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Sample records for satellite dna repeats

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of satellite DNA repeats from Phaseolus beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Tiago; Dos Santos, Karla G B; Richard, Manon M S; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Geffroy, Valérie; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) subtelomeres are highly enriched for khipu, the main satellite DNA identified so far in this genome. Here, we comparatively investigate khipu genomic organization in Phaseolus species from different clades. Additionally, we identified and characterized another satellite repeat, named jumper, associated to khipu. A mixture of P. vulgaris khipu clones hybridized in situ confirmed the presence of khipu-like sequences on subterminal chromosome regions in all Phaseolus species, with differences in the number and intensity of signals between species and when species-specific clones were used. Khipu is present as multimers of ∼500 bp and sequence analyses of cloned fragments revealed close relationship among khipu repeats. The new repeat, named jumper, is a 170-bp satellite sequence present in all Phaseolus species and inserted into the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rDNA in the P. vulgaris genome. Nevertheless, jumper was found as a high-copy repeat at subtelomeres and/or pericentromeres in the Phaseolus microcarpus lineage only. Our data argue for khipu as an important subtelomeric satellite DNA in the genus and for a complex satellite repeat composition of P. microcarpus subtelomeres, which also contain jumper. Furthermore, the differential amplification of these repeats in subtelomeres or pericentromeres reinforces the presence of a dynamic satellite DNA library in Phaseolus.

  2. Evolution of ribosomal DNA-derived satellite repeat in tomato genome

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    Hur Cheol-Goo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandemly repeated DNA, also called as satellite DNA, is a common feature of eukaryotic genomes. Satellite repeats can expand and contract dramatically, which may cause genome size variation among genetically-related species. However, the origin and expansion mechanism are not clear yet and needed to be elucidated. Results FISH analysis revealed that the satellite repeat showing homology with intergenic spacer (IGS of rDNA present in the tomato genome. By comparing the sequences representing distinct stages in the divergence of rDNA repeat with those of canonical rDNA arrays, the molecular mechanism of the evolution of satellite repeat is described. Comprehensive sequence analysis and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that a long terminal repeat retrotransposon was interrupted into each copy of the 18S rDNA and polymerized by recombination rather than transposition via an RNA intermediate. The repeat was expanded through doubling the number of IGS into the 25S rRNA gene, and also greatly increasing the copy number of type I subrepeat in the IGS of 25-18S rDNA by segmental duplication. Homogenization to a single type of subrepeat in the satellite repeat was achieved as the result of amplifying copy number of the type I subrepeat but eliminating neighboring sequences including the type II subrepeat and rRNA coding sequence from the array. FISH analysis revealed that the satellite repeats are commonly present in closely-related Solanum species, but vary in their distribution and abundance among species. Conclusion These results represent that the dynamic satellite repeats were originated from intergenic spacer of rDNA unit in the tomato genome. This result could serve as an example towards understanding the initiation and the expansion of the satellite repeats in complex eukaryotic genome.

  3. Evolutionary Origin of Higher-Order Repeat Structure in Alpha-Satellite DNA of Primate Centromeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Yuriko; Terada, Shoko; Jahan, Israt; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is a main DNA component of primate centromeres, consisting of tandemly repeated units of ∼170 bp. The AS of humans contains sequences organized into higher-order repeat (HOR) structures, in which a block of multiple repeat units forms a larger repeat unit and the larger units are repeated tandemly. The presence of HOR in AS is widely thought to be unique to hominids (family Hominidae; humans and great apes). Recently, we have identified an HOR-containing AS in the siamang, which is a small ape species belonging to the genus Symphalangus in the family Hylobatidae. This result supports the view that HOR in AS is an attribute of hominoids (superfamily Hominoidea) rather than hominids. A single example is, however, not sufficient for discussion of the evolutionary origin of HOR-containing AS. In the present study, we developed an efficient method for detecting signs of large-scale HOR and demonstrated HOR of AS in all the three other genera. Thus, AS organized into HOR occurs widely in hominoids. Our results indicate that (i) HOR-containing AS was present in the last common ancestor of hominoids or (ii) HOR-containing AS emerged independently in most or all basal branches of hominoids. We have also confirmed HOR occurrence in centromeric AS in the Hylobatidae family, which remained unclear in our previous study because of the existence of AS in subtelomeric regions, in addition to centromeres, of siamang chromosomes. PMID:24585002

  4. Significance of satellite DNA revealed by conservation of a widespread repeat DNA sequence among angiosperms.

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    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, Soom Nath; Rajpal, Vijay Rani

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of plant genome structure and evolution requires comprehensive characterization of repetitive sequences that make up the majority of plant nuclear DNA. In the present study, we analyzed the nature of pCtKpnI-I and pCtKpnI-II tandem repeated sequences, reported earlier in Carthamus tinctorius. Interestingly, homolog of pCtKpnI-I repeat sequence was also found to be present in widely divergent families of angiosperms. pCtKpnI-I showed high sequence similarity but low copy number among various taxa of different families of angiosperms analyzed. In comparison, pCtKpnI-II was specific to the genus Carthamus and was not present in any other taxa analyzed. The molecular structure of pCtKpnI-I was analyzed in various unrelated taxa of angiosperms to decipher the evolutionary conserved nature of the sequence and its possible functional role.

  5. Obesity-induced sperm DNA methylation changes at satellite repeats are reprogrammed in rat offspring

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    Neil A Youngson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is now strong evidence that the paternal contribution to offspring phenotype at fertilisation is more than just DNA. However, the identity and mechanisms of this nongenetic inheritance are poorly understood. One of the more important questions in this research area is: do changes in sperm DNA methylation have phenotypic consequences for offspring? We have previously reported that offspring of obese male rats have altered glucose metabolism compared with controls and that this effect was inherited through nongenetic means. Here, we describe investigations into sperm DNA methylation in a new cohort using the same protocol. Male rats on a high-fat diet were 30% heavier than control-fed males at the time of mating (16-19 weeks old, n = 14/14. A small (0.25% increase in total 5-methyl-2Ͳ-deoxycytidine was detected in obese rat spermatozoa by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Examination of the repetitive fraction of the genome with methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-Seq and pyrosequencing revealed that retrotransposon DNA methylation states in spermatozoa were not affected by obesity, but methylation at satellite repeats throughout the genome was increased. However, examination of muscle, liver, and spermatozoa from male 27-week-old offspring from obese and control fathers (both groups from n = 8 fathers revealed that normal DNA methylation levels were restored during offspring development. Furthermore, no changes were found in three genomic imprints in obese rat spermatozoa. Our findings have implications for transgenerational epigenetic reprogramming. They suggest that postfertilization mechanisms exist for normalising some environmentally-induced DNA methylation changes in sperm cells.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

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    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  7. Major satellite repeat RNA stabilize heterochromatin retention of Suv39h enzymes by RNA-nucleosome association and RNA:DNA hybrid formation.

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    Velazquez Camacho, Oscar; Galan, Carmen; Swist-Rosowska, Kalina; Ching, Reagan; Gamalinda, Michael; Karabiber, Fethullah; De La Rosa-Velazquez, Inti; Engist, Bettina; Koschorz, Birgit; Shukeir, Nicholas; Onishi-Seebacher, Megumi; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 histone lysine methyltransferases are hallmark enzymes at mammalian heterochromatin. We show here that the mouse Suv39h2 enzyme differs from Suv39h1 by containing an N-terminal basic domain that facilitates retention at mitotic chromatin and provides an additional affinity for major satellite repeat RNA. To analyze an RNA-dependent interaction with chromatin, we purified native nucleosomes from mouse ES cells and detect that Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 exclusively associate with poly-nucleosomes. This association was attenuated upon RNaseH incubation and entirely lost upon RNaseA digestion of native chromatin. Major satellite repeat transcripts remain chromatin-associated and have a secondary structure that favors RNA:DNA hybrid formation. Together, these data reveal an RNA-mediated mechanism for the stable chromatin interaction of the Suv39h KMT and suggest a function for major satellite non-coding RNA in the organization of an RNA-nucleosome scaffold as the underlying structure of mouse heterochromatin.

  8. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

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    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  9. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

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    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  10. Comparative genomics and molecular dynamics of DNA repeats in eukaryotes.

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    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, "tandem repeats" and "dispersed repeats." Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences.

  11. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  12. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  13. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    OpenAIRE

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range.

  14. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  15. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species

  16. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    1995-01-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattl

  17. Mammalian satellite DNA: a speaking dumb.

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    Enukashvily, Natella I; Ponomartsev, Nikita V

    2013-01-01

    The tandemly organized highly repetitive satellite DNA is the main DNA component of centromeric/pericentromeric constitutive heterochromatin. For almost a century, it was considered as "junk DNA," only a small portion of which is used for kinetochore formation. The current review summarizes recent data about satellite DNA transcription. The possible functions of the transcripts are discussed.

  18. Satellite DNA in Plants: More than Just Rubbish.

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    Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A

    2015-01-01

    For decades, satellite DNAs have been the hidden part of genomes. Initially considered as junk DNA, there is currently an increasing appreciation of the functional significance of satellite DNA repeats and of their sequences. Satellite DNA families accumulate in the heterochromatin in different parts of the eukaryotic chromosomes, mainly in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions, but they also span the functional centromere. Tandem repeat sequences may spread from subtelomeric to interstitial loci, leading to the formation of chromosome-specific loci or to the accumulation in equilocal sites in different chromosomes. They also appear as the main components of the heterochromatin in the sex-specific region of sex chromosomes. Satellite DNA, required for chromosome organization, also plays a role in pairing and segregation. Some satellite repeats are transcribed and can participate in the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin structure and in the modulation of gene expression. In addition to the identification of the different satellite DNA families, their characteristics and location, we are interested in determining their impact on the genomes, by identifying the mechanisms leading to their appearance and amplification as well as in understanding how they change over time, the factors affecting these changes, and the influence exerted by the evolutionary history of the organisms. On the other hand, satellite DNA sequences are rapidly evolving sequences that may cause reproductive barriers between organisms and promote speciation. The accumulation of experimental data collected in recent years and the emergence of new approaches based on next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genome analysis are opening new perspectives that are changing our understanding of satellite DNA. This review examines recent data to provide a timely update on the overall information gathered about this part of the genome, focusing on the advances in the knowledge of its

  19. Evaluation of pulsed RFI effects on digital satellite repeaters

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    Huang, T. C.; Braun, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for assessing the effect of pulsed RFI on the error probability of a coherent phase-shift keyed signal through a nonlinear satellite repeater. The RFI is assumed to affect the uplink channel and to consist of CW pulses with random power levels and arriving randomly in time with a Poisson distribution. A model to approximate the effect of intermodulation products is introduced and the error probability conditioned on the output of the satellite repeater is computed. The classical moment technique is then used as an efficient method of averaging the conditional error probability over the numerous random parameters associated with the uplink signal.

  20. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

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    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  1. Satellite DNA and heterochromatin of the flour beetle Tribolium confusum.

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    Plohl, M; Lucijanić-Justić, V; Ugarković, D; Petitpierre, E; Juan, C

    1993-06-01

    The chromosomes of Tribolium confusum have conspicuous bulks of pericentromeric constitutive heterochromatin. The amount of heterochromatin measured by C-banding in metaphase chromosomes is estimated to be 40-45%. It is composed of an A + T rich DNA according to the distamycin A/diamidinophenylindol staining of chromosomes. Restriction analysis of isolated T. confusum genomic DNA shows that this species has a satellite DNA that constitutes about 40% of the genome. Cloning and sequencing experiments reveal a monomer length of 158 base pairs and a copy number of 5.77 x 10(5) per haploid genome. Its sequence is A + T rich (73%), with direct and inverted repeats, one of them with a possibility of forming stable cruciform structure. The abundance, monomer length, and the mutation rate are similar to those found in other satellite families from different species of Tenebrionidae, but no sequence homology has been found among them. No retarded mobility of satellite DNA, characteristic for molecules with sequence-induced curvature, has been detected by electrophoresis on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. In situ digestions with restriction enzymes and in situ hybridization show that this satellite DNA is located in pericentromeric positions of all chromosomes coinciding with C-bands.

  2. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible ...

  3. The human TTAGGG repeat factors 1 and 2 bind to a subset of interstitial telomeric sequences and satellite repeats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Simonet; Elena Giulotto; Frederique Magdinier; Béatrice Horard; Pascal Barbry; Rainer Waldmann; Eric Gison; Laure-Emmanuelle Zaragosi; Claude Philippe; Kevin Lebrigand; Clémentine Schouteden; Adeline Augereau; Serge Bauwens; Jing Ye; Marco Santagostino

    2011-01-01

    The study of the proteins that bind to telomeric DNA in mammals has provided a deep understanding of the mech anisms involved in chromosome-end protection. However, very little is known on the binding of these proteins to nontelomeric DNA sequences. The TTAGGG DNA repeat proteins 1 and 2 (TRF1 and TRF2) bind to mammalian telomeres as part of the shelterin complex and are essential for maintaining chromosome end stability. In this study, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing to map at high sensitivity and resolution the human chromosomal sites to which TRF1 and TRF2 bind. While most of the identified sequences correspond to telomeric regions, we showed that these two proteins also bind to extratelomeric sites. The vast majority of these extratelomeric sites contains interstitial telomeric sequences (or ITSs). However, we also identified non-iTS sites, which correspond to centromeric and pericentromeric satellite DNA. Interestingly, the TRF-binding sites are often located in the proximity of genes or within introns. We propose that TRF1 and TRF2 couple the functional state of telomeres to the long-range organization of chromosomes and gene regulation networks by binding to extratelomeric sequences.

  4. Pericentric satellite DNA and molecular phylogeny in Acomys (Rodentia).

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    Kunze, B; Traut, W; Garagna, S; Weichenhan, D; Redi, C A; Winking, H

    1999-01-01

    Satellite DNAs (stDNAs) of four Acomys species (spiny-mice), A. cahirinus, A. cineraceus, A. dimidiatus and A. russatus, belong to closely related sequence families. Monomer sizes range from 338 to 364 bp. Between-species sequence identity was from 81.0% to 97.2%. The molecular phylogeny of the sequences helps to clarify the taxonomy of this 'difficult' group. The A. dimidiatus genome contains about 60000 repeats. According to the restriction patterns, repeats are arranged in tandem. The stDNA maps to the centromeric heterochromatin of most autosomes, both acrocentric and metacentric, but appears to be absent in the centromeric region of Y chromosomes. A well-conserved centromere protein B (CENP-B) box is present in the stDNA of A. russatus while it is degenerated in the other species.

  5. Satellite DNA as a driver of population divergence in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

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    Feliciello, Isidoro; Akrap, Ivana; Brajković, Josip; Zlatar, Ivo; Ugarković, Đurđica

    2014-12-19

    Tandemly repeated satellite DNAs are among most rapidly evolving sequences in eukaryotic genome, usually differing significantly among closely related species. By inducing changes in heterochromatin and/or centromere, satellite DNAs are expected to drive population and species divergence. However, despite high evolutionary dynamics, divergence of satellite DNA profiles at the level of natural population which precedes and possibly triggers speciation process is not readily detected. Here, we characterize minor TCAST2 satellite DNA of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and follow its dynamics among wild-type strains originating from diverse geographic locations. The investigation revealed presence of three distinct subfamilies of TCAST2 satellite DNA which differ in monomer size, genome organization, and subfamily specific mutations. Subfamilies Tcast2a and Tcast2b are tandemly arranged within pericentromeric heterochromatin whereas Tcast2c is preferentially dispersed within euchromatin of all chromosomes. Among strains, TCAST2 subfamilies are conserved in sequence but exhibit a significant content variability. This results in overrepresentation or almost complete absence of particular subfamily in some strains and enables discrimination between strains. It is proposed that homologous recombination, probably stimulated by environmental stress, is responsible for the emergence of TCAST2 satellite subfamilies, their copy number variation and dispersion within genome. The results represent the first evidence for the existence of population-specific satellite DNA profiles. Partial organization of TCAST2 satellite DNA in the form of single repeats dispersed within euchromatin additionally contributes to the genome divergence at the population level.

  6. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

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    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  7. Schistosome satellite DNA encodes active hammerhead ribozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbeyre, G; Smith, J M; Cedergren, R

    1998-07-01

    Using a computer program designed to search for RNA structural motifs in sequence databases, we have found a hammerhead ribozyme domain encoded in the Smalpha repetitive DNA of Schistosoma mansoni. Transcripts of these repeats are expressed as long multimeric precursor RNAs that cleave in vitro and in vivo into unit-length fragments. This RNA domain is able to engage in both cis and trans cleavage typical of the hammerhead ribozyme. Further computer analysis of S. mansoni DNA identified a potential trans cleavage site in the gene coding for a synaptobrevin-like protein, and RNA transcribed from this gene was efficiently cleaved by the Smalpha ribozyme in vitro. Similar families of repeats containing the hammerhead domain were found in the closely related Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosomatium douthitti species but were not present in Schistosoma japonicum or Heterobilharzia americana, suggesting that the hammerhead domain was not acquired from a common schistosome ancestor.

  8. Uncoupling of satellite DNA and centromeric function in the genus Equus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Piras

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1 several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs, seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2 satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs.

  9. DNA profiling of extended tracts of primitive DNA repeats: Direct identification of unstable simple repeat loci in complex genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogaeva, E.A.; Korovaitseva, G.; St. George-Hyslop, P. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The most simple DNA repetitive elements, with repetitive monomer units of only 1-10 bp in tandem tracts, are an abundant component of the human genome. The expansion of at least one type of these repeats ((CCG)n and (CTG)n) have been detected for a several neurological diseases with anticipation in successive generations. We propose here a simple method for the identification of particularly expanded repeats and for the recovery of flanking sequences. We generated DNA probes using PCR to create long concatamers (n>100) by amplification of the di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeat oligonucleotide primer pairs. To reduce the complexity of the background band pattern, the genomic DNA was restricted with a mixture of at least five different endonucleases, thereby reducing the size of restriction fragments containing short simple repeat arrays while leaving intact the large fragments containing the longer simple repeats arrays. Direct blot hybridization has shown different {open_quotes}DNA fingerprint{close_quotes} patterns with all arbitrary selected di-hexa nucleotide repeat probes. Direct hybridization of the (CTG)n and (CCG)n probes revealed simple or multiple band patterns depending upon stringency conditions. We were able to detect the presence of expanded unstable tri-nucleotide alleles by (CCG)n probe for some FRAXA subjects and by (CTG)n probe for some myotonic dystrophy subjects which were not present in the parental DNA patterns. The cloning of the unstable alleles for simple repeats can be performed by direct recover from agarose gels of the aberrant unstable bands detected above. The recovered flanking regions can be cloned, sequenced and used for PCR detection of expanded alleles or can be used to screen cDNA. This method may be used for testing of small families with diseases thought to display clinical evidence of anticipation.

  10. Influence of DNA methylation on positioning and DNA flexibility of nucleosomes with pericentric satellite DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Adachi, Fumiya; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation occurs on CpG sites and is important to form pericentric heterochromatin domains. The satellite 2 sequence, containing seven CpG sites, is located in the pericentric region of human chromosome 1 and is highly methylated in normal cells. In contrast, the satellite 2 region is reportedly hypomethylated in cancer cells, suggesting that the methylation status may affect the chromatin structure around the pericentric regions in tumours. In this study, we mapped the nucleosome positioning on the satellite 2 sequence in vitro and found that DNA methylation modestly affects the distribution of the nucleosome positioning. The micrococcal nuclease assay revealed that the DNA end flexibility of the nucleosomes changes, depending on the DNA methylation status. However, the structures and thermal stabilities of the nucleosomes are unaffected by DNA methylation. These findings provide new information to understand how DNA methylation functions in regulating pericentric heterochromatin formation and maintenance in normal and malignant cells.

  11. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paric Enesa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Results Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. Conclusion These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  12. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawalder, James; Paric, Enesa; Neff, Norma F

    2003-10-27

    Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  13. Cloning, characterization, and properties of seven triplet repeat DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Kang, S; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1996-07-12

    Several neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetically unstable triplet repeat sequences (CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, or AAG.CTT) in or near the responsible genes. We implemented novel cloning strategies with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to clone seven of the triplet repeat sequences (GTA.TAC, GAT.ATC, GTT.AAC, CAC.GTG, AGG.CCT, TCG.CGA, and AAG.CTT), and the adjoining paper (Ohshima, K., Kang, S., Larson, J. E., and Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16784-16791) describes studies on TTA.TAA. This approach in conjunction with in vivo expansion studies in Escherichia coli enabled the preparation of at least 81 plasmids containing the repeat sequences with lengths of approximately 16 up to 158 triplets in both orientations with varying extents of polymorphisms. The inserts were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as DNA polymerase pausings, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chemical probe analyses to evaluate the capacity to adopt negative supercoil induced non-B DNA conformations. AAG.CTT and AGG.CCT form intramolecular triplexes, and the other five repeat sequences do not form any previously characterized non-B structures. However, long tracts of TCG.CGA showed strong inhibition of DNA synthesis at specific loci in the repeats as seen in the cases of CTG.CAG and CGG.CCG (Kang, S., Ohshima, K., Shimizu, M., Amirhaeri, S., and Wells, R. D.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27014-27021). This work along with other studies (Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 2875-2878) on CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, and TTA.TAA makes available long inserts of all 10 triplet repeat sequences for a variety of physical, molecular biological, genetic, and medical investigations. A model to explain the reduction in mRNA abundance in Friedreich's ataxia based on intermolecular triplex formation is proposed.

  14. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  15. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciello, Isidoro; Akrap, Ivana; Ugarković, Đurđica

    2015-08-01

    Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  16. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro Feliciello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  17. Performances of regenerative and non-regenerative satellite repeaters with MPSK signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, K. T.

    1978-01-01

    Linear (translation), hard-limited, and demod/remod types of satellite repeaters are considered in this paper. Both uncoded and coded multiple phase shift keyed (MPSK) signals are assumed to be transmitted through these repeaters. Relative performances of these repeaters in the presence of uplink and downlink noises are then compared quantitatively. Probabilities of bit errors and the computational cutoff rates are computed for 2, 4, and 8 phases PSK signals, with uplink and downlink SNRs as parameters.

  18. Direct detection of expanded trinucleotide repeats using DNA hybridization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petronis, A.; Tatuch, Y.; Kennedy, J.L. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, unstable trinucleotide repeats have been shown to be the etiologic factor in several neuropsychiatric diseases, and they may play a similar role in other disorders. To our knowledge, a method that detects expanded trinucleotide sequences with the opportunity for direct localization and cloning has not been achieved. We have developed a set of hybridization-based methods for direct detection of unstable DNA expansion. Our analysis of myotonic dystrophy patients that possess different degrees of (CTG){sub n} expansion, versus unaffected controls, has demonstrated the identification of the trinucleotide instability site without any prior information regarding genetic map location. High stringency modified Southern blot hybridization with a PCR-generated trinucleotide repeat probe allowed us to detect the DNA fragment containing the expansion in myotonic dystrophy patients. The same probe was used for fluorescent in situ hybridization and several regions of (CTG){sub n}/(CAG){sub n} repeats in the human genome were detected, including the myotonic dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q. These strategies can be applied to directly clone genes involved in disorders caused by unstable DNA.

  19. CTCF regulates the local epigenetic state of ribosomal DNA repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Nobelen Suzanne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a highly conserved zinc finger protein, which is involved in chromatin organization, local histone modifications, and RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. CTCF may act by binding tightly to DNA and recruiting other proteins to mediate its various functions in the nucleus. To further explore the role of this essential factor, we used a mass spectrometry-based approach to screen for novel CTCF-interacting partners. Results Using biotinylated CTCF as bait, we identified upstream binding factor (UBF and multiple other components of the RNA polymerase I complex as potential CTCF-interacting partners. Interestingly, CTCFL, the testis-specific paralog of CTCF, also binds UBF. The interaction between CTCF(L and UBF is direct, and requires the zinc finger domain of CTCF(L and the high mobility group (HMG-box 1 and dimerization domain of UBF. Because UBF is involved in RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal (rRNA transcription, we analyzed CTCF binding to the rDNA repeat. We found that CTCF bound to a site upstream of the rDNA spacer promoter and preferred non-methylated over methylated rDNA. DNA binding by CTCF in turn stimulated binding of UBF. Absence of CTCF in cultured cells resulted in decreased association of UBF with rDNA and in nucleolar fusion. Furthermore, lack of CTCF led to reduced binding of RNA polymerase I and variant histone H2A.Z near the rDNA spacer promoter, a loss of specific histone modifications, and diminished transcription of non-coding RNA from the spacer promoter. Conclusions UBF is the first common interaction partner of CTCF and CTCFL, suggesting a role for these proteins in chromatin organization of the rDNA repeats. We propose that CTCF affects RNA polymerase I-mediated events globally by controlling nucleolar number, and locally by regulating chromatin at the rDNA spacer promoter, similar to RNA polymerase II promoters. CTCF may load UBF onto rDNA, thereby forming

  20. Impact of Noncoding Satellite Repeats on Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    may be mediated by a variety of endogenous RTs encoded by retroviral elements, LINE-1, telomerase, or a yet to be identified enzyme . While we...First, to achieve a cleaner separation of the aqueous phase from the gDNA-containing interphase, we used Phase Lock Gel (PLG) tubes, which separate the

  1. Comparative molecular cytogenetic analyses of a major tandemly repeated DNA family and retrotransposon sequences in cultivated jute Corchorus species (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rabeya; Zakrzewski, Falk; Menzel, Gerhard; Weber, Beatrice; Alam, Sheikh Shamimul; Schmidt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The cultivated jute species Corchorus olitorius and Corchorus capsularis are important fibre crops. The analysis of repetitive DNA sequences, comprising a major part of plant genomes, has not been carried out in jute but is useful to investigate the long-range organization of chromosomes. The aim of this study was the identification of repetitive DNA sequences to facilitate comparative molecular and cytogenetic studies of two jute cultivars and to develop a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) karyotype for chromosome identification. A plasmid library was generated from C. olitorius and C. capsularis with genomic restriction fragments of 100-500 bp, which was complemented by targeted cloning of satellite DNA by PCR. The diversity of the repetitive DNA families was analysed comparatively. The genomic abundance and chromosomal localization of different repeat classes were investigated by Southern analysis and FISH, respectively. The cytosine methylation of satellite arrays was studied by immunolabelling. Major satellite repeats and retrotransposons have been identified from C. olitorius and C. capsularis. The satellite family CoSat I forms two undermethylated species-specific subfamilies, while the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons CoRetro I and CoRetro II show similarity to the Metaviridea of plant retroelements. FISH karyotypes were developed by multicolour FISH using these repetitive DNA sequences in combination with 5S and 18S-5·8S-25S rRNA genes which enable the unequivocal chromosome discrimination in both jute species. The analysis of the structure and diversity of the repeated DNA is crucial for genome sequence annotation. The reference karyotypes will be useful for breeding of jute and provide the basis for karyotyping homeologous chromosomes of wild jute species to reveal the genetic and evolutionary relationship between cultivated and wild Corchorus species.

  2. Impact of Noncoding Satellite Repeats on Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    differentially expressed in HSATII induced cell lines compared to GFP induced cell line controls. Gene ontology of these genes did not identify any major...Fig. 5: NRTI ddC differential effect in SW620 cell line grown in (A) 2D vs (B) 3D. NRTI ddC with significant reduction in SW620 xenograft (C...described in human cells , there is ample precedent for retroelement-mediated in- tegration of such repeats in plants (27, 28). In mammalian cells

  3. Integrity of the human centromere DNA repeats is protected by CENP-A, CENP-C, and CENP-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Simona; Funabiki, Hironori

    2017-02-21

    Centromeres are highly specialized chromatin domains that enable chromosome segregation and orchestrate faithful cell division. Human centromeres are composed of tandem arrays of α-satellite DNA, which spans up to several megabases. Little is known about the mechanisms that maintain integrity of the long arrays of α-satellite DNA repeats. Here, we monitored centromeric repeat stability in human cells using chromosome-orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization (CO-FISH). This assay detected aberrant centromeric CO-FISH patterns consistent with sister chromatid exchange at the frequency of 5% in primary tissue culture cells, whereas higher levels were seen in several cancer cell lines and during replicative senescence. To understand the mechanism(s) that maintains centromere integrity, we examined the contribution of the centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A and members of the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), CENP-C, CENP-T, and CENP-W. Depletion of CENP-A and CCAN proteins led to an increase in centromere aberrations, whereas enhancing chromosome missegregation by alternative methods did not, suggesting that CENP-A and CCAN proteins help maintain centromere integrity independently of their role in chromosome segregation. Furthermore, superresolution imaging of centromeric CO-FISH using structured illumination microscopy implied that CENP-A protects α-satellite repeats from extensive rearrangements. Our study points toward the presence of a centromere-specific mechanism that actively maintains α-satellite repeat integrity during human cell proliferation.

  4. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kass, D.H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  5. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  6. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    Short regularly spaced repeats (SRSRs) occur in multiple large clusters in archaeal chromosomes and as smaller clusters in some archaeal conjugative plasmids and bacterial chromosomes. The sequence, size, and spacing of the repeats are generally constant within a cluster but vary between clusters...... that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...

  7. A Glimpse into the Satellite DNA Library in Characidae Fish (Teleostei, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Utsunomia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Satellite DNA (satDNA is an abundant fraction of repetitive DNA in eukaryotic genomes and plays an important role in genome organization and evolution. In general, satDNA sequences follow a concerted evolutionary pattern through the intragenomic homogenization of different repeat units. In addition, the satDNA library hypothesis predicts that related species share a series of satDNA variants descended from a common ancestor species, with differential amplification of different satDNA variants. The finding of a same satDNA family in species belonging to different genera within Characidae fish provided the opportunity to test both concerted evolution and library hypotheses. For this purpose, we analyzed here sequence variation and abundance of this satDNA family in ten species, by a combination of next generation sequencing (NGS, PCR and Sanger sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. We found extensive between-species variation for the number and size of pericentromeric FISH signals. At genomic level, the analysis of 1000s of DNA sequences obtained by Illumina sequencing and PCR amplification allowed defining 150 haplotypes which were linked in a common minimum spanning tree, where different patterns of concerted evolution were apparent. This also provided a glimpse into the satDNA library of this group of species. In consistency with the library hypothesis, different variants for this satDNA showed high differences in abundance between species, from highly abundant to simply relictual variants.

  8. A Glimpse into the Satellite DNA Library in Characidae Fish (Teleostei, Characiformes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomia, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Silva, Duílio M. Z. A.; Serrano, Érica A.; Rosa, Ivana F.; Scudeler, Patrícia E. S.; Hashimoto, Diogo T.; Oliveira, Claudio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.; Foresti, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is an abundant fraction of repetitive DNA in eukaryotic genomes and plays an important role in genome organization and evolution. In general, satDNA sequences follow a concerted evolutionary pattern through the intragenomic homogenization of different repeat units. In addition, the satDNA library hypothesis predicts that related species share a series of satDNA variants descended from a common ancestor species, with differential amplification of different satDNA variants. The finding of a same satDNA family in species belonging to different genera within Characidae fish provided the opportunity to test both concerted evolution and library hypotheses. For this purpose, we analyzed here sequence variation and abundance of this satDNA family in ten species, by a combination of next generation sequencing (NGS), PCR and Sanger sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We found extensive between-species variation for the number and size of pericentromeric FISH signals. At genomic level, the analysis of 1000s of DNA sequences obtained by Illumina sequencing and PCR amplification allowed defining 150 haplotypes which were linked in a common minimum spanning tree, where different patterns of concerted evolution were apparent. This also provided a glimpse into the satDNA library of this group of species. In consistency with the library hypothesis, different variants for this satDNA showed high differences in abundance between species, from highly abundant to simply relictual variants. PMID:28855916

  9. S1 satellite DNA repetitive units display identical structure and overall variability in all Anatolian brown frog taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picariello, Orfeo; Feliciello, Isidoro; Chinali, Gianni

    2016-02-01

    S1 satellite DNA from Palearctic brown frogs has a species-specific structure in all European species. We characterized S1 satellite DNA from the Anatolian brown frogs Rana macrocnemis, R. camerani, and R. holtzi in order to define their taxonomic rank and the structure of this satellite in this frog lineage. Southern blots of genomic DNA digested with KpnI, EcoRV, NdeI, NheI, or StuI produced the same pattern of satellite DNA bands. Moreover, quantitative dot blots showed that this satellite DNA accounts for 0.1 % of the genome in all taxa. Analysis of the overall genomic variability of the S1a repeat sequence in specimens from various populations demonstrated that this repetitive unit also has the same size (476 bp), the same most common sequence (MCS) and the same overall variability in all three taxa, and also in R. macrocnemis tavasensis. The S1a repetitive unit presents three deletions of 9, 8 and 1 bp compared to the 494-bp S1a repeat from European frogs. The S1a MCS has three variable positions (sequence WWTK in positions 183-186), due to the presence of two repeat subpopulations with motifs AATG and WWTT in all taxa. Unlike previously analyzed mitochondrial and nuclear sequences that show considerable variations among these taxa, no difference could be detected in the structure and variability of the S1 satellite repetitive units. This suggests that these taxa should belong to a single species. Our results indicate that this satellite DNA variety probably formed when the Anatolian lineage radiated from common ancestor about 4 mya, and since then has maintained its structure in all four taxa examined.

  10. Characterization of two unrelated satellite DNA families in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Pedro; Torres, M Isabel; Palomeque, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata, family Chrysomelidae),a phytophagous insect, which feeds preferably on potatoes, constitutes a serious pest of this crop and causes extensive damage to tomatoes and egg plants. It has a remarkable ability to develop resistance quickly against insecticides and shows a diversified and flexible life history. Consequently, the control of this pest has become difficult, requiring the development of new alternative biotechnology-based strategies. Such strategies require a thorough knowledge of the beetle’s genome,including the repetitive DNA. Satellite DNA (stDNA), composed of long arrays of tandemly arranged repeat units, constitutes the major component of heterochromatin and is located mainly in centromeric and telomeric chromosomal regions. We have studied two different unrelated satellite-DNA families of which the consensus sequences were 295 and 109bp in length, named LEDE-I and LEDE-II, respectively.Both were AT-rich (70.8% and 71.6%, respectively). Predictive models of sequence-dependent DNA bending and the study of electrophoretic mobility on non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels have shown that the DNA was curved in both satellite-DNA families. Among other features, the chromosome localization of both stDNAs has been studied. In situ hybridization performed on meiotic and mitoticnuclei showed chromosomes, including the X chromosome, with zero, one, or two stDNAs. In recent years, it has been proposed that the repetitive DNA may play a key role in biological diversification processes. This is the first molecular and cytogenetic study conducted on L. decemlineata repetitive DNA and specifically on stDNA, which is one of the important constituents of eukaryotic genomes.

  11. Properties of CENP-B and its target sequence in a satellite DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masumoto, H.; Yoda, K.; Ikeno, M.; Kitagawa, K.; Muro, Y.; Okazaki, T. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    The centromere plays an essential role in the proper segregation of eukaryotic chromosomes at mitosis and meiosis. The centromere is the multifunctional domain of chromosome responsible for sister chromatid association at the inner site and for microtubule attachment at the outer surface. It also acts as a mechanochemical motor for chromosome movement. These multiple centromere functions must, in some way, be directed by a cis-acting DNA sequence located in the centromere region. Indeed, specific centromere DNA sequences (CEN-DNA) were identified in two yeast species. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CEN-DNA consists of roughly 125 bp sequence composed of three conserved elements. In contrast, the centromere sequence of S. pombe is quite different from S. cerevisiae in length and sequence organization. The molecular bases for understanding the structure and function of the centromere/kinetochore domain have not been elucidated in higher eukaryotes. In mammalian cells, satellite DNA`s are localized in the centromeric heterochromatin or heterochromatic arm. In all human chromosomes, the alpha satellite or alphoid DNA family, a highly repetitive DNA composed of about 170 bp fundamental monomer repeating units, is found at the primary constriction. Its function, however, has not been established.

  12. A preliminary estimate of geoid-induced variations in repeat orbit satellite altimeter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anita C.; Beckley, B. D.; Koblinsky, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Altimeter satellites are often maintained in a repeating orbit to facilitate the separation of sea-height variations from the geoid. However, atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure cause a satellite orbit to drift. For Geosat this drift causes the ground track to vary by + or - 1 km about the nominal repeat path. This misalignment leads to an error in the estimates of sea surface height variations because of the local slope in the geoid. This error has been estimated globally for the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission using a mean sea surface constructed from Geos 3 and Seasat altimeter data. Over most of the ocean the geoid gradient is small, and the repeat-track misalignment leads to errors of only 1 to 2 cm. However, in the vicinity of trenches, continental shelves, islands, and seamounts, errors can exceed 20 cm. The estimated error is compared with direct estimates from Geosat altimetry, and a strong correlation is found in the vicinity of the Tonga and Aleutian trenches. This correlation increases as the orbit error is reduced because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. A preliminary estimate of geoid-induced variations in repeat orbit satellite altimeter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anita C.; Beckley, B. D.; Koblinsky, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Altimeter satellites are often maintained in a repeating orbit to facilitate the separation of sea-height variations from the geoid. However, atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure cause a satellite orbit to drift. For Geosat this drift causes the ground track to vary by + or - 1 km about the nominal repeat path. This misalignment leads to an error in the estimates of sea surface height variations because of the local slope in the geoid. This error has been estimated globally for the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission using a mean sea surface constructed from Geos 3 and Seasat altimeter data. Over most of the ocean the geoid gradient is small, and the repeat-track misalignment leads to errors of only 1 to 2 cm. However, in the vicinity of trenches, continental shelves, islands, and seamounts, errors can exceed 20 cm. The estimated error is compared with direct estimates from Geosat altimetry, and a strong correlation is found in the vicinity of the Tonga and Aleutian trenches. This correlation increases as the orbit error is reduced because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Satellite DNA in the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae): characterization, interpopulation analysis, and chromosome location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, P; Carrillo, J A; Garnería, I; Petitpierre, E; Palomeque, T

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the satellite DNA (stDNA) of the phytophagous beetle Xanthogaleruca luteola is analyzed. It is organized in a tandem repeat of 149-bp-long monomers, has an AT content of 59%, and presents inverted internal repeats. Restriction analysis of the total DNA with methylation-sensitive enzymes suggests that this repetitive DNA is not methylated. Analysis of the electrophoretic mobility of stDNA on non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels showed that this stDNA is not curved. In situ hybridization with a biotinylated probe of the stDNA revealed a pericentromeric localization of these sequences in the majority of the meiotic bivalents. We have studied the stDNA of X. luteola from two populations with very distinct geographical origins. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis of monomers from these two populations showed that the repetitive element is conserved within the species. Putative gene conversion tracts are identified when the different monomers of the same population are compared. These results could indicate the existence of processes of homogenization that would extend these mutations to all the satellite repeats.

  15. Bioinformatic Analysis of BBTV Satellite DNA in Hainan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nai-tong Yu; Tuan-cheng Feng; Yu-liang Zhang; Jian-hua Wang; Zhi-xin Liu

    2011-01-01

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV),family Nanaviridae,genus Babuvirus,is a single stranded DNA virus (ssDNA) that causes banana bunchy top disease (BBTD) in banana plants.It is the most common and most destructive of all viruses in these plants and is widespread throughout the Asia-Pacific region.In this study we isolated,cloned and sequenced a BBTV sample from Hainan Island,China.The results from sequencing and bioinformatics analysis indicate this isolate represents a satellite DNA component with 12 DNA sequences motifs.We also predicted the physical and chemical properties,structure,signal peptide,phosphorylation,secondary structure,tertiary structure and functional domains of its encoding protein,and compare them with the corresponding quantities in the replication initiation protein of BBTV DNA1.

  16. Imperfect DNA mirror repeats in E. coli TnsA and other protein-coding DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Dorothy M

    2005-09-01

    DNA imperfect mirror repeats (DNA-IMRs) are ubiquitous in protein-coding DNA. However, they overlap and often have different centers of symmetry, making it difficult to evaluate their relationship to each other and to specific DNA and protein motifs and structures. This paper describes a systematic method of determining a hierarchy for DNA-IMRs and evaluates their relationship to protein structural elements (PSEs)--helices, turns and beta-sheets. DNA-IMRs are identifed by two different methods--DNA-IMRs terminated by reverse dinucleotides (rd-IMRs) and DNA-IMRs terminated by a single (mono) matching nucleotide (m-IMRs). Both rd-IMRs and m-IMRs are evaluated in 17 proteins, and illustrated in detail for TnsA. For each of the proteins, Fisher's exact test (FET) is used to measure the coincidence between the terminal dinucleotides of rd-IMRs and the terminal amino acids of individual PSEs. A significant correlation over a span of about 3 nt was found for each protein. The correlation is robust and for most genes, all rd-IMRs16 nt contain approximately 88% of the potential functional motifs. The protein translation of the longest rd- and m-IMRs span sequences important to the protein's structure and function. In all 17 proteins studied, the population of rd-IMRs is substantially less than the expected number and the population of m-IMRs greater than the expected number, indicating strong selective pressures. The association of rd-IMRs with PSEs restricts their spatial distribution, and therefore, their number. The greater than predicted number of m-IMRs indicates that DNA symmetry exists throughout the entire protein-coding region and may stabilize the sequence.

  17. Methods for sequencing GC-rich and CCT repeat DNA templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a PCR-based method of cycle sequencing DNA and other polynucleotide sequences having high CG content and regions of high GC content, and includes for example DNA strands with a high Cytosine and/or Guanosine content and repeated motifs such as CCT repeats.

  18. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem r...

  19. Differential distribution and association of repeat DNA sequences in the lateral element of the synaptonemal complex in rat spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, Abrahan; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Ortiz, Rosario; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Echeverría, Olga M; Benavente, Ricardo; Vázquez-Nin, Gerardo H

    2008-02-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is an evolutionarily conserved structure that mediates synapsis of homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase I. Previous studies have established that the chromatin of homologous chromosomes is organized in loops that are attached to the lateral elements (LEs) of the SC. The characterization of the genomic sequences associated with LEs of the SC represents an important step toward understanding meiotic chromosome organization and function. To isolate these genomic sequences, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in rat spermatocytes using an antibody against SYCP3, a major structural component of the LEs of the SC. Our results demonstrated the reproducible and exclusive isolation of repeat deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences, in particular long interspersed elements, short interspersed elements, long terminal direct repeats, satellite, and simple repeats. The association of these repeat sequences to the LEs of the SC was confirmed by in situ hybridization of meiotic nuclei shown by both light and electron microscopy. Signals were also detected over the chromatin surrounding SCs and in small loops protruding from the lateral elements into the SC central region. We propose that genomic repeat DNA sequences play a key role in anchoring the chromosome to the protein scaffold of the SC.

  20. Stable DNA methylation boundaries and expanded trinucleotide repeats: role of DNA insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Anja; Kraus, Cornelia; Hoogeveen, André; Ramirez, Christina M; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-07-15

    The human genome segment upstream of the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) gene (Xq27.3) contains several genetic signals, among them is a DNA methylation boundary that is located 65-70 CpGs upstream of the CGG repeat. In fragile X syndrome (FXS), the boundary is lost, and the promoter is inactivated by methylation spreading. Here we document boundary stability in spite of critical expansions of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in male or female premutation carriers and in high functioning males (HFMs). HFMs carry a full CGG repeat expansion but exhibit an unmethylated promoter and lack the FXS phenotype. The boundary is also stable in Turner (45, X) females. A CTCF-binding site is located slightly upstream of the methylation boundary and carries a unique G-to-A polymorphism (single nucleotide polymorphism), which occurs 3.6 times more frequently in genomes with CGG expansions. The increased frequency of this single nucleotide polymorphism might have functional significance. In CGG expansions, the CTCF region does not harbor additional mutations. In FXS individuals and often in cells transgenomic for EBV (Epstein Barr Virus) DNA or for the telomerase gene, the large number of normally methylated CpGs in the far-upstream region of the boundary is decreased about 4-fold. A methylation boundary is also present in the human genome segment upstream of the HTT (huntingtin) promoter (4p16.3) and is stable both in normal and Huntington disease chromosomes. Hence, the vicinity of an expanded repeat does not per se compromise methylation boundaries. Methylation boundaries exert an important function as promoter safeguards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of an AT-rich satellite DNA family in Urvillea chacoensis Hunz. (Paullinieae, Sapindaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdampilleta, Juan D; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Schneider, Dilaine R S; Vanzela, André L L; Ferrucci, María S; Martins, Eliana R F

    2009-05-01

    Urvillea chacoensis is a climber with 2n = 22 and some terminal AT-rich heterochromatin blocks that differentiate it from other species of the genus. The AT-rich highly repeated satellite DNA was isolated from U. chacoensis by the digestion of total nuclear DNA with HindIII and XbaI and cloned in Escherichia coli. Satellite DNA structure and chromosomal distribution were investigated. DNA sequencing revealed that the repeat length of satDNA ranges between 721 and 728 bp, the percentage of AT-base pairs was about 72-73% and the studied clones showed an identity of 92.5-95.9%. Although this monomer has a tetranucleosomal size, direct imperfect repetitions of ~180 bp subdividing it in four nucleosomal subregions were observed. The results obtained with FISH indicate that this monomer usually appears distributed in the terminal regions of most chromosomes and is associated to heterochromatin blocks observed after DAPI staining. These observations are discussed in relation to the satellite DNA evolution and compared with other features observed in several plant groups.

  2. Unusual structures are present in DNA fragments containing super-long Huntingtin CAG repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Duzdevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD, expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM. As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: "Super-long" CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD.

  3. Tandem repeat DNA localizing on the proximal DAPI bands of chromosomes in Larix, Pinaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Masahiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Matsumoto, Ayako; Maruyama, Yukie; Hayashi, Eiji; Kondo, Teiji; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Shozo; Hong, Deyuan

    2002-08-01

    Repetitive DNA was cloned from HindIII-digested genomic DNA of Larix leptolepis. The repetitive DNA was about 170 bp long, had an AT content of 67%, and was organized tandemly in the genome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and subsequent DAPI banding, the repetitive DNA was localized in DAPI bands at the proximal region of one arm of chromosomes in L. leptolepis and Larix chinensis. Southern blot hybridization to genomic DNA of seven species and five varieties probed with cloned repetitive DNA showed that the repetitive DNA family was present in a tandem organization in genomes of all Larix taxa examined. In addition to the 170-bp sequence, a 220-bp sequence belonging to the same DNA family was also present in 10 taxa. The 220-bp repeat unit was a partial duplication of the 170-bp repeat unit. The 220-bp repeat unit was more abundant in L. chinensis and Larix potaninii var. macrocarpa than in other taxa. The repetitive DNA composed 2.0-3.4% of the genome in most taxa and 0.3 and 0.5% of the genome in L. chinensis and L. potaninii var. macrocarpa, respectively. The unique distribution of the 220-bp repeat unit in Larix indicates the close relationship of these two species. In the family Pinaceae, the LPD (Larix proximal DAPI band specific repeat sequence family) family sequence is widely distributed, but their amount is very small except in the genus Larix. The abundant LPD family in Larix will occur after its speciation.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation on the telomeric DNA base sequence repeat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres are protein-DNA complexes at the terminals of linear chromosomes, which protect chromosomal integrity and maintain cellular replicative capacity.From single-cell organisms to advanced animals and plants,structures and functions of telomeres are both very conservative. In cells of human and vertebral animals, telomeric DNA base sequences all are (TTAGGG)n. In the present work, we have obtained absorption and fluorescence spectra measured from seven synthesized oligonucleotides to simulate the telomeric DNA system and calculated their relative fluorescence quantum yields on which not only telomeric DNA characteristics are predicted but also possibly the shortened telomeric sequences during cell division are imrelative fluorescence quantum yield and remarkable excitation energy innerconversion, which tallies with the telomeric sequence of (TTAGGG)n. This result shows that telomeric DNA has a strong non-radiative or innerconvertible capability.``

  5. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  6. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe;

    2013-01-01

    in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2......Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...

  7. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...... in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2...

  8. Applications of inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) rDNA in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applications of inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) rDNA in detecting ... and phylogenetic relationships between Lymnaea natalensis collected from Giza, ... in water samples of all tested governorates with different significant differences.

  9. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease.

  10. Quality Control of Isothermal Amplified DNA Based on Short Tandem Repeat Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes the use of a 16plex PCR for the purpose assessing DNA quality after isothermal whole genome amplification (WGA). In short, DNA products, generated by amplification multiple displacement amplification, are forwarded to PCR targeting 15 short tandem repeats (STR) as well as amelogenin generating up to 32 different PCR products. After amplification, the PCR products are separated via capillary electrophoresis and analyzed based on the obtained DNA profiles. Isothermal WGA products of good DNA quality will result in DNA profiles with efficiencies of >90 % of the full DNA profile.

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and genomic organization of major DNA repeats in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, O S; Karlov, G I

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the bioinformatic, molecular genetic, and cytogenetic study of castor bean (Ricinus communis, 2n = 20), which belongs to the monotypic Ricinus genus within the Euphorbiaceae family. Because castor bean chromosomes are small, karyotypic studies are difficult. However, the use of DNA repeats has yielded new prospects for karyotypic research and genome characterization. In the present study, major DNA repeat sequences were identified, characterized and localized on mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes. Analyses of the nucleotide composition, curvature models, and FISH localization of the rcsat39 repeat suggest that this repeat plays a key role in building heterochromatic arrays in castor bean. Additionally, the rcsat390 sequences were determined to be chromosome-specific repeats located in the pericentromeric region of mitotic chromosome A (pachytene chromosome 1). The localization of rcsat39, rcsat390, 45S and 5S rDNA genes allowed for the development of cytogenetic landmarks for chromosome identification. General questions linked to heterochromatin formation, DNA repeat distribution, and the evolutionary emergence of the genome are discussed. The article may be of interest to biologists studying small genome organization and short monomer DNA repeats.

  12. Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer (E-TRA): A new program for DNA sequence mining

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Karaca; Mehmet Bilgen; A. Naci Onus; Ayse Gul Ince; Safinaz Y. Elmasulu

    2005-04-01

    Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer 1.0 (E-TRA) combines sequence motif searches with keywords such as ‘organs’, ‘tissues’, ‘cell lines’ and ‘development stages’ for finding simple exact tandem repeats as well as non-simple repeats. E-TRA has several advanced repeat search parameters/options compared to other repeat finder programs as it not only accepts GenBank, FASTA and expressed sequence tags (EST) sequence files, but also does analysis of multiple files with multiple sequences. The minimum and maximum tandem repeat motif lengths that E-TRA finds vary from one to one thousand. Advanced user defined parameters/options let the researchers use different minimum motif repeats search criteria for varying motif lengths simultaneously. One of the most interesting features of genomes is the presence of relatively short tandem repeats (TRs). These repeated DNA sequences are found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, distributed almost at random throughout the genome. Some of the tandem repeats play important roles in the regulation of gene expression whereas others do not have any known biological function as yet. Nevertheless, they have proven to be very beneficial in DNA profiling and genetic linkage analysis studies. To demonstrate the use of E-TRA, we used 5,465,605 human EST sequences derived from 18,814,550 GenBank EST sequences. Our results indicated that 12.44% (679,800) of the human EST sequences contained simple and non-simple repeat string patterns varying from one to 126 nucleotides in length. The results also revealed that human organs, tissues, cell lines and different developmental stages differed in number of repeats as well as repeat composition, indicating that the distribution of expressed tandem repeats among tissues or organs are not random, thus differing from the un-transcribed repeats found in genomes.

  13. The histone H3K9 methylation and RNAi pathways regulate normalnucleolar and repeated DNA organization by inhibiting formation ofextrachromosomal DNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-06-15

    In order to identify regulators of nuclear organization, Drosophila mutants in the Su(var)3-9 histone H3K9 methyltransferase, RNAi pathway components, and other regulators of heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing were examined for altered nucleoli and positioning of repeated DNAs. Animals lacking components of the H3K9 methylation and RNAi pathways contained disorganized nucleoli, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and satellite DNAs. The levels of H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) in chromatin associated with repeated DNAs decreased dramatically in Su(var)3-9 and dcr-2 (dicer-2) mutant tissues compared to wild type. We also observed a substantial increase in extrachromosomal repeated DNAs in mutant tissues. The disorganized nucleolus phenotype depends on the presence of Ligase 4 (Lig4), and ecc DNA formation is not induced by removal of cohesin. We conclude that H3K9 methylation of rDNA and satellites, maintained by Su(var)3-9, HP1, and the RNAi pathway, is necessary for the structural stability of repeated DNAs, which is mediated through suppression of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). These results suggest a mechanism for how local chromatin structure can regulate genome stability, and the organization of chromosomal elements and nuclear organelles.

  14. Polymorphisms in the CAG repeat--a source of error in Huntington disease DNA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S; Fimmel, A; Fung, D; Trent, R J

    2000-12-01

    Five of 400 patients (1.3%), referred for Huntington disease DNA testing, demonstrated a single allele on CAG alone, but two alleles when the CAG + CCG repeats were measured. The PCR assay failed to detect one allele in the CAG alone assay because of single-base silent polymorphisms in the penultimate or the last CAG repeat. The region around and within the CAG repeat sequence in the Huntington disease gene is a hot-spot for DNA polymorphisms, which can occur in up to 1% of subjects tested for Huntington disease. These polymorphisms may interfere with amplification by PCR, and so have the potential to produce a diagnostic error.

  15. CTCF regulates the local epigenetic state of ribosomal DNA repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Nobelen (Suzanne); M. Rosa-Garrido (Manuel); J. Leers (Joerg); H. Heath (Helen); W.S.W. Soochit (Widia); L. Joosen (Linda); I. Jonkers (Iris); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); M. van der Reijden (Michael); V. Torrano (Veránica); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); M.D. Delgado (Dolores); R. Renkawitz (Rainer); N.J. Galjart (Niels); F. Sleutels (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a highly conserved zinc finger protein, which is involved in chromatin organization, local histone modifications, and RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. CTCF may act by binding tightly to DNA and recruiting other proteins to mediate

  16. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  17. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Chen, B K; Qiu, Y; Sonobe, H; Ohtsuki, Y

    1997-12-19

    A novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats, designated B120, was cloned by PCR amplification. An approximately 300-bp 3' untranslated region in this cDNA was followed by a 3426-bp coding region containing the CAG repeats. A computer search failed to find any significant homology between this cDNA and previously reported genes. The number of CAG trinucleotide repeats appeared to vary from seven to 12 in analyses of genomic DNA from healthy volunteers. An approximately 8-kb band was detected in brain, skeletal muscle and thymus by Northern blot analysis. The deduced amino-acid sequence had a polyglutamine chain encoded by CAG repeats as well as glutamine- and tyrosine-rich repeats, which has also been reported for several RNA binding proteins. We immunized mice with recombinant gene product and established a monoclonal antibody to it. On Western immunoblotting, this antibody detected an approximately 120-kDa protein in human brain tissue. In addition, immunohistochemical staining showed that the cytoplasm of neural cells was stained with this antibody. These findings indicated that B120 is a novel cDNA with a CAG repeat length polymorphism and that its gene product is a cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa.

  18. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg, (Russian Federation); Edlarov, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center of Bioengineering, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  19. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  20. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  1. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing, into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  2. A model of DNA repeat-assembled mitotic chromosomal skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  3. An ancient satellite DNA has maintained repetitive units of the original structure in most species of the living fossil plant genus Zamia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafasso, Donata; Chinali, Gianni

    2014-03-01

    ZpS1 satellite DNA is specific to the genus Zamia and presents repetitive units organized as long arrays and also as very short arrays dispersed in the genome. We have characterized the structure of the ZpS1 repeats in 12 species representative of the whole geographic distribution of the genus. In most species, the clone most common sequences (cMCS) were so similar that a general most common sequence (GMCS) of the ZpS1 repetitive unit in the genus could be obtained. The few partial variations from the GMCS found in cMCS of some species correspond to variable positions present in most other species, as indicated by the clone consensus sequences (cCS). Two species have an additional species-specific variety of ZpS1 satellite. The dispersed repeats were found to contain more mutations than repeats from long arrays. Our results indicate that all or most species of Zamia inherited the ZpS1 satellite from a common ancestor in Miocene and have maintained repetitive units of the original structure till present. The features of ZpS1 satellite in the genus Zamia are poorly compatible with the model of concerted evolution, but they are perfectly consistent with a new model of satellite evolution based on experimental evidences indicating that a specific amplification-substitution repair mechanism maintains the homogeneity and stability of the repeats structure in each satellite DNA originally present in a species as long as the species exists.

  4. Human mitochondrial mTERF wraps around DNA through a left-handed superhelical tandem repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Menéndez, Nereida; Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Arnan, Carme; Montoya, Julio; Jacobs, Howard T; Bernadó, Pau; Coll, Miquel; Usón, Isabel; Solà, Maria

    2010-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) processes is slowly being characterized at a structural level. We present here crystal structures of human mitochondrial regulator mTERF, a transcription termination factor also implicated in replication pausing, in complex with double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the tRNA(Leu)(UUR) gene sequence. mTERF comprises nine left-handed helical tandem repeats that form a left-handed superhelix, the Zurdo domain.

  5. Recombination frequency in plasmid DNA containing direct repeats--predictive correlation with repeat and intervening sequence length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Lemos, Francisco; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Prazeres, Duarte M F

    2008-09-01

    In this study, a simple non-linear mathematical function is proposed to accurately predict recombination frequencies in bacterial plasmid DNA harbouring directly repeated sequences. The mathematical function, which was developed on the basis of published data on deletion-formation in multicopy plasmids containing direct-repeats (14-856 bp) and intervening sequences (0-3872 bp), also accounts for the strain genotype in terms of its recA function. A bootstrap resampling technique was used to estimate confidence intervals for the correlation parameters. More than 92% of the predicted values were found to be within a pre-established +/-5-fold interval of deviation from experimental data. The correlation does not only provide a way to predict, with good accuracy, the recombination frequency, but also opens the way to improve insight into these processes.

  6. Direct detection of expanded trinucleotide repeats using PCR and DNA hybridization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petronis, A.; Tatuch, Y.; Klempan, T.A.; Kennedy, J.L. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1996-02-16

    Recently, unstable trinucleotide repeats have been shown to be the etiologic factor in seven neuropsychiatric diseases, and they may play a similar role in other genetic disorders which exhibit genetic anticipation. We have tested one polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based and two hybridization-based methods for direct detection of unstable DNA expansion in genomic DNA. This technique employs a single primer (asymmetric) PCR using total genomic DNA as a template to efficiently screen for the presence of large trinucleotide repeat expansions. High-stringency Southern blot hybridization with a PCR-generated trinucleotide repeat probe allowed detection of the DNA fragment containing the expansion. Analysis of myotonic dystrophy patients containing different degrees of (CTG){sub n} expansion demonstrated the identification of the site of trinucleotide instability in some affected individuals without any prior information regarding genetic map location. The same probe was used for fluorescent in situ hybridization and several regions of (CTG){sub n}/(CAG){sub n} repeats in the human genome were detected, including the myotonic dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q. Although limited at present to large trinucleotide repeat expansions, these strategies can be applied to directly clone genes involved in disorders caused by large expansions of unstable DNA. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Satellite-DNA diversification and the evolution of major lineages in Cardueae (Carduoideae Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Bosque, María Ester Quesada; López-Flores, Inmaculada; Suárez-Santiago, Víctor N; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work, we characterized the HinfI satellite DNA family in the subtribe Centaureinae (Cardueae) demonstrating that a "library" of eight HinfI subfamilies would exist in the common ancestor of all Centaureinae, which were differentially amplified in different lineages. Now, we extend our study by analyzing a total of 219 additional repeats from fifteen species belonging to Carlininae, Echinopsinae and Carduinae, and comparing them to those of Centaureinae. Most HinfI sequences belonged to the subfamily II, although a few sequences of other subfamilies were detected in some species. Additionally, a new subfamily characteristic of several Carduinae species was discovered. Although phylogenetic trees grouped sequences by subfamily affinity instead of species provenance, when comparing repeats of the same subfamily, the degree of divergence between any pair of sequences was related to the evolutionary distance between the species compared in most cases. Exceptions were in comparisons between sequences of some Centaureinae species, and between sequences of some Carduinae species and those of Centaureinae. Our results demonstrate that: (1) At least nine HinfI subfamilies would exist in the common ancestor of Cardueae, each one differentially amplified in different lineages; (2) After differential spreading, sequences of each subfamily evolved concertedly through molecular drive, resulting in the gradual divergence of repeats between different species; (3) The rate to which concerted evolution occurred was different between lineages according to the evolutionary history of each one.

  8. Worldwide widespread decadal-scale decrease of glacier speed revealed using repeat optical satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Heid

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Matching of repeat optical satellite images to derive glacier velocities is an approach that is much used within glaciology. Lately, focus has been put into developing, improving, automating and comparing different image matching methods. This makes it now possible to investigate glacier dynamics within large regions of the world and also between regions to improve knowledge about glacier dynamics in space and time. In this study we investigate whether the negative glacier mass balance seen over large parts of the world has caused the glaciers to change their speeds. The studied regions are Pamir, Caucasus, Penny Ice Cap, Alaska Range and Patagonia. In addition we derive speed changes for Karakoram, a region assumed to have positive mass balance and that contains many surge-type glaciers. We find that the mapped glaciers in the five regions with negative mass balance have decreased their speeds over the last decades, Pamir by 43 % in average per decade, Caucasus by 8 % in average per decade, Penny Ice Cap by 25 % in average per decade, Alaska Range by 11 % in average per decade and Patagonia by 20 % in average per decade. Glaciers in Karakoram have generally increased their speeds, but surging glaciers and glaciers with flow instabilities are most prominent in this area.

  9. Repeat optical satellite images reveal widespread and long term decrease in land-terminating glacier speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Heid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available By matching of repeat optical satellite images it is now possible to investigate glacier dynamics within large regions of the world and also between regions to improve knowledge about glacier dynamics in space and time. In this study we investigate whether the negative glacier mass balance seen over large parts of the world has caused the glaciers to change their speeds. The studied regions are Pamir, Caucasus, Penny Ice Cap, Alaska Range and Patagonia. In addition we derive speed changes for Karakoram, a region assumed to have positive mass balance and that contains many surge-type glaciers. We find that the mapped glaciers in the five regions with negative mass balance have over the last decades decreased their velocity at an average rate per decade of: 43 % in the Pamir, 8 % in the Caucasus, 25 % on Penny Ice Cap, 11 % in the Alaska Range and 20 % in Patagonia. Glaciers in Karakoram have generally increased their speeds, but surging glaciers and glaciers with flow instabilities are most prominent in this area. Therefore the calculated average speed change is not representative for this area.

  10. Chromosomal localization of a tandemly repeated DNA sequence in Trifilium repens L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJM; NWELLISON; 等

    1996-01-01

    A karyotype of Trifolium repens constructed from mitotic cells revealed 13 pairs of metacentric and 3 pairs of submetacentric chromosomes including a pair of satellites located at the end of the short arm of chromosome 16.C-bands were identified around the centromeric regions of 8 pairs of chromosomes.A 350 bp tandemly repeated DNAsequence from T.repens labelled with digoxygenin hybridized to the proximal centromeric regions of 12 chromosome pairs.Some correlation between the distribution of the repeat sequence and the distribution of C-banding was demonstrated.

  11. Effect of repeated sequential ejaculation on sperm DNA integrity in subfertile males with asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, T M; Elariny, A F; Elabd, M M; Elgarem, Y F; Elsawy, M M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the possible beneficial effect of repeated sequential ejaculation on sperm DNA integrity in subfertile males and its possible implementation in assisted reproduction. The study included 20 infertile males with idiopathic asthenozoospermia or oligoasthenozoospermia. They underwent detailed history taking, complete clinical assessment and hormonal assessment. Patients were asked to bring two semen samples (taken within 1-3 h). Two consecutive samples were assessed with regard to semen volume, sperm count, motility grading, and morphology and sperm DNA integrity using the comet assay. There was a significant improvement in the sperm motility pattern and DNA integrity in the second sample in comparison with the first sample. Therefore, it is concluded that due to its positive impact on sperm motility and DNA integrity, repeated sequential ejaculation is recommended in subfertile males with idiopathic asthenozoospermia who pursue assisted reproduction.

  12. A Novel Signal Processing Measure to Identify Exact and Inexact Tandem Repeat Patterns in DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification and analysis of repetitive patterns are active areas of biological and computational research. Tandem repeats in telomeres play a role in cancer and hypervariable trinucleotide tandem repeats are linked to over a dozen major neurodegenerative genetic disorders. In this paper, we present an algorithm to identify the exact and inexact repeat patterns in DNA sequences based on orthogonal exactly periodic subspace decomposition technique. Using the new measure our algorithm resolves the problems like whether the repeat pattern is of period P or its multiple (i.e., 2P, 3P, etc., and several other problems that were present in previous signal-processing-based algorithms. We present an efficient algorithm of O(NLw logLw, where N is the length of DNA sequence and Lw is the window length, for identifying repeats. The algorithm operates in two stages. In the first stage, each nucleotide is analyzed separately for periodicity, and in the second stage, the periodic information of each nucleotide is combined together to identify the tandem repeats. Datasets having exact and inexact repeats were taken up for the experimental purpose. The experimental result shows the effectiveness of the approach.

  13. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of a species-specific transcribed centromeric satellite repeat from the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Satellite repetitive sequences that accumulate in the heterochromatin consist a large fraction of a genome and due to their properties are suggested to be implicated in centromere function. Current knowledge of heterochromatic regions of Bactrocera oleae genome, the major pest of the olive tree, is practically nonexistent. In our effort to explore the repetitive DNA portion of B. oleae genome, a novel satellite sequence designated BoR300 was isolated and cloned. The present study describes the genomic organization, abundance and chromosomal distribution of BoR300 which is organized in tandem, forming arrays of 298 bp-long monomers. Sequence analysis showed an AT content of 60.4%, a CENP-B like-motif and a high curvature value based on predictive models. Comparative analysis among randomly selected monomers demonstrated a high degree of sequence homogeneity (88%-97% of BoR300 repeats, which are present at approximately 3,000 copies per haploid genome accounting for about 0.28% of the total genomic DNA, based on two independent qPCR approaches. In addition, expression of the repeat was also confirmed through RT-PCR, by which BoR300 transcripts were detected in both sexes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of BoR300 on mitotic metaphases and polytene chromosomes revealed signals to the centromeres of two out of the six chromosomes which indicated a chromosome-specific centromeric localization. Moreover, BoR300 is not conserved in the closely related Bactrocera species tested and it is also absent in other dipterans, but it's rather restricted to the B. oleae genome. This feature of species-specificity attributed to BoR300 satellite makes it a good candidate as an identification probe of the insect among its relatives at early development stages.

  14. Subnuclear relocalization and silencing of a chromosomal region by an ectopic ribosomal DNA repeat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Domange Jordö, Marie Elise; Mebarek, Mazhoura Aït;

    2013-01-01

    dimerization, providing a mechanism for the observed relocalization. Replacing the full rDNA repeat with Reb1-binding sites, and using mutants lacking the histone H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4, indicated that the relocalized region was silenced redundantly by heterochromatin and another mechanism, plausibly...

  15. Reviews and syntheses: Australian vegetation phenology: new insights from satellite remote sensing and digital repeat photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Caitlin E.; Brown, Tim; Keenan, Trevor F.; Duursma, Remko A.; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Beringer, Jason; Culvenor, Darius; Evans, Bradley; Huete, Alfredo; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Maier, Stefan; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Sonnentag, Oliver; Specht, Alison; Taylor, Jeffrey R.; van Gorsel, Eva; Liddell, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    Phenology is the study of periodic biological occurrences and can provide important insights into the influence of climatic variability and change on ecosystems. Understanding Australia's vegetation phenology is a challenge due to its diverse range of ecosystems, from savannas and tropical rainforests to temperate eucalypt woodlands, semi-arid scrublands, and alpine grasslands. These ecosystems exhibit marked differences in seasonal patterns of canopy development and plant life-cycle events, much of which deviates from the predictable seasonal phenological pulse of temperate deciduous and boreal biomes. Many Australian ecosystems are subject to irregular events (i.e. drought, flooding, cyclones, and fire) that can alter ecosystem composition, structure, and functioning just as much as seasonal change. We show how satellite remote sensing and ground-based digital repeat photography (i.e. phenocams) can be used to improve understanding of phenology in Australian ecosystems. First, we examine temporal variation in phenology on the continental scale using the enhanced vegetation index (EVI), calculated from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Spatial gradients are revealed, ranging from regions with pronounced seasonality in canopy development (i.e. tropical savannas) to regions where seasonal variation is minimal (i.e. tropical rainforests) or high but irregular (i.e. arid ecosystems). Next, we use time series colour information extracted from phenocam imagery to illustrate a range of phenological signals in four contrasting Australian ecosystems. These include greening and senescing events in tropical savannas and temperate eucalypt understorey, as well as strong seasonal dynamics of individual trees in a seemingly static evergreen rainforest. We also demonstrate how phenology links with ecosystem gross primary productivity (from eddy covariance) and discuss why these processes are linked in some ecosystems but not others. We conclude that

  16. Characterization of a highly repeated DNA sequence family in five species of the genus Eulemur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, M; Boniotto, M; Cardone, M F; Fulizio, L; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M; Crovella, S

    2001-09-19

    The karyotypes of Eulemur species exhibit a high degree of variation, as a consequence of the Robertsonian fusion and/or centromere fission. Centromeric and pericentromeric heterochromatin of eulemurs is constituted by highly repeated DNA sequences (including some telomeric TTAGGG repeats) which have so far been investigated and used for the study of the systematic relationships of the different species of the genus Eulemur. In our study, we have cloned a set of repetitive pericentromeric sequences of five Eulemur species: E. fulvus fulvus (EFU), E. mongoz (EMO), E. macaco (EMA), E. rubriventer (ERU), and E. coronatus (ECO). We have characterized these clones by sequence comparison and by comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in EMA and EFU. Our results showed a high degree of sequence similarity among Eulemur species, indicating a strong conservation, within the five species, of these pericentromeric highly repeated DNA sequences.

  17. Comparison of highly repeated DNA sequences in some Lemuridae and taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnon, D; Crovella, S; Rumpler, Y

    1993-01-01

    Highly repeated DNA sequences of Eulemur fulvus mayottensis, E. coronatus, Lemur catta, and Hapalemur griseus griseus have been identified and compared. Sequence analysis of highly repeated DNA fragments isolated from L. catta and Hapalemur showed a high percentage of similarity (nearly 95%), as did fragments isolated from the two very close Eulemur species, whereas comparison of the DNA fragments isolated from the two Eulemur species and the L. catta/Hapalemur group showed a very low percentage (approximately 40%) of identity, as might be expected for distant species. These results confirm our previous data, obtained by Southern blot hybridization techniques on the same species, and strongly support the existence of a common trunk between L. catta and Hapalemur, but different from the leading to the Eulemur species.

  18. [Heterogeneity and homologies of the repeating and unique DNA of dragonflies (Odonata, Insecta)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N B; Aleshin, V V

    1983-01-01

    A relative content of unique and reiterated nucleotide sequences in DNA of eleven dragonfly species was estimated. The degree of intra- and intergenomic divergence of these DNA sequences was determined by means of DNA-DNA hybridization. Species from different genera share 40-45% of the repetitive sequences and those from different families--from 11 to 20% only. Data on the thermostability of homo- and heteroduplexes suggest that new families of the repetitive sequences have arisen repeatedly during dragonflies evolution. The quality of homologous unique sequences in the DNA compared (20-97%) correlates with the taxonomic relationships of species. Phylogenesis of some dragonfly families is discussed in view of the results obtained.

  19. Regulation of the nucleosome repeat length in vivo by the DNA sequence, protein concentrations and long-range interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Beshnova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The nucleosome repeat length (NRL is an integral chromatin property important for its biological functions. Recent experiments revealed several conflicting trends of the NRL dependence on the concentrations of histones and other architectural chromatin proteins, both in vitro and in vivo, but a systematic theoretical description of NRL as a function of DNA sequence and epigenetic determinants is currently lacking. To address this problem, we have performed an integrative biophysical and bioinformatics analysis in species ranging from yeast to frog to mouse where NRL was studied as a function of various parameters. We show that in simple eukaryotes such as yeast, a lower limit for the NRL value exists, determined by internucleosome interactions and remodeler action. For higher eukaryotes, also the upper limit exists since NRL is an increasing but saturating function of the linker histone concentration. Counterintuitively, smaller H1 variants or non-histone architectural proteins can initiate larger effects on the NRL due to entropic reasons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different regimes of the NRL dependence on histone concentrations exist depending on whether DNA sequence-specific effects dominate over boundary effects or vice versa. We consider several classes of genomic regions with apparently different regimes of the NRL variation. As one extreme, our analysis reveals that the period of oscillations of the nucleosome density around bound RNA polymerase coincides with the period of oscillations of positioning sites of the corresponding DNA sequence. At another extreme, we show that although mouse major satellite repeats intrinsically encode well-defined nucleosome preferences, they have no unique nucleosome arrangement and can undergo a switch between two distinct types of nucleosome positioning.

  20. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Eldarov, M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center for Bioengineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  1. siRNAs from an X-linked satellite repeat promote X-chromosome recognition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Debashish U; Coarfa, Cristian; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-11-18

    Highly differentiated sex chromosomes create a lethal imbalance in gene expression in one sex. To accommodate hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies, expression of X-linked genes increases twofold. This is achieved by the male- specific lethal (MSL) complex, which modifies chromatin to increase expression. Mutations that disrupt the X localization of this complex decrease the expression of X-linked genes and reduce male survival. The mechanism that restricts the MSL complex to X chromatin is not understood. We recently reported that the siRNA pathway contributes to localization of the MSL complex, raising questions about the source of the siRNAs involved. The X-linked 1.688 g/cm(3) satellite related repeats (1.688(X) repeats) are restricted to the X chromosome and produce small RNA, making them an attractive candidate. We tested RNA from these repeats for a role in dosage compensation and found that ectopic expression of single-stranded RNAs from 1.688(X) repeats enhanced the male lethality of mutants with defective X recognition. In contrast, expression of double-stranded hairpin RNA from a 1.688(X) repeat generated abundant siRNA and dramatically increased male survival. Consistent with improved survival, X localization of the MSL complex was largely restored in these males. The striking distribution of 1.688(X) repeats, which are nearly exclusive to the X chromosome, suggests that these are cis-acting elements contributing to identification of X chromatin.

  2. Chromatin opening of DNA satellites by targeted sequence-specific drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, S; Durussel, T; Laemmli, U K

    2000-11-01

    There are few tools available for dissecting and elucidating the functions of DNA satellites and other nongenic DNA. To address this, we have explored the experimental potential of DNA sequence-specific drugs containing pyrrole and imidazole amino acids (polyamides). Compounds were synthesized that target different Drosophila melanogaster satellites. Dimeric oligopyrroles were shown to target the AT-rich satellites I, III, and SARs (scaffold associated regions). One polyamide (P31) specifically binds the GAGAA satellite V. Specificity of targeting was established by footprinting, epifluorescence of nuclei, and polytene chromosomes stained with fluorescent derivatives. These polyamides were shown to mediate satellite-specific chromatin opening of the chromatin fiber. Remarkably, certain polyamides induced defined gain or loss-of-function phenotypes when fed to Drosophila melanogaster.

  3. Genomic and polyploid evolution in genus Avena as revealed by RFLPs of repeated DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Toshinobu; Nishihara, Miho

    2009-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and genome affinities were investigated by utilizing all the biological Avena species consisting of 11 diploid species (15 accessions), 8 tetraploid species (9 accessions) and 4 hexaploid species (5 accessions). Genomic DNA regions of As120a, avenin, and globulin were amplified by PCR. A total of 130 polymorphic fragments were detected out of 156 fragments generated by digesting the PCR-amplified fragments with 11 restriction enzymes. The number of fragments generated by PCR-amplification followed by digestion with restriction enzymes was almost the same as those among the three repeated DNA sequences. A high level of genetic distance was detected between A. damascena (Ad) and A. canariensis (Ac) genomes, which reflected their different morphology and reproductive isolation. The A. longiglumis (Al) and A. prostrata (Ap) genomes were closely related to the As genome group. The AB genome species formed a cluster with the AsAs genome artificial autotetraploid and the As genome diploids indicating near-autotetraploid origin. The A. macrostachya is an outbreeding autotetraploid closely related with the C genome diploid and the AC genome tetraploid species. The differences of genetic distances estimated from the repeated DNA sequence divergence among the Avena species were consistent with genome divergences and it was possible to compare the genetic intra- and inter-ploidy relationships produced by RFLPs. These results suggested that the PCR-mediated analysis of repeated DNA polymorphism can be used as a tool to examine genomic relationships of polyploidy species.

  4. Cytogenetic analysis of Populus trichocarpa--ribosomal DNA, telomere repeat sequence, and marker-selected BACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam-Faridi, M N; Nelson, C D; DiFazio, S P; Gunter, L E; Tuskan, G A

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  5. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis -type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  6. Controlled growth of DNA structures from repeating units using the vernier mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greschner, Andrea A; Bujold, Katherine E; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2014-08-11

    In this report, we demonstrate the assembly of length-programmed DNA nanostructures using a single 16 base sequence and its complement as building blocks. To achieve this, we applied the Vernier mechanism to DNA assembly, which uses a mismatch in length between two monomers to dictate the final length of the product. Specifically, this approach relies on the interaction of two DNA strands containing a different number (n, m) of complementary binding sites: these two strands will keep binding to each other until they come into register, thus generating a larger assembly whose length (n × m) is encoded by the number of binding sites in each strand. While the Vernier mechanism has been applied to other areas of supramolecular chemistry, here we present an application of its principles to DNA nanostructures. Using a single 16 base repeat and its complement, and varying the number of repeats on a given DNA strand, we show the consistent construction of duplexes up to 228 base pairs (bp) in length. Employing specific annealing protocols, strand capping, and intercalator chaperones allows us to further grow the duplex to 392 base pairs. We demonstrate that the Vernier method is not only strand-efficient, but also produces a cleaner, higher-yielding product than conventional designs.

  7. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-11-16

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats.

  8. Linker histone variant H1T targets rDNA repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Ruiko; Hayakawa, Koji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shiota, Kunio

    2016-04-02

    H1T is a linker histone H1 variant that is highly expressed at the primary spermatocyte stage through to the early spermatid stage of spermatogenesis. While the functions of the somatic types of H1 have been extensively investigated, the intracellular role of H1T is unclear. H1 variants specifically expressed in germ cells show low amino acid sequence homology to somatic H1s, which suggests that the functions or target loci of germ cell-specific H1T differ from those of somatic H1s. Here, we describe the target loci and function of H1T. H1T was expressed not only in the testis but also in tumor cell lines, mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and some normal somatic cells. To elucidate the intracellular localization and target loci of H1T, fluorescent immunostaining and ChIP-seq were performed in tumor cells and mESCs. We found that H1T accumulated in nucleoli and predominantly targeted rDNA repeats, which differ from somatic H1 targets. Furthermore, by nuclease sensitivity assay and RT-qPCR, we showed that H1T repressed rDNA transcription by condensing chromatin structure. Imaging analysis indicated that H1T expression affected nucleolar formation. We concluded that H1T plays a role in rDNA transcription, by distinctively targeting rDNA repeats.

  9. Mitochondrial Inverted Repeats Strongly Correlate with Lifespan: mtDNA Inversions and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Nan; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects are implicated in aging and in a multitude of age-related diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. However, it is still unclear how mitochondrial defects arise under normal physiological conditions. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions caused by direct repeats (DRs) are implicated in the formation of mitochondrial defects, however, mitochondrial DRs show relatively weak (Pearson’s r = −0.22, p<0.002; Spearman’s ρ = −0.12, p = 0.1) correlation with maximum lifespan (MLS). Here we report a stronger correlation (Pearson’s r = −0.55, p<10–16; Spearman’s ρ = −0.52, p<10–14) between mitochondrial inverted repeats (IRs) and lifespan across 202 species of mammals. We show that, in wild type mice under normal conditions, IRs cause inversions, which arise by replication-dependent mechanism. The inversions accumulate with age in the brain and heart. Our data suggest that IR-mediated inversions are more mutagenic than DR-mediated deletions in mtDNA, and impose stronger constraint on lifespan. Our study identifies IR-induced mitochondrial genome instability during mtDNA replication as a potential cause for mitochondrial defects. PMID:24069185

  10. Mitochondrial inverted repeats strongly correlate with lifespan: mtDNA inversions and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Nan Yang

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial defects are implicated in aging and in a multitude of age-related diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, it is still unclear how mitochondrial defects arise under normal physiological conditions. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions caused by direct repeats (DRs are implicated in the formation of mitochondrial defects, however, mitochondrial DRs show relatively weak (Pearson's r = -0.22, p<0.002; Spearman's ρ = -0.12, p = 0.1 correlation with maximum lifespan (MLS. Here we report a stronger correlation (Pearson's r = -0.55, p<10(-16; Spearman's ρ = -0.52, p<10(-14 between mitochondrial inverted repeats (IRs and lifespan across 202 species of mammals. We show that, in wild type mice under normal conditions, IRs cause inversions, which arise by replication-dependent mechanism. The inversions accumulate with age in the brain and heart. Our data suggest that IR-mediated inversions are more mutagenic than DR-mediated deletions in mtDNA, and impose stronger constraint on lifespan. Our study identifies IR-induced mitochondrial genome instability during mtDNA replication as a potential cause for mitochondrial defects.

  11. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  12. Discrimination of Shark species by simple PCR of 5S rDNA repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo Pinhal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sharks are suffering from intensive exploitation by worldwide fisheries leading to a severe decline in several populations in the last decades. The lack of biological data on a species-specific basis, associated with a k-strategist life history make it difficult to correctly manage and conserve these animals. The aim of the present study was to develop a DNA-based procedure to discriminate shark species by means of a rapid, low cost and easily applicable PCR analysis based on 5S rDNA repeat units amplification, in order to contribute conservation management of these animals. The generated agarose electrophoresis band patterns allowed to unequivocally distinguish eight shark species. The data showed for the first time that a simple PCR is able to discriminate elasmobranch species. The described 5S rDNA PCR approach generated species-specific genetic markers that should find broad application in fishery management and trade of sharks and their subproducts.

  13. Relative Telomere Repeat Mass in Buccal and Leukocyte-Derived DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnicum, Casey T.; Dolan, Conor V.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Weber, Zachary M.; Petersen, Jason L.; Beck, Jeffrey J.; Codd, Veryan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Davies, Gareth E.; Ehli, Erik A.

    2017-01-01

    Telomere length has garnered interest due to the potential role it may play as a biomarker for the cellular aging process. Telomere measurements obtained from blood-derived DNA are often used in epidemiological studies. However, the invasive nature of blood draws severely limits sample collection, particularly with children. Buccal cells are commonly sampled for DNA isolation and thus may present a non-invasive alternative for telomere measurement. Buccal and leukocyte derived DNA obtained from samples collected at the same time period were analyzed for telomere repeat mass (TRM). TRM was measured in buccal-derived DNA samples from individuals for whom previous TRM data from blood samples existed. TRM measurement was performed by qPCR and was normalized to the single copy 36B4 gene relative to a reference DNA sample (K562). Correlations between TRM from blood and buccal DNA were obtained and also between the same blood DNA samples measured in separate laboratories. Using the classical twin design, TRM heritability was estimated (N = 1892, MZ = 1044, DZ = 775). Buccal samples measured for TRM showed a significant correlation with the blood-1 (R = 0.39, p < 0.01) and blood-2 (R = 0.36, p < 0.01) samples. Sex and age effects were observed within the buccal samples as is the norm within blood-derived DNA. The buccal, blood-1, and blood-2 measurements generated heritability estimates of 23.3%, 47.6% and 22.2%, respectively. Buccal derived DNA provides a valid source for the determination of TRM, paving the way for non-invasive projects, such as longitudinal studies in children. PMID:28125671

  14. Formation of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Long Terminal Repeats of Retrotransposons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik D. Møller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA derived from chromosomal Ty retrotransposons in yeast can be generated in multiple ways. Ty eccDNA can arise from the circularization of extrachromosomal linear DNA during the transpositional life cycle of retrotransposons, or from circularization of genomic Ty DNA. Circularization may happen through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ of long terminal repeats (LTRs flanking Ty elements, by Ty autointegration, or by LTR–LTR recombination. By performing an in-depth investigation of sequence reads stemming from Ty eccDNAs obtained from populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c, we find that eccDNAs predominantly correspond to full-length Ty1 elements. Analyses of sequence junctions reveal no signs of NHEJ or autointegration events. We detect recombination junctions that are consistent with yeast Ty eccDNAs being generated through recombination events within the genome. This opens the possibility that retrotransposable elements could move around in the genome without an RNA intermediate directly through DNA circularization.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Satellite DNA in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Madhav; Warsinger-Pepe, Natalie; Watase, George J; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2017-02-09

    Satellite DNAs are highly repetitive sequences that account for the majority of constitutive heterochromatin in many eukaryotic genomes. It is widely recognized that sequences and locations of satellite DNAs are highly divergent even in closely related species, contributing to the hypothesis that satellite DNA differences may underlie speciation. However, due to its repetitive nature, the mapping of satellite DNAs has been mostly left out of recent genomics analyses, hampering the use of molecular genetics techniques to better understand their role in speciation and evolution. Satellite DNAs are most extensively and comprehensively mapped in Drosophila melanogaster, a species that is also an excellent model system with which to study speciation. Yet the lack of comprehensive knowledge regarding satellite DNA identity and location in its sibling species (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) has prevented the full utilization of D. melanogaster in studying speciation. To overcome this problem, we initiated the mapping of satellite DNAs on the genomes of the D. melanogaster species complex (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) using multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our study confirms a striking divergence of satellite DNAs in the D. melanogaster species complex, even among the closely related species of the D. simulans clade (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia), and suggests the presence of unidentified satellite sequences in these species.

  16. Expanded CAG/CTG repeat DNA induces a checkpoint response that impacts cell proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangapriya Sundararajan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA elements are mutational hotspots in the genome, and their instability is linked to various neurological disorders and cancers. Although it is known that expanded trinucleotide repeats can interfere with DNA replication and repair, the cellular response to these events has not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that an expanded CAG/CTG repeat elicits a DNA damage checkpoint response in budding yeast. Using microcolony and single cell pedigree analysis, we found that cells carrying an expanded CAG repeat frequently experience protracted cell division cycles, persistent arrests, and morphological abnormalities. These phenotypes were further exacerbated by mutations in DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination and end joining, implicating a DNA damage response. Cell cycle analysis confirmed repeat-dependent S phase delays and G2/M arrests. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the above phenotypes are due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, since expanded CAG repeats induced the phosphorylation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in a rad52Δ recombination deficient mutant. Interestingly, cells mutated for the MRX complex (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2, a central component of DSB repair which is required to repair breaks at CAG repeats, failed to elicit repeat-specific arrests, morphological defects, or Rad53 phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that damage at expanded CAG/CTG repeats is likely sensed by the MRX complex, leading to a checkpoint response. Finally, we show that repeat expansions preferentially occur in cells experiencing growth delays. Activation of DNA damage checkpoints in repeat-containing cells could contribute to the tissue degeneration observed in trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

  17. Expanded CAG/CTG repeat DNA induces a checkpoint response that impacts cell proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Rangapriya; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2011-03-01

    Repetitive DNA elements are mutational hotspots in the genome, and their instability is linked to various neurological disorders and cancers. Although it is known that expanded trinucleotide repeats can interfere with DNA replication and repair, the cellular response to these events has not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that an expanded CAG/CTG repeat elicits a DNA damage checkpoint response in budding yeast. Using microcolony and single cell pedigree analysis, we found that cells carrying an expanded CAG repeat frequently experience protracted cell division cycles, persistent arrests, and morphological abnormalities. These phenotypes were further exacerbated by mutations in DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination and end joining, implicating a DNA damage response. Cell cycle analysis confirmed repeat-dependent S phase delays and G2/M arrests. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the above phenotypes are due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, since expanded CAG repeats induced the phosphorylation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in a rad52Δ recombination deficient mutant. Interestingly, cells mutated for the MRX complex (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2), a central component of DSB repair which is required to repair breaks at CAG repeats, failed to elicit repeat-specific arrests, morphological defects, or Rad53 phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that damage at expanded CAG/CTG repeats is likely sensed by the MRX complex, leading to a checkpoint response. Finally, we show that repeat expansions preferentially occur in cells experiencing growth delays. Activation of DNA damage checkpoints in repeat-containing cells could contribute to the tissue degeneration observed in trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

  18. [Mutation in microsatellite repeats of DNA and embryonal death in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, T V; Nazarenko, S A

    2000-07-01

    In the analysis of tetranucleotide DNA repeats inheritance carried out in 55 families with a history of spontaneous miscarriages and normal karyotypes in respect to 21 loci located on seven autosomes, 8 embryos (14.5%) demonstrating 12 cases of the presence of alleles absent in both parents were described. The study of chromosome segregation using other DNA markers permitted highly probable exclusion of false paternity as well as uniparental disomy as the reasons for parent/child allele mismatches. The high probability of paternity together with the presence of a "new" allele at any offspring locus points to the mutation having occurred during game-togenesis in one of the parents. Examination of mutation in spontaneous abortuses revealed an increased number of tandem repeat units at microsatellite loci in three cases and an decreased number of these repeats in six cases. In two abortuses, a third allele absent in both parents, which resulted from a somatic mutation that occurred during embryonic development, was observed. The prevalence of the male germline mutations, revealed during investigation of the mutation origin, was probably associated with an increased number of DNA replication cycles in sperm compared to the oocytes. In spontaneous abortuses, the mean mutation rate of the tetranucleotide repeat complexes analyzed was 9.8 x 10(-3) per locus per gamete per generation. This was about five times higher than the spontaneous mutation rate of these STR loci. It can be suggested that genome instability detected at the level of repeated DNA sequences can involve not only genetically neutral loci but also active genomic regions crucial for embryonic viability. This results in cell death and termination of embryonic development. Our findings indicate that the death of embryos with normal karyotypes in most cases is associated with an increased frequency of germline and somatic microsatellite mutations. The data of the present study also provide a practical tool for

  19. Identification of a nanovirus-like DNA molecule associated with Tobacco curly shoot virus isolates containing satellite DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yan; WU Peijun; TAO Xiaorong; ZHOU Xueping

    2004-01-01

    A circular single-stranded DNA molecule, designated DNA1, was identified from Tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV) isolates Y35 and Y115 containing satellite DNAβ using abutting primers based on the two reported DNA1 sequences of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses, while DNA1 molecule was not found in TbCSV isolates Y1 and Y121 without DNAβ. The immunotrapping PCR test showed that DNA1 could be encapsidated in virus particles. Southern blot further confirmed that DNA1 molecules were only associated with TbCSV isolates (Y35 and Y115) containing DNAβ. Sequences of Y35 and Y115 DNA1 comprise 1367 and 1368 nucleotides, respectively, each having a conserved ORF encoding nanovirus-like replication-associated protein (Rep). A low nucleotide sequence identity was found between DNA1 molecules and their cognate DNA-As. Y35 and Y115 DNA1 shared 92% overall nucleotide sequence identity and 96% amino acid sequence identity for Rep, while 69%~79% overall nucleotide sequence identity and 87%~90% amino acid sequence identity were found when compared with two reported DNA1 molecules associated with Ageratum yellow vein virus and Cotton leaf curl Multon virus. Sequence analysis showed that DNA1 was less related to nanovirus DNA.

  20. Ginger DNA transposons in eukaryotes and their evolutionary relationships with long terminal repeat retrotransposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons such as Copia, BEL and Gypsy integrate their DNA copies into the host genome using a particular type of DDE transposase called integrase (INT. The Gypsy INT-like transposase is also conserved in the Polinton/Maverick self-synthesizing DNA transposons and in the 'cut and paste' DNA transposons known as TDD-4 and TDD-5. Moreover, it is known that INT is similar to bacterial transposases that belong to the IS3, IS481, IS30 and IS630 families. It has been suggested that LTR retrotransposons evolved from a non-LTR retrotransposon fused with a DNA transposon in early eukaryotes. In this paper we analyze a diverse superfamily of eukaryotic cut and paste DNA transposons coding for INT-like transposase and discuss their evolutionary relationship to LTR retrotransposons. Results A new diverse eukaryotic superfamily of DNA transposons, named Ginger (for 'Gypsy INteGrasE Related' DNA transposons is defined and analyzed. Analogously to the IS3 and IS481 bacterial transposons, the Ginger termini resemble those of the Gypsy LTR retrotransposons. Currently, Ginger transposons can be divided into two distinct groups named Ginger1 and Ginger2/Tdd. Elements from the Ginger1 group are characterized by approximately 40 to 270 base pair (bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and are flanked by CCGG-specific or CCGT-specific target site duplication (TSD sequences. The Ginger1-encoded transposases contain an approximate 400 amino acid N-terminal portion sharing high amino acid identity to the entire Gypsy-encoded integrases, including the YPYY motif, zinc finger, DDE domain, and, importantly, the GPY/F motif, a hallmark of Gypsy and endogenous retrovirus (ERV integrases. Ginger1 transposases also contain additional C-terminal domains: ovarian tumor (OTU-like protease domain or Ulp1 protease domain. In vertebrate genomes, at least two host genes, which were previously thought to be derived from

  1. Overexpression of a splice variant of DNA methyltransferase 3b, DNMT3b4, associated with DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during human hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Kanai, Yae; Sakamoto, Michiie; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ishii, Hiromasa; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2002-01-01

    DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions is an early and frequent event associated with heterochromatin instability during human hepatocarcinogenesis. A DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3b, is required for methylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during mouse development. To clarify the molecular mechanism underlying DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during human hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined mutations of the DNMT3b gene and mRNA expression levels ...

  2. Methylation profile of a satellite DNA constituting the intercalary G+C-rich heterochromatin of the cut trough shell Spisula subtruncata (Bivalvia, Mactridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Souto, Daniel; Mravinac, Brankica; Šatović, Eva; Plohl, Miroslav; Morán, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J

    2017-07-31

    Tandemly repeated DNAs usually constitute significant portions of eukaryotic genomes. In bivalves, however, repetitive DNAs are habitually not widespread. In our search for abundant repetitive DNAs in trough shells, we discovered a novel satellite DNA, SSUsat, which constitutes at least 1.3% of the genome of Spisula subtruncata. As foreseen by the satellite DNA library hypothesis, we confirmed that this satellite DNA is also present in two other Mactridae species, showing a highly conserved nucleotide sequence together with a dramatic diminution in the number of repeats. Predominantly located at the G + C-rich intercalary heterochromatin of S. subtruncata, SSUsat displays several DNA methylation peculiarities. The level of methylation of SSUsat is high (3.38%) in comparison with bivalve standards and triplicates the mean of the S. subtruncata genome (1.13%). Methylation affects not only the cytosines in CpG dinucleotides but also those in CHH and CHG trinucleotides, a feature common in plants but scarce and without any clear known relevance in animals. SSUsat segments enriched in methylated cytosines partly overlap those showing higher sequence conservation. The presence of a chromosome pair showing an accumulation of markedly under-methylated SSUsat monomers additionally indicates that the methylation processes that shape repetitive genome compartments are quite complex.

  3. Mutagenic roles of DNA "repair" proteins in antibody diversity and disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Ranum, Laura P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2008-07-01

    While DNA repair proteins are generally thought to maintain the integrity of the whole genome by correctly repairing mutagenic DNA intermediates, there are cases where DNA "repair" proteins are involved in causing mutations instead. For instance, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) require the contribution of various DNA repair proteins, including UNG, MSH2 and MSH6 to mutate certain regions of immunoglobulin genes in order to generate antibodies of increased antigen affinity and altered effector functions. Another instance where "repair" proteins drive mutations is the instability of gene-specific trinucleotide repeats (TNR), the causative mutations of numerous diseases including Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FRAXA), Huntington's disease (HD), myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) all of which arise via various modes of pathogenesis. These healthy and deleterious mutations that are induced by repair proteins are distinct from the genome-wide mutations that arise in the absence of repair proteins: they occur at specific loci, are sensitive to cis-elements (sequence context and/or epigenetic marks) and transcription, occur in specific tissues during distinct developmental windows, and are age-dependent. Here we review and compare the mutagenic role of DNA "repair" proteins in the processes of SHM, CSR and TNR instability.

  4. HP1 recruits activity-dependent neuroprotective protein to H3K9me3 marked pericentromeric heterochromatin for silencing of major satellite repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Mosch

    Full Text Available H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3 is a histone posttranslational modification (PTM that has emerged as hallmark of pericentromeric heterochromatin. This constitutive chromatin domain is composed of repetitive DNA elements, whose transcription is differentially regulated. Mammalian cells contain three HP1 proteins, HP1α, HP1β and HP1γ These have been shown to bind to H3K9me3 and are thought to mediate the effects of this histone PTM. However, the mechanisms of HP1 chromatin regulation and the exact functional role at pericentromeric heterochromatin are still unclear. Here, we identify activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP as an H3K9me3 associated factor. We show that ADNP does not bind H3K9me3 directly, but that interaction is mediated by all three HP1 isoforms in vitro. However, in cells ADNP localization to areas of pericentromeric heterochromatin is only dependent on HP1α and HP1β. Besides a PGVLL sequence patch we uncovered an ARKS motif within the ADNP homeodomain involved in HP1 dependent H3K9me3 association and localization to pericentromeric heterochromatin. While knockdown of ADNP had no effect on HP1 distribution and heterochromatic histone and DNA modifications, we found ADNP silencing major satellite repeats. Our results identify a novel factor in the translation of H3K9me3 at pericentromeric heterochromatin that regulates transcription.

  5. Reduction in the structural instability of cloned eukaryotic tandem-repeat DNA by low-temperature culturing of host bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapana, Watcharaporn; Sujiwattanarat, Penporn; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-10-27

    Summary For accurate analyses of eukaryotic tandem-repeat DNA, it is often required to clone a genomic DNA fragment into a bacterial plasmid. It is, however, a serious problem that tandem-repeat DNA is frequently subjected to structural changes during maintenance or amplification in the host bacteria. Here, we show an example of a clear difference in the instability of tandem-repeat DNA between different culturing temperatures. A fragment of monkey centromeric DNA carried by pUC19 was considerably degraded by culturing bacteria at 37 °C, but the damage was reduced at 25 °C. Thus, culturing temperature is a significant factor for avoiding degradation, in addition to the genotype of the host bacteria.

  6. Recombination-independent recognition of DNA homology for repeat-induced point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2017-06-01

    Numerous cytogenetic observations have shown that homologous chromosomes (or individual chromosomal loci) can engage in specific pairing interactions in the apparent absence of DNA breakage and recombination, suggesting that canonical recombination-mediated mechanisms may not be the only option for sensing DNA/DNA homology. One proposed mechanism for such recombination-independent homology recognition involves direct contacts between intact double-stranded DNA molecules. The strongest in vivo evidence for the existence of such a mechanism is provided by the phenomena of homology-directed DNA modifications in fungi, known as repeat-induced point mutation (RIP, discovered in Neurospora crassa) and methylation-induced premeiotically (MIP, discovered in Ascobolus immersus). In principle, Neurospora RIP can detect the presence of gene-sized DNA duplications irrespectively of their origin, underlying nucleotide sequence, coding capacity or relative, as well as absolute positions in the genome. Once detected, both sequence copies are altered by numerous cytosine-to-thymine (C-to-T) mutations that extend specifically over the duplicated region. We have recently shown that Neurospora RIP does not require MEI-3, the only RecA/Rad51 protein in this organism, consistent with a recombination-independent mechanism. Using an ultra-sensitive assay for RIP mutation, we have defined additional features of this process. We have shown that RIP can detect short islands of homology of only three base-pairs as long as many such islands are arrayed with a periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along a pair of DNA molecules. While the presence of perfect homology is advantageous, it is not required: chromosomal segments with overall sequence identity of only 35-36 % can still be recognized by RIP. Importantly, in order for this process to work efficiently, participating DNA molecules must be able to co-align along their lengths. Based on these findings, we have proposed a model, in which

  7. DNA methylation and triplet repeat stability: New proposals addressing actual questions on the CGG repeat of fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehrle, D.; Schwemmle, S.; Steinbach, P. [Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    1996-08-09

    Methylation of expanded CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene may well have different consequences. One is that methylation, extending into upstream regulatory elements, could lead to gene inactivation. Another effect of methylation, which we have obtained evidence for, could be stabilization of the repeat sequence and even prevention of premutations from expansion to full mutation. The full mutation of the fragile X syndrome probably occurs in an early transitional stage of embryonic development. The substrate is a maternally inherited premutation. The product usually is a mosaic pattern of full mutations detectable in early fetal life. These full mutation patterns are mitotically stable as, for instance, different somatic tissues of full mutation fetuses show identical mutation patterns. This raised the following questions: What triggers repeat expansion in that particular stage of development and what causes subsequent mitotic stability of expanded repeats? 21 refs., 1 fig.

  8. A Conserved DNA Repeat Promotes Selection of a Diverse Repertoire of Trypanosoma brucei Surface Antigens from the Genomic Archive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel Hovel-Miner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are mammalian pathogens that must regularly change their protein coat to survive in the host bloodstream. Chronic trypanosome infections are potentiated by their ability to access a deep genomic repertoire of Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG genes and switch from the expression of one VSG to another. Switching VSG expression is largely based in DNA recombination events that result in chromosome translocations between an acceptor site, which houses the actively transcribed VSG, and a donor gene, drawn from an archive of more than 2,000 silent VSGs. One element implicated in these duplicative gene conversion events is a DNA repeat of approximately 70 bp that is found in long regions within each BES and short iterations proximal to VSGs within the silent archive. Early observations showing that 70-bp repeats can be recombination boundaries during VSG switching led to the prediction that VSG-proximal 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology. Yet, this long held assumption had not been tested and no specific function for the conserved 70-bp repeats had been demonstrated. In the present study, the 70-bp repeats were genetically manipulated under conditions that induce gene conversion. In this manner, we demonstrated that 70-bp repeats promote access to archival VSGs. Synthetic repeat DNA sequences were then employed to identify the length, sequence, and directionality of repeat regions required for this activity. In addition, manipulation of the 70-bp repeats allowed us to observe a link between VSG switching and the cell cycle that had not been appreciated. Together these data provide definitive support for the long-standing hypothesis that 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology during switching. Yet, the fact that silent archival VSGs are selected under these conditions suggests the 70-bp repeats also direct DNA pairing and recombination machinery away from the closest homologs (silent BESs and toward the rest of

  9. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  10. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  11. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Møller, A; Morling, N

    1994-01-01

    DNA from the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 100 unrelated Danes, 147 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 89 Danish mother/child...

  12. DNA-labelled cytidine assay for the quantification of CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bello, Dannelys; Xu, Z H; Higginson-Clarke, David; Rojas, Ana María Riverón; Le, Weidong; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine

    2008-03-30

    The sequencing procedure has been used to determine the size of the CAG repeat expansion for the diagnosis of genetic disorders. Likewise, standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis techniques are applied for screening large number of patients. The trinucleotide repeats (TNR) region amplification by means of the PCR procedure was initially performed using 32-P end-labelled primers and currently carried out with fluorescently end-labelled primers. The goal to obtain reliable TNR quantification assays, at low cost and short assay times, represents a challenge for the molecular diagnosis aimed at massive screening of affected populations. In the current work, we obtained preliminary results of a new methodology for the detection and size estimation of CAG expanded alleles. The assay was based on an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantifying the amount of labelled cytidines in DNA molecules. The label, 6-(p-bromobenzamido)caproyl radical, was introduced by the transamination and acylation reactions. A group of model sequences containing different numbers of CAG repeats, as well as the ATXN3 (ataxin 3) gene (from subjects suffering type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia SCA3) were used for assay standardization. The assay is simple, inexpensive, and easy to perform and differentiates distinct degrees of CAG expansions.

  13. Analysis of the trinucleotide CAG repeat from the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene in healthy and diseased individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio, A; Tiranti, V; Bednarz, A L; Suomalainen, A; Spelbrink, J N; Lecrenier, N; Melberg, A; Zeviani, M; Poulton, J; Foury, F; Jacobs, H T

    1999-01-01

    The human nuclear gene (POLG) for the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma) contains a trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeat within the coding sequence. We have investigated the frequency of different repeat-length alleles in populations of diseased and healthy individuals. The predominant allele of 10 CAG repeats was found at a very similar frequency (approximately 88%) in both Finnish and ethnically mixed population samples, with homozygosity close to the equilibrium prediction. Other alleles of between 5 and 13 repeat units were detected, but no larger, expanded alleles were found. A series of 51 British myotonic dystrophy patients showed no significant variation from controls, indicating an absence of generalised CAG repeat instability. Patients with a variety of molecular lesions in mtDNA, including sporadic, clonal deletions, maternally inherited point mutations, autosomally transmitted mtDNA depletion and autosomal dominant multiple deletions showed no differences in POLG trinucleotide repeat-length distribution from controls. These findings rule out POLG repeat expansion as a common pathogenic mechanism in disorders characterised by mitochondrial genome instability.

  14. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-06-13

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340-350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys.

  15. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated wi...

  16. Conserved DNA Motifs, Including the CENP-B Box-like, Are Possible Promoters of Satellite DNA Array Rearrangements in Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Ana; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Abad, Pierre; Plohl, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Tandemly arrayed non-coding sequences or satellite DNAs (satDNAs) are rapidly evolving segments of eukaryotic genomes, including the centromere, and may raise a genetic barrier that leads to speciation. However, determinants and mechanisms of satDNA sequence dynamics are only partially understood. Sequence analyses of a library of five satDNAs common to the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne chitwoodi and M. fallax together with a satDNA, which is specific for M. chitwoodi only revealed low sequence identity (32–64%) among them. However, despite sequence differences, two conserved motifs were recovered. One of them turned out to be highly similar to the CENP-B box of human alpha satDNA, identical in 10–12 out of 17 nucleotides. In addition, organization of nematode satDNAs was comparable to that found in alpha satDNA of human and primates, characterized by monomers concurrently arranged in simple and higher-order repeat (HOR) arrays. In contrast to alpha satDNA, phylogenetic clustering of nematode satDNA monomers extracted either from simple or from HOR array indicated frequent shuffling between these two organizational forms. Comparison of homogeneous simple arrays and complex HORs composed of different satDNAs, enabled, for the first time, the identification of conserved motifs as obligatory components of monomer junctions. This observation highlights the role of short motifs in rearrangements, even among highly divergent sequences. Two mechanisms are proposed to be involved in this process, i.e., putative transposition-related cut-and-paste insertions and/or illegitimate recombination. Possibility for involvement of the nematode CENP-B box-like sequence in the transposition-related mechanism and together with previously established similarity of the human CENP-B protein and pogo-like transposases implicate a novel role of the CENP-B box and related sequence motifs in addition to the known function in centromere protein binding. PMID:23826269

  17. Evaluation of intra- and interspecific divergence of satellite DNA sequences by nucleotide frequency calculation and pairwise sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Mikio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite DNA sequences are known to be highly variable and to have been subjected to concerted evolution that homogenizes member sequences within species. We have analyzed the mode of evolution of satellite DNA sequences in four fishes from the genus Diplodus by calculating the nucleotide frequency of the sequence array and the phylogenetic distances between member sequences. Calculation of nucleotide frequency and pairwise sequence comparison enabled us to characterize the divergence among member sequences in this satellite DNA family. The results suggest that the evolutionary rate of satellite DNA in D. bellottii is about two-fold greater than the average of the other three fishes, and that the sequence homogenization event occurred in D. puntazzo more recently than in the others. The procedures described here are effective to characterize mode of evolution of satellite DNA.

  18. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich's Ataxia (GAA)(n) Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigen......Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated...... with epigenetic modifications. With the aim of interfering with higher order H-DNA (like) DNA structures within pathological (GAA)n expansions, we examined sequence-specific interaction of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with (GAA)n repeats of different lengths (short: n=9, medium: n=75 or long: n=115) by chemical...... probing of triple helical and single stranded regions. We found that a triplex structure (H-DNA) forms at GAA repeats of different lengths; however, single stranded regions were not detected within the medium size pathological repeat, suggesting the presence of a more complex structure. Furthermore, (GAA...

  19. Visualization and quantitative analysis of extrachromosomal telomere-repeat DNA in individual human cells by Halo-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosa, Martin; Root, Heather; Meyn, M Stephen

    2015-02-27

    Current methods for characterizing extrachromosomal nuclear DNA in mammalian cells do not permit single-cell analysis, are often semi-quantitative and frequently biased toward the detection of circular species. To overcome these limitations, we developed Halo-FISH to visualize and quantitatively analyze extrachromosomal DNA in single cells. We demonstrate Halo-FISH by using it to analyze extrachromosomal telomere-repeat (ECTR) in human cells that use the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway(s) to maintain telomere lengths. We find that GM847 and VA13 ALT cells average ∼80 detectable G/C-strand ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus, while U2OS ALT cells average ∼18 molecules/nucleus. In comparison, human primary and telomerase-positive cells contain 300), range widely in length (200 kb) and are composed of primarily G- or C-strand telomere-repeat DNA. Halo-FISH enables, for the first time, the simultaneous analysis of ECTR DNA and chromosomal telomeres in a single cell. We find that ECTR DNA comprises ∼15% of telomere-repeat DNA in GM847 and VA13 cells, but FISH can facilitate the study of a wide variety of extrachromosomal DNA in mammalian cells.

  20. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarath Baicharoen

    Full Text Available Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes.

  1. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes.

  2. Localization of a new highly repeated DNA sequence of Lemur cafta (Lemuridae, Strepsirhini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniotto, Michele; Ventura, Mario; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Boaretto, Francesca; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Crovella, Sergio

    2002-10-01

    We have isolated and cloned an 800-bp highly repeated DNA (HRDNA) sequence from Lemur catta (LCA) and described its localization on LCA chromosomes. Lemur catta HRDNA sequences were localized by performing FISH experiments on standard and elongated metaphasic chromosomes using an LCA HRDNA probe (LCASAT). A complex hybridization pattern was detected. A strong pericentromeric hybridization signal was observed on most LCA chromosomes. Chromosomes 7 and 13 were lit in pericentromeric regions, as well as in the interspersed heterochromatin. Chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 17, 19, X, and microchromosomes (20, 25, 26, and 27) showed no signals in the pericentromeric region, but chromosomes 3 and 4 showed a positive hybridization in heterochromatic regions. The 800-bp L catta HRDNA was species specific. We performed FISH experiments with the LCASAT probe on Eulemur macaco macaco (EMA) and Eulemur fulvus fulvus (EFU) metaphases and no positive signal of hybridization was detected. These findings were also confirmed by Southern blot analysis and PCR.

  3. Herpesvirus telomeric repeats facilitate genomic integration into host telomeres and mobilization of viral DNA during reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Jarosinski, Keith W; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-03-14

    Some herpesviruses, particularly lymphotropic viruses such as Marek's disease virus (MDV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), integrate their DNA into host chromosomes. MDV and HHV-6, among other herpesviruses, harbor telomeric repeats (TMRs) identical to host telomeres at either end of their linear genomes. Using MDV as a natural virus-host model, we show that herpesvirus TMRs facilitate viral genome integration into host telomeres and that integration is important for establishment of latency and lymphoma formation. Integration into host telomeres also aids in reactivation from the quiescent state of infection. Our results and the presence of TMRs in many herpesviruses suggest that integration mediated by viral TMRs is a conserved mechanism, which ensures faithful virus genome maintenance in host cells during cell division and allows efficient mobilization of dormant viral genomes. This finding is of particular importance as reactivation is critical for virus spread between susceptible individuals and is necessary for continued herpesvirus evolution and survival.

  4. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Tsukasa; Iwasa, Mineo; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Ichiro; Matoba, Ryoji; Yokoi, Motoo; Nagao, Masataka

    2002-09-01

    A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 300 degrees C, 400 degrees C, and 500 degrees C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases.

  6. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-03

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  8. DNA dynamics is likely to be a factor in the genomic nucleotide repeats expansions related to diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boian S Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats sequences (TRS represent a common type of genomic DNA motif whose expansion is associated with a large number of human diseases. The driving molecular mechanisms of the TRS ongoing dynamic expansion across generations and within tissues and its influence on genomic DNA functions are not well understood. Here we report results for a novel and notable collective breathing behavior of genomic DNA of tandem TRS, leading to propensity for large local DNA transient openings at physiological temperature. Our Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulations demonstrate that the patterns of openings of various TRSs depend specifically on their length. The collective propensity for DNA strand separation of repeated sequences serves as a precursor for outsized intermediate bubble states independently of the G/C-content. We report that repeats have the potential to interfere with the binding of transcription factors to their consensus sequence by altered DNA breathing dynamics in proximity of the binding sites. These observations might influence ongoing attempts to use LMD and MCMC simulations for TRS-related modeling of genomic DNA functionality in elucidating the common denominators of the dynamic TRS expansion mutation with potential therapeutic applications.

  9. Huntington's disease and mitochondrial DNA deletions: event or regular mechanism for mutant huntingtin protein and CAG repeats expansion?!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Houshmand, Massoud; Panahi, Mehdi Shafa Shariat; Shariati, Parvin; Rostami, Maryam; Manshadi, Masoumeh Dehghan; Majidizadeh, Tayebeh

    2007-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory chain complex activities in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). Research studies were conducted to determine the possible levels of mitochondrial defect (deletion) in HD patients and consideration of interaction between the expanded Huntingtin gene as a nuclear gene and mitochondria as a cytoplasmic organelle. To determine mtDNA damage, we investigated deletions based in four areas of mitochondrial DNA, in a group of 60 Iranian patients clinically diagnosed with HD and 70 healthy controls. A total of 41 patients out of 60 had CAG expansion (group A). About 19 patients did not show expansion but had the clinical symptoms of HD (group B). MtDNA deletions were classified into four groups according to size; 9 kb, 7.5 kb, 7 kb, and 5 kb. We found one of the four-mtDNA deletions in at least 90% of samples. Multiple deletions have also been observed in 63% of HD patients. None of the normal control (group C) showed mtDNA deletions. The sizes or locations of the deletions did not show a clear correlation with expanded CAG repeat and age in our samples. The study presented evidence that HD patients had higher frequencies of mtDNA deletions in lymphocytes in comparison to the controls. It is thus proposed that CAG repeats instability and mutant Htt are causative factor in mtDNA damage.

  10. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich's Ataxia (GAA)(n) Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben;

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigen......Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated...

  11. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  12. Is radon emission in caves causing deletions in satellite DNA sequences of cave-dwelling crickets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Allegrucci

    Full Text Available The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA. Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26,000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration.

  13. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  14. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  15. Molecular characterization of a new begomovirus infecting Sida cordifolia and its associated satellite DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojian; Zhou, Xueping

    2006-12-01

    Two virus isolates Hn57 and Hn60 were obtained from Sida cordifolia showing mild upward leaf-curling symptoms in Hainan province of China. Comparison of partial sequences of DNA-A like molecule confirmed the existence of a single type of begomovirus. The complete nucleotide sequence of DNA-A of Hn57 was determined to be 2757 nucleotides, with a genomic organization typical of begomoviruses. Complete sequence comparison with other reported begomoviruses revealed that Hn57 DNA-A has the highest sequence identity (71.0%) with that of Tobacco leaf curl Yunnan virus. Consequently, Hn57 was considered to be a new begomovirus species, for which the name Sida leaf curl virus (SiLCV) is proposed. In addition to DNA-A molecule, two additional circular single-stranded satellite DNA molecules corresponding to DNAbeta and DNA1 were found to be associated with SiLCV isolates. Both DNAbeta and DNA1 were approximately half the size of their cognate genomic DNA. Sequence analysis shows that DNAbeta of Hn57 and Hn60 share 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity, and they have the highest sequence identity (58.5%) with DNAbeta associated with Ageratum leaf curl disease (AJ316027). The nucleotide sequence identity between DNA1 of Hn57 and that of Hn60 was 83.8%, they share 58.2-79.3% nucleotide sequence identities in comparison with other previously reported DNAl.

  16. Molecular mechanisms for maintenance of G-rich short tandem repeats capable of adopting G4 DNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagama, Hitoshi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)]. E-mail: hnakagam@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp; Higuchi, Kumiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tanaka, Etsuko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Naoto [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakashima, Katsuhiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Katahira, Masato [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Fukuda, Hirokazu [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2006-06-25

    Mammalian genomes contain several types of repetitive sequences. Some of these sequences are implicated in various specific cellular events, including meiotic recombination, chromosomal breaks and transcriptional regulation, and also in several human disorders. In this review, we document the formation of DNA secondary structures by the G-rich repetitive sequences that have been found in several minisatellites, telomeres and in various triplet repeats, and report their effects on in vitro DNA synthesis. d(GGCAG) repeats in the mouse minisatellite Pc-1 were demonstrated to form an intra-molecular folded-back quadruplex structure (also called a G4' structure) by NMR and CD spectrum analyses. d(TTAGGG) telomere repeats and d(CGG) triplet repeats were also shown to form G4' and other unspecified higher order structures, respectively. In vitro DNA synthesis was substantially arrested within the repeats, and this could be responsible for the preferential mutability of the G-rich repetitive sequences. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using NIH3T3 cell extracts revealed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and A3, which were tightly and specifically bound to d(GGCAG) and d(TTAGGG) repeats with K {sub d} values in the order of nM. HnRNP A1 unfolded the G4' structure formed in the d(GGCAG) {sub n} and d(TTAGGG) {sub n} repeat regions, and also resolved the higher order structure formed by d(CGG) triplet repeats. Furthermore, DNA synthesis arrest at the secondary structures of d(GGCAG) repeats, telomeres and d(CGG) triplet repeats was efficiently repressed by the addition of hnRNP A1. High expression of hnRNPs may contribute to the maintenance of G-rich repetitive sequences, including telomere repeats, and may also participate in ensuring the stability of the genome in cells with enhanced proliferation. Transcriptional regulation of genes, such as c-myc and insulin, by G4 sequences found in the promoter regions could be an intriguing field of

  17. Crystal Structure of DNA-PKcs Reveals a Large Open-Ring Cradle Comprised of HEAT Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2009-01-01

    Broken chromosomes arising from DNA double strand breaks result from endogenous events such as the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism, as well as from exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation1, 2, 3. Left unrepaired or incorrectly repaired they can lead to genomic changes that may result in cell death or cancer. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a holo-enzyme that comprises DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)4, 5 and the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80, plays a major role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the main pathway in mammals used to repair double strand breaks6, 7, 8. DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine protein kinase comprising a single polypeptide chain of 4128 amino acids and belonging to the phosphotidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)- related protein family9. DNA-PKcs is involved in the sensing and transmission of DNA damage signals to proteins such as p53, setting off events that lead to cell cycle arrest10, 11. It phosphorylates a wide range of substrates in vitro, including Ku70/Ku80, which is translocated along DNA12. Here we present the crystal structure of human DNA-PKcs at 6.6Å resolution, in which the overall fold is for the first time clearly visible. The many α-helical HEAT repeats (helix-turn-helix motifs) facilitate bending and allow the polypeptide chain to fold into a hollow circular structure. The C-terminal kinase domain is located on top of this structure and a small HEAT repeat domain that likely binds DNA is inside. The structure provides a flexible cradle to promote DNA double-strand-break repair. PMID:20023628

  18. Programmable DNA-binding proteins from Burkholderia provide a fresh perspective on the TALE-like repeat domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Dietze, Jörn; Elsaesser, Janett; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The tandem repeats of transcription activator like effectors (TALEs) mediate sequence-specific DNA binding using a simple code. Naturally, TALEs are injected by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells to manipulate the host transcriptome. In the laboratory TALE DNA binding domains are reprogrammed and used to target a fused functional domain to a genomic locus of choice. Research into the natural diversity of TALE-like proteins may provide resources for the further improvement of current TALE technology. Here we describe TALE-like proteins from the endosymbiotic bacterium Burkholderia rhizoxinica, termed Bat proteins. Bat repeat domains mediate sequence-specific DNA binding with the same code as TALEs, despite less than 40% sequence identity. We show that Bat proteins can be adapted for use as transcription factors and nucleases and that sequence preferences can be reprogrammed. Unlike TALEs, the core repeats of each Bat protein are highly polymorphic. This feature allowed us to explore alternative strategies for the design of custom Bat repeat arrays, providing novel insights into the functional relevance of non-RVD residues. The Bat proteins offer fertile grounds for research into the creation of improved programmable DNA-binding proteins and comparative insights into TALE-like evolution.

  19. Satellite DNA and Transposable Elements in Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides), a Dioecious Plant with Small Y and Large X Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterova, Janka; Razumova, Olga; Martinek, Tomas; Alexandrov, Oleg; Divashuk, Mikhail; Kubat, Zdenek; Hobza, Roman; Karlov, Gennady

    2017-01-01

    Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) is a dioecious shrub commonly used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and environmental industry as a source of oil, minerals and vitamins. In this study, we analyzed the transposable elements and satellites in its genome. We carried out Illumina DNA sequencing and reconstructed the main repetitive DNA sequences. For data analysis, we developed a new bioinformatics approach for advanced satellite DNA analysis and showed that about 25% of the genome consists of satellite DNA and about 24% is formed of transposable elements, dominated by Ty3/Gypsy and Ty1/Copia LTR retrotransposons. FISH mapping revealed X chromosome-accumulated, Y chromosome-specific or both sex chromosomes-accumulated satellites but most satellites were found on autosomes. Transposable elements were located mostly in the subtelomeres of all chromosomes. The 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were localized on one autosomal locus each. Although we demonstrated the small size of the Y chromosome of the seabuckthorn and accumulated satellite DNA there, we were unable to estimate the age and extent of the Y chromosome degeneration. Analysis of dioecious relatives such as Shepherdia would shed more light on the evolution of these sex chromosomes. PMID:28057732

  20. Molecular Cytogenetic Mapping of Satellite DNA Sequences in Aegilops geniculata and Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Dal-Hoe; Tiwari, Vijay K; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides an efficient system for cytogenetic analysis of wild relatives of wheat for individual chromosome identification, elucidation of homoeologous relationships, and for monitoring alien gene transfers into wheat. This study is aimed at developing cytogenetic markers for chromosome identification of wheat and Aegilops geniculata (2n = 4x = 28, UgUgMgMg) using satellite DNAs obtained from flow-sorted chromosome 5Mg. FISH was performed to localize the satellite DNAs on chromosomes of wheat and selected Aegilops species. The FISH signals for satellite DNAs on chromosome 5Mg were generally associated with constitutive heterochromatin regions corresponding to C-band-positive chromatin including telomeric, pericentromeric, centromeric, and interstitial regions of all the 14 chromosome pairs of Ae. geniculata. Most satellite DNAs also generated FISH signals on wheat chromosomes and provided diagnostic chromosome arm-specific cytogenetic markers that significantly improved chromosome identification in wheat. The newly identified satellite DNA CL36 produced localized Mg genome chromosome-specific FISH signals in Ae. geniculata and in the M genome of the putative diploid donor species Ae. comosa subsp. subventricosa but not in Ae. comosa subsp. comosa, suggesting that the Mg genome of Ae. geniculata was probably derived from subsp. subventricosa.

  1. A simple Duplex-PCR to evaluate the DNA quality of anthropological and forensic samples prior short tandem repeat typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Schwark, Thorsten; Harbeck, Michaela; Oehmichen, Manfred

    2004-04-01

    Typing of DNA from ancient or otherwise highly degraded material, e.g. formalin fixed tissues, can be difficult, time consuming and costly. Very often, genetic typing is not possible at all. We present an inexpensive and easy to use Duplex-PCR that amplifies a 164 bp fragment specific for nuclear DNA together with a 260 bp mitochondrial DNA fragment and that can be employed as a pretest prior to short tandem repeat (STR) typing. All together, we analyzed DNA from 20 ancient bones, 20 formalin fixed tissues and 20 other forensic samples in different concentrations. Each sample that failed in the presented Duplex-amplification was also negative for STR typing, while samples that showed strong and clear signals in the Duplex-PCR led to reproducible genetic profiles using the multiplex kits AmpFLSTR Identifiler and Powerplex ES. The Duplex-PCR worked as a reliable indicator of DNA quality in the sample.

  2. Comparative mapping of a gorilla-derived alpha satellite DNA clone on great ape and human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Miller, D A; Shridhar, V; Rocchi, M; Miller, O J; Ward, D C

    1991-11-01

    We have isolated an alpha satellite DNA clone, pG3.9, from gorilla DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes under high stringency conditions revealed that pG3.9 identifies homologous sequences at the centromeric region of ten gorilla chromosomes, and, with few exceptions, also recognizes the homologous chromosomes in human. A pG3.9-like alphoid DNA is present on a larger number of orangutan chromosomes, but, in contrast, is present on only two chromosomes in the chimpanzee. These results show that the chromosomal subsets of related alpha satellite DNA sequences may undergo different patterns of evolution.

  3. Circomics of Cuban geminiviruses reveals the first alpha-satellite DNA in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Holger; Kober, Sigrid; Schäfer, Benjamin; Strohmeier, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Circomics (circular DNA genomics), the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and pyro-sequencing, has been used recently to identify geminiviruses with high efficiency and low costs. Circular DNAs associated with Cuban geminiviruses were characterised by RCA/RFLP analysis and 454 sequencing of two batches of DNA amplified from selected plant samples as well as individual cloning and Sanger sequencing of DNA components and compared to other geminiviral DNAs by phylogenetic analysis. Cuban geminiviruses that were closely related to each other challenged the circomics approach. Ten geminiviral components and one alpha-satellite DNA were determined and compared to three geminiviral components obtained by conventional cloning. New strains of Sida yellow mottle virus (SiYMoV), tomato yellow distortion leaf virus (ToYDLV), Sida golden mosaic Florida virus (SiGMFV) and Sida golden mosaic Liguanea virus (SiGMLV) are described with host plant species being classified by molecular PCR-based bar coding. A new virus species is named Peristrophe mosaic virus. The first alpha-satellite found in Middle America establishes the New World branch of these elements which are related to nanoviruses and were previously thought to be restricted to the Old World. In conclusion, circomics is efficient for complex infections and closely related viruses to detected unexpected viral DNAs, but may need some scrutinisation by direct sequencing and cloning of individual components for certain cases.

  4. Overexpression of a splice variant of DNA methyltransferase 3b, DNMT3b4, associated with DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Kanai, Yae; Sakamoto, Michiie; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ishii, Hiromasa; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2002-07-23

    DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions is an early and frequent event associated with heterochromatin instability during human hepatocarcinogenesis. A DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3b, is required for methylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during mouse development. To clarify the molecular mechanism underlying DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during human hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined mutations of the DNMT3b gene and mRNA expression levels of splice variants of DNMT3b in noncancerous liver tissues showing chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, which are considered to be precancerous conditions, and in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Mutation of the DNMT3b gene was not found in HCCs. Overexpression of DNMT3b4, a splice variant of DNMT3b lacking conserved methyltransferase motifs IX and X, significantly correlated with DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions in precancerous conditions and HCCs (P = 0.0001). In particular, the ratio of expression of DNMT3b4 to that of DNMT3b3, which is the major splice variant in normal liver tissues and retains conserved methyltransferase motifs I, IV, VI, IX, and X, showed significant correlation with DNA hypomethylation (P = 0.009). Transfection of human epithelial 293 cells with DNMT3b4 cDNA induced DNA demethylation on satellite 2 in pericentromeric heterochromatin DNA. These results suggest that overexpression of DNMT3b4, which may lack DNA methyltransferase activity and compete with DNMT3b3 for targeting to pericentromeric satellite regions, results in DNA hypomethylation on these regions, even in precancerous stages, and plays a critical role in human hepatocarcinogenesis by inducing chromosomal instability.

  5. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  6. A family of DNA repeats in Aspergillus nidulans has assimilated degenerated retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.L.; Hermansen, T.D.; Aleksenko, Alexei Y.

    2001-01-01

    In the course of a chromosomal walk towards the centromere of chromosome IV of Aspergillus nidulans, several cross- hybridizing genomic cosmid clones were isolated. Restriction mapping of two such clones revealed that their restriction patterns were similar in a region of at least 15 kb, indicati......) phenomenon, first described in Neurospora crassa, may have operated in A. nidulans. The data indicate that this family of repeats has assimilated mobile elements that subsequently degenerated but then underwent further duplications as a part of the host repeats....... the presence of a large repeat. The nature of the repeat was further investigated by sequencing and Southern analysis. The study revealed a family of long dispersed repeats with a high degree of sequence similarity. The number and location of the repeats vary between wild isolates. Two copies of the repeat...

  7. Naphthyridine-Benzoazaquinolone: Evaluation of a Tricyclic System for the Binding to (CAG)n Repeat DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Sakata, Akihiro; He, Hanping; Bai, Li-Ping; Murata, Asako; Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-05

    The expansion of CAG repeats in the human genome causes the neurological disorder Huntington's disease. The small-molecule naphthyridine-azaquinolone NA we reported earlier bound to the CAG/CAG motif in the hairpin structure of the CAG repeat DNA. In order to investigate and improve NA-binding to the CAG repeat DNA and RNA, we conducted systematic structure-binding studies of NA to CAG repeats. Among the five new NA derivatives we synthesized, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay showed that all of the derivatives modified from amide linkages in NA to a carbamate linkage failed to bind to CAG repeat DNA and RNA. One derivative, NBzA, modified by incorporating an additional ring to the azaquinolone was found to bind to both d(CAG)9 and r(CAG)9 . NBzA binding to d(CAG)9 was similar to NA binding in terms of large changes in the SPR assay and circular dichroism (CD) as well as pairwise binding, as assessed by electron spray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometry. For the binding to r(CAG)9 , both NA and NBzA showed stepwise binding in ESI-TOF MS, and NBzA-binding to r(CAG)9 induced more extensive conformational change than NA-binding. The tricyclic system in NBzA did not show significant effects on the binding, selectivity, and translation, but provides a large chemical space for further modification to gain higher affinity and selectivity. These studies revealed that the linker structure in NA and NBzA was suitable for the binding to CAG DNA and RNA, and that the tricyclic benzoazaquinolone did not interfere with the binding.

  8. Role of direct repeat and stem-loop motifs in mtDNA deletions: cause or coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Narayanan Lakshmanan

    Full Text Available Deletion mutations within mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been implicated in degenerative and aging related conditions, such as sarcopenia and neuro-degeneration. While the precise molecular mechanism of deletion formation in mtDNA is still not completely understood, genome motifs such as direct repeat (DR and stem-loop (SL have been observed in the neighborhood of deletion breakpoints and thus have been postulated to take part in mutagenesis. In this study, we have analyzed the mitochondrial genomes from four different mammals: human, rhesus monkey, mouse and rat, and compared them to randomly generated sequences to further elucidate the role of direct repeat and stem-loop motifs in aging associated mtDNA deletions. Our analysis revealed that in the four species, DR and SL structures are abundant and that their distributions in mtDNA are not statistically different from randomized sequences. However, the average distance between the reported age associated mtDNA breakpoints and their respective nearest DR motifs is significantly shorter than what is expected of random chance in human (p10 bp tend to decrease with increasing lifespan among the four mammals studied here, further suggesting an evolutionary selection against stable mtDNA misalignments associated with long DRs in long-living animals. In contrast to the results on DR, the probability of finding SL motifs near a deletion breakpoint does not differ from random in any of the four mtDNA sequences considered. Taken together, the findings in this study give support for the importance of stable mtDNA misalignments, aided by long DRs, as a major mechanism of deletion formation in long-living, but not in short-living mammals.

  9. Molecular and evolutionary characteristics of the fraction of human alpha satellite DNA associated with CENP-A at the centromeres of chromosomes 1, 5, 19, and 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roizès Gérard

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mode of evolution of the highly homogeneous Higher-Order-Repeat-containing alpha satellite arrays is still subject to discussion. This is also true of the CENP-A associated repeats where the centromere is formed. Results In this paper, we show that the molecular mechanisms by which these arrays evolve are identical in multiple chromosomes: i accumulation of crossovers that homogenise and expand the arrays into different domains and subdomains that are mostly unshared between homologues and ii sporadic mutations and conversion events that simultaneously differentiate them from one another. Individual arrays are affected by these mechanisms to different extents that presumably increase with time. Repeats associated with CENP-A, where the centromere is formed, are subjected to the same evolutionary mechanisms, but constitute minor subsets that exhibit subtle sequence differences from those of the bulk repeats. While the DNA sequence per se is not essential for centromere localisation along an array, it appears that certain sequences can be selected against. On chromosomes 1 and 19, which are more affected by the above evolutionary mechanisms than are chromosomes 21 and 5, CENP-A associated repeats were also recovered from a second homogeneous array present on each chromosome. This could be a way for chromosomes to sustain mitosis and meiosis when the normal centromere locus is ineluctably undermined by the above mechanisms. Conclusion We discuss, in light of these observations, possible scenarios for the normal evolutionary fates of human centromeric regions.

  10. Repeated oral administration of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles delivers functional FVIII with the absence of antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwar, S S; Kiernan, J; Wen, J; Hortelano, G

    2010-12-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A is expensive and involves regular infusions of factor (F)VIII concentrates. The supply of functional FVIII is further compromised by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, the development of an alternative safe, cost effective, non-invasive treatment that circumvents immune response induction is desirable. To evaluate the feasibility of oral administration of chitosan nanoparticles containing FVIII DNA to provide sustainable FVIII activity in hemophilia A mice. Nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, DNA protection and transfection efficiency. Oral administration of nanoparticles containing canine FVIII in C57Bl/6 FVIII(-/-) hemophilia A mice was evaluated for biodistribution, plasma FVIII activity and phenotypic correction. Sustainable FVIII expression was elucidated after repeated nanoparticle administration. Immune responses to repeated oral nanoparticle administration were also investigated. Chitosan nanoparticles had a particle size range of 200-400 nm and protected DNA from endonuclease and pH degradation. In addition, nanoparticles transfected HEK 293 cells resulted in expression of eGFP, luciferase and FVIII. Hemophilia A mice that ingested chitosan nanoparticles demonstrated transient canine FVIII expression reaching > 100 mU 1 day after treatment, together with partial phenotypic correction. The delivered FVIII plasmid DNA was detected in the intestine and, to a lesser extent, in the liver. Importantly, repeated weekly administrations restored FVIII activity. Furthermore, inhibitors and non-neutralizing FVIII antibodies were not detectable. Repeat oral administration of FVIII DNA formulated in chitosan nanoparticles resulted in sustained FVIII activity in hemophilic mice, and thus may provide a non-invasive alternative treatment for hemophilia A. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Repeat associated non-ATG translation initiation: one DNA, two transcripts, seven reading frames, potentially nine toxic entities!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Pearson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Diseases associated with unstable repetitive elements in the DNA, RNA, and amino acids have consistently revealed scientific surprises. Most diseases are caused by expansions of trinucleotide repeats, which ultimately lead to diseases like Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, fragile X syndrome, and a series of spinocerebellar ataxias. These repeat mutations are dynamic, changing through generations and within an individual, and the repeats can be bi-directionally transcribed. Unsuspected modes of pathogenesis involve aberrant loss of protein expression; aberrant over-expression of non-mutant proteins; toxic-gain-of-protein function through expanded polyglutamine tracts that are encoded by expanded CAG tracts; and RNA-toxic-gain-of-function caused by transcripts harboring expanded CUG, CAG, or CGG tracts. A recent advance reveals that RNA transcripts with expanded CAG repeats can be translated in the complete absence of a starting ATG, and this Repeat Associated Non-ATG translation (RAN-translation occurs across expanded CAG repeats in all reading frames (CAG, AGC, and GCA to produce homopolymeric proteins of long polyglutamine, polyserine, and polyalanine tracts. Expanded CTG tracts expressing CUG transcripts also show RAN-translation occurring in all three frames (CUG, UGC, and GCU, to produce polyleucine, polycysteine, and polyalanine. These RAN-translation products can be toxic. Thus, one unstable (CAG•(CTG DNA can produce two expanded repeat transcripts and homopolymeric proteins with reading frames (the AUG-directed polyGln and six RAN-translation proteins, yielding a total of potentially nine toxic entities. The occurrence of RAN-translation in patient tissues expands our horizons of modes of disease pathogenesis. Moreover, since RAN-translation counters the canonical requirements of translation initiation, many new questions are now posed that must be addressed. This review covers RAN-translation and some of the pertinent

  12. Malvastrum yellow vein virus,a new Begomovirus species associated with satellite DNA molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xueping; XIE Yan; PENG Yan; ZHANG Zhongkai

    2003-01-01

    Virus isolate Y47 was obtained from Malvastrum coromandelianum showing yellow vein symptom in Honghe, Yunnan Province. The complete nucleotide sequence of DNA-A was determined, it contains 2731 nucleotides, having typical genomic organization of a begomovirus, encoding 6 ORFs with 2 ORFs [AV1(CP) and AV2] in virion- sense DNA and 4 ORFs (AC1-AC4) in complementary- sense DNA. Comparisons show that the total DNA-A of Y47 has the highest sequence identity (77%) with that of Okra yellow vein mosaic virus-[201] (AJ002451), while less than 76% identities are found when compared with other begomoviruses. The molecular data show that virus isolate Y47 is a distinct begomovirus species, for which the name Malvastrum yellow vein virus is proposed. Satellite DNA molecule (Y47β) was found to be associated with Y47 using the primers (beta01 and beta02) specific for DNAβ. Y47β consists of 1348 nucleotides, with a functional ORF (C1) in complementary-sense DNA. Y47β Has 62%-67% sequence identity with DNAβ molecule associated with Cotton leaf curl Multan virus or Cotton leaf curl Rajasthan virus, while lower than 46% sequence identities are found when compared with other reported DNAβ molecules. Relationship dendrograms show that DNAβ molecules are co-evolved with their help begomoviruses.

  13. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H.; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  14. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method for Nuclear Short Tandem Repeat Testing of Skeletal Remains from Mass Graves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Jon; Vanek, Daniel; Konjhodzić, Rijad; Crews, John; Huffine, Edwin; Parsons, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To quantitatively compare a silica extraction method with a commonly used phenol/chloroform extraction method for DNA analysis of specimens exhumed from mass graves. Methods DNA was extracted from twenty randomly chosen femur samples, using the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) silica method, based on Qiagen Blood Maxi Kit, and compared with the DNA extracted by the standard phenol/chloroform-based method. The efficacy of extraction methods was compared by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to measure DNA quantity and the presence of inhibitors and by amplification with the PowerPlex 16 (PP16) multiplex nuclear short tandem repeat (STR) kit. Results DNA quantification results showed that the silica-based method extracted on average 1.94 ng of DNA per gram of bone (range 0.25-9.58 ng/g), compared with only 0.68 ng/g by the organic method extracted (range 0.0016-4.4880 ng/g). Inhibition tests showed that there were on average significantly lower levels of PCR inhibitors in DNA isolated by the organic method. When amplified with PP16, all samples extracted by silica-based method produced 16 full loci profiles, while only 75% of the DNA extracts obtained by organic technique amplified 16 loci profiles. Conclusions The silica-based extraction method showed better results in nuclear STR typing from degraded bone samples than a commonly used phenol/chloroform method. PMID:17696302

  15. Tandemly repeated DNA is a target for the partial replacement of thymine by beta-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F; Kieft, R; Cross, M; Borst, P

    2000-07-01

    In the DNA of African trypanosomes a small fraction of thymine is replaced by the modified base beta-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil (J). The function of this large base is unknown. The presence of J in the silent variant surface glycoprotein gene expression sites and the lack of J in the transcribed expression site indicates that DNA modification might play a role in control of gene repression. However, the abundance of J in the long telomeric repeat tracts and in subtelomeric arrays of simple repeats suggests that J may also have specific functions in repetitive DNA. We have now analyzed chromosome-internal repetitive sequences in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei and found J in the minichromosomal 177-bp repeats, in the long arrays of 5S RNA gene repeats, and in the spliced-leader RNA gene repeats. No J was found in the rDNA locus or in dispersed repetitive transposon-like elements. Remarkably, the rDNA of T. brucei is not organized in long arrays of tandem repeats, as in many other eukaryotes. T. brucei contains only approximately 15-20 rDNA repeat units that are divided over six to seven chromosomes. Our results show that J is present in many tandemly repeated sequences, either at a telomere or chromosome internal. The presence of J might help to stabilize the long arrays of repeats in the genome.

  16. Characterization of non-coding DNA satellites associated with sweepoviruses (genus Begomovirus, Geminiviridae - definition of a distinct class of begomovirus-associated satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria eLozano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae are whitefly-transmitted, plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that cause crop losses throughout the warmer parts of the World. Sweepoviruses are a phylogenetically distinct group of begomoviruses that infect plants of the family Convolvulaceae, including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas. Two classes of subviral molecules are often associated with begomoviruses, particularly in the Old World; the betasatellites and the alphasatellites. An analysis of sweet potato and Ipomoea indica samples from Spain and Merremia dissecta samples from Venezuela identified small non-coding subviral molecules in association with several distinct sweepoviruses. The sequences of 18 clones were obtained and found to be structurally similar to tomato leaf curl virus–satellite (ToLCV-sat, the first DNA satellite identified in association with a begomovirus, with a region with significant sequence identity to the conserved region of betasatellites, an A-rich sequence, a predicted stem-loop structure containing the nonanucleotide TAATATTAC, and a second predicted stem-loop. These sweepovirus-associated satellites join an increasing number of ToLCV-sat-like non-coding satellites identified recently. Although sharing some features with betasatellites, evidence is provided to suggest that the ToLCV-sat-like satellites are distinct from betasatellites and should be considered a separate class of satellites, for which the collective name deltasatellites is proposed.

  17. Correlation of inter-locus polyglutamine toxicity with CAG•CTG triplet repeat expandability and flanking genomic DNA GC content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm E Nestor

    Full Text Available Dynamic expansions of toxic polyglutamine (polyQ-encoding CAG repeats in ubiquitously expressed, but otherwise unrelated, genes cause a number of late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias. As polyQ toxicity in these disorders increases with repeat length, the intergenerational expansion of unstable CAG repeats leads to anticipation, an earlier age-at-onset in successive generations. Crucially, disease associated alleles are also somatically unstable and continue to expand throughout the lifetime of the individual. Interestingly, the inherited polyQ length mediating a specific age-at-onset of symptoms varies markedly between disorders. It is widely assumed that these inter-locus differences in polyQ toxicity are mediated by protein context effects. Previously, we demonstrated that the tendency of expanded CAG•CTG repeats to undergo further intergenerational expansion (their 'expandability' also differs between disorders and these effects are strongly correlated with the GC content of the genomic flanking DNA. Here we show that the inter-locus toxicity of the expanded polyQ tracts of these disorders also correlates with both the expandability of the underlying CAG repeat and the GC content of the genomic DNA flanking sequences. Inter-locus polyQ toxicity does not correlate with properties of the mRNA or protein sequences, with polyQ location within the gene or protein, or steady state transcript levels in the brain. These data suggest that the observed inter-locus differences in polyQ toxicity are not mediated solely by protein context effects, but that genomic context is also important, an effect that may be mediated by modifying the rate at which somatic expansion of the DNA delivers proteins to their cytotoxic state.

  18. Begomovirus-Associated Satellite DNA Diversity Captured Through Vector-Enabled Metagenomic (VEM Surveys Using Whiteflies (Aleyrodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Rosario

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Monopartite begomoviruses (Geminiviridae, which are whitefly-transmitted single-stranded DNA viruses known for causing devastating crop diseases, are often associated with satellite DNAs. Since begomovirus acquisition or exchange of satellite DNAs may lead to adaptation to new plant hosts and emergence of new disease complexes, it is important to investigate the diversity and distribution of these molecules. This study reports begomovirus-associated satellite DNAs identified during a vector-enabled metagenomic (VEM survey of begomoviruses using whiteflies collected in various locations (California (USA, Guatemala, Israel, Puerto Rico, and Spain. Protein-encoding satellite DNAs, including alphasatellites and betasatellites, were identified in Israel, Puerto Rico, and Guatemala. Novel alphasatellites were detected in samples from Guatemala and Puerto Rico, resulting in the description of a phylogenetic clade (DNA-3-type alphasatellites dominated by New World sequences. In addition, a diversity of small (~640–750 nucleotides satellite DNAs similar to satellites associated with begomoviruses infecting Ipomoea spp. were detected in Puerto Rico and Spain. A third class of satellite molecules, named gammasatellites, is proposed to encompass the increasing number of reported small (<1 kilobase, non-coding begomovirus-associated satellite DNAs. This VEM-based survey indicates that, although recently recovered begomovirus genomes are variations of known genetic themes, satellite DNAs hold unexplored genetic diversity.

  19. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  20. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  1. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH. A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL, 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL, and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  2. Topology of a G-quadruplex DNA formed by C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats associated with ALS and FTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Liu, Changdong; Geng, Yanyan; Zhu, Guang

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal expansions of an intronic hexanucleotide GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat of the C9orf72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Previous studies suggested that the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE), either as DNA or the transcribed RNA, can fold into G-quadruplexes with distinct structures. These structural polymorphisms lead to abortive transcripts and contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS and FTD. Using circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analyzed the structures of C9orf72 HRE DNA with various G4C2 repeats. They exhibited diverse G-quadruplex folds in potassium ions. Furthermore, we determined the topology of a G-quadruplex formed by d(G4C2)4. It favors a monomeric fold and forms a chair-type G-quadruplex with a four-layer antiparallel G-tetra core and three edgewise loops, which is distinct from known structures of chair-type G-quadruplexes. Our findings highlight the conformational heterogeneity of C9orf72 HRE DNA, and may lay the necessary structural basis for designing small molecules for the modulation of ALS/FTD pathogenesis.

  3. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Elizaveta S; Skorodumova, Elena N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Volkova, Irina V; Stepanova, Elena V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N=88) and tritium β-radiation (N=88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the circulating cfDNA as compared with the cfDNA of non-exposed people (N=109). Such index that simultaneously displays both the increase of rDNA content and decrease of satellite III content in the cfDNA (RrDNA/RsatIII) can be recommended as a marker of chronic processes in the body that involve the elevated cell death rate and/or increased blood plasma endonuclease activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...... formed microtubule-associated kinetochores with normal morphology and of the same size as the kinetochores of other large chromosomes. The deleted centromere formed a small linear marker chromosome that reacted strongly with anticentromere antibodies, but showed reduced kinetochore size. The 3q26...

  5. Genome-wide stochastic adaptive DNA amplification at direct and inverted DNA repeats in the parasite Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Ubeda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.

  6. Genome-wide stochastic adaptive DNA amplification at direct and inverted DNA repeats in the parasite Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jean-Michel; Raymond, Frédéric; Mukherjee, Angana; Plourde, Marie; Gingras, Hélène; Roy, Gaétan; Lapointe, Andréanne; Leprohon, Philippe; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Corbeil, Jacques; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion) of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.

  7. Effective DNA fragmentation technique for simple sequence repeat detection with a microsatellite-enriched library and high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Ohtake, Rumi; Yoshida, Saki; Shinohara, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Two different techniques for genomic DNA fragmentation before microsatellite-enriched library construction-restriction enzyme (NlaIII and MseI) digestion and sonication-were compared to examine their effects on simple sequence repeat (SSR) detection using high-throughput sequencing. Tens of thousands of SSR regions from 5 species of the plant family Myrtaceae were detected when the output of individual samples was >1 million paired-end reads. Comparison of the two DNA fragmentation techniques showed that restriction enzyme digestion was superior to sonication for identification of heterozygous genotypes, whereas sonication was superior for detection of various SSR flanking regions with both species-specific and common characteristics. Therefore, choosing the most suitable DNA fragmentation method depends on the type of analysis that is planned.

  8. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

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    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  9. Long inverted repeat transiently stalls DNA replication by forming hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pey Jiun; Lim, Chew Theng; Le, Hang Phuong; Katayama, Tsutomu; Leach, David R F; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-02-01

    Long inverted repeats (LIRs), often found in eukaryotic genomes, are unstable in Escherichia coli where they are recognized by the SbcCD (the bacterial Mre11/Rad50 homologue), an endonuclease/exonuclease capable of cleaving hairpin DNA. It has long been postulated that LIRs form hairpin structures exclusively on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication, and SbcCD cleaves these hairpin-containing lagging strands to generate DNA double-strand breaks. Using a reconstituted oriC plasmid DNA replication system, we have examined how a replication fork behaves when it meets a LIR on DNA. We have shown that leading-strand synthesis stalls transiently within the upstream half of the LIR. Pausing of lagging-strand synthesis at the LIR was not clearly observed, but the pattern of priming sites for Okazaki fragment synthesis was altered within the downstream half of the LIR. We have found that the LIR on a replicating plasmid was cleaved by SbcCD with almost equal frequency on both the leading- and lagging-strand templates. These data strongly suggest that the LIR is readily converted to a cruciform DNA, before the arrival of the fork, creating SbcCD-sensitive hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands. We propose a model for the replication-dependent extrusion of LIRs to form cruciform structures that transiently impede replication fork movement.

  10. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  11. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

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    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  12. 黑斑原(鱼兆)微卫星DNA 富集文库构建与鉴定%CONSTRUCTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF DNA LIBRARIES ENRICHED FOR MICROSATELLITE REPEAT SEQUENCES OF GLYPTOSTERNUM MACULATUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宝英; 谢从新; 祁鹏志; 吴常文; 邓一兵

    2011-01-01

    采用磁珠富集法,利用生物素标记的(CA)12 寡核苷酸探针从黑斑原(鱼兆)基因组DNA MboI 酶切的400-1000 bp 片段中筛选CA/GT 微卫星位点,洗脱的杂交片段克隆到pMD18-T 载体上构建富集微卫星基因组文库后,通过PCR 筛选检测出720 个阳性克隆,占所有克隆的89.2%,从阳性克隆中随机选取139 个进行测序,序列分析发现,124 个克隆含有7 个以上的重复序列,其中完全的为80 个(64.5%),不完全的为40 个(32.3%),复合的为15 个(3.2%),重复次数范围为7-165 次,平均为52 次.在124 条序列中共59 条可以设计引物.%Microsatellite marker (SSR) has been widely used in population genetics and genetic map construction. In order to determine the genetic diversity of G. Maculatum, this study was undertaken to develop and characterize the micro satellite sequence firstly for further to develop the micro satellite markers. Genomic DNA was extracted from muscle tissue using a traditional proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform extraction procedure with RNA removed by Rnase. Approximately 2 u.g of total genomic DNA was digested with Mbo\\, then ligated to the adapters (Linker A and Linker B). The treated DNA sample was then pooled and fragments were separated on a 1.5% agarose gel prior to size selection. The resulting fragments (400-1000 bp) were extracted from the gel matrix using a column and amplified 20 cycles with Linker B primers. The amplified DNA was hybridized with 5μL of 5'-biotinylated (CA)12repeat oligos in a total volume of 100 μL of 6x SSC and 0.1% SDS. The mixture was incubated at 95℃ for 5min, followed by anneal at 65℃ for 60min and cooled to room temperature. During this hybridization, the 100 μL (per treatment) of Streptavidin coated beads was resuspended in 300 μL l× hybridization buffer (6x SSC + 0.1% SDS) and washed three times. The hybridization mixture was added to the washed beads and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. The beads were

  13. Curcusone C induces telomeric DNA-damage response in cancer cells through inhibition of telomeric repeat factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxue; Cao, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Jian-Yong; Qiu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Shu, Bing; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Yin, Sheng; Li, Ding

    2017-11-01

    Telomeric repeat factor 2 (known as TRF2 or TERF2) is a key component of telomere protection protein complex named as Shelterin. TRF2 helps the folding of telomere to form T-loop structure and the suppression of ATM-dependent DNA damage response activation. TRF2 has been recognized as a potentially new therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In our routine screening of small molecule libraries, we found that Curcusone C had significant effect in disrupting the binding between TRF2 and telomeric DNA, with potent antitumor activity against cancer cells. Our result showed that Curcusone C could bind with TRF2 without binding interaction with TRF1 (telomeric repeat factor 1) although these two proteins share high sequence homology, indicating that their binding conformations and biological functions in telomere could be different. Our mechanistic studies showed that Curcusone C bound with TRF2 possibly through its DNA binding site causing blockage of its interaction with telomeric DNA. Further in cellular studies indicated that the interaction of TRF2 with Curcusone C could activate DNA-damage response, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and cause cell cycle arrest, resulting in tumor cell apoptosis. Our studies showed that Curcusone C could become a promising lead compound for further development for cancer treatment. Here, TRF2 was firstly identified as a target of Curcusone C. It is likely that the anti-cancer activity of some other terpenes and terpenoids are related with their possible effect for telomere protection proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  15. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated with the preparation of a PCR reaction mixture and PCR itself. Each part of the process is modelled with input efficiency parameters. Then, the key output parameters that define the characteristics of a DNA profile are derived, namely heterozygote balance (Hb) and the probability of allelic drop-out p(D). The model can be used to estimate the unknown efficiency parameters, such as pi(extraction). 'What-if' scenarios can be used to improve and optimize the entire process, e.g. by increasing the aliquot forwarded to PCR, the improvement expected to a given DNA profile can be reliably predicted. We demonstrate that Hb and drop-out are mainly a function of stochastic effect of pre-PCR molecular selection. Whole genome amplification is unlikely to give any benefit over conventional PCR for LCN.

  16. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Noorain; Kolimi, Narendar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2015-04-01

    Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  17. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorain Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  18. Repeat Finding Techniques, Data Structures and Algorithms in DNA sequences: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeson Kaniwa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequencing technologies keep getting faster and cheaper leading to massive availability of entire human genomes. This massive availability calls for better analysis tools with a potential to realize a shift from reactive to predictive medicine. The challenge remains, since the entire human genomes need more space and processing power than that can be offered by a standard Desktop PC for their analysis. A background of key concepts surrounding the area of DNA analysis is given and a review of selected prominent algorithms used in this area. The significance of this paper would be to survey the concepts surrounding DNA analysis so as to provide a deep rooted understanding and knowledge transfer regarding existing approaches for DNA analysis using Burrows-Wheeler transform, Wavelet tree and their respective strengths and weaknesses. Consequent to this survey, the paper attempts to provide some directions for future research.

  19. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  20. The HumD21S11 system of short tandem repeat DNA polymorphisms in Japanese and Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H G; Sato, K; Nishimaki, Y; Fang, L; Hasekura, H

    1997-04-18

    HumD21S11 is a short tandem repeat DNA polymorphic system with a complex basic structure of (TCTA)4-6 (TCTG)5-6 (TCTA)3 TA (TCTA)3 TCA (TCTA)2 TCCA TA (TCTA)n. Using the allelic ladder prepared by us, the distribution of alleles among Japanese and Chinese was investigated, and four new alleles 28.2, 34, 35.2, and 36.2, were discovered. DNA sequencing was performed on the newly found alleles as well as on family samples and led to the discovery of different gene structures within alleles 28 and 32. Forensic materials, including hairs and seminal stains, were tested in parallel with blood samples from the same individual and were successfully typed for D21S11.

  1. Next-generation repeat-free FISH probes for DNA amplification in glioblastoma in vivo: Improving patient selection to MDM2-targeted inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Matteo; Eccher, Albino; Cima, Luca; Trippini, Tobia; Pedron, Serena; Chilosi, Marco; Barbareschi, Mattia; Scarpa, Aldo; Pinna, Giampietro; Cabrini, Giulio; Pilotto, Sara; Carbognin, Luisa; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Fioravanzo, Adele; Schiavo, Nicola; Meglio, Mario; Sava, Teodoro; Belli, Laura; Martignoni, Guido; Ghimenton, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    A next-generation FISH probe mapping to the MDM2 locus-specific region has recently been designed. The level of MDM2 gene amplification (high versus low) may allow selection of patients for cancer treatment with MDM2 inhibitors and may predict their responsiveness. We investigated the spectrum of MDM2 gene alterations using the new probes in vivo after visualizing single neoplastic cells in situ from a series of glioblastomas. Signals from next-generation repeat-free FISH interphase probes were identified in tissue microarrays that included 3 spots for each of the 48 cases. The murine double minutes (MDM2)-specific DNA probe and the satellite enumeration probe for chromosome 12 were used. Three cases (6%) showed more than 25 signals (high gene amplification), and 7 (15%) showed 3-10 signals (gains); among these, 4 cases (8%) had an equal number of MDM2 and centromeric signals on chromosome 12 (polyploidy). Genomic heterogeneity was observed only in 3 cases with low gene amplification. In our series, 6% of glioblastomas exhibited high MDM2 amplification (in vivo) with a pattern related to the known double minutes/chromothripsis phenomenon (in situ), and only cases with low amplification showed genomic heterogeneity. We concluded that the rate of MDM2 gene amplification can be a useful predictive biomarker to improve patient selection.

  2. Structure and organization of the mitochondrial DNA control region with tandemly repeated sequence in the Amazon ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio, Maria Leandra; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo

    2013-02-01

    Tandemly repeated sequences are a common feature of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA control regions. However, questions still remain about their mode of evolution and function. To better understand patterns of variation in length and to explore the existence of previously described domain, we have characterized the control region structure of the Amazonian ornamental fish Nannostomus eques and Nannostomus unifasciatus. The control region ranged from 1121 to 1142 bp in length and could be separated into three domains: the domain associated with the extended terminal associated sequences, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence blocks domain. In the first domain, we encountered a sequence repeated 10 times in tandem (variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)) that could adopt an "inverted repetitions" type structural conformation. The results suggest that the VNTR pattern encountered in both N. eques and N. unifasciatus is consistent with the prerequisites of the illegitimate elongation model in which the unequal pairing of the chains near the 5'-end of the control region favors the formation of repetitions.

  3. Expansion of CAG triplet repeats by human DNA polymerases λ and β in vitro, is regulated by flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Hübscher, Ulrich; Maga, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by the expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeats (TNR) in the N-terminal region of coding sequence of the Huntingtin's (HTT) gene. This results in the addition of a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein, resulting in its pathological form. The mechanism by which TRN expansion takes place is not yet fully understood. We have recently shown that DNA polymerase (Pol) β can promote the microhomology-mediated end joining and triplet expansion of a substrate mimicking a double strand break in the TNR region of the HTT gene. Here we show that TNR expansion is dependent on the structure of the DNA substrate, as well as on the two essential Pol β co-factors: flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA ligase 1 (Lig1). We found that Fen1 significantly stimulated TNR expansion by Pol β, but not by the related enzyme Pol λ, and subsequent ligation of the DNA products by Lig1. Interestingly, the deletion of N-terminal domains of Pol λ, resulted in an enzyme which displayed properties more similar to Pol β, suggesting a possible evolutionary mechanism. These results may suggest a novel mechanism for somatic TNR expansion in HD.

  4. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina A Wojcik

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and single-strand annealing (SSA, to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1 directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2 stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3 enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  5. The repeat domain of the type III effector protein PthA shows a TPR-like structure and undergoes conformational changes upon DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mário Tyago; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Neves, Jorge Luiz; Paiva, Joice Helena; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Pereira, André Luiz Araujo; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    Many plant pathogenic bacteria rely on effector proteins to suppress defense and manipulate host cell mechanisms to cause disease. The effector protein PthA modulates the host transcriptome to promote citrus canker. PthA possesses unusual protein architecture with an internal region encompassing variable numbers of near-identical tandem repeats of 34 amino acids termed the repeat domain. This domain mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and two polymorphic residues in each repeat unit determine DNA specificity. To gain insights into how the repeat domain promotes protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts, we have solved the structure of a peptide corresponding to 1.5 units of the PthA repeat domain by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and carried out small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopic studies on the entire 15.5-repeat domain of PthA2 (RD2). Consistent with secondary structure predictions and circular dichroism data, the NMR structure of the 1.5-repeat peptide reveals three α-helices connected by two turns that fold into a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domain. The NMR structure corroborates the theoretical TPR superhelix predicted for RD2, which is also in agreement with the elongated shape of RD2 determined by SAXS. Furthermore, RD2 undergoes conformational changes in a pH-dependent manner and upon DNA interaction, and shows sequence similarities to pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a nucleic acid-binding motif structurally related to TPR. The results point to a model in which the RD2 structure changes its compactness as it embraces the DNA with the polymorphic diresidues facing the interior of the superhelix oriented toward the nucleotide bases.

  6. Evaluating the weight of evidence by using quantitative short tandem repeat data in DNA mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2010-01-01

    he evaluation of results from mixtures of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from two or more people in crime case investigations may be improved by taking not only the qualitative but also the quantitative part of the results into consideration. We present a statistical likelihood approach to assess...... distribution of peak areas for assessing the weight of the evidence. On the basis of data from analyses of controlled experiments with mixed DNA samples, we exploited the linear relationship between peak heights and peak areas, and the linear relationships of the means and variances of the measurements...... to factorization of the likelihood, properties of the normal distribution and use of auxiliary variables, an ordinary implementation of the EM algorithm solved the missing data problem....

  7. Distinctive adaptive response to repeated exposure to hydrogen peroxide associated with upregulation of DNA repair genes and cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria A. Santa-Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental and physiological stresses are chronic. Thus, cells are constantly exposed to diverse types of genotoxic insults that challenge genome stability, including those that induce oxidative DNA damage. However, most in vitro studies that model cellular response to oxidative stressors employ short exposures and/or acute stress models. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic and repeated exposure to a micromolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 could activate DNA damage responses, resulting in cellular adaptations. For this purpose, we developed an in vitro model in which we incubated mouse myoblast cells with a steady concentration of ~50 μM H2O2 for one hour daily for seven days, followed by a final challenge of a 10 or 20X higher dose of H2O2 (0.5 or 1 mM. We report that intermittent long-term exposure to this oxidative stimulus nearly eliminated cell toxicity and significantly decreased genotoxicity (in particular, a >5-fold decreased in double-strand breaks resulting from subsequent acute exposure to oxidative stress. This protection was associated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M and induction of expression of nine DNA repair genes. Together, this evidence supports an adaptive response to chronic, low-level oxidative stress that results in genomic protection and up-regulated maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  8. An examination of the origin and evolution of additional tandem repeats in the mitochondrial DNA control region of Japanese sika deer (Cervus Nippon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Hengxing; Wu, Lang; Liu, Zongyue; Li, Chunyi

    2016-01-01

    Tandem repeat units are only detected in the left domain of the mitochondrial DNA control region in sika deer. Previous studies showed that Japanese sika deer have more tandem repeat units than its cousins from the Asian continent and Taiwan, which often have only three repeat units. To determine the origin and evolution of these additional repeat units in Japanese sika deer, we obtained the sequence of repeat units from an expanded dataset of the control region from all sika deer lineages. The functional constraint is inferred to act on the first repeat unit because this repeat has the least sequence divergence in comparison to the other units. Based on slipped-strand mispairing mechanisms, the illegitimate elongation model could account for the addition or deletion of these additional repeat units in the Japanese sika deer population. We also report that these additional repeat units could be occurring in the internal positions of tandem repeat regions, possibly via coupling with a homogenization mechanism within and among these lineages. Moreover, the increased number of repeat units in the Japanese sika deer population could reflect a balance between mutation and selection, as well as genetic drift.

  9. Micro satellite mapping of plant genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović Slaven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro satellites are DNA markers, based on the repeated nucleotide sequences number polymorphism. They belong to a group of PCR markers and are mainly used as an addition to other types of markers. Their characteristics and technical aspects of their application are discussed in the present study. Furthermore, some results obtained by the use of the micro satellite DNA in genetic mapping of plant genomes are also presented. Although micro satellites provide the identification of genotypes within a species, inadequacy of comparative mapping of different species is their serious blemish. .

  10. The validity and reliability of a global positioning satellite system device to assess speed and repeated sprint ability (RSA) in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero-Alvarez, José C; Coutts, Aaron; Granda, Juan; Barbero-Alvarez, Verónica; Castagna, Carlo

    2010-03-01

    There is a limited understanding of the validity and reliability of commercially available global positioning satellite (GPS) devices for assessing repeated sprint performance in athletes. The aims of this study were to assess the convergent validity and the test-retest reliability of a GPS device for measuring repeated sprint ability test (RSAT) variables. Two groups participated in this study, a group of 21 physical education students (age: 20.2+/-2.3 years, stature: 1.75+/-0.42 m, body mass: 68.0+/-6.8kg) and a second group 14 elite junior soccer players (age: 14.5+/-1.2 years, stature: 1.60+/-0.09 m, body mass: 57.7+/-3.8kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Convergent validity was assessed as the correlation between sprint performance (15 and 30-m) using both timing lights and a portable GPS device during a RSAT (7 x 30-m sprints with 30-s of active recovery). The 7 x 30-m RSAT test-retest reliability using GPS device was assessed in elite junior soccer players repeating the test 1 week apart and expressing reliability as a coefficient of variation. Results showed a strong correlation between peak speed measures with the GPS device and RSAT performance measured with timing lights for the 15-m (r(2)=0.87, pspeed (1.7%) and peak speed (1.2%) during the 7 x 30-m RSAT, but high variation for the percentage decrement score (36.2%). These results provide evidence to support the use of the GPS device as an alternative measure to assess repeated sprint performance but suggest a percentage decrement score is not a reliable measure of RSAT performance.

  11. Tracking of intercalary DNA sequences integrated into tandem repeat arrays in rye Secale vavilovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Achrem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of repetitive sequences of the JNK block present in the pericentromeric region of the 2RL chromosome was studied in Secale vavilovii. Amplification of sequences present between the JNK sequences led to the identification of seven abnormal DNA fragments. Two of these fragments showed high similarity to the glutamate 5-kinase gene and putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of trypanosomatid from the genus Leishmania, whose presence can be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Other fragments were similar to mitochondrial gene for ribosomal protein S4 in plants and to the glycoprotein (G gene of the IHNV virus. Presumably, they are pseudogenes inserted into the JNK heterochromatin region. Within this region, also fragments similar to the rye repetitive sequence and chromosome 3B in wheat were found. There is no known mechanism that would explain how foreign sequences were inserted into the block region of tandem repetitive sequences of the JNK family.

  12. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz-Ulrich G. Weier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  13. Meta-Analysis of DNA Tumor-Viral Integration Site Selection Indicates a Role for Repeats, Gene Expression and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M. Doolittle-Hall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoviruses cause tremendous global cancer burden. For several DNA tumor viruses, human genome integration is consistently associated with cancer development. However, genomic features associated with tumor viral integration are poorly understood. We sought to define genomic determinants for 1897 loci prone to hosting human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV or Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. These were compared to HIV, whose enzyme-mediated integration is well understood. A comprehensive catalog of integration sites was constructed from the literature and experimentally-determined HPV integration sites. Features were scored in eight categories (genes, expression, open chromatin, histone modifications, methylation, protein binding, chromatin segmentation and repeats and compared to random loci. Random forest models determined loci classification and feature selection. HPV and HBV integrants were not fragile site associated. MCPyV preferred integration near sensory perception genes. Unique signatures of integration-associated predictive genomic features were detected. Importantly, repeats, actively-transcribed regions and histone modifications were common tumor viral integration signatures.

  14. A contralateral repeated bout effect attenuates induction of NF-κB DNA binding following eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ling; Hyldahl, Robert D; Chipkin, Stuart R; Clarkson, Priscilla M

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the existence of contralateral repeated bout effect and tested if the attenuation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB; an important regulator of muscle inflammation) induction following eccentric exercise is a potential mechanism. Thirty-one healthy men performed two bouts of knee extension eccentric exercise, initially with one leg and then with the opposite leg 4 wk later. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of both exercised and control legs were taken 3 h postexercise. Knee extension isometric and isokinetic strength (60°/sec and 180°/sec) were measured at baseline, pre-exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1/day for 5 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and muscle soreness were assessed at baseline and 1/day for 5 days postexercise. NF-κB (p65) DNA-binding activity was measured in the muscle biopsies. Isometric strength loss was lower in bout 2 than in bout 1 at 24, 72, and 96 h postexercise (P eccentric exercise (compared with the control leg) in bout 1 (122.9% ± 2.6%; P eccentric exercise results in a contralateral repeated bout effect, which could be due to the attenuated increase in NF-κB activity postexercise. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Polymorphic tandem repeats within gene promoters act as modifiers of gene expression and DNA methylation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez, Javier; Guilmatre, Audrey; Garg, Paras; Highnam, Gareth; Gymrek, Melissa; Erlich, Yaniv; Joshi, Ricky S; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew J

    2016-05-05

    Despite representing an important source of genetic variation, tandem repeats (TRs) remain poorly studied due to technical difficulties. We hypothesized that TRs can operate as expression (eQTLs) and methylation (mQTLs) quantitative trait loci. To test this we analyzed the effect of variation at 4849 promoter-associated TRs, genotyped in 120 individuals, on neighboring gene expression and DNA methylation. Polymorphic promoter TRs were associated with increased variance in local gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting functional consequences related to TR variation. We identified >100 TRs associated with expression/methylation levels of adjacent genes. These potential eQTL/mQTL TRs were enriched for overlaps with transcription factor binding and DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, providing a rationale for their effects. Moreover, we showed that most TR variants are poorly tagged by nearby single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers, indicating that many functional TR variants are not effectively assayed by SNP-based approaches. Our study assigns biological significance to TR variations in the human genome, and suggests that a significant fraction of TR variations exert functional effects via alterations of local gene expression or epigenetics. We conclude that targeted studies that focus on genotyping TR variants are required to fully ascertain functional variation in the genome. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. DNA polymorphism among Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis populations from oil palm, using a repeated and dispersed sequence "Palm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyna, I; Renard, J L; Brygoo, Y

    1996-07-31

    A worldwide collection, of 76 F. oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis isolates (Foe), and of 21 F. oxysporum isolates from the soil of several palm grove was analysed by RFLP. As a probe, we used a random DNA fragment (probe 46) from a genomic library of a Foe isolate. This probe contains two different types of sequence, one being repeated and dispersed in the genome "Palm", the other being a single-copy sequence. All F. oxysporum isolates from the palm-grove soils were non-pathogenic to oil palm. They all had a simple restriction pattern with one band homologous to the single-copy sequence of probe 46. All Foe isolates were pathogenic to oil palm and they all had complex patterns due to hybridization with "Palm". This repetitive sequence reveals that Foe isolates are distinct from the other F. oxysporum palm-grove soils isolates. The sequence can reliably discriminate pathogenic from non-pathogenic oil palm isolates. Based on DNA fingerprint similarities, Foe populations were divided into ten groups consisting of isolates with the same geographic origin. Isolates from Brazil and Ecuador were an exception to that rule as they had the same restriction pattern as a few isolates from the Ivory Coast, suggesting they may originated from Africa.

  17. A highly parallel method for synthesizing DNA repeats enables the discovery of 'smart' protein polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiram, Miriam; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Callahan, Daniel J; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-02-01

    Robust high-throughput synthesis methods are needed to expand the repertoire of repetitive protein-polymers for different applications. To address this need, we developed a new method, overlap extension rolling circle amplification (OERCA), for the highly parallel synthesis of genes encoding repetitive protein-polymers. OERCA involves a single PCR-type reaction for the rolling circle amplification of a circular DNA template and simultaneous overlap extension by thermal cycling. We characterized the variables that control OERCA and demonstrated its superiority over existing methods, its robustness, high-throughput and versatility by synthesizing variants of elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) and protease-responsive polymers of glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. Despite the GC-rich, highly repetitive sequences of ELPs, we synthesized remarkably large genes without recursive ligation. OERCA also enabled us to discover 'smart' biopolymers that exhibit fully reversible thermally responsive behaviour. This powerful strategy generates libraries of repetitive genes over a wide and tunable range of molecular weights in a 'one-pot' parallel format.

  18. Heart rate variability and DNA methylation levels are altered after short-term metal fume exposure among occupational welders: a repeated-measures panel study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: In occupational settings, boilermakers are exposed to high levels of metallic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated during the welding process. The effect of welding PM2.5 on heart rate variability (HRV) has been described, but the relationship between PM2.5, DNA methylation, and HRV is not known. Methods: In this repeated-measures panel study, we recorded resting HRV and measured DNA methylation levels in transposable elements Alu and long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE...

  19. Repeated intrathecal administration of plasmid DNA complexed with polyethylene glycol-grafted polyethylenimine led to prolonged transgene expression in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L; Tang, G P; Gao, S J; Ma, Y X; Liu, B H; Li, Y; Zeng, J M; Ng, Y K; Leong, K W; Wang, S

    2003-07-01

    Gene delivery into the spinal cord provides a potential approach to the treatment of spinal cord traumatic injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. These disorders progress over long periods of time, necessitating a stable expression of functional genes at therapeutic levels for months or years. We investigated in this study the feasibility of achieving prolonged transgene expression in the rat spinal cord through repeated intrathecal administration of plasmid DNA complexed with 25 kDa polyethylenimine (PEI) into the lumbar subarachnoid space. With a single injection, DNA/PEI complexes could provide transgene expression in the spinal cord 40-fold higher than naked plasmid DNA. The transgene expression at the initial level persisted for about 5 days, with a low-level expression being detectable for at least 8 weeks. When repeated dosing was tested, a 70% attenuation of gene expression was observed following reinjection at a 2-week interval. This attenuation was associated with apoptotic cell death and detected even using complexes containing a noncoding DNA that did not mediate any gene expression. When each component of the complexes, PEI polymer or naked DNA alone, were tested in the first dosing, no reduction was found. Using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-grafted PEI for DNA complexes, no attenuation of gene expression was detected after repeated intrathecal injections, even in those rats receiving three doses, administered 2 weeks apart. Lumbar puncture is a routine and relatively nontraumatic clinical procedure. Repeated administration of DNA complexed with PEG-grafted PEI through this less invasive route may prolong the time span of transgene expression when needed, providing a viable strategy for the gene therapy of spinal cord disorders.

  20. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  1. Somatic CTG•CAG repeat instability in a mouse model for myotonic dystrophy type 1 is associated with changes in cell nuclearity and DNA ploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieringa Bé

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trinucleotide instability is a hallmark of degenerative neurological diseases like Huntington's disease, some forms of spinocerebellar ataxia and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. To investigate the effect of cell type and cell state on the behavior of the DM1 CTG•CAG repeat, we studied a knock-in mouse model for DM1 at different time points during ageing and followed how repeat fate in cells from liver and pancreas is associated with polyploidization and changes in nuclearity after the onset of terminal differentiation. Results After separation of liver hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells in pools with 2n, 4n or 8n DNA, we analyzed CTG•CAG repeat length variation by resolving PCR products on an automated PAGE system. We observed that somatic CTG•CAG repeat expansion in our DM1 mouse model occurred almost uniquely in the fraction of cells with high cell nuclearity and DNA ploidy and aggravated with aging. Conclusion Our findings suggest that post-replicative and terminal-differentiation events, coupled to changes in cellular DNA content, form a preconditional state that influences the control of DNA repair or recombination events involved in trinucleotide expansion in liver hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells.

  2. Translesion DNA polymerases Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are not essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Tamuli; C Ravindran; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2006-12-01

    Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize DNA across a damaged template. DNA synthesis by such translesion polymerases can be mutagenic due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. In fact, many mutational and hypermutational processes in systems ranging from yeast to mammals have been traced to the activity of such polymerases. We show however, that the translesion polymerases are dispensable for repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora crassa. Additionally, we demonstrate that the upr-1 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of Pol , is a highly polymorphic locus in Neurospora.

  3. CAG repeat variants in the POLG1 gene encoding mtDNA polymerase-gamma and risk of breast cancer in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrak, Sami; Ayyasamy, Vanniarajan; Zirpoli, Gary; Ambrosone, Christine; Bandera, Elisa V; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Jandorf, Lina; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Pawlish, Karen S; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav

    2012-01-01

    The DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG) gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of enzyme responsible for directing mitochondrial DNA replication in humans, contains a polyglutamine tract encoded by CAG repeats of varying length. The length of the CAG repeat has been associated with the risk of testicular cancer, and other genomic variants that impact mitochondrial function have been linked to breast cancer risk in African-American (AA) women. We evaluated the potential role of germline POLG-CAG repeat variants in breast cancer risk in a sample of AA women (100 cases and 100 age-matched controls) who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study, an ongoing multi-institutional, case-control study of breast cancer. Genotyping was done by fragment analysis in a blinded manner. Results from this small study suggest the possibility of an increased risk of breast cancer in women with minor CAG repeat variants of POLG, but no statistically significant differences in CAG repeat length were observed between cases and controls (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 1.74; 95% CI, 0.49-6.21). Our study suggests that POLG-CAG repeat length is a potential risk factor for breast cancer that needs to be explored in larger population-based studies.

  4. CAG repeat variants in the POLG1 gene encoding mtDNA polymerase-gamma and risk of breast cancer in African-American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Azrak

    Full Text Available The DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of enzyme responsible for directing mitochondrial DNA replication in humans, contains a polyglutamine tract encoded by CAG repeats of varying length. The length of the CAG repeat has been associated with the risk of testicular cancer, and other genomic variants that impact mitochondrial function have been linked to breast cancer risk in African-American (AA women. We evaluated the potential role of germline POLG-CAG repeat variants in breast cancer risk in a sample of AA women (100 cases and 100 age-matched controls who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study, an ongoing multi-institutional, case-control study of breast cancer. Genotyping was done by fragment analysis in a blinded manner. Results from this small study suggest the possibility of an increased risk of breast cancer in women with minor CAG repeat variants of POLG, but no statistically significant differences in CAG repeat length were observed between cases and controls (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 1.74; 95% CI, 0.49-6.21. Our study suggests that POLG-CAG repeat length is a potential risk factor for breast cancer that needs to be explored in larger population-based studies.

  5. Construction of Plasmonic Core-Satellite Nanostructures on Substrates Based on DNA-Directed Self-Assembly as a Sensitive and Reproducible Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Li, He; Hou, Shengwei; Dong, Youqing; Pang, Guangsheng; Zhang, Yingwei

    2015-12-16

    We report the successful construction of plasmonic core-satellite nanostructured assemblies on two-dimensional substrates, based on a strategy of combining DNA-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) with the specific recognition ability toward target to enable satellite NPs to self-assemble around the core immobilized on substrates. A strongly coupled plasmonic resonance band was observed because of the close proximity between core and satellite NPs, which presented significant red-shift and enhanced extinction with respect to the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band of individual core NPs on the substrate. The functionality of this core-satellite nanostructured assembly as a biosensor was further explored, and the changes in extinction intensity and the peak shift of the plasmonic coupling resonance band arising from the probe-target DNA binding event all proved to be useful criteria for target DNA detection. Moreover, high selectivity down to single-base mismatched DNA was achieved using this strongly coupled plasmonic core-satellite nanostructured assembly on a substrate. Such substrate-based detection was advantageous, and its reusability and high cycle stability were demonstrated after five cycles of disassembly and reassembly. Our work demonstrates the biosensing capacity of this DNA-functionalized plasmonic nanoassembly model system on two-dimensional substrate, which is also applicable to the detection of numerous DNA-recognized biomolecules. Likewise, the presented construction method can be extended to fabricate other compositional core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  6. Complete nucleotide sequences of the domestic cat (Felis catus) mitochondrial genome and a transposed mtDNA tandem repeat (Numt) in the nuclear genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.V.; Cevario, S.; O`Brien, S.J. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1996-04-15

    The complete 17,009-bp mitochondrial genome of the domestic cat, Felis catus, has been sequenced and conforms largely to the typical organization of previously characterized mammalian mtDNAs. Codon usage and base composition also followed canonical vertebrate patterns, except for an unusual ATC (non-AUG) codon initiating the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) gene. Two distinct repetitive motifs at opposite ends of the control region contribute to the relatively large size (1559 bp) of this carnivore mtDNA. Alignment of the feline mtDNA genome to a homologous 7946-bp nuclear mtDNA tandem repeat DNA sequence in the cat, Numt, indicates simple repeat motifs associated with insertion/deletion mutations. Overall DNA sequence divergence between Numt and cytoplasmic mtDNA sequence was only 5.1%. Substitutions predominate at the third codon position of homologous feline protein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial gene sequences confirms the recent transfer of the cytoplasmic mtDNA sequences to the domestic cat nucleus and recapitulates evolutionary relationships between mammal species. 86 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Based on Variable Number of Tandem DNA Repeats Used Alone and in Association with Spoligotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filliol, Ingrid; Ferdinand, Severine; Negroni, Laetitia; Sola, Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2000-01-01

    Fingerprinting based on variable numbers of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR), a recently described methodology, was evaluated for molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an insular setting. In this study, VNTR fingerprinting was used alone or as a second-line test in association with spoligotyping, double-repetitive-element PCR (DRE-PCR), and IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and the discriminatory power for each method or the combination of methods was compared by calculating the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index (HGI). The results obtained showed that in 6 out of 12 (50%) cases, VNTR-defined clusters were further subdivided by spoligotyping, compared to 7 out of 18 (39%) cases where spoligotyping-defined clusters were further subdivided by VNTR. When used alone, VNTR was the least discriminatory method (HGI = 0.863). Although VNTR was significantly more discriminatory when used in association with spoligotyping (HGI = 0.982), the combination of spoligotyping and DRE-PCR (HGI = 0.992) was still the most efficient among rapid, PCR-based methodologies, giving results comparable to IS6110 RFLP analysis. Nonetheless, VNTR typing may provide additional phylogenetical information that may be helpful to trace the molecular evolution of tubercle bacilli. PMID:10878036

  8. Organellar genome, nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit, and microsatellites isolated from a small-scale of 454 GS FLX sequencing on two mosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Forrest, Laura L; Bainard, Jillian D; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Recent innovations in high-throughput DNA sequencing methodology (next generation sequencing technologies [NGS]) allow for the generation of large amounts of high quality data that may be particularly critical for resolving ambiguous relationships such as those resulting from rapid radiations. Application of NGS technology to bryology is limited to assembling entire nuclear or organellar genomes of selected exemplars of major lineages (e.g., classes). Here we outline how organellar genomes and the entire nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat can be obtained from minimal amounts of moss tissue via small-scale 454 GS FLX sequencing. We sampled two Funariaceae species, Funaria hygrometrica and Entosthodon obtusus, and assembled nearly complete organellar genomes and the whole nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S-IGS1-5S-IGS2) for both taxa. Sequence data from these species were compared to sequences from another Funariaceae species, Physcomitrella patens, revealing low overall degrees of divergence of the organellar genomes and nrDNA genes with substitutions spread rather evenly across their length, and high divergence within the external spacers of the nrDNA repeat. Furthermore, we detected numerous microsatellites among the 454 assemblies. This study demonstrates that NGS methodology can be applied to mosses to target large genomic regions and identify microsatellites.

  9. DNA sequence functionalized with heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassembly for novel energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-15

    This work reports the use of compositionally heterogeneous asymmetric Ag@Au core-satellite nanoassembly functionalized with DNA sequence as unique signaling nanoprobes for the realization of new energy-transfer-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay of prostate- specific antigen (PSA). Specifically, the Ag@Au asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies (Ag@Au ACS) were fabricated on a two-dimensional glass substrate by a modified controlled assembly technique, and then functionalized with DNA sequences containing PSA aptamers as signaling nanoprobes. Then, the sandwich complexing between the PSA, its antibodies, and the signaling nanoprobes was performed on a CdS QDs modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The single stranded DNA can server as a facile mediator that place the Ag@Au ACS in proximity of CdS QDs, stimulating the interparticle exciton-plasmon interactions between Ag@Au ACS and CdS QDs and thus quenching the excitonic states in the latter. Since the damping effect is closely related to the target concentration, a novel energy-transfer-based PEC bioanalysis could be achieved for the sensitive and specific PSA assay. The developed biosensor displayed a linear range from 1.0×10(-11)gmL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)gmL(-1) and the detection limit was experimentally found to be of 0.3×10(-13)gmL(-1). This strategy used the Ag@Au ACS-DNA signaling nanoprobes and overcame the deficiency of short operating distance of the energy transfer process for feasible PEC immunoassay. More significantly, it provided a way to couple the plasmonic properties of the Ag NPs and Au NPs in a single PEC bioanalytical system. We expected this work could inspire more interests and further investigations on the advanced engineering of the core-satellite or other judiciously designed nanostructures for new PEC bioanalytical uses with novel properties.

  10. Measurement of Surface Displacement and Deformation of Mass Movements Using Least Squares Matching of Repeat High Resolution Satellite and Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misganu Debella-Gilo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Displacement and deformation are fundamental measures of Earth surface mass movements such as glacier flow, rockglacier creep and rockslides. Ground-based methods of monitoring such mass movements can be costly, time consuming and limited in spatial and temporal coverage. Remote sensing techniques, here matching of repeat optical images, are increasingly used to obtain displacement and deformation fields. Strain rates are usually computed in a post-processing step based on the gradients of the measured velocity field. This study explores the potential of automatically and directly computing velocity, rotation and strain rates on Earth surface mass movements simultaneously from the matching positions and the parameters of the geometric transformation models using the least squares matching (LSM approach. The procedures are exemplified using bi-temporal high resolution satellite and aerial images of glacier flow, rockglacier creep and land sliding. The results show that LSM matches the images and computes longitudinal strain rates, transverse strain rates and shear strain rates reliably with mean absolute deviations in the order of 10−4 (one level of significance below the measured values as evaluated on stable grounds. The LSM also improves the accuracy of displacement estimation of the pixel-precision normalized cross-correlation by over 90% under ideal (simulated circumstances and by about 25% for real multi-temporal images of mass movements.

  11. Tandem repeat sequence variation and length heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial DNA D-loop of the threatened Gulf of Mexico sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrhynchus desotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracle, A L; Campton, D E

    1995-01-01

    Genetic variability within the Suwannee River, Florida, population of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrhynchus desotoi, was assessed by examining sequence and length variation within the control region, or D-loop, of the mitochondrial genome. Although once abundant throughout the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf sturgeon are now listed as a threatened species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Mitochondrial DNA was analyzed for length variation from 168 individual Gulf sturgeon by PCR amplification and visualization of PCR products using ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels. Of the 168 individual Gulf sturgeon, 31 (18.5%) were heteroplasmic for one to four copies of an 81-base pair, tandemly repeated sequence in the D-loop region. However, no individuals homoplasmic for multiple copies of the repeat sequence were observed. The existence and nature of these tandem repeats in heteroplasmic individuals was confirmed by direct sequencing of the PCR products for a subset of 22 individuals. The results are consistent with the apparent nature and mechanism of heteroplasmy observed in a congeneric species, A. transmontanus. In addition, sequences for 187 base pairs outside of the tandem repeats were identical among all 16 individuals assayed for this region. Lack of variable sequences is concordant with earlier studies involving mtDNA restriction fragment length profiles of Gulf sturgeon found in the Suwannee River. The absence of sequence variation exclusive of the tandem repeats is consistent with the hypothesis that the subspecies has undergone a population or evolutionary bottleneck.

  12. A single whole-body low dose X-irradiation does not affect L1, B1 and IAP repeat element DNA methylation longitudinally.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Newman

    Full Text Available The low dose radioadaptive response has been shown to be protective against high doses of radiation as well as aging-induced genomic instability. We hypothesised that a single whole-body exposure of low dose radiation would induce a radioadaptive response thereby reducing or abrogating aging-related changes in repeat element DNA methylation in mice. Following sham or 10 mGy X-irradiation, serial peripheral blood sampling was performed and differences in Long Interspersed Nucleic Element 1 (L1, B1 and Intracisternal-A-Particle (IAP repeat element methylation between samples were assessed using high resolution melt analysis of PCR amplicons. By 420 days post-irradiation, neither radiation- or aging-related changes in the methylation of peripheral blood, spleen or liver L1, B1 and IAP elements were observed. Analysis of the spleen and liver tissues of cohorts of untreated aging mice showed that the 17-19 month age group exhibited higher repeat element methylation than younger or older mice, with no overall decline in methylation detected with age. This is the first temporal analysis of the effect of low dose radiation on repeat element methylation in mouse peripheral blood and the first to examine the long term effect of this dose on repeat element methylation in a radiosensitive tissue (spleen and a tissue fundamental to the aging process (liver. Our data indicate that the methylation of murine DNA repeat elements can fluctuate with age, but unlike human studies, do not demonstrate an overall aging-related decline. Furthermore, our results indicate that a low dose of ionising radiation does not induce detectable changes to murine repeat element DNA methylation in the tissues and at the time-points examined in this study. This radiation dose is relevant to human diagnostic radiation exposures and suggests that a dose of 10 mGy X-rays, unlike high dose radiation, does not cause significant short or long term changes to repeat element or global DNA

  13. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas O; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol-chloroform-isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations.

  14. Intergenerational and striatal CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice involve different DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragileva, Ella; Hendricks, Audrey; Teed, Allison; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith T; Friedberg, Errol C; Kucherlapati, Raju; Edelmann, Winfried; Lunetta, Kathryn L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2009-01-01

    Modifying the length of the Huntington's disease (HD) CAG repeat, the major determinant of age of disease onset, is an attractive therapeutic approach. To explore this we are investigating mechanisms of intergenerational and somatic HD CAG repeat instability. Here, we have crossed HD CAG knock-in mice onto backgrounds deficient in mismatch repair genes, Msh3 and Msh6, to discern the effects on CAG repeat size and disease pathogenesis. We find that different mechanisms predominate in inherited and somatic instability, with Msh6 protecting against intergenerational contractions and Msh3 required both for increasing CAG length and for enhancing an early disease phenotype in striatum. Therefore, attempts to decrease inherited repeat size may entail a full understanding of Msh6 complexes, while attempts to block the age-dependent increases in CAG size in striatal neurons and to slow the disease process will require a full elucidation of Msh3 complexes and their function in CAG repeat instability.

  15. Satellite DNA methylation status and expression of selected genes in Bos indicus blastocysts produced in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, R; Bernal-Ulloa, S M; Chavarría, N A; Herrera-Puerta, E; Lucas-Hahn, A; Herrmann, D; Winkler, S; Pache, D; Niemann, H; Rodriguez-Osorio, N

    2017-04-01

    Bovine embryos produced in vivo and in vitro differ with respect to molecular profiles, including epigenetic marks and gene expression profiles. This study investigated the CpG methylation status in bovine testis satellite I (BTS) and Bos taurus alpha satellite I (BTαS) DNA sequences, and concomitantly the relative abundance of transcripts, critically involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1 and DNMT3A), growth and development (IGF2R) and pluripotency (POU5F1) in Bos indicus embryos produced in vitro or in vivo. Results revealed that methylation of BTS were higher (P vitro compared with their in vivo produced counterparts, while the methylation status of BTαS was similar in both groups. There were no significant differences in transcript abundance for DNMT3A, IGF2R and POU5F1 between blastocysts produced in vivo and in vitro. However, a significantly lower amount of DNMT1 transcripts was found in the in vitro cultured embryos (P vitro embryo production system.

  16. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gladyshev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP. Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes

  17. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP) Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2016-05-01

    Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP). Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes where homologous

  18. High-resolution DNA melt curve analysis of the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat locus of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erin P; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short sequence repeats in other species.

  19. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purves Joanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Results Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. Conclusions The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  20. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Joanne; Blades, Matthew; Arafat, Yasrab; Malik, Salman A; Bayliss, Christopher D; Morrissey, Julie A

    2012-09-28

    Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR) elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  1. A contracted DNA repeat in LHX3 intron 5 is associated with aberrant splicing and pituitary dwarfism in German shepherd dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie M W Y Voorbij

    Full Text Available Dwarfism in German shepherd dogs is due to combined pituitary hormone deficiency of unknown genetic cause. We localized the recessively inherited defect by a genome wide approach to a region on chromosome 9 with a lod score of 9.8. The region contains LHX3, which codes for a transcription factor essential for pituitary development. Dwarfs have a deletion of one of six 7 bp repeats in intron 5 of LHX3, reducing the intron size to 68 bp. One dwarf was compound heterozygous for the deletion and an insertion of an asparagine residue in the DNA-binding homeodomain of LHX3, suggesting involvement of the gene in the disorder. An exon trapping assay indicated that the shortened intron is not spliced efficiently, probably because it is too small. We applied bisulfite conversion of cytosine to uracil in RNA followed by RT-PCR to analyze the splicing products. The aberrantly spliced RNA molecules resulted from either skipping of exon 5 or retention of intron 5. The same splicing defects were observed in cDNA derived from the pituitary of dwarfs. A survey of similarly mutated introns suggests that there is a minimal distance requirement between the splice donor and branch site of 50 nucleotides. In conclusion, a contraction of a DNA repeat in intron 5 of canine LHX3 leads to deficient splicing and is associated with pituitary dwarfism.

  2. A Contracted DNA Repeat in LHX3 Intron 5 Is Associated with Aberrant Splicing and Pituitary Dwarfism in German Shepherd Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorbij, Annemarie M. W. Y.; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Vos-Loohuis, Manon; Martens, Ellen E. C. P.; Hanson-Nilsson, Jeanette M.; van Oost, Bernard A.; Kooistra, Hans S.; Leegwater, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Dwarfism in German shepherd dogs is due to combined pituitary hormone deficiency of unknown genetic cause. We localized the recessively inherited defect by a genome wide approach to a region on chromosome 9 with a lod score of 9.8. The region contains LHX3, which codes for a transcription factor essential for pituitary development. Dwarfs have a deletion of one of six 7 bp repeats in intron 5 of LHX3, reducing the intron size to 68 bp. One dwarf was compound heterozygous for the deletion and an insertion of an asparagine residue in the DNA-binding homeodomain of LHX3, suggesting involvement of the gene in the disorder. An exon trapping assay indicated that the shortened intron is not spliced efficiently, probably because it is too small. We applied bisulfite conversion of cytosine to uracil in RNA followed by RT-PCR to analyze the splicing products. The aberrantly spliced RNA molecules resulted from either skipping of exon 5 or retention of intron 5. The same splicing defects were observed in cDNA derived from the pituitary of dwarfs. A survey of similarly mutated introns suggests that there is a minimal distance requirement between the splice donor and branch site of 50 nucleotides. In conclusion, a contraction of a DNA repeat in intron 5 of canine LHX3 leads to deficient splicing and is associated with pituitary dwarfism. PMID:22132174

  3. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  4. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in the DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) gene and the risk of testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) was investigated in this study. The hypothesis was prompted by an earlier preliminary study proposing an association of the absence...... of the common 10-CAG-long POLG allele with testicular cancer as well as previously reported in some European populations' association with male subfertility, which is a condition carrying an increased risk of TGCT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The number of CAG repeats in both POLG alleles was established in 243.......001). The vast majority of the homozygous patients had a seminoma (11 of 12; 97%), despite that only about half (55%) of the studied patients had this tumour type. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the POLG polymorphism may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of TGCT particularly in seminoma...

  5. A novel approach to propagate flavivirus infectious cDNA clones in bacteria by introducing tandem repeat sequences upstream of virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Despite tremendous efforts to improve the methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, the manipulation of flavivirus cDNAs remains a difficult task in bacteria. Here, we successfully propagated DNA-launched type 2 dengue virus (DENV2) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infectious cDNAs by introducing seven repeats of the tetracycline-response element (7×TRE) and a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMVmin) promoter upstream of the viral genome. Insertion of the 7×TRE-CMVmin sequence upstream of the DENV2 or JEV genome decreased the cryptic E. coli promoter (ECP) activity of the viral genome in bacteria, as measured using fusion constructs containing DENV2 or JEV segments and the reporter gene Renilla luciferase in an empty vector. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from DNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs were similar to those of parental viruses. Similarly, RNA-launched DENV2 infectious cDNAs were generated by inserting 7×TRE-CMVmin, five repeats of the GAL4 upstream activating sequence, or five repeats of BamHI linkers upstream of the DENV2 genome. All three tandem repeat sequences decreased the ECP activity of the DENV2 genome in bacteria. Notably, 7×TRE-CMVmin stabilized RNA-launched JEV infectious cDNAs and reduced the ECP activity of the JEV genome in bacteria. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from RNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs displayed patterns similar to those of the parental viruses. These results support a novel methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, which will facilitate research in virology, viral pathogenesis and vaccine development of flaviviruses and other RNA viruses. © 2014 The Authors.

  6. Cytomolecular discrimination of the A(m) chromosomes of Triticum monococcum and the A chromosomes of Triticum aestivum using microsatellite DNA repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Mária; Mikó, Péter; Farkas, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Molnár, István

    2017-02-01

    The cytomolecular discrimination of the A(m)- and A-genome chromosomes facilitates the selection of wheat-Triticum monococcum introgression lines. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the commonly used DNA probes Afa family, 18S rDNA and pSc119.2 showed that the more complex hybridisation pattern obtained in T. monococcum relative to bread wheat made it possible to differentiate the A(m) and A chromosomes within homoeologous groups 1, 4 and 5. In order to provide additional chromosomal landmarks to discriminate the A(m) and A chromosomes, the microsatellite repeats (GAA)n, (CAG)n, (CAC)n, (AAC)n, (AGG)n and (ACT)n were tested as FISH probes. These showed that T. monococcum chromosomes have fewer, generally weaker, simple sequence repeat (SSR) signals than the A-genome chromosomes of hexaploid wheat. A differential hybridisation pattern was observed on 6A(m) and 6A chromosomes with all the SSR probes tested except for the (ACT)n probe. The 2A(m) and 2A chromosomes were differentiated by the signals given by the (GAA)n, (CAG)n and (AAC)n repeats, while only (GAA)n discriminated the chromosomes 3A(m) and 3A. Chromosomes 7A(m) and 7A could be differentiated by the lack of (GAA)n and (AGG)n signals on 7A. As potential landmarks for identifying the A(m) chromosomes, SSR repeats will facilitate the introgression of T. monococcum chromatin into wheat.

  7. Repeated oral dosing of TAS-102 confers high trifluridine incorporation into DNA and sustained antitumor activity in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nozomu; Sakamoto, Kazuki; Okabe, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Akio; Yamamura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Fumio; Nagase, Hideki; Yokogawa, Tatsushi; Oguchi, Kei; Ishida, Keiji; Osada, Akiko; Kazuno, Hiromi; Yamada, Yukari; Matsuo, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent containing trifluridine (FTD) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI). The compound improves overall survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who are insensitive to standard chemotherapies. FTD possesses direct antitumor activity since it inhibits thymidylate synthase (TS) and is itself incorporated into DNA. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the incorporation into DNA and the inhibition of TS remain unclear. We found that FTD-dependent inhibition of TS was similar to that elicited by fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), another clinically used nucleoside analog. However, washout experiments revealed that FTD-dependent inhibition of TS declined rapidly, whereas FdUrd activity persisted. The incorporation of FTD into DNA was significantly higher than that of other antitumor nucleosides. Additionally, orally administered FTD had increased antitumor activity and was incorporated into DNA more effectively than continuously infused FTD. When TAS-102 was administered, FTD gradually accumulated in tumor cell DNA, in a TPI-independent manner, and significantly delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival, compared to treatment with 5-FU derivatives. TAS-102 reduced the Ki-67-positive cell fraction, and swollen nuclei were observed in treated tumor tissue. The amount of FTD incorporation in DNA and the antitumor activity of TAS-102 in xenograft models were positively and significantly correlated. These results suggest that TAS-102 exerts its antitumor activity predominantly due to its DNA incorporation, rather than as a result of TS inhibition. The persistence of FTD in the DNA of tumor cells treated with TAS-102 may underlie its ability to prolong survival in cancer patients.

  8. Triplet repeat sequences in human DNA can be detected by hybridization to a synthetic (5'-CGG-3')17 oligodeoxyribonucleotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behn-Krappa, A; Mollenhauer, J; Doerfler, W

    1993-01-01

    The seemingly autonomous amplification of naturally occurring triplet repeat sequences in the human genome has been implicated in the causation of human genetic disease, such as the fragile X (Martin-Bell) syndrome, myotonic dystrophy (Curshmann-Steinert), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy...

  9. Isolation and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 20-specific alpha-satellite DNA clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Archidiacono, N; Carbone, R; Bolino, A; Shridhar, V; Miller, O J; Miller, D A; Ward, D C; Rocchi, M

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a human genomic DNA clone (PZ20, locus D20Z2) that identifies, under high-stringency hybridization conditions, an alphoid DNA subset specific for chromosome 20. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sequence analysis confirmed our previously reported data on the great similarity between the chromosome 20 and chromosome 2 alphoid subsets. Comparative mapping of pZ20 on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes, also performed under high-stringency conditions, indicates that the alphoid subset has ancestral sequences on chimpanzee chromosome 11 and gorilla chromosome 19. However, no hybridization was observed to chromosomes 21 in the great apes, the homolog of human chromosome 20.

  10. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  11. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  12. Radiation-induced mutation at tandem repeat DNA Loci in the mouse germline: spectra and doubling doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2005-02-01

    The spectra and dose response for mutations at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of male mice acutely exposed to low-LET X or gamma rays at pre-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis were compared in five strains of laboratory mice. Most mutation events involved the gain or loss of a relatively small number of repeat units, and the distributions of length changes were indistinguishable between the exposed and control males. Overall, a significant bias toward gains of repeats was detected, with approximately 60% of mutants showing gains. The values for ESTR mutation induction did not differ substantially between strains. The highest values of doubling dose were obtained for two genetically related strains, BALB/c and C.B17 (mean value 0.98 Gy). The estimates of doubling dose for three other strains (CBA/H, C57BL/6 x CBA/H F1 and 129SVJ x C57BL/6) were lower, with a mean value of 0.44 Gy. The dose response for ESTR mutation across all five strains was very close to that for the specific loci (Russell 7-locus test). The mechanisms of ESTR mutation induction and applications of this system for monitoring radiation-induced mutation in the mouse germline are discussed.

  13. B-G cDNA clones have multiple small repeats and hybridize to both chicken MHC regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1989-01-01

    We used rabbit antisera to the chicken MHC erythrocyte molecule B-G and to the class I alpha chain (B-F) to screen lambda gt11 cDNA expression libraries made with RNA selected by oligo-dT from bone marrow cells of anemic B19 homozygous chickens. Eight clones were found to encode B-G molecules which...

  14. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  15. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an adjoining single-copy gene in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meenal Vyas; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2005-02-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is an unusual genome defense mechanism that was discovered in Neurospora crassa. RIP occurs during a sexual cross and induces numerous G : C to A : T mutations in duplicated DNA sequences and also methylates many of the remaining cytosine residues. We measured the susceptibility of the erg-3 gene, present in single copy, to the spread of RIP from duplications of adjoining sequences. Genomic segments of defined length (1, 1.5 or 2 kb) and located at defined distances (0, 0.5, 1 or 2 kb) upstream or downstream of the erg-3 open reading frame (ORF) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the duplications were created by transformation of the amplified DNA. Crosses were made with the duplication strains and the frequency of erg-3 mutant progeny provided a measure of the spread of RIP from the duplicated segments into the erg-3 gene. Our results suggest that ordinarily RIP-spread does not occur. However, occasionally the mechanism that confines RIP to the duplicated segment seems to fail (frequency 0.1–0.8%) and then RIP can spread across as much as 1 kb of unduplicated DNA. Additionally, the bacterial hph gene appeared to be very susceptible to the spread of RIP-associated cytosine methylation.

  17. Cerastoderma glaucum 5S ribosomal DNA: characterization of the repeat unit, divergence with respect to Cerastoderma edule, and PCR-RFLPs for the identification of both cockles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Ruth; Insua, Ana; Méndez, Josefina

    2005-06-01

    The 5S rDNA repeat unit of the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum from the Mediterranean and Baltic coasts was PCR amplified and sequenced. The length of the units was 539-568 bp, of which 120 bp were assigned to the 5S rRNA gene and 419-448 bp to the spacer region, and the G/C content was 46%-49%, 54%, and 44%-47%, respectively. Two types of units (A and B), differing in the spacer, were distinguished based on the percentage of differences and clustering in phylogenetic trees. A PCR assay with specific primers for each unit type indicated that the occurrence of both units is not restricted to the sequenced individuals. The 5S rDNA units of C. glaucum were compared with new and previously reported sequences of Cerastoderma edule. The degree of variation observed in C. edule was lower than that in C. glaucum and evidence for the existence of units A and B in C. edule was not found. The two cockles have the same coding region but displayed numerous fixed differences in the spacer region and group separately in the phylogenetic trees. Digestion of the 5S rDNA PCR product with the restriction enzymes HaeIII and EcoRV revealed two RFLPs useful for cockle identification.

  18. Identification of exhumed remains of fire tragedy victims using conventional methods and autosomal/Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat DNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calacal, Gayvelline C; Delfin, Frederick C; Tan, Michelle Music M; Roewer, Lutz; Magtanong, Danilo L; Lara, Myra C; Fortun, Raquel dR; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A

    2005-09-01

    In a fire tragedy in Manila in December 1998, one of the worst tragic incidents which resulted in the reported death of 23 children, identity could not be established initially resulting in the burial of still unidentified bodies. Underscoring the importance of identifying each of the human remains, the bodies were exhumed 3 months after the tragedy. We describe here our work, which was the first national case handled by local laboratories wherein conventional and molecular-based techniques were successfully applied in forensic identification. The study reports analysis of DNA obtained from skeletal remains exposed to conditions of burning, burial, and exhumation. DNA typing methods using autosomal and Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) markers reinforced postmortem examinations using conventional identification techniques. The strategy resulted in the identification of 18 out of the 21 human remains analyzed, overcoming challenges encountered due to the absence of established procedures for the recovery of mass disaster remains. There was incomplete antemortem information to match the postmortem data obtained from the remains of 3 female child victims. Two victims were readily identified due to the availability of antemortem tissues. In the absence of this biologic material, parentage testing was performed using reference blood samples collected from parents and relatives. Data on patrilineal lineage based on common Y-STR haplotypes augmented autosomal DNA typing, particularly in deficiency cases.

  19. Interactions between meso-tetrakis(4-(N-methylpyridiumyl))porphyrin TMPyP4 and DNA G-quadruplex of telomeric repeated sequence TTAGGG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The binding properties between meso-tetrakis(4-(N-methylpyridiumyl))porphyrin (TMPyP4) and the parallel DNA G-quadruplex (G4) of telomeric repeated sequence 5′-TTAGGG-3′ have been characterized by means of circular dichroism,steady-state absorption,steady-state fluorescence and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The binding constant and the saturated binding number were determined as 1.29×106 (mol/L)-1 and 3,respectively,according to steady-state absorption spec-troscopy. Based on the findings by the use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic technique,it is deduced that TMPyP4 binds to a DNA G-quadruplex with both the thread-intercalating and end-stacking modes and at the saturated binding state,one TMPyP4 molecule intercalates into the intervals of G-tetrads while the other two stack to the ends of the DNA G-quadruplex.

  20. B-G cDNA clones have multiple small repeats and hybridize to both chicken MHC regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1989-01-01

    in turn react with authentic B-G proteins. None of the clones represent a complete message, some--if not all--bear introns, and none of them match with any sequences presently stored in the data banks. The following new information did, however, emerge. At least two homologous transcripts are present......We used rabbit antisera to the chicken MHC erythrocyte molecule B-G and to the class I alpha chain (B-F) to screen lambda gt11 cDNA expression libraries made with RNA selected by oligo-dT from bone marrow cells of anemic B19 homozygous chickens. Eight clones were found to encode B-G molecules which...... could explain the bewildering variation in size of B-G proteins within and between haplotypes. Southern blots of genomic chicken DNA gave complex patterns for most probes, with many bands in common using different probes, but few bands in common between haplotypes. The sequences detected are all present...

  1. Modification of a viral satellite DNA-based gene silencing vector and its application to leaf or flower color change in Petunia hybrida

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Xiaorong; QIAN Yajuan; ZHOU Xueping

    2006-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing offers a powerful reverse-genetic tool for the study of gene function in plants. We have previously reported effective gene silencing of plant genes using a viral satellite DNA associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). In this study, we further modified the viral satellite DNA-based vector. The modified vector can induce sulfu (Su) gene silencing as effective as the original vector in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, but the new system simplifies procedures for construction of vector derivative. Furthermore, a fragment of petunia Su or chalcone synthase (CHS) endogenous gene was inserted into the modified vector. When petunia plants were agro- inoculated with the modified vector carrying a Su or CHS gene, the Su silenced plants started to appear yellowing in veins of systemically infected upper leaves two weeks after agroinoculation, while the CHS silenced plants started to show flower color change one month after agroinoculation and later single-color flowers became mosaic.

  2. Kearns-Sayre syndrome case presenting a mitochondrial DNA deletion with unusual direct repeats and a rudimentary RNAse mitochondria ribonucleotide processing target sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, A.M.; Hassinen, I.E. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland)); Peuhkurinen, K.J.; Herva, R.; Majamaa, K. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1993-04-01

    A mitochondrial DNA deletion in a case of Kearns-Sayre syndrome is described. The deletion is bracketed by direct repeats that were unusual in that one of them was located 11--13 nucleotides from the deletion seam and both were conserved, which should not occur in slip replication or illegitimate elongation. The deleted region was demarcated on the deletion side by sequences that could be predicted to form hairpin structures. The 5[prime]-side of the deletion was flanked by a sequence homologous to a 9-nucleotide piece of the conserved sequence block II of the D-loop. This arrangement around the deletion in Kearns-Sayre syndrome bears some resemblance to the arrangement in the Pearson marrow- pancreas syndrome described by A. Rotig et al. (1991, Genomics 10: 502--504). 10 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis and Design of Simple Sequence Repeats Markers from a Full-Length cDNA Library in Perilla frutescens (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Soo Seong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perilla frutescens is valuable as a medicinal plant as well as a natural medicine and functional food. However, comparative genomics analyses of P. frutescens are limited due to a lack of gene annotations and characterization. A full-length cDNA library from P. frutescens leaves was constructed to identify functional gene clusters and probable EST-SSR markers via analysis of 1,056 expressed sequence tags. Unigene assembly was performed using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST homology searches and annotated Gene Ontology (GO. A total of 18 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were designed as primer pairs. This study is the first to report comparative genomics and EST-SSR markers from P. frutescens will help gene discovery and provide an important source for functional genomics and molecular genetic research in this interesting medicinal plant.

  4. In situ hybridization of the feline major satellite DNA FA-SAT in feline fibrosarcoma cell lines and feline fibrosarcoma tissue sections

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro Alarcón, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Feline fibrosarcomas are the most common skin tumors of cats. Despite this high frequency and the publication of different hypotheses for their pathogenesis by several authors, the alterations accompanying the development of this tumor are still not completely understood. We studied the feline major satellite DNA (FA-SAT) hybridization pattern by FISH in four fibrosarcoma cell lines and one normal embryonic fibroblastic cell line as well as in 30 fibrosarcomas from 28 cats. Of the latter, ...

  5. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation and transcriptional inhibition by long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates targeting CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Hashiya, Kaori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Introducing novel building blocks to solid-phase peptide synthesis, we readily synthesized long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates 3 and 4 via the introduction of an amino group into a GABA (γ-turn) contained in 3, to target CAG/CTG repeat sequences, which are associated with various hereditary disorders. A high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gel revealed sequence-specific alkylation both strands at the N3 of adenines or guanines in CAG/CTG repeats by conjugates 3 and 4, with 11bp recognition. In vitro transcription assays using conjugate 4 revealed that specific alkylation inhibited the progression of RNA polymerase at the alkylating sites. Chiral substitution of the γ-turn with an amino group resulted in higher binding affinity observed in SPR assays. These assays suggest that conjugates 4 with 11bp recognition has the potential to cause specific DNA damage and transcriptional inhibition at the alkylating sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A highly parallel method for synthesizing DNA repeats enables the discovery of ‘smart’ protein polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiram, Miriam; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Callahan, Daniel J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-02-01

    Robust high-throughput synthesis methods are needed to expand the repertoire of repetitive protein-polymers for different applications. To address this need, we developed a new method, overlap extension rolling circle amplification (OERCA), for the highly parallel synthesis of genes encoding repetitive protein-polymers. OERCA involves a single PCR-type reaction for the rolling circle amplification of a circular DNA template and simultaneous overlap extension by thermal cycling. We characterized the variables that control OERCA and demonstrated its superiority over existing methods, its robustness, high-throughput and versatility by synthesizing variants of elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) and protease-responsive polymers of glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. Despite the GC-rich, highly repetitive sequences of ELPs, we synthesized remarkably large genes without recursive ligation. OERCA also enabled us to discover ‘smart’ biopolymers that exhibit fully reversible thermally responsive behaviour. This powerful strategy generates libraries of repetitive genes over a wide and tunable range of molecular weights in a ‘one-pot’ parallel format.

  7. The Trypanosoma cruzi satellite DNA OligoC-TesT and Trypanosoma cruzi kinetoplast DNA OligoC-TesT for diagnosis of Chagas disease: a multi-cohort comparative evaluation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen De Winne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Trypanosoma cruzi satellite DNA (satDNA OligoC-TesT is a standardised PCR format for diagnosis of Chagas disease. The sensitivity of the test is lower for discrete typing unit (DTU TcI than for TcII-VI and the test has not been evaluated in chronic Chagas disease patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a new prototype of the OligoC-TesT based on kinetoplast DNA (kDNA detection. We evaluated the satDNA and kDNA OligoC-TesTs in a multi-cohort study with 187 chronic Chagas patients and 88 healthy endemic controls recruited in Argentina, Chile and Spain and 26 diseased non-endemic controls from D.R. Congo and Sudan. All specimens were tested in duplicate. The overall specificity in the controls was 99.1% (95% CI 95.2%-99.8% for the satDNA OligoC-TesT and 97.4% (95% CI 92.6%-99.1% for the kDNA OligoC-TesT. The overall sensitivity in the patients was 67.9% (95% CI 60.9%-74.2% for the satDNA OligoC-TesT and 79.1% (95% CI 72.8%-84.4% for the kDNA OligoC-Test. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Specificities of the two T. cruzi OligoC-TesT prototypes are high on non-endemic and endemic controls. Sensitivities are moderate but significantly (p = 0.0004 higher for the kDNA OligoC-TesT compared to the satDNA OligoC-TesT.

  8. Repeated reunions and splits feature the highly dynamic evolution of 5S and 35S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in the Asteraceae family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In flowering plants and animals the most common ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) organisation is that in which 35S (encoding 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA) and 5S genes are physically separated occupying different chromosomal loci. However, recent observations established that both genes have been unified to a single 35S-5S unit in the genus Artemisia (Asteraceae), a genomic arrangement typical of primitive eukaryotes such as yeast, among others. Here we aim to reveal the origin, distribution and mechanisms leading to the linked organisation of rDNA in the Asteraceae by analysing unit structure (PCR, Southern blot, sequencing), gene copy number (quantitative PCR) and chromosomal position (FISH) of 5S and 35S rRNA genes in ~200 species representing the family diversity and other closely related groups. Results Dominant linked rDNA genotype was found within three large groups in subfamily Asteroideae: tribe Anthemideae (93% of the studied cases), tribe Gnaphalieae (100%) and in the "Heliantheae alliance" (23%). The remaining five tribes of the Asteroideae displayed canonical non linked arrangement of rDNA, as did the other groups in the Asteraceae. Nevertheless, low copy linked genes were identified among several species that amplified unlinked units. The conserved position of functional 5S insertions downstream from the 26S gene suggests a unique, perhaps retrotransposon-mediated integration event at the base of subfamily Asteroideae. Further evolution likely involved divergence of 26S-5S intergenic spacers, amplification and homogenisation of units across the chromosomes and concomitant elimination of unlinked arrays. However, the opposite trend, from linked towards unlinked arrangement was also surmised in few species indicating possible reversibility of these processes. Conclusions Our results indicate that nearly 25% of Asteraceae species may have evolved unusual linked arrangement of rRNA genes. Thus, in plants, fundamental changes in intrinsic structure of rDNA units

  9. Repeated reunions and splits feature the highly dynamic evolution of 5S and 35S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA in the Asteraceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Sònia

    2010-08-01

    structure of rDNA units, their copy number and chromosomal organisation may occur within relatively short evolutionary time. We hypothesize that the 5S gene integration within the 35S unit might have repeatedly occurred during plant evolution, and probably once in Asteraceae.

  10. Organization and evolution of Gorilla centromeric DNA from old strategies to new approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Catacchio, C. R.; Ragone, R.; Chiatante, G.; M. Ventura

    2015-01-01

    The centromere/kinetochore interaction is responsible for the pairing and segregation of replicated chromosomes in eukaryotes. Centromere DNA is portrayed as scarcely conserved, repetitive in nature, quickly evolving and protein-binding competent. Among primates, the major class of centromeric DNA is the pancentromeric α-satellite, made of arrays of 171 bp monomers, repeated in a head-to-tail pattern. α-satellite sequences can either form tandem heterogeneous monomeric arrays or assemble in h...

  11. Improved recombinant antibody production by CHO cells using a production enhancer DNA element with repeated transgene integration at a predetermined chromosomal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Inao, Takanori; Komatsu, Shodai; Huang, Guan; Ito, Akira; Omasa, Takeshi; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2017-03-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are one of the most useful host cell lines for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins. Although a series of production processes have been refined to improve protein productivity and cost performance, establishing producer cells is still time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recombinase-mediated site-specific gene integration into a predetermined chromosomal locus may enable predictable protein expression, reducing the laborious process of cell screening. We previously developed an accumulative site-specific gene integration system (AGIS) using Cre recombinase and mutated loxP sites for transgene integration and amplification in the CHO cell genome. Epigenetic modifier elements such as insulators are effective DNA cis-regulatory elements for stabilizing transgene expression. Here, we attempted to enhance transgene expression in recombinant CHO cells generated by AGIS using a production enhancer DNA element (PE) derived from the CHO genome. The PE was introduced into an expression unit for a recombinant scFv-Fc antibody. The effect on scFv-Fc productivity of PE position and orientation within the transgene was evaluated, while keeping the background chromosomal structure constant. For the optimal PE arrangement, scFv-Fc productivity was enhanced 2.6-fold compared with an expression unit without a PE. The enhancing effect of the PE on transgene expression was also observed when two or three PE-flanked expression units were inserted as tandem repeats. These results indicate that AGIS using the PE-flanked expression unit is a promising approach for establishing producer cell lines for biopharmaceutical protein production.

  12. Bov-B long interspersed repeated DNA (LINE) sequences are present in Vipera ammodytes phospholipase A2 genes and in genomes of Viperidae snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordis, D; Gubensek, F

    1997-06-15

    Ammodytin L is a myotoxic Ser49 phospholipase A2 (PLA2) homologue, which is tissue-specifically expressed in the venom glands of Vipera ammodytes. The complete DNA sequence of the gene and its 5' and 3' flanking regions has been determined. The gene consists of five exons separated by four introns. Comparative analysis of the ammodytin L and ammodytoxin C genes shows that all intron and flanking sequences are considerably more conserved (93-97%) than the mature protein-coding exons. The pattern of nucleotide substitutions in protein-coding exons is not random but occurs preferentially on the first and the second positions of codons, which suggests positive Darwinian evolution for a new function. An Ruminantia specific ART-2 retroposon, recently recognised as a 5'-truncated Bov-B long interspersed repeated DNA (LINE) sequence, was identified in the fourth intron of both genes. This result suggests that ammodytin L and ammodytoxin C genes are derived by duplication of a common ancestral gene. The phylogenetic distribution of Bov-B LINE among vertebrate classes shows that, besides the Ruminantia, it is limited to Viperidae snakes (Vipera ammodytes, Vipera palaestinae, Echis coloratus, Bothrops alternatus, Trimeresurus flavoviridis and Trimeresurus gramineus). The copy number of the 3' end of Bov-B LINE in the Vipera ammodytes genome is between 62,000 and 75,000. The absence of Bov-B LINE at orthologous positions in other snake PLA2 genes indicates that its retrotransposition in the V. ammodytes PLA2 gene locus has occurred quite recently, about 5 My ago. The amplification of Bov-B LINEs in snakes may have occurred before the divergence of the Viperinae and Crotalinae subfamilies. Due to its wide distribution in Viperidae snakes it may be a valuable phylogenetic marker. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree shows two clusters of truncated Bov-B LINE, a Bovidae and a snake cluster, indicating an early horizontal transfer of this transposable element.

  13. DNA cassette exchange in ES cells mediated by Flp recombinase: an efficient strategy for repeated modification of tagged loci by marker-free constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibler, J; Schübeler, D; Fiering, S; Groudine, M; Bode, J

    1998-05-05

    The repeated modification of a genomic locus is a technically demanding but powerful strategy to analyze the function of a particular gene product or the role of cis-regulatory DNA elements in mammalian cells. The initial step is "tagging" a site with a selectable marker which is done by homologous recombination (HR) to modify a known locus or by random integration to study cis-regulatory elements at a reproducibly accessible genomic location. The tag is then used to target the construct of choice during an exchange step. Presented here is a novel technique in which the exchange is independent of HR and does not introduce vector sequences. It relies on our previous studies on the replacement of DNA cassettes by FLP-recombinase, whereby some common limitations can be overcome. To this end, the tag, a hygtk positive/negative selection marker, is integrated into the genome of embryonic stem (ES) cells. This marker is flanked by a wild-type Flp-recognition target (FRT) site on one end and by a modified heterospecific FRT site on the other. Successful Flp-mediated replacement of the hygtk cassette is enriched by ganciclovir (GANC) selection for cells that lack the encoded fusion protein. Thereby, the hygtk gene can be exchanged for virtually any sequence in a single efficient step without the need of introducing a positive selectable marker. The system can hence be used to analyze the function of either a gene product or regulatory sequences in ES cells or the transgenic mice derived thereof.

  14. Variation of TTC Repeat Pattern In The Dna of Mycobacterium Leprae Isolates Obtained from Archeological Bones and Leprosy Patients From East Nusa Tenggara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Adriaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of leprosy or kusta or Morbus Hansen or Hansen’s disease has been known for years, including in Indonesia. Starting from the discovery of Mycobacterium leprae isolates from ancient bone (about 1.000 years B.C, the archaeological excavations results in East Nusa Tenggara, interesting questions arise about how the development of leprosy in eastern Indonesia is. Biology molecular study would become a powerful tool to investigate the presence of leprosy bacillary whether there are similarities between the genomes of M. leprae isolates in the primeval and the present. PCR examinations were performed on mandibular bone fragments from ancient human who lived 1000 years B.C. discovered in archaeological surveys on the island of Lembata and three leprosy patients from East Nusa Tenggara. The DNA extraction was performed using a kit from Qiagen products and its TTC repeating pattern was seen with the method of direct sequencing. It turned out that the TTC profile obtained from samples of archaeological was as many as 13 copies, while the repetition of TTC in three samples of leprosy patients were 15, 17 and 26 copies. The different number of TTC repetition shows the different isolates of M. leprae between in the ancient times and the present. Further studies are needed to verify the differences in the genome that occur, for example from the study of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  15. [Conformational polymorphysm of G-rich fragments of DNA Alu-repeats. II. the putative role of G-quadruplex structures in genomic rearrangements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varizhuk, A M; Sekridova, A V; Tankevich, M V; Podgorsky, V S; Smirnov, I P; Pozmogova, G E

    2016-11-01

    Three evolutionary conserved sites of Alu repeats (PQS2, PQS3 and PQS4) were shown to form stable inter- and intramolecular G-quadruplexes (GQs) in vitro. Structures and topologies of these GQs were elucidated using spectral methods. Self-association of G-rich Alu fragments was studied. Dimeric GQ formation from two distal identical or different putative quadruplex sites - (PQS2)2, (PQS3)2 or PQS2-PQS3 - within one lengthy DNA strand was demonstrated by a FRET-based method. Oligomer PQS4 (folded into a parallel intramolecular GQ) was shown to form stacks of quadruplexes that are stabilized by stacking interactions of external G-tetrads (this was confirmed by DOSY NMR, AFM microscopy and differential CD spectroscopy). Comparative analysis of the properties of various GQs allowed us to put forward a hypothesis of two general mechanisms of intermolecular GQ-dependant genomic rearrangements: 1) formation of a dimeric GQs; 2) association of pre-folded intramolecular parallel GQs from different strands into GQ-stacks. Thus, the observed co-localization of G-rich motifs of Alu elements with double-strand break hotspots and rearrangement hotspots may be accounted for by the specific secondary structure of these motifs. At the same time, this is likely primarily due to high abundance of such G-rich Alu fragments in the genome.

  16. Unstable microsatellite repeats facilitate rapid evolution of coding and regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, A; Gemayel, R; Verstrepen, K J

    2012-01-01

    Tandem repeats are intrinsically highly variable sequences since repeat units are often lost or gained during replication or following unequal recombination events. Because of their low complexity and their instability, these repeats, which are also called satellite repeats, are often considered to be useless 'junk' DNA. However, recent findings show that tandem repeats are frequently found within promoters of stress-induced genes and within the coding regions of genes encoding cell-surface and regulatory proteins. Interestingly, frequent changes in these repeats often confer phenotypic variability. Examples include variation in the microbial cell surface, rapid tuning of internal molecular clocks in flies, and enhanced morphological plasticity in mammals. This suggests that instead of being useless junk DNA, some variable tandem repeats are useful functional elements that confer 'evolvability', facilitating swift evolution and rapid adaptation to changing environments. Since changes in repeats are frequent and reversible, repeats provide a unique type of mutation that bridges the gap between rare genetic mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, and highly unstable but reversible epigenetic inheritance.

  17. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  18. In the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system sae, the response regulator SaeR binds to a direct repeat sequence and DNA binding requires phosphorylation by the sensor kinase SaeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length SaeR could be restored by sensor kinase SaeS-induced phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SaeR is more resistant to digestion by trypsin, suggesting conformational changes. DNase I footprinting assays revealed that the SaeR protection region in the P1 promoter contains a direct repeat sequence (GTTAAN(6)GTTAA [where N is any nucleotide]). This sequence is critical to the binding of phosphorylated SaeR. Mutational changes in the repeat sequence greatly reduced both the in vitro binding of SaeR and the in vivo function of the P1 promoter. From these results, we concluded that SaeR recognizes the direct repeat sequence as a binding site and that binding requires phosphorylation by SaeS.

  19. Inverted repeat of Olisthodiscus luteus chloroplast DNA contains genes for both subunits of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the 32,000-dalton QB protein: Phylogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Michael; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    1986-01-01

    The chloroplast DNA of the chromophytic alga Olisthodiscus luteus has been physically mapped with four restriction enzymes. An inverted repeat of 22 kilobase pairs is present in this 150-kilobase-pair plastid genome. The inverted repeat contains the genes for the large and small subunit polypeptides of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) and also codes for the 32,000-dalton QB protein. These observations demonstrate that significant differences exist in chloroplast genome structure and organization among major plant taxa. Images PMID:16578794

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of satellite DNA sequences from constitutive heterochromatin of the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Viperidae) and the Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Seki, Risako; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-12-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences of the centromeric heterochromatin provide valuable molecular cytogenetic markers for the investigation of genomic compartmentalization in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of sauropsids. Here, the relationship between centromeric heterochromatin and karyotype evolution was examined using cloned repetitive DNA sequences from two snake species, the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Crotalinae, Viperidae) and Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae). Three satellite DNA (stDNA) families were isolated from the heterochromatin of these snakes: 168-bp PFL-MspI from P. flavoviridis and 196-bp PBI-DdeI and 174-bp PBI-MspI from P. bivittatus. The PFL-MspI and PBI-DdeI sequences were localized to the centromeric regions of most chromosomes in the respective species, suggesting that the two sequences were the major components of the centromeric heterochromatin in these organisms. The PBI-MspI sequence was localized to the pericentromeric region of four chromosome pairs. The PFL-MspI and the PBI-DdeI sequences were conserved only in the genome of closely related species, Gloydius blomhoffii (Crotalinae) and Python molurus, respectively, although their locations on the chromosomes were slightly different. In contrast, the PBI-MspI sequence was also in the genomes of P. molurus and Boa constrictor (Boidae), and additionally localized to the centromeric regions of eight chromosome pairs in B. constrictor, suggesting that this sequence originated in the genome of a common ancestor of Pythonidae and Boidae, approximately 86 million years ago. The three stDNA sequences showed no genomic compartmentalization between the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes, suggesting that homogenization of the centromeric and/or pericentromeric stDNA sequences occurred in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of these snakes.

  1. Recent Advances of Repeat-induced Point Mutation (RIP) of DNA Sequence in Fungi%真菌中 DNA 重复序列诱导点突变的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯凤鹃; 曲志才; 田李; 王转斌

    2014-01-01

    Repeat -induced point mutations ( RIP) was discovered in Neurospora crassa in 1987 by Selker. RIP searches for sequence duplications in haploid nuclei of premeiotic tissue and then litters them with numerous C to T mutations.T+A rich fragments so that the G-C pairs in duplications can be mutated to A -T.In addition, RIP’ s sequences , which are concentrated in centromeric regions , and are predominantly relics of transposons , are left methylated .Mobile transposable elements are among the primary drivers of the evolution of eukaryotic genomes . For fungi , repeat-induced point mutation ( RIP) silencing minimizes deleterious effects of transposons by mutating multicopy DNA during meiosis .To explore the impact of RIP-mutated transposons is conducive to generate evolu-tionary inferences for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses .The paper has reviewed the mechanism of RIP and the progress of RIP in fungi .%1987年,由Selker等在粗糙脉孢菌中首次发现重复序列诱导点突变( repeat-induced point mu-tation,RIP)。在重复序列诱导点突变过程中,搜寻前减数分裂组织单倍体核中DNA的重复序列,然后发生众多的碱基C到T的突变,产生富碱基T+A片段,从而使重复序列中的G-C碱基对发生转换突变成为A-T碱基对。此外,发生RIP的序列多集中在着丝粒区域,主要是转座子甲基化后的遗迹。移动转座子是真核生物基因组进化的主要驱动力。对于真菌,重复序列诱导点突变( RIP)在减数分裂过程中通过突变多拷贝DNA,能最大限度地减少转座子的影响,因此对RIP的研究在一定程度上能有助于了解基因组进化的真谛。综述了重复序列诱导点突变的产生机制,以及真菌中重复序列诱导点突变的研究进展。

  2. The organization and evolution of the Responder satellite in species of the Drosophila melanogaster group: dynamic evolution of a target of meiotic drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larracuente, Amanda M

    2014-11-25

    Satellite DNA can make up a substantial fraction of eukaryotic genomes and has roles in genome structure and chromosome segregation. The rapid evolution of satellite DNA can contribute to genomic instability and genetic incompatibilities between species. Despite its ubiquity and its contribution to genome evolution, we currently know little about the dynamics of satellite DNA evolution. The Responder (Rsp) satellite DNA family is found in the pericentric heterochromatin of chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. Rsp is well-known for being the target of Segregation Distorter (SD)- an autosomal meiotic drive system in D. melanogaster. I present an evolutionary genetic analysis of the Rsp family of repeats in D. melanogaster and its closely-related species in the melanogaster group (D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. mauritiana, D. erecta, and D. yakuba) using a combination of available BAC sequences, whole genome shotgun Sanger reads, Illumina short read deep sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. I show that Rsp repeats have euchromatic locations throughout the D. melanogaster genome, that Rsp arrays show evidence for concerted evolution, and that Rsp repeats exist outside of D. melanogaster, in the melanogaster group. The repeats in these species are considerably diverged at the sequence level compared to D. melanogaster, and have a strikingly different genomic distribution, even between closely-related sister taxa. The genomic organization of the Rsp repeat in the D. melanogaster genome is complex-it exists of large blocks of tandem repeats in the heterochromatin and small blocks of tandem repeats in the euchromatin. My discovery of heterochromatic Rsp-like sequences outside of D. melanogaster suggests that SD evolved after its target satellite and that the evolution of the Rsp satellite family is highly dynamic over a short evolutionary time scale (<240,000 years).

  3. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  4. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target.

  5. TAL effector specificity for base 0 of the DNA target is altered in a complex, effector- and assay-dependent manner by substitutions for the tryptophan in cryptic repeat -1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Doyle

    Full Text Available TAL effectors are re-targetable transcription factors used for tailored gene regulation and, as TAL effector-nuclease fusions (TALENs, for genome engineering. Their hallmark feature is a customizable central string of polymorphic amino acid repeats that interact one-to-one with individual DNA bases to specify the target. Sequences targeted by TAL effector repeats in nature are nearly all directly preceded by a thymine (T that is required for maximal activity, and target sites for custom TAL effector constructs have typically been selected with this constraint. Multiple crystal structures suggest that this requirement for T at base 0 is encoded by a tryptophan residue (W232 in a cryptic repeat N-terminal to the central repeats that exhibits energetically favorable van der Waals contacts with the T. We generated variants based on TAL effector PthXo1 with all single amino acid substitutions for W232. In a transcriptional activation assay, many substitutions altered or relaxed the specificity for T and a few were as active as wild type. Some showed higher activity. However, when replicated in a different TAL effector, the effects of the substitutions differed. Further, the effects differed when tested in the context of a TALEN in a DNA cleavage assay, and in a TAL effector-DNA binding assay. Substitution of the N-terminal region of the PthXo1 construct with that of one of the TAL effector-like proteins of Ralstonia solanacearum, which have arginine in place of the tryptophan, resulted in specificity for guanine as the 5' base but low activity, and several substitutions for the arginine, including tryptophan, destroyed activity altogether. Thus, the effects on specificity and activity generated by substitutions at the W232 (or equivalent position are complex and context dependent. Generating TAL effector scaffolds with high activity that robustly accommodate sites without a T at position 0 may require larger scale re-engineering.

  6. Highly species-specific centromeric repetitive DNA sequences in lizards: molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel family of satellite DNA sequences isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasertsri, Nampech; Uno, Yoshinobu; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Prakhongcheep, Ornjira; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Charernsuk, Saranon; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Koga, Akihiko; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2013-01-01

    Two novel repetitive DNA sequences, VSAREP1 and VSAREP2, were isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota) and characterized using molecular cytogenetics. The respective lengths and guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of the sequences were 190 bp and 57.5% for VSAREP1 and 185 bp and 59.7% for VSAREP2, and both elements were tandemly arrayed as satellite DNA in the genome. VSAREP1 and VSAREP2 were each located at the C-positive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2q, the centromeric region of chromosome 5, and 3 pairs of microchromosomes. This suggests that genomic compartmentalization between macro- and microchromosomes might not have occurred in the centromeric repetitive sequences of V. salvator macromaculatus. These 2 sequences did only hybridize to genomic DNA of V. salvator macromaculatus, but no signal was observed even for other squamate reptiles, including Varanus exanthematicus, which is a closely related species of V. salvator macromaculatus. These results suggest that these sequences were differentiated rapidly or were specifically amplified in the V. salvator macromaculatus genome.

  7. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  8. The C9orf72 repeat size correlates with onset age of disease, DNA methylation and transcriptional downregulation of the promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijselinck, I; Van Mossevelde, S; van der Zee, J; Sieben, A; Engelborghs, S; De Bleecker, J; Ivanoiu, A; Deryck, O; Edbauer, D; Zhang, M; Heeman, B; Bäumer, V; Van den Broeck, M; Mattheijssens, M; Peeters, K; Rogaeva, E; De Jonghe, P; Cras, P; Martin, J-J; de Deyn, P P; Cruts, M; Van Broeckhoven, C

    2016-08-01

    Pathological expansion of a G4C2 repeat, located in the 5' regulatory region of C9orf72, is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). C9orf72 patients have highly variable onset ages suggesting the presence of modifying factors and/or anticipation. We studied 72 Belgian index patients with FTLD, FTLD-ALS or ALS and 61 relatives with a C9orf72 repeat expansion. We assessed the effect of G4C2 expansion size on onset age, the role of anticipation and the effect of repeat size on methylation and C9orf72 promoter activity. G4C2 expansion sizes varied in blood between 45 and over 2100 repeat units with short expansions (45-78 units) present in 5.6% of 72 index patients with an expansion. Short expansions co-segregated with disease in two families. The subject with a short expansion in blood but an indication of mosaicism in brain showed the same pathology as those with a long expansion. Further, we provided evidence for an association of G4C2 expansion size with onset age (Pdisease anticipation. Also, intermediate repeats (7-24 units) showed a slightly higher methylation degree (Pdisease mechanisms and have important implications for diagnostic counseling and potential therapeutic approaches.

  9. The 28S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer from Crithidia fasciculata: repeated sequences, length heterogeneity, putative processing sites and potential interactions between U3 small nucleolar RNA and the ribosomal RNA precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnare, M N; Collings, J C; Spencer, D F; Gray, M W

    2000-09-15

    In Crithidia fasciculata, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene repeats range in size from approximately 11 to 12 kb. This length heterogeneity is localized to a region of the intergenic spacer (IGS) that contains tandemly repeated copies of a 19mer sequence. The IGS also contains four copies of an approximately 55 nt repeat that has an internal inverted repeat and is also present in the IGS of Leishmania species. We have mapped the C.fasciculata transcription initiation site as well as two other reverse transcriptase stop sites that may be analogous to the A0 and A' pre-rRNA processing sites within the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) of other eukaryotes. Features that could influence processing at these sites include two stretches of conserved primary sequence and three secondary structure elements present in the 5' ETS. We also characterized the C.fasciculata U3 snoRNA, which has the potential for base-pairing with pre-rRNA sequences. Finally, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of large subunit rRNA in both C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei involves 3'-terminal addition of three A residues that are not present in the corresponding DNA sequences.

  10. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  11. DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  12. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  13. Triage of HR-HPV positive women with minor cytological abnormalities: a comparison of mRNA testing, HPV DNA testing, and repeat cytology using a 4-year follow-up of a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Persson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. METHODS: Liquid-based (PreservCyt cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA. Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. RESULTS: Nine of 25 (36% women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36% women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74% women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100% and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8% groups, although specificity was insufficient (<50%. HPV16 DNA testing and repeat cytology were more specific than APTIMA. CONCLUSION: The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL.

  14. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  15. Analysis and location of a rice BAC clone containing telomeric DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟文学; 陈浩; 颜辉煌; 严长杰; 王国梁; 朱立煌

    1999-01-01

    BAC2, a rice BAC clone containing (TTTAGGG)n homologous sequences, was analyzed by Southern hybridization and DNA sequencing of its subclones. It was disclosed that there were many tandem repeated satellite DNA sequences, called TA352, as well as simple tandem repeats consisting of TTTAGGG or its variant within the BAC2 insert. A 0. 8 kb (TTTAGGG) n-containing fragment in BAC2 was mapped in the telomere regions of at least 5 pairs of rice chromosomes by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). By RFLP analysis of low copy sequences the BAC2 clone was localized in one terminal region of chromosome 6. All the results strongly suggest that the telomeric DNA sequences of rice are TTTAGGG or its variant, and the linked satellite DNA TA352 sequences belong to telomere-associated sequences.

  16. Assembly of supramolecular DNA complexes containing both G-quadruplexes and i-motifs by enhancing the G-repeat-bearing capacity of i-motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanwei; Gao, Shang; Yan, Yuting; Bruist, Michael F.; Wang, Bing; Guo, Xinhua

    2017-01-01

    The single-step assembly of supramolecular complexes containing both i-motifs and G-quadruplexes (G4s) is demonstrated. This can be achieved because the formation of four-stranded i-motifs appears to be little affected by certain terminal residues: a five-cytosine tetrameric i-motif can bear ten-base flanking residues. However, things become complex when different lengths of guanine-repeats are added at the 3′ or 5′ ends of the cytosine-repeats. Here, a series of oligomers d(XGiXC5X) and d(XC5XGiX) (X = A, T or none; i < 5) are designed to study the impact of G-repeats on the formation of tetrameric i-motifs. Our data demonstrate that tetramolecular i-motif structure can tolerate specific flanking G-repeats. Assemblies of these oligonucleotides are polymorphic, but may be controlled by solution pH and counter ion species. Importantly, we find that the sequences d(TGiAC5) can form the tetrameric i-motif in large quantities. This leads to the design of two oligonucleotides d(TG4AC7) and d(TGBrGGBrGAC7) that self-assemble to form quadruplex supramolecules under certain conditions. d(TG4AC7) forms supramolecules under acidic conditions in the presence of K+ that are mainly V-shaped or ring-like containing parallel G4s and antiparallel i-motifs. d(TGBrGGBrGAC7) forms long linear quadruplex wires under acidic conditions in the presence of Na+ that consist of both antiparallel G4s and i-motifs. PMID:27899568

  17. High-Resolution DNA Melt Curve Analysis of the Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short-Palindromic-Repeat Locus of Campylobacter jejuni▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Erin P; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M.

    2007-01-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short ...

  18. PTSD and DNA Methylation in Select Immune Function Gene Promoter Regions: A Repeated Measures Case-control Study of U.S. Military Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    other relevant exposures which may influ- ence DNA methylation, such as dietary factors (folate, vitamin B12 intake) (Fenech, 2001; Piyathilake and...of folic acid and Vitamin B12 in genomic stability of human cells. Mutat. Res. 475, 57–67. doi:10.1016/S0027- 5107(01)00069-0 Feng, J., and Fan, G...42, 746–753. Oliveira, N. F., Damm, G. R., Andia, D. C., Salmon , C., Nociti, F. H. Jr., Line, S. R., et al. (2009). DNA methylation status of the

  19. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  20. Analytical Performance of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Using TaqMan Probes for Quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi Satellite DNA in Blood Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Teresa; Cayo, Nelly M.; Parrado, Rudy; Bello, Zoraida Diaz; Velazquez, Elsa; Muñoz-Calderon, Arturo; Juiz, Natalia A.; Basile, Joaquín; Garcia, Lineth; Riarte, Adelina; Nasser, Julio R.; Ocampo, Susana B.; Yadon, Zaida E.; Torrico, Faustino; de Noya, Belkisyole Alarcón; Ribeiro, Isabela; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The analytical validation of sensitive, accurate and standardized Real-Time PCR methods for Trypanosoma cruzi quantification is crucial to provide a reliable laboratory tool for diagnosis of recent infections as well as for monitoring treatment efficacy. Methods/Principal Findings We have standardized and validated a multiplex Real-Time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR) based on TaqMan technology, aiming to quantify T. cruzi satellite DNA as well as an internal amplification control (IAC) in a single-tube reaction. IAC amplification allows rule out false negative PCR results due to inhibitory substances or loss of DNA during sample processing. The assay has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.70 parasite equivalents/mL and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1.53 parasite equivalents/mL starting from non-boiled Guanidine EDTA blood spiked with T. cruzi CL-Brener stock. The method was evaluated with blood samples collected from Chagas disease patients experiencing different clinical stages and epidemiological scenarios: 1- Sixteen Venezuelan patients from an outbreak of oral transmission, 2- Sixty three Bolivian patients suffering chronic Chagas disease, 3- Thirty four Argentinean cases with chronic Chagas disease, 4- Twenty seven newborns to seropositive mothers, 5- A seronegative receptor who got infected after transplantation with a cadaveric kidney explanted from an infected subject. Conclusions/Significance The performing parameters of this assay encourage its application to early assessment of T. cruzi infection in cases in which serological methods are not informative, such as recent infections by oral contamination or congenital transmission or after transplantation with organs from seropositive donors, as well as for monitoring Chagas disease patients under etiological treatment. PMID:23350002

  1. Analytical performance of a multiplex Real-Time PCR assay using TaqMan probes for quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi satellite DNA in blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Duffy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analytical validation of sensitive, accurate and standardized Real-Time PCR methods for Trypanosoma cruzi quantification is crucial to provide a reliable laboratory tool for diagnosis of recent infections as well as for monitoring treatment efficacy. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have standardized and validated a multiplex Real-Time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR based on TaqMan technology, aiming to quantify T. cruzi satellite DNA as well as an internal amplification control (IAC in a single-tube reaction. IAC amplification allows rule out false negative PCR results due to inhibitory substances or loss of DNA during sample processing. The assay has a limit of detection (LOD of 0.70 parasite equivalents/mL and a limit of quantification (LOQ of 1.53 parasite equivalents/mL starting from non-boiled Guanidine EDTA blood spiked with T. cruzi CL-Brener stock. The method was evaluated with blood samples collected from Chagas disease patients experiencing different clinical stages and epidemiological scenarios: 1- Sixteen Venezuelan patients from an outbreak of oral transmission, 2- Sixty three Bolivian patients suffering chronic Chagas disease, 3- Thirty four Argentinean cases with chronic Chagas disease, 4- Twenty seven newborns to seropositive mothers, 5- A seronegative receptor who got infected after transplantation with a cadaveric kidney explanted from an infected subject. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The performing parameters of this assay encourage its application to early assessment of T. cruzi infection in cases in which serological methods are not informative, such as recent infections by oral contamination or congenital transmission or after transplantation with organs from seropositive donors, as well as for monitoring Chagas disease patients under etiological treatment.

  2. Recommendations of the DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) on quality control of autosomal Short Tandem Repeat allele frequency databasing (STRidER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodner, Martin; Bastisch, Ingo; Butler, John M.

    2016-01-01

    for mitochondrial mtDNA, and YHRD for Y-chromosomal loci) that centralized quality control and data curation is essential to minimize error. The concepts employed for quality control involve software-aided likelihood-of-genotype, phylogenetic, and population genetic checks that allow the researchers to compare...

  3. The cDNA sequence for the protein-tyrosine kinase substrate p36 (calpactin I heavy chain) reveals a multidomain protein with internal repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarin, C T; Tack, B F; Kristensen, Torsten;

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a full-length cDNA clone for the protein-tyrosine kinase substrate p36 (calpactin I heavy chain). This sequence predicts a 339 amino acid (Mr 38,493) protein containing an N-terminal region of 20 amino acids, known to interact with a 10 kd protein (light chain), and...

  4. Chloroplast DNA phylogeography reveals repeated range expansion in a widespread aquatic herb Hippuris vulgaris in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ming Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP is one of the most extensive habitats for alpine plants in the world. Climatic oscillations during the Quaternary ice age had a dramatic effect on species ranges on the QTP and the adjacent areas. However, how the distribution ranges of aquatic plant species shifted on the QTP in response to Quaternary climatic changes remains almost unknown. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the phylogeography and demographic history of the widespread aquatic herb Hippuris vulgaris from the QTP and adjacent areas. Our sampling included 385 individuals from 47 natural populations of H. vulgaris. Using sequences from four chloroplast DNA (cpDNA non-coding regions, we distinguished eight different cpDNA haplotypes. From the cpDNA variation in H. vulgaris, we found a very high level of population differentiation (G ST = 0.819 but the phylogeographical structure remained obscure (N ST = 0.853>G ST = 0.819, P>0.05. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two main cpDNA haplotype lineages. The split between these two haplotype groups can be dated back to the mid-to-late Pleistocene (ca. 0.480 Myr. Mismatch distribution analyses showed that each of these had experienced a recent range expansion. These two expansions (ca. 0.12 and 0.17 Myr might have begun from the different refugees before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study initiates a research on the phylogeography of aquatic herbs in the QTP and for the first time sheds light on the response of an alpine aquatic seed plant species in the QTP to Quaternary climate oscillations.

  5. Knob-associated tandem repeats on mitotic chromosomes in maize, Zea diploperennis and their hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zhiyong; GAO Yuan; HE Guanyuan; GU Mingguang; GUO Lequn; SONG Yunchun

    2004-01-01

    Knob-associated tandem repeats, 180-bp repeats and TR-1 elements, together with 45S rDNA were located on mitotic chromosomes of Zea diploperennis (DP),maize inbred line F102 and their hybrid. In DP, knobs on the short arm of chromosomes 1 and 4 and on the long arm of the chromosomes 4 and 5 are composed predominantly of the 180-bp repeats. In addition, 180-bp repeats existed together with TR-1 elements were also detected on the short arm of chromosomes 2 and 5 and on the long arm of the chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 8 and 9. In maize inbred line F102, 180-bp repeats were present in chromosomes 7S and one homologue of chromosomes 8L. TR-1 elements appeared on satellite of chromosome 6 and no detectable hybridization site co-located with 180-bp repeats was observed in maize F102. Polymorphism of size, number, and distribution of 180-bp and TR-1 signals were revealed among different chromosomes in these two species and heteromorphism existed between some homologous chromosomes in the same species.Using these excellent landmarks, the interspecific hybrid of maize and DP were identified. The results suggest that comparative analysis of 180-bp repeats and TR-1 elements may help understand the genome organization and the evolution in Zea.

  6. Local repeat sequence organization of an intergenic spacer in the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to DNA expansion and sequence scrambling: a complex mode of “copy-choice replication”?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra D Wagle; Subhojit Sen; Basuthkar J Rao

    2001-12-01

    Parent-specific, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were obtained from total genomic DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Such parent-specific RAPD bands (genomic fingerprints) segregated uniparentally (through mt+) in a cross between a pair of polymorphic interfertile strains of Chlamydomonas (C. reinhardtii and C. minnesotti), suggesting that they originated from the chloroplast genome. Southern analysis mapped the RAPD-markers to the chloroplast genome. One of the RAPD-markers, ``P2” (1.6 kb) was cloned, sequenced and was fine mapped to the 3 kb region encompassing 3′ end of 23S, full 5S and intergenic region between 5S and psbA. This region seems divergent enough between the two parents, such that a specific PCR designed for a parental specific chloroplast sequence within this region, amplified a marker in that parent only and not in the other, indicating the utility of RAPD-scan for locating the genomic regions of sequence divergence. Remarkably, the RAPD-product, ``P2” seems to have originated from a PCR-amplification of a much smaller (about 600 bp), but highly repeat-rich (direct and inverted) domain of the 3 kb region in a manner that yielded no linear sequence alignment with its own template sequence. The amplification yielded the same uniquely ``sequence-scrambled” product, whether the template used for PCR was total cellular DNA, chloroplast DNA or a plasmid clone DNA corresponding to that region. The PCR product, a ``unique” new sequence, had lost the repetitive organization of the template genome where it had originated from and perhaps represented a ``complex path” of copy-choice replication.

  7. Single and repeated moderate consumption of native or dealcoholized red wine show different effects on antioxidant parameters in blood and DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes in healthy volunteers: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN68505294

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spengler Ulrich

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red wine (RW is rich in antioxidant polyphenols that might protect from oxidative stress related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Antioxidant effects after single ingestion of RW or dealcoholized RW (DRW have been observed in several studies, but results after regular consumption are contradictory. Thus, we examined if single or repeated consumption of moderate amounts of RW or DRW exert antioxidant activity in vivo. Methods Total phenolic content and concentration of other antioxidants in plasma/serum, total antioxidant capacity (TEAC in plasma as well as DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes were measured in healthy non-smokers A before, 90 and 360 min after ingestion of one glass of RW, DRW or water; B before and after consumption of one glass of RW or DRW daily for 6 weeks. DNA strand breaks (SB were determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet Assay in untreated cells and after induction of oxidative stress ex vivo with H2O2 (300 μM, 20 min. Results Both RW and DRW transiently increased total phenolic content in plasma after single consumption, but only RW lead to a sustained increase if consumed regularly. Plasma antioxidant capacity was not affected by single or regular consumption of RW or DRW. Effects of RW and DRW on DNA SB were conflicting. DNA strand breaks in untreated cells increased after a single dose of RW and DRW, whereas H2O2 induced SB were reduced after DRW. In contrast, regular RW consumption reduced SB in untreated cells but did not affect H2O2 induced SB. Conclusion The results suggest that consumption of both RW and DRW leads to an accumulation of phenolic compounds in plasma without increasing plasma antioxidant capacity. Red wine and DRW seem to affect the occurrence of DNA strand breaks, but this cannot be referred to antioxidant effects.

  8. In vitro nucleosome positioning features of DNA repeats sequence associated with human genetic disease%与人遗传病相关的DNA重复序列的体外核小体定位特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴荣; 赵宏宇; 蔡禄

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nucleosome positioning of DNA repeats sequence ire vitro which can cause human genetic disease. Methods The recombinant plasmids containing (GAA)42, (ATTCT)43, (GCCT)18 and 601 sequence were cloned. The histone and plasmids were used to assemble chromatin structure ire vitro,and then analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis after micrococcal nuclease digestion. Results The plasmid containing ATTCT repeats sequence was easier to form nucleosome than GAA containing repeats sequence ire vitro. Conclusions The recombinant plasmids' ability to form chromatin structure was changed because of the insert of the different repeats sequence fragment.%目的 研究与人遗传病相关的DNA重复序列的体外核小体定位.方法 构建含有(GAA)42、(ATTCT)43、(GCCT)18和601序列的重组质粒,体外利用盐透析将质粒与组蛋白八聚体组装形成染色质结构,微球菌核酸酶消化后,用琼脂糖凝胶电泳分析染色质的结构.结果 含有ATTCT重复序列的质粒较含GAA重复序列质粒在体外易于形成核小体.结论 在重组质粒中,由于引入的重复序列片段形成核小体能力的不同会影响其局部染色质结构.

  9. Karyotypes, male meiosis and comparative FISH mapping of 18S ribosomal DNA and telomeric (TTAGGn repeat in eight species of true bugs (Hemiptera, Heteroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snejana Grozeva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Eight species belonging to five true bug families were analyzed using DAPI/CMA3-staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with telomeric (TTAGGn and 18S rDNA probes. Standard chromosomal complements are reported for the first time for Deraeocoris rutilus (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838 (2n=30+2m+XY and D. ruber (Linnaeus, 1758 (2n=30+2m+XY from the family Miridae. Using FISH, the location of a 18S rDNA cluster was detected in these species and in five more species: Megaloceroea recticornis (Geoffroy, 1785 (2n=30+XY from the Miridae; Oxycarenus lavaterae (Fabricius, 1787 (2n=14+2m+XY from the Lygaeidae s.l.; Pyrrhocoris apterus (Linnaeus, 1758 (2n=22+X from the Pyrrhocoridae; Eurydema oleracea (Linnaeus, 1758 (2n=12+XY and Graphosoma lineatum (Linnaeus, 1758 (2n=12+XY from the Pentatomidae. The species were found to differ with respect to location of a 18S rRNA gene cluster which resides on autosomes in O. lavaterae and P. apterus, whereas it locates on sex chromosomes in other five species. The 18S rDNA location provides the first physical landmark of the genomes of the species studied. The insect consensus telomeric pentanucleotide (TTAGGn was demonstrated to be absent in all the species studied in this respect, D. rutilus, M. recticornis, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 (Cimicidae, E. oleracea, and G. lineatum, supporting the hypothesis that this motif was lost in early evolution of the Heteroptera and secondarily replaced with another motif (yet unknown or the alternative telomerase-independent mechanisms of telomere maintenance. Dot-blot hybridization analysis of the genomic DNA from C. lectularius, Nabis sp. and O. lavaterae with (TTAGGn and six other telomeric probes likewise provided a negative result.

  10. Site- and strand-specific nicking of DNA by fusion proteins derived from MutH and I-SceI or TALE repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabsalilow, Lilia; Schierling, Benno; Friedhoff, Peter; Pingoud, Alfred; Wende, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Targeted genome engineering requires nucleases that introduce a highly specific double-strand break in the genome that is either processed by homology-directed repair in the presence of a homologous repair template or by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) that usually results in insertions or deletions. The error-prone NHEJ can be efficiently suppressed by 'nickases' that produce a single-strand break rather than a double-strand break. Highly specific nickases have been produced by engineering of homing endonucleases and more recently by modifying zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) composed of a zinc finger array and the catalytic domain of the restriction endonuclease FokI. These ZF-nickases work as heterodimers in which one subunit has a catalytically inactive FokI domain. We present two different approaches to engineer highly specific nickases; both rely on the sequence-specific nicking activity of the DNA mismatch repair endonuclease MutH which we fused to a DNA-binding module, either a catalytically inactive variant of the homing endonuclease I-SceI or the DNA-binding domain of the TALE protein AvrBs4. The fusion proteins nick strand specifically a bipartite recognition sequence consisting of the MutH and the I-SceI or TALE recognition sequences, respectively, with a more than 1000-fold preference over a stand-alone MutH site. TALE-MutH is a programmable nickase.

  11. A DNA-binding protein from Candida albicans that binds to the RPG box of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the telomeric repeat sequence of C. albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, N; Yamamoto, M; Lahm, H W; Iizumi, S; Yoshihara, F; Nakayama, H; Arisawa, M; Aoki, Y

    1997-02-01

    Electromobility shift assays with a DNA probe containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ENO1 RPG box identified a specific DNA-binding protein in total protein extracts of Candida albicans. The protein, named Rbf1p (RPG-box-binding protein 1), bound to other S. cerevisiae RPG boxes, although the nucleotide recognition profile was not completely the same as that of S. cerevisiae Rap 1p (repressor-activator protein 1), an RPG-box-binding protein. The repetitive sequence of the C. albicans chromosomal telomere also competed with RPG-box binding to Rbf1p. For further analysis, we purified Rbf1p 57,600-fold from C. albicans total protein extracts, raised mAbs against the purified protein and immunologically cloned the gene, whose ORF specified a protein of 527 aa. The bacterially expressed protein showed RPG-box-binding activity with the same profile as that of the purified one. The Rbf1p, containing two glutamine-rich regions that are found in many transcription factors, showed transcriptional activation capability in S. cerevisiae and was predominantly observed in nuclei. These results suggest that Rbf1p is a transcription factor with telomere-binding activity in C. albicans.

  12. Distribution and evolution of simple repeats in the mtDNA D-loop in mammalian%简单重复DNA序列在哺乳动物mtDNA D-loop区的分布及进化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    危金普; 潘学峰; 李红权; 段斐

    2011-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) distribute extensively in genomes of all organisms.but the molecular mechanism underlined is poorly understood.In this study, we characterized distribution and biological significance of the simple repetitive DNA sequences in the D-Ioop region in mitochondria DNA of 256 mammal species, and classified the mammal carriers into three groups including 53 species with hexanucleotide repeats, 104 species with other types of simple repeats (>6 bp) and 99 species without any repeat sequences, respectively.Furthermore, we found that the hexanucleotide repeats dispersed significantly in the interval space between CSBI and CSB2, while other repeats dispersed mainly in the termination region, central conserved region and the conserve sequence block (CSB) regions.In addition, comparison on the base composition and the DNA contexts of the central conserved region, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3 revealed a lack of significant differences in similarity among different species with or without repeat sequences.Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis with 256 mammal species using N-J method suggested loss of the repeat sequences in mammals in evolution.%简单重复序列广泛分布于从原核到真核生物的基因组中,其形成的分子机理目前尚不明确.对NCBI数据库中已有256种哺乳动物线粒体DNA(mtDNA)D-loop区进行序列比对分析,根据其所含有的简单重复序列类型分为3组,分别是53种哺乳动物含有六核苷酸重复序列;104种哺乳动物含有非六核苷酸重复序列(>6bp);99种哺乳动物不含有任何重复序列.通过碱基序列分析比对,发现六核苷酸重复序列集中分布在CSB1-CSB2间隔区,而非六核苷酸重复可以分布于终止区(TAS)、中央保守(Central domain)以及CSB(Central sequence block)区.通过比较含有重复序列与不含重复序列的功能保守区发现,简单重复序列的存在并不明确影响D-loop区内的中央保守区以及CSB1、CSB2、CSB3三个功

  13. Cloning of full-length cDNA of Microsporum canis membrane protein PQ-loop repeat protein gene%犬小孢子菌膜蛋白PQ-LRP基因全长cDNA的克隆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞娟; 祝逸平; 杨国玲

    2012-01-01

    Objective To clone the full-length cDNA of Microsporum canis membrane protein PQ-loop repeat protein (PQ-LRP) gene,so as to investigate the roles of PQ-LRP in the pathogenesis of tinea capitis.Methods A Microsporum canis strain (A518) from a patient with tinea capitis served as the experimental strain.Rapid cDNA end amplification (RACE) was performed to clone the full length cDNA sequence of PQLRP gene.Bioinformatics methods were used to make a preliminary functional analysis of the gene.Results The cDNA of PQ-LRP gene was obtained with a full length of 1522 bp,including the 5' untranslated region (49 bp),coding region (1080 bp) and 3' untranslated region (393 bp).The coding region encoded a protein precursor including 359 amino acid residues.The cloned cDNA of PQ-LRP gene shared an 81% nucleotide identity with that of Trichophyton tonsurans and a 79% nucleotide identity with that of Trichophyton rubrum.Conclusions The full-length cDNA of Microsporum canis membrane protein PQ-LRP gene has been successfully cloned,which will provide an important basis for further researches into the roles of PQ-LRP in Microsporum canis-associated diseases.%目的 克隆犬小孢子菌膜蛋白PQ-LRP(PQ-loop repeat protein)基因全长cDNA,探讨在头癣发病机制中的作用.方法 选用犬小孢子菌头癣株(A518)为实验株,采用cDNA快速末端扩增法(RACE),克隆PQ-LRP基因的全长序列.结合生物信息学方法对获得的序列进行初步功能分析.结果 获得犬小孢子菌PQ-LRP全长序列为1522 bp,拥有一个1080 bp的开放阅读框,编码359个氨基酸,5 '非编码区为49 bp,3 '非编码区为393 bp;同源性比对与断发毛癣菌的PQ-LRP同源性达到81%,与红色毛癣菌PQ-LRP同源性达到79%.结论 克隆出犬小孢子菌膜蛋白PQ-LRP cDNA全长序列,为研究膜蛋白PQ-LRP基因在犬小孢子菌病中的功能奠定基础.

  14. Allele frequencies of combined DNA index system (CODIS) and non-CODIS short tandem repeat loci in Goiás, Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodovalho, R G; Santos, G S; Cavalcanti, L M; Moura, B F S M; Rodrigues, E L; Lima, P R; Gigonzac, M A D; Vieira, T C

    2015-01-01

    In studies of human identification, obtaining a high standard of outcomes and satisfactory conclusions are directly related to the use of highly polymorphic molecular markers. In addition to the combined DNA index system (CODIS) group, it is also important to implement non-CODIS markers into the analysis, as they increase the power of discrimination. During the identification process, it is essential to consider the genetic variation among distinct groups of populations, as the allele frequencies are directly associated with the power of discrimination. However, the population of Goiás, a State located in Central Brazil, is characterized by a highly mixed population due to its diverse ethnic origins. In this study, a survey of the allelic frequencies in the Goiás population was carried out using a molecular assembly composed of 21 autosomal loci both from and external to the CODIS group. The new data, for some of the markers used, were statistically similar to those from previous studies. This consistency means that the use of these markers might serve as a parameter for future population comparisons. The results from these analyses further our knowledge of the study of human identification.

  15. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the two short tandem repeat (STR) systems upstream of the human myelin basic protein (MBP) gene in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Frederiksen, J; Morling, N

    1996-01-01

    -A and MBP-B were analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 112 unrelated Danes, 140 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 88 Danish mother/child pairs were analyzed. The distributions of MBP phenotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both...... in Eskimos (0.225) than in Danes (0.06). Strong gametic associations were found between fragments from MBP-A and MBP-B series in both Danes and Eskimos. Some of the associations were different in Danes and Eskimos. In the 88 Danish mother/child pairs, the segregation of the MBP genotypes were in accordance...... with a genetic model of co-dominant inheritance and no mutation was found. Two MBP STR regions with irregular structures were sequenced. One fragment had a single base G to A transition at position 124 in the primer binding region between the MBP-A and MBP-B regions. In the other fragment, a deletion starting...

  16. Diversity of a complex centromeric satellite and molecular characterization of dispersed sequence families in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Gerhard; Dechyeva, Daryna; Wenke, Torsten; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work was the identification and molecular characterization of novel sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) repetitive sequences to unravel the impact of repetitive DNA on size and evolution of Beta genomes via amplification and diversification. Genomic DNA and a pool of B. vulgaris repetitive sequences were separately used as probes for a screening of high-density filters from a B. vulgaris plasmid library. Novel repetitive motifs were identified by sequencing and further used as probes for Southern analyses in the genus Beta. Chromosomal localization of the repeats was analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridization on chromosomes of B. vulgaris and two other species of the section Beta. Two dispersed repetitive families pDvul1 and pDvul2 and the tandemly arranged repeat family pRv1 were isolated from a sugar beet plasmid library. The dispersed repetitive families pDvul1 and pDvul2 were identified in all four sections of the genus Beta. The members of the pDvul1 and pDvul2 family are scattered over all B. vulgaris chromosomes, although amplified to a different extent. The pRv1 satellite repeat is exclusively present in species of the section Beta. The centromeric satellite pBV1 by structural variations of the monomer and interspersion of pRv1 units forms complex satellite structures, which are amplified in different degrees on the centromeres of 12 chromosomes of the three species of the Beta section. The complexity of the pBV1 satellite family observed in the section Beta of the genus Beta and, in particular, the strong amplification of the pBV1/pRv1 satellite in the domesticated B. vulgaris indicates the dynamics of centromeric satellite evolution during species radiation within the genus. The dispersed repeat families pDvul1 and pDvul2 might represent derivatives of transposable elements.

  17. Triage of HR-HPV Positive Women with Minor Cytological Abnormalities: A Comparison of mRNA Testing, HPV DNA Testing, and Repeat Cytology Using a 4-Year Follow-Up of a Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K. Miriam; Brismar Wendel, Sophia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA) to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. Methods Liquid-based (PreservCyt) cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. Results Nine of 25 (36%) women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36%) women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74%) women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100%) and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8%) groups, although specificity was insufficient (cytology were more specific than APTIMA. Conclusion The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL. PMID:24587193

  18. Triage of HR-HPV positive women with minor cytological abnormalities: a comparison of mRNA testing, HPV DNA testing, and repeat cytology using a 4-year follow-up of a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K Miriam; Brismar Wendel, Sophia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA) to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. Liquid-based (PreservCyt) cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. Nine of 25 (36%) women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36%) women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74%) women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100%) and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8%) groups, although specificity was insufficient (cytology were more specific than APTIMA. The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL.

  19. Suppression of RNA silencing by a plant DNA virus satellite requires a host calmodulin-like protein to repress RDR6 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense. To counteract host defense, plant viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs that target different effector molecules in the RNA silencing pathway. Evidence has shown that plants also encode endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing (ESRs that function in proper regulation of RNA silencing. The possibility that these cellular proteins can be subverted by viruses to thwart host defense is intriguing but has not been fully explored. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana calmodulin-like protein Nbrgs-CaM is required for the functions of the VSR βC1, the sole protein encoded by the DNA satellite associated with the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV. Nbrgs-CaM expression is up-regulated by the βC1. Transgenic plants over-expressing Nbrgs-CaM displayed developmental abnormities reminiscent of βC1-associated morphological alterations. Nbrgs-CaM suppressed RNA silencing in an Agrobacterium infiltration assay and, when over-expressed, blocked TYLCCNV-induced gene silencing. Genetic evidence showed that Nbrgs-CaM mediated the βC1 functions in silencing suppression and symptom modulation, and was required for efficient virus infection. Moreover, the tobacco and tomato orthologs of Nbrgs-CaM also possessed ESR activity, and were induced by betasatellite to promote virus infection in these Solanaceae hosts. We further demonstrated that βC1-induced Nbrgs-CaM suppressed the production of secondary siRNAs, likely through repressing RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6 expression. RDR6-deficient N. benthamiana plants were defective in antiviral response and were hypersensitive to TYLCCNV infection. More significantly, TYLCCNV could overcome host range restrictions to infect Arabidopsis thaliana when the plants carried a RDR6 mutation. These findings demonstrate a distinct mechanism of VSR for suppressing PTGS through usurpation of a host ESR, and

  20. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  1. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  2. Organization and evolution of Gorilla centromeric DNA from old strategies to new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catacchio, C R; Ragone, R; Chiatante, G; Ventura, M

    2015-09-21

    The centromere/kinetochore interaction is responsible for the pairing and segregation of replicated chromosomes in eukaryotes. Centromere DNA is portrayed as scarcely conserved, repetitive in nature, quickly evolving and protein-binding competent. Among primates, the major class of centromeric DNA is the pancentromeric α-satellite, made of arrays of 171 bp monomers, repeated in a head-to-tail pattern. α-satellite sequences can either form tandem heterogeneous monomeric arrays or assemble in higher-order repeats (HORs). Gorilla centromere DNA has barely been characterized, and data are mainly based on hybridizations of human alphoid sequences. We isolated and finely characterized gorilla α-satellite sequences and revealed relevant structure and chromosomal distribution similarities with other great apes as well as gorilla-specific features, such as the uniquely octameric structure of the suprachromosomal family-2 (SF2). We demonstrated for the first time the orthologous localization of alphoid suprachromosomal families-1 and -2 (SF1 and SF2) between human and gorilla in contrast to chimpanzee centromeres. Finally, the discovery of a new 189 bp monomer type in gorilla centromeres unravels clues to the role of the centromere protein B, paving the way to solve the significance of the centromere DNA's essential repetitive nature in association with its function and the peculiar evolution of the α-satellite sequence.

  3. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, microscopically visible granules that cluster around centrosomes. These structures, which contain numerous proteins directly involved in centrosome maintenance, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis, have traditionally been viewed as vehicles for protein trafficking...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  4. Satellite theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of the natural satellite of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are analyzed on the basis of the solar tidal perturbation factor and the oblateness factor of the primary planet for each satellite. For the inner satellites, for which the value of the solar tidal factor is much smaller than the planetary oblateness factor, it is shown that the eccentricity and inclination of satellite orbits are generally very small and almost constant; several pairs of inner satellites are also found to exhibit commensurable mean motions, or secular accelerations in mean longitude. In the case of the outer satellites, for which solar perturbations are dominant, secular perturbations and long-period perturbations may be derived by the solution of equations of motion reduced to one degree of freedom. The existence of a few satellites, termed intermediary satellites, for which the solar tidal perturbation is on the order of the planetary oblateness factor, is also observed, and the pole of the orbital plane of the satellite is noted to execute a complex motion around the pole of the planet or the orbital plane of the planet.

  5. NMR studies of the R2 repeat and related peptide fragments of the DNA binding domain of c-Myb. New light on the structure and folding of R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségalas, I.; Desjardins, S.; Oulyadi, H.; Prigent, Y.; Tribouillard, S.; Bernardi, E.; Schoofs, A. R.; Davoust1, D.; Toma, F.

    1999-10-01

    The solution structure of the R2 repeat of the DNA binding domain of the protooncogene c-Myb contains a N-terminal structural motif comprising two antiparallel helices. The motif is stabilized by interactions involving conserved residues. The recognition region in C-terminal position is flexible. This structure differs from that of R2 of another c-Myb protein. La structure en solution de la répétition R2 du domaine de liaison à l'ADN du protooncogène c-Myb possède un motif à deux hélices antiparallèles dans la moitié N-terminale, stabilisé par des interactions entre résidus conservés. La région de reconnaissance à l'ADN en position C-terminale est flexible. Cette structure diffère de celle montrée pour la répétition R2 d'une autre protéine c-Myb.

  6. Construction and identification of DNA libraries enriched for microsatellite repeat sequences of Chinese hamster%中国地鼠基因组微卫星富集文库的构建与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋国华; 耿佳宁; 贾若愚; 岳文斌; 刘田福; 胡松年

    2011-01-01

    目的 筛选中国地鼠微卫星位点,为中国地鼠种质资源的分类、进化等遗传研究奠定基础.方法中国地鼠基因组DNA经超声打碎,用2%琼脂糖凝胶电泳回收500~1000 bp的DNA片段,与SNX连接头连接,连接产物与生物素标记的14种微卫星探针变性及退火,再通过链亲和素偶联磁珠亲和捕捉,经吸附、洗涤及洗脱,然后以洗脱产物为模板,通过PCR扩增,与pGEM-T载体连接,转化大肠杆菌DH10B,构建中国地鼠微卫星DNA富集文库.结果 测序结果发现,微卫星DNA序列的阳性克隆占70.3%.结论 中国地鼠微卫星文库的建立和微卫星的筛选将为下一步进行中国地鼠遗传连锁图谱的构建、分子进化和系统发育研究提供大量的微卫星标记.%Objective To screen the microsatellite loci of Chinese hamster DNA to serve the genetic studies of germplasm resources, classification and evolution of Chinese hamsters. Methods Genomic DNAs from Chinese hamster was fragmented by ultrasonication. The fragments in size from 500 bp to 1000 bp were recovered by 2% agarose gel electro-phoresis and ligated to SNX linkers with T4 DNA ligase, then denatured and hybridized to 14 biotinylated oligonucleotides. The biotinylated hybrids were retained on magnetic beads according to the strong afinity between biotin and streptavidin. The products was amplified by PCR and cloned into pGEM-T plasmid vector, and then transformed into Escherichia coli DH10B to construct DNA libraries enriched for microsatellite repeat sequences of Chinese hamster. Results The results of sequencing showed that sequences contained microsatellites indicating a high degree of microsatellite enrichment. Conclusions The new polymorphic microsatellite markers identified and characterized in this study may serve the Chinese hamster genetic linkage mapping, molecular evolution and phylogenetic studies.

  7. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  8. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites........ The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...

  9. Satellite (Natural)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  10. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions f...

  11. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sathiji eNageshwaran; Richard eFestenstein

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions fr...

  12. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs): the hallmark of an ingenious antiviral defense mechanism in prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Attar, S.; Westra, E.R.; Oost, van der J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Many prokaryotes contain the recently discovered defense system against mobile genetic elements. This defense system contains a unique type of repetitive DNA stretches, termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs). CRISPRs consist of identical repeated DNA sequences

  13. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs): the hallmark of an ingenious antiviral defense mechanism in prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Attar, S.; Westra, E.R.; Oost, van der J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Many prokaryotes contain the recently discovered defense system against mobile genetic elements. This defense system contains a unique type of repetitive DNA stretches, termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs). CRISPRs consist of identical repeated DNA sequences (re

  14. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  15. Repetitive sequence analysis and karyotyping reveals centromere-associated DNA sequences in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qunyan; Cai, Zexi; Hu, Tianhua; Liu, Huijun; Bao, Chonglai; Mao, Weihai; Jin, Weiwei

    2015-04-18

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., 2n = 2x = 18) is a major root vegetable crop especially in eastern Asia. Radish root contains various nutritions which play an important role in strengthening immunity. Repetitive elements are primary components of the genomic sequence and the most important factors in genome size variations in higher eukaryotes. To date, studies about repetitive elements of radish are still limited. To better understand genome structure of radish, we undertook a study to evaluate the proportion of repetitive elements and their distribution in radish. We conducted genome-wide characterization of repetitive elements in radish with low coverage genome sequencing followed by similarity-based cluster analysis. Results showed that about 31% of the genome was composed of repetitive sequences. Satellite repeats were the most dominating elements of the genome. The distribution pattern of three satellite repeat sequences (CL1, CL25, and CL43) on radish chromosomes was characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). CL1 was predominantly located at the centromeric region of all chromosomes, CL25 located at the subtelomeric region, and CL43 was a telomeric satellite. FISH signals of two satellite repeats, CL1 and CL25, together with 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA, provide useful cytogenetic markers to identify each individual somatic metaphase chromosome. The centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) has been used as a marker to identify centromere DNA sequences. One putative CENH3 (RsCENH3) was characterized and cloned from radish. Its deduced amino acid sequence shares high similarities to those of the CENH3s in Brassica species. An antibody against B. rapa CENH3, specifically stained radish centromeres. Immunostaining and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) tests with anti-BrCENH3 antibody demonstrated that both the centromere-specific retrotransposon (CR-Radish) and satellite repeat (CL1) are directly associated with RsCENH3 in radish. Proportions

  16. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    followed Hale’s into orbit. In 1879, Jules Verne wrote about launching small satellites with a gun possessing a muzzle velocity of 10 000 m/sec (ref. 3...was activated in 1950.11 It was located only a few tens of miles from the spot where Jules Verne had his Baltimore Gun Club fire a manned projectile to...principle, satellites can be launched by a single impulse applied at the Earth’s surface-say, with a large cannon, & la Jules Verne (sec. 8-3). In

  17. Heart Monitoring By Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The ambulance antenna shown is a specially designed system that allows satellite-relayed two-way communications between a moving emergency vehicle and a hospital emergency room. It is a key component of a demonstration program aimed at showing how emergency medical service can be provided to people in remote rural areas. Satellite communication permits immediate, hospital- guided treatment of heart attacks or other emergencies by ambulance personnel, saving vital time when the scene of the emergency is remote from the hospital. If widely adopted, the system could save tens of thousands of lives annually in the U.S. alone, medical experts say. The problem in conventional communication with rural areas is the fact that radio signals travel in line of sight. They may be blocked by tall buildings, hills and mountains, or even by the curvature of the Earth, so signal range is sharply limited. Microwave relay towers could solve the problem, but a complete network of repeater towers would be extremely expensive. The satellite provides an obstruction-free relay station in space.

  18. Use of the modified viral satellite DNA vector to silence mineral nutrition-related genes in plants: silencing of the tomato ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO1, as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is potentially an attractive reverse-genetics tool for studies of plant gene function, but whether it is effective in silencing mineral nutritional-related genes in roots has not been demonstrated. Here we report on an efficient VIGS system that functions in tomato roots using a modified viral satellite DNA (DNAmβ) associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). A cDNA fragment of the ferric chelate reductase gene (FRO1) from tomato was inserted into the DNAmβ vector. Tomato roots agro-inoculated with DNAmβ carrying both a fragment of FRO1 and TYLCCNV used as a helper virus exhibited a significant reduction at the FRO1 mRNA level. As a consequence, ferric chelate reductase activity, as determined by visualization of the pink FeBPDS3 complex was significantly decreased. Our results clearly demonstrated that VIGS system can be employed to investigate gene function associated with plant nutrient uptake in roots.

  19. Use of the modified viral satellite DNA vector to silence mineral nutrition-related genes in plants: silencing of the tomato ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO1, as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE XiuXia; JIN ChongWei; LI GuiXin; YOU GuangYi; ZHOU XuePing; ZHENG ShaoJian

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is potentially an attractive reverse-genetics tool for studies of plant gene function, but whether it is effective in silencing mineral nutritional-related genes in roots has not been demonstrated. Here we report on an efficient VIGS system that functions in tomato roots using a modified viral satellite DNA (DNAmβ) associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). A cDNA fragment of the ferric chelate reductase gene (FRO1) from tomato was inserted into the DNAmβ vector. Tomato roots agro-inoculated with DNAmβ carrying both a fragment of FRO1 and TYLCCNV used as a helper virus exhibited a significant reduction at the FRO1 mRNA level. As a consequence, ferric chelate reductase activity, as determined by visualization of the pink FeBPDS3complex was significantly decreased. Our results clearly demonstrated that VIGS system can be employed to investigate gene function associated with plant nutrient uptake in roots.

  20. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  1. Repeat Composition of CenH3-chromatin and H3K9me2-marked heterochromatin in Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowar, Teresa; Zakrzewski, Falk; Macas, Jiří; Kobližková, Andrea; Viehoever, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-26

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is an important crop of temperate climate zones, which provides nearly 30 % of the world's annual sugar needs. From the total genome size of 758 Mb, only 567 Mb were incorporated in the recently published genome sequence, due to the fact that regions with high repetitive DNA contents (e.g. satellite DNAs) are only partially included. Therefore, to fill these gaps and to gain information about the repeat composition of centromeres and heterochromatic regions, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq) using antibodies against the centromere-specific histone H3 variant of sugar beet (CenH3) and the heterochromatic mark of dimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me2). ChIP-Seq analysis revealed that active centromeres containing CenH3 consist of the satellite pBV and the Ty3-gypsy retrotransposon Beetle7, while heterochromatin marked by H3K9me2 exhibits heterogeneity in repeat composition. H3K9me2 was mainly associated with the satellite family pEV, the Ty1-copia retrotransposon family Cotzilla and the DNA transposon superfamily of the En/Spm type. In members of the section Beta within the genus Beta, immunostaining using the CenH3 antibody was successful, indicating that orthologous CenH3 proteins are present in closely related species within this section. The identification of repetitive genome portions by ChIP-Seq experiments complemented the sugar beet reference sequence by providing insights into the repeat composition of poorly characterized CenH3-chromatin and H3K9me2-heterochromatin. Therefore, our work provides the basis for future research and application concerning the sugar beet centromere and repeat-rich heterochromatic regions characterized by the presence of H3K9me2.

  2. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TAL effectors (TALEs contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE.

  3. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hua; Chang, Shan; Hu, Jian-ping; Tian, Xu-hong

    2016-01-01

    TAL effectors (TALEs) contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE. PMID:27803930

  4. In the Staphylococcus aureus Two-Component System sae, the Response Regulator SaeR Binds to a Direct Repeat Sequence and DNA Binding Requires Phosphorylation by the Sensor Kinase SaeS ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length Sae...

  5. Species-genomic relationships among the tribasic diploid and polyploid Carthamus taxa based on physical mapping of active and inactive 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA gene families, and the two tandemly repeated DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Renuka; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Tandon, Rajesh; Rao, Satyawada Rama; Raina, Soom Nath

    2013-05-25

    In the genus Carthamus (2n=20, 22, 24, 44, 64; x=10, 11, 12), most of the homologues within and between the chromosome complements are difficult to be identified. In the present work, we used fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) to determine the chromosome distribution of the two rRNA gene families, and the two isolated repeated DNA sequences in the 14 Carthamus taxa. The distinctive variability in the distribution, number and signal intensity of hybridisation sites for 18S-26S and 5S rDNA loci could generally distinguish the 14 Carthamus taxa. Active 18S-26S rDNA sites were generally associated with NOR loci on the nucleolar chromosomes. The two A genome taxa, C. glaucus ssp. anatolicus and C. boissieri with 2n=20, and the two botanical varieties of B genome C. tinctorius (2n=24) had diagnostic FISH patterns. The present results support the origin of C. tinctorius from C. palaestinus. FISH patterns of C. arborescens vis-à-vis the other taxa indicate a clear division of Carthamus taxa into two distinct lineages. Comparative distribution and intensity pattern of 18S-26S rDNA sites could distinguish each of the tetraploid and hexaploid taxa. The present results indicate that C. boissieri (2n=20) is one of the genome donors for C. lanatus and C. lanatus ssp. lanatus (2n=44), and C. lanatus is one of the progenitors for the hexaploid (2n=64) taxa. The association of pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence with rRNA gene cluster (orphon) in 2-10 nucleolar and non-nucleolar chromosomes and the consistent occurrence of pCtKpnI-1 repeated sequence at the subtelomeric region in all the taxa analysed indicate some functional role of these sequences.

  6. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiji eNageshwaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasised following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA in 1991. In this review we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases.

  7. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  8. The excess of small inverted repeats in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2008-09-01

    Recent analyses have shown that there is a large excess of perfect inverted repeats in many prokaryotic genomes but not in eukaryotic ones. This difference could be due to a genuine difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes or to differences in the methods and types of data analyzed--full genome versus protein coding sequences. We used simulations to show that the method used previously tends to underestimate the expected number of inverted repeats. However, this bias is not large and cannot explain the excess of inverted repeats observed in real data. In contrast, our method is unbiased. When both methods are applied to bacterial protein coding sequences they both detect an excess of inverted repeats, which is much lower than previously reported in whole prokaryotic genomes. This suggests that the reported large excess of inverted repeats is due to repeats found in intergenic regions. These repeats could be due to transcription factor binding sites, or other types of repetitive DNA, on opposite strands of the DNA sequence. In contrast, the smaller, but significant, excess of inverted repeats that we report in protein coding sequences may be due to sequence-directed mutagenesis (SDM). SDM is a process where one copy of a small, imperfect, inverted repeat corrects the other copy via strand misalignment, resulting in a perfect repeat and a series of mutations. We show by simulation that even very low levels of SDM, relative to the rate of point mutation, can generate a substantial excess of inverted repeats.

  9. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  10. Robust Satellite Communications Under Hostile Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Gaussian Noise BER Bit Error Rate BLER Block Error Rate BPSK Binary Phase Shift Keying CODEC Coder and Decoder CRC Cyclic Redundancy Check dB...Satellite Communication SNR Signal to Noise Ratio STK Systems Took Kit TDRS Tracking and Data Relay Satellite Toff Idle Time of a Transmitter Ton...Received Signal-to- Noise Ratio at the Jammer ...................................................... 15  3.2.2  SNR Threshold for Repeating the Signal

  11. Selective binding of specific mouse genomic DNA fragments by mouse vimentin filaments in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Tolstonog, G; Shoeman, R L; Traub, P

    1996-03-01

    Mouse vimentin intermediate filaments (IFs) reconstituted in vitro were analyzed for their capacity to select certain DNA sequences from a mixture of about 500-bp-long fragments of total mouse genomic DNA. The fragments preferentially bound by the IFs and enriched by several cycles of affinity binding and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification were cloned and sequenced. In general, they were G-rich and highly repetitive in that they often contained Gn, (GT)n, and (GA)n repeat elements. Other, more complex repeat sequences were identified as well. Apart from the capacity to adopt a Z-DNA and triple helix configuration under superhelical tension, many fragments were potentially able to form cruciform structures and contained consensus binding sites for various transcription factors. All of these sequence elements are known to occur in introns and 5'/3'-flanking regions of genes and to play roles in DNA transcription, recombination and replication. A FASTA search of the EMBL data bank indeed revealed that sequences homologous to the mouse repetitive DNA fragments are commonly associated with gene-regulatory elements. Unexpectedly, vimentin IFs also bound a large number of apparently overlapping, AT-rich DNA fragments that could be aligned into a composite sequence highly homologous to the 234-bp consensus centromere repeat sequence of gamma-satellite DNA. Previous experiments have shown a high affinity of vimentin for G-rich, repetitive telomere DNA sequences, superhelical DNA, and core histones. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that, after penetration of the double nuclear membrane via an as yet unidentified mechanism, vimentin IFs cooperatively fix repetitive DNA sequence elements in a differentiation-specific manner in the nuclear periphery subjacent to the nuclear lamina and thus participate in the organization of chromatin and in the control of transcription, replication, and recombination processes. This includes aspects of global

  12. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  13. Instability of trinucleotidic repeats during chromatin remodeling in spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Olivier; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Arguin, Mélina; Brazeau, Marc-André; Leduc, Frédéric; Marois, Isabelle; Richter, Martin V; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2014-11-01

    Transient DNA breaks and evidence of DNA damage response have recently been reported during the chromatin remodeling process in haploid spermatids, creating a potential window of enhanced genetic instability. We used flow cytometry to achieve separation of differentiating spermatids into four highly purified populations using transgenic mice harboring 160 CAG repeats within exon 1 of the human Huntington disease gene (HTT). Trinucleotic repeat expansion was found to occur immediately following the chromatin remodeling steps, confirming the genetic instability of the process and pointing to the origin of paternal anticipation observed in some trinucleotidic repeats diseases.

  14. Karyotype Analysis of Allium cepa L. by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization with Satellite DNA%洋葱染色体核型的FISH分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵泓; O.Schrader; R.Ahne

    2003-01-01

    挑选洋葱(Allium cepa L.)(2n=2x=16,CC)有丝分裂中期细胞,以洋葱卫星DNA序列(AC-SAT-DNA)为探针,DIG-11-dUTP为标记物,用荧光原位杂交(FISH)方法观察其在染色体上的定位,并进行洋葱的核型分析.6号染色体为近端部着丝点染色体,在其长臂末端有一个卫星DNA序列的主要位点.其余每条染色体在其长、短臂的末端都各具有一个主要位点.差异表现在各染色体上卫星DNA序列的次要位点分布不同.根据洋葱8对染色体各自具有的独特的卫星DNA分布位点,可将洋葱8对染色体全部分开.以此为基础,构建了洋葱卫星DNA在染色体上分布的模式图.

  15. The Ecological Genomics of Fungi: Repeated Elements in Filamentous Fungi with a Focus on Wood-Decay Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Payen, Thibaut [INRA, Nancy, France; Petitpierre, Denis [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the genome of several dozen filamentous fungi have been sequenced. Interestingly, vast diversity in genome size was observed (Fig. 2.1) with 14-fold differences between the 9 Mb of the human pathogenic dandruff fungus (Malassezia globosa; Xu, Saunders, et al., 2007) and the 125 Mb of the ectomycorrhizal black truffle of P rigord (Tuber melanosporum; Martin, Kohler, et al., 2010). Recently, Raffaele and Kamoun (2012) highlighted that the genomes of several lineages of filamentous plant pathogens have been shaped by repeat-driven expansion. Indeed, repeated elements are ubiquitous in all prokaryote and eukaryote genomes; however, their frequencies can vary from just a minor percentage of the genome to more that 60 percent of the genome. Repeated elements can be classified in two major types: satellites DNA and transposable elements. In this chapter, the different types of repeated elements and how these elements can impact genome and gene repertoire will be described. Also, an intriguing link between the transposable elements richness and diversity and the ecological niche will be highlighted.

  16. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  17. Geosat Exact Repeat Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) (NODC Accession 0061150)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains waveform data records (WDRs) from the US Navy Geodetic Satellite (GEOSAT) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of November 08,...

  18. Automated Extraction of DNA from clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Nøhr Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing...... the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable DNA profiles....

  19. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  20. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  1. Oxidative Damage to Nucleic Acids and Benzo(apyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-DNA Adducts and Chromosomal Aberration in Children with Psoriasis Repeatedly Exposed to Crude Coal Tar Ointment and UV Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Borska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a prospective cohort study. Observed group was formed of children with plaque psoriasis (n=19 treated by Goeckerman therapy (GT. The study describes adverse (side effects associated with application of GT (combined exposure of 3% crude coal tar ointment and UV radiation. After GT we found significantly increased markers of oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 8-hydroxyguanosine, and 8-hydroxyguanine, significantly increased levels of benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE DNA adducts (BPDE-DNA, and significantly increased levels of total number of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes. We found significant relationship between (1 time of UV exposure and total number of aberrated cells and (2 daily topical application of 3% crude coal tar ointment (% of body surface and level of BPDE-DNA adducts. The findings indicated increased hazard of oxidative stress and genotoxic effects related to the treatment. However, it must be noted that the oxidized guanine species and BPDE-DNA adducts also reflect individual variations in metabolic enzyme activity (different extent of bioactivation of benzo[a]pyrene to BPDE and overall efficiency of DNA/RNA repair system. The study confirmed good effectiveness of the GT (significantly decreased PASI score.

  2. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  3. Forensic DNA Profiling and Database

    OpenAIRE

    Panneerchelvam, S.; Norazmi, M. N.

    2003-01-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  4. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  5. Automated Extraction of DNA from clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Nøhr Hansen, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing t...... the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable DNA profiles.......Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing...

  6. Geostationary Satellite (GOES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from radiometer instruments on SMS (ATS) and GOES satellites in geostationary orbit. These satellites produced...

  7. Polymorphic DNA sequences and their application in paternity testing; Polimorficzne sekwencje DNA i ich zastosowanie w dochodzeniu spornego ojcostwa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slomski, R. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Zaklad Genetyki Czlowieka]|[Akademia Rolnicza, Poznan (Poland)]|[Laboratorium Genetyki Molekularnej, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska, J.; Chlebowska, H. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Zaklad Genetyki Czlowieka; Siemieniallo, B. [Akademia Rolnicza, Poznan (Poland); Slomska, M. [Laboratorium Genetyki Molekularnej, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Characteristics of polymorphic sequences of DNA, especially satellite, mini satellite and micro satellite sequences are presented. Own experience from the use of multi and single locus analysis of DNA in paternity testing has been compared with the results of research in other laboratories. Critical points of both types of analysis are discussed. (author). 53 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs.

  8. Neptune's small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P.

    1992-04-01

    The small satellites of Neptune and other planets discovered during the Voyager 2 mission are discussed in terms of their composition and relationship to the planetary systems. The satellite Proteus is described in terms of its orbit, five other satellites are described, and they are compared to ther small satellites and systems. Neptune's satellites are hypothesized to be related to the ring system, and the satellite Galatea is related to the confinement of the rings.

  9. Global repeat discovery and estimation of genomic copy number in a large, complex genome using a high-throughput 454 sequence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varala Kranthi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive computational and database tools are available to mine genomic and genetic databases for model organisms, but little genomic data is available for many species of ecological or agricultural significance, especially those with large genomes. Genome surveys using conventional sequencing techniques are powerful, particularly for detecting sequences present in many copies per genome. However these methods are time-consuming and have potential drawbacks. High throughput 454 sequencing provides an alternative method by which much information can be gained quickly and cheaply from high-coverage surveys of genomic DNA. Results We sequenced 78 million base-pairs of randomly sheared soybean DNA which passed our quality criteria. Computational analysis of the survey sequences provided global information on the abundant repetitive sequences in soybean. The sequence was used to determine the copy number across regions of large genomic clones or contigs and discover higher-order structures within satellite repeats. We have created an annotated, online database of sequences present in multiple copies in the soybean genome. The low bias of pyrosequencing against repeat sequences is demonstrated by the overall composition of the survey data, which matches well with past estimates of repetitive DNA content obtained by DNA re-association kinetics (Cot analysis. Conclusion This approach provides a potential aid to conventional or shotgun genome assembly, by allowing rapid assessment of copy number in any clone or clone-end sequence. In addition, we show that partial sequencing can provide access to partial protein-coding sequences.

  10. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  11. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teraporn Vutyavanich; Worashorn Lattiwongsakorn; Waraporn Piromlertamorn; Sudarat Samchimchom

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing.Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots:non-frozen,rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing.Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<O.01) after the first,second and third cycles of freezing/thawing,but there was no difference in morphology.In the second experiment,rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects.The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay.DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing,but to a level that was not clinically important.In the third experiment,rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects,until no motile sperm were observed after thawing.The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range:5-8,mean:6.8).In conclusion,we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing.This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology.

  12. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite measurements should not be viewed as a replacement for stream gauges. However, occasionally it is suggested that because satellite-based measurements can provide river discharge, a motivation for satellite approaches is an increasing lack of stream gauges. This is an argument for more stream gauges, but not necessarily for satellite measurements. Rather, in-situ and spaceborne methods of estimating discharge are complementary. Stream gauges provide frequent measurements at one point in the river reach whereas satellites have the potential to measure throughout all reaches but at orbital repeat intervals of days to weeks. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT) is an opportunity to further develop these complements. The motivation for SWOT, and indeed for any satellite based method of estimating discharge, should not be as a replacement for stream gauges. Scientific and application uses should motivate the measurements. For example, understanding floods with their dynamic water surfaces are best sampled from remote platforms that provide water surface elevations throughout the floodwave. As another example, today’s water and energy balance models are giving outputs at increasing spatial resolution and are making use of water surface elevations throughout the modeled basin. These models require a similar resolution in the calibrating and validating observations. We should also be aware of practical limitations. In addition to providing spatially distributed hydrodynamic measurements on rivers, SWOT will be able to measure storage changes in the estimated 30 million lakes in the world that are larger than a hectare. Knowing the storage changes in these lakes is especially important in certain regions such as the Arctic but gauging even a small fraction of these is impractical. Another motivator for satellite methods is that even in the presence of stream gauges, discharge data is not always well shared throughout all countries

  13. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  14. Suiformes orthologous satellite DNAs as a hallmark of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari (Tayassuidae) evolutionary rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2008-12-01

    In a broad general way, eukaryotic satellite DNA sequences are characterized by a highly dynamic molecular behavior due to concerted evolution that leads to rapid change between repeat sequences of different species, achieved by amplification of new variants during speciation or by gradual sequence evolution due to the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions. There are, although exceptions for this almost universal rule. We isolated variants from both the Mc1 and Ac2 pig (Sus scrofa, Suidae) satellite DNA families from the genomes of two Tayassuidae members: Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari, which have highly derived karyotypes. The presence of these sequences in both families' genomes (Suidae and Tayassuidae) implies their existence in a common ancestor, what confers to the variants the status of orthology and the approximate age of, at least 40 million years. While at the molecular composition level these orthologous sequences are highly homologous, cross-species physical mapping revealed a completely different chromosomal location in Suidae versus Tayassuidae families, most probably, reflecting the high level of divergence and chromosomes evolution pathways after radiation of each family. Detailed comparative analysis of the satellites assignment on the peccary's chromosomes revealed its co-localization with homologous evolutionary breakpoints in both species, suggesting their involvement in the rearrangement events. The complex behavior of the repeats evolution in the pig/peccaries genomes is here clearly illustrated. These sequences are molecularly preserved for a considerable period of time and display slow rates of sequence change, but show a dynamic motion behavior throughout the peccary's genomes that accompanied the great architectonic reorganization of Tayassuidae chromosomes during evolution.

  15. Molecular cytogenetics studies in Reichardia tingetana: Physical mapping of heterochromatin, telomere repeats, and 5S and 45S rDNA by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdy Hussein ABD EL-TWAB

    2012-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetics studies of A-T-rich regions,telomeres,and 5S and 45S rDNA sites on the chromosomes of Reichardia tingetana Roth (2n =16; diploid) were done using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).The species were collected from three geographically isolated populations at Borg El Arab (salt marsh habitat),and Rashed and Shosha (sandy clay habitats) in Egypt.The three populations showed the chromosome number of all plants are diploid except for two tetraploid samples from Shosha.Plants from both Rashed and Shosha showed similarity in the distribution of six DAPI bands on six chromosomes,whereas those of Borg El Arab showed a distribution of 16 bands on 14 chromosomes.The FISH signals of the telomeres,and 5S and 45S rDNA,were at the telomeres of all chromosomes,two interstitial,and four terminal,respectively.The combination of DAPI and FISH showed colocalization of the DAPI bands with two 5S and two 45S rDNA loci.The increased number of DAPI bands in the cytotypes from the salt marsh habitat could indicate natural genetic adaptation through increasing the heterochromatin of A-T-rich regions.

  16. A new spin on disks of satellite galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S; Sawala, Till

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the angular and kinematic distributions of satellite galaxies around a large sample of bright isolated primaries in the spectroscopic and photometric catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We detect significant anisotropy in the spatial distribution of satellites. To test whether this anisotropy could be related to the rotating disks of satellites recently found by Ibata et al. in a sample of SDSS galaxies, we repeat and extend their analysis. Ibata et al. found an excess of satellites on opposite sides of their primaries having anticorrelated radial velocities. We find that this excess is sensitive to small changes in the sample selection criteria which can greatly reduce its significance. In addition, we find no evidence for correspondingly correlated velocities for satellites observed on the same side of their primaries, which would be expected for rotating disks of satellites. We conclude that the detection of coherent rotation in the satellite population in current observationa...

  17. PCR-free digital minisatellite tandem repeat genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuchao; Seo, Tae Seok

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrated a proof-of-concept for novel minisatellite tandem repeat typing, called PCR-free digital VNTR (variable number tandem repeat) typing, which is composed of three steps: a ligation reaction instead of PCR thermal cycling, magnetic bead-based solid-phase capture for purification, and an elongated sample stacking microcapillary electrophoresis (μCE) for sensitive digital coding of repeat number. We designed a 16-bp fluorescently labeled ligation probe which is complementary to a repeat unit of a biotinylated synthetic template mimicking the human D1S80 VNTR locus and is randomly hybridized with the minisatellite tandem repeats. A quick isothermal ligation reaction was followed to link the adjacent ligation probes on the DNA templates, and then the ligated products were purified by streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. After a denaturing step, a large amount of ligated products whose size difference was equivalent to the repeat unit were released and recovered. Through the elongated sample stacking μCE separation on a microdevice, the fluorescence signal of the ligated products was generated in the electropherogram and the peak number was directly counted which was exactly matched with the repeat number of VNTR locus. We could successfully identify the minisatellite tandem repeat number with only 5 fmol of DNA template in 30 min.

  18. REPdenovo: Inferring De Novo Repeat Motifs from Short Sequence Reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chu

    Full Text Available Repeat elements are important components of eukaryotic genomes. One limitation in our understanding of repeat elements is that most analyses rely on reference genomes that are incomplete and often contain missing data in highly repetitive regions that are difficult to assemble. To overcome this problem we develop a new method, REPdenovo, which assembles repeat sequences directly from raw shotgun sequencing data. REPdenovo can construct various types of repeats that are highly repetitive and have low sequence divergence within copies. We show that REPdenovo is substantially better than existing methods both in terms of the number and the completeness of the repeat sequences that it recovers. The key advantage of REPdenovo is that it can reconstruct long repeats from sequence reads. We apply the method to human data and discover a number of potentially new repeats sequences that have been missed by previous repeat annotations. Many of these sequences are incorporated into various parasite genomes, possibly because the filtering process for host DNA involved in the sequencing of the parasite genomes failed to exclude the host derived repeat sequences. REPdenovo is a new powerful computational tool for annotating genomes and for addressing questions regarding the evolution of repeat families. The software tool, REPdenovo, is available for download at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/REPdenovo.

  19. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  20. Histone deacetylase complexes promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Debacker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of DNA trinucleotide repeats cause at least 17 inherited neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease. Expansions can occur at frequencies approaching 100% in affected families and in transgenic mice, suggesting that specific cellular proteins actively promote (favor expansions. The inference is that expansions arise due to the presence of these promoting proteins, not their absence, and that interfering with these proteins can suppress expansions. The goal of this study was to identify novel factors that promote expansions. We discovered that specific histone deacetylase complexes (HDACs promote CTG•CAG repeat expansions in budding yeast and human cells. Mutation or inhibition of yeast Rpd3L or Hda1 suppressed up to 90% of expansions. In cultured human astrocytes, expansions were suppressed by 75% upon inhibition or knockdown of HDAC3, whereas siRNA against the histone acetyltransferases CBP/p300 stimulated expansions. Genetic and molecular analysis both indicated that HDACs act at a distance from the triplet repeat to promote expansions. Expansion assays with nuclease mutants indicated that Sae2 is one of the relevant factors regulated by Rpd3L and Hda1. The causal relationship between HDACs and expansions indicates that HDACs can promote mutagenesis at some DNA sequences. This relationship further implies that HDAC3 inhibitors being tested for relief of expansion-associated gene silencing may also suppress somatic expansions that contribute to disease progression.

  1. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  2. Advanced satellite communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  3. Zinc-finger directed double-strand breaks within CAG repeat tracts promote repeat instability in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, David; Moye, Christopher; Morton, Jason; Sykoudis, Kristen; Lin, Yunfu; Carroll, Dana; Wilson, John H

    2009-06-16

    Expanded triplet repeats have been identified as the genetic basis for a growing number of neurological and skeletal disorders. To examine the contribution of double-strand break repair to CAG x CTG repeat instability in mammalian systems, we developed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that recognize and cleave CAG repeat sequences. Engineered ZFNs use a tandem array of zinc fingers, fused to the FokI DNA cleavage domain, to direct double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a site-specific manner. We first determined that the ZFNs cleave CAG repeats in vitro. Then, using our previously described tissue culture assay for identifying modifiers of CAG repeat instability, we found that transfection of ZFN-expression vectors induced up to a 15-fold increase in changes to the CAG repeat in human and rodent cell lines, and that longer repeats were much more sensitive to cleavage than shorter ones. Analysis of individual colonies arising after treatment revealed a spectrum of events consistent with ZFN-induced DSBs and dominated by repeat contractions. We also found that expressing a dominant-negative form of RAD51 in combination with a ZFN, dramatically reduced the effect of the nuclease, suggesting that DSB-induced repeat instability is mediated, in part, through homology directed repair. These studies identify a ZFN as a useful reagent for characterizing the effects of DSBs on CAG repeats in cells.

  4. Satellite data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bormin

    2011-01-01

    Satellite Data Compression covers recent progress in compression techniques for multispectral, hyperspectral and ultra spectral data. A survey of recent advances in the fields of satellite communications, remote sensing and geographical information systems is included. Satellite Data Compression, contributed by leaders in this field, is the first book available on satellite data compression. It covers onboard compression methodology and hardware developments in several space agencies. Case studies are presented on recent advances in satellite data compression techniques via various prediction-

  5. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  6. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    and colleagues shows that also physiological threats to genome integrity such as DNA secondary structure-forming triplet repeat sequences relocalize to the NPC during DNA replication. Mutants that fail to reposition the triplet repeat locus to the NPC cause repeat instability. Here, we review the types of DNA...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  7. DNA Microarray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakare SP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray is the emerging technique in Biotechnology. The many varieties of DNA microarray or DNA chip devices and systems are described along with their methods for fabrication and their use. It also includes screening and diagnostic applications. The DNA microarray hybridization applications include the important areas of gene expression analysis and genotyping for point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and short tandem repeats (STRs. In addition to the many molecular biological and genomic research uses, this review covers applications of microarray devices and systems for pharmacogenomic research and drug discovery, infectious and genetic disease and cancer diagnostics, and forensic and genetic identification purposes.

  8. The CRISPRdb database and tools to display CRISPRs and to generate dictionaries of spacers and repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Vergnaud Gilles; Grissa Ibtissem; Pourcel Christine

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In Archeae and Bacteria, the repeated elements called CRISPRs for "clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats" are believed to participate in the defence against viruses. Short sequences called spacers are stored in-between repeated elements. In the current model, motifs comprising spacers and repeats may target an invading DNA and lead to its degradation through a proposed mechanism similar to RNA interference. Analysis of intra-species polymorphism shows t...

  9. The maternal nucleolus plays a key role in centromere satellite maintenance during the oocyte to embryo transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulka, Helena; Langerova, Alena

    2014-04-01

    The oocyte (maternal) nucleolus is essential for early embryonic development and embryos originating from enucleolated oocytes arrest at the 2-cell stage. The reason for this is unclear. Surprisingly, RNA polymerase I activity in nucleolus-less mouse embryos, as manifested by pre-rRNA synthesis, and pre-rRNA processing are not affected, indicating an unusual role of the nucleolus. We report here that the maternal nucleolus is indispensable for the regulation of major and minor satellite repeats soon after fertilisation. During the first embryonic cell cycle, absence of the nucleolus causes a significant reduction in major and minor satellite DNA by 12% and 18%, respectively. The expression of satellite transcripts is also affected, being reduced by more than half. Moreover, extensive chromosome bridging of the major and minor satellite sequences was observed during the first mitosis. Finally, we show that the absence of the maternal nucleolus alters S-phase dynamics and causes abnormal deposition of the H3.3 histone chaperone DAXX in pronuclei of nucleolus-less zygotes.

  10. Molecular biology of fuselloviruses and their satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contursi, Patrizia; Fusco, Salvatore; Cannio, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Fuselloviruses, also known as Sulfolobus Spindle-shaped viruses (SSVs), are "lemon"- or "spindle"-shaped double-stranded DNA viruses. Among them, SSV1, SSV2 and the satellite viruses pSSVx and pSSVi have been investigated at the structural, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical level...

  11. Xichang Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    Xichang Satellite Launch Center(XSLC) is mainly for geosynchronous orbit launches. The main purpose of XSLC is to launch spacecraft, such as broadcasting,communications and meteorological satellites, into geo-stationary orbit.Most of the commercial satellite launches of Long March vehicles have been from Xichang Satellite Launch Center. With 20 years' development,XSLC can launch 5 kinds of launch vehicles and send satellites into geostationary orbit and polar orbit. In the future, moon exploration satellites will also be launched from XSLC.

  12. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of this ground breaking reference work was the most comprehensive reference source available about the key aspects of the satellite applications field. This updated second edition covers the technology, the markets, applications and regulations related to satellite telecommunications, broadcasting and networking—including civilian and military systems; precise satellite navigation and timing networks (i.e. GPS and others); remote sensing and meteorological satellite systems. Created under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, this brand new edition is now expanded to cover new innovative small satellite constellations, new commercial launching systems, innovation in military application satellites and their acquisition, updated appendices, a useful glossary and more.

  13. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  14. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  15. Satellite-Delivered Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnall, Gail C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the application of satellite information delivery to training. Describes a new trend, horizontal programming. Also discusses vertical programming and in-house production of training materials. Lists vendors of satellite-based training. (CH)

  16. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  17. China's Recoverable Satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Boehang

    2008-01-01

    @@ By the end of 2006, China had launched 24 recoverable satellites (FSW) in total. Among them, 23 were launched successfully, of which all but one were successfully recovered. Recoverable satellites launched by China are listed in Table 1.

  18. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  19. Promoter-bound trinucleotide repeat mRNA drives epigenetic silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-02-28

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide-repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5' untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA.

  20. Satellite communication engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kolawole, Michael Olorunfunmi

    2013-01-01

    An undeniably rich and thorough guide to satellite communication engineering, Satellite Communication Engineering, Second Edition presents the fundamentals of information communications systems in a simple and succinct way. This book considers both the engineering aspects of satellite systems as well as the practical issues in the broad field of information transmission. Implementing concepts developed on an intuitive, physical basis and utilizing a combination of applications and performance curves, this book starts off with a progressive foundation in satellite technology, and then moves on

  1. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  2. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  3. Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    There are three major space launch bases in China, the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center,the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center and the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. All the three launch centers are located in sparsely populated areas where the terrain is even and the field of vision is broad. Security, transport conditions and the influence of the axial rotation

  4. Geodetic Secor Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    simple, and had low-power lem. 17 14. Satellite Orientation . The satellite was designed to maintain a constant relationship between the antenna...the same satellite orientation . Further considerations were Th oscillations, however, when higher orbital ranges (500-2500 nautical miles) -, 3 a

  5. TC-2 Satellite Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On April 18, 2005, TC-2, the second satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), which was jointly developed by CNSA and ESA, was approved to be delivered to the user after the on-board test and trial operation. The satellite is working well and the performance can meet the user's need. The satellite has collected large amount of valuable scientific data

  6. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  7. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  8. A Novel Algorithm for Finding Interspersed Repeat Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongdong Li; Zhengzhi Wang; Qingshan Ni

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of repeats in the DNA sequences is an important subject in bioinformatics. In this paper, we propose a novel projection-assemble algorithm to find unknown interspersed repeats in DNA sequences. The algorithm employs random projection algorithm to obtain a candidate fragment set, and exhaustive search algorithm to search each pair of fragments from the candidate fragment set to find potential linkage, and then assemble them together. The complexity of our projection-assemble algorithm is nearly linear to the length of the genome sequence, and its memory usage is limited by the hardware. We tested our algorithm with both simulated data and real biology data, and the results show that our projection-assemble algorithm is efficient. By means of this algorithm, we found an un-labeled repeat region that occurs five times in Escherichia coli genome, with its length more than 5,000 bp, and a mismatch probability less than 4%.

  9. A satellite explosion in the genome of holocentric nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Subirana

    Full Text Available Centromere sequences in the genome are associated with the formation of kinetochores, where spindle microtubules grow in mitosis. Centromere sequences usually have long tandem repeats (satellites. In holocentric nematodes it is not clear how kinetochores are formed during mitosis; they are distributed throughout the chromosomes. For this reason it appeared of interest to study the satellites in nematodes in order to determine if they offer any clue on how kinetochores are assembled in these species. We have studied the satellites in the genome of six nematode species. We found that the presence of satellites depends on whether the nematode chromosomes are holocentric or monocentric. It turns out that holocentric nematodes are unique because they have a large number of satellites scattered throughout their genome. Their number, length and composition are different in each species: they apparently have very little evolutionary conservation. In contrast, no scattered satellites are found in the monocentric nematode Trichinella spiralis. It appears that the absence/presence of scattered satellites in the genome distinguishes monocentric from holocentric nematodes. We conclude that the presence of satellites is related to the holocentric nature of the chromosomes of most nematodes. Satellites may stabilize a higher order structure of chromatin and facilitate the formation of kinetochores. We also present a new program, SATFIND, which is suited to find satellite sequences.

  10. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  11. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  12. Role of the DNA methyltransferase variant DNMT3b3 in DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Daniel J; Velicescu, Mihaela; Cheng, Jonathan C; Gonzales, Felicidad A; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Several alternatively spliced variants of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3b have been described. Here, we identified new murine Dnmt3b mRNA isoforms and found that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells expressed only Dnmt3b transcripts that contained exons 10 and 11, whereas the Dnmt3b transcripts in somatic cells lacked these exons, suggesting that this region is important for embryonic development. DNMT3b2 and 3b3 were the major isoforms expressed in human cell lines and the mRNA levels of these isoforms closely correlated with their protein levels. Although DNMT3b3 may be catalytically inactive, it still may be biologically important because D4Z4 and satellites 2 and 3 repeat sequences, all known DNMT3b target sequences, were methylated in cells that predominantly expressed DNMT3b3. Treatment of cells with the mechanism-based inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) caused a complete depletion of DNMT1, 3a, 3b1, and 3b2 proteins. Human DNMT3b3 and the murine Dnmt3b3-like isoform, Dnmt3b6, were also depleted although less efficiently, suggesting that DNMT3b3 also may be capable of DNA binding. Moreover, de novo methylation of D4Z4 in T24 cancer cells after 5-Aza-CdR treatment only occurred when DNMT3b3 was expressed, reinforcing its role as a contributing factor of DNA methylation. The expression of either DNMT3b2 or 3b3, however, was not sufficient to explain the abnormal methylation of DNMT3b target sequences in human cancers, which may therefore be dependent on factors that affect DNMT3b targeting. Methylation analyses of immunodeficiency, chromosomal instabilities, and facial abnormalities cells revealed that an Alu repeat sequence was highly methylated, suggesting that Alu sequences are not DNMT3b targets.

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  14. Meteorological satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Su-Yin

    2014-01-01

    “Meteorological Satellite Systems” is a primer on weather satellites and their Earth applications. This book reviews historic developments and recent technological advancements in GEO and polar orbiting meteorological satellites. It explores the evolution of these remote sensing technologies and their capabilities to monitor short- and long-term changes in weather patterns in response to climate change. Satellites developed by various countries, such as U.S. meteorological satellites, EUMETSAT, and Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Indian satellite platforms are reviewed. This book also discusses international efforts to coordinate meteorological remote sensing data collection and sharing. This title provides a ready and quick reference for information about meteorological satellites. It serves as a useful tool for a broad audience that includes students, academics, private consultants, engineers, scientists, and teachers.

  15. Theory of geostationary satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Zee, Chong-Hung

    1989-01-01

    Geostationary or equatorial synchronous satellites are a daily reminder of our space efforts during the past two decades. The nightly television satellite weather picture, the intercontinental telecommunications of television transmissions and telephone conversations, and the establishrnent of educational programs in remote regions on Earth are constant reminders of the presence of these satellites. As used here, the term 'geo­ stationary' must be taken loosely because, in the long run, the satellites will not remain 'stationary' with respect to an Earth-fixed reference frame. This results from the fact that these satellites, as is true for all satellites, are incessantly subject to perturbations other than the central-body attraction of the Earth. Among the more predominant pertur­ bations are: the ellipticity of the Earth's equator, the Sun and Moon, and solar radiation pressure. Higher harmonics of the Earth's potential and tidal effects also influence satellite motion, but they are of second­ order whe...

  16. [Loop organization of eukaryotic chromosomes and triple-stranded DNA structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, M V

    2011-01-01

    To study possible involvement of polypurine and polypyrimidine DNA tracks potentially capable to form triple-stranded structures (H-form of DNA) in compactization of eukaryotic chromosomes a search in silico for "complementary" polypurine and polypyrimidine tracks within 12 eukaryotic gene nucleotide sequences was carried out. Polypurine and polypyrimidine tracks (10-11 b.p.) potentially capable of interacting with each other with the formation of triplex structures ("structurizing" regions) has been shown to be located in chromosomal locus of genes, predominantly in introns and flanking regions. In the case of in vivo realization of such DNA-DNA interactions the chromosomal gene domains can be folded into several small loops. An involvement of DNA triplexes in the chromosomal gene loci compactization may be associated with the gene functioning. The analogous analysis carried out for nucleotide sequences of long (LINE) and short (SINE) repeats dispersed over the genome as well as of satellite DNA has demonstrated a fundamental identity between mechanisms of chromosomal encoding and non-coding regions' compactization.

  17. The Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT): Analyzing the structure and evolution of the C. elegans genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.; States, D.J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Over 3.6 million bases of DNA sequence from chromosome III of the C. elegans have been determined. The availability of this extended region of contiguous sequence has allowed us to analyze the nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences in the genome of a eukaryotic organism with a high gene density. We have assembled a Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT) to analyze the patterns of repeats occurring in DNA. The tools include identifying significant local alignments (utilizing both two-way and three-way alignments), dividing the set of alignments into connected components (signifying repeat families), computing evolutionary distance between repeat family members, constructing minimum spanning trees from the connected components, and visualizing the evolution of the repeat families. Over 7000 families of repetitive sequences were identified. The size of the families ranged from isolated pairs to over 1600 segments of similar sequence. Approximately 12.3% of the analyzed sequence participates in a repeat element.

  18. Automated extraction of DNA from clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Nøhr Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing t...

  19. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  20. Analysis of tandem repeats in the genome of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Jie; GAO Huan

    2005-01-01

    Through random sequencing, we found a total of 884000 base-pairs (bp) of random genomic sequences in the genome of Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis). Using bio-soft Tandem Repeat Finder (TRF) software, 2159 tandem repeats were found, in which there were 1714 microsatellites and 445 minisatellites, accounting for 79.4% and 20.6% of repeat sequences, respectively. The cumulative length of repeat sequences was found to be 116685 bp, accounting for 13.2% of the total DNA sequence; the cumulative length of microsatellites occupied 9.78% of the total DNA sequence, and that of minisatellites occupied 3.42%. In decreasing order, the 20 most abundant repeat sequence classes were as follows: AT (557), AC (471), AG (274), AAT (92), A (56), AAG (28), ATC (27), ATAG (27), AGG (18), ACT (15), C (11), AAC (11), ACAT (11), CAGA (10), AGAA (9), AGGG (7), CAAA (7), CGCA (6), ATAA (6), AGAGAA (6). Dinucleotide repeats, not only in the aspect of the number, but also in cumulative length, were the preponderant repeat type. There were few classes and low copy numbers of repeat units of the pentanucleotide repeat type, which included only three classes: AGAGA, GAGGC and AAAGA. The classes and copy numbers of heptanucleotide, eleven-nucleotide and thirteen-nucleotide primer-number-composed repeats were distinctly less than that of repeat types beside them.

  1. Systematic exchanges between nucleotides: Genomic swinger repeats and swinger transcription in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-11-07

    Chargaff׳s second parity rule, quasi-equal single strand frequencies for complementary nucleotides, presumably results from insertion of repeats and inverted repeats during sequence genesis. Vertebrate mitogenomes escape this rule because repeats are counterselected: their hybridization produces loop bulges whose deletion is deleterious. Some DNA/RNA sequences match mitogenomes only after assuming one among 23 systematic nucleotide exchanges (swinger DNA/RNA: nine symmetric, e.g. A ↔ C; and 14 asymmetric, e.g. A → C → G → A). Swinger-transformed repeats do not hybridize, escaping selection against deletions due to bulge formation. Blast analyses of the human mitogenome detect swinger repeats for all 23 swinger types, more than in randomized sequences with identical length and nucleotide contents. Mean genomic swinger repeat lengths increase with observed human swinger RNA frequencies: swinger repeat and swinger RNA productions appear linked, perhaps by swinger RNA retrotranscription. Mean swinger repeat lengths are proportional to reading frame retrievability, post-swinger transformation, by the natural circular code. Genomic swinger repeats confirm at genomic level, independently of swinger RNA detection, occurrence of swinger polymerizations. They suggest that repeats, and swinger repeats in particular, contribute to genome genesis.

  2. Instability of human TATA-binding protein CAG triplet repeats during amplification by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, F C; van der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    1994-09-13

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of a TATA-binding protein cDNA that contains CAG triplet repeats results in heterogeneous products. This is caused by a variable loss in the number of CAG triplets. Sequence analysis of PCR products suggests that instability increases with repeat length.

  3. Mobile satellite communications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Cochetti, Roger

    2014-01-01

    With a Preface by noted satellite scientist Dr. Ahmad Ghais, the Second Edition reflects the expanded user base for this technology by updating information on historic, current, and planned commercial and military satellite systems and by expanding sections that explain the technology for non-technical professionals.   The book begins with an introduction to satellite communications and goes on to provide an overview of the technologies involved in mobile satellite communications, providing basic introductions to RF Issues, power Issues, link issues and system issues. It describes

  4. Satellite communication antenna technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  5. Methods of satellite oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical basis for remote sensing measurements of climate and ocean dynamics is examined. Consideration is given to: the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere; scattering in the atmosphere; and satellite observations using visible light. Consideration is also given to: the theory of radio scatter from the sea; scatter of centimeter waves from the sea; and the theory of operation of synthetic aperture radars. Additional topics include: the coordinate systems of satellite orbits for oceanographic remote sensing applications; the operating features of the major U.S. satellite systems for viewing the ocean; and satellite altimetry.

  6. Chromosomal organization of simple sequence repeats in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas): (GGAT)4, (GT)7 and (TA)10 chromosome patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Bouilly; R. Chaves; A. Leitão; A. Benabdelmouna; H. Guedes-Pinto

    2008-08-01

    Chromosome identification is essential in oyster genomic research. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for the identification of oyster chromosomes. It has been used to locate satellite DNAs, telomeres or ribosomal DNA sequences. However, regarding chromosome identification, no study has been conducted with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). FISH was used to probe the physical organization of three particular SSRs, (GGAT)4, (GT)7 and (TA)10 onto metaphase chromosomes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Hybridization signals were observed in all the SSR probes, but the distribution and intensity of signals varied according to the oligonucleotide repeat. The intercalary, centromeric and telomeric bands were observed along the chromosomes, and for each particular repeat every chromosome pair presented a similar pattern, allowing karyotypic analysis with all the SSRs tested. Our study is the first in mollusks to show the application of SSR in situ hybridization for chromosome identification and karyotyping. This technique can be a useful tool for oyster comparative studies and to understand genome organization in different oyster taxa.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms of 9 non-combined of DNA index system short tandem repeat loci in Guangdong Han population%九个非DNA联合索引系统核心短串联重复序列基因座在广东汉族人群的遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晋湘; 薛天羽; 李海霞; 孙宏钰; 成建定

    2009-01-01

    目的 调查D7S3048等9个非DNA联合索引系统(combined of DNA index system,CODIS)指定的核心短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座在广东汉族人群的遗传多态性.方法 采用荧光标记复合扩增和毛细管电泳技术,对广东汉族500名无关个体的DNA进行9个STR基因座分型.结果 500名无关个体在D7S3048等9个非CODIS核心STR基因座共检出115个等位基因,160种基因型,各基因座杂合度为0.824~0.884,个人识别能力为0.925~0.969,多态信息总量为0.77~0.86,均符合Hardy-Weinberg平衡(P>0.05),9个STR基因座的累计个体识别力达1.00×10~(-13),三联体累计非父排除率为0.999989488,二联体累计非父排除率为0.873436.结论 D7S3048等9个STR基因座在个体识别及亲子鉴定中是一个高效的检测系统,在二联体亲子鉴定中可作为补充基因座满足疑难、单亲和突变案件的需求.%Objective To investigate the genetic polymorphisms and their forensic application of 9 non-combined of DNA index system (CODIS) short tandem repeat (STR) loci in Guangdong Han population. Methods DNA samples from 500 unrelated individuals were extracted and amplified with fluorescence labeled multiplex PCR system. PCR products were separated and genotyped with capillary electrophoresis. Results One hundred and fifteen alleles and 160 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci, respectively. The heterozygosity was 0. 824-0. 884, the discrimination power (DP) was 0. 925-0. 969 and the polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0. 77-0. 86, respectively. The distribution met the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The total discrimination power was 1.00×10~(-13), the combined probability of exclusion for trio-paternity testing was 0. 999989488. The combined probability of exclusion for duo-paternity testing was 0. 873436. Conclusion The 9 STR loci are powerful and reliable for personal identification and paternity testing. They can be used as supplementary loci

  8. Hammerhead-mediated processing of satellite pDo500 family transcripts from Dolichopoda cave crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, A A; Vazquez-Tello, A; Ferbeyre, G; Venanzetti, F; Bachmann, L; Paquin, B; Sbordoni, V; Cedergren, R

    2000-10-15

    This work reports the discovery and functional characterization of catalytically active hammerhead motifs within satellite DNA of the pDo500 family from several DOLICHOPODA: cave cricket species. We show that in vitro transcribed RNA of some members of this satellite DNA family do self-cleave in vitro. This self-cleavage activity is correlated with the efficient in vivo processing of long primary transcripts into monomer-sized RNA. The high sequence conservation of the satellite pDo500 DNA family among genetically isolated DOLICHOPODA: schiavazzii populations, as well as other DOLICHOPODA: species, along with the fact that satellite members are actively transcribed in vivo suggests that the hammerhead-encoding satellite transcripts are under selective pressure, perhaps because they fulfil an important physiological role or function. Remarkably, this is the third example of hammerhead ribozyme structures associated with transcribed repetitive DNA sequences from animals. The possibility that such an association may not be purely coincidental is discussed.

  9. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  10. ERROR-CONTROL CODING OF ADS-B MESSAGES FOR IRIDIUM SATELLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For modelling of ADS-B messages transmitting on the base of low-orbit satellite constellation Іrіdіum the model of a communication channel “Aircraft - Satellite - Ground Station” was built using MATLAB Sіmulіnk. This model allowed to investigate dependences of the Bit Error Rate on a type of  signal coding/decoding, ratio Eb/N0 and satellite repeater gain

  11. Paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in the sheep (Ovine aries)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xingbo; Chu, Mingxing; Li, Ning; Wu, Changxin

    2001-01-01

    Paternal inheritance of mitochondria DNA in sheep was discovered by examination of 152 sheep from 38 hybrid families for mtDNA D-loop polymorphisms using PCR-RFLP, amplification of repeated sequence...

  12. Repeated superovulation may affect mitochondrial functions of cumulus cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Juan-Ke; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Yin, Shen; Zhang, Cui-Lian; Ge, Zhao-Jia

    2016-10-04

    Controlled ovarian stimulation by exogenous gonadotrophins is a key procedure during the in vitro fertilization cycle to obtain a sufficient number of oocytes in humans. Previous studies demonstrated that repeated superovulation had deleterious effects on the ovaries. However, whether repeated superovulation adversely affects the mitochondrial functions of cumulus cells remains unclear. In this study, mice were divided into three groups: superovulation once (R1); superovulation three times (R3), and superovulation five times (R5). We evaluated the effects of repeated superovulation on mitochondrial DNA copies (mtDNA) and observed decreased mtDNA copies per cell with increasing number of superovulation cycles. Further, we investigated the DNA methylation status in exon 2 and the mRNA expression level of nuclear-encoded DNA polymerase gamma A (PolgA). The results showed that the DNA methylation levels of PolgA in R1 and R5 were slightly lower than in R3. Additionally, the altered DNA methylation in PolgA coincided with the changes in PolgA expression in cumulus cells. We also found that the mRNA expression of COX1, CYTB, ND2, and ND4 was altered by repeated superovulation in cumulus cells. Thus, repeated superovulation had adverse effects on mitochondrial function.

  13. Automated Detection of Trinucleotide Repeats in Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan; Tynan; Fenwick; Leon

    1997-12-01

    Background: The conventional method for diagnosis of fragile X syndrome has been amplification of the trinucleotide repeat region of the FMR-1 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analysis to detect full expansion and hypermethylation. "Stuttering" resulting from incomplete amplification is still observed in the PCR products despite the use of reagents that reduce the secondary structure of the GC-rich template. In addition, PCR products can be detected by autoradiography only after 1 to 2 days of exposure. By combination of a recently reported amplification protocol with fluorescence detection of PCR products in an automated DNA sequencer, the PCR protocol for amplification of trinucleotide repeats was simplified. This modified protocol is highly reproducible, more accurate, and less costly than the conventional protocol because of the elimination of radioisotopes from the PCR. Methods and Results: PCRs were conducted with betaine and Pfu DNA polymerase. This improved PCR protocol allowed immediate detection of PCR products in agarose gels containing ethidium bromide. Stuttering was completely eliminated and fragments of up to 1kb ( approximately 250 repeats) were visible in agarose gels. PCR products were automatically detected by laser fluorescence in an automated DNA sequencer by inclusion of a fluorescently-labeled primer in the PCR reaction. A short electrophoresis run of 100 minutes in denaturing acrylamide gels was sufficient to give high resolution of fragments with higher accuracy and sensitivity than conventional detection by autoradiography. Conclusions: A simple, nonradioactive protocol that is more rapid and less expensive than the conventional PCR protocol for the detection of trinucleotide repeats has been developed. By use of this detection protocol, fragment sizes containing up to 100 repeats could be detected, alleles differing by one trinucleotide repeat were clearly resolved, and heterogeneous repeat patterns such as those

  14. Introducing you to satellite operated data collection platforms (DCP).

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stavropoulos, CC

    1977-09-01

    Full Text Available using this form of repeater. However, satellites able to handle reports from data collection platform (DCP's) have hitherto only been experimental. Within the next two years the operational phase for this type of activity will have been reached...

  15. Satellites of spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Smith, Rodney; Frenk, Carlos; White, Simon D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present a survey of satellites around a homogeneous set of late-type spirals with luminosity similar to that of the Milky Way. On average, we find fewer than 1.5 satellites per primary, but we argue that we can treat the survey as an ensemble and so derive the properties of the halo of a 'typical' isolated spiral. The projected density profile of the ensemble falls off approximately as 1/r. Within 50 kpc the azimuthal distribution of satellites shows some evidence for the 'Holmberg effect', an excess near the minor axis of the primary; however, at larger projected distances, the distribution appears isotropic. There is a weak but significant correlation between the size of a satellite and its distance from its primary, as expected if satellites are tidally truncated. Neither Hubble type nor spectral characteristics correlate with apparent separation. The ensemble of satellites appears to be rotating at about 30 km/s in the same direction as the galactic disk. Satellites on prograde orbits tend to be brighter than those on retrograde orbits. The typical velocity difference between a satellite and its primary shows no clear dependence either on apparent separation, or on the rotation speed of the primary. Thus our survey demonstrates that isolated spiral galaxies have massive halos that extend to many optical radii.

  16. Communication satellite technology trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Louis

    1986-01-01

    A chronology of space-Earth interconnectivity is presented. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system, Land Mobile Satellite, space-Earth antennas, impact of antenna size on coverage, intersatellite links are outlined. This presentation is represented by graphs and charts only.

  17. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  18. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  19. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation dynamics during early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okae, Hiroaki; Chiba, Hatsune; Hiura, Hitoshi; Hamada, Hirotaka; Sato, Akiko; Utsunomiya, Takafumi; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Suyama, Mikita; Arima, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    DNA methylation is globally reprogrammed during mammalian preimplantation development, which is critical for normal development. Recent reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) studies suggest that the methylome dynamics are essentially conserved between human and mouse early embryos. RRBS is known to cover 5-10% of all genomic CpGs, favoring those contained within CpG-rich regions. To obtain an unbiased and more complete representation of the methylome during early human development, we performed whole genome bisulfite sequencing of human gametes and blastocysts that covered>70% of all genomic CpGs. We found that the maternal genome was demethylated to a much lesser extent in human blastocysts than in mouse blastocysts, which could contribute to an increased number of imprinted differentially methylated regions in the human genome. Global demethylation of the paternal genome was confirmed, but SINE-VNTR-Alu elements and some other tandem repeat-containing regions were found to be specifically protected from this global demethylation. Furthermore, centromeric satellite repeats were hypermethylated in human oocytes but not in mouse oocytes, which might be explained by differential expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases. These data highlight both conserved and species-specific regulation of DNA methylation during early mammalian development. Our work provides further information critical for understanding the epigenetic processes underlying differentiation and pluripotency during early human development.

  1. A Brief Review of Short Tandem Repeat Mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Fan; Jia-You Chu

    2007-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are short tandemly repeated DNA sequences that involve a repetitive unit of 1-6 bp. Because of their polymorphisms and high mutation rates, STRs are widely used in biological research. Strand-slippage replication is the predominant mutation mechanism of STRs, and the stepwise mutation model is regarded as the main mutation model. STR mutation rates can be influenced by many factors. Moreover, some trinucleotide repeats are associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. In order to deepen our knowledge of these diseases and broaden STR application, it is essential to understand the STR mutation process in detail. In this review, we focus on the current known information about STR mutation.

  2. Beginnings of Satellite Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Solarić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The first satellite navigation system called the Navy Navigation Satellite System (NNSS or TRANSIT was planned in the USA in 1958. It consisted of 5-6 artificial Earth satellites, was set in motion for the USA military in 1964, and in 1967 for civilian purposes. The frequency shift of received radio waves emitted from the satellite and caused by the Doppler effect was measured. The TRANSIT satellite speed of approaching or moving away was derived from that; the TRANSIT satellites emmited also their own coordinates. Then the ship's position was determined by an intersection of three hyperboloids, which were determined from differences of distances in three time intervals. Maintenance of this navigation system was stopped in 1996, but it is still being used in the USA Navy for exploring the ionosphere. Furthermore, results of Doppler measurements in international projects at the Hvar Observatory from 1982 and 1983. This was the first time in Croatia and the former country that the coordinates of the Hvar Observatory were determined in the unique world coordinate system WGS'72. The paper ends with a brief representation of the Tsiklon Doppler navigation system produced in the former Soviet Union, and there is a list of some of numerous produced and designed satellite navigation systems.Ključne riječi

  3. Molecular organization and chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Amazonian Engystomops (Anura, Leiuperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Débora Silva; Rivera, Miryan; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2012-03-20

    For anurans, knowledge of 5S rDNA is scarce. For Engystomops species, chromosomal homeologies are difficult to recognize due to the high level of inter- and intraspecific cytogenetic variation. In an attempt to better compare the karyotypes of the Amazonian species Engystomops freibergi and Engystomops petersi, and to extend the knowledge of 5S rDNA organization in anurans, the 5S rDNA sequences of Amazonian Engystomops species were isolated, characterized, and mapped. Two types of 5S rDNA, which were readily differentiated by their NTS (non-transcribed spacer) sizes and compositions, were isolated from specimens of E. freibergi from Brazil and E. petersi from two Ecuadorian localities (Puyo and Yasuní). In the E. freibergi karyotypes, the entire type I 5S rDNA repeating unit hybridized to the pericentromeric region of 3p, whereas the entire type II 5S rDNA repeating unit mapped to the distal region of 6q, suggesting a differential localization of these sequences. The type I NTS probe clearly detected the 3p pericentromeric region in the karyotypes of E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo and the 5p pericentromeric region in the karyotype of E. petersi from Yasuní, but no distal or interstitial signals were observed. Interestingly, this probe also detected many centromeric regions in the three karyotypes, suggesting the presence of a satellite DNA family derived from 5S rDNA. The type II NTS probe detected only distal 6q regions in the three karyotypes, corroborating the differential distribution of the two types of 5S rDNA. Because the 5S rDNA types found in Engystomops are related to those of Physalaemus with respect to their nucleotide sequences and chromosomal locations, their origin likely preceded the evolutionary divergence of these genera. In addition, our data indicated homeology between Chromosome 5 in E. petersi from Yasuní and Chromosomes 3 in E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo. In addition, the chromosomal location of the type II 5S rDNA

  4. Sensor Data Records (SDR) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission from 8 November 1986 to 31 December 1989 (NODC Accession 0054289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the sensor data records (SDRs) from the Geodetic Satellite (GEOSAT) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of November 8, 1986 to...

  5. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  6. A method for the incremental expansion of polyglutamine repeats in recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy L; Bottomley, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    The polyglutamine diseases are caused by the expansion of CAG repeats. A key step in understanding the disease mechanisms, at the DNA and protein level, is the ability to produce recombinant proteins with specific length glutamine tracts which is a time-consuming first step in setting up in vitro systems to study the effects of polyglutamine expansion. Described here is a PCR-based method for the amplification of CAG repeats, which we used to incrementally extend CAG length by 3-5 repeats per cycle. This method could be translated into various contexts where amplification of repeating elements is necessary.

  7. Improved set of short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms for screening the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo; Vaske, D.; Weber, J.L. [Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (microsatellite) DNA polymorphisms are widely used for screening the human and other genomes in initial linkage mapping. Since the average spacing between polymorphisms in genome screens is usually {ge}10 cM and since many thousands of human short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are now available, optimal subsets of STRPs must be selected for screening. Two screening sets of STRPs for humans have been described in the literature, both of which are based primarily on dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. Here we describe our eighth and most recent human screening set, which is based almost entirely on trinucleotide-and tetranucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  9. The Pathogenic Role of Low Range Repeats in SCA17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwan Shin

    Full Text Available SCA17 is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with expansion of the CAG/CAA trinucleotide repeats in the TATA-binding protein (TBP gene. SCA17 can have various clinical presentations including parkinsonism, ataxia, chorea and dystonia. SCA17 is diagnosed by detecting the expanded CAG repeats in the TBP gene; however, in the literature, pathologic repeat numbers as low as 41 overlap with normal repeat numbers.The subjects in this study included patients with involuntary movement disorders such as cerebellar ataxia, parkinsonism, chorea and dystonia who visited Seoul National University Hospital between Jan. 2006 and Apr. 2014 and were screened for SCA17. Those who were diagnosed with other genetic diseases or nondegenerative diseases were excluded. DNA from healthy subjects who did not have a family history of parkinsonism, ataxia, psychiatric symptoms, chorea or dystonia served as the control. In total, 5242 chromosomes from 2099 patients and 522 normal controls were analyzed.The total number of patients included in the analysis was 2099 (parkinsonism, 1706; ataxia, 345; chorea, 37; and dystonia, 11. In the normal control, up to 44 repeats were found. In the 44 repeat group, there were 7 (0.3% patients and 1 (0.2% normal control. In 43 repeat group, there were 8 (0.4% patients and 2 (0.4% normal controls. In the 42 repeat group, there were 16 (0.8% patients and 3 (0.6% normal controls. In 41 repeat group, there were 48 (2.3% patients and 8 (1.5% normal controls. Considering the overlaps and non-significant differences in allelic frequencies between the patients and the normal controls with low-expansions, we could not determine a definitive cutoff value for the pathologic CAG repeat number of SCA17.Because the statistical analysis between the normal controls and patients with low range expansions failed to show any differences so far, we must consider that clinical cases with low range expansions could be idiopathic movement disorders showing

  10. Trends In Satellite Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, William A.; Stevens, Grady H.; Stevenson, Steven M.; Lekan, Jack; Arth, Clifford H.; Hollansworth, James E.; Miller, Edward F.

    1988-01-01

    Report assesses trends in satellite communication from present to year 2010. Examines restrictions imposed by limited spectrum resource and technology needs created by trends. Personal communications, orbiting switchboards, and videophones foreseen.

  11. Domestic Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  12. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Top space experts from around the world have collaborated to produce this comprehensive, authoritative, and clearly illustrated reference guide to the fast growing, multi-billion dollar field of satellite applications and space communications. This handbook, done under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, addresses not only system technologies but also examines market dynamics, technical standards and regulatory constraints. The handbook is a completely multi-disciplinary reference book that covers, in an in-depth fashion, the fields of satellite telecommunications, Earth observation, remote sensing, satellite navigation, geographical information systems, and geosynchronous meteorological systems. It covers current practices and designs as well as advanced concepts and future systems. It provides a comparative analysis of the common technologies and design elements for satellite application bus structures, thermal controls, power systems, stabilization techniques, telemetry, com...

  13. Biological satellite Kosmos-936

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedeshin, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of physiological experiments performed on the biological satellite Kosmos-936. Other experiments to determine the electrostatic and dielectric responses to the effects of cosmic radiation are discussed.

  14. Small Satellite Transporter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective is to determine whether this small satellite transporter is capable of transporting at least four 6U CubeSats is possible for a given set of...

  15. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  16. DFH-3 Satellite Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenShufang

    2005-01-01

    The DFH-3 satellite platform is designed and developed by China Academy of Space Technology (CAST). It is a medium capability communications satellite platform. The platform adopts threeaxis attitude stabilization control system, having solar array output power of 1.7kW by the end of its design lifetime of 8 years. Its mass is 2100kg with payload capacity of 220kg.

  17. The Archimedes satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart C.; Shurvinton, William D.

    1992-03-01

    Archimedes is a satellite system conceived by the European Space Agency (ESA) to effectively serve the European market for Mobile Radio Services (MRS). This paper describes the requirements and technical design of the Archimedes satellite system. The underlying assumptions and trade-offs behind the design are detailed and the design is compared and contrasted against alternative design solutions, both technically and economically. A path forward for the development of the system is indicated.

  18. ASTRID II satellit projekt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Primdahl, Fritz

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan.......The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan....

  19. Satellite formation. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. W.

    1978-01-01

    A satellite formation model is extended to include evolution of planetary ring material and elliptic orbital motion. In this model the formation of the moon begins at a later time in the growth of the earth, and a significant fraction of the lunar material is processed through a circumterrestrial debris cloud where volatiles might have been lost. Thus, the chemical differences between the earth and moon are more plausibly accounted for. Satellites of the outer planets probably formed in large numbers throughout the growth of those planets. Because of rapid inward evolution of the orbits of small satellites, the present satellite systems represent only satellites formed in the last few percent of the growths of their primaries. The rings of Saturn and Uranus are most plausibly explained as the debris of satellites disrupted within the Roche limit. Because such a ring would collapse onto the planet in the course of any significant further accretion by the planet, the rings must have formed very near or even after the conclusion of accretion.

  20. Isolation and characterization of human brain genes with (CCA){sub n} trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longshore, J.W.; Finley, W.H.; Descartes, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of trinucleotide repeats has been described as a new form of mutation. To date, only the expansion of (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats have been associated with disease. Expansion of (CAG){sub n} repeats has been found to cause Huntington`s disease, Kennedy`s disease, myotonic dystrophy, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy. (CGG){sub n} repeat expansion has been implicated in the fragile X syndrome and FRAXE mental retardation. In an effort to identify other potential repeats as candidates for expansion, a DNA linguistics approach was used to study 10 Mb of human DNA sequences in GenBank. Our study found the (CCA){sub n} repeat and the disease-associated (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats to be over-represented in the human genome. The (CCA){sub n} repeat also shares other characteristics with (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n}, making it a good candidate for expansion. Trinucleotide repeat numbers in disease-associated genes are normally polymorphic in a population. Therefore, by studying genes for polymorphisms, candidate genes may be identified. Twelve sequences previously deposited in GenBank with at least five tandem copies of (CCA) were studied and no polymorphisms were found. To identify other candidate genes, a human hippocampus cDNA library was screened with a (CCA){sub 8} probe. This approach identified 19 novel expressed sequences having long tandem (CCA){sub n} repeats which are currently under investigation for polymorphisms. Genes with polymorphic repeats may serve as markers for linkage studies or as candidate genes for genetic diseases showing anticipation.

  1. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  2. CHINA LAUNCHES NEW SCIENTIFIC SATELLITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China on Sept. 27, 2004 launched a scientific satellite atop a Long March 2D carrier rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Gansu province. 10 minutes after the launch, the satellite entered a preset orbit and is running sound at the orbit. It is the 20th recoverable satellite for scientific and technological

  3. Molecular characterization and physical localization of highly repetitive DNA sequences from Brazilian Alstroemeria species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, A.G.J.; Kamstra, S.A.; Jeu, de M.J.; Jacobsen, E.

    2002-01-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences were isolated from genomic DNA libraries of Alstroemeria psittacina and A. inodora. Among the repetitive sequences that were isolated, tandem repeats as well as dispersed repeats could be discerned. The tandem repeats belonged to a family of interlinked Sau3A subfragm

  4. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  5. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  6. A Scheme to Improve Throughput for ARQ-Protected Satellite Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniel; Ephremides, Anthony

    1997-01-01

    Automatic-repeat-request (ARQ) error control is often employed to assure high fidelity information transmission. However, ARQ error control can provide poor throughput for satellite multicasting. The throughput in such communication may be improved by the combination of a terrestrial network parallel to the satellite network and a judiciously modified ARQ protocol. In particular, retransmitted ARQ frames can be sent terrestrially in such a hybrid network, allowing higher throughput than in a pure-satellite network. This work presents analytic results to establish the potential for improving the throughput of satellite multicast communication employing ARQ error control by the adoption of such a hybrid network architecture.

  7. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  8. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  9. Satellite Communications for ATM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation is an overview on Satellite Communication for the Aeronautical Telecommunication Management (ATM) research. Satellite Communications are being considered by the FAA and NASA as a possible alternative to the present and future ground systems supporting Air Traffic Communications. The international Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have in place Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) which is mainly derived from the pre-existing Inmarsat service that has been in service since the 1980s. The Working Group A of the Aeronautical Mobile Communication Panel of ICAO has also been investigating SARPS for what is called the Next Generation Satellite Service (NGSS) which conforms less to the Inmarsat based architecture and explores wider options in terms of satellite architectures. Several designs are being proposed by Firms such as Boeing, ESA, NASA that are geared toward full or secondary usage of satellite communications for ATM. Satellite communications for ATM can serve several purposes ranging from primary usage where ground services would play a minimal backup role, to an integrated solution where it will be used to cover services, or areas that are less likely to be supported by the proposed and existing ground infrastructure. Such Integrated roles can include usage of satellite communications for oceanic and remote land areas for example. It also can include relieving the capacity of the ground network by providing broadcast based services of Traffic Information Services messages (TIS-B), or Flight Information Services (FIS-B) which can take a significant portion of the ground system capacity. Additionally, satellite communication can play a backup role to support any needs for ground replacement, or additional needed capacity even after the new digital systems are in place. The additional bandwidth that can be provided via satellite communications can also open the door for many new

  10. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials.

  11. Experimental Satellite 2 Successfully Launched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    Small satellite Experimental Satellite 2 (SY-2) was launched by LM-2C launch vehicle from Xichang Satellite Launch Center on Nov. 18, 2004. Later the satellite entered the preset sun-synchronous orbit, which is 700 kilometers above the earth. The launch was the eighthmission this year by China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation(CASC), which aims to test the technology of the satellite, conduct survey and monitoring of the land and resources and geographical environment on a trial basis.

  12. China's Meteorological Satellite Application System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiashen

    2008-01-01

    @@ China's meteorological satellite program consists of five systems,namely the satellite system,the launch vehicle system,the launch center system,TT&C and the ground application system.The satellite system consists of FengYun (FY) polar orbiting series and FY geostationary series,which are launched by LM launch vehicles from Taiyan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) and Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC) respectively.

  13. An SS-TDMA system using onboard regenerative repeaters and baseband switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Samejima, S.; Yamamoto, H.

    A system configuration of a Satellite Switched Time Division Multiple Access (SS-TDMA) satellite communication system employing onboard regenerative repeaters, a baseband switch and IF switch is proposed and discussed. The system proposed in this paper utilizes 30/20 GHz frequency bands and is composed of Trunk Transmission Systems and Satellite Digital Communication Systems which provide wide band digital communication links between customers directly. Interface conditions between terrestrial digital terminals and TDMA traffic terminals, and a TDMA frame structure for Trunk Transmission Systems are proposed and discussed. Moreover, a transmission power control scheme for multibeam satellite communication systems is proposed. Furthermore, the experimental results for a prototype onboard burst modem are presented showing good bit error ratio and weight performance.

  14. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  15. Random DNA libraries from three species of the stick insect genus Bacillus (Insecta: Phasmida): repetitive DNA characterization and first observation of polyneopteran MITEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Marco; Luchetti, Andrea; Bonandin, Livia; Mantovani, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    The repetitive DNA content of the stick insect species Bacillus rossius (facultative parthenogenetic), Bacillus grandii (gonochoric), and Bacillus atticus (obligate parthenogenetic) was analyzed through the survey of random genomic libraries roughly corresponding to 0.006% of the genome. By repeat masking, 19 families of transposable elements were identified (two LTR and six non-LTR retrotransposons; 11 DNA transposons). Moreover, a de novo analysis revealed, among the three libraries, the first MITE family observed in polyneopteran genomes. On the whole, transposable element abundance represented 23.3% of the genome in B. rossius, 22.9% in B. atticus, and 18% in B. grandii. Tandem repeat content in the three libraries is much lower: 1.32%, 0.64%, and 1.86% in B. rossius, B. grandii, and B. atticus, respectively. Microsatellites are the most abundant in all species. Minisatellites were only found in B. rossius and B. atticus, and five monomers belonging to the Bag320 satellite family were detected in B. atticus. Assuming the survey provides adequate representation of the relative genome, the obligate parthenogenetic species (B. atticus), compared with the other two species analyzed, does not show a lower transposable element content, as expected from some theoretical and empirical studies.

  16. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  17. A ranking index for quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles forensic DNA profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Assessment of DNA profile quality is vital in forensic DNA analysis, both in order to determine the evidentiary value of DNA results and to compare the performance of different DNA analysis protocols. Generally the quality assessment is performed through manual examination of the DNA profiles based on empirical knowledge, or by comparing the intensities (allelic peak heights) of the capillary electrophoresis electropherograms. Results We recently developed a ranking index for unbiased and quantitative quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles, the forensic DNA profile index (FI) (Hedman et al. Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles, Biotechniques 47 (2009) 951-958). FI uses electropherogram data to combine the intensities of the allelic peaks with the balances within and between loci, using Principal Components Analysis. Here we present the construction of FI. We explain the mathematical and statistical methodologies used and present details about the applied data reduction method. Thereby we show how to adapt the ranking index for any Short Tandem Repeat-based forensic DNA typing system through validation against a manual grading scale and calibration against a specific set of DNA profiles. Conclusions The developed tool provides unbiased quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles. It can be applied for any DNA profiling system based on Short Tandem Repeat markers. Apart from crime related DNA analysis, FI can therefore be used as a quality tool in paternal or familial testing as well as in disaster victim identification. PMID:21062433

  18. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease

    KAUST Repository

    Shimada, Makoto K.

    2016-06-11

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. Site and Orbit Repeatabilities using Adaptive Mapping Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Camille; Gegout, Pascal; Soudarin, Laurent; Biancale, Richard; Perosanz, Felix

    2015-04-01

    The electromagnetic signals emitted by the satellite positioning systems travel at the speed of light in a straight line in a vacuum but are modified in their propagation through the neutral atmosphere by temporal and spatial changes of density, and composition and refractivity. These waves are slowed down and their trajectories are bent. This presentation summarizes the performances of the modeling of the tropospheric propagation by the ray tracing technique through the assimilations of the European Meteorological Centre (ECMWF) in the framework of realizing the geodetic reference frame. This goal is achieved by modeling the spatial variability of the propagation using the time variable three-dimensional physical parameters of the atmosphere. The tropospheric delays obtained by ray tracing in all directions throughout the meteorological model surrounding the geodetic site, are fitted by Adaptive Mapping Functions (AMF) parameterized by several tens of coefficients. The delays produced by the Horizon software are then experimented, kept unchanged or adjusted, when recovering a reference frame based on hundred sites using the GINS software. Without any adjustments of the tropospheric modeling, the subcentimetric performances of the AMF are demonstrated by the repeatability of sites positions and GPS satellites orbits. When some AMF coefficients are adjusted, the accuracy of orbits recovery in term of quadratic mean is 7 to 8 millimeters. This limit is imposed by the lack or deficiency of other models, such as non-tidal and tidal loading respectively. Hence the repeatability of the vertical position is not enhanced by changing the propagation model. At the contrary, the repeatability of the horizontal position of geodetic sites is greatly enhanced by accounting for the azimuthal variability provided by the realistic 3D shapes of the Atmosphere and the Earth and the rigorous interpolations of atmospheric parameters included in Adaptive Mapping Functions with respect

  20. Solar Power Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Flournoy, Don M

    2012-01-01

    Communication satellites are a $144 billion industry. Is there any space-based industry that could possibly beat that market? 'Solar Power Satellites' shows why and how the space satellite industry will soon begin expanding its market from relaying signals to Earth to generating energy in space and delivering it to the ground as electricity. In all industrialized nations, energy demand is growing exponentially. In the developing world, the need for energy is as basic as food and water. The Sun's energy is available everywhere, and it is non-polluting. As business plans demonstrate its technical feasibility, commercial potential, and environmental acceptability, every country on Earth will look to space for the power it needs.

  1. Geostationary satellites collocation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hengnian

    2014-01-01

    Geostationary Satellites Collocation aims to find solutions for deploying a safe and reliable collocation control. Focusing on the orbital perturbation analysis, the mathematical foundations for orbit and control of the geostationary satellite are summarized. The mathematical and physical principle of orbital maneuver and collocation strategies for multi geostationary satellites sharing with the same dead band is also stressed. Moreover, the book presents some applications using the above algorithms and mathematical models to help readers master the corrective method for planning station keeping maneuvers. Engineers and scientists in the fields of aerospace technology and space science can benefit from this book. Hengnian Li is the Deputy Director of State Key Laboratory of Astronautic Dynamics, China.

  2. ESA's satellite communications programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholome, P.

    1985-02-01

    The developmental history, current status, and future plans of the ESA satellite-communications programs are discussed in a general survey and illustrated with network diagrams and maps. Consideration is given to the parallel development of national and European direct-broadcast systems and telecommunications networks, the position of the European space and electronics industries in the growing world market, the impact of technological improvements (both in satellite systems and in ground-based networks), and the technological and commercial advantages of integrated space-terrestrial networks. The needs for a European definition of the precise national and international roles of satellite communications, for maximum speed in implementing such decisions (before the technology becomes obsolete), and for increased cooperation and standardization to assure European equipment manufacturers a reasonable share of the market are stressed.

  3. AVS on satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiwu; Wang, Guozhong; Hou, Gang

    2005-07-01

    AVS is a new digital audio-video coding standard established by China. AVS will be used in digital TV broadcasting and next general optical disk. AVS adopted many digital audio-video coding techniques developed by Chinese company and universities in recent years, it has very low complexity compared to H.264, and AVS will charge very low royalty fee through one-step license including all AVS tools. So AVS is a good and competitive candidate for Chinese DTV and next generation optical disk. In addition, Chinese government has published a plan for satellite TV signal directly to home(DTH) and a telecommunication satellite named as SINO 2 will be launched in 2006. AVS will be also one of the best hopeful candidates of audio-video coding standard on satellite signal transmission.

  4. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three......-axis magnetometer, three piezoelectric gyros, and four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. The operation of the spacecraft is fully autonomous. The data flow between the transducers and the onboard computer placed physically outside the satellite is provided by a radio link. The purpose...

  5. Bovine and equine forensic DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Goor, L.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Animal forensic DNA analysis is being used for human criminal investigations (e.g traces from cats and dogs), wildlife management, breeding and food safety. The most common DNA markers used for such forensic casework are short tandem repeats (STR). Rules and guidelines concerning quality assurance (

  6. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  8. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  9. Declassified intelligence satellite photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Recently declassified photographs from spy satellites are an important addition to the record of the Earth?s land surface held by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). More than 800,000 high-resolution photos taken between 1959 through 1972 were made available by Executive Order of the President. The collection is held at the USGS EROS Data Center, near Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and are offered for public sale. For some purposes in earth science studies, these photos extend the record of changes in the land surface another decade back in time from the advent of the Landsat earth-observing satellite program.

  10. Oceanography from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that oceanographers have benefited from the space program mainly through the increased efficiency it has brought to ship operations. For example, the Transit navigation system has enabled oceanographers to compile detailed maps of sea-floor properties and to more accurately locate moored subsurface instrumentation. General descriptions are given of instruments used in satellite observations (altimeter, color scanner, infrared radiometer, microwave radiometer, scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar). It is pointed out that because of the large volume of data that satellite instruments generate, the development of algorithms for converting the data into a form expressed in geophysical units has become especially important.

  11. Satellite oceanography - The instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that no instrument is sensitive to only one oceanographic variable; rather, each responds to a combination of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. This complicates data interpretation and usually requires that a number of observations, each sensitive to somewhat different phenomena, be combined to provide unambiguous information. The distinction between active and passive instruments is described. A block diagram illustrating the steps necessary to convert data from satellite instruments into oceanographic information is included, as is a diagram illustrating the operation of a radio-frequency radiometer. Attention is also given to the satellites that carry the various oceanographic instruments.

  12. 园艺作物的ISSR分子标记研究及应用%Inter-simple sequence repeat and its application in horticultural crop research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑芹; 吴凤芝; 刘守伟

    2012-01-01

    ISSR (Inter-simple sequence repeat)是一种基于微卫星序列发展起来的新型分子标记方法,具有无需知道任何靶标序列的微卫星背景信息、遗传多态性高、稳定高效、检测快速等特点.目前,ISSR分子标记技术在园艺作物的遗传多样性研究、品种鉴定、遗传图谱构建、基因定位及分子标记辅助育种等方面得到了广泛应用,文章就ISSR标记的原理、方法、特点及其在园艺作物研究中的应用加以综述.%Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) is a new molecular marker method which is based on micro-satellite technique with advantages of simple, quick, stable, reliable and higher DNA polymorphism, etc. At present, ISSR has been widely applied in genetic diversity research, genetic map construction, genetic mapping, molecular marker assisted breeding and variety purity identification of horticultural crops. The purpose of this review is to introduce principles, methods, characteristics of the ISSR and its application in the research of horticultural crops.

  13. Integrated Satellite-HAP Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianca, Ernestina; De Sanctis, Mauro; De Luise, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    for an efficient hybrid terrestrial-satellite communication system. Two integrated HAP-satellite scenarios are presented, in which the HAP is used to overcome some of the shortcomings of satellite- based communications. Moreover, it is shown that the integration of HAPs with satellite systems can be used......Thus far, high-altitude platform (HAP)-based systems have been mainly conceived as an alternative to satellites for complementing the terrestrial network. This article aims to show that HAP should no longer be seen as a competitor technology by investors of satellites, but as a key element...

  14. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  15. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  16. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  17. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  19. Structural basis for seq