in modified gravity theories, focusing on higher dimensional approaches and chameleon/f(R) theories. We classify these models in terms of the screening mechanisms that enable such theories to approach general relativity on small scales (and thus satisfy solar system constraints). We describe general features of the modified Friedman equation in such theories. The second half of this review describes experimental tests of gravity in light of the new theoretical approaches. We summarize the high precision tests of gravity on laboratory and solar system scales. We describe in some detail tests on astrophysical scales ranging from ~kpc (galaxy scales) to ~Gpc (large-scale structure). These tests rely on the growth and inter-relationship of perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields which can be measured using gravitational lensi...

  18. Quantum Gravity Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new quantum gravity experiment is reported with the data confirming the generali- sation of the Schrödinger equation to include the interaction of the wave function with dynamical space. Dynamical space turbulence, via this interaction process, raises and lowers the energy of the electron wave function, which is detected by observing conse- quent variations in the electron quantum barrier tunnelling rate in reverse-biased Zener diodes. This process has previously been reported and enabled the measurement of the speed of the dynamical space flow, which is consistent with numerous other detection experiments. The interaction process is dependent on the angle between the dynamical space flow velocity and the direction of the electron flow in the diode, and this depen- dence is experimentally demonstrated. This interaction process explains gravity as an emergent quantum process, so unifying quantum phenomena and gravity. Gravitational waves are easily detected.

  19. Ghosts of Critical Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Porrati, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Recently proposed "critical" higher-derivative gravities in $AdS_D$ $D>3$ are expected to carry logarithmic representation of the Anti de Sitter isometry group. In this note, we quantize linear fluctuations of these critical gravities, which are known to be either identical with linear fluctuations of Einstein's gravity or else satisfy logarithmic boundary conditions at spacial infinity. We identify the scalar product uniquely defined by the symplectic structure implied by the classical action, and show that it does not posses null vectors. Instead, we show that the scalar product between any two Einstein modes vanishes, while the scalar product of an Einstein mode with a logarithmic mode is generically nonzero. This is the basic property of logarithmic representation that makes them neither unitary nor unitarizable.

  20. GRAVITY detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrgan, Leander H.; Finger, Gert; Eisenhauer, Frank; Panduro, Johana

    2016-08-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation instrument for the VLT Interferometer, designed for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the K-band. It will combine the AO corrected beams of the four VLT telescopes. In total, the GRAVITY instrument uses five eAPD detectors four for the infrared wavefront sensors of each telescope and one for the fringe tracker. In addition two Hawaii2RG arrays are installed, one for the acquisition camera and one for the spectrometer. The SAPHIRA eAPD array is a newly developed near-infrared detector with sub-electron noise performance at frame rates > 1Kfps. For all seven detectors the ESO common controller, NGC, is used. This paper presents an overview and comparison of GRAVITY detector systems and their final performances at the telescope