WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite ccd pixels

  1. Modelling electron distributions within ESA's Gaia satellite CCD pixels to mitigate radiation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, G. M.; Holland, A. D.; Burt, D.; Robbins, M. S.

    2009-08-01

    The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented positional accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. At L2, protons cause displacement damage in the silicon of CCDs. The resulting traps capture and emit electrons from passing charge packets in the CCD pixel, distorting the image PSF and biasing its centroid. Microscopic models of Gaia's CCDs are being developed to simulate this effect. The key to calculating the probability of an electron being captured by a trap is the 3D electron density within each CCD pixel. However, this has not been physically modelled for the Gaia CCD pixels. In Seabroke, Holland & Cropper (2008), the first paper of this series, we motivated the need for such specialised 3D device modelling and outlined how its future results will fit into Gaia's overall radiation calibration strategy. In this paper, the second of the series, we present our first results using Silvaco's physics-based, engineering software: the ATLAS device simulation framework. Inputting a doping profile, pixel geometry and materials into ATLAS and comparing the results to other simulations reveals that ATLAS has a free parameter, fixed oxide charge, that needs to be calibrated. ATLAS is successfully benchmarked against other simulations and measurements of a test device, identifying how to use it to model Gaia pixels and highlighting the affect of different doping approximations.

  2. Silvaco ATLAS model of ESA's Gaia satellite e2v CCD91-72 pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, George; Holland, Andrew; Burt, David; Robbins, Mark

    2010-07-01

    The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for CCD radiation damage and CCD geometric distortion. In this paper, the third of the series, we present our 3D Silvaco ATLAS model of the Gaia e2v CCD91-72 pixel. We publish e2v's design model predictions for the capacities of one of Gaia's pixel features, the supplementary buried channel (SBC), for the first time. Kohley et al. (2009) measured the SBC capacities of a Gaia CCD to be an order of magnitude smaller than e2v's design. We have found the SBC doping widths that yield these measured SBC capacities. The widths are systematically 2 μm offset to the nominal widths. These offsets appear to be uncalibrated systematic offsets in e2v photolithography, which could either be due to systematic stitch alignment offsets or lateral ABD shield doping diffusion. The range of SBC capacities were used to derive the worst-case random stitch error between two pixel features within a stitch block to be +/-0.25 μm, which cannot explain the systematic offsets. It is beyond the scope of our pixel model to provide the manufacturing reason for the range of SBC capacities, so it does not allow us to predict how representative the tested CCD is. This open question has implications for Gaia's radiation damage and geometric calibration models.

  3. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  4. Direct measurement and calibration of the Kepler CCD Pixel Response Function for improved photometry and astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkov, Zoran

    Stellar images taken with telescopes and detectors in space are usually undersampled, and to correct for this, an accurate pixel response function is required. The standard approach for HST and KEPLER has been to measure the telescope PSF combined ("convolved") with the actual pixel response function, super-sampled by taking into account dithered or offset observed images of many stars (Lauer [1999]). This combined response function has been called the "PRF" (Bryson et al. [2011]). However, using such results has not allowed astrometry from KEPLER to reach its full potential (Monet et al. [2010], [2014]). Given the precision of KEPLER photometry, it should be feasible to use a pre-determined detector pixel response function (PRF) and an optical point spread function (PSF) as separable quantities to more accurately correct photometry and astrometry for undersampling. Wavelength (i.e. stellar color) and instrumental temperature should be affecting each of these differently. Discussion of the PRF in the "KEPLER Instrument Handbook" is limited to an ad-hoc extension of earlier measurements on a quite different CCD. It is known that the KEPLER PSF typically has a sharp spike in the middle, and the main bulk of the PSF is still small enough to be undersampled, so that any substructure in the pixel may interact significantly with the optical PSF. Both the PSF and PRF are probably asymmetric. We propose to measure the PRF for an example of the CCD sensors used on KEPLER at sufficient sampling resolution to allow significant improvement of KEPLER photometry and astrometry, in particular allowing PSF fitting techniques to be used on the data archive.

  5. Characterization of a 512x512-pixel 8-output full-frame CCD for high-speed imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeve, Thorsten; Dereniak, Eustace L.

    1993-01-01

    The characterization of a 512 by 512 pixel, eight-output full frame CCD manufactured by English Electric Valve under part number CCD13 is discussed. This device is a high- resolution Silicon-based array designed for visible imaging applications at readout periods as low as two milliseconds. The characterization of the device includes mean-variance analysis to determine read noise and dynamic range, as well as charge transfer efficiency, MTF, and quantum efficiency measurements. Dark current and non-uniformity issues on a pixel-to-pixel basis and between individual outputs are also examined. The characterization of the device is restricted by hardware limitations to a one MHz pixel rate, corresponding to a 40 ms readout time. However, subsections of the device have been operated at up to an equivalent 100 frames per second. To maximize the frame rate, the CCD is illuminated by a synchronized strobe flash in between frame readouts. The effects of the strobe illumination on the imagery obtained from the device is discussed.

  6. System for Digital 1D-Image Processing with 1024 Pixel CCD Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Misun

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The conception of system for digital 1D-images processing with digital CCD camera is presented. The system is created from these three basic parts: the digital CCD camera with linear image sensor CCD L133C, 8-bit interface and a personal computer. The scanning digital CCD camera generated a video signals, which are processed in the analog signal processor. The output signal is continually converted to 8-bit data words in A/D converter. This data words maybe transfer over a bus driver to the operation memory of personal computer, by setting one of the three work regimes of digital CCD camera. Some application possibilities and basic technical parameters of this system are given.

  7. Modelling of the over-exposed pixel area of CCD cameras caused by laser dazzling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoist, K.W.; Schleijpen, R.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple model has been developed and implemented in Matlab code, predicting the over-exposed pixel area of cameras caused by laser dazzling. Inputs of this model are the laser irradiance on the front optics of the camera, the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the used optics, the integration time of

  8. Determining the Pixel-to-Pixel Uncertainty in Satellite-Derived SST Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary measure of the quality of sea surface temperature (SST fields obtained from satellite-borne infrared sensors has been the bias and variance of matchups with co-located in-situ values. Because such matchups tend to be widely separated, these bias and variance estimates are not necessarily a good measure of small scale (several pixels gradients in these fields because one of the primary contributors to the uncertainty in satellite retrievals is atmospheric contamination, which tends to have large spatial scales compared with the pixel separation of infrared sensors. Hence, there is not a good measure to use in selecting SST fields appropriate for the study of submesoscale processes and, in particular, of processes associated with near-surface fronts, both of which have recently seen a rapid increase in interest. In this study, two methods are examined to address this problem, one based on spectra of the SST data and the other on their variograms. To evaluate the methods, instrument noise was estimated in Level-2 Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR SST fields of the Sargasso Sea. The two methods provided very nearly identical results for AVHRR: along-scan values of approximately 0.18 K for both day and night and along-track values of 0.21 K for day and night. By contrast, the instrument noise estimated for VIIRS varied by method, scan geometry and day-night. Specifically, daytime, along-scan (along-track, spectral estimates were found to be approximately 0.05 K (0.08 K and the corresponding nighttime values of 0.02 K (0.03 K. Daytime estimates based on the variogram were found to be 0.08 K (0.10 K with the corresponding nighttime values of 0.04 K (0.06 K. Taken together, AVHRR instrument noise is significantly larger than VIIRS instrument noise, along-track noise is larger than along-scan noise and daytime levels are higher than nighttime levels. Given the similarity of

  9. A configurable distributed high-performance computing framework for satellite's TDI-CCD imaging simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bo; Mao, Bingjing; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2010-11-01

    This paper renders a configurable distributed high performance computing(HPC) framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation. It uses strategy pattern to adapt multi-algorithms. Thus, this framework help to decrease the simulation time with low expense. Imaging simulation for TDI-CCD mounted on satellite contains four processes: 1) atmosphere leads degradation, 2) optical system leads degradation, 3) electronic system of TDI-CCD leads degradation and re-sampling process, 4) data integration. Process 1) to 3) utilize diversity data-intensity algorithms such as FFT, convolution and LaGrange Interpol etc., which requires powerful CPU. Even uses Intel Xeon X5550 processor, regular series process method takes more than 30 hours for a simulation whose result image size is 1500 * 1462. With literature study, there isn't any mature distributing HPC framework in this field. Here we developed a distribute computing framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation, which is based on WCF[1], uses Client/Server (C/S) layer and invokes the free CPU resources in LAN. The server pushes the process 1) to 3) tasks to those free computing capacity. Ultimately we rendered the HPC in low cost. In the computing experiment with 4 symmetric nodes and 1 server , this framework reduced about 74% simulation time. Adding more asymmetric nodes to the computing network, the time decreased namely. In conclusion, this framework could provide unlimited computation capacity in condition that the network and task management server are affordable. And this is the brand new HPC solution for TDI-CCD imaging simulation and similar applications.

  10. Discriminação de variedades de citros em imagens CCD/CBERS-2 Discrimination of citrus varieties using CCD/CBERS-2 satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Del'Arco Sanches

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar as imagens CCD/CBERS-2 quanto à possibilidade de discriminarem variedades de citros. A área de estudo localiza-se em Itirapina (SP e, para este estudo, foram utilizadas imagens CCD de três datas (30/05/2004, 16/08/2004 e 11/09/2004. Um modelo que integra os elementos componentes da cena citrícola sensoriada é proposto com o objetivo de explicar a variabilidade das respostas das parcelas de citros em imagens orbitais do tipo CCD/CBERS-2. Foram feitas classificações pelos algoritmos Isoseg e Maxver e, de acordo com o índice kappa, concluiu-se que é possível obterem-se exatidões qualificadas como muito boas, sendo que as melhores classificações foram conseguidas com imagens da estação seca.This paper was aimed at evaluating the possibility of discriminating citrus varieties in CCD imageries from CBERS-2 satellite ("China-Brazil Earth Resouces Satellite". The study area is located in Itirapina, São Paulo State. For this study, three CCD images from 2004 were acquired (May 30, August 16, and September 11. In order to acquire a better understanding and for explaining the variability of the spectral behavior of the citrus areas in orbital images (like as the CCD/CBERS-2 images a model that integrates the elements of the citrus scene is proposed and discussed. The images were classified by Isoseg and MaxVer classifiers. According to kappa index, it was possible to obtain classifications qualified as 'very good'. The best results were obtained with the images from the dry season.

  11. Scientific, Back-Illuminated CCD Development for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, V.; Ciampi, J.; Cooper, M. J.; Lambert, R. D.; O'Mara, D. M.; Prigozhin, I.; Young, D. J.; Warner, K.; Burke, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of the fully depleted, back illuminated charge coupled devices for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which includes a set of four wide angle telescopes, each having a 2x2 array of CCDs. The devices are fabricated on the newly upgraded 200-mm wafer line at Lincoln Laboratory. We discuss methods used to produce the devices and present early performance results from the 100- micron thick, 15x15-microns, 2k x 4k pixel frame transfer CCDs.

  12. Radioactive quality evaluation and cross validation of data from the HJ-1A/B satellites' CCD sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Xiang; Liu, Guodong; Kang, Qian; Wu, Donghai

    2013-07-05

    Data from multiple sensors are frequently used in Earth science to gain a more complete understanding of spatial information changes. Higher quality and mutual consistency are prerequisites when multiple sensors are jointly used. The HJ-1A/B satellites successfully launched on 6 September 2008. There are four charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors with uniform spatial resolutions and spectral range onboard the HJ-A/B satellites. Whether these data are keeping consistency is a major issue before they are used. This research aims to evaluate the data consistency and radioactive quality from the four CCDs. First, images of urban, desert, lake and ocean are chosen as the objects of evaluation. Second, objective evaluation variables, such as mean, variance and angular second moment, are used to identify image performance. Finally, a cross validation method are used to ensure the correlation of the data from the four HJ-1A/B CCDs and that which is gathered from the moderate resolution imaging spectro-radiometer (MODIS). The results show that the image quality of HJ-1A/B CCDs is stable, and the digital number distribution of CCD data is relatively low. In cross validation with MODIS, the root mean square errors of bands 1, 2 and 3 range from 0.055 to 0.065, and for band 4 it is 0.101. The data from HJ-1A/B CCD have better consistency.

  13. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  14. Preliminary demonstration of an IonCCD as an alternative pixelated anode for direct MCP readout in a compact MS-based detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjar, Omar; Fowler, William K; Kibelka, Gottfried; Schnute, William C

    2012-02-01

    We report on the preliminary testing of a new position-sensitive detector (PSD) by combining a microchannel plate (MCP) and a charge-sensitive pixilated anode with a direct readout based on charge-coupled detector (CCD) technology, which will be referred to as IonCCD (Hadjar et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(4):612-623, 2011; Johnson et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(8):1388-1394, 2011; Hadjar et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(10):1872-1884, 2011). This work exploits the recently discovered electron detection capability of the IonCCD (Hadjar et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(4):612-623, 2011), allowing it to be used directly behind an MC. This MCP-IonCCD configuration potentially obviates the need for electro-optical ion detector systems (EOIDs), which typically feature a relatively difficult-to-implement 5-kV power source as well as a phosphorus screen behind the MCP for conversion of electrons to photons prior to signal generation in a photosensitive CCD. Thus, the new system (MCP-IonCCD) has the potential to be smaller, simpler, more robust, and more cost efficient than EOID-based technologies in many applications. The use of the IonCCD as direct MCP readout anode, as opposed to its direct use as an ion detector, will benefit from the instant three-to-four-order-of-magnitude gain of the MCP with virtually no additional noise. The signal/noise gain can be used for either sensitivity or speed enhancement of the detector. The speed enhancement may motivate the development of faster IonCCD readout speeds (currently at 2.7 ms) to achieve the 2 kHz frame rate for which the IonCCD chip was designed, a must for transient signal applications. The presented detector exhibits clear potential not only as a trace analysis detector in scan-free mass spectrometry and electron spectroscopy but also as a compact detector for photon and particle imaging applications. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  15. Measurements of UV irradiance within the area of one satellite pixel

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    P. Weihs

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign was performed in the region of Vienna and its surroundings from May to July 2007. Within the scope of this campaign erythemal UV was measured at six ground stations within a radius of 30 km. First, the homogeneity of the UV levels within the area of one satellite pixel was studied. Second, the ground UV was compared to ground UV retrieved by the ozone monitoring instrument (OMI onboard the NASA EOS Aura Spacecraft. During clear-sky conditions the mean bias between erythemal UV measured by the different stations was within the measurement uncertainty of ±5%. Short term fluctuations of UV between the stations were below 3% within a radius of 20 km. For partly cloudy conditions and overcast conditions the discrepancy of instantaneous values between the stations is up to 200% or even higher. If averages of the UV index over longer time periods are compared the difference between the stations decreases strongly. The agreement is better than 20% within a distance of 10 km between the stations for 3 h averages. The comparison with OMI UV showed for clear-sky conditions higher satellite retrieved UV values by, on the average, approximately 15%. The ratio of OMI to ground measured UV lies between 0.9 and 1.5. and strongly depends on the aerosol optical depth. For partly cloudy and overcast conditions the OMI derived surface UV estimates show larger deviation from the ground-based reference data, and even bigger systematic positive bias. Here the ratio OMI to ground data lies between 0.5 and 4.5. The average difference between OMI and ground measurements is +24 to +37% for partly cloudy conditions and more than +50% for overcast conditions.

  16. Extrapolation of contrail investigations by LIDAR to larger scale measurements. Analysis and calibration of CCD camera and satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, R.; Homburg, F.; Freudenthaler, V.; Jaeger, H. [Frauenhofer Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The CCD image of a persistent contrail and the coincident LIDAR measurement are presented. To extrapolate the LIDAR derived optical thickness to the video field of view an anisotropy correction and calibration has to be performed. Observed bright halo components result from highly regular oriented hexagonal crystals with sizes of 200 {mu}m-2 mm. This explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation threshold of natural cirrus. Optical thickness from LIDAR shows significant discrepancies to the result from coincident NOAA-14 data. Errors result from anisotropy correction and parameterized relations between AVHRR channels and optical properties. (author) 28 refs.

  17. Effects of Per-Pixel Variability on Uncertainties in Bathymetric Retrievals from High-Resolution Satellite Images

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    Elizabeth J. Botha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased sophistication of high spatial resolution multispectral satellite sensors provides enhanced bathymetric mapping capability. However, the enhancements are counter-acted by per-pixel variability in sunglint, atmospheric path length and directional effects. This case-study highlights retrieval errors from images acquired at non-optimal geometrical combinations. The effects of variations in the environmental noise on water surface reflectance and the accuracy of environmental variable retrievals were quantified. Two WorldView-2 satellite images were acquired, within one minute of each other, with Image 1 placed in a near-optimal sun-sensor geometric configuration and Image 2 placed close to the specular point of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF. Image 2 had higher total environmental noise due to increased surface glint and higher atmospheric path-scattering. Generally, depths were under-estimated from Image 2, compared to Image 1. A partial improvement in retrieval error after glint correction of Image 2 resulted in an increase of the maximum depth to which accurate depth estimations were returned. This case-study indicates that critical analysis of individual images, accounting for the entire sun elevation and azimuth and satellite sensor pointing and geometry as well as anticipated wave height and direction, is required to ensure an image is fit for purpose for aquatic data analysis.

  18. Assessment of Total Suspended Sediment Distribution under Varying Tidal Conditions in Deep Bay: Initial Results from HJ-1A/1B Satellite CCD Images

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    Liqiao Tian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using Deep Bay in China as an example, an effective method for the retrieval of total suspended sediment (TSS concentration using HJ-1A/1B satellite images is proposed. The factors driving the variation of the TSS spatial distribution are also discussed. Two field surveys, conducted on August 29 and October 26, 2012, showed that there was a strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.9623 between field-surveyed OBS (optical backscatter measurements (5-31NTU and laboratory-analyzed TSS concentrations (9.89–35.58 mg/L. The COST image-based atmospheric correction procedure and the pseudo-invariant features (PIF method were combined to remove the atmospheric effects from the total radiance measurements obtained with different CCDs onboard the HJ-1A/1B satellites. Then, a simple and practical retrieval model was established based on the relationship between the satellite-corrected reflectance band ratio of band 3 and band 2 (Rrs3/Rrs2 and in-situ TSS measurements. The R2 of the regression relationship was 0.807, and the mean relative error (MRE was 12.78%, as determined through in-situ data validation. Finally, the influences of tide cycles, wind factors (direction and speed and other factors on the variation of the TSS spatial pattern observed from HJ-1A/1B satellite images from September through November of 2008 are discussed. The results show that HJ-1A/1B satellite CCD images can be used to estimate TSS concentrations under different tides in the study area over synoptic scales without using simultaneous in-situ atmospheric parameters and spectrum data. These findings provide strong informational support for numerical simulation studies on the combined influence of tide cycles and other associated hydrologic elements in Deep Bay.

  19. CCD Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  20. A technique for determining cloud free vs cloud contaminated pixels in satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlman, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the first earth orbiting satellite sent pictures of the earth back to them, atmospheric scientists have been focused on the possibilities of using that information as both a forecasting tool and as a meteorological research tool. With the latest generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) now entering service, that view of the earth yields views at a frequency and resolution never before available. These satellites have imagers with a five band multi-spectral capability with high spatial resolution. In addition, the sounder has eighteen thermal infrared (IR) channels plus one low-resolution visible band. With a resolution as small as one kilometer, GOES provides scientists with a powerful eye on the atmosphere. Menzel and Purdom (1994) detail both the imager and sounder capability as well as other systems on the GOES satellites. Immediately apparent in the visible channel are the patterns of clouds swirling over both oceans and continents. These clouds range in size from huge planetary systems covering thousands of kilometers to puffy fair weather cumulus clouds on the order of half a kilometer in size. With the IR sensors temperature patterns are observed. High clouds appear very cold, while low stratus field show temperatures near that of the surface. The surface, in turn, generally appears warmer than the clouds. It would seem then a simple manner to determine cloud and surface temperature from the imagery, but such is not the case. While most of the atmospheric constituents are well mixed and homogeneous, water vapor is not. The water molecule, because of its unique structure and vibration modes, affects the transmittance of the atmosphere most notably in the infrared regions. There are regions of the IR spectrum where water vapor acts as a strong absorber, and at others it is nearly transparent. The transparent wavelengths are called windows, and one such window occurs at 11.2 microns. Adjacent to this window at 12.7 microns

  1. Sun glitter imaging analysis of submarine sand waves in HJ-1A/B satellite CCD images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaguo; He, Xiekai; Yang, Kang; Fu, Bin; Guan, Weibing

    2014-11-01

    Submarine sand waves are a widespread bed-form in tidal environment. Submarine sand waves induce current convergence and divergence that affect sea surface roughness thus become visible in sun glitter images. These sun glitter images have been employed for mapping sand wave topography. However, there are lots of effect factors in sun glitter imaging of the submarine sand waves, such as the imaging geometry and dynamic environment condition. In this paper, several sun glitter images from HJ-1A/B in the Taiwan Banks are selected. These satellite sun glitter images are used to discuss sun glitter imaging characteristics in different sensor parameters and dynamic environment condition. To interpret the imaging characteristics, calculating the sun glitter radiance and analyzing its spatial characteristics of the sand wave in different images is the best way. In this study, a simulated model based on sun glitter radiation transmission is adopted to certify the imaging analysis in further. Some results are drawn based on the study. Firstly, the sun glitter radiation is mainly determined by sensor view angle. Second, the current is another key factor for the sun glitter. The opposite current direction will cause exchanging of bright stripes and dark stripes. Third, brightness reversal would happen at the critical angle. Therefore, when using sun glitter image to obtain depth inversion, one is advised to take advantage of image properties of sand waves and to pay attention to key dynamic environment condition and brightness reversal.

  2. [Atmospheric correction method for HJ-1 CCD imagery over waters based on radiative transfer model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Gu, Xing-Fa; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Li, Li; Chen, Xing-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric correction is a bottleneck in quantitative application of Chinese satellites HJ-1 data to remote sensing of water color. According to the characteristics of CCD sensors, the present paper made use of air-water coupled radiative transfer model to work out the look-up table (LUT) of atmospheric corrected parameters, and thereafter developed pixel-by-pixel atmospheric correction method over waters accomplishing the water-leaving remote sensing reflectance with accessorial meteorological input. The paper validates the HJ-1 CCD retrievals with MODIS and in-situ results. It was found that the accuracy in blue and green bands is good. However, the accuracy in red or NIR bands is much worse than blue or green ones. It was also demonstrated that the aerosol model is a sensitive factor to the atmospheric correction accuracy.

  3. Development of CCD controller for scientific application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. S.; Pathan, F. M.; Shah, U. V., Prof; Makwana, D. H., Prof; Anandarao, B. G., Prof

    2010-02-01

    Photoelectric equipment has wide applications such as spectroscopy, temperature measurement in infrared region and in astronomical research etc. A photoelectric transducer converts radiant energy into electrical energy. There are two types of photoelectric transducers namely photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and charged couple device (CCD) are used to convert radiant energy into electrical signal. Now the entire modern instruments use CCD technology. We have designed and developed a CCD camera controller using camera chip CD47-10 of Marconi which has 1K × 1K pixel for space application only.

  4. Scaling Surface Fluxes from Tower Footprint to Global Model Pixel Scale Using Multi-Satellite Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. C.; Hain, C.; Gao, F.; Semmens, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Schull, M. A.; Ring, T.; Kustas, W. P.; Alfieri, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    There is a fundamental challenge in evaluating performance of global land-surface and climate modeling systems, given that few in-situ observation sets adequately sample surface conditions representative at the global model pixel scale (10-100km). For example, a typical micrometeorological flux tower samples a relatively small footprint ranging from 100m to 1km, depending on tower height and environmental conditions. There is a clear need for diagnostic tools that can effectively bridge this gap in scale, and serve as a means of benchmarking global prognostic modeling systems under current conditions. This paper discusses a multi-scale energy balance modeling system (the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and disaggregation utility: ALEXI/DisALEXI) that fuses flux maps generated with thermal infrared (TIR) imagery collected by multiple satellite platforms to estimate daily surface fluxes from field to global scales. These diagnostic assessments, with land-surface temperature (LST) as the primary indicator of surface moisture status, operate under fundamentally different constraints than prognostic land-surface models based on precipitation and water balance, and therefore can serve as a semi-independent benchmark. Furthermore, LST can be retrieved from TIR imagery over a broad range of spatiotemporal resolutions: from several meters (airborne systems; periodically) to ~100m (Landsat; bi-weekly) to 1km (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - MODIS; daily) to 3-10km (geostationary; hourly). Applications of ALEXI/DisALEXI to flux sites within the US and internationally are described, evaluating daily evapotranspiration retrievals generated at 30m resolution. Annual timeseries of maps at this scale can be useful for better understanding local heterogeneity in the tower vicinity and dependences of observed fluxes on wind direction. If reasonable multi-year performance is demonstrated at the tower footprint scale for flux networks such as the National

  5. Giga-pixels and Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, J. L.; Luppino, G.; Kaiser, N.; Burke, B. E.; Jacoby, G. H.

    We describe a project to build a new type of astronomical CCD that should significantly decrease the cost per pixel of detectors. This device should also provide very fast readout, autoguiding capability, image motion compensation, and good red sensitivity.

  6. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  7. Cryostat and CCD for MEGARA at GTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Ferrusca, D.; Tulloch, S.; Velázquez, M.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez, F. M.; Vílchez Medina, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the new integral field unit (IFU) and multi-object spectrograph (MOS) instrument for the GTC. The spectrograph subsystems include the pseudo-slit, the shutter, the collimator with a focusing mechanism, pupil elements on a volume phase holographic grating (VPH) wheel and the camera joined to the cryostat through the last lens, with a CCD detector inside. In this paper we describe the full preliminary design of the cryostat which will harbor the CCD detector for the spectrograph. The selected cryogenic device is an LN2 open-cycle cryostat which has been designed by the "Astronomical Instrumentation Lab for Millimeter Wavelengths" at INAOE. A complete description of the cryostat main body and CCD head is presented as well as all the vacuum and temperature sub-systems to operate it. The CCD is surrounded by a radiation shield to improve its performance and is placed in a custom made mechanical mounting which will allow physical adjustments for alignment with the spectrograph camera. The 4k x 4k pixel CCD231 is our selection for the cryogenically cooled detector of MEGARA. The characteristics of this CCD, the internal cryostat cabling and CCD controller hardware are discussed. Finally, static structural finite element modeling and thermal analysis results are shown to validate the cryostat model.

  8. Characterizing the Pixel Footprint of Satellite Albedo Products Derived from MODIS Reflectance in the Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Peng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The adjacency effect and non-uniform responses complicate the precise delimitation of the surface support of remote sensing data and their derived products. Thus, modeling spatial response characteristics (SRCs prior to using remote sensing information has become important. A point spread function (PSF is typically used to describe the SRCs of the observation cells from remote sensors and is always estimated in a laboratory before the sensor is launched. However, research on the SRCs of high-order remote sensing products derived from the observations remains insufficient, which is an obstacle to converting between multi-scale remote sensing products and validating coarse-resolution products. This study proposed a method that combines simulation and validation to establish SRC models of coarse-resolution albedo products. Two series of commonly used 500-m/1-km resolution albedo products, which are derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS reflectance data, were investigated using 30-m albedo products that provide the required sub-pixel information. The analysis proves that the size of the surface support of each albedo pixel is larger than the nominal resolution of the pixel and that the response weight is non-uniformly distributed, with an elliptical Gaussian shape. The proposed methodology is generic and applicable for analyzing the SRCs of other advanced remote sensing products.

  9. A GRAPH READER USING A CCD IMAGE SENSOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... 3. Data Processing. The microcontroller, the CCD sensor, the stepper motor and the rest of the system are interfaced to the PC where data processing and overall control are done. A software program in. QUICKBASIC is used to process the pixels. First the 1024 pixels of an image line are received from the.

  10. IMPROVING PER-PIXEL CLASSIFICATION OF CROP-SHELTER COVERAGE BY TEXTURE ANALYSES OF HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE PANCHROMATIC IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Arcidiacono

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Actual research challenges in automated recognition of crop shelters regard, among other issues, the accuracy of classification, contour detection and typology identification. In this field the use of high-resolution multispectral images has been found to improve the feature recognition in comparison to RGB images or low resolution multispectral ones. As for classification methodologies, per-pixel and object-oriented ones offer different tools to cope with image recognition and feature extraction. In this study, to improve the classification of cropshelter coverage, the per-pixel method was applied to high-resolution multispectral images, coupled with a texture analysis of high-resolution panchromatic images. In detail, the results of the classification accuracy assessment achieved by the use of native high-resolution panchromatic images and RGB-band images resampled accordingly, were compared with those found in a previous study in which panchromatic images degraded to the RGB-band image resolution were used. The results show that the proposed methodology is suitable to improve crop-shelter classification quality and contour detection of parcels.

  11. Satellite Albedo products Validation by Upscaling Multi-nodes in situ Data into a Satellite Pixel Scale over Heterogeneous Land Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, D.; Wen, J.; Wu, X.; Liu, Q.; Peng, J.; Xiao, Q.; Qinhuo, L.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface albedo is a key parameter for energy budgets. There are many available products from remote sensing sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and so on. Their accuracy should be carefully quantified before being used. Most validations directly use a single-point in situ measurement in the relatively homogeneous land surface. However, it is not valid over heterogeneous cases. A multi-scale validation strategy using a high-resolution albedo imagery as a bridge is alternative, with several uncertainties from high-spatial-resolution albedo imagery, geometric registration, and the upscaling process. It results a relative precision. Hence, for more effective validation, the albedo absolute value based on ground measurements is still required, which can be conceptualized as the "truth" value of pixel scale albedo. In this study, a sampling strategy based on using wireless sensor network (WSN) technology to measure albedo at multiple nodes is proposed to capture the land surface heterogeneity in Huailai remote sensing test station, Hebei province, China, which is one station of a Chinese validation network (fig. 1). The nodes are distributed in an optimal layout determined by a sequential selection method using theirs representativeness. The first six nodes with the highest degree of representativeness are finally selected (fig. 2). Upscaling functions with different weights for each node, calculated by the ordinary least squares (OLS) linear regression, are used to upscale them to a coarse pixel scale. Application is exemplified by the validation of the MODIS albedo product (fig. 3), and VIIRS albedo product (fig.4), from Jul. 18, 2013 to Jul. 31, 2014. The RMSEs are 0.025 and 0.020 for MCD43B3 full inversion and magnitude inversion, respectively. The overall accuracy of VIIRS albedo is 0.021 and 0.014 under clear sky and

  12. CCD developed for scientific application by Hamamatsu

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaguchi, K; Dezaki, J; Yamamoto, K

    1999-01-01

    We have developed CCDs for scientific applications that feature a low readout noise of less than 5 e-rms and low dark current of 10-25 pA/cm sup 2 at room temperature. CCDs with these characteristics will prove extremely useful in applications such as spectroscopic measurement and dental radiography. In addition, a large-area CCD of 2kx4k pixels and 15 mu m square pixel size has recently been completed for optical use in astronomical observations. Applications to X-ray astronomy require the most challenging device performance in terms of deep depletion, high CTE, and focal plane size, among others. An abuttable X-ray CCD, having 1024x1024 pixels and 24 mu m square pixel size, is to be installed in an international space station (ISS). We are now striving to achieve the lowest usable cooling temperature by means of a built-in TEC with limited power consumption. Details on the development status are described in this report. We would also like to present our future plans for a large active area and deep depleti...

  13. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  14. Detection of interstellar CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, F.; Boulanger, F.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Gerin, M.; Bogey, M.

    1985-01-01

    The first detection of interstellar CCD has been obtained in the N = 3-2, J = 7/2-5/2 line at 216.3732 GHz towards the Kleinman-Low nebula. An abundance ratio CCD/CCH of 0.045 is found, indicating in this molecule a deuterium enhancement similar to that found for HNC, but an order of magnitude higher than for HCN. Negative results towards DR 21(OH), NGC 2264, L 134N, TM Cl, Rho OphB2, and IRC 10216 rule out a stronger D enhancement for CCD than for other deuterated molecules in these sources. Predictions of currently developed ion-molecule reaction schemes are consistent with the CCD line detected and the negative results.

  15. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Karin; Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    elucidate and exemplify already well-known problems in relation to the experience of vertical and horizontal lighting. Pixel Experiments exist as a synergy between speculative test setups and lighting design in practice. This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research......Pixel Experiments The term pixel is traditionally defined as any of the minute elements that together constitute a larger context or image. A pixel has its own form and is the smallest unit seen within a larger structure. In working with the potentials of LED technology in architectural lighting...... lighting design in practice, one quickly experiences and realises that there are untapped potentials in the attributes of LED technology. In this research, speculative studies have been made working with the attributes of LEDs in architectural contexts, with the ambition to ascertain new strategies...

  16. An adaptive threshold method for improving astrometry of space debris CCD images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rong-yu; Zhao, Chang-yin

    2014-06-01

    Optical survey is a main technique for observing space debris, and precisely measuring the positions of space debris is of great importance. Due to several factors, e.g. the angle object normal to the observer, the shape as well as the attitude of the object, the variations of observed characteristics for low earth orbital space debris are distinct. When we look at optical CCD images of observed objects, the size and brightness are varying, hence it’s difficult to decide the threshold during centroid measurement and precise astrometry. Traditionally the threshold is given empirically and constantly in data reduction, and obviously it’s not suitable for data reduction of space debris. Here we offer a solution to provide the threshold. Our method assumes that the PSF (point spread function) is Gaussian and estimates the signal flux by a directly two-dimensional Gaussian fit, then a cubic spline interpolation is performed to divide each initial pixel into several sub-pixels, at last the threshold is determined by the estimation of signal flux and the sub-pixels above threshold are separated to estimate the centroid. A trail observation of the fast spinning satellite Ajisai is made and the CCD frames are obtained to test our algorithm. The calibration precision of various threshold is obtained through the comparison between the observed equatorial position and the reference one, the latter are obtained from the precise ephemeris of the satellite. The results indicate that our method reduces the total errors of measurements, it works effectively in improving the centering precision of space debris images.

  17. Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh radiation environment at the LHC without severe compromises in performance. From these developments a number of different applications have spun off, most notably for biomedical imaging. Beyond hybrid pixels, a number of monolithic or semi-monolithic developments, which do not require complicated hybridization but come as single sensor/IC entities, have appeared and are currently developed to greater maturity. Most advanced in terms of maturity are so called CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels. The present state in the ...

  18. Optimization of polarimetry sensitivity for X-ray CCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, K. E-mail: hayasida@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Hashimoto, Y.; Ohtani, M

    1999-10-21

    X-ray polarimetry with CCD has been performed using a polarized X-ray beam from an electron impact X-ray source. The standard data reduction method employing double-pixel events yields the modulation factor M of 0.14 at 27 keV and 0.24 at 43 keV for the 12 {mu}m pixel size CCD chip. We develop a new data reduction method, in which multi-pixel events are employed, and which approximates the charge spread as an oval shape. We optimize the reduction parameters, so that we improve the P{sub min} (minimum detectable polarization degree) by factor of three from the value obtained through the usual double-pixel event method.

  19. Optimization of polarimetry sensitivity for X-ray CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashida, K; Tsunemi, H; Hashimoto, Y; Ohtani, M

    1999-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry with CCD has been performed using a polarized X-ray beam from an electron impact X-ray source. The standard data reduction method employing double-pixel events yields the modulation factor M of 0.14 at 27 keV and 0.24 at 43 keV for the 12 mu m pixel size CCD chip. We develop a new data reduction method, in which multi-pixel events are employed, and which approximates the charge spread as an oval shape. We optimize the reduction parameters, so that we improve the P sub m sub i sub n (minimum detectable polarization degree) by factor of three from the value obtained through the usual double-pixel event method.

  20. Uncertainty of soil reflectance retrieval from SPOT and RapidEye multispectral satellite images using a per-pixel bootstrapped empirical line atmospheric correction over an agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, E.; Gilliot, J. M.; Bel, L.; Bréchet, L.; Hamiache, J.; Hadjar, D.; Lemonnier, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Many authors have reported the use of empirical line regression between field target sites and image pixels in order to perform atmospheric correction of multispectral images. However few studies were dedicated to the specific reflectance retrieval for cultivated bare soils from multispectral satellite images, from a large number (≥15) of bare field targets spread over a region. Even fewer were oriented towards additional field targets for validation and uncertainty assessment of reflectance error. This study aimed at assessing ELM validation accuracy and uncertainty for predicting topsoil reflectance over a wide area (221 km2) with contrasting soils and tillage practices using a set of six multispectral images at very high (supermode SPOT5, 2.5 m), high (RapidEye, 6.5 m) and medium (SPOT4, 20 m) spatial resolutions. For each image and each spectral band, linear regression (LR) models were constructed through a series of 1000 bootstrap datasets of training/validation samples generated amongst a total of about 30 field sites used as targets, the reflectance measurements of which were made between -6 days/+7 days around acquisition date. The achieved models had an average coefficient of variation of validation errors of ∼14%, which indicates that the composition of training field sites does influence performance results of ELM. However, according to median LR-models, our approach mostly resulted in accurate predictions with low standard errors of estimation around 1-2% reflectance, validation errors of 2-3% reflectance, low validation bias (March: in agricultural areas, images programmed during periods when most field tillage operations have resulted in smooth seedbed conditions (April in this study) are in favour of better performances of soil reflectance prediction. Nevertheless, directional effects appear to mainly and moderately affect the global performance of near-infrared and SWIR bands-models except for oblique viewing images (viewing angle > |20°|). The

  1. SNR improvement for hyperspectral application using frame and pixel binning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Sami Ur; Kumar, Ankush; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometer systems are increasingly being used in the field of remote sensing for variety of civilian and military applications. The ability of such instruments in discriminating finer spectral features along with improved spatial and radiometric performance have made such instruments a powerful tool in the field of remote sensing. Design and development of spaceborne hyper spectral imaging spectrometers poses lot of technological challenges in terms of optics, dispersion element, detectors, electronics and mechanical systems. The main factors that define the type of detectors are the spectral region, SNR, dynamic range, pixel size, number of pixels, frame rate, operating temperature etc. Detectors with higher quantum efficiency and higher well depth are the preferred choice for such applications. CCD based Si detectors serves the requirement of high well depth for VNIR band spectrometers but suffers from smear. Smear can be controlled by using CMOS detectors. Si CMOS detectors with large format arrays are available. These detectors generally have smaller pitch and low well depth. Binning technique can be used with available CMOS detectors to meet the large swath, higher resolution and high SNR requirements. Availability of larger dwell time of satellite can be used to bin multiple frames to increase the signal collection even with lesser well depth detectors and ultimately increase the SNR. Lab measurements reveal that SNR improvement by frame binning is more in comparison to pixel binning. Effect of pixel binning as compared to the frame binning will be discussed and degradation of SNR as compared to theoretical value for pixel binning will be analyzed.

  2. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    elucidate and exemplify already well-known problems in relation to the experience of vertical and horizontal lighting. Pixel Experiments exist as a synergy between speculative test setups and lighting design in practice. This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research...... design it became relevant to investigate the use of LEDs as the physical equivalent of a pixel as a design approach. In this book our interest has been in identifying how the qualities of LEDs can be used in lighting applications. With experiences in the planning and implementation of architectural...... lighting design in practice, one quickly experiences and realises that there are untapped potentials in the attributes of LED technology. In this research, speculative studies have been made working with the attributes of LEDs in architectural contexts, with the ambition to ascertain new strategies...

  3. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  4. CCD-based vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Damerell, C J S

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, CCD-based vertex detectors have been used to construct some of the most precise 'tracking microscopes' in particle physics. They were initially used by the ACCMOR collaboration for fixed target experiments in CERN, where they enabled the lifetimes of some of the shortest-lived charm particles to be measured precisely. The migration to collider experiments was accomplished in the SLD experiment, where the original 120 Mpixel detector was later upgraded to one with 307 Mpixels. This detector was used in a range of physics studies which exceeded the capability of the LEP detectors, including the most precise limit to date on the Bs mixing parameter. This success, and the high background hit densities that will inevitably be encountered at the future TeV-scale linear collider, have established the need for a silicon pixel-based vertex detector at this machine. The technical options have now been broadened to include a wide range of possible silicon imaging technologies as well as CCDs (mon...

  5. High-resolution CCD imagers using area-array CCD's for sensing spectral components of an optical line image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabd, Hammam (Inventor); Kosonocky, Walter F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    CCD imagers with a novel replicated-line-imager architecture are abutted to form an extended line sensor. The sensor is preceded by optics having a slit aperture and having an optical beam splitter or astigmatic lens for projecting multiple line images through an optical color-discriminating stripe filter to the CCD imagers. A very high resolution camera suitable for use in a satellite, for example, is thus provided. The replicated-line architecture of the imager comprises an area-array CCD, successive rows of which are illuminated by replications of the same line segment, as transmitted by respective color filter stripes. The charge packets formed by accumulation of photoresponsive charge in the area-array CCD are read out row by row. Each successive row of charge packets is then converted from parallel to serial format in a CCD line register and its amplitude sensed to generate a line of output signal.

  6. Design of a CCD Camera for Space Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    demonstration of the SensorSat satellite to scan the geosynchronous- orbit belt from low Earth orbit . This mission is technology pathfinder follow-on for the...the geo belt from an equatorial orbit . This is done with a novel approach via microsatellite of only 120 Kg. The satellite will scan the belt...electronics design for observing satellites in the geo belt. The paper discusses the design overview, tactics for tuning operation of a CCD, and

  7. arXiv Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-26

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068  e- rms/pixel. This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while ...

  8. Nonlinear Pixel Replacement Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    taken by the LANDSAT and NIMBUS-7 satellites. They also show the effect of noisy pixels on these techniques arid the types of performance... surface clutter and may not give the best representation of the true intensity values which should be there. The intent of this report is to describe...end c shell sort c sort the real arr~jy elements I(,) to I()) C ascending orde~r c subroutine sliell,,orA(x ri) real*4 x(*i, temp * rnteger*4 i~yn

  9. Multi-spectral CCD camera system for ocean water color and seacoast observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Shiping; Wu, Yanlin; Huang, Qiaolin; Jin, Weiqi

    2001-10-01

    One of the earth observing instruments on HY-1 Satellite which will be launched in 2001, the multi-spectral CCD camera system, is developed by Beijing Institute of Space Mechanics & Electricity (BISME), Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST). In 798 km orbit, the system can provide images with 250 m ground resolution and a swath of 500 km. It is mainly used for coast zone dynamic mapping and oceanic watercolor monitoring, which include the pollution of offshore and coast zone, plant cover, watercolor, ice, terrain underwater, suspended sediment, mudflat, soil and vapor gross. The multi- spectral camera system is composed of four monocolor CCD cameras, which are line array-based, 'push-broom' scanning cameras, and responding for four spectral bands. The camera system adapts view field registration; that is, each camera scans the same region at the same moment. Each of them contains optics, focal plane assembly, electrical circuit, installation structure, calibration system, thermal control and so on. The primary features on the camera system are: (1) Offset of the central wavelength is better than 5 nm; (2) Degree of polarization is less than 0.5%; (3) Signal-to-noise ratio is about 1000; (4) Dynamic range is better than 2000:1; (5) Registration precision is better than 0.3 pixel; (6) Quantization value is 12 bit.

  10. EVALUATION OF RATIONAL FUNCTION MODEL FOR GEOMETRIC MODELING OF CHANG'E-1 CCD IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rational Function Model (RFM is a generic geometric model that has been widely used in geometric processing of high-resolution earth-observation satellite images, due to its generality and excellent capability of fitting complex rigorous sensor models. In this paper, the feasibility and precision of RFM for geometric modeling of China's Chang'E-1 (CE-1 lunar orbiter images is presented. The RFM parameters of forward-, nadir- and backward-looking CE-1 images are generated though least squares solution using virtual control points derived from the rigorous sensor model. The precision of the RFM is evaluated by comparing with the rigorous sensor model in both image space and object space. Experimental results using nine images from three orbits show that RFM can precisely fit the rigorous sensor model of CE-1 CCD images with a RMS residual error of 1/100 pixel level in image space and less than 5 meters in object space. This indicates that it is feasible to use RFM to describe the imaging geometry of CE-1 CCD images and spacecraft position and orientation. RFM will enable planetary data centers to have an option to supply RFM parameters of orbital images while keeping the original orbit trajectory data confidential.

  11. [Retrieval and validation of the surface reflectance using HJ-1-CCD data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shen-Shen; Chen, Liang-Fu; Tao, Jin-Hua; Han, Dong; Wang, Zhong-Ting; He, Bao-Hua

    2011-02-01

    The potentiality of the retrieval of surface reflectance using CCD camera aboard HJ-1A/B satellite was studied. It is very difficult to use dark targets in atmospheric correction due to the lack of near infrared band. The alternative normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the red/blue reflectance ratio are detected from the spectral experiment in Beijing and the Pearl River Delta. Ground-based spectral data including grass, dense vegetation, water body, soil, residential roof and bright building etc. were used to validate the surface reflectance in Beijing, and the relative error in red, blue band is under 38.7% and 37.2% respectively. Uncertainties of the surface reflectance retrievals were analyzed. The comparison of MODIS surface reflectance product showed that there is a good agreement in the dense targets, and the correlation coefficient (R2) in red, blue band is as high as 0.809 4 and 0.723 9 respectively. HJ-1-CCD data can effectively reduce pixel-mixed impact on the cement roof and bright buildings, and the inversion accuracy is higher than MODIS products.

  12. Correction of sub-pixel topographical effects on land surface albedo retrieved from geostationary satellite (FengYun-2D) observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roupioz, L.F.S.; Jia, L.; Nerry, F.; Menenti, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is characterised by a very strong relief which affects albedo retrieval from satellite data. The objective of this study is to highlight the effects of subpixel topography and to account for those effects when retrieving land surface albedo from geostationary satellite

  13. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  14. ACS/WFC Pixel History, Bringing the Pixels Back to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy within a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) results in excess electrical current that is trapped within the lattice structure of the electronics. This excess signal from the CCD itself can be present through multiple exposures, which will have an adverse effect on its science performance unless it is corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as ``dark'' images, allow for the measurement of thermal-electron contamination at each pixel of the CCD. This so-called ``dark current'' can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling to the science exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain value are traditionally marked as ``hot'' and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these pixels as being bad. However, these pixels may not be bad in the sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted; if these pixels are shown to be stable over a given anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current can be taken into account and put into the error arrays.

  15. Is Flat fielding Safe for Precision CCD Astronomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Michael; Davis, Christopher P.; Roodman, Aaron

    2017-08-01

    The ambitious goals of precision cosmology with wide-field optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) demand precision CCD astronomy as their foundation. This in turn requires an understanding of previously uncharacterized sources of systematic error in CCD sensors, many of which manifest themselves as static effective variations in pixel area. Such variation renders a critical assumption behind the traditional procedure of flat fielding—that a sensor’s pixels comprise a uniform grid—invalid. In this work, we present a method to infer a curl-free model of a sensor’s underlying pixel grid from flat-field images, incorporating the superposition of all electrostatic sensor effects—both known and unknown—present in flat-field data. We use these pixel grid models to estimate the overall impact of sensor systematics on photometry, astrometry, and PSF shape measurements in a representative sensor from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) and a prototype LSST sensor. Applying the method to DECam data recovers known significant sensor effects for which corrections are currently being developed within DES. For an LSST prototype CCD with pixel-response non-uniformity (PRNU) of 0.4%, we find the impact of “improper” flat fielding on these observables is negligible in nominal .7″ seeing conditions. These errors scale linearly with the PRNU, so for future LSST production sensors, which may have larger PRNU, our method provides a way to assess whether pixel-level calibration beyond flat fielding will be required.

  16. Thinned back-illuminated CCD for x-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Ilse, Werner; Wilhein, Thomas; Guttmann, Peter

    1993-07-01

    X-ray microscopy requires image detectors for soft x-rays (2.4 nm to 4.5 nm wavelength) with high detective quantum efficiency for a low radiation dosage applied to the sample. A thinned backside illuminated CCD has been attached to the Gottingen x-ray microscope, which is installed at the BESSY electron storage ring in Berlin. The CCD was a commercially available device with 1024 by 1024 pixels (each 24 micrometers square) without the anti-reflecting coating, which is applied to the standard device. First experiments performed at the primarily used x- ray wavelength of 2.4 nm show a considerable reduction of exposure time compared to the previously used photographic emulsion. This greatly reduces the radiation dose applied to the sample specimen. There was no degradation in performance of the CCD detected after one week of operation.

  17. LiCHy: The CAF’s LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral Integrated Airborne Observation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design, implementation and performance of a novel airborne system, which integrates commercial waveform LiDAR, CCD (Charge-Coupled Device camera and hyperspectral sensors into a common platform system. CAF’s (The Chinese Academy of Forestry LiCHy (LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral Airborne Observation System is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation vertical structure, horizontal pattern, and foliar spectra from different view angles at very high spatial resolution (~1 m on a wide range of airborne platforms. The horizontal geo-location accuracy of LiDAR and CCD is about 0.5 m, with LiDAR vertical resolution and accuracy 0.15 m and 0.3 m, respectively. The geo-location accuracy of hyperspectral image is within 2 pixels for nadir view observations and 5–7 pixels for large off-nadir observations of 55° with multi-angle modular when comparing to LiDAR product. The complementary nature of LiCHy’s sensors makes it an effective and comprehensive system for forest inventory, change detection, biodiversity monitoring, carbon accounting and ecosystem service evaluation. The LiCHy system has acquired more than 8000 km2 of data over typical forests across China. These data are being used to investigate potential LiDAR and optical remote sensing applications in forest management, forest carbon accounting, biodiversity evaluation, and to aid in the development of similar satellite configurations. This paper describes the integration of the LiCHy system, the instrument performance and data processing workflow. We also demonstrate LiCHy’s data characteristics, current coverage, and potential vegetation applications.

  18. Pixel Stability in HST Advanced Camera for Surveys Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman A.; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current that is propagated into individual pixels in an exposure. This excess signal from the CCD itself can be persistently existent through multiple exposures and can have an adverse effect on the detectors science performance unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed to map the location of these pixels. These images, generally referred to as “dark” images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the science exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as “hot” and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these pixels as being bad because of this extra current. However, these pixels may not be "bad" in the traditional sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted. If these pixels are shown to be stable over an anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra Poisson noise from this hot pixel’s dark current can be taken into account. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously marked as bad to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  19. Gold detector: modular CCD area detector for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naday, Istvan; Ross, Stephan W.; Kanyo, Miklos; Westbrook, Mary L.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Phillips, Walter C.; Stanton, Martin J.; O'Mara, Daniel M.

    1995-04-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a modular CCD area detector system for macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron x-ray sources, code-named the `gold' detector system. The sensitive area of the detector is 150 mm X 150 mm, with 3,072 X 3,072 pixel sampling, resulting in roughly a 50 micrometers pixel raster. The x-ray image formed on the face of the detector is converted to visible light by a thin phosphor layer. This image is transferred optically to nine CCD sensors by nine square fiberoptic tapers (one for each CCD), arranged in a 3 X 3 array. Each taper demagnifies the image by a factor of approximately 2. Each CCD has a 1,024 X 1,024 pixel raster and is read out through two independent data channels. After each x-ray exposure period the x-ray shutter is closed and the electronic image is digitized (16-bit) and read out in 1.8s. Alteratively, the image may be binned 2 X 2 during readout, resulting in a 1,536 X 1,536 raster of 100 micrometers pixels; this image can be read out in 0.4s. The CCD sensors are operated at -40 degree(s)C to reduce electronic noise. The detector is operated under full computer control: all operational parameters (readout rates, CCD temperature, etc.) can be adjusted from the console. The image data (18 MByte/image) are transferred via a fast VME system to a control processor and ultimately to disk storage. During April 1994 we carried out a complete set of measurements at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) for a full characterization of the gold detector. Characterization includes quantitative evaluation of the instrument's conversion gain (signal level/x-ray photon); detective quantum efficiency (DQE); point-spread function; sensitivity as a function of x-ray energy; geometrical distortion of images; spatial uniformity; read noise; and dark image and dark image noise. Characterization parameters derived from these measurements show that this detector will be extraordinarily valuable for macromolecular

  20. Modulation coding for pixel-matched holographic data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, G W; Ashley, J; Coufal, H; Grygier, R K; Hoffnagle, J A; Jefferson, C M; Marcus, B

    1997-05-01

    We describe a digital holographic storage system for the study of noise sources and the evaluation of modulation and error-correction codes. A precision zoom lens and Fourier transform optics provide pixel-to-pixel matching between any input spatial light modulator and output CCD array over magnifications from 0.8 to 3. Holograms are angle multiplexed in LiNbO(3):Fe by use of the 90 degrees geometry, and reconstructions are detected with a 60-frame/s CCD camera. Modulation codes developed on this platform permit image transmission down to signal levels of ~2000 photons per ON camera pixel, at raw bit-error rates (BER's) of better than 10(-5). Using an 8-12-pixel modulation code, we have stored and retrieved 1200 holograms (each with 45,600 user bits) without error, for a raw BER of <2x10(-8).

  1. Active pixel sensors : The sensor of choice for future space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijtens, J.; Theuwissen, A.; Rao, P.R.; Wang, X.; Xie, N.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally known that active pixel sensors (APS) have a number of advantages over CCD detectors if it comes to cost for mass production, power consumption and ease of integration. Nevertheless, most space applications still use CCD detectors because they tend to give better performance and have

  2. CCD Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheim, Bob; Argyle, R. W.

    One night late in 1918, astronomer William Milburn, observing the region of Cassiopeia from Reverend T.H.E.C. Espin's observatory in Tow Law (England), discovered a hitherto unrecorded double star (Wright 1993). He reported it to Rev. Espin, who measured the pair using his 24-in. reflector: the fainter star was 6.0 arcsec from the primary, at position angle 162.4 ^{circ } (i.e. the fainter star was south-by-southeast from the primary) (Espin 1919). Some time later, it was recognized that the astrograph of the Vatican Observatory had taken an image of the same star-field a dozen years earlier, in late 1906. At that earlier epoch, the fainter star had been separated from the brighter one by only 4.8 arcsec, at position angle 186.2 ^{circ } (i.e. almost due south). Were these stars a binary pair, or were they just two unrelated stars sailing past each other? Some additional measurements might have begun to answer this question. If the secondary star was following a curved path, that would be a clue of orbital motion; if it followed a straight-line path, that would be a clue that these are just two stars passing in the night. Unfortunately, nobody took the trouble to re-examine this pair for almost a century, until the 2MASS astrometric/photometric survey recorded it in late 1998. After almost another decade, this amateur astronomer took some CCD images of the field in 2007, and added another data point on the star's trajectory, as shown in Fig. 15.1.

  3. Fundamental performance differences of CMOS and CCD imagers: part V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Pinter, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    Previous papers delivered over the last decade have documented developmental progress made on large pixel scientific CMOS imagers that match or surpass CCD performance. New data and discussions presented in this paper include: 1) a new buried channel CCD fabricated on a CMOS process line, 2) new data products generated by high performance custom scientific CMOS 4T/5T/6T PPD pixel imagers, 3) ultimate CTE and speed limits for large pixel CMOS imagers, 4) fabrication and test results of a flight 4k x 4k CMOS imager for NRL's SoloHi Solar Orbiter Mission, 5) a progress report on ultra large stitched Mk x Nk CMOS imager, 6) data generated by on-chip sub-electron CDS signal chain circuitry used in our imagers, 7) CMOS and CMOSCCD proton and electron radiation damage data for dose levels up to 10 Mrd, 8) discussions and data for a new class of PMOS pixel CMOS imagers and 9) future CMOS development work planned.

  4. High-Voltage Clock Driver for Photon-Counting CCD Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the CCD97 from e2v technologies as it is being evaluated at Goddard Space Flight Center's Detector Characterization Laboratory (DCL) for possible use in ultra-low background noise space astronomy applications, such as Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C). The CCD97 includes a photoncounting mode where the equivalent output noise is less than one electron. Use of this mode requires a clock signal at a voltage level greater than the level achievable by the existing CCD (charge-coupled-device) electronics. A high-voltage waveform generator has been developed in code 660/601 to support the CCD97 evaluation. The unit generates required clock waveforms at voltage levels from -20 to +50 V. It deals with standard and arbitrary waveforms and supports pixel rates from 50 to 500 kHz. The system is designed to interface with existing Leach CCD electronics.

  5. Charge-coupled device (CCD) television camera for NASA's Galileo mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, K. P.; Clary, M. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The CCD detector under construction for use in the slow-scan television camera for the NASA Galileo Jupiter orbiter to be launched in 1985 is presented. The science objectives and the design constraints imposed by the earth telemetry link, platform residual motion, and the Jovian radiation environment are discussed. Camera optics are inherited from Voyager; filter wavelengths are chosen to enable discrimination of Galilean-satellite surface chemical composition. The CCO design, an 800 by 800-element 'virtual-phase' solid-state silicon image-sensor array with supporting electronics, is described with detailed discussion of the thermally generated dark current, quantum efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and resolution. Tests of the effect of ionizing radiation were performed and are analyzed statistically. An imaging mode using a 2-1/3-sec frame time and on-chip summation of the signal in 2 x 2 blocks of adjacent pixels is designed to limit the effects of the most extreme Jovian radiation. Smearing due to spacecraft/target relative velocity and platform instability will be corrected for via an algorithm maximizing spacial resolution at a given signal-to-noise level. The camera is expected to produce 40,000 images of Jupiter and its satellites during the 20-month mission.

  6. Series of CCD cameras for low-light-level applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Michal L.; Weaver, Daniel W.; Ambrose, Tom P.; Hirpara, Dan; Gallagher, Susan; Hall, Andrew M.; Bone, Gregg

    1996-03-01

    We describe a series of five CCD cameras designed by Gordian for low light-level applications. The first device is a low-cost non-imaging astronomical autoguiding tracker based on the Texas Instruments TC255 CCD chip and an MC6811 microcontroller. Mounting off-axis, it provides standardized tracking-motor signals for any telescope with a dual-axis drive corrector, automatically compensating for the mechanical peculiarities of the drive, set- up factors, and pointing errors. The tracker can guide to +/- 1 arcsec on an 8th magnitude star when used with an 8' aperture, f/10 telescope. The basic autoguider design has been extended to produce self-contained 8-bit and 16-bit imaging cameras with autoguiding functionality. Images are buffered in PSRAM, then relayed to a host PC via an RS-232 serial connection. The addition of regulated thermoelectric cooling reduces CCD thermal noise and alleviates dark current saturation. Gordian has also designed two high-resolution cameras based on the Kodak KAF-0400 and KAF-1600 CCDs. The cameras produce 16-bit images with 768 X 512 pixels or 1536 X 1024 pixels, respectively. Pixel size is 9 micrometers square. The camera head contains the CCD, thermoelectric cooling mechanism, analog electronics, and a custom-designed electromechanical shutter based on FlexinolTM actuator wire. A separate base unit houses a Motorola 68306 microprocessor and associated electronics for telescope control and on-board image processing. A stepper-motor based filter wheel can be attached directly to the camera head. The camera communicates with a personal computer via SCSI or serial connection. Software for the host PC provides additional control options, data storage, and image processing capability.

  7. Pixels and patterns: A satellite-based investigation of changes to urban features in the Sanya Region, Hainan Special Economic Zone, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Andrew Allan

    Throughout most of China, and particularly in the coastal areas of its south, ecological resources and traditional culture are viewed by many to be negatively impacted by accelerating urbanization. As a result, achieving an appropriate balance between development and environmental protection has become a significant problem facing policy-makers in these urbanizing areas. The establishment of a Special Economic Zone in the Chinese Province of Hainan has made its coastal areas attractive locations for business and commerce. Development activities that support a burgeoning tourism industry, but which are damaging the environment, are now prominent components of the landscape in the Sanya Region of Hainan. In this study, patterns of urban growth in the Sanya Region of Hainan Province are investigated. Specifically, using several forms of satellite imagery, statistical tools and ancillary data, urban morphology and changes to the extent and spatial arrangement of urban features are researched and documented. A twelve-year chronology of data was collected which consists of four dates of satellite imagery (1987, 1991, 1997, 1999) acquired by three different satellite sensors (SPOT 2 HRV, Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+). A method of assessing inter-temporal variance in unchanged features is developed as a surrogate for traditional evaluations of change detection that require spatially accurate and time-specific data. Results reveal that selective PCA using visible bands with the exclusion of an ocean mask yield the most interpretable components representative of landscape urbanization in the Sanya Region. The geostatistical approach of variography is employed to measure spatial dependence and to test for the presence of directional change in urban morphology across a time series of satellite images. Interpreted time-series geostatistics identify and quantify landscape structure, and changes to structure, and provide a valuable quantitative description of landscape change

  8. Optical and dark characterization of the PLATO CCD at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, Peter; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Oosterbroek, Tim; Duvet, Ludovic; Beaufort, Thierry; Blommaert, Sander; Butler, Bart; Heijnen, Jerko; Lemmel, Frederic; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Smit, Hans; Visser, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    PLATO - PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars - is the third medium-class mission (M3) to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. It is due for launch in 2025 with the main objective to find and study terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around solar-like stars. The payload consists of >20 cameras; with each camera comprising 4 Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), a large number of flight model devices procured by ESA shall ultimately be integrated on the spacecraft. The CCD270 - specially designed and manufactured by e2v for the PLATO mission - is a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) back-illuminated device operating at 4 MHz pixel rate and coming in two variants: full frame and frame transfer. In order to de-risk the PLATO CCD procurement and aid the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section is currently validating the PLATO CCD270. This validation consists in demonstrating that the device achieves its specified electrooptical performance in the relevant environment: operated at 4 MHz, at cold and before and after proton irradiation. As part of this validation, CCD270 devices have been characterized in the dark as well as optically with respect to performance parameters directly relevant for the photometric application of the CCDs. Dark tests comprise the measurement of gain sensitivity to bias voltages, charge injection tests, and measurement of hot and variable pixels after irradiation. In addition, the results of measurements of Quantum Efficiency for a range of angles of incidence, intra- pixel response (non-)uniformity, and response to spot illumination, before and after proton irradiation. In particular, the effect of radiation induced degradation of the charge transfer efficiency on the measured charge in a star-like spot has been studied as a function of signal level and of position on the pixel grid, Also, the effect of various levels of background light on the

  9. Developments in X-ray and astronomical CCD imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, J A; Kosicki, B B; Reich, R K

    1999-01-01

    There have been many recent developments in the attributes and capabilities of silicon-based CCD detectors for use in space and ground-based astronomy. The imagers used as X-ray detectors require very low noise and excellent quantum efficiency over the energy range of 200-10000 eV. This is achieved using a combination of front and back-illuminated imagers fabricated on a 5000 OMEGA-cm resistivity material. A requirement for ground-based imagers is very good sensitivity between 350 and 1000 nm, as well as low noise and a high degree of spatial uniformity. We will describe the fabrication and performance of these imagers. Special features integrated into the CCD pixel architecture have increased the capability of the imagers. A fast electronic shutter has been developed for a wavefront sensor in an adaptive optics system. An orthogonal transfer CCD has been designed to compensate for the image motion relative to the CCD focal plane. Also, an antiblooming drain process has been developed so bright sources do not...

  10. Diagnostics of the CCD using the mesh experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunemi, H; Mori, K; Yoshita, K; Miyata, E

    1999-01-01

    We present here the results of a mesh experiment with which we can measure the shape of a charge cloud generated by the photoabsorption of X-rays inside a charge-coupled device (CCD). The mesh used is made of gold of 13-mu m thickness, and has many holes of 1.4 mu m diameter spaced 48 mu m apart. The CCD used has 12 mu m square pixels. A new criterion with which we can determine the precise alignment in the experiment is introduced to eliminate uncertainties. We measured the charge cloud size at three X-ray energies: Al-K (1.5 keV), Mo-L (2.3 keV) and Ti-K (4.5 keV). The shapes can be well represented not by a point-symmetric Gaussian function, but by an axial symmetric Gaussian function with sigma of 0.7-1.5 mu m. The charge cloud size depends weakly on the mean absorption length in silicon. We find that the charge cloud size can be well explained by a simple model inside the CCD. We discuss that the knowledge of the charge cloud size will enable us to improve the position resolution of the CCD.

  11. Design, analysis, and testing of a CCD array mounting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, John A.; O'Neill, Mark B.

    1991-12-01

    A method has been developed for mounting charge-coupled device (CCD) arrays in an optical telescope so as to minimize thermal defocusing errors. The mounting arrangement was developed for a six-inch aperture, visible band, off-axis reimaging telescope attached to an experimental satellite. The mounting arrangement consists of two pieces: a fiberglass frame which holds the actively cooled CCD package and provides thermal isolation from the telescope body; and a titanium flexure, which acts to minimize structural distortions caused by the difference in thermal expansion properties of the CCD array and the telescope body. This paper describes the design, analysis, and testing of this CCD array mounting arrangement. A detailed finite-element model of the CCD array and the mount was developed and used to predict thermally-induced defocus and gravity sag deformations, as well as natural frequencies. Experimental tests to verify the computer model results were performed using holographic interferometry. Vibration tests were also performed to verify the natural frequencies as well as structural integrity during launch. A comparison of the computer model predictions and the holographic interferometric measurements of thermally-induced defocussing indicates agreement to within 15 to 20%. Both the experimental and computer results indicate that the mounting structure provides focus stability over the operational temperature range of the telescope with sufficient structural integrity to survive the anticipated spacecraft launch loads.

  12. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Turko, B.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  13. Application of a finite size of the charge cloud shape generated by an X-ray photon inside the CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunemi, H; Miyata, E

    2002-01-01

    A mesh experiment enables us to specify the X-ray landing position on a charge-coupled device (CCD) with subpixel resolution. By this experiment, we find that the final charge cloud shape generated by Ti-K X-ray photons (4.5 keV) in the CCD is about 1.5x1.1 mu m sup 2 (standard deviation). An X-ray photon photoabsorbed in the CCD generates a number of electrons, forming an X-ray event. It becomes up to a 4-pixel-split event since the pixel size of the CCD used (12 mu m square pixel) is bigger than the charge cloud size. Using the mesh experiment, we can determine the X-ray landing position on the CCD. In this way, we can compare the estimated X-ray landing position with the actual landing position on the CCD. Employing the charge cloud shape, we can improve the position resolution of the X-ray CCD by referring to the X-ray event pattern. We find that the position accuracy of our method is about 1.0 mu m. We discuss our method, comparing it with the charge centroid method.

  14. First Light with a 67-Million-Pixel WFI Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    tests with the WFI in order to arrive at the optimum adjustment of the camera at the telescope. We show here two of these that illustrate the great potential of this new facility. Spiral Galaxy NGC 253 ESO PR Photo 02a/99 ESO PR Photo 02a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800x850 pix - 205k] [High-Res - JPEG: 4000 x 4252 pix - 3.0Mb] ESO PR Photo 02b/99 ESO PR Photo 02b/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800x870 pix - 353k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2200 x 2393 pix - 2.0Mb] Caption to PR Photos 02a/99 and 02b/99 : These photos show a sky field around the Spiral Galaxy NGC 253 (Type Sc) seen nearly edge-on. It is located in the southern constellation Sculptor at a distance of about 8 million light-years. The image is the sum of five 5-min exposures through a blue (B-band) optical filtre. They were slightly offset with respect to each other so that the small gaps between the eight CCD's of the mosaic are no longer visible. This image also shows the faint trails of 2 artificial satellites. In PR Photo 02a/99 , the full WFI field-of-view is reproduced, while the sub-field in PR Photo 02b/99 contains some fainter and smaller background galaxies. Many of the quite numerous and small, slightly fuzzy objects are undoubtedly globular clusters of NGC 253. Technical information: The image processing consisted of de-biassing, flat-fielding, and removal (by interpolation) of some bad columns. The full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of stellar images is about 1.0 arcsec. PR Photo 02a/99 was rebinned (2x2) to 4kx4k size and sampling 0.48 arcsec/pixel. PR Photo 02b/99 is a subimage of the former, but at the full original sampling of 0.24 arcsec/pixel. It covers about 2kx2k, or about 1/16 of the full field. North is up and East is left. The observations were made on December 17, 1998. The Waning Moon ESO PR Photo 02c/99 ESO PR Photo 02c/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 1245 pix - 242k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 4667 pix - 2.3Mb] ESO PR Photo 02d/99 ESO PR Photo 02d/99 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 1003 pix - 394k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x

  15. Pixel History for Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, D.; Grogin, N.; Bourque, M.; Ogaz, S.

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current. This excess charge is trapped within the silicon lattice structure of the CCD electronics. It can persist through multiple exposures and have an adverse effect on science performance of the detectors unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as "dark" images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This so-called "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the corresponding exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as "hot" and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these because of the extra current. However, these pixels may not be unusable because of an unreliable dark subtraction; if we find these pixels to be stable over an anneal period, we can properly subtract the charge and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current will be propagated into the error arrays. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously flagged as unusable to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  16. CCD camera for an autoguider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, William V.

    1991-06-01

    The requirements of a charge coupled device (CCD) autoguider camera and the specifications of a camera that we propose to build to meet those requirements will be discussed. The design goals of both the package and the electronics will be considered.

  17. CCD Corner-Turning Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    devices and exhibits the characteristic 1-(0 + t/r )l transient with T- CL/ gmo -18 ns, where gmo Is the device transconductence at t - 0+. Figure 63(b...Diamon, A. M. Mohsen, and T. C. McGill, "Charge Transfer In Buried Channel CCD’s," ISSCC Philadelphia, Digest of Tech. Papers, 146 (1974). 14. See

  18. Radiation events in astronomical CCD images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.R.; McDonald, R.J.; Hurley, D.L.; Holland, S.E.; Groom, D.E.; Brown, W.E.; Gilmore, D.K.; Stover, R.J.; Wei, M.

    2001-12-18

    The remarkable sensitivity of depleted silicon to ionizing radiation is a nuisance to astronomers. ''Cosmic rays'' degrade images because of struck pixels, leading to modified observing strategies and the development of algorithms to remove the unwanted artifacts. In the new-generation CCD's with thick sensitive regions, cosmic-ray muons make recognizable straight tracks and there is enhanced sensitivity to ambient gamma radiation via Compton-scattered electrons (''worms''). Beta emitters inside the dewar, for example high-potassium glasses such as BK7, also produce worm-like tracks. The cosmic-ray muon rate is irreducible and increases with altitude. The gamma rays are mostly by-products of the U and Th decay chains; these elements always appear as traces in concrete and other materials. The Compton recoil event rate can be reduced significantly by the choice of materials in the environment and dewar and by careful shielding. Telescope domes appear to be significantly cleaner than basement laboratories and Coude spectrograph rooms. Radiation sources inside the dewar can be eliminated by judicious choice of materials. Cosmogenic activation during high-altitude flights does not appear to be a problem. Our conclusions are supported by tests at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory low-level counting facilities in Berkeley and at Oroville, California (180 m underground).

  19. CVD diamond pixel development

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, R; Koeth, T W; Perera, L P; Schnetzer, S; Worm, S

    2002-01-01

    Pixel detectors using synthetic diamond are an attractive alternative to silicon for use in radiation harsh environments such as at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Recent test beam results using Compact Muon Solenoid pixel readout electronics are presented, which demonstrate a hit efficiency of 95% and position resolution of 31 mu m for a diamond pixel sensor with 125 * 125 mu m/sup 2/ pitch. (5 refs).

  20. Organic smart pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodabalapur, A.; Bao, Z.; Makhija, A.; Laquindanum, J. G.; Raju, V. R.; Feng, Y.; Katz, H. E.; Rogers, J.

    1998-07-01

    The fabrication and characteristics of organic smart pixels are described. The smart pixel reported in this letter consists of a single organic thin-film field effect transistor (FET) monolithically integrated with an organic light-emitting diode. The FET active material is a regioregular polythiophene. The maximum optical power emitted by the smart pixel is about 300 nW/cm2 corresponding to a luminance of ˜2300 cd/m2.

  1. Analysis of Dark Current in BRITE Nanostellite CCD Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Popowicz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The BRightest Target Explorer (BRITE is the pioneering nanosatellite mission dedicated for photometric observations of the brightest stars in the sky. The BRITE charge coupled device (CCD sensors are poorly shielded against extensive flux of energetic particles which constantly induce defects in the silicon lattice. In this paper we investigate the temporal evolution of the generation of the dark current in the BRITE CCDs over almost four years after launch. Utilizing several steps of image processing and employing normalization of the results, it was possible to obtain useful information about the progress of thermal activity in the sensors. The outcomes show a clear and consistent linear increase of induced damage despite the fact that only about 0.14% of CCD pixels were probed. By performing the analysis of temperature dependencies of the dark current, we identified the observed defects as phosphorus-vacancy (PV pairs, which are common in proton irradiated CCD matrices. Moreover, the Meyer-Neldel empirical rule was confirmed in our dark current data, yielding E M N = 24.8 meV for proton-induced PV defects.

  2. Single-Electron and Single-Photon Sensitivity with a Silicon Skipper CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Sofo-Haro, Miguel; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-01

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068 e- rms /pixel . This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while future astronomical applications may include direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  3. Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Sofo-Haro, Miguel [Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Fermilab; Essig, Rouven [YITP, Stony Brook; Guardincerri, Yann [Fermilab; Holland, Steve [LBL, Berkeley; Volansky, Tomer [Tel Aviv U.; Yu, Tien-Tien [CERN

    2017-05-31

    We have developed a non-destructive readout system that uses a floating-gate amplifier on a thick, fully depleted charge coupled device (CCD) to achieve ultra-low readout noise of 0.068 e- rms/pix. This is the first time that discrete sub-electron readout noise has been achieved reproducibly over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This allows the precise counting of the number of electrons in each pixel, ranging from pixels with 0 electrons to more than 1500 electrons. The resulting CCD detector is thus an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while astronomical applications include future direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  4. The OCA CCD Camera Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    multi CCD arrays for wide field telescopes with an array of 8x8 1K CCDs in use at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile . The same group is also involved...Verify key EPROM -292H VIH . VIH Program security bitl 1 29AH . VPP Program security’ bit 2 *. .298H -Vpp Verify security bits - 9HVIH ViI NOTE: 1...Pulsed from V.. to VIL and returned to VIH . EPROM PROGRAMMING AND VERIFICATION ..t= 21’C to-+27 ’rC:-VCC= 5V ±10%VS3 = OV. SYMBOL I .-- PARAMETER MIN MAX

  5. UV-sensitive scientific CCD image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevsky, Grigory I.; Kossov, Vladimir G.; Iblyaminova, A. F.; Lazovsky, Leonid Y.; Vydrevitch, Michail G.

    1997-06-01

    An investigation of probe laser irradiation interaction with substances containing in an environment has long since become a recognized technique for contamination detection and identification. For this purpose, a near and midrange-IR laser irradiation is traditionally used. However, as many works presented on last ecology monitoring conferences show, in addition to traditional systems, rapidly growing are systems with laser irradiation from near-UV range (250 - 500 nm). Use of CCD imagers is one of the prerequisites for this allowing the development of a multi-channel computer-based spectral research system. To identify and analyze contaminating impurities on an environment, such methods as laser fluorescence analysis, UV absorption and differential spectroscopy, Raman scattering are commonly used. These methods are used to identify a large number of impurities (petrol, toluene, Xylene isomers, SO2, acetone, methanol), to detect and identify food pathogens in real time, to measure a concentration of NH3, SO2 and NO in combustion outbursts, to detect oil products in a water, to analyze contaminations in ground waters, to define ozone distribution in the atmosphere profile, to monitor various chemical processes including radioactive materials manufacturing, heterogeneous catalytic reactions, polymers production etc. Multi-element image sensor with enhanced UV sensitivity, low optical non-uniformity, low intrinsic noise and high dynamic range is a key element of all above systems. Thus, so called Virtual Phase (VP) CCDs possessing all these features, seems promising for ecology monitoring spectral measuring systems. Presently, a family of VP CCDs with different architecture and number of pixels is developed and being manufactured. All CCDs from this family are supported with a precise slow-scan digital image acquisition system that can be used in various image processing systems in astronomy, biology, medicine, ecology etc. An image is displayed directly on a PC

  6. CCD research. [design, fabrication, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental problems encountered in designing, fabricating, and applying CCD's are reviewed. Investigations are described and results and conclusions are given for the following: (1) the development of design analyses employing computer aided techniques and their application to the design of a grapped structure; (2) the role of CCD's in applications to electronic functions, in particular, signal processing; (3) extending the CCD to silicon films on sapphire (SOS); and (4) all aluminum transfer structure with low noise input-output circuits. Related work on CCD imaging devices is summarized.

  7. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) is part of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment : . SPD Structure . Bump Bonding . Test beam . ALICE1LHCb Readout Chip . Chip Tests . Data from the SPD

  8. New advancements in charge-coupled device technology - Sub-electron noise and 4096 x 4096 pixel CCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Dingizian, Arsham; Bredthauer, Richard A.; Chandler, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on two new advancements in CCD technology. The first area of development has produced a special purpose CCD designed for ultra low-signal level imaging and spectroscopy applications that require sub-electron read noise floors. A nondestructive output circuit operating near its 1/f noise regime is clocked in a special manner to read a single pixel multiple times. Off-chip electronics average the multiple values, reducing the random noise by the square-root of the number of samples taken. Noise floors below 0.5 electrons rms are reported. The second development involves the design and performance of a high resolution imager of 4096 x 4096 pixels, the largest CCD manufactured in terms of pixel count. The device utilizes a 7.5-micron pixel fabricated with three-level poly-silicon to achieve high yield.

  9. Practical performance evaluation of a 10k × 10k CCD for electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bammes, Benjamin E; Rochat, Ryan H; Jakana, Joanita; Chiu, Wah

    2011-09-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) images are commonly collected using either charge-coupled devices (CCD) or photographic film. Both film and the current generation of 16 megapixel (4k × 4k) CCD cameras have yielded high-resolution structures. Yet, despite the many advantages of CCD cameras, more than two times as many structures of biological macromolecules have been published in recent years using photographic film. The continued preference to film, especially for subnanometer-resolution structures, may be partially influenced by the finer sampling and larger effective specimen imaging area offered by film. Large format digital cameras may finally allow them to overtake film as the preferred detector for cryo-EM. We have evaluated a 111-megapixel (10k × 10k) CCD camera with a 9 μm pixel size. The spectral signal-to-noise ratios of low dose images of carbon film indicate that this detector is capable of providing signal up to at least 2/5 Nyquist frequency potentially retrievable for 3D reconstructions of biological specimens, resulting in more than double the effective specimen imaging area of existing 4k × 4k CCD cameras. We verified our estimates using frozen-hydrated ε15 bacteriophage as a biological test specimen with previously determined structure, yielding a ∼7 Å resolution single particle reconstruction from only 80 CCD frames. Finally, we explored the limits of current CCD technology by comparing the performance of this detector to various CCD cameras used for recording data yielding subnanometer resolution cryo-EM structures submitted to the electron microscopy data bank (http://www.emdatabank.org/). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gossip: Gaseous pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffeman, E. N.

    2007-12-01

    Several years ago a revolutionary miniature TPC was developed using a pixel chip with a Micromegas foil spanned over it. To overcome the mechanical stability problems and improve the positioning accuracy while spanning a foil on top of a small readout chip a process has been developed in which a Micromegas-like grid is applied on a CMOS wafer in a post-processing step. This aluminum grid is supported on insulating pillars that are created by etching after the grid has been made. The energy resolution (measured on the absorption of the X-rays from a 55Fe source) was remarkably good. Several geometries have since been tested and we now believe that a Gas On Slimmed Silicon Pixel chip' (Gossip) may be realized. The drift region of such a gaseous pixel detector would be reduced to a millimeter. Such a detector is potentially very radiation hard (SLHC vertexing) but aging and sparking must be eliminated.

  11. Gossip: Gaseous pixels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffeman, E.N. [Nikhef, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: d77@nikhef.nl

    2007-12-01

    Several years ago a revolutionary miniature TPC was developed using a pixel chip with a Micromegas foil spanned over it. To overcome the mechanical stability problems and improve the positioning accuracy while spanning a foil on top of a small readout chip a process has been developed in which a Micromegas-like grid is applied on a CMOS wafer in a post-processing step. This aluminum grid is supported on insulating pillars that are created by etching after the grid has been made. The energy resolution (measured on the absorption of the X-rays from a {sup 55}Fe source) was remarkably good. Several geometries have since been tested and we now believe that a Gas On Slimmed Silicon Pixel chip' (Gossip) may be realized. The drift region of such a gaseous pixel detector would be reduced to a millimeter. Such a detector is potentially very radiation hard (SLHC vertexing) but aging and sparking must be eliminated.

  12. A design of optical modulation system with pixel-level modulation accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiwei; Qu, Xinghua; Feng, Wei; Liang, Baoqiu

    2018-01-01

    Vision measurement has been widely used in the field of dimensional measurement and surface metrology. However, traditional methods of vision measurement have many limits such as low dynamic range and poor reconfigurability. The optical modulation system before image formation has the advantage of high dynamic range, high accuracy and more flexibility, and the modulation accuracy is the key parameter which determines the accuracy and effectiveness of optical modulation system. In this paper, an optical modulation system with pixel level accuracy is designed and built based on multi-points reflective imaging theory and digital micromirror device (DMD). The system consisted of digital micromirror device, CCD camera and lens. Firstly we achieved accurate pixel-to-pixel correspondence between the DMD mirrors and the CCD pixels by moire fringe and an image processing of sampling and interpolation. Then we built three coordinate systems and calculated the mathematic relationship between the coordinate of digital micro-mirror and CCD pixels using a checkerboard pattern. A verification experiment proves that the correspondence error is less than 0.5 pixel. The results show that the modulation accuracy of system meets the requirements of modulation. Furthermore, the high reflecting edge of a metal circular piece can be detected using the system, which proves the effectiveness of the optical modulation system.

  13. Characterization of Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Felipe Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    It was commissioned at CERN ATLAS pixel group a fluorescence setup for characterization of pixel sensors. The idea is to measure the energies of different targets to calibrate your sensor. It was measured four matrices (80, 95, 98 and 106) of the Investigator1 sensor with different deep PW using copper, iron and titanium as target materials. The matrix 80 has a higher gain (0.065 ± 0.002) and matrix 106 has a better energy resolution (0.05 ± 0.04). The noise of the setup is around 3.6 mV .

  14. Development and evaluation of a CCD-based digital imaging system for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccaro, Michele F.; Toker, Emre

    1993-05-01

    We have developed a CCD-based, high performance, filmless imaging system for stereotactic biopsy procedures in mammography. The CCD camera is based on a 1024 X 1024 pixel format, full-frame, scientific grade, front-illuminated, MPP mode CCD, directly coupled to an X-ray intensifying screen via a 2:1 fiber optic reducer. The CCD is cooled to -10 degree(s)C, and is digitized in slow-scan, correlated double sampling mode at 500 Kpixels/second with 12-bit contrast resolution. X-ray images acquired with the system are processed and displayed on a high resolution monitor within 20 seconds of exposure. System design and specifications will be described, and evaluation of physical performance characteristics will be discussed. The system has been used in over 100 stereotactic breast biopsy procedures to date, and has been shown to significantly improve the speed and accuracy of the biopsy procedure, due to the near real-time acquisition and display of x-ray images. Initial results also indicate that the fiber optic coupled CCD-based imaging system provides superior detectability of low contrast breast lesions and microcalcifications at lower patient dose, as compared to conventional film-screen detectors.

  15. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  16. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  17. Pixel detector insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of the Pixel Tracker, the 66-million-channel device used to pinpoint the vertex of each colliding proton pair, located at the heart of the detector. The geometry of CMS is a cylinder lying on its side (22 meters long and 15 meters high in dia

  18. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth for Chongqing using the HJ-1 satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengwu; Yang, Shiqi; Zeng, Qiaolin; Wang, Yongqian

    2017-06-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a common indicator applied in monitoring aerosols in the atmosphere. The hilly landscape and rapid economic growth of the megacity Chongqing have facilitated increased aerosol concentration, and it is meaningful to accurately retrieve AOD over Chongqing. The HJ-1A/B satellite of China carries a sensor/camera called the Charge Coupled Device (CCD), the spatial resolution of which meets the requirement for retrieving high resolution AOD. In this paper, analysis of the AOD retrievals from different methods using the HJ-1 satellite data revealed the most suitable algorithm. Through comparison with the AOD product of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the AOD retrieval results using enhanced vegetation index (EVI) to estimate dark pixels showed the highest correlation. The continental aerosol model was used to build a lookup table that was able to facilitate a good AOD retrieval for both city and rural areas. Finally, the algorithm that combined dark pixels, buffer areas, and the deep blue algorithm was found to be most suitable for AOD retrieval. The AOD retrieval results based on the HJ-1 data were consistent with MODIS products, and our algorithm yields reasonable results in most cases. The results were also compared with ground-based PM10 measurements synchronized with the overpass time of the HJ-1 satellite, and high correlation was found. The findings are relevant to other Chinese satellite data used for retrieving AOD on the same channels.

  19. Variable pixel size ionospheric tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Zheng, Hongwei; Wang, Yanjun; Nie, Wenfeng; Li, Chaokui; Ao, Minsi; Hu, Wusheng; Zhou, Wei

    2017-06-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel size was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density (IED) distribution. In variable pixel size computerized ionospheric tomography (VPSCIT) model, the IED distribution is parameterized by a decomposition of the lower and upper ionosphere with different pixel sizes. Thus, the lower and upper IED distribution may be very differently determined by the available data. The variable pixel size ionospheric tomography and constant pixel size tomography are similar in most other aspects. There are some differences between two kinds of models with constant and variable pixel size respectively, one is that the segments of GPS signal pay should be assigned to the different kinds of pixel in inversion; the other is smoothness constraint factor need to make the appropriate modified where the pixel change in size. For a real dataset, the variable pixel size method distinguishes different electron density distribution zones better than the constant pixel size method. Furthermore, it can be non-chided that when the effort is spent to identify the regions in a model with best data coverage. The variable pixel size method can not only greatly improve the efficiency of inversion, but also produce IED images with high fidelity which are the same as a used uniform pixel size method. In addition, variable pixel size tomography can reduce the underdetermined problem in an ill-posed inverse problem when the data coverage is irregular or less by adjusting quantitative proportion of pixels with different sizes. In comparison with constant pixel size tomography models, the variable pixel size ionospheric tomography technique achieved relatively good results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of variable pixel size ionospheric tomography was performed. Finally, according to the results of the statistical analysis and quantitative comparison, the

  20. CCD OBSERVATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Charged Coupled Device (CCD) cameras from ESO were used by groups to observe the outburst of comet Halley using a variety of telescopes and chip sets.

  1. Comparison of a CCD and an APS for soft X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graeme; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Clark, A.; Dhesi, S. S.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Steadman, P.; Tartoni, N.; Turchetta, R.

    2011-12-01

    We compare a new CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) to a Princeton Instruments PIXIS-XO: 2048B Charge Coupled Device (CCD) with soft X-rays tested in a synchrotron beam line at the Diamond Light Source (DLS). Despite CCDs being established in the field of scientific imaging, APS are an innovative technology that offers advantages over CCDs. These include faster readout, higher operational temperature, in-pixel electronics for advanced image processing and reduced manufacturing cost. The APS employed was the Vanilla sensor designed by the MI3 collaboration and funded by an RCUK Basic technology grant. This sensor has 520 x 520 square pixels, of size 25 μm on each side. The sensor can operate at a full frame readout of up to 20 Hz. The sensor had been back-thinned, to the epitaxial layer. This was the first time that a back-thinned APS had been demonstrated at a beam line at DLS. In the synchrotron experiment soft X-rays with an energy of approximately 708 eV were used to produce a diffraction pattern from a permalloy sample. The pattern was imaged at a range of integration times with both sensors. The CCD had to be operated at a temperature of -55°C whereas the Vanilla was operated over a temperature range from 20°C to -10°C. We show that the APS detector can operate with frame rates up to two hundred times faster than the CCD, without excessive degradation of image quality. The signal to noise of the APS is shown to be the same as that of the CCD at identical integration times and the response is shown to be linear, with no charge blooming effects. The experiment has allowed a direct comparison of back thinned APS and CCDs in a real soft x-ray synchrotron experiment.

  2. Alpine Pixel Detector Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Delebecque, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Geffroy, N; Massol, N; Rambure, T; Todorov, T

    2013-01-01

    A description of an optimized layout of pixel sensors based on a stave that combines both barrel and endcap module orientations. The mechanical stiffness of the structure is provided by carbon fiber shells spaced by carbon foam. The cooling of the modules is provided by two-phase $CO_{2}$ flowing in a thin titanium pipe glued inside the carbon fiber foam. The electrical services of all modules are provided by a single stave flex. This layout eliminates the need for separate barrel and endcap detector structures, and therefore the barrel services material in front of the endcap. The transition from barrel to endcap module orientation is optimized separately for each layer in order to minimize the active pixel area and the traversed material. The sparse module spacing in the endcap part of the stave allows for multiple fixation points, and for a stiff overall structure composed only of staves interconnected by stiff disks.

  3. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  4. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    Kaestli, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7~TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  5. CMS pixel upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00575876

    2011-01-01

    The LHC machine at CERN finished its first year of pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. While the commissioning to exploit its full potential is still ongoing, there are plans to upgrade its components to reach instantaneous luminosities beyond the initial design value after 2016. A corresponding upgrade of the innermost part of the CMS detector, the pixel detector, is needed. A full replacement of the pixel detector is planned in 2016. It will not only address limitations of the present system at higher data rates, but will aggressively lower the amount of material inside the fiducial tracking volume which will lead to better tracking and b-tagging performance. This article gives an overview of the project and illuminates the motivations and expected improvements in the detector performance.

  6. A method of immediate detection of objects with a near-zero apparent motion in series of CCD-frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanevych, V. E.; Khlamov, S. V.; Vavilova, I. B.; Briukhovetskyi, A. B.; Pohorelov, A. V.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Kudak, V. I.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Dikov, E. N.; Melnik, R. G.; Vlasenko, V. P.; Reichart, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with a computational method for detection of the solar system minor bodies (SSOs), whose inter-frame shifts in series of CCD-frames during the observation are commensurate with the errors in measuring their positions. These objects have velocities of apparent motion between CCD-frames not exceeding three rms errors (3σ) of measurements of their positions. About 15% of objects have a near-zero apparent motion in CCD-frames, including the objects beyond the Jupiter's orbit as well as the asteroids heading straight to the Earth. The proposed method for detection of the object's near-zero apparent motion in series of CCD-frames is based on the Fisher f-criterion instead of using the traditional decision rules that are based on the maximum likelihood criterion. We analyzed the quality indicators of detection of the object's near-zero apparent motion applying statistical and in situ modeling techniques in terms of the conditional probability of the true detection of objects with a near-zero apparent motion. The efficiency of method being implemented as a plugin for the Collection Light Technology (CoLiTec) software for automated asteroids and comets detection has been demonstrated. Among the objects discovered with this plugin, there was the sungrazing comet C/2012 S1 (ISON). Within 26 min of the observation, the comet's image has been moved by three pixels in a series of four CCD-frames (the velocity of its apparent motion at the moment of discovery was equal to 0.8 pixels per CCD-frame; the image size on the frame was about five pixels). Next verification in observations of asteroids with a near-zero apparent motion conducted with small telescopes has confirmed an efficiency of the method even in bad conditions (strong backlight from the full Moon). So, we recommend applying the proposed method for series of observations with four or more frames.

  7. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soman, M.R., E-mail: m.r.soman@open.ac.uk [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hall, D.J.; Tutt, J.H.; Murray, N.J.; Holland, A.D. [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-12-11

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 µm from the current 24 µm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV–1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 µm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  8. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  9. [An Improved DDV Method to Retrieve AOT for HJ CCD Image in Typical Mountainous Areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-qiang; Li, Ai-nong; Bian, Jin-hu; Huang, Cheng-quan

    2015-06-01

    Domestic HJ CCD imaging applications in environment and disaster monitoring and prediction has great potential. But, HJ CCD image lack of Mid-Nir band can not directly retrieve Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) by the traditional Dark Dense Vegetation (DDV) method, and the mountain AOT changes in space-time dramatically affected by the mountain environment, which reduces the accuracy of atmospheric correction. Based on wide distribution of mountainous dark dense forest, the red band histogram threshold method was introduced to identify the mountainous DDV pixels. Subsequently, the AOT of DDV pixels were retrieved by lookup table constructed by 6S radiative transfer model with assumption of constant ratio between surface reflectance in red and blue bands, and then were interpolated to whole image. MODIS aerosol product and the retrieved AOT by the proposed algorithm had very good consistency in spatial distribution, and HJ CCD image was more suitable for the remote sensing monitoring of aerosol in mountain areas, which had higher spatial resolution. Their fitting curve of scatterplot was y = 0.828 6x-0.01 and R2 was 0.984 3 respectively. Which indicate the improved DDV method can effectively retrieve AOT, and its precision can satisfy the atmospheric correction and terrain radiation correction for Hj CCD image in mountainous areas. The improvement of traditional DDV method can effectively solve the insufficient information problem of the HJ CCD image which have only visible light and near infrared band, when solving radiative transfer equation. Meanwhile, the improved method fully considered the influence of mountainous terrain environment. It lays a solid foundation for the HJ CCD image atmospheric correction in the mountainous areas, and offers the possibility for its automated processing. In addition, the red band histogram threshold method was better than NDVI method to identify mountain DDV pixels. And, the lookup table and ratio between surface reflectance

  10. Retrieval of absorption and backscattering coefficients from HJ-1A/CCD imagery in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Quan, Wenting; Yao, Guoqing; Cui, Tingwei

    2013-03-11

    A simple semi-analytical model (SAB) was developed for computing a(560) and b(b)(550) from HJ-1A/CCD images. By comparison with field measurements, the SAB model produces 5.3-23.5% uncertainty for a(560) and b(b)(550) retrievals. The a(560) and b(b)(550) are also retrieved from satellite images. The match-up analysis results indicate that a(560) and b(b)(550) may be derived from the HJ-1A/CCD images with respective uncertainties of 29.84 and 21.35%. These findings imply that, provided that an atmospheric correction scheme for the green bands is available, the extensive database of HJ-1A/CCD imagery may be used for the quantitative monitoring of optical properties in coastal waters.

  11. High time resolution CCD camera with X-ray image intensifier for SPring-8 BL40XU

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, T; Yagi, N

    2003-01-01

    SPring-8 BL40XU is designed to use high flux X-ray for small angle X-ray scattering and multi purpose. The flux at the experimental hutch is about 1 x 10 sup 1 sup 5 photons/sec at 12.4 KeV, which is larger 2 approx 3 figures than other beamlines at SPring-8. To utilize the high flux X-ray efficiently, new high-speed detector is needed. Therefore, a high frame rate CCD camera C7770 (Hamamatsu) and a new 6-inch X-ray image intensifier V5445P (Hamamatsu) were developed for BL40XU. The CCD camera has three CCD chips to increase the readout speed. Three identical images are created by a prism system in the CCD camera and projected onto the three chips. The pixel number of the CCD is 640 x 480 and the frame rate is 291 frames/sec. Reduction of the number of horizontal lines leads to a faster frame rate up to a few thousands. The combination of the CCD and with an X-ray shutter also leads to faster discrete data acquisition. (author)

  12. Pixelated neutron image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  13. Precise CCD positions of Phoebe in 2011-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q. Y.; Wang, N.; Vienne, A.; Zhang, Q. F.; Li, Z.; Meng, X. H.

    2015-05-01

    346 new CCD observations during the years 2011-2014 have been reduced to derive the precise positions of Phoebe, the ninth satellite of Saturn. The observations were made by the 2.4 m telescope at Yunnan Observatory over nine nights. Due to the use of a focal-reducer on the telescope, its significant geometric distortion is solved for and removed for each CCD field of view. The positions of Phoebe are measured with respect to the stars in UCAC2 catalogue. The theoretical position of Phoebe was retrieved from the Institute de Méchanique Céleste et de Calcul des Éphémérides ephemeris which includes the latest theory PH12 by Desmars et al., while the position of Saturn was obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris DE431. Our results show that the mean O-Cs (observed minus computed) are -0.02 and -0.07 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively. The dispersions of our observations are estimated at about 0.04 arcsec in each direction.

  14. Modelling semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K

    2001-01-01

    expected after 200 ps in most cases. The effect of reducing the charge carrier lifetime and examining the charge collection efficiency has been utilised to explore how these detectors would respond in a harsh radiation environment. It is predicted that over critical carrier lifetimes (10 ps to 0.1 ns) an improvement of 40 % over conventional detectors can be expected. This also has positive implications for fabricating detectors, in this geometry, from materials which might otherwise be considered substandard. An analysis of charge transport in CdZnTe pixel detectors has been performed. The analysis starts with simulation studies into the formation of contacts and their influence on the internal electric field of planar detectors. The models include a number of well known defect states and these are balanced to give an agreement with a typical experimental I-V curve. The charge transport study extends to the development of a method for studying the effect of charge sharing in highly pixellated detectors. The ...

  15. Improvement in the light sensitivity of the ultrahigh-speed high-sensitivity CCD with a microlens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, T.,; Yonai, J.; Kitamura, K.; Arai, T.; Kurita, T.; Tanioka, K.; Maruyama, H.; Etoh, T. Goji; Kitagawa, S.; Hatade, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Iida, K.

    2008-02-01

    We are advancing the development of ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity CCDs for broadcast use that are capable of capturing smooth slow-motion videos in vivid colors even where lighting is limited, such as at professional baseball games played at night. We have already developed a 300,000 pixel, ultrahigh-speed CCD, and a single CCD color camera that has been used for sports broadcasts and science programs using this CCD. However, there are cases where even higher sensitivity is required, such as when using a telephoto lens during a baseball broadcast or a high-magnification microscope during science programs. This paper provides a summary of our experimental development aimed at further increasing the sensitivity of CCDs using the light-collecting effects of a microlens array.

  16. Realization of Vilnius UPXYZVS photometric system for AltaU42 CCD camera at the MAO NAS of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vid'Machenko, A. P.; Andruk, V. M.; Samoylov, V. S.; Delets, O. S.; Nevodovsky, P. V.; Ivashchenko, Yu. M.; Kovalchuk, G. U.

    2005-06-01

    The description of two-inch glass filters of the Vilnius UPXYZVS photometric system, which are made at the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine for AltaU42 CCD camera with format of 2048×2048 pixels, is presented in the paper. Reaction curves of instrumental system are shown. Estimations of minimal star's magnitudes for each filter's band in comparison with the visual V one are obtained. New software for automation of CCD frames processing is developed in program shell of LINUX/MIDAS/ROMAFOT. It is planned to carry out observations with the purpose to create the catalogue of primary UPXYZVS CCD standards in selected field of the sky for some radio-sources, globular and open clusters, etc. Numerical estimations of astrometric and photometric accuracy are obtained.

  17. A comparison of CsI:Tl and GOS in a scintillator-CCD detector for nuclear medicine imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    A number of portable gamma cameras for medical imaging use scintillator-CCD based detectors. This paper compares the performance of a scintillator-CCD based portable gamma camera with either a columnar CsI:Tl or a pixelated GOS scintillator installed. The CsI:Tl scintillator has a sensitivity of 40% at 140.5 keV compared to 54% with the GOS scintillator. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the pixelated GOS detector was 1.09 mm, over 4 times poorer than for CsI:Tl. Count rate capability was also found to be significantly lower when the GOS scintillator was used. The uniformity was comparable for both scintillators.

  18. The ALICE pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mercado Perez, J

    2002-01-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well. (3 refs).

  19. 800 x 800 charge-coupled device /CCD/ camera for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, M. C.; Klaasen, K. P.; Snyder, L. M.; Wang, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    During January 1982 the NASA space transportation system will launch a Galileo spacecraft composed of an orbiting bus and an atmospheric entry probe to arrive at the planet Jupiter in July 1985. A prime element of the orbiter's scientific instrument payload will be a new generation slow-scan planetary imaging system based on a newly developed 800 x 800 charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor. Following Jupiter orbit insertion, the single, narrow-angle, CCD camera, designated the Solid State Imaging (SSI) Subsystem, will operate for 20 months as the orbiter makes repeated encounters with Jupiter and its Galilean Satellites. During this period the SSI will acquire 40,000 images of Jupiter's atmosphere and the surfaces of the Galilean Satellites. This paper describes the SSI, its operational modes, and science objectives.

  20. Protein diffraction experiments with Atlas CCD detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Kovaľ, Tomáš; Dušek, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, Suppl. - abstracts (2008), C192 ISSN 0108-7673. [Congress of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) /21./. 23.08.2008-31.08.2008, Osaka] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : x-ray data collection * CCD detectors * protein crystallography applications Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Development of large-area CCD-based x-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokric, M.; Allinson, Nigel M.; Jorden, Anthony R.; Cox, Matthew P.; Marshall, Andrew R.; Long, P. G.; Moon, Kevin; Jerram, Paul; Pool, Peter J.; Nave, Colin; Derbyshire, Gareth E.; Helliwell, John R.

    1999-10-01

    The design and development of an area CCD-based X-ray detector system, using the first CCD imagers specially designed for macromolecular crystallography, is presented. The system is intended to produce the highest quality data for physically small crystals at synchrotron sources through the use of large CCDs--that is approaching wafer scale. This work is part of a large research and development program for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council in the UK. The detector has been optimized by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray energies for conventional laboratory sources, and offers fast readout and high dynamic range needed for efficient measurements at synchrotron sources. The detector consists of CCDs optically coupled to a X-ray sensitive phosphor via skewed fiber-optic studs. The individual three- sides buttable CCD consists of 2048 X 1536 27 micrometers square pixels (55.3 X 41.5 mm). The pixel size has been optimized to match diffraction spot profiling needs and the high dynamic range required for such applications. The multiple amplifier outputs possess switched responsivity to maximize the trade-off between signal handling capabilities and linearity. The readout noise is 5 electrons rms at a 1 MHz pixel rate at the high responsivity setting. A prototype detector system comprising two close-butted cooled CCDs is being developed. This system employs a high-efficiency scintillator with very low point spread function, skewed optical-fiber studs (instead of the more usual demagnifying tapers) to maximize the system's detective quantum efficiency and minimize optical distortions. Full system specifications and a novel crystallographic data processing are presented.

  2. Toward Fast, Low-noise, Low-power, Small Pixel Digital CCDs for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, Mark W.; Burke, Barry; Cooper, Michael; Foster, Richard; Grant, Catherine E.; LaMarr, Beverly; Malonis, Andrew; Miller, Eric D.; Prigozhin, Gregory; Schuette, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Future X-ray missions such as Lynx will require large-format imaging detectors with spectroscopic performance at least as good as the best current-generation devices but with much higher readout rates. We have been investigating a detector architecture under development at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, called the Digital CCD, for use in such missions. The Digital CCD is envisioned as a CMOS-compatible detector integrated with parallel CMOS signal processing chains. The combination of fast, low noise CCD amplifiers with highly parallel signal processing offers the high frame-rate required. The CMOS-compatibility of the CCD provides low-power charge transfer.Here we report on the X-ray spectral response of a CMOS-compatible test CCD read at 2.5 MHz (about 25 times faster than the CCDs operating on Chandra ACIS), using transfer clock levels of only +-1 V (power per unit area less than 25 times that of ACIS CCDs). The 8-micron pixels of this device are one third the size of those on Chandra ACIS. We compare charge splitting in this detector with that observed in larger-pixel detectors, and we briefly discuss the implications of the small-pixel, deep-depletion detector configurations required by Lynx.

  3. Sub-pixel analysis to enhance the accuracy of evapotranspiration determined using MODIS images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdalhaleem A Hassaballa; Abdul-Nasir Matori; Khalid A Al-Gaadi; Elkamil H Tola; Rangaswamy Madugundu

    2017-01-01

    ...) were recorded at the time of satellite overpass. In order to enhance the accuracy of the generated ET maps, MODIS images were subjected to sub-pixel analysis by assigning weights for different land surface cover...

  4. Optical Cloud Pixel Recovery via Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrina Tahsin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI is a widely used index to monitor vegetation and land use change. NDVI can be retrieved from publicly available data repositories of optical sensors such as Landsat, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS and several commercial satellites. Studies that are heavily dependent on optical sensors are subject to data loss due to cloud coverage. Specifically, cloud contamination is a hindrance to long-term environmental assessment when using information from satellite imagery retrieved from visible and infrared spectral ranges. Landsat has an ongoing high-resolution NDVI record starting from 1984. Unfortunately, this long time series NDVI data suffers from the cloud contamination issue. Though both simple and complex computational methods for data interpolation have been applied to recover cloudy data, all the techniques have limitations. In this paper, a novel Optical Cloud Pixel Recovery (OCPR method is proposed to repair cloudy pixels from the time-space-spectrum continuum using a Random Forest (RF trained and tested with multi-parameter hydrologic data. The RF-based OCPR model is compared with a linear regression model to demonstrate the capability of OCPR. A case study in Apalachicola Bay is presented to evaluate the performance of OCPR to repair cloudy NDVI reflectance. The RF-based OCPR method achieves a root mean squared error of 0.016 between predicted and observed NDVI reflectance values. The linear regression model achieves a root mean squared error of 0.126. Our findings suggest that the RF-based OCPR method is effective to repair cloudy pixels and provides continuous and quantitatively reliable imagery for long-term environmental analysis.

  5. Diamond pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, K K; Robichaud, A; Potenza, R; Kuleshov, S; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Wermes, N; Dulinski, W; Eremin, V; Smith, S; Sopko, B; Olivero, P; Gorisek, A; Chren, D; Kramberger, G; Schnetzer, S; Weilhammer, P; Martemyanov, A; Hugging, F; Pernegger, H; Lagomarsino, S; Manfredotti, C; Mishina, M; Trischuk, W; Dobos, D; Cindro, V; Belyaev, V; Duris, J; Claus, G; Wallny, R; Furgeri, A; Tuve, C; Goldstein, J; Sciortino, S; Sutera, C; Asner, D; Mikuz, M; Lo Giudice, A; Velthuis, J; Hits, D; Griesmayer, E; Oakham, G; Frais-Kolbl, H; Bellini, V; D'Alessandro, R; Cristinziani, M; Barbero, M; Schaffner, D; Costa, S; Goffe, M; La Rosa, A; Bruzzi, M; Schreiner, T; de Boer, W; Parrini, G; Roe, S; Randrianarivony, K; Dolenc, I; Moss, J; Brom, J M; Golubev, A; Mathes, M; Eusebi, R; Grigoriev, E; Tsung, J W; Mueller, S; Mandic, I; Stone, R; Menichelli, D

    2011-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10(16) protons/cm(2) illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel m...

  6. Advanced CCD imager technology for use from 1 to 10,000 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, J. C.; Burke, B. E.; Reich, R. K.; Mcgonagle, W. H.; Huang, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    A low-noise, high-sensitivity charge-coupled-device (CCD) technology for imaging applications extending from the soft X-ray (1 A) to the near-infrared (10,000 A) regimes was developed together with a fabrication technology for making back-illuminated versions of these devices with quantum efficiencies as high as 90 percent from 5000 to 7000 A. The efforts have focused on two devices, a 64 x 64 pixel back-illuminated imager with two output ports that operates at 2000 frames per second with 23 electrons read noise, and a larger device, with 420 x 420 pixel format, designed for lower frame rates with noise as low as 1.5 electrons and used at visible, UV, and X-ray wavelengths. Applications to plasma diagnostics include Thomson scattering and high-frame-rate imaging in the visible, as well as X-ray imaging and bolometry.

  7. ATLAS Pixel Detector System Test

    CERN Document Server

    Triplett, N

    2007-01-01

    On June 25th of 2007 the ATLAS collaboration lowered the pixel detector into place, however before this the detector had to be qualified through a series of tests. Prior to assembly, each individual piece of the detector and services chain passed a set of quality controls. This was followed by the construction and test of the whole pixel detector. This test of the full chain of services -including the voltage supplies, opto-boards, cooling, temperature monitoring, control software, and the pixel modules themselves- is referred to as the Pixel System Test. The System Test took place in an above-ground laboratory setting at CERN and consisted of two main parts. The first half of the test focused on one of the pixel detector’s endcaps. This endcap consists of 144 modules, making up roughly 10% of the total pixel detector. For the pixel endcap test, most of the 144 modules were operated simultaneously which required that the pixel endcap’s cooling system be functioning as well[1]. Additionally, four scintilla...

  8. Small pixel infrared sensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon

    2017-02-01

    We report on product maturation of small pixel high definition high charge capacity 2.4 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Arrays. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which enables near Nyquist limited sampling with by the optical system of many IR lenses. These smaller sub diffraction pitch pixels enable improved sensitivity and resolution resulting in clear, crisp high contrast imaging with excellent IFOVs even with small focal length lenses. The small pixel IR sensor allows the designer to trade off field of view, MTF, optics F/# to obtain a more compact and high performance IR sensor. This enables lower size, power and weight reductions of the entire IR Sensor System. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  9. Design of a multifunction astronomical CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dalei; Wen, Desheng; Xue, Jianru; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Yan; Jiang, Baotan; Xi, Jiangbo

    2015-07-01

    To satisfy the requirement of the astronomical observation, a novel timing sequence of frame transfer CCD is proposed. The multiple functions such as the adjustments of work pattern, exposure time and frame frequency are achieved. There are four work patterns: normal, standby, zero exposure and test. The adjustment of exposure time can set multiple exposure time according to the astronomical observation. The fame frequency can be adjusted when dark target is imaged and the maximum exposure time cannot satisfy the requirement. On the design of the video processing, offset correction and adjustment of multiple gains are proposed. Offset correction is used for eliminating the fixed pattern noise of CCD. Three gains pattern can improve the signal to noise ratio of astronomical observation. Finally, the images in different situations are collected and the system readout noise is calculated. The calculation results show that the designs in this paper are practicable.

  10. A self triggered intensified CCD (STIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Y.; Laniece, P.; Bendali, M.; Gaillard, J. M.; Leblanc, M.; Mastrippolito, R.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1991-12-01

    We are developing a new device based on the results reported previously of the successful coincidence detection of β - particles with a high spatial resolution. The novelty of the device consists in triggering and intensified CCD, i.e. a CCD coupled to an image intensifier (II), by an electrical signal collected from the II itself. This is a suitable procedure for detecting low light and rare events with high efficiency and high resolution. The trigger pulse is obtained from the secondary electrons produced by multiplication in a double microchannel plate (MCP) and collected on the aluminized layer protecting the phosphor screen in the II. Triggering efficiencies up to 80% have already been achieved.

  11. Autonomous star tracker based on active pixel sensors (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, U.

    2017-11-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used onboard of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years, star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The Jena-Optronik GmbH is active in the field of opto-electronic sensors like star trackers since the early 80-ties. Today, with the product family ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15, all marked segments like earth observation, scientific applications and geo-telecom are supplied to European and Overseas customers. A new generation of star trackers can be designed based on the APS detector technical features. The measurement performance of the current CCD based star trackers can be maintained, the star tracker functionality, reliability and robustness can be increased while the unit costs are saved.

  12. From Pixels to Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownston, Lee; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched in 2009 as NASAs first mission capable of finding Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Its telescope consists of a 1.5-m primary mirror and a 0.95-m aperture. The 42 charge-coupled devices in its focal plane are read out every half hour, compressed, and then downlinked monthly. After four years, the second of four reaction wheels failed, ending the original mission. Back on earth, the Science Operations Center developed the Science Pipeline to analyze about 200,000 target stars in Keplers field of view, looking for evidence of periodic dimming suggesting that one or more planets had crossed the face of its host star. The Pipeline comprises several steps, from pixel-level calibration, through noise and artifact removal, to detection of transit-like signals and the construction of a suite of diagnostic tests to guard against false positives. The Kepler Science Pipeline consists of a pipeline infrastructure written in the Java programming language, which marshals data input to and output from MATLAB applications that are executed as external processes. The pipeline modules, which underwent continuous development and refinement even after data started arriving, employ several analytic techniques, many developed for the Kepler Project. Because of the large number of targets, the large amount of data per target and the complexity of the pipeline algorithms, the processing demands are daunting. Some pipeline modules require days to weeks to process all of their targets, even when run on NASA's 128-node Pleiades supercomputer. The software developers are still seeking ways to increase the throughput. To date, the Kepler project has discovered more than 4000 planetary candidates, of which more than 1000 have been independently confirmed or validated to be exoplanets. Funding for this mission is provided by NASAs Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Slitless spectroscopy of geosynchronous satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippets, Roger D.; Wakefield, Stephen; Young, Shannon; Ferguson, Ian; Earp-Pitkins, Christopher; Chun, Francis K.

    2015-10-01

    A preliminary investigation into the use of slitless spectroscopy for characterization of geosynchronous satellites is described. A 100 line/mm diffraction grating is used as the dispersing device, and the spectral data obtained are compared to a model with good results. A method used to collect and calibrate slitless spectral observations accounting for pixel to wavelength conversion, pixel response as a function of wavelength, and solar features is presented. Observations of several geosynchronous satellites throughout a night reveal reflectance with noticeable and different profiles indicating that slitless spectroscopy offers the potential for another modality for identifying and discriminating satellites.

  14. Improving quantum efficiency and spectral resolution of a CCD through direct manipulation of the depletion region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig; Ambrosi, Richard M.; Abbey, Tony; Godet, Olivier; O'Brien, R.; Turner, M. J. L.; Holland, Andrew; Pool, Peter J.; Burt, David; Vernon, David

    2008-07-01

    Future generations of X-ray astronomy instruments will require position sensitive detectors in the form of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging with the ability to probe the X-ray universe with greater efficiency. This will require the development of CCDs with structures that will improve their quantum efficiency over the current state of the art. The quantum efficiency improvements would have to span a broad energy range (0.2 keV to >15 keV). These devices will also have to be designed to withstand the harsh radiation environments associated with orbits that extend beyond the Earth's magnetosphere. This study outlines the most recent work carried out at the University of Leicester focused on improving the quantum efficiency of an X-ray sensitive CCD through direct manipulation of the device depletion region. It is also shown that increased spectral resolution is achieved using this method due to a decrease in the number of multi-pixel events. A Monte Carlo and analytical models of the CCD have been developed and used to determine the depletion depths achieved through variation of the device substrate voltage, Vss. The models are also used to investigate multi-pixel event distributions and quantum efficiency as a function of depletion depth.

  15. Precise CCD positions of Himalia using Gaia DR1 in 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H. W.; Peng, Q. Y.; Wang, N.

    2017-05-01

    In order to obtain high-precision CCD positions of Himalia, the sixth Jovian satellite, a total of 598 CCD observations have been obtained during the years 2015-2016. The observations were made by using the 2.4 and 1 m telescopes administered by Yunnan Observatories over 27 nights. Several factors that would influence the positional precision of Himalia were analysed, including the reference star catalogue used, the geometric distortion and the phase effect. By taking advantage of its unprecedented positional precision, the recently released catalogue Gaia Data Release 1 was chosen to match reference stars in the CCD frames of both Himalia and open clusters, which were observed for deriving the geometric distortion. The latest version of sofa library was used to calculate the positions of reference stars. The theoretical positions of Himalia were retrieved from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Horizons System that includes the satellite ephemeris JUP300, while the positions of Jupiter were based on the planetary ephemeris DE431. Our results showed that the means of observed minus computed (O - C) residuals are 0.071 and -0.001 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively. Their standard deviations are estimated at about 0.03 arcsec in each direction.

  16. Enumerating Photography from Spot Meter to CCD

    OpenAIRE

    Cubitt, Sean; Palmer, Daniel; Walkling, Les

    2015-01-01

    The transition from analogue to digital photography was not accomplished in a single step. It required a number of feeder technologies which enabled and structured the nature of digital photography. Among those traced in this article, the most important is the genesis of the raster grid, which is now hard-wired into the design of the most widely employed photographic chip, the charge-coupled device (CCD). In tracing this history from origins in half-tone printing, the authors argue that quali...

  17. The Dark Energy Survey CCD imager design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cease, H.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Guarino, V.; Kuk, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schultz, K.; Schmitt, R.L.; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Argonne

    2008-06-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is planning to use a 3 sq. deg. camera that houses a {approx} 0.5m diameter focal plane of 62 2kx4k CCDs. The camera vessel including the optical window cell, focal plate, focal plate mounts, cooling system and thermal controls is described. As part of the development of the mechanical and cooling design, a full scale prototype camera vessel has been constructed and is now being used for multi-CCD readout tests. Results from this prototype camera are described.

  18. Large scale mapping: an empirical comparison of pixel-based and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innocent E. Bello

    having reliable and up-to-date spatial data sources such as Satellite Remote Sensing, ground surveying and ... later through the use of pixel-based method by classifying satellite image into landcover information .... ground truth data of class k will form the gausian (normal) distribution as denoted in equation 1. (Roostaei et ...

  19. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulovic, M; Rieger, B; van Vliet, L J; Koster, A J; Ravelli, R B G

    2010-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal series, random conical tilt pairs and ultralarge single-particle data sets. Nevertheless, for ultrahigh-resolution work photographic plates are often still preferred. In the ideal case, the quality of the recorded image of a vitrified biological sample would solely be determined by the counting statistics of the limited electron dose the sample can withstand before beam-induced alterations dominate. Unfortunately, the image is degraded by the non-ideal point-spread function of the detector, as a result of a scintillator coupled by fibre optics to a CCD, and the addition of several inherent noise components. Different detector manufacturers provide different types of figures of merit when advertising the quality of their detector. It is hard for most laboratories to verify whether all of the anticipated specifications are met. In this report, a set of algorithms is presented to characterize on-axis slow-scan large-area CCD-based TEM detectors. These tools have been added to a publicly available image-processing toolbox for MATLAB. Three in-house CCD cameras were carefully characterized, yielding, among others, statistics for hot and bad pixels, the modulation transfer function, the conversion factor, the effective gain and the detective quantum efficiency. These statistics will aid data-collection strategy programs and provide prior information for quantitative imaging. The relative performance of the characterized detectors is discussed and a comparison is made with similar detectors that are used in the field of X-ray crystallography.

  20. Further applications for mosaic pixel FPA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.

    2011-06-01

    In previous papers to this SPIE forum the development of novel technology for next generation PIR security sensors has been described. This technology combines the mosaic pixel FPA concept with low cost optics and purpose-designed readout electronics to provide a higher performance and affordable alternative to current PIR sensor technology, including an imaging capability. Progressive development has resulted in increased performance and transition from conventional microbolometer fabrication to manufacture on 8 or 12 inch CMOS/MEMS fabrication lines. A number of spin-off applications have been identified. In this paper two specific applications are highlighted: high performance imaging IRFPA design and forest fire detection. The former involves optional design for small pixel high performance imaging. The latter involves cheap expendable sensors which can detect approaching fire fronts and send alarms with positional data via mobile phone or satellite link. We also introduce to this SPIE forum the application of microbolometer IR sensor technology to IoT, the Internet of Things.

  1. Development of low-noise CCD drive electronics for the world space observatory ultraviolet spectrograph subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Mike; Clapp, Matthew; King, James; Morse, Tom; Mihalcea, Ionut; Waltham, Nick; Hayes-Thakore, Chris

    2016-07-01

    World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a major Russian-led international collaboration to develop a large space-borne 1.7 m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope and instrumentation to study the universe at ultraviolet wavelengths between 115 nm and 320 nm, exceeding the current capabilities of ground-based instruments. The WSO Ultraviolet Spectrograph subsystem (WUVS) is led by the Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences and consists of two high resolution spectrographs covering the Far-UV range of 115-176 nm and the Near-UV range of 174-310 nm, and a long-slit spectrograph covering the wavelength range of 115-305 nm. The custom-designed CCD sensors and cryostat assemblies are being provided by e2v technologies (UK). STFC RAL Space is providing the Camera Electronics Boxes (CEBs) which house the CCD drive electronics for each of the three WUVS channels. This paper presents the results of the detailed characterisation of the WUVS CCD drive electronics. The electronics include a novel high-performance video channel design that utilises Digital Correlated Double Sampling (DCDS) to enable low-noise readout of the CCD at a range of pixel frequencies, including a baseline requirement of less than 3 electrons rms readout noise for the combined CCD and electronics system at a readout rate of 50 kpixels/s. These results illustrate the performance of this new video architecture as part of a wider electronics sub-system that is designed for use in the space environment. In addition to the DCDS video channels, the CEB provides all the bias voltages and clocking waveforms required to operate the CCD and the system is fully programmable via a primary and redundant SpaceWire interface. The development of the CEB electronics design has undergone critical design review and the results presented were obtained using the engineering-grade electronics box. A variety of parameters and tests are included ranging from general system metrics, such as the power and mass

  2. CCD Camera Detection of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John R

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and precise quantification of the infectivity of HIV is important for molecular virologic studies, as well as for measuring the activities of antiviral drugs and neutralizing antibodies. An indicator cell line, a CCD camera, and image-analysis software are used to quantify HIV infectivity. The cells of the P4R5 line, which express the receptors for HIV infection as well as β-galactosidase under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, are infected with HIV and then incubated 2 days later with X-gal to stain the infected cells blue. Digital images of monolayers of the infected cells are captured using a high resolution CCD video camera and a macro video zoom lens. A software program is developed to process the images and to count the blue-stained foci of infection. The described method allows for the rapid quantification of the infected cells over a wide range of viral inocula with reproducibility, accuracy and at relatively low cost.

  3. New Design Concept for Universal CCD Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonyong Han

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the CCDs are widely used in astronomical observations either in direct imaging use or spectroscopic mode. However according to the recent technical advances, new large format CCDs are rapidly developed which have better performances with higher quantum efficiency and sensitivity. In many cases, some microprocessors have been adopted to deal with necessary digital logic for a CCD imaging system. This could often lack the flexibility of a system for a user to upgrade with new devices, especially of it is a commercial product. A new design concept has been explored which could provide the opportunity to deal with any format of devices from ant manufactures effectively for astronomical purposes. Recently available PLD (Programmable Logic Devices technology makes it possible to develop such digital circuit design, which can be integrated into a single component, instead of using microprocessors. The design concept could dramatically increase the efficiency and flexibility of a CCD imaging system, particularly when new or large format devices are available and to upgrade the performance of a system. Some variable system control parameters can be selected by a user with a wider range of choice. The software can support such functional requirements very conveniently. This approach can be applied not only to astronomical purpose, but also to some related fields, such as remote sensing and industrial applications.

  4. Southern Clusters for Standardizing CCD Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, T. T.

    2017-06-01

    Standardizing photometric measurements typically involves undertaking all-sky photometry. This can be laborious and time-consuming and, for CCD photometry, particularly challenging. Transforming photometry to a standard system is, however, a crucial step when routinely measuring variable stars, as it allows photoelectric measurements from different observers to be combined. For observers in the northern hemisphere, standardized UBVRI values of stars in open clusters such as M67 and NGC 7790 have been established, greatly facilitating quick and accurate transformation of CCD measurements. Recently the AAVSO added the cluster NGC 3532 for southern hemisphere observers to similarly standardize their photometry. The availability of NGC 3532 standards was announced on the AAVSO Variable Star Observing, Photometry forum on 27 October 2016. Published photometry, along with some new measurements by the author, provide a means of checking these NGC 3532 standards which were determined through the AAVSO's Bright Star Monitor (BSM) program (see: https://www.aavso.org/aavsonet-epoch-photometry-database). New measurements of selected stars in the open clusters M25 and NGC 6067 are also included.

  5. Photographic and CCD Sky Patrols with Small Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Peter

    Since the twenties of the last century Sonneberg Observatory runs in each clear night a photographic Sky Patrol with a system of small telescopes (55/250 mm) reaching 14m in the blue and 13m in the yellow-red. In addition, a so-called Field Patrol is run with 2 astrographs (400/2000 mm) and a Schmidt camera (500/700/1720 mm) covering 80 selected fields along or near the Milky Way. From these instruments an archive of alomost 300,000 photographic plates arose, documenting the history of the starry night over more than 75 years. Currently much effort is made to take over this photographic sky patrol by a system of electronic detectors. Owing to the fact, that wide-field systems need either large CCDs or arrays of CCDs in order to cover the whole field of view, the technical availability of large detectors was one of the central problems in past. We now invent the use of a PHILIPS 4K×7K chip in wide-field astronomy for Whole-Sky Patrol. Although the chip has a quantum efficiency of only about 30 %, its big size (12μm pixel size) of 48×84 mm offers, for the first time, the replacement of large photographic plates by a single CCD chip. We report our first experiences with this chip when using it with a super wide-angle objective for whole-sky imaging each minute down to ca. 10m for investigating different targets (variable stars, meteors, GRB counterparts, etc.) and first trial to use the large-size chip with other small telescopes (400 to 600 mm diameter) at Sonneberg Observatory.

  6. Energy dependent charge spread function in a dedicated synchrotron beam pnCCD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Hazem

    2011-05-20

    A scan on the pixel edges is the method which is used to resolve the electron cloud size in the pixel array of the pnCCD detector. The EDR synchrotron radiation in BESSY is the source of the X-ray photons which are used in the scans. The radius of the electron cloud as a function of the impinging photon energy is analyzed. The angle of incidence of the X-ray beam is employed in the measurements. The measurements are validated by the numerical simulation models. The inclined X-ray track leads to distribute the electron clouds in a certain number of pixels according to the incident angle of the X-ray beam. The pixels detect different electron clouds according to their generation position in the detector bulk. A collimated X-ray beam of 12.14 keV is used in the measurements with 30 and 40 entrance angles. It is shown that the two factors that leads to expand the electron clouds namely the diffusion and the mutual electrostatic repulsion can be separated from the measured electron clouds. It is noticed as well that the influence of the mutual electrostatic repulsion dominates the cloud expansion over the diffusion process in the collection time of the detector. The perpendicular X-ray track leads to determine the average radius of the electron cloud per photon energy. The results show that the size of the electron clouds (RMS) in the energy range of [5.0-21.6] keV is smaller than the pixel size. (orig.)

  7. A Fully Integrated 0.055% INL X-ray CCD Readout ASIC with Incremental Delta Sigma {text{ADC}}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanchao; Cao, Xiaofei; Yu, Qian; Yi, Ting; Lu, Bo; Chen, Yong; Hong, Zhiliang

    2016-06-01

    A fully integrated 100 kHz X-ray charge coupled device (CCD) readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) employing delta sigma (ΔΣ) digitization is presented. To achieve high linearity with small chip size and low power consumption, the correlated double sampling (CDS) is realized by the ΣΔ ADC instead of the analog front end (AFE) as in conventional CCD readout circuits. Besides, the proposed decimation filter features simple structure and eases the integration. The chip is fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS technology and the measured integral nonlinearity (INL) throughout the input dynamic range of ASIC is 0.055% with 35.1 ±; 0.3 μV input referred noise. A CCD detection system is built and tested with the sensitivity of CCD being 4 μVe-. The integration test results show that the readout noise is 11.8 e- at 100 kHz readout pixel rate and the achieved energy spectrum resolution is 168 eV ±; 4.7 eV (Full Width at Half Maximum: FWHM) at 5.9 keV.

  8. A new algorithm for detecting and correcting bad pixels in infrared images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés David Restrepo Girón

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An image processing algorithm detects and replaces abnormal pixels individually, highlighting them amongst their neighbours in a sequence of thermal images without affecting overall texture, like classical filtering does. Bad pixels from manufacture or constant use of a CCD device in an IR camera are thus detected and replaced with a very good success rate, thereby reducing the risk of bad interpretation. Some thermal sequences from CFRP plates, taken by a Cincinnati Electronics InSb IR camera, were used for developing and testing this algorithm. The results were compared to a detailed list of bad pixels given by the manufacturer (about 70% coincidence. This work becomes relevant considering that the number of papers on this subject is low; most of them talk about astronomical image pre-processing. Moreover, thermo graphic non-destructive testing (TNDT techniques are gaining popularity in Colombia at introductory levels in industrial sectors such as energy generation and transmission, sugar production and military aeronautics.

  9. Microradiography with Semiconductor Pixel Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubek, Jan; Cejnarova, Andrea; Dammer, Jiří; Holý, Tomáš; Platkevič, Michal; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Vavřík, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdeněk

    2007-11-01

    High resolution radiography (with X-rays, neutrons, heavy charged particles, …) often exploited also in tomographic mode to provide 3D images stands as a powerful imaging technique for instant and nondestructive visualization of fine internal structure of objects. Novel types of semiconductor single particle counting pixel detectors offer many advantages for radiation imaging: high detection efficiency, energy discrimination or direct energy measurement, noiseless digital integration (counting), high frame rate and virtually unlimited dynamic range. This article shows the application and potential of pixel detectors (such as Medipix2 or TimePix) in different fields of radiation imaging.

  10. Astrometrica: Astrometric data reduction of CCD images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    Astrometrica is an interactive software tool for scientific grade astrometric data reduction of CCD images. The current version of the software is for the Windows 32bit operating system family. Astrometrica reads FITS (8, 16 and 32 bit integer files) and SBIG image files. The size of the images is limited only by available memory. It also offers automatic image calibration (Dark Frame and Flat Field correction), automatic reference star identification, automatic moving object detection and identification, and access to new-generation star catalogs (PPMXL, UCAC 3 and CMC-14), in addition to online help and other features. Astrometrica is shareware, available for use for a limited period of time (100 days) for free; special arrangements can be made for educational projects.

  11. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  12. Optical system design of multi-spectral and large format color CCD aerial photogrammetric camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yixian; Sun, Tianxiang; Gao, Xiaodong; Liang, Wei

    2007-12-01

    Multi-spectrum and high spatial resolution is the vital problem for optical design of aerial photogrammetric camera all the time. It is difficult to obtain an outstanding optical system with high modulation transfer function (MTF) as a result of wide band. At the same time, for acquiring high qualified image, chromatic distortion in optical system must be expected to be controlled below 0.5 pixels; it is a trouble thing because of wide field and multi-spectrum. In this paper, MTF and band of the system are analyzed. A Russar type photogrammetric objective is chosen as the basic optical structure. A novel optical system is presented to solve the problem. The new optical photogrammetric system, which consists of panchromatic optical system and chromatic optical system, is designed. The panchromatic optical system, which can obtain panchromatic image, makes up of a 9k×9k large format CCD and high-accuracy photographic objective len, its focal length is 69.83mm, field angle is 60°×60°, the size of CCD pixels is 8.75um×8.75um, spectral scope is from 0.43um to 0.74um, modulation transfer function is all above 0.4 in whole field when spatial frequency is at 60lp/mm, distortion is less than 0.007%. In a chromatic optical system, three 2k×2k array CCDs combine individually three same photographic objectives, the high resolution chromatic image is acquired by the synthesis of red, green, blue image data information delivered by three CCD sensors. For the chromatic system, their focal length is 24.83mm and they have the same spectral range of 0.39um to 0.74um. A difference is that they are coated in different film on their protect glass. The pixel number is 2048 × 2048; its MTF exceeds 0.4 in full field when spatial frequency is 30lp/mm. The advantages of digital aerial photogrammetric camera comparison with traditional film camera are described. It is considered that the two development trends on digital aerial photogrammetric camera are high-spectral resolution and

  13. LBA-ECO LC-02 GOES-08 Hot Pixel Data from Acre, Brazil: 1998, 2000, and 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires that were detected by the GOES-8 satellite for the state of Acre, Brazil. Image data were collected...

  14. LBA-ECO LC-02 GOES-08 Hot Pixel Data from Acre, Brazil: 1998, 2000, and 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires that were detected by the GOES-8 satellite for the state of Acre, Brazil. Image data were...

  15. LBA-ECO LC-02 Hot Pixel Fire Indicator Data for Tri-national MAP Region: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires, that were detected by various satellites in the tri-national MAP region (Madre de Dios-Peru,...

  16. LBA-ECO LC-02 Hot Pixel Fire Indicator Data for Tri-national MAP Region: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires, that were detected by various satellites in the tri-national MAP region (Madre de...

  17. VNR CMS Pixel detector replacement

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Joel Butler, spokesperson of the CMS collaboration explains how a team from many different partner institutes installed a new detector in CMS. This detector is the silicon pixel detector and they’ve been working on it for about five years, to replace one of our existing detectors. This detectors measures particles closer to the beam than any of the other components of this huge detector behind me. It gives us the most precise picture of tracks as they come out of the collisions and expand and travel through the detector. This particular device has twice as many pixels, 120 million, as opposed to about 68 million in the old detector and it can take data faster and pump it out to the analysis more quickly. 00’53’’ Images of the descent, insertion and installation of first piece of the Pixel detector on Tue Feb 28. Images of the descent, insertion and installation of second piece of the Pixel and the two cylinders being joined.

  18. CCTV from light to pixels

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovski, Vlado

    2013-01-01

    The new edition of CCTV, a high-level professional reference, is expanded to cover all video compression techniques used in the ever-increasing assortment of digital video recorders (DVRs) available on the market today. In addition to demystifying DVR technology, the third edition also clarifies the technology of data networking and explains various compression techniques. Along with all this, the book retains the particulars that made the previous editions convenient and valuable, including details of CCD cameras, lenses, coaxial cables, fiber-optics, and system design. Updated to address d

  19. Dynamic Mapping of Rice Growth Parameters Using HJ-1 CCD Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temporal resolution (4-day charge-coupled device (CCD cameras onboard small environment and disaster monitoring and forecasting satellites (HJ-1A/B with 30 m spatial resolution and large swath (700 km have substantially increased the availability of regional clear sky optical remote sensing data. For the application of dynamic mapping of rice growth parameters, leaf area index (LAI and aboveground biomass (AGB were considered as plant growth indicators. The HJ-1 CCD-derived vegetation indices (VIs showed robust relationships with rice growth parameters. Cumulative VIs showed strong performance for the estimation of total dry AGB. The cross-validation coefficient of determination ( R C V 2 was increased by using two machine learning methods, i.e., a back propagation neural network (BPNN and a support vector machine (SVM compared with traditional regression equations of LAI retrieval. The LAI inversion accuracy was further improved by dividing the rice growth period into before and after heading stages. This study demonstrated that continuous rice growth monitoring over time and space at field level can be implemented effectively with HJ-1 CCD 10-day composite data using a combination of proper VIs and regression models.

  20. Atmospheric correction of HJ-1 CCD imagery over turbid lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minwei; Tang, Junwu; Dong, Qing; Duan, Hongtao; Shen, Qian

    2014-04-07

    We have presented an atmospheric correction algorithm for HJ-1 CCD imagery over Lakes Taihu and Chaohu with highly turbid waters. The Rayleigh scattering radiance (Lr) is calculated using the hyperspectral Lr with a wavelength interval 1nm. The hyperspectral Lr is interpolated from Lr in the central wavelengths of MODIS bands, which are converted from the band response-averaged Lr calculated using the Rayleigh look up tables (LUTs) in SeaDAS6.1. The scattering radiance due to aerosol (La) is interpolated from La at MODIS band 869nm, which is derived from MODIS imagery using a shortwave infrared atmospheric correction scheme. The accuracy of the atmospheric correction algorithm is firstly evaluated by comparing the CCD measured remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) with MODIS measurements, which are validated by the in situ data. The CCD measured Rrs is further validated by the in situ data for a total of 30 observation stations within ± 1h time window of satellite overpass and field measurements. The validation shows the mean relative errors about 0.341, 0.259, 0.293 and 0.803 at blue, green, red and near infrared bands.

  1. Low-noise video amplifiers for imaging CCD's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scinicariello, F.

    1976-01-01

    Various techniques were developed which enable the CCD (charge coupled device) imaging array user to obtain optimum performance from the device. A CCD video channel was described, and detector-preamplifier interface requirements were examined. A noise model for the system was discussed at length and laboratory data presented and compared to predicted results.

  2. Optimized sampling strategy of Wireless sensor network for validation of remote sensing products over heterogeneous coarse-resolution pixel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J.; Liu, Q.; Wen, J.; Fan, W.; Dou, B.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse-resolution satellite albedo products are increasingly applied in geographical researches because of their capability to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns of land surface parameters. In the long-term validation of coarse-resolution satellite products with ground measurements, the scale effect, i.e., the mismatch between point measurement and pixel observation becomes the main challenge, particularly over heterogeneous land surfaces. Recent advances in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) technologies offer an opportunity for validation using multi-point observations instead of single-point observation. The difficulty is to ensure the representativeness of the WSN in heterogeneous areas with limited nodes. In this study, the objective is to develop a ground-based spatial sampling strategy through consideration of the historical prior knowledge and avoidance of the information redundancy between different sensor nodes. Taking albedo as an example. First, we derive monthly local maps of albedo from 30-m HJ CCD images a 3-year period. Second, we pick out candidate points from the areas with higher temporal stability which helps to avoid the transition or boundary areas. Then, the representativeness (r) of each candidate point is evaluated through the correlational analysis between the point-specific and area-average time sequence albedo vector. The point with the highest r was noted as the new sensor point. Before electing a new point, the vector component of the selected points should be taken out from the vectors in the following correlational analysis. The selection procedure would be ceased once if the integral representativeness (R) meets the accuracy requirement. Here, the sampling method is adapted to both single-parameter and multi-parameter situations. Finally, it is shown that this sampling method has been effectively worked in the optimized layout of Huailai remote sensing station in China. The coarse resolution pixel covering this station could be

  3. Status of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra Aldo, F

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is currently being constructed and will be installed in 2006 to be ready for commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider. The complete pixel detector is composed of three concentric barrels and six disks that are populated by 1744 ATLAS Pixel modules. The main components of the pixel module are the readout electronics and the silicon sensor whose active region is instrumented with rectangular pixels. The module has been designed to be able to survive 10 years of operation within the ATLAS detector. A brief description of the pixel detector will be presented with results and problems encountered during the production stage.

  4. Combining HJ CCD, GF-1 WFV and MODIS Data to Generate Daily High Spatial Resolution Synthetic Data for Environmental Process Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingquan; Huang, Wenjiang; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Changyao

    2015-08-20

    The limitations of satellite data acquisition mean that there is a lack of satellite data with high spatial and temporal resolutions for environmental process monitoring. In this study, we address this problem by applying the Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM) and the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA) to combine Huanjing satellite charge coupled device (HJ CCD), Gaofen satellite no. 1 wide field of view camera (GF-1 WFV) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to generate daily high spatial resolution synthetic data for land surface process monitoring. Actual HJ CCD and GF-1 WFV data were used to evaluate the precision of the synthetic images using the correlation analysis method. Our method was tested and validated for two study areas in Xinjiang Province, China. The results show that both the ESTARFM and STDFA can be applied to combine HJ CCD and MODIS reflectance data, and GF-1 WFV and MODIS reflectance data, to generate synthetic HJ CCD data and synthetic GF-1 WFV data that closely match actual data with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.8989 and 0.8643, respectively. Synthetic red- and near infrared (NIR)-band data generated by ESTARFM are more suitable for the calculation of Normalized Different Vegetation Index (NDVI) than the data generated by STDFA.

  5. Exploring the limits of identifying sub-pixel thermal features using ASTER TIR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R.G.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Davies, A.G.; Schneider, D.J.; Jaworowski, C.; Heasler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of volcanic thermal emissions and how they change with time is important for forecasting and monitoring volcanic activity and potential hazards. Satellite instruments view volcanic thermal features across the globe at various temporal and spatial resolutions. Thermal features that may be a precursor to a major eruption, or indicative of important changes in an on-going eruption can be subtle, making them challenging to reliably identify with satellite instruments. The goal of this study was to explore the limits of the types and magnitudes of thermal anomalies that could be detected using satellite thermal infrared (TIR) data. Specifically, the characterization of sub-pixel thermal features with a wide range of temperatures is considered using ASTER multispectral TIR data. First, theoretical calculations were made to define a "thermal mixing detection threshold" for ASTER, which quantifies the limits of ASTER's ability to resolve sub-pixel thermal mixing over a range of hot target temperatures and % pixel areas. Then, ASTER TIR data were used to model sub-pixel thermal features at the Yellowstone National Park geothermal area (hot spring pools with temperatures from 40 to 90 ??C) and at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica (an active lava lake with temperatures from 200 to 800 ??C). Finally, various sources of uncertainty in sub-pixel thermal calculations were quantified for these empirical measurements, including pixel resampling, atmospheric correction, and background temperature and emissivity assumptions.

  6. Sub-pixel Area Calculation Methods for Estimating Irrigated Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Pandey

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was to develop and demonstrate practical methods forcomputing sub-pixel areas (SPAs from coarse-resolution satellite sensor data. Themethods were tested and verified using: (a global irrigated area map (GIAM at 10-kmresolution based, primarily, on AVHRR data, and (b irrigated area map for India at 500-mbased, primarily, on MODIS data. The sub-pixel irrigated areas (SPIAs from coarse-resolution satellite sensor data were estimated by multiplying the full pixel irrigated areas(FPIAs with irrigated area fractions (IAFs. Three methods were presented for IAFcomputation: (a Google Earth Estimate (IAF-GEE; (b High resolution imagery (IAF-HRI; and (c Sub-pixel de-composition technique (IAF-SPDT. The IAF-GEE involvedthe use of “zoom-in-views” of sub-meter to 4-meter very high resolution imagery (VHRIfrom Google Earth and helped determine total area available for irrigation (TAAI or netirrigated areas that does not consider intensity or seasonality of irrigation. The IAF-HRI isa well known method that uses finer-resolution data to determine SPAs of the coarser-resolution imagery. The IAF-SPDT is a unique and innovative method wherein SPAs aredetermined based on the precise location of every pixel of a class in 2-dimensionalbrightness-greenness-wetness (BGW feature-space plot of red band versus near-infraredband spectral reflectivity. The SPIAs computed using IAF-SPDT for the GIAM was within2 % of the SPIA computed using well known IAF-HRI. Further the fractions from the 2 methods were significantly correlated. The IAF-HRI and IAF-SPDT help to determine annualized or gross irrigated areas (AIA that does consider intensity or seasonality (e.g., sum of areas from season 1, season 2, and continuous year-round crops. The national census based irrigated areas for the top 40 irrigated nations (which covers about 90% of global irrigation was significantly better related (and had lesser uncertainties and errors when

  7. Establishment and Optimization of Rigorous Geometric Model of Push-broom Camera Using TDI CCD Arranged in an Alternating Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENG Weican

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Push-broom cameras using TDI CCD arranged in an alternating pattern are widely carried by typical high-resolution optical satellites in order to obtain high space resolution and enough strip width. For this kind of cameras, several TDI CCD are arranged in an alternating pattern in two lines on the focal plane and push-broom imaging mode is always adopted. Imaging principle and characteristic of this kind of camera is introduced. Exterior parameters of TDI CCD are modeled together based on their same values in any instant of time and an integrated geometric model is finally established. Error compensation methods are designed to remove exterior error and interior error based on this integrated geometric model. A series of tests are designed to verify models and methods proposed in this paper using original image of TH-1 Satellite HR Camera whose detectors are divided into 8 modules arranged in an alternating pattern. As the results, the imaging geometry of this kind of camera can be rigorously described by this integral geometrical model. The positioning accuracy can be obviously improved by our exterior error compensation method, however, different residual error would be remained for different TDI CCD. The positioning accuracy will not be obviously improved while systematic errors of different TDI CCD can be effectively removed by the interior error compensation method. 2 m positioning accuracy in X, Y and Z directions can be achieved and different systematic errors can be removed when both exterior and interior error were compensated. The same accuracy can be achieved in the other scenes when the calculated inner distortion parameters are adopted.

  8. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  9. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  10. [Atmospheric correction of HJ-1 CCD data for water imagery based on dark object model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Guo; Ma, Wei-Chun; Gu, Wan-Hua; Huai, Hong-Yan

    2011-08-01

    The CCD multi-band data of HJ-1A has great potential in inland water quality monitoring, but the precision of atmospheric correction is a premise and necessary procedure for its application. In this paper, a method based on dark pixel for water-leaving radiance retrieving is proposed. Beside the Rayleigh scattering, the aerosol scattering is important to atmospheric correction, the water quality of inland lakes always are case II water and the value of water leaving radiance is not zero. So the synchronous MODIS shortwave infrared data was used to obtain the aerosol parameters, and in virtue of the characteristic that aerosol scattering is relative stabilized in 560 nm, the water-leaving radiance for each visible and near infrared band were retrieved and normalized, accordingly the remotely sensed reflectance of water was computed. The results show that the atmospheric correction method based on the imagery itself is more effective for the retrieval of water parameters for HJ-1A CCD data.

  11. Linearity measurement for image-intensified CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhuan; Zhang, Liwei; Yan, Feng; Gu, Yongqiang; Wan, Liying

    2010-10-01

    To the characteristic of the ultraviolet CCD (UV ICCD), technique of the linearity measurement of the UV ICCD camera is studied based on the theory of radiometry. Approach of linearity measurement is discussed, and a kind of measurement system of the UV ICCD has been developed based on the method of neutral density filter. It is very important that the transmittance of the filter is independent of the wavelength in the method of neutral density filter. Black metal screen mesh with different transmittance is used in our system, and calibration of the filters' transmittance in different working positions has been done. Meanwhile, to assure the uniform of the received radiation on the target of the detector at any test points, an integrating sphere is placed behind the neutral filter to balance light. The whole measurement system mainly consists of a deuterium lamp with high stabilization, the attenuation film with transmission, integrating sphere, optical guide and electro-shift platform. Auto control is realized via special software during the test. With this instrument, the linearity of the UV ICCD was measured. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity of the UV ICCD under fixed-gain is less than 2% and the uncertainty of measurement system is less than 4%.

  12. Improved Surface Reflectance from Remote Sensing Data with Sub-Pixel Topographic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Roupioz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Several methods currently exist to efficiently correct topographic effects on the radiance measured by satellites. Most of those methods use topographic information and satellite data at the same spatial resolution. In this study, the 30 m spatial resolution data of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM from ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer are used to account for those topographic effects when retrieving land surface reflectance from satellite data at lower spatial resolution (e.g., 1 km. The methodology integrates the effects of sub-pixel topography on the estimation of the total irradiance received at the surface considering direct, diffuse and terrain irradiance. The corrected total irradiance is then used to compute the topographically corrected surface reflectance. The proposed method has been developed to be applied on various kilometric pixel size satellite data. In this study, it was tested and validated with synthetic Landsat data aggregated at 1 km. The results obtained after a sub-pixel topographic correction are compared with the ones obtained after a pixel level topographic correction and show that in rough terrain, the sub-pixel topography correction method provides better results even if it tends to slightly overestimate the retrieved land surface reflectance in some cases.

  13. Design and Calibration of a Novel Bio-Inspired Pixelated Polarized Light Compass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Han

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Animals, such as Savannah sparrows and North American monarch butterflies, are able to obtain compass information from skylight polarization patterns to help them navigate effectively and robustly. Inspired by excellent navigation ability of animals, this paper proposes a novel image-based polarized light compass, which has the advantages of having a small size and being light weight. Firstly, the polarized light compass, which is composed of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD camera, a pixelated polarizer array and a wide-angle lens, is introduced. Secondly, the measurement method of a skylight polarization pattern and the orientation method based on a single scattering Rayleigh model are presented. Thirdly, the error model of the sensor, mainly including the response error of CCD pixels and the installation error of the pixelated polarizer, is established. A calibration method based on iterative least squares estimation is proposed. In the outdoor environment, the skylight polarization pattern can be measured in real time by our sensor. The orientation accuracy of the sensor increases with the decrease of the solar elevation angle, and the standard deviation of orientation error is 0 . 15 ∘ at sunset. Results of outdoor experiments show that the proposed polarization navigation sensor can be used for outdoor autonomous navigation.

  14. Systems approach to the design of the CCD sensors and camera electronics for the AIA and HMI instruments on solar dynamics observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, N.; Beardsley, S.; Clapp, M.; Lang, J.; Jerram, P.; Pool, P.; Auker, G.; Morris, D.; Duncan, D.

    2017-11-01

    Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is imaging the Sun in many wavelengths near simultaneously and with a resolution ten times higher than the average high-definition television. In this paper we describe our innovative systems approach to the design of the CCD cameras for two of SDO's remote sensing instruments, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Both instruments share use of a custom-designed 16 million pixel science-grade CCD and common camera readout electronics. A prime requirement was for the CCD to operate with significantly lower drive voltages than before, motivated by our wish to simplify the design of the camera readout electronics. Here, the challenge lies in the design of circuitry to drive the CCD's highly capacitive electrodes and to digitize its analogue video output signal with low noise and to high precision. The challenge is greatly exacerbated when forced to work with only fully space-qualified, radiation-tolerant components. We describe our systems approach to the design of the AIA and HMI CCD and camera electronics, and the engineering solutions that enabled us to comply with both mission and instrument science requirements.

  15. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC collider sets new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction because of its higher energy, pileup and luminosity. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector. Therefore, in view of Run 2, the ATLAS collaboration has constructed the first 4-layer pixel detector in Particle Physics by installing a new pixel layer, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Operational experience and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector during Run 2 are presented.

  16. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  17. Scalable Track Detection in SAR CCD Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, James G [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Quach, Tu-Thach [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Existing methods to detect vehicle tracks in coherent change detection images, a product of combining two synthetic aperture radar images ta ken at different times of the same scene, rely on simple, fast models to label track pixels. These models, however, are often too simple to capture natural track features such as continuity and parallelism. We present a simple convolutional network architecture consisting of a series of 3-by-3 convolutions to detect tracks. The network is trained end-to-end to learn natural track features entirely from data. The network is computationally efficient and improves the F-score on a standard dataset to 0.988, up fr om 0.907 obtained by the current state-of-the-art method.

  18. CMS has a heart of pixels

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In the immediate vicinity of the collision point, CMS will be equipped with pixel detectors consisting of no fewer than 50 million pixels measuring 150 microns along each side. Each of the pixels, which receive the signal, is connected to its own electronic circuit by a tiny sphere (seen here in the electron microscope image) measuring 15 to 20 microns in diameter.

  19. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  20. ATLAS pixel detector electronics and sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G; Bernardet, K [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Ackers, M; Barbero, M B [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D - 53115 Bonn (Germany); Alberti, F A; Aleppo, M; Alimonti, G; Andreani, A; Andreazza, A [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, IT - 20133 Milano (Italy); Alonso, J; Anderssen, E C; Arguin, J-F; Beringer, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Physics Division MS50B-6227, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Arms, K E [Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210-1117, United States of America (United States); Barberis, D; Beccherle, R B [INFN Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, IT - 16146 Genova (Italy); Bazalova, M [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic Na Slovance 2, CZ - 18221 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Becks, K H; Bellina, F [Bergische Universitaet, Fachbereich C, Physik Postfach 100127, Gauss-Strasse 20, D- 42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Behera, P K [203 VAN ALLEN HALL, IOWA CITY IA 52242-1479, United States of America (United States)], E-mail: MGGilchriese@lbl.gov (and others)

    2008-07-15

    The silicon pixel tracking system for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is described and the performance requirements are summarized. Detailed descriptions of the pixel detector electronics and the silicon sensors are given. The design, fabrication, assembly and performance of the pixel detector modules are presented. Data obtained from test beams as well as studies using cosmic rays are also discussed.

  1. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wedenig, R; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Runólfsson, O; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Wagner, A; Walsh, A M; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Zeuner, W; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described. (9 refs).

  2. The hard X-ray response of the XIS-CCD for Astro-E: qualification of the X-ray CCD detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiuchi, M; Awaki, H; Tsuru, T; Sakano, M; Hamaguchi, K; Murakami, H; Tsunemi, H; Hayashida, K; Kitamoto, S; Miyata, E; Dotani, T; Ozaki, M; Bautz, M; Doty, J; Kissel, S; Foster, R; Ricker, G

    1999-01-01

    We report on the hard X-ray response of the CCD detector for the X-ray imaging spectrometer (XIS), to be launched on the next Japanese X-ray Astronomical Satellite, ASTRO-E, in February 2000. XIS is prepared by an international team, comprised of MIT (USA), ISAS, Osaka University and Kyoto University (JAPAN). We have evaluated the X-ray response of the XIS in its high-energy band (1.5-10 keV). Data from the fluorescent line emission of Al, Cl, Ti, Ni, Fe, Zn, Se were used to construct the response function of the CCD detectors. Details of the response function - including the energy-scale, linearity, energy resolution, quantum efficiency -, are given as a function of incident X-ray energy. We find that the tail component of high-energy photopeaks are produced by events with incomplete charge collection. We also conclude that the size of the charge clouds can be estimated using the shapes of the tail components.

  3. CCD charge collection efficiency and the photon transfer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, J.; Klaasen, K.; Elliott, T.

    1985-01-01

    The charge-coupled device (CCD) has shown unprecendented performance as a photon detector in the areas of spectral response, charge transfer, and readout noise. Recent experience indicates, however, that the full potential for the CCD's charge collection efficiency (CCE) lies well beyond that which is realized in currently available devices. A definition of CCE performance is presented and a standard test tool (the photon transfer technique) for measuring and optimizing this important CCD parameter is introduced. CCE characteristics for different types of CCDs are compared; the primary limitations in achieving high CCE performance are discussed, and the prospects for future improvement are outlined.

  4. Enzymatic study on AtCCD4 and AtCCD7 and their potential to form acyclic regulatory metabolites

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2016-09-29

    The Arabidopsis carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (AtCCD4) is a negative regulator of the carotenoid content of seeds and has recently been suggested as a candidate for the generation of retrograde signals that are thought to derive from the cleavage of poly-cis-configured carotene desaturation intermediates. In this work, we investigated the activity of AtCCD4 in vitro and used dynamic modeling to determine its substrate preference. Our results document strict regional specificity for cleavage at the C9–C10 double bond in carotenoids and apocarotenoids, with preference for carotenoid substrates and an obstructing effect on hydroxyl functions, and demonstrate the specificity for all-trans-configured carotenes and xanthophylls. AtCCD4 cleaved substrates with at least one ionone ring and did not convert acyclic carotene desaturation intermediates, independent of their isomeric states. These results do not support a direct involvement of AtCCD4 in generating the supposed regulatory metabolites. In contrast, the strigolactone biosynthetic enzyme AtCCD7 converted 9-cis-configured acyclic carotenes, such as 9-cis-ζ-carotene, 9\\'-cis-neurosporene, and 9-cis-lycopene, yielding 9-cis-configured products and indicating that AtCCD7, rather than AtCCD4, is the candidate for forming acyclic retrograde signals.

  5. Target Image Matching Algorithm Based on Binocular CCD Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed target image in a subpixel level matching algorithm for binocular CCD ranging, which is based on the principle of binocular CCD ranging. In the paper, firstly, we introduced the ranging principle of the binocular ranging system and deduced a binocular parallax formula. Secondly, we deduced the algorithm which was named improved cross-correlation matching algorithm and cubic surface fitting algorithm for target images matched, and it could achieve a subpixel level matching for binocular CCD ranging images. Lastly, through experiment we have analyzed and verified the actual CCD ranging images, then analyzed the errors of the experimental results and corrected the formula of calculating system errors. Experimental results showed that the actual measurement accuracy of a target within 3 km was higher than 0.52%, which meet the accuracy requirements of the high precision binocular ranging.

  6. EARTH BASED CCD OBSERVATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set presents images of 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup obtained by various observers at several ground-based observatories using CCD instruments. These data have not...

  7. Micrometer and CCD measurements of double stars (Series 51

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available 36 micrometric measurements of 20 double or multiple systems carried out with the Zeiss 65/1055 cm Refractor of Belgrade Observatory are communicated. Also 35 CCD measurements of 15 double or multiple systems are included.

  8. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  9. A 20 Mfps high frame-depth CMOS burst-mode imager with low power in-pixel NMOS-only passive amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Coppejans, P.; Craninckx, J.; Wambacq, P.; Borremans, J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a 20 Mfps 32 × 84 pixels CMOS burst-mode imager featuring high frame depth with a passive in-pixel amplifier. Compared to the CCD alternatives, CMOS burst-mode imagers are attractive for their low power consumption and integration of circuitry such as ADCs. Due to storage capacitor size and its noise limitations, CMOS burst-mode imagers usually suffer from a lower frame depth than CCD implementations. In order to capture fast transitions over a longer time span, an in-pixel CDS technique has been adopted to reduce the required memory cells for each frame by half. Moreover, integrated with in-pixel CDS, an in-pixel NMOS-only passive amplifier alleviates the kTC noise requirements of the memory bank allowing the usage of smaller capacitors. Specifically, a dense 108-cell MOS memory bank (10fF/cell) has been implemented inside a 30μm pitch pixel, with an area of 25 × 30μm2 occupied by the memory bank. There is an improvement of about 4x in terms of frame depth per pixel area by applying in-pixel CDS and amplification. With the amplifier's gain of 3.3, an FD input-referred RMS noise of 1mV is achieved at 20 Mfps operation. While the amplification is done without burning DC current, including the pixel source follower biasing, the full pixel consumes 10μA at 3.3V supply voltage at full speed. The chip has been fabricated in imec's 130nm CMOS CIS technology.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy and variance of individual pixels in a scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera for computational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeo; Takahashi, Teruo; Bennett, Keith

    2017-02-01

    The"scientific" CMOS (sCMOS) camera architecture fundamentally differs from CCD and EMCCD cameras. In digital CCD and EMCCD cameras, conversion from charge to the digital output is generally through a single electronic chain, and the read noise and the conversion factor from photoelectrons to digital outputs are highly uniform for all pixels, although quantum efficiency may spatially vary. In CMOS cameras, the charge to voltage conversion is separate for each pixel and each column has independent amplifiers and analog-to-digital converters, in addition to possible pixel-to-pixel variation in quantum efficiency. The "raw" output from the CMOS image sensor includes pixel-to-pixel variability in the read noise, electronic gain, offset and dark current. Scientific camera manufacturers digitally compensate the raw signal from the CMOS image sensors to provide usable images. Statistical noise in images, unless properly modeled, can introduce errors in methods such as fluctuation correlation spectroscopy or computational imaging, for example, localization microscopy using maximum likelihood estimation. We measured the distributions and spatial maps of individual pixel offset, dark current, read noise, linearity, photoresponse non-uniformity and variance distributions of individual pixels for standard, off-the-shelf Hamamatsu ORCA-Flash4.0 V3 sCMOS cameras using highly uniform and controlled illumination conditions, from dark conditions to multiple low light levels between 20 to 1,000 photons / pixel per frame to higher light conditions. We further show that using pixel variance for flat field correction leads to errors in cameras with good factory calibration.

  11. A new pnCCD-based color X-ray camera for fast spatial and energy-resolved measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordavo, I., E-mail: ivan.ordavo@pnsensor.de [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); PNDetector GmbH, Emil-Nolde-Strasse 10, 81735 Muenchen (Germany); Ihle, S. [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); Arkadiev, V. [Institut fuer angewandte Photonik e.V., Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Scharf, O. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Soltau, H. [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); Bjeoumikhov, A.; Bjeoumikhova, S. [IFG - Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Buzanich, G. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gubzhokov, R.; Guenther, A. [IFG - Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hartmann, R.; Holl, P. [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); Kimmel, N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Muenchen (Germany); Kuehbacher, M. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Lang, M. [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); Langhoff, N. [IFG - Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Liebel, A. [PNDetector GmbH, Emil-Nolde-Strasse 10, 81735 Muenchen (Germany); Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2011-10-21

    We present a new high resolution X-ray imager based on a pnCCD detector and a polycapillary optics. The properties of the pnCCD like high quantum efficiency, high energy resolution and radiation hardness are maintained, while color corrected polycapillary lenses are used to direct the fluorescence photons from every spot on a sample to a corresponding pixel on the detector. The camera is sensitive to photons from 3 to 40 keV with still 30% quantum efficiency at 20 keV. The pnCCD is operated in split frame mode allowing a high frame rate of 400 Hz with an energy resolution of 152 eV for Mn K{alpha} (5.9 keV) at 450 kcps. In single-photon counting mode (SPC), the time, energy and position of every fluorescence photon is recorded for every frame. A dedicated software enables the visualization of the elements distribution in real time without the need of post-processing the data. A description of the key components including detector, X-ray optics and camera is given. First experiments show the capability of the camera to perform fast full-field X-Ray Fluorescence (FF-XRF) for element analysis. The imaging performance with a magnifying optics (3x) has also been successfully tested.

  12. Application of a newly developed CCD for spectral-width measurements of a 53 eV germanium laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunemi, H. (Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Earth and Space Science); Nomoto, S. (Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Earth and Space Science); Hayashida, K. (Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Earth and Space Science); Miyata, E. (Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Earth and Space Science); Murakami, H. (Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Earth and Space Science); Kato, Y. (Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering); Yuan, G. (Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering); Murai, K. (Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering); Kodama, R. (Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering); Daido, H. (Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    We report the application of a soft X-ray CCD for X-ray laser experiments. A newly developed CCD which has a thinned protection layer (SiO[sub 2]) of about 0.2 [mu]m was attached to a grazing incidence spectrometer with a resolving power of 16000 in order to measure high-resolution spectra of a germanium soft X-ray laser. Clear spectra have been recorded with a high sensitivity in the energy range between 51 eV (240 A) and 55 eV (225 A). In addition to the two strong lasing lines at 236 A and 232 A, more than 20 weak spontaneous emission lines have been recorded in this energy range. The spectral width of the 236 A lasing line is approximately 20.5 mA at the full width at half maximum. It is shown that this direct X-ray detection system has a spatial resolution of about 1/10 of the CCD pixel size in this spectral measurement. (orig.)

  13. Collection and processing data for high quality CCD images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-03-01

    Coherent Change Detection (CCD) with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a technique whereby very subtle temporal changes can be discerned in a target scene. However, optimal performance requires carefully matching data collection geometries and adjusting the processing to compensate for imprecision in the collection geometries. Tolerances in the precision of the data collection are discussed, and anecdotal advice is presented for optimum CCD performance. Processing considerations are also discussed.

  14. Proceedings of PIXEL98 -- International pixel detector workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    Experiments around the globe face new challenges of more precision in the face of higher interaction rates, greater track densities, and higher radiation doses, as they look for rarer and rarer processes, leading many to incorporate pixelated solid-state detectors into their plans. The highest-readout rate devices require new technologies for implementation. This workshop reviewed recent, significant progress in meeting these technical challenges. Participants presented many new results; many of them from the weeks--even days--just before the workshop. Brand new at this workshop were results on cryogenic operation of radiation-damaged silicon detectors (dubbed the Lazarus effect). Other new work included a diamond sensor with 280-micron collection distance; new results on breakdown in p-type silicon detectors; testing of the latest versions of read-out chip and interconnection designs; and the radiation hardness of deep-submicron processes.

  15. In-flight absolute calibration of the CBERS-2 CCD sensor data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio J. Ponzoni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first images of the sensors on board of CBERS-2 (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite satellite were made available by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE, users have asked information about the conversion of image digital numbers to physical data (radiance or reflectance. This paper describes the main steps that were carried out to calculate the in-flight absolute calibration coefficients for CBERS-2 CCD level 2 (radiometric and geometric correction images considering the reflectance-based method. Remarks about the preliminary evaluation of these coefficients application are also presented.Desde o início da distribuição de imagens dos sensores do satélite CBERS-2 (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite por parte do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE, a comunidade de usuários solicitava informação sobre a conversão dos números digitais em valores físicos (radiância ou reflectância. Este artigo descreve os principais passos adotados no cálculo dos coeficientes de calibração absoluta para as imagens disponibilizadas no nível 2 de correção (correções radiométrica e geométrica da câmera CBERS-2 CCD, considerando o método baseado na reflectância de uma superfície de referência. São apresentados também alguns resultados da avaliação preliminar da aplicação desses coeficientes na conversão mencionada.

  16. Electrical simulation of a DEPFET pixel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffmane, Christian; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Ninkovic, Jelena; Richter, Rainer; Wassatsch, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: DEPFET-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The Belle II experiment will use two layers of pixel detectors to achieve a good vertex resolution. The two layers will consist of 40 pixel sensors each with roughly 190.000 DEPFET pixels to provide the necessary spatial resolution. In addition to the array of DEPFET pixels steering and read-out ASICs are bump bonded on the pixel sensor. The high luminosity of the Belle-II experiment requires a fast and parallel read-out. The pixel sensor will be read-out in rolling shutter-mode with a row read-out time of 100 ns and a frame time of 20 {mu}s. To find design solutions which allow such short read-out times simulations and measurements of prototypes are performed. The electrical simulations incorporating the ASICs and DEPFET pixel array allow early investigations on the interaction between the chips and the pixel array e.g. the pixel output signal depending on the position of the pixel within the array. In the following a model describing the DEPFETs intrinsic properties like the MOS-FET characteristic, the internal amplification and the reset mechanism as well as parasitic resistive and capacitive elements is presented and simulation results are discussed.

  17. Causal Pixel Purity Index (PPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao-Cheng; Chang, Chein-I.

    2009-05-01

    Pixel Purity Index (PPI) has been widely used in endmember extraction. While it is available in ENVI software there are several interesting issues arising in its implementation. This paper re-invents the wheel by re-visiting the design rationale of the PPI and re-designing algorithms to implement PPI. More specifically, it develops the so-called Causal PPI (CPPI) which implements the PPI in a causal manner in the sense that the information used for data processing is only up to the data sample currently being visited. If the time required for computer processing is negligible, the CPPI actually becomes a real time PPI. The proposed CPPI can be implemented automatically and resolves the main issue of requiring human intervention to determine parameters.

  18. FROM IMAGE CONTOURS TO PIXELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scarmana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates to the reconstruction of digital images using their contour representations. The process involves determining the pixel intensity value which would exist at the intersections of a regular grid using the nodes of randomly spaced contour locations. The reconstruction of digital images from their contour maps may also be used as a tool for image compression. This reconstruction process may provide for more accurate results and improved visual details than existing compressed versions of the same image, while requiring similar memory space for storage and speed of transmission over digital links. For the class of images investigated in this work, the contour approach to image reconstruction and compression requires contour data to be filtered and eliminated from the reconstruction process. Statistical tests which validate the proposed process conclude this paper.

  19. ATLAS Pixel Opto-Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arms, K E; Gan, K K; Holder, M; Jackson, P; Johnson, M; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Roggenbuck, A; Rush, C; Schade, P; Smith, S; Ter-Antonian, R; Ziolkowski, M; Zoeller, M M

    2005-01-01

    We have developed two radiation-hard ASICs for optical data transmission in the ATLAS pixel detector at the LHC at CERN: a driver chip for a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) diode for 80 Mbit/s data transmission from the detector, and a Bi-Phase Mark decoder chip to recover the control data and 40 MHz clock received optically by a PIN diode. We have successfully implemented both ASICs in 0.25 micron CMOS technology using enclosed layout transistors and guard rings for increased radiation hardness. We present results of the performance of these chips, including irradiation with 24 GeV protons up to 61 Mrad (2.3 x 10e15 p/cm^2).

  20. Pixel readout chip for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ackers, M; Blanquart, L; Bonzom, V; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Delpierre, P A; Treis, J; Raith, B A; Wermes, N

    1999-01-01

    Pixel detectors with a high granularity and a very large number of sensitive elements (cells) are a very recent development used for high precision particle detection. At the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN (Geneva) a pixel detector with 1.4*10/sup 8/ individual pixel cells is developed for the ATLAS detector. The concept is a hybrid detector. Consisting of a pixel sensor connected to a pixel electronics chip by bump and flip chip technology in one-to-one cell correspondence. The development and prototype results of the pixel front end chip are presented together with the physical and technical requirements to be met at LHC. Lab measurements are reported. (6 refs).

  1. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  2. Advanced pixel architectures for scientific image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Coath, R; Godbeer, A; Wilson, M; Turchetta, R

    2009-01-01

    We present recent developments from two projects targeting advanced pixel architectures for scientific applications. Results are reported from FORTIS, a sensor demonstrating variants on a 4T pixel architecture. The variants include differences in pixel and diode size, the in-pixel source follower transistor size and the capacitance of the readout node to optimise for low noise and sensitivity to small amounts of charge. Results are also reported from TPAC, a complex pixel architecture with ~160 transistors per pixel. Both sensors were manufactured in the 0.18μm INMAPS process, which includes a special deep p-well layer and fabrication on a high resistivity epitaxial layer for improved charge collection efficiency.

  3. Sub-pixel measurement system for grid's width and period based on an improved partial area effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feijia; Jin, Peng

    2017-12-01

    Based on the partial area effect of charge-coupled device (CCD), a sub-pixel line detecting algorithm is proposed to measure the width and the period of a metal grid. An optical pointing system is developed and applied to accurately measure the line-width and the period of a grid. The grid's moving image is captured by the developed system. From the obtained images, one can determine position of a line with sub-pixel resolution. By controlling the grid's movement and aiming at the grid, the absolute coordinates of a grating ruler are obtained. Simulated calculations and experiments are performed with recorded video images to validate the performance of the proposed algorithm. The results show that the precision of the proposed estimation algorithm can reach 0.025 pixels for a moving image.

  4. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System (SPD)

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A; Antinori, Federico; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Dima, R; Elias, D; Fabris, D; Krivda, Marian; Librizzi, F; Manzari, Vito; Morel, M; Moretto, Sandra; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Pepato, Adriano; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Torcato De Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Tydesjo, H; Viesti, G; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE silicon pixel detector (SPD) comprises the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. The SPD includes 120 detector modules (half-staves) each consisting of 10 ALICE pixel chips bump bonded to two silicon sensors and one multi-chip read-out module. Each pixel chip contains 8192 active cells, so that the total number of pixel cells in the SPD is ≈ 107. The on-detector read-out is based on a multi-chip-module containing 4 ASICs and an optical transceiver module. The constraints on material budget and detector module dimensions are very demanding.

  5. Influence of SLM pixel size and shape on the performance of optical correlators and optical memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Michael J.

    2000-05-01

    The principles underlying optical correlators and Fourier transform optical memories are well understood. The components and materials they depend upon are gradually becoming available, bringing these technologies closer to commercialization. As efforts are made to obtain the best possible performance from these systems it becomes increasingly important to understand how their detailed operation differs from simple idealized models. Spatial light modulators (SLMs) used in correlators display sets of discrete data rather than continuous 2D functions, and the optical Fourier transform of these SLMs is influenced by the shape and fill-factor of the SLM's pixels. As a consequence, optical correlators perform a function that is more complex than the simple idealized correlation operation. The performance of Fourier transform optical memories is similarly affected. Here we investigate the operation of such optical systems incorporating pixelated SLMs. Examples are presented which highlight differences between the functions actually performed by these systems and the simple conceptual models of their operation. The output of these systems is commonly detected using pixelated CCD or CMOS imagers, the effect of imager pixel fill-factor is also examined.

  6. Visual enhancement of laparoscopic nephrectomies using the 3-CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Kansal, Neil S.; Dhanani, Nadeem; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Kirk, Allan D.; Pinto, Peter A.; Elster, Eric A.; Huffman, Scott W.; Levin, Ira W.

    2006-02-01

    Many surgical techniques are currently shifting from the more conventional, open approach towards minimally invasive laparoscopic procedures. Laparoscopy results in smaller incisions, potentially leading to less postoperative pain and more rapid recoveries . One key disadvantage of laparoscopic surgery is the loss of three-dimensional assessment of organs and tissue perfusion. Advances in laparoscopic technology include high-definition monitors for improved visualization and upgraded single charge coupled device (CCD) detectors to 3-CCD cameras, to provide a larger, more sensitive color palette to increase the perception of detail. In this discussion, we further advance existing laparoscopic technology to create greater enhancement of images obtained during radical and partial nephrectomies in which the assessment of tissue perfusion is crucial but limited with current 3-CCD cameras. By separating the signals received by each CCD in the 3-CCD camera and by introducing a straight forward algorithm, rapid differentiation of renal vessels and perfusion is accomplished and could be performed real time. The newly acquired images are overlaid onto conventional images for reference and comparison. This affords the surgeon the ability to accurately detect changes in tissue oxygenation despite inherent limitations of the visible light image. Such additional capability should impact procedures in which visual assessment of organ vitality is critical.

  7. CCD Astrophotography High-Quality Imaging from the Suburbs

    CERN Document Server

    Stuart, Adam

    2006-01-01

    This is a reference book for amateur astronomers who have become interested in CCD imaging. Those glorious astronomical images found in astronomy magazines might seem out of reach to newcomers to CCD imaging, but this is not the case. Great pictures are attainable with modest equipment. Adam Stuart’s many beautiful images, reproduced in this book, attest to the quality of – initially – a beginner’s efforts. Chilled-chip astronomical CCD-cameras and software are also wonderful tools for cutting through seemingly impenetrable light-pollution. CCD Astrophotography from the Suburbs describes one man’s successful approach to the problem of getting high-quality astronomical images under some of the most light-polluted conditions. Here is a complete and thoroughly tested program that will help every CCD-beginner to work towards digital imaging of the highest quality. It is equally useful to astronomers who have perfect observing conditions, as to those who have to observe from light-polluted city skies.

  8. Purification and crystallization of Vibrio fischeri CcdB and its complexes with fragments of gyrase and CcdA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jonge, Natalie, E-mail: ndejonge@vub.ac.be; Buts, Lieven; Vangelooven, Joris [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mine, Natacha; Van Melderen, Laurence [Laboratoire de Génétique des Procaryotes, Institut de Biologie et de Médecine, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-04-01

    A CcdB homologue from V. fischeri was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. The free protein was crystallized, as were its complexes with fragments of E. coli and V. fischeri gyrase and with the F-plasmid CcdA C-terminal domain. The ccd toxin–antitoxin module from the Escherichia coli F plasmid has a homologue on the Vibrio fischeri integron. The homologue of the toxin (CcdB{sub Vfi}) was crystallized in two different crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group I23 or I2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter a = 84.5 Å, and diffracts to 1.5 Å resolution. The second crystal form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.5, b = 43.6, c = 37.5 Å, β = 110.0°, and diffracts to 1.7 Å resolution. The complex of CcdB{sub Vfi} with the GyrA14{sub Vfi} fragment of V. fischeri gyrase crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.5, b = 94.6, c = 58.1 Å, and diffracts to 2.2 Å resolution. The corresponding mixed complex with E. coli GyrA14{sub Ec} crystallizes in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 130.1, b = 90.8, c = 58.1 Å, β = 102.6°, and diffracts to 1.95 Å. Finally, a complex between CcdB{sub Vfi} and part of the F-plasmid antitoxin CcdA{sub F} crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 62.6, c = 82.0 Å, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution.

  9. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  10. On-ground and in-orbit characterisation plan for the PLATO CCD normal cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Walton, D.; Smith, A.; Hailey, M.; Curry, P.; Kennedy, T.

    2017-11-01

    PLAnetary Transits and Ocillations (PLATO) is the third European Space Agency (ESA) medium class mission in ESA's cosmic vision programme due for launch in 2026. PLATO will carry out high precision un-interrupted photometric monitoring in the visible band of large samples of bright solar-type stars. The primary mission goal is to detect and characterise terrestrial exoplanets and their systems with emphasis on planets orbiting in the habitable zone, this will be achieved using light curves to detect planetary transits. PLATO uses a novel multi- instrument concept consisting of 26 small wide field cameras The 26 cameras are made up of a telescope optical unit, four Teledyne e2v CCD270s mounted on a focal plane array and connected to a set of Front End Electronics (FEE) which provide CCD control and readout. There are 2 fast cameras with high read-out cadence (2.5 s) for magnitude ~ 4–8 stars, being developed by the German Aerospace Centre and 24 normal (N) cameras with a cadence of 25 s to monitor stars with a magnitude greater than 8. The N-FEEs are being developed at University College London's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) and will be characterised along with the associated CCDs. The CCDs and N-FEEs will undergo rigorous on-ground characterisation and the performance of the CCDs will continue to be monitored in-orbit. This paper discusses the initial development of the experimental arrangement, test procedures and current status of the N-FEE. The parameters explored will include gain, quantum efficiency, pixel response non-uniformity, dark current and Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The current in-orbit characterisation plan is also discussed which will enable the performance of the CCDs and their associated N-FEE to be monitored during the mission, this will include measurements of CTI giving an indication of the impact of radiation damage in the CCDs.

  11. Soft X-ray response of a CCD with a grating spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Shouho, M; Katayama, H; Kohmura, T; Tsunemi, H; Kitamoto, S; Hayashida, K; Miyata, E; Hashimotodani, K; Yoshita, K; Koyama, K; Ricker, G; Bautz, M W; Foster, R; Kissel, S

    1999-01-01

    We calibrate the X-ray imaging spectrometers, which are CCD cameras installed on the ASTRO-E satellite, by using dispersed continuous soft X-rays from a grating spectrometer. We obtained the signal-pulse height and energy-resolution as a function of X-ray energies continuously. However, the wings of the line spread function of the grating distorts the center of the signal-pulse height derived by a simple analysis. An estimation of this distortion is presented. We also describe two methods of extracting the pure signal-pulse-height distribution from the data using the spectrometer. A brief description of the low-energy tail is presented.

  12. Quantum efficiency of the CCD camera (XIS) for the ASTRO-E mission

    CERN Document Server

    Katayama, H; Kohmura, T; Katayama, K; Yoshita, K; Tsunemi, H; Kitamoto, S; Hayashida, K; Miyata, E; Hashimotodani, K; Koyama, K; Ricker, G; Bautz, M W; Foster, R; Kissel, S

    1999-01-01

    We measured the optical and the X-ray transmission of the optical blocking filters for the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XISs) which are the X-ray CCD cameras of the ASTRO-E satellite. We conclude that the oxidation of the aluminum reduces the optical transmission down to approx 60-70% of the theoretical value of the aluminum. We achieved optical transmission below 5x10 sup - sup 5 in the range from 4000 to 9500 A by using aluminum thickness of 1200 A, while the theoretical calculation requires 800 A. The measurement of absolute quantum efficiency of XIS is also performed at several particular energies. We confirmed 20% quantum efficiency at 0.5 keV for the XIS engineering model (XIS EM).

  13. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The bump-bonded silicon pixel detector, developed at CERN by the EP-MIC group, is shown here in its ceramic carrier. Both represent the ISPA-tube anode. The chip features between 1024 (called OMEGA-1) and 8196 (ALICE-1) active pixels.

  14. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS experiment for the operation at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider requires a new and more performant inner tracker, the ITk. The innermost part of this tracker will be built using silicon pixel detectors. This paper describes the ITk pixel project, which, after few years of design and test e ort, is now defined in detail.

  15. Technological aspects of gaseous pixel detectors fabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Salm, Cora; Smits, Sander M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Melai, J.; Chefdeville, M.A.; van der Graaf, H.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated gaseous pixel detectors consisting of a metal punctured foil suspended in the order of 50μm over a pixel readout chip by means by SU-8 insulating pillars have been fabricated. SU-8 is used as sacrificial layer but metallization over uncrosslinked SU-8 presents adhesion and stress

  16. DepAstroCCD an original astrometric tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović I.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex software for preparation and treatment of astro photographic plates and double-star observations recorded with CCD cameras is developed. The preparation interface contains a catalogue base for the choice of observation objects and an interface for bringing into accordance the telescope and CCD camera performance with the assumptions of the postprocessor interface. The processing is based on the original development of image gradient removing software and classical FFT method and autocorrelation. The software has been tested on several theoretical and real images of double stars.

  17. Technology validation of the PLATO CCD at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Lemmel, Frederic; Smit, Hans; Blommaert, Sander; Oosterbroek, Tim; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Visser, Ivo; Heijnen, Jerko; Butler, Bart

    2016-07-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz. The manufacture of such large device in large quantity constitutes an unprecedented effort. To de-risk the PLATO CCD procurement and aid the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation team is characterizing the electro-optical performance of a number of PLATO devices before and after proton irradiation.

  18. ESA's CCD test bench for the PLATO mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Bloemmaert, Sander; Lemmel, Frederic; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Smit, Hans; Butler, Bart; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Heijnen, Jerko; Visser, Ivo

    2016-08-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz and at -70 C. To de-risk the PLATO CCD qualification programme initiated in 2014 and support the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section from the Future Missions Office has developed a dedicated test bench.

  19. Digital Printing Quality Detection and Analysis Technology Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Zheng, Liping

    2017-12-01

    With the help of CCD digital printing quality detection and analysis technology, it can carry out rapid evaluation and objective detection of printing quality, and can play a certain control effect on printing quality. It can be said CDD digital printing quality testing and analysis of the rational application of technology, its digital printing and printing materials for a variety of printing equipments to improve the quality of a very positive role. In this paper, we do an in-depth study and discussion based on the CCD digital print quality testing and analysis technology.

  20. Astrometric CCD Observations of Three Double Stars Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nand, Angela

    2017-04-01

    CCD astrometric observations of three double star groups from the Orion constellation were made. Position angles and separations of corresponding pairs were obtained from the data acquired and compared to previous observations listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog. Present data agrees with previous observational data.

  1. CCD Measurements of WDS 13510+6819 STTA127

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaben, Faisal; Vasilenko, Dmitrii; Ganbold, Gunbold; McClanahan, Stuart; Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2017-07-01

    WDS 13510+6819, a three-star star system, discoverer code STTA 127, is imaged using CCD cameras for astrometric measurements in comparison to historic data contained in the Washington Double Star Catalog. The historical data outlines measurements between the A-B and the B-C components and the 2016 measurements support the trend outlined in the WDS Historical File.

  2. Storage and compression design of high speed CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xichang; Zhai, LinPei

    2009-05-01

    In current field of CCD measurement, large area and high resolution CCD is used to obtain big measurement image, so that, speed and capacity of CCD requires high performance of later storage and process system. The paper discusses how to use SCSI hard disk to construct storage system and use DSPs and FPGA to realize image compression. As for storage subsystem, Because CCD is divided into multiplex output, SCSI array is used in RAID0 way. The storage system is com posed of high speed buffer, DM A controller, control M CU, SCSI protocol controller and SCSI hard disk. As for compression subsystem, according to requirement of communication and monitor system, the output is fixed resolution image and analog PA L signal. The compression means is JPEG 2000 standard, in which, 9/7 wavelets in lifting format is used. 2 DSPs and FPGA are used to com pose parallel compression system. The system is com posed of FPGA pre-processing module, DSP compression module, video decoder module, data buffer module and communication module. Firstly, discrete wavelet transform and quantization is realized in FPGA. Secondly, entropy coding and stream adaption is realized in DSPs. Last, analog PA L signal is output by Video decoder. Data buffer is realized in synchronous dual-port RAM and state of subsystem is transfer to controller. Through subjective and objective evaluation, the storage and compression system satisfies the requirement of system.

  3. A luminescence imaging system based on a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    described here has a maximum spatial resolution of 17 mu m; though this may be varied under software control to alter the signal-to-noise ratio. The camera has been mounted on a Riso automated TL/OSL reader, and both the reader and the CCD are under computer control. In the near u.v and blue part...

  4. Upgrades of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hügging, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will undergo different phases towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector (Phase 1) consists in the construction of a new pixel layer, which will be installed during the 1st long shutdown of the LHC machine (LS1) in 2013/14. The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of about 3.2 cm. The IBL requires the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase of radiation and pixel occupancy as well as to improve the physics performance of the existing pixel detector. The pixel size is reduced and the material budget is minimized by using new lightweight mechanical support materials and a CO2 based cooling system. For Phase 2 upgrade of LHC a complete new 4-layer pixel system is planned as part of a new all silicon Inner Detector. The increase in luminosity to about $5\\cdot 10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ together with a total expected lifetime of ab...

  5. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Brenden [Technology Development, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Milburn, Rob [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burger, Arnold [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, TN (United States); Bilheux, Hassina [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santodonato, Louis [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chvala, Ondrej [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Technology Development, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2} or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of {sup 6}Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 µm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm{sup 3} LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 µm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  6. Pixel detectors from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo; Rohe, Tilman; Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel detectors are a particularly important class of particle and radiation detection devices. They have an extremely broad spectrum of applications, ranging from high-energy physics to the photo cameras of everyday life. This book is a general purpose introduction into the fundamental principles of pixel detector technology and semiconductor-based hybrid pixel devices. Although these devices were developed for high-energy ionizing particles and radiation beyond visible light, they are finding new applications in many other areas. This book will therefore benefit all scientists and engineers working in any laboratory involved in developing or using particle detection.

  7. Full-disk solar Dopplergrams observed with a one-megapixel CCD camera and a sodium magneto-optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Tomczyk, Steven

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents here the first two full-disk solar Dopplergrams obtained with the new 1024 x 1024-pixel CCD camera which has recently been installed at the 60-Foot Tower Telescope of the Mt. Wilson Observatory. These Dopplergrams have a spatial resolution of 2.2 arcseconds and were obtained in a total of one minute of time. The Dopplergrams were obtained with a magnetooptical filter which was designed to obtain images in the two Na D lines. The filter and the camera were operated together as part of the development of a solar oscillations imager experiment which is currently being designed at JPL for the Joint NASA/ESA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory mission. Two different images obtained by subtracting two pairs of the Dopplergrams from the initial time series are also included.

  8. Adopt a Pixel Photographs: 2013-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The photographs in the Adopt a Pixel collection were provided by volunteers with a digital camera, a Global Positioning System (GPS), and a compass or a smart mobile...

  9. MMW/THz imaging using upconversion to visible, based on glow discharge detector array and CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, Avihai; Rozban, Daniel; Abramovich, Amir; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, Natan S.

    2017-10-01

    An inexpensive upconverting MMW/THz imaging method is suggested here. The method is based on glow discharge detector (GDD) and silicon photodiode or simple CCD/CMOS camera. The GDD was previously found to be an excellent room-temperature MMW radiation detector by measuring its electrical current. The GDD is very inexpensive and it is advantageous due to its wide dynamic range, broad spectral range, room temperature operation, immunity to high power radiation, and more. An upconversion method is demonstrated here, which is based on measuring the visual light emitting from the GDD rather than its electrical current. The experimental setup simulates a setup that composed of a GDD array, MMW source, and a basic CCD/CMOS camera. The visual light emitting from the GDD array is directed to the CCD/CMOS camera and the change in the GDD light is measured using image processing algorithms. The combination of CMOS camera and GDD focal plane arrays can yield a faster, more sensitive, and very inexpensive MMW/THz camera, eliminating the complexity of the electronic circuits and the internal electronic noise of the GDD. Furthermore, three dimensional imaging systems based on scanning prohibited real time operation of such imaging systems. This is easily solved and is economically feasible using a GDD array. This array will enable us to acquire information on distance and magnitude from all the GDD pixels in the array simultaneously. The 3D image can be obtained using methods like frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW) direct chirp modulation, and measuring the time of flight (TOF).

  10. Searching for Transients using Whole-Sky Patrol with 4 K×7 K-CCD Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Peter

    Currently much effort is made to take over the Sonneberg's photographic sky patrol by a system of electronic detectors. Owing to the fact, that wide-field systems need either large CCDs or arrays of CCDs in order to cover the whole field of view, the technical availability of large detectors was one of the central problems in past. We now invent the use of a PHILIPS 4K×7K chip in wide-field astronomy for Whole-Sky Patrol. Although the chip has a quantum efficiency of only about 30%, its big size (12μm pixel size) of 48×84 mm offers, for the first time, the replacement of large photographic plates by a single CCD chip. A first system using this chip with a super wide-angle objective for whole-sky imaging each minute down to ca. 10m offers the possibility of monitoring large portions of the sky simultaneously for transients of extrasolar planets. We report on our experience with this system and estimate its efficiency to detect such events.

  11. Whole-Sky Patrol with 4 K×7 K-CCD Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Peter

    Since the twenties of the last century Sonneberg Observatory runs in each clear night a photographic Sky Patrol with a system of small telescopes reaching 14m in the blue and 13m in the yellow-red. Currently much effort is made to take over this photographic sky patrol by a system of electronic detectors. Owing to the fact, that wide-field systems need either large CCDs or arrays of CCDs in order to cover the whole field of view, the technical availability of large detectors was one of the central problems in past. We now invent the use of a PHILIPS 4K×7K chip in wide-field astronomy for Whole-Sky Patrol. Although the chip has a quantum efficiency of only about 30 %, its big size (12μm pixel size) of 48×84 mm offers, for the first time, the replacement of large photographic plates by a single CCD chip. We report our first experience with this chip when using it with a super wide-angle objective for whole-sky imaging each minute down to ca. 10m for investigating different targets (variable stars, meteors, GRB counterparts, etc.).

  12. Charge sharing in silicon pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K; Seller, P; Prydderch, M L; O'Shea, V; Bates, R L; Smith, K M; Rahman, M

    2002-01-01

    We used a pixellated hybrid silicon X-ray detector to study the effect of the sharing of generated charge between neighbouring pixels over a range of incident X-ray energies, 13-36 keV. The system is a room temperature, energy resolving detector with a Gaussian FWHM of 265 eV at 5.9 keV. Each pixel is 300 mu m square, 300 mu m deep and is bump bonded to matching read out electronics. The modelling packages MEDICI and MCNP were used to model the complete X-ray interaction and the subsequent charge transport. Using this software a model is developed which reproduces well the experimental results. The simulations are then altered to explore smaller pixel sizes and different X-ray energies. Charge sharing was observed experimentally to be 2% at 13 keV rising to 4.5% at 36 keV, for an energy threshold of 4 keV. The models predict that up to 50% of charge may be lost to the neighbouring pixels, for an X-ray energy of 36 keV, when the pixel size is reduced to 55 mu m.

  13. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...

  14. Satellite reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloor, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    The potential of the observation equipment in remote sensing satellites is described. United States meteorology, land use and oceanography satellites and the major US Earth observation programs are listed. Imaging satellite systems are described such as: visible light and near infrared, thermal IR window, and microwave window. It is concluded that a geometrical resolution between 10 and 40 m can be expected. In order to reduce the data flow from the satellite system the input side of the system (the object-sensor interaction) has to be known. Satellites with synthetic aperture radar are increasingly important, but satellites can never fully replace observations with aircraft and drones.

  15. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika [Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Słoneczna 36, 60-286 Poznań (Poland); Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander, E-mail: chrisk@amu.edu.pl [Copernicus Astronomical Centre, ul. Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  16. Stroboscope Based Synchronization of Full Frame CCD Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The key obstacle to the use of consumer cameras in computer vision and computer graphics applications is the lack of synchronization hardware. We present a stroboscope based synchronization approach for the charge-coupled device (CCD consumer cameras. The synchronization is realized by first aligning the frames from different video sequences based on the smear dots of the stroboscope, and then matching the sequences using a hidden Markov model. Compared with current synchronized capture equipment, the proposed approach greatly reduces the cost by using inexpensive CCD cameras and one stroboscope. The results show that our method could reach a high accuracy much better than the frame-level synchronization of traditional software methods.

  17. Design, development, and performance of the STEREO SECCHI CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, Nick; Eyles, Chris

    2007-09-01

    We report the design, development and performance of the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) CCD camera electronics on NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). STEREO consists of two nearly identical space-based observatories; one ahead of Earth in its orbit, the other trailing behind to provide the first-ever stereoscopic (3D) measurements to study the Sun and the nature of its coronal mass ejections. The SECCHI instrument suite consists of five telescopes that will observe the solar corona, and inner heliosphere all the way from the surface of the Sun to the orbit of the Earth, and beyond. Each telescope contains a large-format science-grade CCD; two within the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instrument, and three in a separate instrument package (SCIP) consisting of two coronagraphs and an EUV imager. The CCDs are operated from two Camera Electronics Boxes. Constraints on the size, mass, and power available for the camera electronics required the development of a miniaturised solution employing digital and mixed-signal ASICs, FPGAs, and compact surface-mount construction. Operating more than one CCD from a single box also provides economy on the number of DC-DC converters and interface electronics required. We describe the requirements for the overall design and implementation, and in particular the design and performance of the camera's space-saving mixed-signal CCD video processing ASIC. The performance of the camera is reviewed together with sample images obtained since the STEREO mission was successfully launched on October 25 2006 from Cape Canaveral.

  18. CCD readout of GEM-based neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, F A F; Fetal, S T G; Fraga, M; Guérard, B; Manzini, G; Margato, L M S; Oed, A; Policarpo, Armando; Vuure, T V

    2002-01-01

    We report on the optical readout of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) operated with a gaseous mixture suitable for the detection of thermal neutrons: sup 3 He-CF sub 4. A CCD system operating in the 400-1000 nm band was used to collect the light. Spectroscopic data on the visible and NIR scintillation of He-CF sub 4 are presented. Images of the tracks of the proton and triton recorded with a triple GEM detector are also shown.

  19. Multiband CCD Photometry of CY Aquarii Using the AAVSOnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    delta Scuti stars are a class of short-period pulsating variable stars that include CY Aquarii. Multiband CCD photometry was performed on that star using instruments in Massachusetts, New Mexico, and Australia from the AAVSO's global robotic telescope network. Rapid cadence, multi-hour time series yielded high precision light curves and 21 new maxima. Data analyses revealed a pulsation pattern consistent with the existing model that describes the origin of SXPHE stars.

  20. A CCD Photometric Study of Close Binary V445 Cep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Dong Oh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present new BVR CCD photometric light curves for the close binary star V445 Cep. A new photometric solution and absolute physical dimensions of the system were derived by applying the Wilson-Devinney program to our observed light curves and radial velocity curves published by Pych et al. The evolutional status of V445 Cep was found to coincide with those of the general low mass ratio contact binary systems.

  1. Ortho projection and drawing for archeological artifacts using CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Chikatsu, Hirofumi; Miyatsuka, Yoshito

    1995-09-01

    In the compilation of archival records for archeological artifacts, true orthographic drawings of these artifacts have to be drawn by the archeologists themselves or part-timer, expending a great deal of time, labor, and skills. This paper describes the real time orthographic drawing system using a CCD camera. Finally, it demonstrates real time orthographic drawing results for Jomon pottery by using this system instead of the manual method which requires 3-4 hours.

  2. Spatial clustering of pixels of a multispectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-08-19

    A method and system for clustering the pixels of a multispectral image is provided. A clustering system computes a maximum spectral similarity score for each pixel that indicates the similarity between that pixel and the most similar neighboring. To determine the maximum similarity score for a pixel, the clustering system generates a similarity score between that pixel and each of its neighboring pixels and then selects the similarity score that represents the highest similarity as the maximum similarity score. The clustering system may apply a filtering criterion based on the maximum similarity score so that pixels with similarity scores below a minimum threshold are not clustered. The clustering system changes the current pixel values of the pixels in a cluster based on an averaging of the original pixel values of the pixels in the cluster.

  3. A Bridge Deflection Monitoring System Based on CCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For long-term monitoring of the midspan deflection of Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction on 309 national roads in Zibo city, this paper proposes Zhang’s calibration-based DIC deflection monitoring method. CCD cameras are used to track the change of targets’ position, Zhang’s calibration algorithm is introduced to acquire the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of CCD cameras, and the DIC method is combined with Zhang’s calibration algorithm to measure bridge deflection. The comparative test between Zhang’s calibration and scale calibration is conducted in lab, and experimental results indicate that the proposed method has higher precision. According to the deflection monitoring scheme, the deflection monitoring software for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is developed by MATLAB, and a 4-channel CCD deflection monitoring system for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is integrated in this paper. This deflection monitoring system includes functions such as image preview, simultaneous collection, camera calibration, deflection display, and data storage. In situ deflection curves show a consistent trend; this suggests that the proposed method is reliable and is suitable for the long-term monitoring of bridge deflection.

  4. Tsunami damage assessment with satellite radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greidanus, H.; Dekker, R.J.; Caliz, J.J.; Rodrigues, A.

    2005-01-01

    Medium (25 meter) resolution satellite radar imagery was used to identify damage from the SE Asia tsunami of December 2004. Several analysis methods were used on test areas over the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and NW Sumatra: visual assessment of before-after colour composites, pixel-based CFAR

  5. Satellite monitoring of cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) cause extensive problems in lakes worldwide, including human and ecological health risks, anoxia and fish kills, and taste and odor problems. CyanoHABs are a particular concern because of their dense biomass and the risk of exposure to toxins in both recreational waters and drinking source waters. Successful cyanoHAB assessment by satellites may provide a first-line of defense indicator for human and ecological health protection. In this study, assessment methods were developed to determine the utility of satellite technology for detecting cyanoHAB occurrence frequency at locations of potential management interest. The European Space Agency's MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) was evaluated to prepare for the equivalent Sentinel-3 Ocean and Land Colour Imager (OLCI) launched in 2016. Based on the 2012 National Lakes Assessment site evaluation guidelines and National Hydrography Dataset, there were 275,897 lakes and reservoirs greater than 1 hectare in the 48 U.S. states. Results from this evaluation show that 5.6 % of waterbodies were resolvable by satellites with 300 m single pixel resolution and 0.7 % of waterbodies were resolvable when a 3x3 pixel array was applied based on minimum Euclidian distance from shore. Satellite data was also spatially joined to US public water surface intake (PWSI) locations, where single pixel resolution resolved 57% of PWSI and a 3x3 pixel array resolved 33% of

  6. C.C.D. Readout Of A Picosecond Streak Camera With An Intensified C.C.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonier, M.; Richard, J. C.; Cavailler, C.; Mens, A.; Raze, G.

    1985-02-01

    This paper deals with a digital streak camera readout device. The device consists in a low light level television camera made of a solid state C.C.D. array coupled to an image intensifier associated to a video-digitizer coupled to a micro-computer system. The streak camera images are picked-up as a video signal, digitized and stored. This system allows the fast recording and the automatic processing of the data provided by the streak tube. Starting from the output screen of the streak camera, the constitutive elements are : - A fiber optic taper (A.O. Scientific Instruments) set in contact with the fiber optic output window of the streak tube achieves the image demagnification ; - A double proximity focused image intensifier (RTC - XX1410 SP) achieves the bright-ness amplification without any distortion ; - A second fiber optic taper achieves the dimensional matching between intensifier output and C.C.D. sensitive area ;

  7. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, S.; Cole, D. M.; Hancock, B. R.; Smith, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic coupling effects such as Inter-Pixel Capacitance (IPC) affect the quantitative interpretation of image data from CMOS, hybrid visible and infrared imagers alike. Existing methods of characterizing IPC do not provide a map of the spatial variation of IPC over all pixels. We demonstrate a deterministic method that provides a direct quantitative map of the crosstalk across an imager. The approach requires only the ability to reset single pixels to an arbitrary voltage, different from the rest of the imager. No illumination source is required. Mapping IPC independently for each pixel is also made practical by the greater S/N ratio achievable for an electrical stimulus than for an optical stimulus, which is subject to both Poisson statistics and diffusion effects of photo-generated charge. The data we present illustrates a more complex picture of IPC in Teledyne HgCdTe and HyViSi focal plane arrays than is presently understood, including the presence of a newly discovered, long range IPC in the HyViSi FPA that extends tens of pixels in distance, likely stemming from extended field effects in the fully depleted substrate. The sensitivity of the measurement approach has been shown to be good enough to distinguish spatial structure in IPC of the order of 0.1%.

  8. Pixels, Blocks of Pixels, and Polygons: Choosing a Spatial Unit for Thematic Accuracy Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixels, polygons, and blocks of pixels are all potentially viable spatial assessment units for conducting an accuracy assessment. We develop a statistical population-based framework to examine how the spatial unit chosen affects the outcome of an accuracy assessment. The populati...

  9. Where can pixel counting area estimates meet user-defined accuracy requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, François; Defourny, Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Pixel counting is probably the most popular way to estimate class areas from satellite-derived maps. It involves determining the number of pixels allocated to a specific thematic class and multiplying it by the pixel area. In the presence of asymmetric classification errors, the pixel counting estimator is biased. The overarching objective of this article is to define the applicability conditions of pixel counting so that the estimates are below a user-defined accuracy target. By reasoning in terms of landscape fragmentation and spatial resolution, the proposed framework decouples the resolution bias and the classifier bias from the overall classification bias. The consequence is that prior to any classification, part of the tolerated bias is already committed due to the choice of the spatial resolution of the imagery. How much classification bias is affordable depends on the joint interaction of spatial resolution and fragmentation. The method was implemented over South Africa for cropland mapping, demonstrating its operational applicability. Particular attention was paid to modeling a realistic sensor's spatial response by explicitly accounting for the effect of its point spread function. The diagnostic capabilities offered by this framework have multiple potential domains of application such as guiding users in their choice of imagery and providing guidelines for space agencies to elaborate the design specifications of future instruments.

  10. Per-Pixel Lighting Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inanici, Mehlika

    2005-08-01

    This report presents a framework for per-pixel analysis of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of luminous environments. Recognizing the need for better lighting analysis capabilities and appreciating the new measurement abilities developed within the LBNL Lighting Measurement and Simulation Toolbox, ''Per-pixel Lighting Data Analysis'' project demonstrates several techniques for analyzing luminance distribution patterns, luminance ratios, adaptation luminance and glare assessment. The techniques are the syntheses of the current practices in lighting design and the unique practices that can be done with per-pixel data availability. Demonstrated analysis techniques are applicable to both computer-generated and digitally captured images (physically-based renderings and High Dynamic Range photographs).

  11. Comparing Pixel- and Object-Based Approaches in Effectively Classifying Wetland-Dominated Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedros M. Berhane

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetland ecosystems straddle both terrestrial and aquatic habitats, performing many ecological functions directly and indirectly benefitting humans. However, global wetland losses are substantial. Satellite remote sensing and classification informs wise wetland management and monitoring. Both pixel- and object-based classification approaches using parametric and non-parametric algorithms may be effectively used in describing wetland structure and habitat, but which approach should one select? We conducted both pixel- and object-based image analyses (OBIA using parametric (Iterative Self-Organizing Data Analysis Technique, ISODATA, and maximum likelihood, ML and non-parametric (random forest, RF approaches in the Barguzin Valley, a large wetland (~500 km2 in the Lake Baikal, Russia, drainage basin. Four Quickbird multispectral bands plus various spatial and spectral metrics (e.g., texture, Non-Differentiated Vegetation Index, slope, aspect, etc. were analyzed using field-based regions of interest sampled to characterize an initial 18 ISODATA-based classes. Parsimoniously using a three-layer stack (Quickbird band 3, water ratio index (WRI, and mean texture in the analyses resulted in the highest accuracy, 87.9% with pixel-based RF, followed by OBIA RF (segmentation scale 5, 84.6% overall accuracy, followed by pixel-based ML (83.9% overall accuracy. Increasing the predictors from three to five by adding Quickbird bands 2 and 4 decreased the pixel-based overall accuracy while increasing the OBIA RF accuracy to 90.4%. However, McNemar’s chi-square test confirmed no statistically significant difference in overall accuracy among the classifiers (pixel-based ML, RF, or object-based RF for either the three- or five-layer analyses. Although potentially useful in some circumstances, the OBIA approach requires substantial resources and user input (such as segmentation scale selection—which was found to substantially affect overall accuracy. Hence, we

  12. 4K×4K format 10μm pixel pitch H4RG-10 hybrid CMOS silicon visible focal plane array for space astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yibin; Tennant, William; Anglin, Selmer; Wong, Andre; Farris, Mark; Xu, Min; Holland, Eric; Cooper, Donald; Hosack, Joseph; Ho, Kenneth; Sprafke, Thomas; Kopp, Robert; Starr, Brian; Blank, Richard; Beletic, James W.; Luppino, Gerard A.

    2012-07-01

    Teledyne’s silicon hybrid CMOS focal plane array technology has matured into a viable, high performance and high- TRL alternative to scientific CCD sensors for space-based applications in the UV-visible-NIR wavelengths. This paper presents the latest results from Teledyne’s low noise silicon hybrid CMOS visible focal place array produced in 4K×4K format with 10 μm pixel pitch. The H4RG-10 readout circuit retains all of the CMOS functionality (windowing, guide mode, reference pixels) and heritage of its highly successful predecessor (H2RG) developed for JWST, with additional features for improved performance. Combined with a silicon PIN detector layer, this technology is termed HyViSI™ (Hybrid Visible Silicon Imager). H4RG-10 HyViSI™ arrays achieve high pixel interconnectivity (noise (passed radiation testing for low earth orbit (LEO) environment.

  13. The SMILE Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) CCD design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Holland, A. D.; Burgon, R.; Buggey, T.; Skottfelt, J.; Sembay, S.; Drumm, P.; Thornhill, J.; Read, A.; Sykes, J.; Walton, D.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Kennedy, T.; Raab, W.; Verhoeve, P.; Agnolon, D.; Woffinden, C.

    2018-01-01

    SMILE, the Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer, is a joint science mission between the European Space Agency and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The spacecraft will be uniquely equipped to study the interaction between the Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere system and the solar wind on a global scale. SMILE's instruments will explore this science through imaging of the solar wind charge exchange soft X-ray emission from the dayside magnetosheath, simultaneous imaging of the UV northern aurora and in-situ monitoring of the solar wind and magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field conditions. The Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) is the instrument being designed to observe X-ray photons emitted by the solar wind charge exchange process at photon energies between 200 eV and 2000 eV . X-rays will be collected using a focal plane array of two custom-designed CCDs, each consisting of 18 μm square pixels in a 4510 by 4510 array. SMILE will be placed in a highly elliptical polar orbit, passing in and out of the Earth's radiation belts every 48 hours. Radiation damage accumulated in the CCDs during the mission's nominal 3-year lifetime will degrade their performance (such as through decreases in charge transfer efficiency), negatively impacting the instrument's ability to detect low energy X-rays incident on the regions of the CCD image area furthest from the detector outputs. The design of the SMILE-SXI CCDs is presented here, including features and operating methods for mitigating the effects of radiation damage and expected end of life CCD performance. Measurements with a PLATO device that has not been designed for soft X-ray signal levels indicate a temperature-dependent transfer efficiency performance varying between 5×10‑5 and 9×10‑4 at expected End of Life for 5.9 keV photons, giving an initial set of measurements from which to extrapolate the performance of the SXI CCDs.

  14. Development of a CMOS SOI pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ishino, Hirokazu; Hazumi, M; Ikegami, Y; Kohriki, T; Tajima, O; Terada, S; Tsuboyama, T; Unno, Y; Ushiroda, Y; Ikeda, H; Hara, K; Ishino, H; Kawasaki, T; Miyake, H; Martin, E; Varner, G; Tajima, H; Ohno, M; Fukuda, K; Komatsubara, H; Ida, J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a monolithic radiation pixel detector using silicon on insulator (SOI) with a commercial 0.15 m fullydepleted- SOI technology and a Czochralski high resistivity silicon substrate in place of a handle wafer. The SOI TEG (Test Element Group) chips with a size of 2.5 x 2.5mm2 consisting of 20 x 20 um2 pixels have been designed and manufactured. Performance tests with a laser light illumination and a . ray radioactive source indicate successful operation of the detector. We also brie y discuss the back gate effect as well as the simulation study.

  15. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  16. Wafer-scale pixelated detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Zimmerman, Tom

    2017-10-17

    A large area, gapless, detection system comprises at least one sensor; an interposer operably connected to the at least one sensor; and at least one application specific integrated circuit operably connected to the sensor via the interposer wherein the detection system provides high dynamic range while maintaining small pixel area and low power dissipation. Thereby the invention provides methods and systems for a wafer-scale gapless and seamless detector systems with small pixels, which have both high dynamic range and low power dissipation.

  17. Surface vegetative biomass modelling from combined AVHRR and Landsat satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T. L.; Strahler, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology for the estimation of regional biomass on the basis of Landsat and Polar Orbiter Satellite Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery has been developed by the present study, which concentrated on the Sierra Nevada-Cascade Mountains ecological province of California. The Landsat data are only used initially, to calibrate the AVHRR-based biomass data. The essential element of the present approach is a 'pixel proportions' model. An integer block of Landsat pixels corresponds to each AVHRR pixel. The Landsat pixels are converted into biomass pixels using species biomass expression equations available in the literature.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Chinese HJ-1 CCD, GF-1 WFV and ZY-3 MUX Sensor Data for Leaf Area Index Estimations for Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, China has developed and launched several satellites with high spatial resolutions, such as the resources satellite No. 3 (ZY-3 with a multi-spectral camera (MUX and 5.8 m spatial resolution, the satellite GaoFen No. 1 (GF-1 with a wide field of view (WFV camera and 16 m spatial resolution, and the environment satellite (HJ-1A/B with a charge-coupled device (CCD sensor and 30 m spatial resolution. First, to analyze the potential application of ZY-3 MUX, GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD to extract the leaf area index (LAI at the regional scale, this study estimated LAI from the relationships between physical model-based spectral vegetation indices (SVIs and LAI values that were generated from look-up tables (LUTs, simulated from the combination of the PROSPECT-5B leaf model and the scattering by arbitrarily inclined leaves with the hot-spot effect (SAILH canopy reflectance model. Second, to assess the surface reflectance quality of these sensors after data preprocessing, the well-processed surface reflectance products of the Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI sensor with a convincing data quality were used to compare the performances of ZY-3 MUX, GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD sensors both in theory and reality. Apart from several reflectance fluctuations, the reflectance trends were coincident, and the reflectance values of the red and near-infrared (NIR bands were comparable among these sensors. Finally, to analyze the accuracy of the LAI estimated from ZY-3 MUX, GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD, the LAI estimations from these sensors were validated based on LAI field measurements in Huailai, Hebei Province, China. The results showed that the performance of the LAI that was inversed from ZY-3 MUX was better than that from GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD, both of which tended to be systematically underestimated. In addition, the value ranges and accuracies of the LAI inversions both decreased with decreasing spatial resolution.

  19. Imaging quality evaluation method of pixel coupled electro-optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xu; Yuan, Li; Jin, Chunqi; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2017-09-01

    With advancements in high-resolution imaging optical fiber bundle fabrication technology, traditional photoelectric imaging system have become ;flexible; with greatly reduced volume and weight. However, traditional image quality evaluation models are limited by the coupling discrete sampling effect of fiber-optic image bundles and charge-coupled device (CCD) pixels. This limitation substantially complicates the design, optimization, assembly, and evaluation image quality of the coupled discrete sampling imaging system. Based on the transfer process of grayscale cosine distribution optical signal in the fiber-optic image bundle and CCD, a mathematical model of coupled modulation transfer function (coupled-MTF) is established. This model can be used as a basis for following studies on the convergence and periodically oscillating characteristics of the function. We also propose the concept of the average coupled-MTF, which is consistent with the definition of traditional MTF. Based on this concept, the relationships among core distance, core layer radius, and average coupled-MTF are investigated.

  20. Comparison of high resolution x-ray detectors with conventional FPDs using experimental MTFs and apodized aperture pixel design for reduced aliasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, A.; Russ, M.; Vijayan, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2017-03-01

    Apodized Aperture Pixel (AAP) design, proposed by Ismailova et.al, is an alternative to the conventional pixel design. The advantages of AAP processing with a sinc filter in comparison with using other filters include non-degradation of MTF values and elimination of signal and noise aliasing, resulting in an increased performance at higher frequencies, approaching the Nyquist frequency. If high resolution small field-of-view (FOV) detectors with small pixels used during critical stages of Endovascular Image Guided Interventions (EIGIs) could also be extended to cover a full field-of-view typical of flat panel detectors (FPDs) and made to have larger effective pixels, then methods must be used to preserve the MTF over the frequency range up to the Nyquist frequency of the FPD while minimizing aliasing. In this work, we convolve the experimentally measured MTFs of an Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector, (the MAF-CCD with 35μm pixels) and a High Resolution Fluoroscope (HRF) detector (HRF-CMOS50 with 49.5μm pixels) with the AAP filter and show the superiority of the results compared to MTFs resulting from moving average pixel binning and to the MTF of a standard FPD. The effect of using AAP is also shown in the spatial domain, when used to image an infinitely small point object. For detectors in neurovascular interventions, where high resolution is the priority during critical parts of the intervention, but full FOV with larger pixels are needed during less critical parts, AAP design provides an alternative to simple pixel binning while effectively eliminating signal and noise aliasing yet allowing the small FOV high resolution imaging to be maintained during critical parts of the EIGI.

  1. Rotational spectra of vibrationally excited CCH and CCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, T C; Gottlieb, C A; Thaddeus, P

    2007-09-21

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectra of the lowest bending and stretching vibrational levels of CCH and CCD were observed in a low pressure discharge through acetylene and helium. The rotational, centrifugal distortion, and fine structure constants were determined for the (02(0)0) and (02(2)0) bending states, the (100) and (001) stretching levels, and the (011) combination level of CCH. The same pure bending and stretching levels, and the (110) combination level were observed in CCD. Apparent anomalies in the spectroscopic constants in the bending states were shown to be due to l-type resonances. Hyperfine constants, which in CCH are sensitive to the degree of admixture of the A 2Pi excited electronic state, were determined in the excited vibrational levels of both isotopic species. Theoretical Fermi contact and dipole-dipole hyperfine constants calculated by Peric et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 150, 70 (1991)] were found to be in excellent agreement with the measured constants. In CCD, new rotational lines tentatively assigned to the (100) level largely on the basis of the observed hyperfine structure support the assignment of the C-H stretching fundamental (nu1) by Stephens et al. [J. Mol. Struct. 190, 41 (1988)]. Rotational lines in the excited vibrational levels of CCH are fairly intense in our discharge source because the vibrational excitation temperatures of the bending vibrational levels and the (110) and (011) combination levels are only about 100 K higher than the gas kinetic temperature, unlike the higher frequency stretching vibrations, where the excitation temperatures are five to ten times higher.

  2. Multicolour CCD Photometric Study of Galactic Star Clusters SAI 63 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-02-03

    were taken in 2×2 pixel binning mode to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for ... and exposure times information. SAI 63 was observed on February 03, 2011 while SAI 75 was observed on January 22, 2010. Objects. Filters. Exposure time ..... This work has been financially supported by the Department of Science and.

  3. Apical dominance in saffron and the involvement of the branching enzymes CCD7 and CCD8 in the control of bud sprouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In saffron (Crocus sativus), new corms develop at the base of every shoot developed from the maternal corm, a globular underground storage stem. Since the degree of bud sprouts influences the number and size of new corms, and strigolactones (SLs) suppress growth of pre-formed axillary bud, it was considered appropriate to investigate SL involvement in physiology and molecular biology in saffron. We focused on two of the genes within the SL pathway, CCD7 and CCD8, encoding carotenoid cleavage enzymes required for the production of SLs. Results The CsCCD7 and CsCCD8 genes are the first ones isolated and characterized from a non-grass monocotyledonous plant. CsCCD7 and CsCCD8 expression showed some overlapping, although they were not identical. CsCCD8 was highly expressed in quiescent axillary buds and decapitation dramatically reduced its expression levels, suggesting its involvement in the suppression of axillary bud outgrowth. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed also the involvement of auxin, cytokinin and jasmonic acid on the sprouting of axillary buds from corms in which the apical bud was removed. In addition, CsCCD8 expression, but not CsCCD7, was higher in the newly developed vascular tissue of axillary buds compared to the vascular tissue of the apical bud. Conclusions We showed that production and transport of auxin in saffron corms could act synergistically with SLs to arrest the outgrowth of the axillary buds, similar to the control of above-ground shoot branching. In addition, jasmonic acid seems to play a prominent role in bud dormancy in saffron. While cytokinins from roots promote bud outgrowth. In addition the expression results of CsCCD8 suggest that SLs could positively regulate procambial activity and the development of new vascular tissues connecting leaves with the mother corm. PMID:24947472

  4. Accurate wavelength calibration method for compact CCD spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Huang, C; Xia, G; Jin, S Q; Lu, H B

    2017-04-01

    Wavelength calibration is an important step in charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometers. In this paper, an accurate calibration method is proposed. A model of a line profile spectrum is built at the beginning, followed by noise reduction, bandwidth correction, and automatic peak-seeking treatment. Experimental tests are conducted on the USB4000 spectrometer with a mercury-argon calibration light source. Compared with the traditional method, the results show that this wavelength calibration procedure obtains higher accuracy and the deviations are within 0.1 nm.

  5. A Lossy Method for Compressing Raw CCD Images

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Alan M.

    2002-01-01

    Se presenta un método para comprimir las imágenes en bruto de dispositivos como los CCD. El método es muy sencillo: cuantizaciòn con pérdida y luego compresión sin pérdida con herramientas de uso general como gzip o bzip2. Se convierten los archivos comprimidos a archivos de FITS descomprimiéndolos con gunzip o bunzip2, lo cual es una ventaja importante en la distribución de datos comprimidos. El grado de cuantizaciòn se elige para eliminar los bits de bajo orden, los cuales...

  6. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  7. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...

  8. Shadow-free single-pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunhua; Zhang, Zibang; Ma, Xiao; Zhong, Jingang

    2017-11-01

    Single-pixel imaging is an innovative imaging scheme and receives increasing attention in recent years, for it is applicable for imaging at non-visible wavelengths and imaging under weak light conditions. However, as in conventional imaging, shadows would likely occur in single-pixel imaging and sometimes bring negative effects in practical uses. In this paper, the principle of shadows occurrence in single-pixel imaging is analyzed, following which a technique for shadows removal is proposed. In the proposed technique, several single-pixel detectors are used to detect the backscattered light at different locations so that the shadows in the reconstructed images corresponding to each detector shadows are complementary. Shadow-free reconstruction can be derived by fusing the shadow-complementary images using maximum selection rule. To deal with the problem of intensity mismatch in image fusion, we put forward a simple calibration. As experimentally demonstrated, the technique is able to reconstruct monochromatic and full-color shadow-free images.

  9. Performance of active edge pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Bomben, Marco; Bagolini, Alvise; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Calderini, Giovanni; D'Eramo, Louis; Giacomini, Gabriele; Marchiori, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola; Rummler, Andre; Weingarten, Jens

    2017-01-01

    this paper the performance of these modules are reported. In particular the lateral extension of the detection volume, beyond the pixel region, is investigated and the results show high hit efficiency also at the detector edge, even in presence of guard rings.

  10. CMS has a heart of pixels

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    At the core of CMS, particles will come into contact with tiny detector components, known as pixels, which are almost invisible to the naked eye. With these elementary cells measuring a mere 150 microns (or about 1/10 of a millimetre) along each side, a real technological leap has been made.

  11. What's A Pixel Particle Sensor Chip?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS particle physics experiment aided with collaboration ON Semiconductor was recently honored by the European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN), with an Industrial Award recognizing the company's contribution in supplying complex "Pixel Particle Sensor" chips for use in CERN's ATLAS particle physics experiment.

  12. Planar pixel sensors in commercial CMOS technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Macchiolo, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the high luminosity LHC, an all-silicon tracker is foreseen to cope with the increased rate and radiation levels. Pixel and strip detectors will have to cover an area of up to 200m2. To produce modules in high number at reduced costs, new sensor and bonding technologies have to be investigated. Commercial CMOS technologies on high resistive substrates can provide significant advantages in this direction. They offer cost effective, large volume sensor production. In addition to this, production is done on 8'' wafers allowing wafer-to-wafer bonding to the electronics, an interconnection technology substantially cheaper than the bump bonding process used for hybrid pixel detectors at the LHC. Both active and passive n-in-p pixel sensor prototypes have been submitted in a 150 nm CMOS technology on a 2kΩ cm substrate. The passive sensor design will be used to characterize sensor properties and to investigate wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies. This first prototype is made of a matrix of 36 x 16 pixels of size compatible with the FE-I4 readout chip (i.e. 50 μm x 250 μm). Results from lab characterization of this first submission are shown together with TCAD simulations. Work towards a full size FE-I4 sensor for wafer-to-wafer bonding is discussed.

  13. Post Launch Calibration and Testing of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on the GOES-R Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafal, Marc D.; Clarke, Jared T.; Cholvibul, Ruth W.

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is procuring the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments with the first launch of the GOES-R series planned for October 2016. Included in the GOES-R Instrument suite is the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). GLM is a single-channel, near-infrared optical detector that can sense extremely brief (800 microseconds) transient changes in the atmosphere, indicating the presence of lightning. GLM will measure total lightning activity continuously over the Americas and adjacent ocean regions with near-uniform spatial resolution of approximately 10 km. Due to its large CCD (1372x1300 pixels), high frame rate, sensitivity and onboard event filtering, GLM will require extensive post launch characterization and calibration. Daytime and nighttime images will be used to characterize both image quality criteria inherent to GLM as a space-based optic system (focus, stray light, crosstalk, solar glint) and programmable image processing criteria (dark offsets, gain, noise, linearity, dynamic range). In addition ground data filtering will be adjusted based on lightning-specific phenomenology (coherence) to isolate real from false transients with their own characteristics. These parameters will be updated, as needed, on orbit in an iterative process guided by pre-launch testing. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on GLM over the six-month Post Launch Test period to optimize and demonstrate GLM performance.

  14. Post launch calibration and testing of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on GOES-R satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafal, Marc; Clarke, Jared T.; Cholvibul, Ruth W.

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is procuring the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments with the first launch of the GOES-R series planned for October 2016. Included in the GOES-R Instrument suite is the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). GLM is a single-channel, near-infrared optical detector that can sense extremely brief (800 μs) transient changes in the atmosphere, indicating the presence of lightning. GLM will measure total lightning activity continuously over the Americas and adjacent ocean regions with near-uniform spatial resolution of approximately 10 km. Due to its large CCD (1372x1300 pixels), high frame rate, sensitivity and onboard event filtering, GLM will require extensive post launch characterization and calibration. Daytime and nighttime images will be used to characterize both image quality criteria inherent to GLM as a space-based optic system (focus, stray light, crosstalk, solar glint) and programmable image processing criteria (dark offsets, gain, noise, linearity, dynamic range). In addition ground data filtering will be adjusted based on lightning-specific phenomenology (coherence) to isolate real from false transients with their own characteristics. These parameters will be updated, as needed, on orbit in an iterative process guided by pre-launch testing. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on GLM over the six-month Post Launch Test period to optimize and demonstrate GLM performance.

  15. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    , emerging evidence points to these structures as important hubs for dynamic, multi-faceted regulation in response to a variety of cues. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the roles of centriolar satellites in regulating centrosome functions, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis. We also...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  16. Novel nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3(Eu) scintillator screens with a micro-pixel structure for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Lee, Seung Jun; Muralidharan, P.; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Jong Yul; Cho, Gyuseong; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young

    2011-10-01

    We developed a novel pixel-structured scintillation screen with nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu particle sizes for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging detectors. Nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillators were successfully synthesized with a hydrothermal method and a subsequent calcination treatment, which were used as a material for converting incident X-rays into visible light. In this work, silicon-based pixel structures with different 100, 50 and 30 μm pixel sizes, a 10 μm wall width and a 120 μm thickness were prepared with the standard photolithography and the deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. Subsequently, a micro-pixel-structured scintillation screen was fabricated by adding the synthesized nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillating phosphor to pixel-structured silicon arrays. Additionally, X-ray imaging performance such as relative light intensity, X-ray to light response and the spatial resolution in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF) were measured by using an X-ray source and a lens-coupled charge coupled device (CCD) camera system. The light intensity of the pixel-structured nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu screen was much higher than that of a pixel-structured sample made with a commercial microcrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu product due to the density of the nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillating powder-filled silicon structure. As the pixel size of the pixel-structured silicon decreased, the light intensity decreased. However, as the pixel size decreased, the spatial resolution significantly improved with no evident crosstalk from the emitted optical photons between adjacent scintillating pixels. The MTF of pixel-structured nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu screens with a 100 and a 50 μm pixel size was 20% and 30% at 6 lp/mm, respectively. As a result, this new technology showed that a microchannel structure based on a nanocrystalline Gd 2O 3:Eu scintillator could provide higher light intensity and high spatial resolution imaging compared to conventional

  17. CCD Astrometry of Selected Compact Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, P.; Velichko, F.; Filonenko, V.; Myznikov, A.; Sergeev, V.

    The 64 optical positions relative to the Catalog of Astrometric Standards (USNO-A2.0) and 9 optical positions relative to the Extragalactic Reference Link Catalog (de Vegt at al., 2001) had been obtained for the optical counterparts of 50 northern compact extragalactic radio sources (CERS). These positions were determined at the Kharkov Astronomical Observatory with use the CCD-camera ST-6 of the 0.7-m telescope AZT-8. More than 325 CCD-images of field 10.5' × 8' with optical counterparts of selected CERS had been obtained during 1997-2001. Positions of reference stars (from 6 to 12 stars for each CERS) were obtained from USNO-A2.0 catalogue, Extragalactic Reference Link Catalog and Nikolayev AMC catalogue (Pinigin & Shulga, 1999). The mean internal formal errors of the optical positions of these CERS are 100 mas in right ascension and 70 mas in declination. A comparison with VLBI radio positions for these sources is presented. The mean differences between radio and optical positions from our observations are not significantly differing from zero on the 0.05 significance level. The optical data which we obtained is potentially useful to possibly improve the current link of the Hipparcos reference frame to the ICRS. References de Vegt, C., Hindsley, R., Zacharias, N., Winter, L. 2001, AJ, 2815 Pinigin, G.I., Shulga A.V., 1999, Proc. JOURNESS 1999 & IX. Lohrmann-Kolloquium, Dresden (Germany), 64

  18. First large DEPFET pixel modules for the Belle II Pixel Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Felix; Avella, Paola; Kiesling, Christian; Koffmane, Christian; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Valentan, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Andricek, Ladislav; Richter, Rainer [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer excellent signal to noise ratio, resolution and low power consumption with a low material budget. They will be used at Belle II and are a candidate for an ILC vertex detector. The pixels are integrated in a monolithic piece of silicon which also acts as PCB providing the signal and control routings for the ASICs on top. The first prototype DEPFET sensor modules for Belle II have been produced. The modules have 192000 pixels and are equipped with SMD components and three different kinds of ASICs to control and readout the pixels. The entire readout chain has to be studied; the metal layer interconnectivity and routings need to be verified. The modules are fully characterized, and the operation voltages and control sequences of the ASICs are investigated. An overview of the DEPFET concept and first characterization results is presented.

  19. A linearised pixel-swapping method for mapping rural linear land cover features from fine spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, M. W.; Atkinson, P. M.; Holland, D. A.

    2007-10-01

    Accurate maps of rural linear land cover features, such as paths and hedgerows, would be useful to ecologists, conservation managers and land planning agencies. Such information might be used in a variety of applications (e.g., ecological, conservation and land management applications). Based on the phenomenon of spatial dependence, sub-pixel mapping techniques can be used to increase the spatial resolution of land cover maps produced from satellite sensor imagery and map such features with increased accuracy. Aerial photography with a spatial resolution of 0.25 m was acquired of the Christchurch area of Dorset, UK. The imagery was hard classified using a simple Mahalanobis distance classifier and the classification degraded to simulate land cover proportion images with spatial resolutions of 2.5 and 5 m. A simple pixel-swapping algorithm was then applied to each of the proportion images. Sub-pixels within pixels were swapped iteratively until the spatial correlation between neighbouring sub-pixels for the entire image was maximised. Visual inspection of the super-resolved output showed that prediction of the position and dimensions of hedgerows was comparable with the original imagery. The maps displayed an accuracy of 87%. To enhance the prediction of linear features within the super-resolved output, an anisotropic modelling component was added. The direction of the largest sums of proportions was calculated within a moving window at the pixel level. The orthogonal sum of proportions was used in estimating the anisotropy ratio. The direction and anisotropy ratio were then used to modify the pixel-swapping algorithm so as to increase the likelihood of creating linear features in the output map. The new linear pixel-swapping method led to an increase in the accuracy of mapping fine linear features of approximately 5% compared with the conventional pixel-swapping method.

  20. Combining the Pixel-based and Object-based Methods for Building Change Detection Using High-resolution Remote Sensing Images

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Zhiqiang; ZHANG Xinchang; XIN Qinchuan; YANG Xiaoling

    2018-01-01

    Timely and accurate change detection of buildings provides important information for urban planning and management.Accompanying with the rapid development of satellite remote sensing technology,detecting building changes from high-resolution remote sensing images have received wide attention.Given that pixel-based methods of change detection often lead to low accuracy while object-based methods are complicated for uses,this research proposes a method that combines pixel-based and object-based...

  1. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah [Northwestern U. (main); Deptuch, Grzegorz W. [Fermilab; Hoff, James R. [Fermilab; Mohseni, Hooman [Northwestern U. (main)

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  2. 2D Sub-Pixel Disparity Measurement Using QPEC / Medicis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cournet

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of its earth observation missions, CNES created a library called QPEC, and one of its launcher called Medicis. QPEC / Medicis is a sub-pixel two-dimensional stereo matching algorithm that works on an image pair. This tool is a block matching algorithm, which means that it is based on a local method. Moreover it does not regularize the results found. It proposes several matching costs, such as the Zero mean Normalised Cross-Correlation or statistical measures (the Mutual Information being one of them, and different match validation flags. QPEC / Medicis is able to compute a two-dimensional dense disparity map with a subpixel precision. Hence, it is more versatile than disparity estimation methods found in computer vision literature, which often assume an epipolar geometry. CNES uses Medicis, among other applications, during the in-orbit image quality commissioning of earth observation satellites. For instance the Pléiades-HR 1A & 1B and the Sentinel-2 geometric calibrations are based on this block matching algorithm. Over the years, it has become a common tool in ground segments for in-flight monitoring purposes. For these two kinds of applications, the two-dimensional search and the local sub-pixel measure without regularization can be essential. This tool is also used to generate automatic digital elevation models, for which it was not initially dedicated. This paper deals with the QPEC / Medicis algorithm. It also presents some of its CNES applications (in-orbit commissioning, in flight monitoring or digital elevation model generation. Medicis software is distributed outside the CNES as well. This paper finally describes some of these external applications using Medicis, such as ground displacement measurement, or intra-oral scanner in the dental domain.

  3. Tracking radiometric responsivity of optical sensors without on-board calibration systems-case of the Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Xiaoling; Tian, Liqiao; Feng, Lian

    2015-01-26

    The radiometric stability of satellite sensors is crucial for generating highly consistent remote sensing measurements and products. We have presented a radiometric responsivity tracking method designed especially for optical sensors without on-board calibration systems. Using a temporally stable desert site with high reflectance, the sensor responsivity was simulated using the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model (RTM) with information from validated MODIS atmospheric data. Next, radiometric responsivity drifting was identified using a linear regression of the time series bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) normalized coefficients. The proposed method was applied to Chinese HJ-1A/1B charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, which have been on-orbit operations for more than 5 years without continuous assessment of their radiometric performance. Results from the Dunhuang desert site between 2008 and 2013 indicated that the CCD sensors degraded at various rates, with the most significant degradation occurring in the blue bands, ranging from 2.8% to 4.2% yr-1. The red bands were more stable, with a degradation rate of 0.7-3.1% yr-1. A cross-sensor comparison revealed the least degradation for the HJ-1A CCD1 (blue: 2.8%; green: 2.8%; red: 0.7%; and NIR: 0.9% yr-1), whereas the degradation of HJ-1B CCD1 was most pronounced (blue: 3.5%; green: 4.1%; red: 2.3%; and NIR: 3.4% yr-1). The uncertainties of the method were evaluated theoretically based on the propagation of uncertainties from all possible sources of the RT simulations. In addition, a cross comparison with matchup ground-based absolute calibration results was conducted. The comparison demonstrated that the method was useful for continuously monitoring the radiometric performance of remote sensors, such as HJ-1A/1B CCD and GaoFen (GF) series (China's latest high-definition Earth observation satellite), and indicated the potential use of the

  4. Feasibility study of multi-pixel retrieval of optical thickness and droplet effective radius of inhomogeneous clouds using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Rintaro; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Schmidt, K. Sebastian

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) radiative-transfer effects are a major source of retrieval errors in satellite-based optical remote sensing of clouds. The challenge is that 3-D effects manifest themselves across multiple satellite pixels, which traditional single-pixel approaches cannot capture. In this study, we present two multi-pixel retrieval approaches based on deep learning, a technique that is becoming increasingly successful for complex problems in engineering and other areas. Specifically, we use deep neural networks (DNNs) to obtain multi-pixel estimates of cloud optical thickness and column-mean cloud droplet effective radius from multispectral, multi-pixel radiances. The first DNN method corrects traditional bispectral retrievals based on the plane-parallel homogeneous cloud assumption using the reflectances at the same two wavelengths. The other DNN method uses so-called convolutional layers and retrieves cloud properties directly from the reflectances at four wavelengths. The DNN methods are trained and tested on cloud fields from large-eddy simulations used as input to a 3-D radiative-transfer model to simulate upward radiances. The second DNN-based retrieval, sidestepping the bispectral retrieval step through convolutional layers, is shown to be more accurate. It reduces 3-D radiative-transfer effects that would otherwise affect the radiance values and estimates cloud properties robustly even for optically thick clouds.

  5. Tractability gains in symmetry-adapted perturbation theory including coupled double excitations: CCD+ST(CCD) dispersion with natural orbital truncations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Robert M.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-11-01

    This work focuses on efficient and accurate treatment of the intermolecular dispersion interaction using the CCD+ST(CCD) dispersion approach formulated by Williams et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 103, 4586 (1995)]. We apply natural orbital truncation techniques to the solution of the monomer coupled-cluster double (CCD) equations, yielding substantial accelerations in this computationally demanding portion of the SAPT2+(CCD), SAPT2+(3)(CCD), and SAPT2+3(CCD) analyses. It is shown that the wholly rate-limiting dimer-basis particle-particle ladder term can be computed in a reduced natural virtual space which is essentially the same size as the monomer-basis virtual space, with an error on the order of a few thousandths of 1 kcal mol-1. Coupled with our existing natural orbital techniques for the perturbative triple excitation contributions [E. G. Hohenstein and C. D. Sherrill, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 104107 (2010)], this technique provides speedups of greater than an order of magnitude for the evaluation of the complete SAPT2+3(CCD) decomposition, with a total error of a few hundredths of 1 kcal mol-1. The combined approach yields tractability gains of almost 2× in the system size, allowing for SAPT2+3(CCD)/aug-cc-pVTZ analysis to be performed for systems such as adenine-thymine for the first time. Natural orbital based SAPT2+3(CCD)/aug-cc-pVTZ results are presented for stacked and hydrogen-bonded configurations of uracil dimer and the adenine-thymine dimer.

  6. Satellite Communications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Satellite Communications. Arthur C Clarke wrote a seminal paper in 1945 in wireless world. Use three satellites in geo-synchronous orbit to enable intercontinental communications. System could be realised in '50 to 100 years'

  7. Commissioning Perspectives for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067982; Klingenberg, Reiner

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector, the innermost sub-detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN, is an 80 million channel silicon pixel tracking detector designed for high-precision charged particle tracking and secondary vertex reconstruction. It was installed in the ATLAS experiment and commissioning for the first proton-proton collision data taking in 2008 has begun. Due to the complex layout and limited accessibility, quality assurance measurements were continuously performed during production and assembly to ensure that no problematic components are integrated. The assembly of the detector at CERN and related quality assurance measurement results, including comparison to previous production measurements, will be presented. In order to verify that the integrated detector, its data acquisition readout chain, the ancillary services and cooling system as well as the detector control and data acquisition software perform together as expected approximately 8% of the detector system was progress...

  8. Advanced monolithic pixel sensors using SOI technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Toshinobu, E-mail: miyoshi@post.kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Arai, Yasuo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Asano, Mari [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Fujita, Yowichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Hamasaki, Ryutaro [SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Shonan Village, Hayama 240-0193 (Japan); Hara, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shunsuke [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Ikegami, Yoichi; Kurachi, Ikuo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Mitsui, Shingo [Kanazawa University, Kadoma-cho, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Nishimura, Ryutaro [SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Shonan Village, Hayama 240-0193 (Japan); Tauchi, Kazuya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Tobita, Naoshi [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Tsuboyama, Toru; Yamada, Miho [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-07-11

    We are developing advanced pixel sensors using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. A SOI wafer is used; top silicon is used for electric circuit and bottom silicon is used as a sensor. Target applications are high-energy physics, X-ray astronomy, material science, non-destructive inspection, medical application and so on. We have developed two integration-type pixel sensors, FPIXb and INTPIX7. These sensors were processed on single SOI wafers with various substrates in n- or p-type and double SOI wafers. The development status of double SOI sensors and some up-to-date test results of n-type and p-type SOI sensors are shown.

  9. Monolithic pixel detectors for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic pixel detectors integrating sensor matrix and readout in one piece of silicon have revolutionized imaging for consumer applications, but despite years of research they have not yet been widely adopted for high energy physics. Two major requirements for this application, radiation tolerance and low power consumption, require charge collection by drift for the most extreme radiation levels and an optimization of the collected signal charge over input capacitance ratio ( Q / C ). It is shown that monolithic detectors can achieve Q / C for low analog power consumption and even carryout the promise to practically eliminate analog power consumption, but combining suf fi cient Q / C , collection by drift, and integration of readout circuitry within the pixel remains a challenge. An overview is given of different approaches to address this challenge, with possible advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Upgrade of ATLAS ITk Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenges to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with an entirely-silicon inner tracker (ITk) which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation levels are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors and low mass global and local support structures. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the ITk ATLAS Pixel detector developments as well as different layout options will be reviewed.

  11. Efficient segmentation by sparse pixel classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Erik B; Loog, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation methods based on pixel classification are powerful but often slow. We introduce two general algorithms, based on sparse classification, for optimizing the computation while still obtaining accurate segmentations. The computational costs of the algorithms are derived, and they are dem......Segmentation methods based on pixel classification are powerful but often slow. We introduce two general algorithms, based on sparse classification, for optimizing the computation while still obtaining accurate segmentations. The computational costs of the algorithms are derived......, and they are demonstrated on real 3-D magnetic resonance imaging and 2-D radiograph data. We show that each algorithm is optimal for specific tasks, and that both algorithms allow a speedup of one or more orders of magnitude on typical segmentation tasks....

  12. Upscaling In Situ Soil Moisture Observations to Pixel Averages with Spatio-Temporal Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghao Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Validation of satellite-based soil moisture products is necessary to provide users with an assessment of their accuracy and reliability and to ensure quality of information. A key step in the validation process is to upscale point-scale, ground-based soil moisture observations to satellite-scale pixel averages. When soil moisture shows high spatial heterogeneity within pixels, a strategy which captures the spatial characteristics is essential for the upscaling process. In addition, temporal variation in soil moisture must be taken into account when measurement times of ground-based and satellite-based observations are not the same. We applied spatio-temporal regression block kriging (STRBK to upscale in situ soil moisture observations collected as time series at multiple locations to pixel averages. STRBK incorporates auxiliary information such as maps of vegetation and land surface temperature to improve predictions and exploits the spatio-temporal correlation structure of the point-scale soil moisture observations. In addition, STRBK also quantifies the uncertainty associated with the upscaled soil moisture which allows bias detection and significance testing of satellite-based soil moisture products. The approach is illustrated with a real-world application for upscaling in situ soil moisture observations for validating the Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR retrieved soil moisture product in the Heihe Water Allied Telemetry Experimental Research experiment (HiWATER. The results show that STRBK yields upscaled soil moisture predictions that are sufficiently accurate for validation purposes. Comparison of the upscaled predictions with PLMR soil moisture observations shows that the root-mean-squared error of the PLMR soil moisture product is about 0.03 m3·m−3 and can be used as a high-resolution soil moisture product for watershed-scale soil moisture monitoring.

  13. A novel method to improve MODIS AOD retrievals in cloudy pixels using an analog ensemble approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Raman, A.; Delle Monache, L.; Alessandrini, S.; Cheng, W. Y. Y.; Gaubert, B.; Arellano, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) concentrations are one of the fundamental indicators of air quality. Earth orbiting satellite platforms acquire column aerosol abundance that can in turn provide information about the PM concentrations. One of the serious limitations of column aerosol retrievals from low earth orbiting satellites is that these algorithms are based on clear sky assumptions. They do not retrieve AOD in cloudy pixels. After filtering cloudy pixels, these algorithms also arbitrarily remove brightest and darkest 25% of remaining pixels over ocean and brightest and darkest 50% pixels over land to filter any residual contamination from clouds. This becomes a critical issue especially in regions that experience monsoon, like Asia and North America. In case of North America, monsoon season experiences wide variety of extreme air quality events such as fires in California and dust storms in Arizona. Assessment of these episodic events warrants frequent monitoring of aerosol observations from remote sensing retrievals. In this study, we demonstrate a method to fill in cloudy pixels in Moderate Imaging Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals based on ensembles generated using an analog-based approach (AnEn). It provides a probabilistic distribution of AOD in cloudy pixels using historical records of model simulations of meteorological predictors such as AOD, relative humidity, and wind speed, and past observational records of MODIS AOD at a given target site. We use simulations from a coupled community weather forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) run at a resolution comparable to MODIS AOD. Analogs selected from summer months (June, July) of 2011-2013 from model and corresponding observations are used as a training dataset. Then, missing AOD retrievals in cloudy pixels in the last 31 days of the selected period are estimated. Here, we use AERONET stations as target sites to facilitate comparison against in-situ measurements. We use two approaches to

  14. The Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Hans-Günther

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will explore heavy flavour physics (B, charm and tau) at the starting of 2018 with unprecedented precision. Charged particles are tracked by a two-layer DEPFET pixel device (PXD), a four-layer silicon strip detector (SVD) and the central drift chamber (CDC). The PXD will consist of two layers at radii of 14 mm and 22 mm with 8 and 12 ladders, respectively. The pixel sizes will vary, between 50 μm×(55-60) μm in the first layer and between 50 μm×(70-85) μm in the second layer, to optimize the charge sharing efficiency. These innermost layers have to cope with high background occupancy, high radiation and must have minimal material to reduce multiple scattering. These challenges are met using the DEPFET technology. Each pixel is a FET integrated on a fully depleted silicon bulk. The signal charge collected in the 'internal gate' modulates the FET current resulting in a first stage amplification and therefore very low noise. This allows very thin sensors (75 μm) reducing the overall material budget of the detector (0.21% X0). Four fold multiplexing of the column parallel readout allows read out a full frame of the pixel matrix in only 20 μs while keeping the power consumption low enough for air cooling. Only the active electronics outside the detector acceptance has to be cooled actively with a two phase CO2 system. Furthermore the DEPFET technology offers the unique feature of an electronic shutter which allows the detector to operate efficiently in the continuous injection mode of superKEKB.

  15. Electrical characteristics of silicon pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Mata-Bruni, V.; Santistevan, G.; Seidel, S.C. E-mail: seidel@dot.phys.unm.edu; Ciocio, A.; Einsweiler, K.; Emes, J.; Gilchriese, M.; Joshi, A.; Kleinfelder, S.; Marchesini, R.; McCormack, F.; Milgrome, O.; Palaio, N.; Pengg, F.; Richardson, J.; Zizka, G.; Ackers, M.; Comes, G.; Fischer, P.; Keil, M.; Martinez, G.; Peric, I.; Runolfsson, O.; Stockmanns, T.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N.; Goessling, C.; Huegging, F.; Klaiber-Lodewigs, J.; Krasel, O.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Barberis, D.; Beccherle, R.; Caso, C.; Cervetto, M.; Darbo, G.; Gagliardi, G.; Gemme, C.; Morettini, P.; Netchaeva, P.; Osculati, B.; Rossi, L.; Charles, E.; Fasching, D.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnon, P.; Calvet, D.; Clemens, J.-C.; Delpierre, P.; Hallewell, G.; Laugier, D.; Mouthuy, T.; Rozanov, A.; Valin, I.; Andreazza, A.; Caccia, M.; Citterio, M.; Lari, T.; Meroni, C.; Ragusa, F.; Troncon, C.; Vegni, G.; Lutz, G.; Richter, R.H.; Rohe, T.; Boyd, G.R.; Skubic, P.L.; Sicho, P.; Tomasek, L.; Vrba, V.; Holder, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Cauz, D.; Cobal-Grassmann, M.; D' Auria, S.; De Lotto, B.; Del Papa, C.; Grassmann, H.; Santi, L.; Becks, K.H.; Lenzen, G.; Linder, C

    2002-08-21

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been electrically characterized. The current and voltage characteristics, charge-collection efficiencies, and resolutions have been examined. Devices were fabricated on oxygenated and standard detector-grade silicon wafers. Results from prototypes which examine p-stop and standard and moderated p-spray isolation are presented for a variety of geometrical options. Some of the comparisons relate unirradiated sensors with those that have received fluences relevant to LHC operation.

  16. Optical Link of the Atlas Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, K.K.; Jackson, P.D.; Johnson, M.; Kagan, H.; Buchholz, P.; Holder, M.; Roggenbuck, A.; Schade, P.

    2007-01-01

    The on-detector optical link of the ATLAS pixel detector contains radiation-hard receiver chips to decode bi-phase marked signals received on PIN arrays and data transmitter chips to drive VCSEL arrays. The components are mounted on hybrid boards (opto-boards). We present results from the irradiation studies with 24 GeV protons up to 32 Mrad (1.2 x 10^15 p/cm^2) and the experience from the production.

  17. Production chain of CMS pixel modules

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The pictures show the production chain of pixel modules for the CMS detector. Fig.1: overview of the assembly procedure. Fig.2: bump bonding with ReadOut Chip (ROC) connected to the sensor. Fig.3: glueing a raw module onto the baseplate strips. Fig.4: glueing of the High Density Interconnect (HDI) onto a raw module. Fig.5: pull test after heat reflow. Fig.6: wafer sensor processing, Indium evaporation.

  18. Technical Note: Range verification system using edge detection method for a scintillator and a CCD camera system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saotome, Naoya, E-mail: naosao@nirs.go.jp; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Tansho, Ryohei; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji [Department of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional irradiation with a scanned carbon-ion beam has been performed from 2011 at the authors’ facility. The authors have developed the rotating-gantry equipped with the scanning irradiation system. The number of combinations of beam properties to measure for the commissioning is more than 7200, i.e., 201 energy steps, 3 intensities, and 12 gantry angles. To compress the commissioning time, quick and simple range verification system is required. In this work, the authors develop a quick range verification system using scintillator and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and estimate the accuracy of the range verification. Methods: A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. The optical spatial resolution of the system is 0.2 mm/pixel. The camera control system was connected and communicates with the measurement system that is part of the scanning system. The range was determined by image processing. Reference range for each energy beam was determined by a difference of Gaussian (DOG) method and the 80% of distal dose of the depth-dose distribution that were measured by a large parallel-plate ionization chamber. The authors compared a threshold method and a DOG method. Results: The authors found that the edge detection method (i.e., the DOG method) is best for the range detection. The accuracy of range detection using this system is within 0.2 mm, and the reproducibility of the same energy measurement is within 0.1 mm without setup error. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate that the authors’ range check system is capable of quick and easy range verification with sufficient accuracy.

  19. SU-C-207A-03: Development of Proton CT Imaging System Using Thick Scintillator and CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S; Uesaka, M [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, T; Tsuneda, M [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsushita, K [Rikkyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Kabuki, S [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the treatment planning of proton therapy, Water Equivalent Length (WEL), which is the parameter for the calculation of dose and the range of proton, is derived by X-ray CT (xCT) image and xCT-WEL conversion. However, about a few percent error in the accuracy of proton range calculation through this conversion has been reported. The purpose of this study is to construct a proton CT (pCT) imaging system for an evaluation of the error. Methods: The pCT imaging system was constructed with a thick scintillator and a cooled CCD camera, which acquires the two-dimensional image of integrated value of the scintillation light toward the beam direction. The pCT image is reconstructed by FBP method using a correction between the light intensity and residual range of proton beam. An experiment for the demonstration of this system was performed with 70-MeV proton beam provided by NIRS cyclotron. The pCT image of several objects reconstructed from the experimental data was evaluated quantitatively. Results: Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were reconstructed experimentally. A finestructure of approximately 1 mm was clearly observed. The position resolution of pCT image was almost the same as that of xCT image. And the error of proton CT pixel value was up to 4%. The deterioration of image quality was caused mainly by the effect of multiple Coulomb scattering. Conclusion: We designed and constructed the pCT imaging system using a thick scintillator and a CCD camera. And the system was evaluated with the experiment by use of 70-MeV proton beam. Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were acquired by the system. This work was supported by JST SENTAN Grant Number 13A1101 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H04912.

  20. Technical Note: Range verification system using edge detection method for a scintillator and a CCD camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, Naoya; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Tansho, Ryohei; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional irradiation with a scanned carbon-ion beam has been performed from 2011 at the authors' facility. The authors have developed the rotating-gantry equipped with the scanning irradiation system. The number of combinations of beam properties to measure for the commissioning is more than 7200, i.e., 201 energy steps, 3 intensities, and 12 gantry angles. To compress the commissioning time, quick and simple range verification system is required. In this work, the authors develop a quick range verification system using scintillator and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and estimate the accuracy of the range verification. A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. The optical spatial resolution of the system is 0.2 mm/pixel. The camera control system was connected and communicates with the measurement system that is part of the scanning system. The range was determined by image processing. Reference range for each energy beam was determined by a difference of Gaussian (DOG) method and the 80% of distal dose of the depth-dose distribution that were measured by a large parallel-plate ionization chamber. The authors compared a threshold method and a DOG method. The authors found that the edge detection method (i.e., the DOG method) is best for the range detection. The accuracy of range detection using this system is within 0.2 mm, and the reproducibility of the same energy measurement is within 0.1 mm without setup error. The results of this study demonstrate that the authors' range check system is capable of quick and easy range verification with sufficient accuracy.

  1. Development of silicon micropattern pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijne, E.H.M.; Antinori, F.; Beker, H.; Batignani, G.; Beusch, W.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Boutonnet, C.; Burger, P.; Campbell, M.; Cantoni, P.; Catanesi, M.G.; Chesi, E.; Claeys, C.; Clemens, J.C.; Cohen Solal, M.; Darbo, G.; Da Via, C.; Debusscheere, I.; Delpierre, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Dierickx, B.; Enz, C.C.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Gally, Y.; Glaser, M.; Gys, T.; Habrard, M.C.; Hallewell, G.; Hermans, L.; Heuser, J.; Hurst, R.; Inzani, P.; Jaeger, J.J.; Jarron, P.; Karttaavi, T.; Kersten, S.; Krummenacher, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemeilluer, F.; Lenti, V.; Letheren, M.; Lokajicek, M.; Loukas, D.; Macdermott, M.; Maggi, G.; Manzari, V.; Martinengo, P.; Meddeler, G.; Meddi, F.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menetrey, A.; Middelkamp, P.; Morando, M.; Munns, A.; Musico, P.; Nava, P.; Navach, F.; Neyer, C.; Pellegrini, F.; Pengg, F.; Perego, R.; Pindo, M.; Pospisil, S.; Potheau, R.; Quercigh, E.; Redaelli, N.; Ridky, J.; Rossi, L.; Sauvage, D.; Segato, G.; Simone, S.; Sopko, B.; Stefanini, G.; CERN RD19 collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Successive versions of high speed, active silicon pixel detectors with integrated readout electronics have been developed for particle physics experiments using monolithic and hybrid technologies. Various matrices with binary output as well as a linear detector with analog output have been made. The hybrid binary matrix with 1024 cells (dimension 75 [mu]mx500 [mu]m) can capture events at similar 5 MHz and a selected event can then be read out in <10 [mu]s. In different beam tests at CERN a precision of 25 [mu]m has been achieved and the efficiency was better than 99.2%. Detector thicknesses of 300 [mu]m and 150 [mu]m of silicon have been used. In a test with a [sup 109]Cd source a noise level of 170 e[sup -]r.m.s. (1.4 keV fwhm) has been measured with a threshold non-uniformity of 750 e[sup -] r.m.s. Objectives of the development work are the increase of the size of detecting area without loss of efficiency, the design of an appropriate readout architecture for collider operation, the reduction of material thickness in the detector, understanding of the threshold non-uniformity, study of the sensitivity of the pixel matrices to light and low energy electrons for scintillating fiber detector readout and last but not least, the optimization of cost and yield of the pixel detectors in production. ((orig.))

  2. Characterization of the CMS Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Weihua

    2002-01-01

    In 2005 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will start the pp collisions at a high luminosity and at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. The primary goal of the experimental programme is the search of the Higgs boson(s) and the supersymmetric particles. The programme is also proposed to detect a range of diverse signatures in order to provide guidance for future physics. The pixel detector system makes up the innermost part of the CMS experiment, which is one of the two general purpose detectors at the LHC. The main tasks of the system are vertex detection and flavor tagging. The high luminosity and the high particle multiplicity as well as the small bunch spacing at the LHC impose great challenges on the pixel detectors: radiation hardness of sensors and electronics, fast signal processing and a high granularity are the essential requirements. This thesis concentrates on the study of the suitability of two test stands, which are implemented to characterize the CMS pixel detectors: one is con-cerned with test puls...

  3. Pixel electronics for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, P

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will use 3 barrel layers and 2*5 disks of silicon pixel detectors as the innermost elements of the semiconductor tracker. The basic building blocks are pixel modules with an active area of 16.4 mm*60.8 mm which include an n/sup +/ on n-type silicon sensor and 16 VLSI front-end (FE) chips. Every FE chip contains a low power, high speed charge sensitive preamplifier, a fast discriminator, and a readout system which operates at the 40 MHz rate of LHC. The addresses of hit pixels (as well as a low resolution pulse height information) are stored on the FE chips until arrival of a level 1 trigger signal. Hits are then transferred to a module controller chip (MCC) which collects the data of all 16 FE chips, builds complete events and sends the data through two optical links to the data acquisition system. The MCC receives clock and data through an additional optical link and provides timing and configuration information for the FE chips. Two additional chips are used to amplify and decode...

  4. Readout Architecture for Hybrid Pixel Readout Chips

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)694170; Westerlund, Tomi; Wyllie, Ken

    The original contribution of this thesis to knowledge are novel digital readout architectures for hybrid pixel readout chips. The thesis presents asynchronous bus-based architecture, a data-node based column architecture and a network-based pixel matrix architecture for data transportation. It is shown that the data-node architecture achieves readout efficiency 99 % with half the output rate as a bus-based system. The network-based solution avoids ``broken'' columns due to some manufacturing errors, and it distributes internal data traffic more evenly across the pixel matrix than column-based architectures. An improvement of $>$ 10 % to the efficiency is achieved with uniform and non-uniform hit occupancies. Architectural design has been done using transaction level modeling ($TLM$) and sequential high-level design techniques for reducing the design and simulation time. It has been possible to simulate tens of column and full chip architectures using the high-level techniques. A decrease of $>$ 10 in run-time...

  5. ATLAS ITk and new pixel sensors technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudiello, A

    2016-01-01

    During the 2023–2024 shutdown, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be upgraded to reach an instantaneous luminosity up to 7×10$^{34}$ cm$^{−2}$s$^{−1}$. This upgrade of the accelerator is called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The ATLAS detector will be changed to meet the challenges of HL-LHC: an average of 200 pile-up events in every bunch crossing, and an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb $^{−1}$ over ten years. The HL-LHC luminosity conditions are too extreme for the current silicon (pixel and strip) detectors and straw tube transition radiation tracker (TRT) of the current ATLAS tracking system. Therefore the ATLAS inner tracker is being completely rebuilt for data-taking and the new system is called Inner Tracker (ITk). During this upgrade the TRT will be removed in favor of an all-new all-silicon tracker composed only by strip and pixel detectors. An overview of new layouts in study will be reported and the new pixel sensor technologies in development will be explained.

  6. The Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. Shown from left to right in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, the Europa images in September 1996, and the Callisto images in November 1997.Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission

  7. Computing procedure of spatial geo-referencing of satellite image; Un procedimiento simple de geo-referenciacion de imagenes de satelite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.; Vazquez, M.; Fernandes, F.; Prado, T.; Castro, R.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper a computing procedure of spatial geo-referencing is described that, by means of the terrestrial spatial geometry, permits to obtain the Latitude and Longitude that corresponds to a given pixel of a satellite image, the pixel being defined by a pair Line- Pixel. The procedure also permits to compute the other way round. This procedure is more clear and simple than those proposed by Eumetsat and Goes and can be applied to any satellite image. (Author)

  8. [Observations of spectral data and characteristics analysis of snow-bare soil mixed pixel generated by micro-simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang

    2014-07-01

    To explore the differences of mixed-pixel in spectral mixing mechanism at micro-and macro -scale, the micro- simulation of snow-bare soil mixed pixel was taken as the object of study in an artificial test environment. Reflectance spectra of mixed pixel and snow, bare soil endmember with different area ratio were collected by full-band spectrometer with fixed probe distance. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of original reflectance spectra was done, and reflectance spectra form 350 to 2 500 nm and normalized reflectance spectral data of 350 to 1 815 nm excluding noise were normalized. At the same time, we collected EOS/MODIS and Environment and Disaster Monitoring Satellites data of the same period over the same area and analyzed the correlation of channels in visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared wavelength range at different resolution scales and the relationship between spectrum of mixed snow-soil and endmember pixel in MODIS image was analyzed. The results showed that, (1) At the micro scale, non-linear relationship existed between mixed pixel and endmember within the scope of the full-wave and linear relationship existed in sub-band wavelength range; (2) At the macro scale, linear relationship existed between mixed pixel and endmember. (3) In statistics of spectral values, the correlation between snow-soil mixture and endmember is positive for snow-soil mixture and snow endmember, and is negative for snow-soil mixture and soil endmember.

  9. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  10. Fixed Pattern Noise pixel-wise linear correction for crime scene imaging CMOS sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Messinger, David W.; Dube, Roger R.; Ientilucci, Emmett J.

    2017-05-01

    Filtered multispectral imaging technique might be a potential method for crime scene documentation and evidence detection due to its abundant spectral information as well as non-contact and non-destructive nature. Low-cost and portable multispectral crime scene imaging device would be highly useful and efficient. The second generation crime scene imaging system uses CMOS imaging sensor to capture spatial scene and bandpass Interference Filters (IFs) to capture spectral information. Unfortunately CMOS sensors suffer from severe spatial non-uniformity compared to CCD sensors and the major cause is Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN). IFs suffer from "blue shift" effect and introduce spatial-spectral correlated errors. Therefore, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) correction is critical to enhance crime scene image quality and is also helpful for spatial-spectral noise de-correlation. In this paper, a pixel-wise linear radiance to Digital Count (DC) conversion model is constructed for crime scene imaging CMOS sensor. Pixel-wise conversion gain Gi,j and Dark Signal Non-Uniformity (DSNU) Zi,j are calculated. Also, conversion gain is divided into four components: FPN row component, FPN column component, defects component and effective photo response signal component. Conversion gain is then corrected to average FPN column and row components and defects component so that the sensor conversion gain is uniform. Based on corrected conversion gain and estimated image incident radiance from the reverse of pixel-wise linear radiance to DC model, corrected image spatial uniformity can be enhanced to 7 times as raw image, and the bigger the image DC value within its dynamic range, the better the enhancement.

  11. Small Moving Vehicle Detection in a Satellite Video of an Urban Area

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Yang; Xiwen Wang,; Bowei Yao; Jing Li; Yanning Zhang; Zhannan He; Wencheng Duan

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle surveillance of a wide area allows us to learn much about the daily activities and traffic information. With the rapid development of remote sensing, satellite video has become an important data source for vehicle detection, which provides a broader field of surveillance. The achieved work generally focuses on aerial video with moderately-sized objects based on feature extraction. However, the moving vehicles in satellite video imagery range from just a few pixels to dozens of pixels ...

  12. DOUBLE STARS IN THE USNO CCD ASTROGRAPHIC CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartkopf, William I.; Mason, Brian D.; Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert; Wycoff, Gary L.; Hsu, Danley, E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: bdm@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: finch@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: nz@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The newly completed Fourth USNO CCD Astrographic Catalog (UCAC4) has proven to be a rich source of double star astrometry and photometry. Following initial comparisons of UCAC4 results against those obtained by speckle interferometry, the UCAC4 catalog was matched against known double stars in the Washington Double Star Catalog in order to provide additional differential astrometry and photometry for these pairs. Matches to 58,131 pairs yielded 61,895 astrometric and 68,935 photometric measurements. Finally, a search for possible new common proper motion (CPM) pairs was made using new UCAC4 proper motion data; this resulted in 4755 new potential CPM doubles (and an additional 27,718 astrometric and photometric measures from UCAC and other sources)

  13. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  14. Contribution of the Chromosomal ccdAB Operon to Bacterial Drug Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kritika; Tripathi, Arti; Sahu, Alishan; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-10-01

    One of the first identified and best-studied toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems in Escherichia coli is the F-plasmid-based CcdAB system. This system is involved in plasmid maintenance through postsegregational killing. More recently, ccdAB homologs have been found on the chromosome, including in pathogenic strains of E. coli and other bacteria. However, the functional role of chromosomal ccdAB genes, if any, has remained unclear. We show that both the native ccd operon of the E. coli O157 strain (ccdO157) and the ccd operon from the F plasmid (ccdF), when inserted on the E. coli chromosome, lead to protection from cell death under multiple antibiotic stress conditions through formation of persisters, with the O157 operon showing higher protection. While the plasmid-encoded CcdB toxin is a potent gyrase inhibitor and leads to bacterial cell death even under fully repressed conditions, the chromosomally encoded toxin leads to growth inhibition, except at high expression levels, where some cell death is seen. This was further confirmed by transiently activating the chromosomal ccd operon through overexpression of an active-site inactive mutant of F-plasmid-encoded CcdB. Both the ccdF and ccdO157 operons may share common mechanisms for activation under stress conditions, eventually leading to multidrug-tolerant persister cells. This study clearly demonstrates an important role for chromosomal ccd systems in bacterial persistence.IMPORTANCE A large number of free-living and pathogenic bacteria are known to harbor multiple toxin-antitoxin systems, on plasmids as well as on chromosomes. The F-plasmid CcdAB system has been extensively studied and is known to be involved in plasmid maintenance. However, little is known about the function of its chromosomal counterpart, found in several pathogenic E. coli strains. We show that the native chromosomal ccd operon of the E. coli O157 strain is involved in drug tolerance and confers protection from cell death under multiple antibiotic

  15. 4T CMOS Active Pixel Sensors under Ionizing Radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ionizing radiation effects on 4T pixels and the elementary in-pixel test devices with regard to the electrical performance and the optical performance. In addition to an analysis of the macroscopic pixel parameter degradation, the radiation-induced degradation mechanisms

  16. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  17. Satellite myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Roger L.; Hall, David

    2008-01-01

    Richard Corfield's article “Sputnik's legacy” (October 2007 pp23-27) states that the satellite on board the US Vanguard rocket, which exploded during launch on 6 December 1957 two months after Sputnik's successful take-off, was “a hastily put together contraption of wires and circuitry designed only to send a radio signal back to Earth”. In fact, the Vanguard satellite was developed over a period of several years and put together carefully using the best techniques and equipment available at the time - such as transistors from Bell Laboratories/Western Electric. The satellite contained not one but two transmitters, in which the crystal-controlled oscillators had been designed to measure both the temperature of the satellite shell and of the internal package.

  18. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade....... The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites....

  19. Substrate promiscuity of RdCCD1, a carotenoid cleavage oxygenase from Rosa damascena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Schrader, Jens; Sandmann, Gerhard; Schmidt, Holger; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-03-01

    Several of the key flavor compounds in rose essential oil are C(13)-norisoprenoids, such as beta-damascenone, beta-damascone, and beta-ionone which are derived from carotenoid degradation. To search for genes putatively responsible for the cleavage of carotenoids, cloning of carotenoid cleavage (di-)oxygenase (CCD) genes from Rosa damascena was carried out by a degenerate primer approach and yielded a full-length cDNA (RdCCD1). The RdCCD1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant protein was assayed for its cleavage activity with a multitude of carotenoid substrates. The RdCCD1 protein was able to cleave a variety of carotenoids at the 9-10 and 9'-10' positions to produce a C(14) dialdehyde and two C(13) products, which vary depending on the carotenoid substrates. RdCCD1 could also cleave lycopene at the 5-6 and 5'-6' positions to produce 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one. Expression of RdCCD1 was studied by real-time PCR in different tissues of rose. The RdCCD1 transcript was present predominantly in rose flower, where high levels of volatile C(13)-norisoprenoids are produced. Thus, the accumulation of C(13)-norisoprenoids in rose flower is correlated to the expression of RdCCD1.

  20. Legendrian satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Etnyre, John; Vértesi, Vera

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study Legendrian knots in the knot types of satellite knots. In particular, we classify Legendrian Whitehead patterns and learn a great deal about Legendrian braided patterns. We also show how the classification of Legendrian patterns can lead to a classification of the associated satellite knots if the companion knot is Legendrian simple and uniformly thick. This leads to new Legendrian and transverse classification results for knots in the 3-sphere with its standard contact...

  1. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    igniters, and restrictors, can provide dozens of precision bursts of thrust upon command. Solid-rocket throttling ( vernier -thrusting) is more difficult...Here is a very straightforward micromete - oroid detector. A particle penetrates a pressurized vessel, usually a cylinder; the gas inside escapes; and a...The first Explorer satellites carried wire grids. The Micromete - oroid Satellite series used 46 cards, like those sketched in figure 11-85. Explorer

  2. Boomerang Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbrock, Andrew; Minton, David A.

    2017-10-01

    We recently reported that the orbital architecture of the Martian environment allows for material in orbit around the planet to ``cycle'' between orbiting the planet as a ring, or as coherent satellites. Here we generalize our previous analysis to examine several factors that determine whether satellites accreting at the edge of planetary rings will cycle. In order for the orbiting material to cycle, tidal evolution must decrease the semi-major axis of any accreting satellites. In some systems, the density of the ring/satellite material, the surface mass density of the ring, the tidal parameters of the system, and the rotation rate of the primary body contribute to a competition between resonant ring torques and tidal dissipation that prevent this from occurring, either permanently or temporarily. Analyzing these criteria, we examine various bodies in our solar system (such as Saturn, Uranus, and Eris) to identify systems where cycling may occur. We find that a ring-satellite cycle may give rise to the current Uranian ring-satellite system, and suggest that Miranda may have formed from an early, more massive Uranian ring.

  3. Study on enhancing dynamic range of CCD imaging based on digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wang

    2009-05-01

    DMD used as SLM modulation area array CCD design is proposed in the paper. It can Solve a problem in exposing high-contrast scenes by ordinary CCD camera, with images appearing over-exposure or under exposure, bringing a loss of the details of the photo. The method adoptes a forecast imaging scene, CCD is purposely designed by way of more exposure regions and exposure times. Through modulation function of DMD micro-mirror, CCD is exposed with sub-region and time-sharing, at the same time a purposely designed structure of image data enhances the area CCD dynamic range. Experiments shows: This method not only improves visible quality of an image and clear details in the backlighting or highlight, but also enhances the dynamic range of image data. The high-quality image and high dynamic range data are real-time captured, the "fused" software is no longer required.

  4. Dynamical pixel manipulation of metasurfaces (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jin-Qian

    2017-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) metamaterials or known as metasurfaces have attracted researchers' attention due to their capability to manipulate the amplitudes, phases and polarization states of incident electromagnetic waves by conferring extra phase different phase at different positions through a super cell that is composed of different oriented structures. In other words, metasurfaces can achieve beam steering and wave shaping by imparting local, gradient phase shift to the incoming waves. With these abilities, metasurfaces can be applied to applications such as ultrathin invisibility cloaks, metasurface holograms, planar lenses and a vortex generator. With the above mentioned advantages and applications of metasurfaces, yet, all the demonstrated metasurfaces possess a main insufficiency that once the metasurfaces are designed and fabricated, their optical properties are then fixed without any chance for further manipulation, which limits their versatility in practical applications. Moreover, although some researchers employed dynamically changeable materials to achieve an active metasurface, such manipulation can only change the overall performance such as an operating frequency instead of changing the provided phase on each pixel of a metasurface. To solve this issue, we employ liquid crystal integrated with a metasurface and the combination could be thus be dynamically tuned via electric bias on each pixel of liquid crystals. Through this setup, we can alter the polarization state of the incident electromagnetic wave dynamically and thus manipulate the extra phase provided by each pixel. In this combination, liquid crystal is employed to change the incident polarization from 0 to 360-degree and the metasurface is designed to achieve four different output signals including phase modulated linear- and circular-polarized light and amplitude-modulated linear- and circular-polarized light. Meanwhile, the metasurfaces could also control the transmission efficiency of the

  5. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The ISPA tube is a position-sensitive photon detector. It belongs to the family of hybrid photon detectors (HPD), recently developed by CERN and INFN with leading photodetector firms. HPDs confront in a vacuum envelope a photocathode and a silicon detector. This can be a single diode or a pixelized detector. The electrons generated by the photocathode are efficiently detected by the silicon anode by applying a high-voltage difference between them. ISPA tube can be used in high-energy applications as well as bio-medical and imaging applications.

  6. ATLAS Tracker and Pixel Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222525; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on the silicon and gaseous tracking subsystems that form the ATLAS Inner Detector. Those subsystems have undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pile-up and luminosity that are being delivered by the LHC during Run2. The key status and performance metrics of the Pixel Detector and the Semi Conductor Tracker, are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described.

  7. Characterization of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb scintillator screen with pixelated silicon substrate for digital X-ray imaging application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Yul

    2010-02-15

    X-ray imaging detector in combination with scintillator screens have been widely used in digital X-ray imaging applications. The degradation of spatial resolution by light diffusion in scintillator layer can be overcome by pixelation. In this research, terbium doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb) was used as scintillation material for pixelated scintillator screen based on silicon substrates with micropore array of various dimensions fabricated using the photolithography and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The relative light output and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of each fabricated scintillator screen were measured by a cooled CCD for analysis of the effect of pixelated silicon substrate and optimization of micropore geometry in pixelated scintillator screen. The light transport simulation in pixelated scintillator geometry is conducted using MCNPX and LightTools simulation code. The simulation result is well matched with measurement results when compared of the measurement and simulation results. As the results, higher spatial resolution was obtained for smaller micropore pitch. The light output of the pixelated scintillator screens with equivalent fill factor decreases as the micropore pitch size decreases or the micropore thickness increases. This is most likely due to the light absorption in silicon wall surfaces. Therefore, further treatment of the wall surface, such as SiO2 reflective coating, seems necessary to compensate the reduction of the light generated. Then, the micropore thickness can be optimized to maximize the light output. The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb pixelated scintillator screen that has optimized micropore geometry could be applied to digital X-ray imaging.

  8. ATLAS rewards two pixel detector suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, presented the ATLAS supplier award to Herbert Reichl, IZM director, and to Simonetta Di Gioia, from the SELEX company.Two of ATLAS’ suppliers were awarded prizes at a ceremony on Wednesday 13 June attended by representatives of the experiment’s management and of CERN. The prizes went to the Fraunhofer Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration (IZM) in Berlin and the company SELEX Sistemi Integrati in Rome for the manufacture of modules for the ATLAS pixel detector. SELEX supplied 1500 of the modules for the tracker, while IZM produced a further 1300. The modules, each made up of 46080 channels, form the active part of the ATLAS pixel detector. IZM and SELEX received the awards for the excellent quality of their work: the average number of faulty channels per module was less than 2.10-3. They also stayed within budget and on schedule. The difficulty they faced was designing modules based on electronic components and sensor...

  9. The Phase1 CMS Pixel detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul

    2016-01-01

    The pixel detector of the CMS experiment will be replaced in an extended end-of-year shutdown during winter 2016/2017 with an upgraded one able to cope with peak instantaneous luminosities beyond the nominal LHC instantaneous luminosity of $1 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Under the conditions expected in the coming years, which will see an increase of a factor two in instantaneous luminosity, the present system would experience a dynamic inefficiency caused mainly by data losses due to buffer overflows. The Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector, described in this paper, will operate at full efficiency at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, thanks to a new readout chip. The new detector will feature one additional tracking point both in the barrel and in the forward regions, while reducing the material budget as a result of a new CO$_{2}$ cooling system and optimised layout of the services. In this paper, the design and the technological choices of the Phase I detect...

  10. Alignment of the upgraded CMS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schroder, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    The all-silicon tracking system of the CMS experiment provides excellent resolution for charged tracks and an efficient tagging of heavy-flavour jets. After a new pixel detector has been installed during the LHC technical stop at the beginning of 2017, the positions, orientations, and surface curvatures of the sensors needed to be determined with a precision at the order of a few micrometres to ensure the required physics performance. This is far beyond the mechanical mounting precision but can be achieved using a track-based alignment procedure that minimises the track-hit residuals of reconstructed tracks. The results are carefully validated with data-driven methods. In this article, results of the CMS tracker alignment in 2017 from the early detector-commissioning phase and the later operation are presented, that were derived using several million reconstructed tracks in pp-collision and cosmic-ray data. Special emphasis is put on the alignment of the new pixel detector.

  11. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  12. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Four layout options are being investigated at the moment, two with forward coverage to |eta| < 3.2 and two to |eta| < 4. For each coverage option, a layout with long barrel staves and a layout with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region are considered. All potential layouts include modules mounted on ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions...

  13. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Fadmar Osmic, FO

    2006-01-01

    The European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva is currently constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will allow the study of the subnuclear ranges of physics with an accuracy never achieved before. Within the LHC project, ALICE is to the study of strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. ALICE as many other modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments uses silicon pixel detectors for tracking close to the interaction point (IP). The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) will constitute the two innermost layers of ALICE, and will due to its high granularity provide precise tracking information. In heavy ion collisions, the track density could be as high as 80 tracks/cm2 in the first SPD layer. The SPD will provide tracking information at radii of 3.9 and 7.6 cm from the IP. It is a fundamental element for the study of the weak decays of the particles carrying heavy flavour, whose typical signature will be a secondary vertex separated from the primary verte...

  14. Pixel-Tilecal-MDT Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    B. Di Girolamo

    A test with many expectations When an additional week of running (from September 11th to 18th) was allocated for the test-beam, it was decided to give priority to a combined run with the participation of the Pixel, Tilecal and MDT sub-detectors. The integration of these three sub-detectors was possible as they all use the baseline (DAQ-1/EF based) DAQ for test beams (as reported in a previous e-news). The tests and the addition of a common trigger and busy were organized in a short timescale by experts from the three sub-detectors and DAQ/EF. The expectations were many; both looking for problems and finding solutions. The setup The setup, shown in the figure, consisted of the Pixel telescope normally used during the sub-detector tests, two Tilecal barrel modules, two Tilecal extended barrel modules, and six MDT barrel chambers. This fully occupied a length of some 30 meters in the H8 line of the SPS North Area. Each sub-detector used their own specialized front-end electronics. The data collected by modu...

  15. A single pixel camera video ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochocki, B.; Gambin, A.; Manzanera, S.; Irles, E.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.; Artal, P.

    2017-02-01

    There are several ophthalmic devices to image the retina, from fundus cameras capable to image the whole fundus to scanning ophthalmoscopes with photoreceptor resolution. Unfortunately, these devices are prone to a variety of ocular conditions like defocus and media opacities, which usually degrade the quality of the image. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to image the retina in real-time using a single pixel camera, which has the potential to circumvent those optical restrictions. The imaging procedure is as follows: a set of spatially coded patterns is projected rapidly onto the retina using a digital micro mirror device. At the same time, the inner product's intensity is measured for each pattern with a photomultiplier module. Subsequently, an image of the retina is reconstructed computationally. Obtained image resolution is up to 128 x 128 px with a varying real-time video framerate up to 11 fps. Experimental results obtained in an artificial eye confirm the tolerance against defocus compared to a conventional multi-pixel array based system. Furthermore, the use of a multiplexed illumination offers a SNR improvement leading to a lower illumination of the eye and hence an increase in patient's comfort. In addition, the proposed system could enable imaging in wavelength ranges where cameras are not available.

  16. Performance of large area Micro Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayoshi, T; Miuchi, K; Ochi, A; Orito, R; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, M

    2003-01-01

    A novel gaseous two-dimensional imaging detector "Micro Pixel Chamber (micro-PIC)" has been developed. This detector is based on double sided printed circuit board (PCB). We have developed large area (10cm x 10cm) micro-PICs with 65536 pixel anodes of 400um pitch on a 100um thick insulating substrate. Achieved energy resolution was 30% (FWHM) at 5.9keV, and a gas gain of 7000 was obtained with argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. This gain is high enough to detect minimum ionizing particles with such a small electrode pitch. Although several discharges occurred during 65 hours continuous operation, the detectors have kept stable operation with high gain. The micro-PIC is a useful detector for many applications e.g. X-ray, gamma ray, and charged particle imaging. The micro electrode structure allows us to measure directions of primary electrons due to incident X-rays or gamma rays, which provide a strong method for X-ray polarimetry and gamma-ray imaging.

  17. The Pixels system: last but not late!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kevin Einsweiler

    The Pixel Detector for ATLAS is one of the smallest, but most challenging components of the experiment. It lives in the dangerous territory directly outside the beampipe, where the radiation environment is particularly fierce, and it must be roughly one million times more radiation-hard than its human designers. Starting at a radius of just 5cm from the interaction point where the proton beams collide, it occupies a volume of slightly more than one meter in length and a half meter in diameter. In this compact region, there are eighty million channels of electronics (most of the electronics channels in ATLAS!), each capable of measuring the charge deposited by a track in a silicon pixel measuring only 50 microns by 400 microns in size (a volume of 0.005 cubic millimeters). A total cooling capacity of 15 KWatts is available to keep it operating comfortably at -5C. This detector is built around, and provides the support for, the central beampipe of ATLAS. It is supported on carbon fiber rails inside of the Pix...

  18. Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754303

    2016-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3μm for the vertex detector and 7μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2 % X0 per layer in the ver- tex detector and 1-2%X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25x25μm2 and 55x55μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50μm-500μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  19. Deformation Analysis Employing the Coherent Pixel Technique and Envisat and ERS Images in Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, A.; Monells, D.; Fernandez, J.; Duque, S.; Mallorqui, J.

    2010-03-01

    Geodetic measurements in volcanic areas are crucial as they serve as input information to the deformation analysis techniques in order to achieve pre-eruption ground displacement predictions. In particular, Satellite Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has been proven to be a useful and powerful tool in this kind of areas. We present some results obtained by applying the Coherent Pixel Technique, an Advanced Differential SAR Interferometry algorithm, which reveal surface deformation episodes in Canary Islands (La Palma and Tenerife Island). The study is carried out by employing DInSAR interferograms concerning the 1992-2008 period corresponding to both ascending and descending images acquired by the ENVISAT and ERS sensors.

  20. Pixel-level Analog-To-Digital Converters for Hybrid Pixel Detectors with energy sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Segundo Bello, D.; Nauta, Bram; Visschers, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Single-photon counting hybrid pixel detectors have shown to be a valid alternative to other types of X-ray imaging devices due to their high sensitivity, low noise, linear behavior and wide dynamic range. One important advantage of these devices is the fact that detector and readout electronics are

  1. Design of pixel-level ADCs for energy-sensitive hybrid pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Segundo Bello, D.; Nauta, Bram; Visschers, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Single-photon counting hybrid pixel detectors have shown to be a valid alternative to other types of X-ray imaging devices due to their high sensitivity, low noise, linear behavior and wide dynamic range. One important advantage of these devices is the fact that detector and readout electronics are

  2. Pixel readout electronics development for the ALICE pixel vertex and LHCb RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W; Cantatore, E; Cencelli, V; Dinapoli, R; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, Pierre; Lamanna, P; Minervini, D; O'Shea, V; Quiquempoix, V; San Segundo-Bello, D; Van Koningsveld, B; Wyllie, Ken H

    2001-01-01

    The ALICE1LHCB pixel readout chip emerged from previous experience at CERN. The RD-19 collaboration provided the basis for the installation of a pixel system in the WA97 and NA57 experiments. Operation in these experiments was key in the understanding of the system issues. In parallel the RD-49 collaboration provided the basis to obtain radiation tolerance in commercial submicron CMOS through special circuit layout. The new ALICE1LMB chip was developed to serve two different applications: particle tracking in the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector and particle identification in the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. To satisfy the different needs for these two experiments, the chip can be operated in two different modes. In tracking mode all the 50 mu m*435 mu m pixel cells in the 256*32 array are read out individually, whilst in particle identification mode they are combined in groups of 8 to form a 32*32 array of 400 mu m*425 mu m cells. The circuit is currently being manufactured in a commercial 0.25 mu m CMO...

  3. Estimation of rice phenology date using integrated HJ-1 CCD and Landsat-8 OLI vegetation indices time-series images*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Jing-Feng; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Jin, Meng-Ting; Zhou, Zhen; Guo, Qiao-Ying; Zhao, Zhe-Wen; Huang, Wei-Jiao; Zhang, Yao; Song, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of rice phenology is of critical importance for agricultural practices and studies. However, the accuracy of phenological parameters extracted by remote sensing data cannot be guaranteed because of the influence of climate, e.g. the monsoon season, and limited available remote sensing data. In this study, we integrate the data of HJ-1 CCD and Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI) by using the ordinary least-squares (OLS), and construct higher temporal resolution vegetation indices (VIs) time-series data to extract the phenological parameters of single-cropped rice. Two widely used VIs, namely the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and 2-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2), were adopted to minimize the influence of environmental factors and the intrinsic difference between the two sensors. Savitzky-Golay (S-G) filters were applied to construct continuous VI profiles per pixel. The results showed that, compared with NDVI, EVI2 was more stable and comparable between the two sensors. Compared with the observed phenological data of the single-cropped rice, the integrated VI time-series had a relatively low root mean square error (RMSE), and EVI2 showed higher accuracy compared with NDVI. We also demonstrate the application of phenology extraction of the single-cropped rice in a spatial scale in the study area. While the work is of general value, it can also be extrapolated to other regions where qualified remote sensing data are the bottleneck but where complementary data are occasionally available. PMID:26465131

  4. Estimation of rice phenology date using integrated HJ-1 CCD and Landsat-8 OLI vegetation indices time-series images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Jing-feng; Wang, Xiu-zhen; Jin, Meng-ting; Zhou, Zhen; Guo, Qiao-ying; Zhao, Zhe-wen; Huang, Wei-jiao; Zhang, Yao; Song, Xiao-dong

    2015-10-01

    Accurate estimation of rice phenology is of critical importance for agricultural practices and studies. However, the accuracy of phenological parameters extracted by remote sensing data cannot be guaranteed because of the influence of climate, e.g. the monsoon season, and limited available remote sensing data. In this study, we integrate the data of HJ-1 CCD and Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI) by using the ordinary least-squares (OLS), and construct higher temporal resolution vegetation indices (VIs) time-series data to extract the phenological parameters of single-cropped rice. Two widely used VIs, namely the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and 2-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2), were adopted to minimize the influence of environmental factors and the intrinsic difference between the two sensors. Savitzky-Golay (S-G) filters were applied to construct continuous VI profiles per pixel. The results showed that, compared with NDVI, EVI2 was more stable and comparable between the two sensors. Compared with the observed phenological data of the single-cropped rice, the integrated VI time-series had a relatively low root mean square error (RMSE), and EVI2 showed higher accuracy compared with NDVI. We also demonstrate the application of phenology extraction of the single-cropped rice in a spatial scale in the study area. While the work is of general value, it can also be extrapolated to other regions where qualified remote sensing data are the bottleneck but where complementary data are occasionally available.

  5. Simultaneous pixel detection probabilities and spatial resolution estimation of pixelized detectors by means of correlation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabski, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)], E-mail: varlen.grabski@cern.ch

    2008-02-21

    On the basis of the determination of statistical correlations between neighboring detector pixels, a novel method of estimating the simultaneous detection probability of pixels and the spatial resolution of pixelized detectors is proposed. The correlations are determined using noise variance measurement for isolated pixels and for the difference between neighboring pixels. The method is validated using images from two image-acquisition devices, a General Electric Senographe 2000D and a SD mammographic unit. The pixelized detector is irradiated with X-rays over its entire surface. It is shown that the simultaneous pixel detection probabilities can be estimated with an accuracy of 0.001-0.003, with an estimated systematic error of less than 0.005. The two-dimensional pre-sampled point-spread function (PSF{sup 0}) is determined using a single Gaussian approximation and a sum of two Gaussian approximations. The results obtained for the pre-sampled PSF{sup 0} show that the single Gaussian approximation is not appropriate, and the sum of two Gaussian approximations providing the best fit predicts the existence of a large ({approx}50%) narrow component. Support for this observation can be found in the recent simulation study of columnar indirect digital detectors by Badano et al. The sampled two-dimensional PSF is determined using Monte Carlo simulation for the L-shaped, uniformly distributed acceptance function for different fill-factor values. The calculation of the pre-sampled modulation transfer function based on the estimated PSF{sup 0} shows that the observed data can be reproduced only by the single Gaussian approximation, and that when the sum of two Gaussians is used, significantly larger values are apparent in the higher-frequency region for images from both detection devices. The proposed method does not require a precisely, constructed tool. It is insensitive to beam collimation and to system physical size and may be indispensable in cases where thin

  6. Simultaneous pixel detection probabilities and spatial resolution estimation of pixelized detectors by means of correlation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabski, V.

    2008-02-01

    On the basis of the determination of statistical correlations between neighboring detector pixels, a novel method of estimating the simultaneous detection probability of pixels and the spatial resolution of pixelized detectors is proposed. The correlations are determined using noise variance measurement for isolated pixels and for the difference between neighboring pixels. The method is validated using images from two image-acquisition devices, a General Electric Senographe 2000D and a SD mammographic unit. The pixelized detector is irradiated with X-rays over its entire surface. It is shown that the simultaneous pixel detection probabilities can be estimated with an accuracy of 0.001-0.003, with an estimated systematic error of less than 0.005. The two-dimensional pre-sampled point-spread function (PSF 0) is determined using a single Gaussian approximation and a sum of two Gaussian approximations. The results obtained for the pre-sampled PSF 0 show that the single Gaussian approximation is not appropriate, and the sum of two Gaussian approximations providing the best fit predicts the existence of a large (˜50%) narrow component. Support for this observation can be found in the recent simulation study of columnar indirect digital detectors by Badano et al. The sampled two-dimensional PSF is determined using Monte Carlo simulation for the L-shaped, uniformly distributed acceptance function for different fill-factor values. The calculation of the pre-sampled modulation transfer function based on the estimated PSF 0 shows that the observed data can be reproduced only by the single Gaussian approximation, and that when the sum of two Gaussians is used, significantly larger values are apparent in the higher-frequency region for images from both detection devices. The proposed method does not require a precisely, constructed tool. It is insensitive to beam collimation and to system physical size and may be indispensable in cases where thin absorption slits or edges are

  7. Autoguiding and Defocus Experiments for CCD Differential Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    A number of smaller observatories utilize relatively low-cost, off-the-shelf telescopes and CCD cameras to obtain differential photometric measurements of variable stars. Obtaining the best-possible differential photometric precision, as evidenced by the standard deviations of the comparison-check differentials, is often a vital goal. This series of experiments is investigating, for two different Meade LX-200 telescopes (each equipped with an SBIG ST-7XE camera), the relationship between: (1) autoguiding precision and differential photometric precision, and (2) focus precision and differential photometric precision. The effects of purposefully introducing both autoguiding "errors" (i.e. small telescope movements) and image defocus on differential photometric precision are being evaluated. Telescope time is being provided by the Orion and Dark Ridge Observatories. I acknowledge the assistance of Russell Genet (Orion Observatory), Thomas Smith (Dark Ridge Observatory), and John Mottmann (California Polytechnic State University), as well as the financial support by the Department of Physics, California Polytechnic State University for conference and travel expenses.

  8. NIR spectrophotometric system based on a conventional CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat

    2003-05-01

    The near infrared spectral region (NIR) is useful in many applications. These include agriculture, the food and chemical industry, and textile and medical applications. In this region, spectral reflectance measurements are currently made with conventional spectrophotometers. These instruments are expensive since they use a diffraction grating to obtain monochromatic light. In this work, we present a multispectral imaging based technique for obtaining the reflectance spectra of samples in the NIR region (800 - 1000 nm), using a small number of measurements taken through different channels of a conventional CCD camera. We used methods based on the Wiener estimation, non-linear methods and principal component analysis (PCA) to reconstruct the spectral reflectance. We also analyzed, by numerical simulation, the number and shape of the filters that need to be used in order to obtain good spectral reconstructions. We obtained the reflectance spectra of a set of 30 spectral curves using a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 filters under the influence of two different halogen lamps with color temperatures Tc1 = 2852K and Tc2 = 3371K. The results obtained show that using between three and five filters with a large spectral bandwidth (FWHM = 60 nm), the reconstructed spectral reflectance of the samples was very similar to that of the original spectrum. The small amount of errors in the spectral reconstruction shows the potential of this method for reconstructing spectral reflectances in the NIR range.

  9. CCD Parallaxes for 309 Late-type Dwarfs and Subdwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahn, Conard C.; Harris, Hugh C.; Subasavage, John P.; Ables, Harold D.; Guetter, Harry H.; Harris, Fred H.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice B.; Monet, David G.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Walker, Richard L.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Canzian, Blaise J. [L-3 Communications/Brashear, 615 Epsilon Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15238-2807 (United States); Henden, Arne H. [AAVSO, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levine, Stephen E., E-mail: jsubasavage@nofs.navy.mil [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-4499 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    New, updated, and/or revised CCD parallaxes determined with the Strand Astrometric Reflector at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station are presented. Included are results for 309 late-type dwarf and subdwarf stars observed over the 30+ years that the program operated. For 124 of the stars, parallax determinations from other investigators have already appeared in the literature and we compare the different results. Also included here are new or updated VI photometry on the Johnson–Kron-Cousins system for all but a few of the faintest targets. Together with 2MASS JHK{sub s} near-infrared photometry, a sample of absolute magnitude versus color and color versus color diagrams are constructed. Because large proper motion was a prime criterion for targeting the stars, the majority turn out to be either M-type subdwarfs or late M-type dwarfs. The sample also includes 50 dwarf or subdwarf L-type stars, and four T dwarfs. Possible halo subdwarfs are identified in the sample based on tangential velocity, subluminosity, and spectral type. Residuals from the solutions for parallax and proper motion for several stars show evidence of astrometric perturbations.

  10. Machine vision: recent advances in CCD video camera technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Richard A.; Hamilton, Ronald J.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes four state-of-the-art digital video cameras, which provide advanced features that benefit computer image enhancement, manipulation, and analysis. These cameras were designed to reduce the complexity of imaging systems while increasing the accuracy, dynamic range, and detail enhancement of product inspections. Two cameras utilize progressive scan CCD sensors enabling the capture of high- resolution image of moving objects without the need for strobe lights or mechanical shutters. The second progressive scan camera has an unusually high resolution of 1280 by 1024 and a choice of serial or parallel digital interface for data and control. The other two cameras incorporate digital signal processing (DSP) technology for improved dynamic range, more accurate determination of color, white balance stability, and enhanced contrast of part features against the background. Successful applications and future product development trends are discussed. A brief description of analog and digital image capture devices will address the most common questions regarding interface requirements within a typical machine vision system overview.

  11. An Intensive CCD Photometry Campaign to Observe DW Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David; Gaensicke, Boris

    2009-05-01

    We report on a coordinated observing campaign in April and May 2008 to study the eclipsing dwarf nova DW Ursae Majoris. This belongs to the group of SW Sex stars, nova-like variables containing accretion disks which exhibit superhumps in their light curves suggesting that their accretion disks are elliptical and precessing on time scales of a few days due to tidal interactions with the companion star. It has been suggested that the changing geometry will cause the depth of eclipses to be modulated on the accretion disk precession period. The aim of this campaign was to provide for the first time sufficient continuous photometric coverage of an eclipsing super-humper to test this hypothesis. 26 experienced amateur CCD photometrists in 7 countries participated in the project and altogether made almost 55,000 magnitude measurements over a 4 week period, keeping DW UMa under observation for more than 50% of the time. The results provide direct measurements of the orbital, super-hump and disk precession periods, confirming unambiguously that the superhump signal is a beat between the orbital and precession periods. They also reveal modulation not only of the eclipse depth but also of the eclipse time of minimum and width on the accretion disk precession period. The project is a good example of cooperation between the amateur and professional communities to address an open research issue.

  12. Contribution au développement d'une technologie d'intégration tridimensionnelle pour les capteurs d'images CMOS à pixels actifs

    OpenAIRE

    Coudrain, Perceval

    2009-01-01

    Durant la dernière décennie, le marché des capteurs d’images électroniques a connu un essor considérable, appuyé par la démocratisation des applications nomades. Si le domaine a longtemps été dominé par les dispositifs CCD, les capteurs APS (Active Pixel Sensors) se sont depuis largement imposés, aidés par la pénétration des technologies CMOS. Une miniaturisation soutenue de la taille des pixels a conduit à des résolutions d’images élevées, mais a fait émerger des limitations sur les performa...

  13. Serial pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric D.

    2010-02-01

    This method reduces the data path from the counter to the pixel register of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) from as many as 10 bits to a single bit. The reduction in data path width is accomplished by using a coded serial data stream similar to a pseudo random number (PRN) generator. The resulting encoded pixel data is then decoded into a standard hexadecimal format before storage. The high-speed serial pixel ADC concept is based on the single-slope integrating pixel ADC architecture. Previous work has described a massively parallel pixel readout of a similar architecture. The serial ADC connection is similar to the state-of-the art method with the exception that the pixel ADC register is a shift register and the data path is a single bit. A state-of-the-art individual-pixel ADC uses a single-slope charge integration converter architecture with integral registers and "one-hot" counters. This implies that parallel data bits are routed among the counter and the individual on-chip pixel ADC registers. The data path bit-width to the pixel is therefore equivalent to the pixel ADC bit resolution.

  14. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  15. CCD TV focal plane guider development and comparison to SIRTF applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, David M.

    1989-01-01

    It is expected that the SIRTF payload will use a CCD TV focal plane fine guidance sensor to provide acquisition of sources and tracking stability of the telescope. Work has been done to develop CCD TV cameras and guiders at Lick Observatory for several years and have produced state of the art CCD TV systems for internal use. NASA decided to provide additional support so that the limits of this technology could be established and a comparison between SIRTF requirements and practical systems could be put on a more quantitative basis. The results of work carried out at Lick Observatory which was designed to characterize present CCD autoguiding technology and relate it to SIRTF applications is presented. Two different design types of CCD cameras were constructed using virtual phase and burred channel CCD sensors. A simple autoguider was built and used on the KAO, Mt. Lemon and Mt. Hamilton telescopes. A video image processing system was also constructed in order to characterize the performance of the auto guider and CCD cameras.

  16. Mosaic CCD method: A new technique for observing dynamics of cometary magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Kozuba, Y.; Okamura, S.; Konno, I.; Hamabe, M.; Aoki, T.; Minami, S.; Isobe, S.

    1992-12-01

    On April 29, 1990, the plasma tail of Comet Austin was observed with a CCD camera on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory of the University of Tokyo. The area of the CCD used in this observation is only about 1 sq cm. When this CCD is used on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, the area corresponds to a narrow square view of 12 ft x 12 ft. By comparison with the photograph of Comet Austin taken by Numazawa (personal communication) on the same night, we see that only a small part of the plasma tail can be photographed at one time with the CCD. However, by shifting the view on the CCD after each exposure, we succeeded in imaging the entire length of the cometary magnetosphere of 1.6 x 106 km. This new technique is called 'the mosaic CCD method'. In order to study the dynamics of cometary plasma tails, seven frames of the comet from the head to the tail region were twice imaged with the mosaic CCD method and two sets of images were obtained. Six microstructures, including arcade structures, were identified in both the images. Sketches of the plasma tail including microstructures are included.

  17. Satellite broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D.; Rainger, P.; Harvey, R. V.; Jennings, A.

    Questions related to direct broadcasting satellites are addressed with attention given to celestial mechanics, synchronous orbits, propagation, international plans, domestic installation, related laws and system costs. The role of the World Administrative Planning Conference (WARC) organization is discussed and contrasted with that of the regional administrative radio conference. Topics related to the field of law include coverage and overspill, regulation and control, copyrights and international organizations. Alternative ways of estimating direct broadcasting system costs are presented with consideration given to satellite costs as a function of mass, launch costs and system costs as a function of power.

  18. The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD2 catalysing the synthesis of crocetin in spring crocuses and saffron is a plastidial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Berman, Judit; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The apocarotenoid crocetin and its glycosylated derivatives, crocins, confer the red colour to saffron. Crocetin biosynthesis in saffron is catalysed by the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD2 (AIG94929). No homologues have been identified in other plant species due to the very limited presence of crocetin and its derivatives in the plant kingdom. Spring Crocus species with yellow flowers accumulate crocins in the stigma and tepals. Four carotenoid CCDs, namely CaCCD1, CaCCD2 and CaCCD4a/b and CaCCD4c were first cloned and characterized. CaCCD2 was localized in plastids, and a longer CCD2 version, CsCCD2L, was also localized in this compartment. The activity of CaCCD2 was assessed in Escherichia coli and in a stable rice gene function characterization system, demonstrating the production of crocetin in both systems. The expression of all isolated CCDs was evaluated in stigma and tepals at three key developmental stages in relation with apocarotenoid accumulation. CaCCD2 expression parallels crocin accumulation, but C14 apocarotenoids most likely are associated to the CaCCD1 activity in Crocus ancyrensis flowers. The specific CCD2 localization and its membrane interaction will contribute to the development of a better understanding of the mechanism of crocetin biosynthesis and regulation in the chromoplast. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Fibromyalgia in patients with chronic CCD and CMD - A retrospective study of 555 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert-Bruggner, Brigitte; Hülse, Manfred; Hülse, Roland

    2017-06-05

    Craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) and craniocervical dysfunction (CCD) are clearly defined musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Relationships with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) have not yet been investigated. The aim of the present study is to establish possible relationships between FMS and CMD/ CCD. In a retrospective study, 555 patients with CCD and CMD were investigated with respect to the diagnostic criteria of FMS. In addition to otolaryngologic and dental examination, an instrumental functional analysis for the diagnosis of CMD/CCD was performed. Three hundred fifty-one (63%) of the 555 patients evaluated met the diagnostic criteria for FMS. Seventy-two percent of the patients had a widespread pain index of at least 7 and a severity scale score of at least 5. Twenty-nine percent had a widespread pain index of 3-6 and a severity scale score of at least 9. Using myocentric bite splint therapy and therapy with oral orthesis in combination with neuromuscular relaxation measures, a good to very good improvement of physical symptoms was seen in 84% of CMD-FMS patients, and an improvement of the symptoms in the jaw was achieved in 77% of cases. The substantial proportion of CMD and CCD patients who meet the criteria for FMS emphasizes the complexity of the two diseases. It must be assumed that FMS is a crucial factor for the formation of CMD and CCD. Conversely, CMD/ CCD could also be responsible for diverse clinical pictures of the FMS. FMS patients with synchronous CCD/CMD benefit from an interdisciplinary CMD/CCD treatment.

  20. Using different satellite imagery and classification techniques to assess the contribution of trees outside forests in the municipality of Maringá, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Doubrawa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Forest cover of the Maringá municipality, located in northern Parana State, was mapped in this study. Mapping was carried out by using high-resolution HRC sensor imagery and medium resolution CCD sensor imagery from the CBERS satellite. Images were georeferenced and forest vegetation patches (TOFs - trees outside forests were classified using two methods of digital classification: reflectance-based or the digital number of each pixel, and object-oriented. The areas of each polygon were calculated, which allowed each polygon to be segregated into size classes. Thematic maps were built from the resulting polygon size classes and summary statistics generated from each size class for each area. It was found that most forest fragments in Maringá were smaller than 500 m². There was also a difference of 58.44% in the amount of vegetation between the high-resolution imagery and medium resolution imagery due to the distinct spatial resolution of the sensors. It was concluded that high-resolution geotechnology is essential to provide reliable information on urban greens and forest cover under highly human-perturbed landscapes.

  1. RI: CCD-FO Assembly for Spectroscopic Characterization of Flame Synthesis Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    involving thermite reactions with nano-Al. Specifically, the CCD-FO component of 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 15-02-2012 13...for nano-energetic applications involving thermite reactions with nano-Al. Specifically, the CCD-FO component of the detector is used as part of a...energetic applications involving thermite reactions with nano-Al. Specifically, the CCD-FO component of the detector is used as part of a laser-based

  2. The kilopixel array pathfinder project (KAPPa), a 16-pixel integrated heterodyne focal plane array: characterization of the single pixel prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Caleb H.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Mani, Hamdi; McGarey, Patrick; Kuenzi, Linda; Weinreb, Sander; Russell, Damon S.; Kooi, Jacob W.; Lichtenberger, Arthur W.; Walker, Christopher K.; Kulesa, Craig

    2014-07-01

    We report on the laboratory testing of KAPPa, a 16-pixel proof-of-concept array to enable the creation THz imaging spectrometer with ~1000 pixels. Creating an array an order of magnitude larger than the existing state of the art of 64 pixels requires a simple and robust design as well as improvements to mixer selection, testing, and assembly. Our testing employs a single pixel test bench where a novel 2D array architecture is tested. The minimum size of the footprint is dictated by the diameter of the drilled feedhorn aperture. In the adjoining detector block, a 6mm × 6mm footprint houses the SIS mixer, LNA, matching and bias networks, and permanent magnet. We present an initial characterization of the single pixel prototype using a computer controlled test bench to determine Y-factors for a parameter space of LO power, LO frequency, IF bandwidth, magnet field strength, and SIS bias voltage. To reduce the need to replace poorly preforming pixels that are already mounted in a large format array, we show techniques to improve SIS mixer selection prior to mounting in the detector block. The 2D integrated 16-pixel array design has been evolved as we investigate the properties of the single pixel prototype. Carful design of the prototype has allowed for rapid translation of single pixel design improvements to be easily incorporated into the 16-pixel model.

  3. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013-14). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase of the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the sensor technologies’ qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests are presented.

  4. Super pixel-level dictionary learning for hyperspectral image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Wen; Liao, Bo; Fu, Xiangzheng

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a superpixel-level dictionary learning model for hyperspectral data. The idea is to divide the hyperspectral image into a number of super-pixels by means of the super-pixel segmentation method. Each super-pixel is a spatial neighborhood called contextual group. That is, each pixel is represented using a linear combination of a few dictionary items learned from the train data, but since pixels inside a super-pixel are often consisting of the same materials, their linear combinations are constrained to use common items from the dictionary. To this end, the sparse coefficients of the context group have a common sparse pattern by using the joint sparse regularizer for dictionary learning. The sparse coefficients are then used for classification using linear support vector machines. The validity of the proposed method is experimentally verified on a real hyperspectral images.

  5. Irradiation and beam tests qualification for ATLAS IBL Pixel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinskiy, I

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will have different steps towards HL-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (foreseen for 2013–2014). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing Pixel Detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with the increase in the radiation damage and the pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance, which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Two different promising silicon sensor technologies (Planar n-in-n and 3D) are currently under investigation for the Pixel Detector. An overview of the sensor technologies' qualification with particular emphasis on irradiation and beam tests is presented.

  6. Detection of land cover change using an Artificial Neural Network on a time-series of MODIS satellite data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivier, JC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is proposed to detect human-induced land cover change using a sliding window through a time-series of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite surface reflectance pixel values. Training...

  7. Comparison of three sub-pixel computation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, An; Zheng, Lin; Jiang, Meixin

    2005-10-01

    Sub-pixel classification is a tough issue in remote sensing field. Although many kinds of software or its Module can be used to address this problem, their rationale, algorithms and methodologies are different, resulting in different use of different method for different purpose. This makes many users feel confused when they want to detect mixed feature content within a pixel and to use sub-pixel approach for practical application. It is necessary to make an in-depth comparison study for different sub-pixel methods in order for RS&GIS users to choose proper sub-pixel methods for their specific applications. After reviewing the basic theories and methods in dealing with sub-pixels, this paper made an introductory analysis to their principles, algorithms, parameters and computing process of three sub-pixel calculation methods, or Linear Unmixing in platform ILWIS3.0, Erdas8.5's Sub-pixel Classifier, eCognition3.0's Nearest Neighbor. A case study of three sub-pixel methods was then made of flood monitoring in Poyang Lake region of P.R.China with image data of band-1 and band-2 of NOAA AVHRR image. Finally, a theoretic, technological and practical comparison study was made of these three sub-pixel methods in aspects of the basic principles, the parameters to be set, the suitable application fields and their respective use limitation. Opinions and comments were presented in the end on the use of the sub-pixel calculation results of these three methods in a hope to provide some reference to future sub-pixel application study for the researchers in interest.

  8. Bier and Pastis, a pixel readout prototype chip for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, C; Bonzom, V; Delpierre, P A; Desch, Klaus; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Meuser, S; Raith, B A; Wermes, N

    2000-01-01

    The 12*63 pixel readout prototype chip Bieu&Pastis, designed to cope with the environment imposed on a pixel detector by high-energy proton-proton collisions as expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is described. The chip contains the full pixel cell functionality, but not yet the full peripheral architecture for data transfer and readout with LHC speed. Design considerations and lab tests to characterize the performance as well as some test beam results are described. (7 refs).

  9. Mapping Capacitive Coupling Among Pixels in a Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh; Cole, David M.; Smith, Roger M.

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of mapping the capacitive contribution to cross-talk among pixels in an imaging array of sensors (typically, an imaging photodetector array) has been devised for use in calibrating and/or characterizing such an array. The method involves a sequence of resets of subarrays of pixels to specified voltages and measurement of the voltage responses of neighboring non-reset pixels.

  10. Video-rate optical coherence tomography imaging with smart pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Stephan; Waldis, Severin; Seitz, Peter

    2003-10-01

    A novel concept for video-rate parallel acquisition of optical coherence tomography imaging is presented based on in-pixel demodulation. The main restrictions for parallel detection such as data rate, power consumption, circuit size and poor sensitivity are overcome with a smart pixel architecture incorporating an offset compensation circuit, a synchronous sampling stage, programmable time averaging and random pixel accessing, allowing envelope and phase detection in large 1D and 2D arrays.

  11. Hit efficiency study of CMS prototype forward pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the measurement of the hit efficiency of a prototype pixel device for the CMS forward pixel detector. These pixel detectors were FM type sensors with PSI46V1 chip readout. The data were taken with the 120 GeV proton beam at Fermilab during the period of December 2004 to February 2005. The detectors proved to be highly efficient (99.27 {+-} 0.02%). The inefficiency was primarily located near the corners of the individual pixels.

  12. Qualification Procedures of the CMS Pixel Barrel Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Starodumov, A; Horisberger, R.; Kastli, H.Chr.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Trueb, P.

    2006-01-01

    The CMS pixel barrel system will consist of three layers built of about 800 modules. One module contains 66560 readout channels and the full pixel barrel system about 48 million channels. It is mandatory to test each channel for functionality, noise level, trimming mechanism, and bump bonding quality. Different methods to determine the bump bonding yield with electrical measurements have been developed. Measurements of several operational parameters are also included in the qualification procedure. Among them are pixel noise, gains and pedestals. Test and qualification procedures of the pixel barrel modules are described and some results are presented.

  13. Dead pixel correction techniques for dual-band infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chuong T.; Mould, Nick; Regens, James L.

    2015-07-01

    We present two new dead pixel correction algorithms for dual-band infrared imagery. Specifically, we address the problem of repairing unresponsive elements in the sensor array using signal processing techniques to overcome deficiencies in image quality that are present following the nonuniformity correction process. Traditionally, dead pixel correction has been performed almost exclusively using variations of the nearest neighbor technique, where the value of the dead pixel is estimated based on pixel values associated with the neighboring image structure. Our approach differs from existing techniques, for the first time we estimate the values of dead pixels using information from both thermal bands collaboratively. The proposed dual-band statistical lookup (DSL) and dual-band inpainting (DIP) algorithms use intensity and local gradient information to estimate the values of dead pixels based on the values of unaffected pixels in the supplementary infrared band. The DSL algorithm is a regression technique that uses the image intensities from the reference band to estimate the dead pixel values in the band undergoing correction. The DIP algorithm is an energy minimization technique that uses the local image gradient from the reference band and the boundary values from the affected band to estimate the dead pixel values. We evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms with 50 dual-band videos. Simulation results indicate that the proposed techniques achieve perceptually and quantitatively superior results compared to existing methods.

  14. [Research on pixel decomposition of QuickBird multi-spectrum band images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Liu, Cheng-Yu; Zhang, Shu-Qing

    2009-11-01

    In the condition that the DN(Digital Number) value images of ground-atmosphere system recorded by the QuickBird artificial satellite sensor were taken as the experimental datum, the equation of pixel decomposition was structured, abiding by energy conservation law and the proportional relationship between the sum of 1-4 band integral radiance and the panchromatic band (Pan) integral radiance. By using the equation gained above, every pixel of 1-4 band images was decomposed into sixteen pixels. So the high resolution 1-4 band radiance images with the resolution of 0.61 m were finally obtained in this experiment. Compared with the original 1-4 band images, the spatial resolution of the high resolution 1-4 band radiance images was raised by four times. The detailed characteristics of the surface features in the high resolution 1-4 band radiance images were more limpid than the original 1-4 band images. The optesthesia effect was also improved obviously in the high resolution 1-4 band radiance images. Therefore, the map with appropriate scale improved from 1 : 10 000 to 1 : 2 500 can be made based on the high resolution 1-4 band radiance images.

  15. MMT OBSERVATORY 6.5M CCD47 RAW DATA OBSERVATIONS OF LCROSS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains raw observations of the 2009-10-09 impact of the LCROSS spacecraft on the moon by the CCD47 camera on the MMT Observatory 6.5m telescope. The...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 6811 CCD UBVRI photometry (Yontan+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yontan, T.; Bilir, S.; Bostanc, Z. F.; Ak, T.; Karaali, S.; Guver, T.; Ak, S.; Duran, S.; Paunzen, E.

    2015-09-01

    CCD UBVRI observations of NGC 6811 were carried out on 18th July 2012 using the 1m Ritchey-Chretien telescope (T100) located at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Bakirlitepe, Antalya/Turkey. (1 data file).

  17. Researchers develop CCD image sensor with 20ns per row parallel readout time

    CERN Multimedia

    Bush, S

    2004-01-01

    "Scientists at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Oxfordshire have developed what they claim is the fastest CCD (charge-coupled device) image sensor, with a readout time which is 20ns per row" (1/2 page)

  18. Reconstruction of Daily 30 m Data from HJ CCD, GF-1 WFV, Landsat, and MODIS Data for Crop Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingquan Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the recent launch of new satellites and the developments of spatiotemporal data fusion methods, we are entering an era of high spatiotemporal resolution remote-sensing analysis. This study proposed a method to reconstruct daily 30 m remote-sensing data for monitoring crop types and phenology in two study areas located in Xinjiang Province, China. First, the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA was used to reconstruct the time series high spatiotemporal resolution data from the Huanjing satellite charge coupled device (HJ CCD, Gaofen satellite no. 1 wide field-of-view camera (GF-1 WFV, Landsat, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Then, the reconstructed time series were applied to extract crop phenology using a Hybrid Piecewise Logistic Model (HPLM. In addition, the onset date of greenness increase (OGI and greenness decrease (OGD were also calculated using the simulated phenology. Finally, crop types were mapped using the phenology information. The results show that the reconstructed high spatiotemporal data had a high quality with a proportion of good observations (PGQ higher than 0.95 and the HPLM approach can simulate time series Normalized Different Vegetation Index (NDVI very well with R2 ranging from 0.635 to 0.952 in Luntai and 0.719 to 0.991 in Bole, respectively. The reconstructed high spatiotemporal data were able to extract crop phenology in single crop fields, which provided a very detailed pattern relative to that from time series MODIS data. Moreover, the crop types can be classified using the reconstructed time series high spatiotemporal data with overall accuracy equal to 0.91 in Luntai and 0.95 in Bole, which is 0.028 and 0.046 higher than those obtained by using multi-temporal Landsat NDVI data.

  19. Pixel detector modules performance for ATLAS IBL and future pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00355104; Pernegger, Heinz

    2015-11-06

    The ATLAS Detector is one of the four big particle physics experiments at CERN’s LHC. Its innermost tracking system consisted of the 3-Layer silicon Pixel Detector (~80M readout channels) in the first run (2010-2012). Over the past two years it was refurbished and equipped with new services as well as a new beam monitor. The major upgrade, however, was the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). It adds ~12M readout channels for improved vertexing, tracking robustness and b-tagging performance for the upcoming runs, before the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will take place. This thesis covers two main aspects of Pixel detector performance studies: The main work was the planning, commissioning and operation of a test bench that meets the requirements of current pixel detector components. Each newly built ATLAS IBL stave was thoroughly tested, following a specifically developed procedure, and initially calibrated in that setup. A variety of production accompanying measurements as well as preliminary results after integ...

  20. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Traynor, Kirsten S; Andree, Michael; Lichtenberg, Elinor M; Chen, Yanping; Saegerman, Claude; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions), and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees), we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence) and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and factors

  1. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Kirsten S.; Andree, Michael; Lichtenberg, Elinor M.; Chen, Yanping; Saegerman, Claude; Cox-Foster, Diana L.

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions), and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees), we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence) and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and factors

  2. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis vanEngelsdorp

    Full Text Available Honey bee (Apis mellifera colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions, and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees, we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and

  3. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd 2O 2S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  4. JAstroCam - A New Tool for Data Gathering with CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyn, M.; Zola, S.; Wojcik, K.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new acquisition program for observations with CCD. The code is written in the JAVA language, currently supports Photometrics S300, SBIG, APOGEE and Andor CCDs. New hardware support can be extended by adding plugins for either a new type of CCD or a filter wheel. The software is capable of performing an on-line reduction of frames coming in real time either on non-processed or reduced for bias/dark/flat frames.

  5. Design and characterization of high precision in-pixel discriminators for rolling shutter CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Pham, H.; Hu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit the ability to integrate a charge collecting electrode with analog and digital processing circuitry down to the pixel level, a new type of CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability is presented in this paper. The pixel array is read out based on a column-parallel read-out architecture, where each pixel incorporates a diode, a preamplifier with a double sampling circuitry and a discriminator to completely eliminate analog read-out bottlenecks. The sensor featuring a pixel array of 8 rows and 32 columns with a pixel pitch of 80 μm×16 μm was fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The behavior of each pixel-level discriminator isolated from the diode and the preamplifier was studied. The experimental results indicate that all in-pixel discriminators which are fully operational can provide significant improvements in the read-out speed and the power consumption of CMOS pixel sensors.

  6. A Design and Development of Multi-Purpose CCD Camera System with Thermoelectric Cooling: Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Oh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a software which we developed for the multi-purpose CCD camera. This software can be used on the all 3 types of CCD - KAF-0401E (768×512, KAF-1602E (15367times;1024, KAF-3200E (2184×1472 made in KODAK Co.. For the efficient CCD camera control, the software is operated with two independent processes of the CCD control program and the temperature/shutter operation program. This software is designed to fully automatic operation as well as manually operation under LINUX system, and is controled by LINUX user signal procedure. We plan to use this software for all sky survey system and also night sky monitoring and sky observation. As our results, the read-out time of each CCD are about 15sec, 64sec, 134sec for KAF-0401E, KAF-1602E, KAF-3200E., because these time are limited by the data transmission speed of parallel port. For larger format CCD, the data transmission is required more high speed. we are considering this control software to one using USB port for high speed data transmission.

  7. Solar satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poher, C.

    1982-01-01

    A reference system design, projected costs, and the functional concepts of a satellite solar power system (SSPS) for converting sunlight falling on solar panels of a satellite in GEO to a multi-GW beam which could be received by a rectenna on earth are outlined. Electricity transmission by microwaves has been demonstrated, and a reference design system for supplying 5 GW dc to earth was devised. The system will use either monocrystalline Si or concentrator GaAs solar cells for energy collection in GEO. Development is still needed to improve the lifespan of the cells. Currently, the cell performance degrades 50 percent in efficiency after 7-8 yr in space. Each SSPS satellite would weigh either 34,000 tons (Si) or 51,000 tons (GaAs), thereby requiring the fabrication of a heavy lift launch vehicle or a single-stage-to-orbit transport in order to minimize launch costs. Costs for the solar panels have been estimated at $500/kW using the GaAs technology, with transport costs for materials to GEO being $40/kg.

  8. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced in 2025 during the LHC Phase-II shutdown by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The innermost part of ITk will be a pixel detector containing about 12.5m2 of sensitive silicon. The silicon modules are arranged on 5 layers of stave-like support structures in the most central region and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions covering out to |η| < 4; a mid-eta region (~1 < |η| < ~2) will be occupied by novel inclined support structures which keep the angle of incidence of high-momentum tracks more closely normal to the sensitive silicon. All supports will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally-conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide flowing in thin-walled titanium pipes. An extensive prototyping programme, including thermal, mechanical and electrical studies, is being carried out on all the types of support structures. The HL-LHC is expected to deliver up t...

  9. Hyperspectral Anomaly Detection by Graph Pixel Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Ma, Dandan; Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Hyperspectral anomaly detection (AD) is an important problem in remote sensing field. It can make full use of the spectral differences to discover certain potential interesting regions without any target priors. Traditional Mahalanobis-distance-based anomaly detectors assume the background spectrum distribution conforms to a Gaussian distribution. However, this and other similar distributions may not be satisfied for the real hyperspectral images. Moreover, the background statistics are susceptible to contamination of anomaly targets which will lead to a high false-positive rate. To address these intrinsic problems, this paper proposes a novel AD method based on the graph theory. We first construct a vertex- and edge-weighted graph and then utilize a pixel selection process to locate the anomaly targets. Two contributions are claimed in this paper: 1) no background distributions are required which makes the method more adaptive and 2) both the vertex and edge weights are considered which enables a more accurate detection performance and better robustness to noise. Intensive experiments on the simulated and real hyperspectral images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms other benchmark competitors. In addition, the robustness of the proposed method has been validated by using various window sizes. This experimental result also demonstrates the valuable characteristic of less computational complexity and less parameter tuning for real applications.

  10. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, Mathieu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of the ITk will consist of a pixel detector with stave-like support structures in the most central region and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions; there may also be novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap regions. The new detector could have as much as 14 m2 of sensitive silicon. Support structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. The ITk will be instrumented with new sensors and readout electronics to provide improved tracking performance compared to the current detector. All the module components must be performant enough and robust enough to cope with the expected high particle multiplicity and severe radiation background of the High-Luminosity LHC. Readout...

  11. Precision tracking with a single gaseous pixel detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsigaridas, S.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Gromov, V.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P.; de Jong, P.; Kluit, R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of micro-pattern gaseous detectors has grown over the past few years after successful usage in a large number of applications in physics experiments and medicine. We develop gaseous pixel detectors using micromegas-based amplification structures on top of CMOS pixel readout chips.

  12. Pixel size and pitch measurements of liquid crystal spatial light ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a simple technique for the determination of pixel size and pitch of liquid crystal (LC) based spatial light modulator (SLM). The proposed method is based on optical diffraction from pixelated LC panel that has been modeled as a two-dimensional array of rectangular apertures. A novel yet simple, two-plane ...

  13. Centi-pixel accurate real-time inverse distortion correction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, Johan P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Inverse distortion is used to create an undistorted image from a distorted image. For each pixel in the undistorted image it is required to determine which pixel in the distorted image should be used. However the process of characterizing a lens...

  14. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS ...

  15. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  16. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  17. Commissioning the CMS pixel detector with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Heyburn, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of two general purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. The CMS experiment prides itself on an ambitious, all silicon based, tracking system. After almost 20 years of design and construction the CMS tracker detector has been installed and commissioned. The tracker detector consists of ten layers of silicon microstrip detectors while three layers of pixel detector modules are situated closest to the interaction point. The pixel detector consists of 66 million pixels of 100mm 150mm size, and is designed to use the shape of the actual charge distribution of charged particles to gain hit resolutions down to 12mm. This paper will focus on commissioning activities in the CMS pixel detector. Results from cosmic ray studies will be presented, in addition to results obtained from the integration of the pixel detector within the CMS detector and various calibration and alignment analyses.

  18. Status of the CMS Phase I Pixel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2016-09-21

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase~I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  19. Response of the pixel detector Timepix to heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Jakubek, Jan [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Koester, Ulli [Institute Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Platkevic, Michal; Pospisil, Stanislav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-15

    The response of the pixel detector Timepix to ions in the 4-110 MeV kinetic energy range and A=3-136 mass range has been studied at the fission-fragment separator Lohengrin of the Institute Laue Langevin in Grenoble. Timepix detects single ions measuring their position, kinetic energy, and time of arrival. Heavy ions with energy above several tens of 10 MeV produce a distortion of the electronic pixel signal response which arises when the energy collected is, under conventional detector settings, of around {approx}1 MeV per pixel. This effect can be suppressed, and the detector energy range extended, by suitable pixel signal baseline and threshold levels, together with optimally low sensor chip bias voltage. Reasonable results are achieved within the range of ion mass and energy studied extending the linearity level of per pixel measured energy up to {approx}2 MeV.

  20. DAQ Hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment was extended by about 12 million pixels with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented by employing newly designed read-out hardware, which supports the full detector bandwidth even for calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  1. Development of radiation hardened pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Koziel, Michal

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are being developed since a few years to equip vertex detectors for future high-energy physics experiments with the crucial advantages of a low material budget and low production costs. The features simultaneously required are a short readout time, high granularity and high tolerance to radiation. This thesis mainly focuses on the radiation tolerance studies. To achieve the targeted readout time (tens of microseconds), the sensor pixel readout was organized in parallel columns restricting in addition the readout to pixels that had collected the signal charge. The pixels became then more complex, and consequently more sensitive to radiation. Different in-pixel architectures were studied and it was concluded that the tolerance to ionizing radiation was limited to 300 krad with the 0.35- m fabrication process currently used, while the targeted value was several Mrad. Improving this situation calls for implementation of the sensors in processes with a smaller feature size which naturally imp...

  2. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  3. Characterization of active CMOS sensors for capacitively coupled pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirono, Toko; Gonella, Laura; Janssen, Jens; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Active CMOS pixel sensor is one of the most attractive candidates for detectors of upcoming particle physics experiments. In contrast to conventional sensors of hybrid detectors, signal processing circuit can be integrated in the active CMOS sensor. The characterization and optimization of the pixel circuit are indispensable to obtain a good performance from the sensors. The prototype chips of the active CMOS sensor were fabricated in the AMS 180nm and L-Foundry 150 nm CMOS processes, respectively a high voltage and high resistivity technology. Both chips have a charge sensitive amplifier and a comparator in each pixel. The chips are designed to be glued to the FEI4 pixel readout chip. The signals from 3 pixels of the prototype chips are capacitively coupled to the FEI4 input pads. We have performed lab tests and test beams to characterize the prototypes. In this presentation, the measurement results of the active CMOS prototype sensors are shown.

  4. DAQ hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00372086; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has been extended by about 12 million pixels thanks to the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented along with newly designed read-out hardware to support high bandwidth for data readout and calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  5. Assessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Thomas W; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

    2007-10-01

    Since 2000, there have been a number of spaceborne satellites that have changed the way we assess and predict natural hazards. These satellites are able to quantify physical geographic phenomena associated with the movements of the earth's surface (earthquakes, mass movements), water (floods, tsunamis, storms), and fire (wildfires). Most of these satellites contain active or passive sensors that can be utilized by the scientific community for the remote sensing of natural hazards over a number of spatial and temporal scales. The most useful satellite imagery for the assessment of earthquake damage comes from high-resolution (0.6 m to 1 m pixel size) passive sensors and moderate resolution active sensors that can quantify the vertical and horizontal movement of the earth's surface. High-resolution passive sensors have been used to successfully assess flood damage while predictive maps of flood vulnerability areas are possible based on physical variables collected from passive and active sensors. Recent moderate resolution sensors are able to provide near real time data on fires and provide quantitative data used in fire behavior models. Limitations currently exist due to atmospheric interference, pixel resolution, and revisit times. However, a number of new microsatellites and constellations of satellites will be launched in the next five years that contain increased resolution (0.5 m to 1 m pixel resolution for active sensors) and revisit times (daily ≤ 2.5 m resolution images from passive sensors) that will significantly improve our ability to assess and predict natural hazards from space.

  6. Computer monitor pixellation and Sloan letter visual acuity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carkeet, Andrew; Lister, Lucas J

    2017-12-26

    To assess the effects of changing computer monitor pixel density on visual acuity measurements made using Sloan optotypes. Acuity was measured on 10 participants aged 19 to 38 years (mean 27.9 ± 7.0) measured binocularly wearing their best spectacle correction. Stimuli were eight lines of five Sloan letter optotypes in logarithmic progression, ranging in size from -0.4 to 0.3 logMAR. Test distance was varied so that pixels on the monitor ranged in size from 0.125 mins of arc to 1.97 mins of arc. Two sampling approaches were used: (1) unfiltered sampling, with each pixel rendered either black or white; and (2) filtered sampling with pixel luminance averaged across a pixel aperture, giving grey-scale smoothing of letter edges. A broken line fit was made to each data set, with acuity being stable at an asymptotic threshold VAas for small pixels sizes, with thresholds increasing linearly when pixel sizes exceeded a critical pixel size Pcrit . For unfiltered stimuli, Pcrit averaged 1.1 mins of arc and for unfiltered stimuli averaged 0.69 mins of arc. For filtered stimuli, Pcrit was 1.79xVAas , and for unfiltered Pcrit was 1.05xVAas . The results show that grey-scale filtering makes acuity measurement more resistant to the effects of pixellation. Based on a conservative interpretation of these findings, we make the recommendation that charts be constructed with, for filtered optotypes, a maximum pixel size of 0.6 x of the smallest MAR used and, for unfiltered optotypes, 0.35 x the smallest MAR used. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  7. Intelligent real-time CCD data processing system based on variable frame rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-ting

    2009-07-01

    In order to meet the need of image shooting with CCD in unmanned aerial vehicles, a real-time high resolution CCD data processing system based on variable frame rate is designed. The system is consisted of three modules: CCD control module, data processing module and data display module. In the CCD control module, real-time flight parameters (e.g. flight height, velocity and longitude) should be received from GPS through UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter) and according to the corresponding flight parameters, the variable frame rate is calculated. Based on the calculated variable frame rate, CCD external synchronization control impulse signal is generated in the control of FPGA and then CCD data is read out. In the data processing module, data segmentation is designed to extract ROI (region of interest), whose resolution is equal to valid data resolution of HDTV standard conforming to SMPTE (1080i). On one hand, Ping-pong SRAM storage controller is designed in FPGA to real-time store ROI data. On the other hand, according to the need of intelligent observing, changeable window position is designed, and a flexible area of interest is obtained. In the real-time display module, a special video encoder is used to accomplish data format conversion. Data after storage is packeted to HDTV format by creating corresponding format information in FPGA. Through inner register configuration, high definition video analog signal is implemented. The entire system has been implemented in FPGA and validated. It has been used in various real-time CCD data processing situations.

  8. International Workshop on Semiconductor Pixel Detectors for Particles and Imaging (PIXEL2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Leonardo; PIXEL2016

    2016-01-01

    The workshop will cover various topics related to pixel detector technology. Development and applications will be discussed for charged particle tracking in High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and for X-ray imaging in Astronomy, Biology, Medicine and Material Science. The conference program will also include reports on front and back end electronics, radiation effects, low mass mechanics, environmental control and construction techniques. Emerging technologies, such as monolithic and HV&HR CMOS, will also be treated. Will be published in: http://pos.sissa.it/

  9. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  10. Monolithic pixel detectors with 0.2 μm FD-SOI pixel process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Arai, Yasuo; Chiba, Tadashi; Fujita, Yowichi; Hara, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shunsuke; Igarashi, Yasushi; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Kohriki, Takashi; Ohno, Morifumi; Ono, Yoshimasa; Shinoda, Naoyuki; Takeda, Ayaki; Tauchi, Kazuya; Tsuboyama, Toru; Tadokoro, Hirofumi; Unno, Yoshinobu; Yanagihara, Masashi

    2013-12-01

    Truly monolithic pixel detectors were fabricated with 0.2 μm SOI pixel process technology by collaborating with LAPIS Semiconductor Co., Ltd. for particle tracking experiment, X-ray imaging and medical applications. CMOS circuits were fabricated on a thin SOI layer and connected to diodes formed in the silicon handle wafer through the buried oxide layer. We can choose the handle wafer and therefore high-resistivity silicon is also available. Double SOI (D-SOI) wafers fabricated from Czochralski (CZ)-SOI wafers were newly obtained and successfully processed in 2012. The top SOI layers are used as electric circuits and the middle SOI layers used as a shield layer against the back-gate effect and cross-talk between sensors and CMOS circuits, and as an electrode to compensate for the total ionizing dose (TID) effect. In 2012, we developed two SOI detectors, INTPIX5 and INTPIX3g. A spatial resolution study was done with INTPIX5 and it showed excellent performance. The TID effect study with D-SOI INTPIX3g detectors was done and we confirmed improvement of TID tolerance in D-SOI sensors.

  11. Use of a CCD camera for the thermographic study of a transient liquid phase bonding process in steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eduardo H.; Epelbaum, Carlos; Carnero, Angel; Arcondo, Bibiana

    2001-03-01

    The bonding of steel pieces and the development of novel soldering methods, appropriate to the extended variety of applications of steels nowadays, bring the sensing of temperature an outstanding role in any metallurgical process. Transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB) processes have been successfully employed to join metals, among them steels. A thin layer of metal A, with a liquids temperature TLA, is located between two pieces of metal B, with a liquids temperature TLB higher than TLA. The joining zone is heated up to a temperature T(TLAsteel is performed in a 30 Kw induction furnace at temperatures in the range 800 degree(s)C to 1400 degree(s)C depending on the layer metal. A small window was opened between the central loops of the coil in order to observe the radiation emitted by the hot steel zone. A low price black and white CCD camera with 752x582 pixels has been adapted for temperature measurements through the coil of the furnace. The output of the camera is digitized and visualized in a 14-inch monitor. The temperature is calculated using the correlation with the gray tone present in the monitor, which is measured by means of suitable software. The technical specifications of the camera and the modifications introduced to adapt it for this work are presented. The calibration of the camera and the method employed in the measurements are described. The measured temperatures are corrected by the effect of emissivity of the materials surfaces and the environment radiation reflected. Thermographs obtained are shown and results are discussed. We conclude that a low priced camera may be used to measure temperature in this range with acceptable accuracy.

  12. CCD-Based Skinning Injury Recognition on Potato Tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.: A Comparison between Visible and Biospeckle Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwang Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Skinning injury on potato tubers is a kind of superficial wound that is generally inflicted by mechanical forces during harvest and postharvest handling operations. Though skinning injury is pervasive and obstructive, its detection is very limited. This study attempted to identify injured skin using two CCD (Charge Coupled Device sensor-based machine vision technologies, i.e., visible imaging and biospeckle imaging. The identification of skinning injury was realized via exploiting features extracted from varied ROIs (Region of Interests. The features extracted from visible images were pixel-wise color and texture features, while region-wise BA (Biospeckle Activity was calculated from biospeckle imaging. In addition, the calculation of BA using varied numbers of speckle patterns were compared. Finally, extracted features were implemented into classifiers of LS-SVM (Least Square Support Vector Machine and BLR (Binary Logistic Regression, respectively. Results showed that color features performed better than texture features in classifying sound skin and injured skin, especially for injured skin stored no less than 1 day, with the average classification accuracy of 90%. Image capturing and processing efficiency can be speeded up in biospeckle imaging, with captured 512 frames reduced to 125 frames. Classification results obtained based on the feature of BA were acceptable for early skinning injury stored within 1 day, with the accuracy of 88.10%. It is concluded that skinning injury can be recognized by visible and biospeckle imaging during different stages. Visible imaging has the aptitude in recognizing stale skinning injury, while fresh injury can be discriminated by biospeckle imaging.

  13. Towards Shift Tolerant Visual Secret Sharing Schemes without Pixel Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Justie Su-Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Naor and Shamir proposed the visual cryptography in 1995, they encrypted secret image into two meaningless random images, called shares, and it can be decrypted by human vision without any calculations. However, there would be problems in alignment when these two shares are staked by hand in practical. Therefore, this paper presents the fault-tolerant schemes of stacking two shares which are acquired from secret image encryption without pixel expansion. The main idea of these schemes is combining several pixels to be a unit, then encrypting every unit into a specific combination of pixels. It makes visual secret sharing scheme more practical.

  14. Dual readout 3D direct/induced-signals pixel systems

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Sherwood; Deile, Mario; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Christopher; Kok, Angela; Watts, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, 3D-electrode pixel detectors are described, in which the bias electrode systems have additional elements. Adding resistors between the bias supply line and each bias electrode together with a signal electrode readout that can measure pulse heights of both polarities could simultaneously provide lower capacitance and improved spatial resolution in both directions. A separate paper (“Dual-readout—strip/pixel systems”) covers an alternative—pixels with an added strip readout in one direction which could be used with either planar or 3D-electrodes, and could simultaneously provide a fast trigger and significantly increase the spatial resolution in both directions.

  15. The ATLAS Pixel nSQP Readout Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel New Service Quarter Panel (nSQP) project aims to deliver replacements for all on-detector services of the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The nSQPs will have replacements for the electro-optical converters. The replacement devices are LVDS transceiver boards (E-Boards) and they communicate with the existing ATLAS Pixel MCC chips over the original type 0 cables. In the other direction the E-Boards communicate over a 6.6 meter long transmission line with the VCSEL driver chips in the new electro-optical converters. These converters have been relocated to a region that is much more accessible.

  16. Dual collection mode optical microscope with single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have developed a single-pixel optical microscope that provides both re ection and transmission images of the sample under test by attaching a diamond pixel layout DMD to a commercial inverted microscope. Our system performs simultaneous measurements of re ection and transmission modes. Besides, in contrast with a conventional system, in our single-element detection system both images belong, unequivocally, to the same plane of the sample. Furthermore, we have designed an algorithm to modify the shape of the projected patterns that improves the resolution and prevents the artifacts produced by the diamond pixel architecture.

  17. Model-based satellite image fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Sveinsson, J. R.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for pixel-level satellite image fusion derived directly from a model of the imaging sensor. By design, the proposed method is spectrally consistent. It is argued that the proposed method needs regularization, as is the case for any method for this problem. A framework for pixel...... neighborhood regularization is presented. This framework enables the formulation of the regularization in a way that corresponds well with our prior assumptions of the image data. The proposed method is validated and compared with other approaches on several data sets. Lastly, the intensity......-hue-saturation method is revisited in order to gain additional insight of what implications the spectral consistency has for an image fusion method....

  18. Leaf Area Index Retrieval Combining HJ1/CCD and Landsat8/OLI Data in the Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary restriction on high resolution remote sensing data is the limit observation frequency. Using a network of multiple sensors is an efficient approach to increase the observations in a specific period. This study explores a leaf area index (LAI inversion method based on a 30 m multi-sensor dataset generated from HJ1/CCD and Landsat8/OLI, from June to August 2013 in the middle reach of the Heihe River Basin, China. The characteristics of the multi-sensor dataset, including the percentage of valid observations, the distribution of observation angles and the variation between different sensor observations, were analyzed. To reduce the possible discrepancy between different satellite sensors on LAI inversion, a quality control system for the observations was designed. LAI is retrieved from the high quality of single-sensor observations based on a look-up table constructed by a unified model. The averaged LAI inversion over a 10-day period is set as the synthetic LAI value. The percentage of valid LAI inversions increases significantly from 6.4% to 49.7% for single-sensors to 75.9% for multi-sensors. LAI retrieved from the multi-sensor dataset show good agreement with the field measurements. The correlation coefficient (R2 is 0.90, and the average root mean square error (RMSE is 0.42. The network of multiple sensors with 30 m spatial resolution can generate LAI products with reasonable accuracy and meaningful temporal resolution.

  19. Non-normal distribution of the Top-Of-Atmosphere satellite optical measurements over calibration sites

    OpenAIRE

    Gorroño, J; Bialek, A; Green, PD; Harris, P; Scanlon, T; Fox, NP; Underwood, CI

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the distribution associated with the measurement of the satellite derived Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance on a pixel-to-pixel level, within a defined spatial region of interest (ROI) within a vicarious calibration target site. The study analyses the effects of the atmosphere and surface reflectance distribution spatial shape. The analysis shows that some of the contributing effects are inherently non-linear, so produce non-normal distributions. For these non-normal dist...

  20. Quantum efficiency modeling for a thick back-illuminated astronomical CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, D. E.; Haque, S.; Holland, S. E.; Kolbe, W. F.

    2017-08-01

    The quantum efficiency and reflectivity of thick, back-illuminated CCD's being fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for astronomical applications are modeled and compared with experiments. The treatment differs from standard thin-film optics in that (a) absorption is permitted in any film, (b) the 200-500 μm thick silicon substrate is considered as a thin film in order to observe the fringing behavior at long wavelengths, and (c) by using approximate boundary conditions, absorption in the surface films is separated from absorption in the substrate. For quantum efficiency measurements, the CCD's are normally operated as CCD's, usually at T =-140 ° C, and at higher temperatures, as photodiodes. They are mounted on mechanical substrates. Reflectivity is measured on air-backed wafer samples at room temperature. The agreement between model expectation and quantum efficiency measurement is in general satisfactory.

  1. High-aperture monochromator-reflectometer and its usefulness for CCD calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Eugene A.; Shcherbakov, Alexander V.; Pertsov, Andrei A.; Polkovnikov, Vladimir N.; Pestov, Alexey E.; Pariev, Dmitry E.; Chkhalo, Nikolai I.

    2017-05-01

    We present a laboratory high-aperture monochromator-reflectometer employing laser-plasma radiation source and three replaceable Schwarzschild objectives for a certain range of applications in the soft X-ray spectral waveband. Three sets of X-ray multilayer mirrors for the Schwarzschild objectives enable operation of the reflectometer at the wavelengths of 135, 171 and 304 Å, while a goniometer with three degrees of freedom allows different measurement modes. We have used the facility for a laboratory CCD calibration at the wavelengths specified. Combined with the results of the CCD sensitivity measurements conducted in the VUV spectral waveband, the total outcome provides a more comprehensive understanding of the CCD effectivity in a wide spectral range.

  2. Investigation of the radiation performance of CCD sensors in a vertex detector application

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanov, K D; Miyamoto, A; Sugimoto, Y; Tamura, N; Takahashi, S; Abe, K; Nagamine, T; Aso, T

    1999-01-01

    The radiation performance of a Hamamatsu S5466 and an EEV CCD02-06 silicon CCD sensors, working in a Multi-Pinned Phase (MPP) mode has been evaluated, in view of their possible use in the vertex detector of a future linear collider. We have examined the influence of the electron irradiation from a beta-source with fluencies up to 4.3x10 sup 1 sup 2 e sup - /cm sup 2 on the parameters of the CCD sensors such as dark current, dark current spikes, drive pulse voltages and charge transfer inefficiency (CTI). The changes of the parameters of the devices resulting from the irradiation are reported and discussed.

  3. Magneto-optic Kerr effect CCD imaging with polarization modulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Nakayama

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE imaging system with a charge-coupled-device (CCD camera by using the rotating compensator technique. We chose optimal conditions of the rotation frequency of the compensator with stable rotation along with a CCD camera frame rate that allowed precise control of the exposure timing in order to link with the angle of the compensator. Precise timing management of the CCD exposure enables us to carry out repeated experiments, which greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the longitudinal MOKE signal. We applied the technique to the material characterization of the Ni81 Fe19 thin film and its microstructure, and succeeded in evaluating the spatial variation of the complex magneto-optic constant Q of the sample. Because of its attractive advantages such as high-speed and compactness, the present method provides a novel platform for investigating the domain structures in various magnetic materials.

  4. Magneto-optic Kerr effect CCD imaging with polarization modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Satoru; Okano, Makoto; Nozaki, Yukio; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2017-05-01

    We have developed a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) imaging system with a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera by using the rotating compensator technique. We chose optimal conditions of the rotation frequency of the compensator with stable rotation along with a CCD camera frame rate that allowed precise control of the exposure timing in order to link with the angle of the compensator. Precise timing management of the CCD exposure enables us to carry out repeated experiments, which greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the longitudinal MOKE signal. We applied the technique to the material characterization of the Ni81 Fe19 thin film and its microstructure, and succeeded in evaluating the spatial variation of the complex magneto-optic constant Q of the sample. Because of its attractive advantages such as high-speed and compactness, the present method provides a novel platform for investigating the domain structures in various magnetic materials.

  5. Digital column readout architectures for hybrid pixel detector readout chips

    CERN Document Server

    Poikela, T; Westerlund, T; Buytaert, J; Campbell, M; De Gaspari, M; Llopart, X; Wyllie, K; Gromov, V; Kluit, R; van Beuzekom, M; Zappon, F; Zivkovic, V; Brezina, C; Desch, K; Fu, Y; Kruth, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two digital column architectures suitable for sparse readout of data from a pixel matrix in trigger-less applications are presented. Each architecture reads out a pixel matrix of 256 x 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 µm. The first architecture has been implemented in the Timepix3 chip, and this is presented together with initial measurements. Simulation results and measured data are compared. The second architecture has been designed for Velopix, a readout chip planned for the LHCb VELO upgrade. Unlike Timepix3, this has to be tolerant to radiation-induced single-event effects. Results from post-layout simulations are shown with the circuit architectures.

  6. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  7. Initial Measurements on Pixel Detector Modules for the ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Gallrapp, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Delicate conditions in terms of peak and integrated luminosity in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will raise the ATLAS Pixel Detector to its performance limits. Silicon planar, silicon 3D and diamond pixel sensors are three possible sensor technologies which could be implemented in the upcoming Pixel Detector upgrades of the ATLAS experiment. Measurements of the IV-behavior and measurements with radioactive Americium-241 and Strontium-90 are used to characterize the sensor properties and to understand the interaction between the ATLAS FE-I4 front-end chip and the sensor. Comparisons of results from before and after irradiation for silicon planar and 3D pixel sensors, which give a first impression on the charge collection properties of the different sensor technologies, are presented.

  8. Small Pixel Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Samuel; Bray, Evan; Burrows, David N.; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Kern, Matthew; McQuaide, Maria; Wages, Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    Concepts for future space-based X-ray observatories call for a large effective area and high angular resolution instrument to enable precision X-ray astronomy at high redshift and low luminosity. Hybrid CMOS detectors are well suited for such high throughput instruments, and the Penn State X-ray detector lab, in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors, has recently developed new small pixel hybrid CMOS X-ray detectors. These prototype 128x128 pixel devices have 12.5 micron pixel pitch, 200 micron fully depleted depth, and include crosstalk eliminating CTIA amplifiers and in-pixel correlated double sampling (CDS) capability. We report on characteristics of these new detectors, including the best read noise ever measured for an X-ray hybrid CMOS detector, 5.67 e- (RMS).

  9. A passive CMOS pixel sensor for the high luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daas, Michael; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Janssen, Jens; Krueger, Hans; Pohl, David-Leon; Wermes, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Macchiolo, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The high luminosity upgrade for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new inner tracking detector for the ATLAS experiment. About 200 m{sup 2} of silicon detectors are needed demanding new, low cost hybridization- and sensor technologies. One promising approach is to use commercial CMOS technologies to produce the passive sensor for a hybrid pixel detector design. In this talk a fully functional prototype of a 300 μm thick, backside biased CMOS pixel sensor in 150 nm LFoundry technology is presented. The sensor is bump bonded to the ATLAS FE-I4 with AC and DC coupled pixels. Results like leakage current, noise performance, and charge collection efficiency are presented and compared to the actual ATLAS pixel sensor design.

  10. Evaluating Pixel vs. Segmentation based Classifiers with Height ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    2017-10-13

    Oct 13, 2017 ... classification of digital imagery. ... Traditional pixel-based classifiers have been widely used for classifying optical imagery from ..... Chavez, P, Sides, SC & Anderson, JA 1991, 'Comparison of three different methods to merge.

  11. Geostationary Satellite (GOES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from radiometer instruments on SMS (ATS) and GOES satellites in geostationary orbit. These satellites produced...

  12. Small pitch pixel sensors for the CMS Phase II upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069790

    2015-01-01

    The CMS collaboration has undertaken two sensor R\\&D programs on thin n-in-p planar and 3D silicon sensor technologies. To cope with the increase in instantaneous luminosity, the pixel area has to be reduced to approximately 2500 $\\mu$m$^{2}$ to keep the occupancy at the percent level. Suggested pixel cell geometries to match this requirement are {50$\\times$50 }$\\mu$...

  13. Pixel-based meshfree modelling of skeletal muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Basava, Ramya Rao; Zhang, Yantao; Csapo, Robert; Malis, Vadim; Sinha, Usha; Hodgson, John; Sinha, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the meshfree Reproducing Kernel Particle Method (RKPM) for 3D image-based modeling of skeletal muscles. This approach allows for construction of simulation model based on pixel data obtained from medical images. The material properties and muscle fiber direction obtained from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) are input at each pixel point. The reproducing kernel (RK) approximation allows a representation of material heterogeneity with smooth transition. A ...

  14. Pixel readout electronics for LHC and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanquart, L; Comes, G; Delpierre, P A; Fischer, P; Hausmann, J C; Keil, M; Lindner, Manfred; Meuser, S; Wermes, N

    2000-01-01

    The demanding requirements for pixel readout electronics for high- energy physics experiments and biomedical applications are reviewed. Some examples of the measured analog performance of prototype chips are given. The readout architectures of the PIxel readout for the ATlas experiment (PIRATE) chip suited for LHC experiments and of the multi-picture element counter (MPEC) counting chip targeted for biomedical applications are presented. First results with complete chip-sensor assemblies are also shown. (12 refs).

  15. FPIX2, the BTeV pixel readout chip

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, D C; Chiodini, G; Hoff, J; Kwan, S; Mekkaoui, A; Yarema, R; 10.1016/j.nima.2005.04.046

    2005-01-01

    A radiation tolerant pixel readout chip, FPIX2, has been developed at Fermilab for use by BTeV. Some of the requirements of the BTeV pixel readout chip are reviewed and contrasted with requirements for similar devices in LHC experiments. A description of the FPIX2 is given, and results of initial tests of its performance are presented, as is a summary of measurements planned for the coming year.

  16. New results on diamond pixel sensors using ATLAS frontend electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Markus; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; de Boer, Wim; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dulinski, W

    2003-01-01

    Diamond is a promising sensor material for future collider experiments due to its radiation hardness. Diamond pixel sensors have been bump bonded to an ATLAS pixel readout chip using PbSn solder bumps. Single chip devices have been characterised by lab measurements and in a high-energy pion beam at CERN. Results on charge collection, spatial resolution, efficiency and the charge carrier lifetime are presented.

  17. Characterisation of Hybrid Pixel Detectors with capacitive charge division

    CERN Document Server

    Caccia, M; Battaglia, Marco; Kucewicz, W; Palka, H; Zalewska-Bak, A; Domanski, K; Marczewski, J; Tomaszewski, D

    2001-01-01

    In order to fully exploit the physics potential of the future high energy e+ e- linear collider, a Vertex Tracker providing high resolution track reconstruction is required. Hybrid pixel sensors are an attractive technology due to their fast read-out capabilities and radiation hardness. A novel pixel detector layout with interleaved cells between the readout nodes has been developed to improve the single point resolution. The results of the characterisation of the first processed prototypes are reported.

  18. A silicon pixel detector prototype for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Vicente Barreto Pinto, Mateus

    2017-01-01

    A silicon pixel detector prototype for CLIC, currently under study for the innermost detector surrounding the collision point. The detector is made of a High-Voltage CMOS sensor (top) and a CLICpix2 readout chip (bottom) that are glued to each other. Both parts have a size of 3.3 x 4.0 $mm^2$ and consist of an array of 128 x 128 pixels of 25 x 25 $\\micro m^2$ size.

  19. Adaptive pixel/patch-based synthesis for texture compression

    OpenAIRE

    Racapé, Fabien; Lefort, Simon; Francois, Edouard; Babel, Marie; Déforges, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents an adaptive scheme for synthesizing missing textured regions. In synthesis-based compression approaches, large textures are removed at encoder side and filled in at decoder side. This work proposes a synthesizer in which both complementary pixel-based and patch-based approaches are used. According to results shown by synthesis algorithms, patch-based and pixel-based approaches are efficient with different kinds of texture. Two algorithms are adapted...

  20. Pixels Intensity Evolution to Describe the Plastic Films Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Briñez-De León

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes an approach for mechanical behavior description in the plastic film deformation using techniques for the images analysis, which are based on the intensities evolution of fixed pixels applied to an images sequence acquired through polarizing optical assembly implemented around the platform of the plastic film deformation. The pixels intensities evolution graphs, and mechanical behavior graphic of the deformation has dynamic behaviors zones which could be associated together.

  1. Leakage current measurements on pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, B.; Blondel, C.; Daly, F.; Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of the R&D of a new generation hard X-ray cameras for space applications we focus on the use of pixelated CdTe or CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. They are covered with 64 (0.9×0.9 mm2) or 256 (0.5×0.5 mm2) pixels, surrounded by a guard ring and operate in the energy ranging from several

  2. Volumetric Diffuse Optical Tomography for Small Animals Using a CCD-Camera-Based Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Jing Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D volumetric diffuse optical tomography for small animal imaging by using a CCD-camera-based imaging system with a newly developed depth compensation algorithm (DCA. Our computer simulations and laboratory phantom studies have demonstrated that the combination of a CCD camera and DCA can significantly improve the accuracy in depth localization and lead to reconstruction of 3D volumetric images. This approach may present great interests for noninvasive 3D localization of an anomaly hidden in tissue, such as a tumor or a stroke lesion, for preclinical small animal models.

  3. PROCESSING METHOD EFFECT ON SUN DIAMETER MEASUREMENT WITH CCD SOLAR ASTROLABE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafer, Djelloul [Unite de Recherche Appliquee en Energies Renouvelables, BP 88, Ghardaiea (Algeria); Irbah, Abdenour, E-mail: djdjafer@gmail.com, E-mail: abdenour.irbah@latmos.ipsl.fr [Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), CNRS UMR8190, Universite Paris VI, Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines INSU, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2012-05-01

    Photometric Sun diameter measurement is based on the calculation of the inflection point of the solar limb. In ground measurement, this point is located at a position on the solar limb where the signal-to-noise ratio is very high, which necessitates the appropriate filtering techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving its position. In this paper, we compare the filtering method currently in use to process the CCD solar astrolabe data, the FFTD method widely used, with a different method that we propose. Using the acquired data from the CCD astrolabe at Calern, France during 1997, we can obtain a mean difference of 130 mas in the measured radii.

  4. Processing Method Effect on Sun Diameter Measurement with CCD Solar Astrolabe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafer, Djelloul; Irbah, Abdenour

    2012-05-01

    Photometric Sun diameter measurement is based on the calculation of the inflection point of the solar limb. In ground measurement, this point is located at a position on the solar limb where the signal-to-noise ratio is very high, which necessitates the appropriate filtering techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving its position. In this paper, we compare the filtering method currently in use to process the CCD solar astrolabe data, the FFTD method widely used, with a different method that we propose. Using the acquired data from the CCD astrolabe at Calern, France during 1997, we can obtain a mean difference of 130 mas in the measured radii.

  5. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito E-mail: matsu3@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-21

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  6. Construction of a photochemical reactor combining a CCD spectrophotometer and a LED radiation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombár, Melinda; Józsa, Éva; Braun, Mihály; Ősz, Katalin

    2012-10-01

    An inexpensive photoreactor using LED light sources and a fibre-optic CCD spectrophotometer as a detector was built by designing a special cell holder for standard 1.000 cm cuvettes. The use of this device was demonstrated by studying the aqueous photochemical reaction of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone. The developed method combines the highly quantitative data collection of CCD spectrophotometers with the possibility of illuminating the sample independently of the detecting light beam, which is a substantial improvement of the method using diode array spectrophotometers as photoreactors.

  7. Active pixel sensor having intra-pixel charge transfer with analog-to-digital converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra K. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Zhou, Zhimin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node and an analog-to-digital converter formed in the substrate connected to the output of the readout circuit.

  8. Imaging by photon counting with 256 x 256 pixel matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, Lukas; Heijne, Erik H M; Llopart-Cudie, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Using 0.25 mum standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256 multiplied by 256 square 55mum pixels intended for X- ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise similar to 150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3 multiplied by 10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13- bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of similar to 300 mus could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to t...

  9. SU-F-BRA-16: Development of a Radiation Monitoring Device Using a Low-Cost CCD Camera Following Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, S; Fru, L Che; Desai, V; Lentz, J; Lin, C; Scarpelli, M; Simiele, E; Trestrail, A; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is now commonplace to handle treatments of hyperthyroidism using iodine-131 as an outpatient procedure due to lower costs and less stringent federal regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has currently updated release guidelines for these procedures, but there is still a large uncertainty in the dose to the public. Current guidelines to minimize dose to the public require patients to remain isolated after treatment. The purpose of this study was to use a low-cost common device, such as a cell phone, to estimate exposure emitted from a patient to the general public. Methods: Measurements were performed using an Apple iPhone 3GS and a Cs-137 irradiator. The charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on the phone was irradiated to exposure rates ranging from 0.1 mR/hr to 100 mR/hr and 30-sec videos were taken during irradiation with the camera lens covered by electrical tape. Interactions were detected as white pixels on a black background in each video. Both single threshold (ST) and colony counting (CC) methods were performed using MATLAB®. Calibration curves were determined by comparing the total pixel intensity output from each method to the known exposure rate. Results: The calibration curve showed a linear relationship above 5 mR/hr for both analysis techniques. The number of events counted per unit exposure rate within the linear region was 19.5 ± 0.7 events/mR and 8.9 ± 0.4 events/mR for the ST and CC methods respectively. Conclusion: Two algorithms were developed and show a linear relationship between photons detected by a CCD camera and low exposure rates, in the range of 5 mR/hr to 100-mR/hr. Future work aims to refine this model by investigating the dose-rate and energy dependencies of the camera response. This algorithm allows for quantitative monitoring of exposure from patients treated with iodine-131 using a simple device outside of the hospital.

  10. Pixel-structured scintillators for digital x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seung Man; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a pixel-structured scintillator that would match the readout pixel array, such as a photodiode array. This combination may become an indirect-conversion detector having high x-ray sensitivity without sacrificing the inherent resolving power defined by the pixel geometry of the photodiodes, because the scintillation material has a relatively high atomic number and density compared with the photoconductors, and the pixel-structured design may provide a band-limited modulation-transfer function (MTF) characteristic even with a thicker scintillator. For the realization of pixel-structured scintillators, two-dimensional (2D) array of pixel-structured wells with a depth of 100μm was prepared by using a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process on a silicon wafer. Then, Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor powders with organic binders were filled within the well array by using a sedimentation method. Three different pixel designs of 50, 100 and 200 μm with a wall (or septum) thickness of 10 μm were considered. Each sample size was 20 × 30 mm2 considering intra-oral imaging. The samples were coupled to the CMOS photodiode array with a pixel pitch of 48 μm and the imaging performances were evaluated in terms of MTF, NPS (noise-power spectrum) and DQE (detective quantum efficiency) at intra-oral imaging conditions. From the measurement results, the sensitivities of the samples with 50, 100 and 200 μm pitch designs were about 12, 25 and 41% of that of the reference commercial phosphor screen (MinR-2000). Hence the DQE performances at 0.2 lp/mm were about 3.7, 9.6, 22.7% of the reference screen. According to the Monte Carlo simulations, the lower sensitivity was due to the loss of optical photons in silicon walls. However, the MTF performance was mainly determined by the designed pixel apertures. If we make pixel-structured scintillators with a deeper depth and provide reflectance on walls, much enhanced DQE performance is expected.

  11. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John; Kamhawi, Hani; Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort to mature an iodine propulsion system while reducing risk and increasing fidelity of a technology demonstration mission concept. 1 The FY 2014 tasks include investments leveraged throughout NASA, from multiple mission directorates, as a partnership with NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Technology Investment Project, and an Air Force partnership. Propulsion technology is often a critical enabling technology for space missions. NASA is investing in technologies to enable high value missions with very small and low-cost spacecraft, even CubeSats. However, these small spacecraft currently lack any appreciable propulsion capability. CubeSats are typically deployed and drift without any ability to transfer to higher value orbits, perform orbit maintenance, or deorbit. However, the iodine Hall system can allow the spacecraft to transfer into a higher value science orbit. The iodine satellite (iSAT) will be able to achieve a (Delta)V of >500 m/s with 1,300 s. The iSAT spacecraft, illustrated in figure 1, is currently a 12U CubeSat. The spacecraft chassis will be constructed from aluminum with a finish to prevent iodine-driven corrosion. The iSAT spacecraft includes full three-axis control using wheels, magnetic torque rods, inertial management unit, and a suite of sensors and optics. The spacecraft will leverage heat generated by spacecraft components and radiators for a passive thermal control system.

  12. PICsIT detector for gamma-ray astronomy pixels qualification campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cocco, G; Labanti, C; Malaguti, G; Pinazza, O; Rossi, E; Schiavone, F

    2002-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors coupled to coded masks are used for imaging in high energy astronomy. PICsIT is the gamma-ray position sensitive detector of the IBIS telescope to be flown onboard the INTEGRAL satellite in 2001. PICsIT detector functionalities and scientific performances as a whole are described in details elsewhere in this Conference (Labanti et al. (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, this conference)). In this work, we present the aim, methodology, and results of the tests and calibrations performed on the first qualification lot of 136 PICsIT pixels carried out at SCIONIX laboratories in The Netherlands, in April 1999. Before being accepted for PICsIT, each detection unit has in fact to be fully characterized in terms of energy resolution and lower energy threshold. The principal aim of PICsIT pixel qualification campaign described in this work has been to measure the key parameters of each CsI(Tl)+photodiode detection unit: CsI(Tl) crystals light output, gain variation with temperature, energy resolut...

  13. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  14. Exploiting Satellite Focal Plane Geometry for Automatic Extraction of Traffic Flow from Single Optical Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, T.

    2014-11-01

    The focal plane assembly of most pushbroom scanner satellites is built up in a way that different multispectral or multispectral and panchromatic bands are not all acquired exactly at the same time. This effect is due to offsets of some millimeters of the CCD-lines in the focal plane. Exploiting this special configuration allows the detection of objects moving during this small time span. In this paper we present a method for automatic detection and extraction of moving objects - mainly traffic - from single very high resolution optical satellite imagery of different sensors. The sensors investigated are WorldView-2, RapidEye, Pléiades and also the new SkyBox satellites. Different sensors require different approaches for detecting moving objects. Since the objects are mapped on different positions only in different spectral bands also the change of spectral properties have to be taken into account. In case the main distance in the focal plane is between the multispectral and the panchromatic CCD-line like for Pléiades an approach for weighted integration to receive mostly identical images is investigated. Other approaches for RapidEye and WorldView-2 are also shown. From these intermediate bands difference images are calculated and a method for detecting the moving objects from these difference images is proposed. Based on these presented methods images from different sensors are processed and the results are assessed for detection quality - how many moving objects can be detected, how many are missed - and accuracy - how accurate is the derived speed and size of the objects. Finally the results are discussed and an outlook for possible improvements towards operational processing is presented.

  15. CMOS in-pixel optical pulse frequency modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Nicolaas E.; du Plessis, M.; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the design of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) pixel readout circuit with a built-in frequency conversion feature. The pixel contains a CMOS photo sensor along with all signal-to-frequency conversion circuitry. An 8×8 array of these pixels is also designed. Current imaging arrays often use analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and digital signal processing (DSP) techniques that are off-chip1. The frequency modulation technique investigated in this paper is preferred over other ADC techniques due to its smaller size, and the possibility of a higher dynamic range. Careful considerations are made regarding the size of the components of the pixel, as various characteristics of CMOS devices are limited by decreasing the scale of the components2. The methodology used was the CMOS design cycle for integrated circuit design. All components of the pixel were designed from first principles to meet necessary requirements of a small pixel size (30×30 μm2) and an output resolution greater than that of an 8-bit ADC. For the photodetector, an n+-p+/p-substrate diode was designed with a parasitic capacitance of 3 fF. The analog front-end stage was designed around a Schmitt trigger circuit. The photo current is integrated on an integration capacitor of 200 fF, which is reset when the Schmitt trigger output voltage exceeds a preset threshold. The circuit schematic and layout were designed using Cadence Virtuoso and the process used was the AMS CMOS 350 nm process using a power supply of 5V. The simulation results were confirmed to comply with specifications, and the layout passed all verification checks. The dynamic range achieved is 58.828 dB per pixel, with the output frequencies ranging from 12.341kHz to 10.783 MHz. It is also confirmed that the output frequency has a linear relationship to the photocurrent generated by the photodiode.

  16. CCD Astrometric Measurements and Historical Data Summary of WDS 12182-4251

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Anushree; Boyce, Grady

    2018-01-01

    Precise astrometric coordinates, separation, and position angle of proposed binary system WDS 12182-4251 (DAM 1244) were determined from CCD (charge-coupled device) imaging analysis. The measurements acquired largely align with previously collected data available through databases such as the Washington Double Star (WDS) Catalog. Additionally, the historical data and other information available on this system have been gathered and examined.

  17. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; van Luijk, P.

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modem radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd2O2S:Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and

  18. Subpixel translation of MEMS measured by discrete fourier transform analysis of CCD images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamahata, C.; Sarajlic, Edin; Stranczl, M.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Gijs, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a straightforward method for measuring in-plane linear displacements of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with subnanometer resolution. The technique is based on Fourier transform analysis of a video recorded with a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera attached to an optical microscope

  19. A graph reader using a CCD image sensor | Seeti | Nigerian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Physics. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 20, No 1 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. A graph reader using a CCD image sensor. ML Seeti. Abstract. No Abstract.

  20. Bifunctional lacZ alpha-ccdB genes for selective cloning of PCR products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabant, P; Drèze, P L; Van Reeth, T; Szpirer, J; Szpirer, C

    1997-11-01

    The use of PCR-amplified DNA-fragments is a classical approach to generate recombinant DNA. To facilitate the cloning of PCR products, we have constructed two new pKIL vectors that allow selection of recombinants. The multiple cloning sites (MCS) of these plasmids contain two adjacent Aspel sites and a unique HindII site. Cleavage of these vectors with Aspel produce linearized molecules with a single thymidine nucleotide at the 3' ends allowing TA cloning of Taq-amplified fragments. On the other hand, cleavage with HindII can be used for the cloning of blunt-ended PCR products generated by other DNA polymerases. The LacZ alpha-CcdB fusion protein produced by these plasmids has retained both the CcdB killer activity and the ability to alpha-complement the truncated LacZ delta M15. This bifunctionality allowed us to show that small PCR products (< 1000 bp) that do not disrupt lacZ alpha efficiently do inactivate CcdB, which demonstrates that the CcdB-based selection is well adapted for cloning of PCR products, especially for small size fragments.

  1. On the use of CCD area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenter, P; Catalano, J G; Park, C; Zhang, Z

    2006-07-01

    The use and application of charge coupled device (CCD) area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity is discussed. Direct comparison of high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity data measured with CCD area detectors and traditional X-ray scintillator ('point') detectors demonstrates that the use of CCD detectors leads to a substantial (approximately 30-fold) reduction in data acquisition rates because of the elimination of the need to scan the sample to distinguish signal from background. The angular resolution with a CCD detector is also improved by a factor of approximately 3. The ability to probe the large dynamic range inherent to high-resolution X-ray reflectivity data in the specular reflection geometry was demonstrated with measurements of the orthoclase (001)- and alpha-Al2O3 (012)-water interfaces, with measured reflectivity signals varying by a factor of approximately 10(6) without the use of any beam attenuators. Statistical errors in the reflectivity signal are also derived and directly compared with the repeatability of the measurements.

  2. Construction of a shortwave near-infrared spectrofluorometer with diode laser source and CCD detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silzel, John W.; Obremski, Robert J.

    1993-05-01

    Spectrofluorometers employing xenon arc lamp excitation and photomultiplier tube detectors afford sensitivity over the UV/VIS spectral region for which these instruments were designed, but suffer sensitivity limitations in the short-wave near infrared (NIR) region (800 - 1000 nm) because of their limited source energy and low detector quantum efficiency. To achieve high sensitivity in the NIR region, a 30 mW diode laser source, an imaging spectrograph, and a cryogenically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) have been combined in a spectrofluorometer specifically designed for use in the NIR region. The diode laser source incorporates integral source filters, optics, and a beam trap, and utilizes a vertical beam geometry which provides an illuminated volume oriented conveniently for the imaging of fluorescence emissions on the entrance slit of the spectrograph. Data is presented which demonstrates that the temporal and spectral stability of the source is equal or superior to that of an arc lamp for solution-phase fluorometry. In addition to spectral information, the CCD detector provides spatial resolution of fluorescence emissions along the vertical path of the excitation beam. An absolute photometric calibration of the CCD detector, and measurement of its read noise, fixed pattern noise, and linear dynamic range is performed using the photon transfer technique of Janesick, et al. Improvement in the instrument performance by more than six decades is demonstrated by measured LOD of NIR dyes using a commercial SLM 4800 instrument and the new diode laser/CCD arrangement. Origin of the present detection limits is discussed.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 6819 CCD UBV photometry (Ak+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, T.; Bostanci, Z. F.; Yontan, T.; Bilir, S.; Guver, T.; Ak, S.; Urgup, H.; Paunzen, E.

    2016-11-01

    CCD UBVRI images of the open cluster NGC 6819 and standard stars selected from Landolt (2009, Cat. J/AJ/137/4186) were acquired on 2015 May 18 using a 1-m Ritchey-Chretien telescope (T100) located at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Bakirlitepe, Antalya/Turkey. (1 data file).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 225 CCD UBV photometry (Bilir+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilir, S.; Bostanci, Z. F.; Yontan, T.; Guver, T.; Bakis, V.; Ak, T.; Ak, S.; Paunzen, E.; Eker, Z.

    2016-11-01

    CCD UBVRI images of the open cluster NGC 225 and standard stars selected from Landolt (2009, Cat. J/AJ/137/4186) were acquired on 2012 July 18 using a 1-m Ritchey-Chretien telescope (T100) located at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Bakirlitepe, Antalya/Turkey. (1 data file).

  5. 3D morphology reconstruction using linear array CCD binocular stereo vision imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu; Wang, Jinjiang

    2018-01-01

    Binocular vision imaging system, which has a small field of view, cannot reconstruct the 3-D shape of the dynamic object. We found a linear array CCD binocular vision imaging system, which uses different calibration and reconstruct methods. On the basis of the binocular vision imaging system, the linear array CCD binocular vision imaging systems which has a wider field of view can reconstruct the 3-D morphology of objects in continuous motion, and the results are accurate. This research mainly introduces the composition and principle of linear array CCD binocular vision imaging system, including the calibration, capture, matching and reconstruction of the imaging system. The system consists of two linear array cameras which were placed in special arrangements and a horizontal moving platform that can pick up objects. The internal and external parameters of the camera are obtained by calibrating in advance. And then using the camera to capture images of moving objects, the results are then matched and 3-D reconstructed. The linear array CCD binocular vision imaging systems can accurately measure the 3-D appearance of moving objects, this essay is of great significance to measure the 3-D morphology of moving objects.

  6. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.; Rieger, B.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Koster, A.J.; Ravelli, R.B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal

  7. A comparative study on the observation of spontaneous nystagmus with Frenzel glasses and an infrared CCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Shunkichi; Fukumoto, Akiko; Aoyagi, Mio; Koizumi, Yasuo; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Yagi, Toshiaki

    2004-02-01

    To compare the usefulness of a CCD camera with infrared illumination (IR-CCD camera) over Frenzel glasses (F Glasses) for the observation of spontaneous nystagmus, the incidence and direction of nystagmus, and the frequency, amplitude and slow phase of spontaneous nystagmus. One hundred vertiginous patients, fifty-three females and forty-seven males participated in this study. Before undergoing routine neurotological examination, their eye movements were recorded by electronystagmogram (ENG) in conjunction with observations of eye movements under F glasses and through an IR-CCD camera. The data was collected from patients who exhibited spontaneous nystagmus either under F glasses or the IR-CCD camera. Thirty-three patients showed spontaneous nystagmus under F glasses. On the other hand, under the IR-CCD camera, all patients examined exhibited spontaneous nystagmus. The frequency of nystagmus was not significantly different between these two systems. However, the amplitude and slow phase velocity exhibited significantly larger values under the IR-CCD camera in patients with spontaneous nystagmus both under the IR-CCD camera and F glasses. From these observations and evidence, the IR-CCD camera can be recommended as a more useful system and powerful tool for neurotological examination than F glasses.

  8. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  9. Precision of natural satellite ephemerides from observations of different types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, N. V.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, various types of observations of natural planetary satellites are used to refine their ephemerides. A new type of measurement - determining the instants of apparent satellite encounters - has recently been proposed by Morgado and co-workers. The problem that arises is which type of measurement to choose in order to obtain an ephemeris precision that is as high as possible. The answer can be obtained only by modelling the entire process: observations, obtaining the measured values, refining the satellite motion parameters, and generating the ephemeris. The explicit dependence of the ephemeris precision on observational accuracy as well as on the type of observations is unknown. In this paper, such a dependence is investigated using the Monte Carlo statistical method. The relationship between the ephemeris precision for different types of observations is then assessed. The possibility of using the instants of apparent satellite encounters to obtain an ephemeris is investigated. A method is proposed that can be used to fit the satellite orbital parameters to this type of measurement. It is shown that, in the absence of systematic scale errors in the CCD frame, the use of the instants of apparent encounters leads to less precise ephemerides. However, in the presence of significant scale errors, which is often the case, this type of measurement becomes effective because the instants of apparent satellite encounters do not depend on scale errors.

  10. Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Winter Crops at Sub-Pixel Level Using AVHRR NDVI Time Series and Neural Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rembold

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For large areas, it is difficult to assess the spatial distribution and inter-annual variation of crop acreages through field surveys. Such information, however, is of great value for governments, land managers, planning authorities, commodity traders and environmental scientists. Time series of coarse resolution imagery offer the advantage of global coverage at low costs, and are therefore suitable for large-scale crop type mapping. Due to their coarse spatial resolution, however, the problem of mixed pixels has to be addressed. Traditional hard classification approaches cannot be applied because of sub-pixel heterogeneity. We evaluate neural networks as a modeling tool for sub-pixel crop acreage estimation. The proposed methodology is based on the assumption that different cover type proportions within coarse pixels prompt changes in time profiles of remotely sensed vegetation indices like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI. Neural networks can learn the relation between temporal NDVI signatures and the sought crop acreage information. This learning step permits a non-linear unmixing of the temporal information provided by coarse resolution satellite sensors. For assessing the feasibility and accuracy of the approach, a study region in central Italy (Tuscany was selected. The task consisted of mapping the spatial distribution of winter crops abundances within 1 km AVHRR pixels between 1988 and 2001. Reference crop acreage information for network training and validation was derived from high resolution Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper (TM/ETM+ images and official agricultural statistics. Encouraging results were obtained demonstrating the potential of the proposed approach. For example, the spatial distribution of winter crop acreage at sub-pixel level was mapped with a cross-validated coefficient of determination of 0.8 with respect to the reference information from high resolution imagery. For the eight years for which

  11. Development of a CCD-based pyrometer for surface temperature measurement of casting billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Lang, Xianli; Hu, Zhenwei; Shu, Shuangbao

    2017-06-01

    In order to achieve high accuracy and good stability of temperature measurement results, an online vision-based temperature field measurement system for continuous casting billets is developed instead of the conventional single-point radiation pyrometer in this paper. This system is a hybrid temperature measurement system which consists of a monochrome array CCD camera with high resolution and a single spot colorimetric thermometer simultaneously. In this system, a narrow-band spectrum radiation temperature measurement model is established for the optical CCD-based pyrometer system, and the non-uniformity of the temperature field measurement due to the inter-element sensitivity deviations of the CCD-array detector and photometric distortion caused by the vignetting in the optical system is analyzed in detail and compensated. Furthermore, in order to eliminate the temperature fluctuation caused by the stripped iron oxide scale on billets, a temperature field reconstruction approach, which took full advantage of the high resolution characteristic of CCD and the distribution character of the surface temperature field of billets, is introduced in this system. Meanwhile, based on the narrow band spectral thermometry theory, the spot temperature measured by the colorimetric thermometer is used to correct the temperature field measured by the CCD camera on-line so as to reduce the temperature measurement error caused by the inconclusive absolute emissivity of different grades of steel and the interference of industrial dust. Currently, the system has been successfully applied and verified in some continuous casting production lines. Industrial trials indicate that the system could effectively eliminate false temperature variation caused by striped iron oxide scale and provide information about changes of processing parameters in the continuous casting production line in real time.

  12. [A quickly atmospheric correction method for HJ-1 CCD with deep blue algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Ting; Wang, Hong-Mei; Li, Qing; Zhao, Shao-Hua; Li, Shen-Shen; Chen, Liang-Fu

    2014-03-01

    In the present, for the characteristic of HJ-1 CCD camera, after receiving aerosol optical depth (AOD) from deep blue algorithm which was developed by Hsu et al. assisted by MODerate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance database, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) correction with Kernel-Driven Model, and the calculation of viewing geometry with auxiliary data, a new atmospheric correction method of HJ-1 CCD was developed which can be used over vegetation, soil and so on. And, when the CCD data is processed to correct atmospheric influence, with look up table (LUT) and bilinear interpolation, atmospheric correction of HJ-1 CCD is completed quickly by grid calculation of atmospheric parameters and matrix operations of interface define language (IDL). The experiment over China North Plain on July 3rd, 2012 shows that by our method, the atmospheric influence was corrected well and quickly (one CCD image of 1 GB can be corrected in eight minutes), and the reflectance after correction over vegetation and soil was close to the spectrum of vegetation and soil. The comparison with MODIS reflectance product shows that for the advantage of high resolution, the corrected reflectance image of HJ-1 is finer than that of MODIS, and the correlation coefficient of the reflectance over typical surface is greater than 0.9. Error analysis shows that the recognition error of aerosol type leads to 0. 05 absolute error of surface reflectance in near infrared band, which is larger than that in visual bands, and the 0. 02 error of reflectance database leads to 0.01 absolute error of surface reflectance of atmospheric correction in green and red bands.

  13. HiPERCAM: a high-speed quintuple-beam CCD camera for the study of rapid variability in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Vikram S.; Marsh, Thomas R.; Bezawada, Naidu; Black, Martin; Dixon, Simon; Gamble, Trevor; Henry, David; Kerry, Paul; Littlefair, Stuart; Lunney, David W.; Morris, Timothy; Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard W.

    2016-08-01

    HiPERCAM is a high-speed camera for the study of rapid variability in the Universe. The project is funded by a ɛ3.5M European Research Council Advanced Grant. HiPERCAM builds on the success of our previous instrument, ULTRACAM, with very significant improvements in performance thanks to the use of the latest technologies. HiPERCAM will use 4 dichroic beamsplitters to image simultaneously in 5 optical channels covering the u'g'r'I'z' bands. Frame rates of over 1000 per second will be achievable using an ESO CCD controller (NGC), with every frame GPS timestamped. The detectors are custom-made, frame-transfer CCDs from e2v, with 4 low noise (2.5e-) outputs, mounted in small thermoelectrically-cooled heads operated at 180 K, resulting in virtually no dark current. The two reddest CCDs will be deep-depletion devices with anti-etaloning, providing high quantum efficiencies across the red part of the spectrum with no fringing. The instrument will also incorporate scintillation noise correction via the conjugate-plane photometry technique. The opto-mechanical chassis will make use of additive manufacturing techniques in metal to make a light-weight, rigid and temperature-invariant structure. First light is expected on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma in 2017 (on which the field of view will be 10' with a 0.3"/pixel scale), with subsequent use planned on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias on La Palma (on which the field of view will be 4' with a 0.11"/pixel scale) and the 3.5m New Technology Telescope in Chile.

  14. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pixel-By Estimation of Scene Motion in Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashlinskii, A. G.; Smirnov, P. V.; Tsaryov, M. G.

    2017-05-01

    The paper considers the effectiveness of motion estimation in video using pixel-by-pixel recurrent algorithms. The algorithms use stochastic gradient decent to find inter-frame shifts of all pixels of a frame. These vectors form shift vectors' field. As estimated parameters of the vectors the paper studies their projections and polar parameters. It considers two methods for estimating shift vectors' field. The first method uses stochastic gradient descent algorithm to sequentially process all nodes of the image row-by-row. It processes each row bidirectionally i.e. from the left to the right and from the right to the left. Subsequent joint processing of the results allows compensating inertia of the recursive estimation. The second method uses correlation between rows to increase processing efficiency. It processes rows one after the other with the change in direction after each row and uses obtained values to form resulting estimate. The paper studies two criteria of its formation: gradient estimation minimum and correlation coefficient maximum. The paper gives examples of experimental results of pixel-by-pixel estimation for a video with a moving object and estimation of a moving object trajectory using shift vectors' field.

  16. Feasibility of microminiature satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryouichi

    1991-07-01

    A conceptual study is conducted on technical problems and system design techniques to accomplish higher performance microminiature satellites by smaller systems. Applications of microminiature satellite technology to practical satellite mission are mentioned. Concepts of microminiature satellites, measures to miniaturize satellites, and micro-miniaturization technologies for communication and data processing, electric solar power paddle, attitude and orbit control, structure, thermal control, propulsion, and instrumentation systems are outlined. Examples of miniaturizing satellite missions such as planet exploration, low-altitude communication networks, space positioning system, low-altitude earth observation mission, clustered satellites, tethered satellites, and timely observation are described. Satellite miniaturizing technology can also be used to launch systems by lasers, and superconductive linear catapults (space escalator). It is pointed out that keys to promote satellite miniaturization are electronics, precision machining, raw material, electric power source technologies, and system design technology to integrate those technologies.

  17. Submesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Variability from UAV and Satellite Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L. Castro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies of spatial variability in sea surface temperature (SST using ship-based radiometric data suggested that variability at scales smaller than 1 km is significant and affects the perceived uncertainty of satellite-derived SSTs. Here, we compare data from the Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST thermal infrared radiometer flown over the Arctic Ocean against coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS measurements to assess the spatial variability of skin SSTs within 1-km pixels. By taking the standard deviation, σ, of the BESST measurements within individual MODIS pixels, we show that significant spatial variability of the skin temperature exists. The distribution of the surface variability measured by BESST shows a peak value of O(0.1 K, with 95% of the pixels showing σ < 0.45 K. Significantly, high-variability pixels are located at density fronts in the marginal ice zone, which are a primary source of submesoscale intermittency near the surface. SST wavenumber spectra indicate a spectral slope of −2, which is consistent with the presence of submesoscale processes at the ocean surface. Furthermore, the BESST wavenumber spectra not only match the energy distribution of MODIS SST spectra at the satellite-resolved wavelengths, they also span the spectral slope of −2 by ~3 decades, from wavelengths of 8 km to <0.08 km.

  18. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  19. Digital Power Consumption Estimations for CHIPIX65 Pixel Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotulli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    New hybrid pixel detectors with improved resolution capable of dealing with hit rates up to 3 GHz/cm2 will be required for future High Energy Physics experiments in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Given this, the RD53 collaboration works on the design of the next generation pixel readout chip needed for both the ATLAS and CMS detector phase 2 pixel upgrades. For the RD53 demonstrator chip in 65nm CMOS technology, different architectures are considered. In particular the purpose of this work is estimating the power consumption of the digital architecture of the readout ASIC developed by CHIPIX65 project of the INFN National Scientific Committee. This has been done with modern chip design tools integrated with the VEPIX53 simulation framework that has been developed within the RD53 collaboration in order to assess the performance of the system in very high rate, high energy physics experiments.

  20. Angular resolution of the gaseous micro-pixel detector Gossip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilevych, Y.; Blanco Carballo, V.; Dijk, M. van; Fransen, M.; Graaf, H. van der; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.; Koppert, W.; Nauta, S. [Nikhef, P.O. Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rogers, M. [Radboud University, P.O. Box 9102, 6500HC Nijmegen (Netherlands); Romaniouk, A.; Veenhof, R. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Gossip is a gaseous micro-pixel detector with a very thin drift gap intended for a high rate environment like at the pixel layers of ATLAS at the sLHC. The detector outputs not only the crossing point of a traversing MIP, but also the angle of the track, thus greatly simplifying track reconstruction. In this paper we describe a testbeam experiment to examine the angular resolution of the reconstructed track segments in Gossip. We used here the low diffusion gas mixture DME/CO{sub 2} 50/50. An angular resolution of 20 mrad for perpendicular tracks could be obtained from a 1.5 mm thin drift volume. However, for the prototype detector used at the testbeam experiment, the resolution of slanting tracks was worsened by poor time resolution of the pixel chip used.

  1. Angular resolution of the gaseous micro-pixel detector Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilevych, Y.; Blanco Carballo, V.; van Dijk, M.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.; Koppert, W.; Nauta, S.; Rogers, M.; Romaniouk, A.; Veenhof, R.

    2011-06-01

    Gossip is a gaseous micro-pixel detector with a very thin drift gap intended for a high rate environment like at the pixel layers of ATLAS at the sLHC. The detector outputs not only the crossing point of a traversing MIP, but also the angle of the track, thus greatly simplifying track reconstruction. In this paper we describe a testbeam experiment to examine the angular resolution of the reconstructed track segments in Gossip. We used here the low diffusion gas mixture DME/CO 2 50/50. An angular resolution of 20 mrad for perpendicular tracks could be obtained from a 1.5 mm thin drift volume. However, for the prototype detector used at the testbeam experiment, the resolution of slanting tracks was worsened by poor time resolution of the pixel chip used.

  2. The Phase-1 upgrade of the CMS silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Menichelli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The present CMS pixel detector will be replaced in the shutdown period 2016/17 by an upgraded version due to the following reasons: increased luminosity at reduced bunch spacing ( from 7 x 10 33 cm - 2 s - 1 at 50 ns bunch spacing to 2 x 10 34 cm - 2 s - 1 at 25 ns bunch spacing) in the LHC , and radiation damage effects that will significantly degrade the present detector. The new upgraded detector will have higher tracking efficiency and lower mass with four barrel layer and three forward/backward disks to provide higher hit pixel coverage out to pseudorapidities of ±2.5. In this paper we will describe the new pixel detector focus ing mostly on the barrel detector design, construction and expected performances

  3. Virus based Full Colour Pixels using a Microheater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Kyujung; Ha, Sung-Hun; Song, Hyerin; Yu, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Chuntae; Kim, Jong-Man; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Mimicking natural structures has been received considerable attentions, and there have been a few practical advances. Tremendous efforts based on a self-assembly technique have been contributed to the development of the novel photonic structures which are mimicking nature’s inventions. We emulate the photonic structures from an origin of colour generation of mammalian skins and avian skin/feathers using M13 phage. The structures can be generated a full range of RGB colours that can be sensitively switched by temperature and substrate materials. Consequently, we developed an M13 phage-based temperature-dependent actively controllable colour pixels platform on a microheater chip. Given the simplicity of the fabrication process, the low voltage requirements and cycling stability, the virus colour pixels enable us to substitute for conventional colour pixels for the development of various implantable, wearable and flexible devices in future.

  4. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  5. The Pixel-similarity Measurement in SAR Image Despeckling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Guang-ting

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pixel Relativity (PR measurement of SAR image, which is the key of the despeckling techniques based on weighted average, is researched in three aspects. Firstly, the rationality of ratio PR model is expounded, and two new ratio PR models, which are the LOG-domain Gaussian model and the pixel similarity probability model, are proposed. Meanwhile, the Probability Density Function (PDF of SAR image and the PDF of the ratio between pixels are transformed into ratio PR models. Then, in order to evaluate the four ratio PR models, the weighted maximum likelihood filters are designed using the PR. Finally, a novel method, performed by calibrating the maximum location of the PR model, is introduced to improve the radiation preservation of those models whose maximum do not locate at 1. The effectiveness of the two proposed PR models and the approach to calibrate the maximum location of the PR model, are indicated by the theoretical analysis and experimental comparison.

  6. Serial powering for the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, Marlon; Gonella, Laura; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut, Univ. Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A serial powering scheme is proposed for the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel detector at the High Luminosity (HL-)LHC, to provide an efficient and low material power distribution. The main regulation element is the Shunt-LDO regulator, a new regulator concept designed to meet the requirements of serially powered detector systems. The Shunt-LDO working principle was successfully demonstrated with two prototypes, and two Shunt-LDO regulators are integrated in the new ATLAS pixel FE (Front-End) chip, the FE-I4. Results of the characterization of the regulators in FE-I4 are shown, and the chip performance is compared for different powering options, with and without regulators. At the same time a serial powering demonstrator is being developed. This will include a chain of four 2-chips pixel modules, AC-coupled data transmission, dedicated HV distribution scheme, and possibly a stave protection chip. Results on the stave demonstrator are presented as well.

  7. Apodized pixel lenses in compact shadow-casting correlators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, K; Athale, R A

    1995-04-10

    We present a compact two-dimensional shadow-casting correlator that can perform correlation between inputs of size 256 × 256 and a point-spread function of size 32 × 32. A two-dimensional array of mutually incoherent sources is used to encode the point-spread function, and each source is individually steered to improve the light uniformity and the light-utilization efficiency. The geometric optics constraint requires that the shadow region be very close to the input plane. This constraint is removed by the introduction of apodized pixel lenses in the input spatial light modulator. The pixel lenses move the shadow plane to their Fourier plane, and pixel apodization reduces the interchannel cross talk, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulation and experimental results verifying these concepts are presented.

  8. Detector Modules for the CMS Pixel Phase 1 Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, De Hua; Berger, Pirmin; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Starodumov, Andrey; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Pixel phase 1 upgrade detector consists of 1184 modules with new design. An important part of the production is the module qualification and calibration, ensuring their proper functionality within the detector. This paper summarizes the qualification and calibration results of modules used in the innermost two detector layers with focus on methods using module-internal calibration signals. Extended characterizations on pixel level such as electronic noise and bump bond connectivity, optimization of operational parameters, sensor quality and thermal stress resistance were performed using a customized setup with controlled environment. It could be shown that the selected modules have on average $0.55 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\, \\pm \\, 0.01 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\,$ defective pixels and that all performance parameters stay within their specifications.

  9. Spectroscopic X-ray imaging with photon counting pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, L

    2010-01-01

    Single particle counting hybrid pixel detectors simultaneously provide low noise, high granularity and high readout speed and make it possible to build detector systems offering high spatial resolution paired with good energy resolution. A limiting factor for the spectroscopic performance of such detector systems is charge sharing between neighbouring pixels in the sensor part of the detector. The signal spectrum at the collection electrodes of the readout electronics deviates significantly from the photonic spectrum when planar segmented sensor geometries are used. The Medipix3 implements a novel, distributed signal processing architecture linking neighbouring pixels and aims at eliminating the spectral distortion produced in the sensor by charge sharing and at reducing the impact of fluorescence photons generated in the sensor itself. Preliminary results from the very first Medipix3 readouts bump bonded to 300 pm Si sensor are presented. Material reconstruction is a possible future application of spectrosco...

  10. Initial Measurements On Pixel Detector Modules For The ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Gallrapp, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated conditions in terms of peak and integrated luminosity in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will raise the ATLAS Pixel detector to its performance limits. Silicon planar, silicon 3D and diamond pixel sensors are three possible sensor technologies which could be implemented in the upcoming pixel detector upgrades of the ATLAS experiment. Measurements of the IV-behavior and measurements with radioactive Americium-241 and Strontium-90 are used to characterize the sensor properties and to understand the interaction between the ATLAS FE-I4 front-end chip and the sensor. Comparisons of results from before and after irradiation, which give a first impression on the charge collection properties of the different sensor technologies are presented.

  11. Calibration Analysis Software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The calibration of the Pixel detector fulfills two main purposes: to tune front-end registers for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel detector scans and analyses is called Calibration Console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new Front End-I4 Chips, required an update the Console architecture. It now handles scans and scans analyses applied toghether to chips with dierent characteristics. An overview of the newly developed Calibration Analysis Software will be presented, together with some preliminary result.

  12. Planar Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade: Beam Tests results

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, J

    2012-01-01

    The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

  13. Online calibrations and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 M electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. The talk will give an overview of the calibration and performance of both the detector and its optical readout. The most basic parameter to be tuned and calibrated for the detector electronics is the readout threshold of the individual pixel channels. These need to be carefully tuned to optimise position resolution a...

  14. Production accompanying testing of the ATLAS Pixel module

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067982; Klingenberg, R

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector, innermost sub-detector of the ATLAS experiment at LHC, CERN, can be sensibly tested in its entirety the first time after its installation in 2006. Because of the poor accessibility (probably once per year) of the Pixel detector and tight scheduling the replacement of damaged modules after integration as well as during operation will become a highly exposed business. Therefore and to ensure that no affected parts will be used in following production steps, it is necessary that each production step is accompanied by testing the components before assembly and make sure the operativeness afterwards. Probably 300 of about total 2000 semiconductor hybrid pixel detector modules will be build at the Universität Dortmund. Thus a production test setup has been build up and examined before starting serial production. These tests contain the characterization and inspection of the module components and the module itself under different environmental conditions and diverse operating parameters. O...

  15. Testbeam and Laboratory Characterization of CMS 3D Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Bubna, M.; Alagoz, E.; Krzywda, A.; Arndt, K.; Shipsey, I.; Bolla, G.; Hinton, N.; Kok, A.; Hansen, T.-E.; Summanwar, A.; Brom, J.M.; Boscardin, M.; Chramowicz, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Dinardo, M.; Godshalk, A.; Jones, M.; Krohn, M.D.; Kumar, A.; Lei, C.M.; Mendicino, R.; Moroni, L.; Perera, L.; Povoli, M.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Solano, A.; Obertino, M.M.; Kwan, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vigani, L.; Wagner, S.

    2014-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device in CMS, reconstructing interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The sensors located in the innermost layers of the pixel detector must be upgraded for the ten-fold increase in luminosity expected with the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) phase. As a possible replacement for planar sensors, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to its good performance after high radiation fluence. In this paper, we report on pre- and post- irradiation measurements for CMS 3D pixel sensors with different electrode configurations. The effects of irradiation on electrical properties, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution of 3D sensors are discussed. Measurements of various test structures for monitoring the fabrication process and studying the bulk and surface properties, such as MOS capacitors, planar and gate-controlled diodes are also presented.

  16. Status and new layout of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Netchaeva, P

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is based on a set of radiation-hard electronics chips able to resist a dose of 500 kGy. The implementation of these chips in the DMILL technology did not give the expected results. Re-design of the radiation-hard chips in Deep SubMicron technology is ongoing, but has implied a one and a half year delay in an already tight schedule. Major layout changes have therefore been necessary to allow installation of the ATLAS pixel detector at LHC start-up. This paper illustrates the status of the ATLAS pixel project, die motivations for the new layout, the way this should be implemented and the prototype fabrication and testing. (4 refs).

  17. The first bump-bonded pixel detectors on CVD diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Fried, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Palmieri, V G; Pan, L S; Peitz, A; Pernicka, Manfred; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Steuerer, J; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Turchetta, R; Vittone, E; Wagner, A; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Zeuner, W; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M; Charles, E; Ciocio, A; Dao, K; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Fasching, D; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Richardson, J; Sinervo, P K; Zizka, G

    1999-01-01

    Diamond is a nearly ideal material for detecting ionising radiation. Its outstanding radiation hardness, fast charge collection and low leakage current allow it to be used in high radiation environments. These characteristics make diamond sensors particularly appealing for use in the next generation of pixel detectors. Over the last year, the RD42 collaboration has worked with several groups that have developed pixel readout electronics in order to optimise diamond sensors for bump-bonding. This effort resulted in an operational diamond pixel sensor that was tested in a pion beam. We demonstrate that greater than 98565544f the channels were successfully bump-bonded and functioning. The device shows good overall hit efficiency as well as clear spatial hit correlation to tracks measured in a silicon reference telescope. A position resolution of 14.8 mu m was observed, consistent with expectations given the detector pitch. (13 refs).

  18. Monitoring of Chlorophyll in Water Reservoirs Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, A. V.; Tikhomirov, O. A.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Pakhomov, P. M.

    2017-05-01

    The statistical relationship between Landsat sensor data and the chlorophyll concentration in Ivankovo reservoir was studied. A regression relationship describing the dependence of the pixel values of satellite images on the in situ measured (using electronic spectroscopy) chlorophyll concentration in water and allowing an analysis of the spatial distribution of the reservoir chlorophyll concentration was found. The trophic status, amount of phytoplankton biomass, and primary production were estimated based on the chlorophyll concentration data.

  19. Analytical Study of Colour Spaces for Plant Pixel Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of regions of interest is an important pre-processing step in many colour image analysis procedures. Similarly, segmentation of plant objects in digital images is an important preprocessing step for effective phenotyping by image analysis. In this paper, we present results of a statistical analysis to establish the respective abilities of different colour space representations to detect plant pixels and separate them from background pixels. Our hypothesis is that the colour space representation for which the separation of the distributions representing object and background pixels is maximized is the best for the detection of plant pixels. The two pixel classes are modelled by Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs. In our statistical modelling we make no prior assumptions on the number of Gaussians employed. Instead, a constant bandwidth mean-shift filter is used to cluster the data with the number of clusters, and hence the number of Gaussians, being automatically determined. We have analysed the following representative colour spaces: R G B , r g b , H S V , Y c b c r and C I E - L a b . We have analysed the colour space features from a two-class variance ratio perspective and compared the results of our model with this metric. The dataset for our empirical study consisted of 378 digital images (and their manual segmentations of a variety of plant species: Arabidopsis, tobacco, wheat, and rye grass, imaged under different lighting conditions, in either indoor or outdoor environments, and with either controlled or uncontrolled backgrounds. We have found that the best segmentation of plants is found using H S V colour space. This is supported by measures of Earth Mover Distance (EMD of the GMM distributions of plant and background pixels.

  20. Extreme charge-trapping by pixels in Hubble's ACS/WFC detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, Jenna E.; Grogin, Norman A.; ACS Team

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the properties of sink pixels in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) detector. These pixels likely contain extra charge traps and therefore appear anomalously low in images with relatively high backgrounds. We identify sink pixels in the average short (0.5-second) dark image from each monthly anneal cycle, which, since January 2015, have been post-flashed to a background of about 60 e-. Sink pixels can affect the pixels immediately above and below them in the same column, resulting in high downstream pixels and low trails of upstream pixels. We determine typical trail lengths for sink pixels of different depths at various background levels. We create a reference image, one for each anneal cycle since January 2015, that will be used by CALACS to flag sink pixels and the adjacent affected pixels in science images.