WorldWideScience

Sample records for satanic ritual abuse

  1. Satanism, ritual abuse, and multiple personality disorder: a sociohistorical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, S

    1994-10-01

    During the past decade in North America, a growing number of mental health professionals have reported that between 25% and 50% of their patients in treatment for multiple personality disorder (MPD) have recovered early childhood traumatic memories of ritual torture, incestuous rape, sexual debauchery, sacrificial murder, infanticide, and cannibalism perpetrated by members of clandestine satanic cults. Although hundreds of local and federal police investigations have failed to corroborate patients' therapeutically constructed accounts, because the satanic etiology of MPD is logically coherent with the neodissociative, traumatic theory of psychopathology, conspiracy theory has emerged as the nucleus of a consistent pattern of contemporary clinical interpretation. Resolutely logical and thoroughly operational, ultrascientific psychodemonology remains paradoxically oblivious to its own irrational premises. When the hermetic logic of conspiracy theory is stripped away by historical and socio/psychological analysis, however, the hypothetical perpetrators of satanic ritual abuse simply disappear, leaving in their wake the very real human suffering of all those who have been caught up in the social delusion.

  2. Past-life identities, UFO abductions, and satanic ritual abuse: the social construction of memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, N P; Burgess, C A; Burgess, M F

    1994-10-01

    People sometimes fantasize entire complex scenarios and later define these experiences as memories of actual events rather than as imaginings. This article examines research associated with three such phenomena: past-life experiences, UFO alien contact and abduction, and memory reports of childhood ritual satanic abuse. In each case, elicitation of the fantasy events is frequently associated with hypnotic procedures and structured interviews which provide strong and repeated demands for the requisite experiences, and which then legitimate the experiences as "real memories." Research associated with these phenomena supports the hypothesis that recall is reconstructive and organized in terms of current expectations and beliefs.

  3. Teenagers and Satanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenberg, Alice M.

    The background of Satanism and typical Satanic activities are described. It is noted that contemporary Satanism has three forms: solitary Satanists, outlaw cults, and neo-Satanic churches. Included in a description of Satanic activities are Heavy Metal music and fantasy games, both of which are intensely interesting to teenagers. The next section…

  4. Participatory Action Research on Help-Seeking Behaviors of Self-Defined Ritual Abuse Survivors: A Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Laurie; Barron, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    The existence of ritual abuse is the subject of much debate. Ritual abuse survivor perceptions of seeking help have not been explored, and studies have yet to utilize self-defined survivors as collaborative researchers. This study addresses both issues. Participatory action research was utilized to design a survey and semistructured interview to investigate ritual abuse survivor experience of seeking help. Sixty-eight participants completed the survey, and 22 were interviewed. A group approach to thematic analysis aided validity and reliability. Participants reported experiencing disbelief and a lack of ritual abuse awareness and help from support services. In contrast, participatory action research was reported by participants as educative and emancipatory. Future research should explore the benefits of participatory action research for survivors of different forms of oppression.

  5. Dissecting Disbelief: Possible Reasons for the Denial of the Existence of Ritual Abuse in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Richardson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When allegations of ritual abuse first came to light in the UK, they were met primarily with a ‘discourse of disbelief’ that left little room for the possibility accounts could be based in genuine experience. Despite convictions, recent criminological, sociological and psychological literature appears fixed on debunking ritual abuse’s existence through highly debated concepts such as ‘false memory’. This paper proposes three broad ‘reasons’ for the creation and maintenance of disbelief around ritual abuse, highlighting the importance of key cases in shaping press coverage of the issue during the 1980s and 1990s, and the role survivor advocates have played in distancing ritual abuse from established knowledge within both psychology and child protection. I argue that the tangibility of death and abject horror within survivor accounts, as well as the perceived religious motivations of perpetrators, make ritual abuse both experientially and conceptually alien to most members of late-modern societies. 

  6. Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances in Adolescents Involved in Witchcraft and Satanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burket, Roger C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined inpatient medical records of 157 consecutive adolescent admissions to private psychiatric hospital. Ten patients with interest in witchcraft and Satanism had significantly more diagnoses of identity disorder, alcohol abuse, and hallucinogen abuse. One-half reported history of self-mutilation. Found no significant difference in criminal…

  7. Satanic Tourism: Adolescent Dabblers and Identity Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Gary Alan; Victor, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The attraction of some teenagers to Satanic symbolism, which communicates extreme pessimism, nihilism, and hopelessness, is distressing. Focusing on the trappings of teenage pseudo-Satanism is counterproductive; we should concentrate on the root causes of teenage crime--low self-esteem and poor social conditions--and not become distracted by…

  8. Satanic Tourism: Adolescent Dabblers and Identity Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Gary Alan; Victor, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The attraction of some teenagers to Satanic symbolism, which communicates extreme pessimism, nihilism, and hopelessness, is distressing. Focusing on the trappings of teenage pseudo-Satanism is counterproductive; we should concentrate on the root causes of teenage crime--low self-esteem and poor social conditions--and not become distracted by…

  9. Doing Rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGraw, John J.

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with recent developments in the cognitive sciences regarding the importance of action, ritual theory has undergone a similar revision over the last few decades. Whereas ritual was once discussed mainly in terms of symbolism and expressed meaning, now the importance of ritual action is...

  10. Discurso ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardo García Néstor Alejandro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo presenta los resultados de una investigación sobre el discurso ritual, su caracterización y la forma como se da en la comunicación que establecen los seres humanos con lo sobrenatural. Se examinan las clases de rituales y se introduce el concepto de extrañamiento, como un concepto central en la definición del discurso ritual. Se presentan así mismo algunas características observadas en la relación comunicativa entre vivos y muertos que comúnmente se conoce como brujería. Finalmente, se hace una breve mención de las lápidas y los epitafios como otro elemento constitutivo en los procesos tanatosemiológicos.

  11. Nationalizing Rituals? The Ritual Economy in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2008-01-01

    the understanding and practice of Islamic ritual. Building on fieldwork in a suburb outside Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur, this article explores this ritual economy i.e. ways in which economic processes are driven by and integrated with religious ritual. I shall show how the question of Islamic rituals...

  12. Nationalizing Rituals? The Ritual Economy in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the 1970s, the wave of Islamic revivalism in Malaysia has revitalized ritual life among many Malay Muslims. In the same period, the country has witnessed steady economic growth, an emerging Malay middle class and the formation of an Islamic state bureaucracy that attempts to transform...... the understanding and practice of Islamic ritual. Building on fieldwork in a suburb outside Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur, this article explores this ritual economy i.e. ways in which economic processes are driven by and integrated with religious ritual. I shall show how the question of Islamic rituals...

  13. Cults and Satanism: Threats to Teens. A "Bulletin" Special.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Marcia R.

    1990-01-01

    Administrators, teachers, and counselors must learn to recognize the signs of cult or Satanic-influenced youngsters. The process and effects of mind-control are unique and cannot be understood in traditional psychiatric terms or treated by traditional therapeutic methods. Schools should hold preventive cult-education programs. The International…

  14. Ritualizing and Materializing Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsholt, Tine

    2009-01-01

      This paper focuses on the possible transformation of the self in citizenship ceremonies in Western countries. It is argued that the transformation in these life defining moments is not only a question of ritual objectification or intentionality. The rituals are often experienced as emotional by....... These transformations engage a so called ‘ontological choreography' in which processes of ritual objectification and subjectification are intertwined, involving materiality, performativity, structural constraint, and the co-dependence of the performers....

  15. Lig op Satan en Satanisme vanuit die Nuwe Testament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. van Rensburg

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available In hierdie artikel word, in aansluiting by en as voorsetting van prof. Vosloo se "Lig op Satanisme vanuit die Ou Testament" ook in die Nuwe Testament lig op die Satan en Satanisme-verskynsel gesoek. Wat die aard van die inhoud van hierdie artikel betref, probeer ek doelbewus om die stof só aan te bied dat dit gemaklik tot die gemiddelde ernstige Bybelleser kommunikeer. Derhalwe is die aanpak nie akademies-wetenskaplik nie, maar populêr-wetenskaplik.

  16. Death Acceptance through Ritual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using death-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "death-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…

  17. Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basic needs like food, shelter, and love. Family violence can affect anyone. It can happen in any kind of family. Sometimes parents abuse each other, which can be hard for a child to witness. Some parents abuse their kids by using physical or verbal cruelty as a way of discipline. ...

  18. 论撒旦的本性%The Nature of Satan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛培

    2013-01-01

    Satan is the famous character in Milton’s Paradise Lost. By analyzing the author’s identity, aims of creation, com-plexity of Satan’s character and unfair behavior, this paper argues that the nature of Satan is more like a devil instead of a hero in the epic.

  19. [Double ritual murder by the Satanist cult members based on the casuistry of the Forensic Medicine Department in Katowice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowaniec, Czesław; Jałfoński, Christian; Kabiesz-Neniczka, Stanisława; Kobek, Mariusz; Rygol, Krystian

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, an increased activity of various sects, especially Satanist ones, has been observed in Poland. This is associated with an increase in the number of various crimes, including offences against life and health. The ideology of Satanism came to Poland in the early eighties of the last century, along with heavy metal music and its variants. In 1999, two cases of the murders of a 21-year-old woman and a 19-year-old man committed by Satanist cult members during their ritual mass were reported at the Forensic Medicine Department in Katowice. In the report, the authors present some issues associated with Satanism, the circumstances of these two murders and the results of medico-legal examinations of the victims.

  20. Anxiety and ritualized speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalljee, Mansur; Cook, Mark

    1975-01-01

    The experiment examines the effects on a number of words that seem irrelevant to semantic communication. The Units of Ritualized Speech (URSs) considered are: 'I mean', 'in fact', 'really', 'sort of', 'well' and 'you know'. (Editor)

  1. Failure of Ritual Reinvention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Even though a couple of characteristics (a high degree of contingency, improvisation, and abundant use of emblematic bodily signs) point to the fact that the yearly ‘Ancestor-gods-rituals' revitalized by Taiwan's Taroko in the late nineties were very efficaciously integrated into the social...... or disability of different ethnic elites to channel these ambivalences in accordance with their specific goals and power intentions. This contribution therefore argues that it is not necessarily the violation of prescribed ritual rules that causes the rejection of a ritual as wrong or heterodox in the course....... The comparison with the contemporary rituals of the Ami - another Aboriginal group in Taiwan - however suggests that it also depends on the degree of emancipation (the psychological state) of a specific group in postcolonial identity construction that decides whether more traditional models of religion...

  2. Anxiety and ritualized speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalljee, Mansur; Cook, Mark

    1975-01-01

    The experiment examines the effects on a number of words that seem irrelevant to semantic communication. The Units of Ritualized Speech (URSs) considered are: 'I mean', 'in fact', 'really', 'sort of', 'well' and 'you know'. (Editor)

  3. Ritual and embodied cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.; Klocova, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Dette kapitel introducerer et embodied cognition tilgang til studiet af religiøse ritualer. Da tilgangen rummer forskellige elementer fra forskellige discipliner bliver disse opsummeret i "4E approach", nemlig kognition som embodied, embedded, extended og enactive.......Dette kapitel introducerer et embodied cognition tilgang til studiet af religiøse ritualer. Da tilgangen rummer forskellige elementer fra forskellige discipliner bliver disse opsummeret i "4E approach", nemlig kognition som embodied, embedded, extended og enactive....

  4. Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicate neglect. Belittling, threats or other uses of power by spouses, family members or others may indicate verbal or emotional abuse. Strained or tense relationships and frequent arguments between ...

  5. Hail Prevention Rituals and Ritual Practitioners in Northeast Amdo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rdo rje don grub

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hail prevention rituals and ser srung 'hail prevention ritual practitioners' in Skya rgya Village (Gcan tsha County, Rma lho Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon Province are described. The origins and history of the ser srung are discussed and their ritual implements and practices are detailed. Tibetan texts related to ser srung are provided with English translations.

  6. Realisme, teatralitet, ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2008-01-01

    , and that they are characterised by a heightened awareness as to the physical, subjective and temporal aspects of the viewer's experience.  Moreover, it argues that the elements mentioned in the title "Realism, theatricality, ritual" are key characteristics of this genre. It demonstrates this by using a range of different works...

  7. El tiempo ritual

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Desde la semiótica contemporánea -de corte estructural- propongo considerar tres tiempos que interactúan en el ritual: el de la existencia (tiempo cronológico), el de la experiencia (tiempo vivido) y el de la velocidad de la acción (lentitud y celeri

  8. Rituals of environmental expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2008-01-01

    Use of experts in media reports about the environment is not confined to its information function. Voices of expertise also serve a ritual function in societal communication by enacting collective sentiments and common world views cast around consensus as well as conflict. This article presents t...

  9. A Theory of Ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jørgen Podemann

    2008-01-01

    Et forsøg på at forene teorier om myte og ritual, teorier om offer og teorier om liminalitet i en overordnet teori. Dens anvendelighed søges demonstreret med særligt henblik på antikkens religionshistorie. Bl.a. behandles Attismyten og Kybelekulten, det græske slagtoffer (Vernant), det delfiske o...

  10. Realism, theatricality, ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2008-01-01

    , and that they are characterised by a heightened awareness as to the physical, subjective and temporal aspects of the viewer's experience.  Moreover, it argues that the elements mentioned in the title "Realism, theatricality, ritual" are key characteristics of this genre. It demonstrates this by using a range of different works...

  11. Man, Satan, and God of Mawlana (Rumi and Milton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mir Mojarabian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This research is a critical analysis on the place of human and his integration with religious issues, and the subject of disobedience and rebellion. In addition, topics such as reward, punishment, redemption and salvation of mankind in two great works of literature of the world, Masnavi by Mawlana and Paradise Lost by Milton have been comparatively discussed.     Rumi's poetry and thought has been accepted by commons and special people in Iran and the world. Rumi is one of the few supreme poets in Persian language and the world. Generally, Milton has Known as the greatest English poet after Shakespeare, and his Paradise Lost as the greatest English fiction poem. This work is a the well-known epics of human-divine composed in live new languages, and comparing these two works even in one field of speech, indeed is the comparison of two thoughts, two nations, and two ancient cultures.     The author attempts to examine the similarities and contrasts of the two poems of these two great poets on the subjects of human, God, and Satan and the world, to achieve the analytical and critical comparison of them in this context. In this paper the author tries to base the Paradise Lost of Milton and compare it with the ideas of Mawlana common to imagine man's first story and his disobedience, religious approaches, and finally the end presumed for mankind.     In these two poems, contrast between "God" and "man" is derived from the fundamental relationship between "God" and "man". Milton while calls God, our Heavenly Father and refer to his role of creativity, entitles him as the dominant power, All mighty, the victorious winner, Glorious and Holy ruler, powerful king, and in one word, omnipotent. The Creator that all creatures are worshiping him, the omnipotent could be seen his capability remarks in everywhere, the unique structure of the universe beautiful is his own and the glorious ruler, sitting over the skies, sometimes invisible and sometimes

  12. Man, Satan, and God of Mawlana (Rumi and Milton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nasre Esfahani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is a critical analysis on the place of human and his integration with religious issues, and the subject of disobedience and rebellion. In addition, topics such as reward, punishment, redemption and salvation of mankind in two great works of literature of the world, Masnavi by Mawlana and Paradise Lost by Milton have been comparatively discussed.     Rumi's poetry and thought has been accepted by commons and special people in Iran and the world. Rumi is one of the few supreme poets in Persian language and the world. Generally, Milton has Known as the greatest English poet after Shakespeare, and his Paradise Lost as the greatest English fiction poem. This work is a the well-known epics of human-divine composed in live new languages, and comparing these two works even in one field of speech, indeed is the comparison of two thoughts, two nations, and two ancient cultures.     The author attempts to examine the similarities and contrasts of the two poems of these two great poets on the subjects of human, God, and Satan and the world, to achieve the analytical and critical comparison of them in this context. In this paper the author tries to base the Paradise Lost of Milton and compare it with the ideas of Mawlana common to imagine man's first story and his disobedience, religious approaches, and finally the end presumed for mankind.     In these two poems, contrast between "God" and "man" is derived from the fundamental relationship between "God" and "man". Milton while calls God, our Heavenly Father and refer to his role of creativity, entitles him as the dominant power, All mighty, the victorious winner, Glorious and Holy ruler, powerful king, and in one word, omnipotent. The Creator that all creatures are worshiping him, the omnipotent could be seen his capability remarks in everywhere, the unique structure of the universe beautiful is his own and the glorious ruler, sitting over the skies, sometimes invisible and sometimes

  13. Man, Satan, and God of Mawlana (Rumi and Milton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mir Mojarabian

    Full Text Available This research is a critical analysis on the place of human and his integration with religious issues, and the subject of disobedience and rebellion. In addition, topics such as reward, punishment, redemption and salvation of mankind in two great works of literature of the world, Masnavi by Mawlana and Paradise Lost by Milton have been comparatively discussed. Rumi's poetry and thought has been accepted by commons and special people in Iran and the world. Rumi is one of the few supreme poets in Persian language and the world. Generally, Milton has Known as the greatest English poet after Shakespeare, and his Paradise Lost as the greatest English fiction poem. This work is a the well-known epics of human-divine composed in live new languages, and comparing these two works even in one field of speech, indeed is the comparison of two thoughts, two nations, and two ancient cultures. The author attempts to examine the similarities and contrasts of the two poems of these two great poets on the subjects of human, God, and Satan and the world, to achieve the analytical and critical comparison of them in this context. In this paper the author tries to base the Paradise Lost of Milton and compare it with the ideas of Mawlana common to imagine man's first story and his disobedience, religious approaches, and finally the end presumed for mankind. In these two poems, contrast between "God" and "man" is derived from the fundamental relationship between "God" and "man". Milton while calls God, our Heavenly Father and refer to his role of creativity, entitles him as the dominant power, All mighty, the victorious winner, Glorious and Holy ruler, powerful king, and in one word, omnipotent. The Creator that all creatures are worshiping him, the omnipotent could be seen his capability remarks in everywhere, the unique structure of the universe beautiful is his own and the glorious ruler, sitting over the skies, sometimes invisible and sometimes visible, even

  14. [Ethics and ritual circumcision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, C; Faix, A

    2014-12-01

    Circumcision dates back to ancient times, nowadays, this ritual is practiced mainly in the context of Jewish and Muslim religions. The purpose of this article is to give urologists elements of reflection on the act according to the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. According to a Kantian vision, priority should be given to the respect and wishes of the individuals. In contrast, for the utilitarian theory, circumcision can be justified by a contribution to the happiness of the majority of community members at the expense of a given few. In the event of a request for ritual circumcision, urologists find themselves in the middle, uncomfortable for some, questioning the ethics of its meaning. The main pitfall for the surgeon remains in respecting the child's autonomy.

  15. In-group ritual and relational work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadar, Daniel Z.; Bax, Marcel M. H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents some preliminary insights into an important yet generally neglected discursive phenomenon which we define as 'in-group ritual'. In-group ritual refers to ritual practices formed by relational networks. In terms of typology, in-group ritual represents a different type of ritual th

  16. Liturgical singing as ritual symbol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coenie Calitz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Liturgical singing is more than text and melody; it is also symbol and ritual. It is part of the ensemble of rituals within the worship service. As a ritual symbol, it is closely connected to the culture or subculture where it is conducted. Meaning is not only immanent in the text (lyrics, but assigned on a continuous base and differs from culture to culture. As a ritual symbol, liturgical singing does not only point to another reality, but presents the other reality within the cultural context of the worship service; within ritual the music and melody are more important than text and lyrics. Liturgical singing as a ritual symbol is never static, but in a continuous process of change.

  17. The transforming power of ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Alvise

    2009-01-01

    The dreams of a patient with chronic PTSD suggested that she was engaged in an unconscious search for a ritual to address one of her traumas. As dream analysis proceeded, the ritual was imagined, thought through, and planned jointly by therapist and patient, and eventually it was performed by the patient outside of the treatment setting. The positive effect of the ritual on working through of the trauma became evident in subsequent dreams and in a significant reduction of overt symptoms. Anthropological and psychological views of ritual, particularly concepts related to the numinous aspect of these activities, provide a context for the therapeutic intervention.

  18. Distortion, Messianism, and Apocalyptic Time in The Satanic Verses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Eisinger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Salman Rushdie’s novel The Satanic Verses presents its readers with a striking perspective on apocalypse. Taking place in the context of a modernist, migrant worldview, this apocalypse works to unsettle its participating characters by teaching them how to create a world in which they might someday belong. Though often defined as destructive, the apocalypse as I define it involves a reaching for or gesture towards the impossible, which the Verses achieves through massive temporal distortion. Linear time finds itself subverted; characters’ narratives speed up or slow down, forcing them to question their various adventures in 1980s London. Rushdie’s protagonist Saladin Chamcha re-grasps and reinvents his world; his other protagonist, Gibreel Farishta, does not. For one man, apocalypse becomes a means of empowerment; for another, it develops into a black hole. Unlike real black holes, however, Rushdie’s apocalypse does not kill all who venture into it, but instead stretches its hardiest entrants both emotionally and intellectually before dropping them into a new universe. Apocalypse and the post-apocalyptic are not therefore to be feared but to be reached for: worthy achievements for those individuals who can survive the risk, the compression, and the disorientation to emerge in a ‘post’ that is not a wasteland but a realm of ceaseless energetic creation—a realm which allows migrants to construct for themselves better lives in the 21st century world.

  19. Tarasca: ritual monster of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, David D

    2008-09-01

    children (Konner 2002, 222). The Pentecostal beastie combines equine, reptilian, and bird-like features with a giraffe's neck, an elephant's bulk, an impossible number of legs, the usual human malevolence, and the satyr's insatiable lust. The monster also combines cognitive antitheses in a way that reinforces cultural biases while at the same time undermining them--a typical paradox of the Monstrous in ritual and art (Andriano 1999). In the Hacinas festival the integrated themes are those of bodily mutilation, sexual abuse, cannibalism, death, and decay. All these themes come together in certain compelling Iberian traditions: misogyny, costumed parading, religious revitalization, ritual displacement of aggression onto external objects, spontaneous street theatre. All forms of aggression are visually embodied in the image of the mystic beast, as happens every day in the classic Spanish bullfight pitting man against raw nature (Mitchell 1991). Peremptory male sexuality both parodied and glorified, women both raped and rescued, children both terrified and liberated. As Bloch has argued in the aptly titled Prey into Hunter (1992), the narrative of the Tarasca rite, turning victim into victimizer, enables the community to "absorb the vitality" of the external threat and thereby to regenerate itself and to transcend everyday reality. We may make a third, psychoanalytic, observation. As with all such fabulous and scary images, the Tarasca provokes regressive responses that probably go back to the primary organization of the mind before the advent of speech. In this childhood environment, sensations are limited to visions and primary emotions, and the world is experienced largely through the eyes and mouth. Psychoanalysts of childhood have called this the phase of oral/visual primacy. It may explain the locus of aggression in typical monster imagery: the rending teeth, the gnashing jaws, the cavernous belly. It would also help us understand the terror at being devoured by a giant

  20. On detailed and condensed rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    How the tantric rituals of Tibetan Buddhism relate to the different faculties and abilities of tantric adepts in the view of 'Jig-rten-gsum-mgon.......How the tantric rituals of Tibetan Buddhism relate to the different faculties and abilities of tantric adepts in the view of 'Jig-rten-gsum-mgon....

  1. Parent Involvement as Ritualized Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    This article examines parent involvement (PI) as a ritual system using Turner's concept of root paradigms. Through a twofold analysis, I argue that the highly ritualized nature of PI practices creates a group identity among mainstream parents and schools that marginalizes diverse families. First, I point out three root paradigms in the ritual…

  2. The Ritualization of Family Ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, David

    1988-01-01

    Examines three theories of family ritual derived from Emile Durkheim's sociology of social order: the structural-functional theory, constructionist theory, and mobilization theory. Concludes that rituals maintain traditional family structures, yet are creative in that they may define new forms of relationships and support emerging possibilities…

  3. Ritualforschung und Organisationsentwicklung [The dynamic of rituals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widlok, T.

    2009-01-01

    Ritual dynamics is the title of a new research program and of an international congress recently held in Heidelberg. More generally, the potentially innovative dynamic of rituals is a marked feature of current research on rituals that emphasizes the innovative and generative strength of rituals. Thi

  4. Ritual of the Broken Stone

    OpenAIRE

    Bel, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    This “ritual of the broken stone” was performed in July 1996 to celebrate an auspicious event in a private house of Choglamsar, a settlement of Tibetan migrates in a suburb of Leh (Ladakh, India). According to local informants, its performers were ermits living in caves of Spiti. Most astonishing is the mixture of a religious ritual with comical scenes and demonstrations of 'magical' powers. Este “ritual de la piedra rota“ se llevó a cabo en julio de 1996 para celebrar un acontecimiento au...

  5. Music Healing Rituals in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussakorn Binson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the music healing rituals from North, Northeast and Southern Thailand. In general, these healing rituals bring together supportive elements from the family, the community and spiritual entities with the shaman as a conductor. Shaman utilizes music in corporate the community as a whole including elicits the support from the spiritual entitles. Traditional music healing process played the role as enticement to recruit spirits, distract the patients from experiencing unpleasant in their body. Even in today’s modern society these healing rituals have persisted, as they are inseparable from these regions’ animistic beliefs system.

  6. Música ritual funeraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Lisón Tolosana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La música es, como todos sabemos, una arte que con sonidos vocales y/o instrumentales de muy variado tipo nos deleita por su belleza y nos entusiasma porque expresa y produce emociones. Es, además, un arte universal y proteico porque la encontramos en todas culturas y porque va asociado a la palabra, a la canción y a la múltiple danza y, más importante para el tema de estas pocas líneas, con el ritual. No es extraño que su uso se ritualizara en psicoterapia desde hace siglos; al pintor Hugo Van der Goes (1440-1482 le tocaban música para aliviarlo de su melancolía. La música en alguna de sus manifestaciones se oye en todas partes, pero sea clásica o folclórica, sinfonía, jazz u ópera, sonara o fuga, flamenco o jota, e instrumentada por cuerda, percusión, clavicordio, piano, viento etc. se produce según cánones culturales temporales, dimensión importante que nos invita a reflexionar sobre algo tan atrayente desde la antropología. Me limito en este corto ensayo a describir un aspecto tradicional popular en el que engranan música, rito y funeral en parte del SO orensano. Parto, como siempre de la etnografía.

  7. Espacio ritual, espacio comercial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1989-01-01

    este proceso más de la mitad de las chacras terminaban siendo ocupadas por los melocotoneros, un espacio enclavado en el corazón del maizal de Callacancha permanecía intacto: Cuto, tierra de huacas, en donde chulpas y hábitat prehispánico dominan, desde su promontorio, varias tierras sagradas, sitio de uno de los últimos ceremoniales comunales, el sembrío de maíz. En 1973, la comunidad, conjuntamente con los representantes de las cofradías depositarias de aquellas tierras sagradas, decidieron alquilar las parcelas a particulares, poniendo así punto final a la tradición ritual del sembrío, suprimiendo de este modo el carácter sagrado de aquellas tierras. El objetivo del presente artículo es tentar trazar, a partir de los archivos disponibles y testimonios de comuneros, la función y evolución de este espacio considerado como sagrado (tierras de huacas y de cofradías a la vez actualmente entregado a la economía de mercado, y de describir la ceremonia ritual hoy en día desaparecida. Since 1952 the village of San Salvador de Pampas (3150 m., Chancay underwent a series of deep transformations. Favouring the development of orcharding, the comuneros decided to abandon the highlands, migrating towards their maizal, where they founded the new village, La Florida. Up to then devoted to corn and wheat crops and used as well as luzerne-field, the maizal began at that time to lose its traditional staple-producer vocation. While through that process more than half of the chacras end up being occupied by peach-trees, there still rested untouched an enclave in the heart of Callacancha's maizal: Cuto. Cuto, huacas' lands where chulpas and pre-hispanic dwellings dominate from its promontory several sacred lands, was the site of one of the latest comunal ceremonials, the sembrío de maíz. In 1973, the community and the cofradías trustees in charge of those sacred lands, decided to rent the sacred plots to private individuals. In that way the traditional sembr

  8. Pain and Coping in Rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt

    . Understanding the online religious activities and experiences of people participating in stressful and painful rituals calls for a methodology integrating objective measures and subjective assessment. This research project involves functional imaging technology (fMRI), measures of physiological processes (EKG......Both pain and religious rituals are complex phenomena. On the one hand pain is often understood as an object for natural science, but on the other hand pain is always defined as a psychological and subjective experience, leaving room for psychology and the humanities. Rituals, like pain, are framed...... by biological, psychological, social and cultural factors, which indicates that a bottom-up and a top-down approach in the study of pain and religion should interact instead of co-exist. This paper presents the initial framework of an interdisciplinary study of pain and coping in the religious mind...

  9. The Romans and ritual murder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Celia E

    2010-01-01

    The Roman abhorrence of human sacrifice presented by ancient literary sources stands in contrast to the frequency of rites requiring the death of a human being performed by the Romans during the Republic (509-44 BCE). After examining the ways our sources talk about ritual murder, especially as it was practiced by foreign peoples and subversive or tyrannical elements within Roman society, this discussion turns to the issue of the forms of ritual murder performed by the Romans. Of these various rites, the only one clearly identified by them as human sacrifice, that is, as an offering to the gods of a human life, is the live interment of Gauls and Greeks. Other forms of ritual murder-the burial of unchaste Vestal Virgins and the drowning of hermaphroditic children-were not, in Roman opinion, sacrifice. This distinction made the disposal of Vestal Virgins and hermaphrodites acceptable.

  10. At sige farvel gennem ritualer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild Stølen, Karen Marie

    2006-01-01

    Dette projekt undersøger ritualers betydning for pårørende i forlængelse af en nærtsståendes død. Ritualer forstås som en del af den åndelige omsorg i sygeplejen. Fokus er rituelle handlinger i forlængelse af dødsfald på hospice, f.eks. at se afdøde, istandgørelse af afdøde og udsyngning. Metoden...

  11. Evaluating Ritual Efficacy: Evidence from the Supernatural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H.; Souza, Andre L.

    2012-01-01

    Rituals pose a cognitive paradox: although widely used to treat problems, rituals are causally opaque (i.e., they lack a causal explanation for their effects). How is the efficacy of ritual action evaluated in the absence of causal information? To examine this question using ecologically valid content, three studies (N=162) were conducted in…

  12. Evaluating Ritual Efficacy: Evidence from the Supernatural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H.; Souza, Andre L.

    2012-01-01

    Rituals pose a cognitive paradox: although widely used to treat problems, rituals are causally opaque (i.e., they lack a causal explanation for their effects). How is the efficacy of ritual action evaluated in the absence of causal information? To examine this question using ecologically valid content, three studies (N=162) were conducted in…

  13. Teaching Family Ritual: Sunday, Sausage, and Solidarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Diane E.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses teaching sociology with the concept of ritual. Explains that students write descriptions of a family ritual that may be discussed and compared in class. Suggests that studying ritual in everyday life may reduce ethnocentrism in viewing those of other cultures and can be a tool to support the importance of the family. (DK)

  14. Extreme Rituals as Social Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Ronald; Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    We often think of pain as intrinsically bad, and the avoidance of pain is a fundamental evolutionary drive of all species. How can we then explain widespread cultural prac- tices like certain rituals that involve the voluntary infliction of physical pain? In this paper, we argue that inflicting...

  15. Lamak : ritual objects in Bali

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkgreve, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    A lamak is a long narrow hanging that is an essential requirement at most rituals in Bali. Made usually of palm leaves, it is by nature ephemeral. Although permanent forms of lamak, made of cloth or coins, exist, the ephemeral palm leaf form must be present. Hung from altars and shrines, a lamak ser

  16. [Legal aspects of ritual circumcision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M; Schott, G E; Rascher, W; Bender, A W

    2009-12-01

    Female circumcision (genital mutilation) is a criminal violation of human rights under German law. Even with consent of the person to be circumcised and/or her legal representative this procedure must not be carried out since a consent to female circumcision is unethical and therefore void. As much consent as there is on female circumcision the legal situation with ritual male circumcision is very unclear. In practice and unnoticed by the public male circumcision is carried out - be it for medical or ritual reasons - without deeper-going reflexions on the clearness of the medical indication or the legal situation with ritual circumcision. From the medical aspect there are big differences between female and male circumcision but also certain parallels. Various reasons, partly founded in prejudice and misinformation, make people refrain from regarding circumcision of boys also as illegal. Contrary to the prevailing opinion male circumcision also represents a bodily harm which a doctor can only carry out after a preoperative interview and with the consent of the affected person. Since ritual male circumcision does not serve the wellbeing of a child it is not possible for the parents to give their consent to the circumcision in lieu of the child. Male circumcision is only permitted if the child has given his consent and is thus only legally permitted if the child has reached an age at which he is mature enough to understand the meaning and extent of such an action which is hardly the case before he has completed his 16 (th) year.

  17. The question of ritual: a cognitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Sørensen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Why does ritual continue to be an issue in religious studies and in anthropology? In this paper the author proposes a cognitive approach to rituals, focusing those aspects of rituals that are distinct from other types of actions, together with what cognitive responses these differences provoke. It will be argued that rituals violate basic causal assumptions and by doing so, trigger off cognitive processes in order to ascribe purpose and meaning to the action. In conclusion, this will be related to findings in ethology and evolutionary theory, arguing that ritual as a behavioural category plays an important role in the formation of symbolic thinking.

  18. Using Rituals for Intervention Refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Keller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a culture-based health promotion/disease prevention intervention model.  This model, which is family-based, incorporates a life course perspective, which involves the identification of individual developmental milestones, and incorporates aspects of culture that have been widely used across cultures to influence behavior and mark important developmental transitions. Central among those cultural traits is the ritual, or rite of passage, which, for millennia, has been used to teach the skills associated with developmental task mastery and move individuals, and their families, through life stages so that they reach certain developmental milestones. Family rituals, such as eating dinner together, can serve as powerful leverage points to support health behavior change, and serve as unique intervention delivery strategies that not only influence behavior, but further strengthen families. 

  19. Ritual. Medieval Liturgy and the Senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combined uses of several media in medieval church rituals. Assessing the application of a (modern) notion of ritual to medieval liturgical ceremonies, it points out how these 'rituals' worked through a sensory combination of words, music, architectural setting, and move......This chapter discusses the combined uses of several media in medieval church rituals. Assessing the application of a (modern) notion of ritual to medieval liturgical ceremonies, it points out how these 'rituals' worked through a sensory combination of words, music, architectural setting...... with the actual washing of the feet of either monks or poor people. The combination of words and melodies with elaborate melismas, and the further sensorial staging and setting of the ceremony produced a 'polyphony' of media, which can be analysed by way of early medieval notions of sacrament. The chapter also...

  20. Ritual, meaningfulness, and interstellar message construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traphagan, John W.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, I am interested in exploring the potential of ritual performance as a means of communication with ETI. I argue that the study of ritual and ritualized behavior, understood as a technique for representation of meaning and meaningfulness about the world, has potential to inform how scientists think about the construction and interpretation of interstellar messages. I do not suggest that ritual activities themselves provide more than limited potential for communication with ETI. However, the structural elements of ritual and the manner in which meaning is conveyed through the formality and repetition of ritual is at least to some extent decipherable cross-culturally and provides one way to think about how to express important aspects of humans and their cultures to ETI and to represent, if not specific meanings themselves, the fact that a message is meaningful.

  1. Rituals and Religious Innovation. The Meaning of Rituals in Shan the Rising Light

    OpenAIRE

    Mikael Rothstein

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an example of how rituals may play an important role in the birth of a new religion, and how this religious innovation can be interpreted through the rituals. This example concerns a religious group — Shan the Rising Light — that has managed to introduce a comprehensive body of rituals into a belief system otherwise characteristed by its general lack of rituals and ceremonies (namely the theosophy of Madame Blavatsky), thereby setting the standards for a virtually new rel...

  2. Invisible wounds: corporal punishment in British schools as a form of ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthall, J

    1991-01-01

    This article examines a presumed historical association between corporal punishment and the British "ruling class," taking as data the elaborate forms of beating practiced at a well-known English fee-paying boarding school in the 1950s and here documented in detail. Analogies with other forms of ritual studied by anthropologists are considered, as well as the psychosexual dynamics of beating for both officiants and victims. The paper argues that ritual corporal punishment must be seen in retrospect as a clear case of child abuse that is both physical and sexual. Such rituals of authority, though virtually abolished in Britain, may well exist in a different form in present day residential institutions for children in some Third World countries that have borrowed from now outdated European practices.

  3. Pain and Coping in Rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt

    by biological, psychological, social and cultural factors, which indicates that a bottom-up and a top-down approach in the study of pain and religion should interact instead of co-exist. This paper presents the initial framework of an interdisciplinary study of pain and coping in the religious mind......, blood pressure, cortisol levels) and objective and subjective measures of pain (pain tolerance, questionnaires and interviews). Furthermore, the social, cultural and historical context of these rituals is expected to play an important role in setting the frame and interpreting the results....

  4. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; Andel, Van Tinde

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Aim of the study Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have

  5. Introduction : Sacrifice in modernity: community, ritual, identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, Marcel; Korte, Anne-marie; Duyndam, Joachim; Poorthuis, Marcel; Duyndam, Joachim; Korte, Anne-marie

    2016-01-01

    Sacrifice seems to belong to a religious context of the past. In Sacrifice in Modernity: Community, Ritual, Identity it is demonstrated how sacrificial themes remain an essential element in our post-modern society. The shaping of community, performing rituals and the search for identity, three main

  6. The functions of ritual in social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Legare, Cristine H

    2016-01-01

    Ritual cognition builds upon social learning biases that may have become specialized for affiliation within social groups. The adaptive problems of group living required a means of identifying group members, ensuring commitment to the group, facilitating cooperation, and maintaining group cohesion. We discuss how ritual serves these social functions.

  7. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; Andel, Van Tinde

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Aim of the study Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have

  8. RITUAL AESTHETICS IN AFRICAN DRAMATURGY *Uzoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Conceptual Background to Ritual. The concept of ... and similar places notable theatres of African performances. Ritual has ... reassurance about his natural and psychological concerns. ... want nothing more. ... dance or music and often all put together. .... Ed. Layiwola D. Sidney, Australia: Harwood Academic.

  9. LINGUA-SEMIOTICS OF POWER RITUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astafurova Tatyana Nikolaevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with lingua-semiotic representation of the power ritual as one of the symbolic forms of behavior that over time ceases to be spontaneous and becomes regular and repeated. Under discussion is the rite of coronation, which was becoming more complicated and acquired a final form throughout the history of Anglo-Saxon statehood. The process of defining parameters and characteristics of the power ritual is performed by chrono-, topo-, sound and language components of the ritual; it is established that in ritual communication the verbalization of the event is gradually becoming more complicated, clarifying its linguistic component, which largely ensures the success of the ritual; the non-verbal signs acquire additional meaning becoming dominant over simplified verbal signs. It is proved that within the ritual space of the Anglo-Saxon statehood an extensive and rigidly fixed system of signs and symbols has been formed, nominating the process of interaction between the sovereign and his subjects – three groups of signs characterizing the Anglo-Saxon power ritual communication: regulating, processing and classifying signs. Their content distinction is analyzed. Authority widely applies these signs as tools to influence the society through social stereotypes and ethnic psychological associations. Artifacts, as symbols of state power, and oaths, as discursive element of the coronation, are stated as the central elements of the ritual.

  10. Introduction : Sacrifice in modernity: community, ritual, identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, Marcel; Korte, Anne-marie; Duyndam, Joachim; Poorthuis, Marcel; Duyndam, Joachim; Korte, Anne-marie

    2016-01-01

    Sacrifice seems to belong to a religious context of the past. In Sacrifice in Modernity: Community, Ritual, Identity it is demonstrated how sacrificial themes remain an essential element in our post-modern society. The shaping of community, performing rituals and the search for identity, three main

  11. Assessment of addiction severity among ritual users of ayahuasca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábregas, Josep Maria; González, Débora; Fondevila, Sabela; Cutchet, Marta; Fernández, Xavier; Barbosa, Paulo César Ribeiro; Alcázar-Córcoles, Miguel Ángel; Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Bouso, José Carlos

    2010-10-01

    Ayahuasca is a psychoactive beverage used for magico-religious purposes in the Amazon. Recently, Brazilian syncretic churches have helped spread the ritual use of ayahuasca abroad. This trend has raised concerns that regular use of this N,N-dimethyltryptamine-containing tea may lead to the medical and psychosocial problems typically associated with drugs of abuse. Here we assess potential drug abuse-related problems in regular ayahuasca users. Addiction severity was assessed using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), and history of alcohol and illicit drug use was recorded. In Study 1, jungle-based ayahuasca users (n=56) were compared vs. rural controls (n=56). In Study 2, urban-based ayahuasca users (n=71) were compared vs. urban controls (n=59). Follow-up studies were conducted 1 year later. In both studies, ayahuasca users showed significantly lower scores than controls on the ASI Alcohol Use, and Psychiatric Status subscales. The jungle-based ayahuasca users showed a significantly higher frequency of previous illicit drug use but this had ceased at the time of examination, except for cannabis. At follow-up, abstinence from illicit drug use was maintained in both groups except for cannabis in Study 1. However, differences on ASI scores were still significant in the jungle-based group but not in the urban group. Despite continuing ayahuasca use, a time-dependent worsening was only observed in one subscale (Family/Social relationships) in Study 2. Overall, the ritual use of ayahuasca, as assessed with the ASI in currently active users, does not appear to be associated with the deleterious psychosocial effects typically caused by other drugs of abuse.

  12. Ritual, Imitation and Education in R. S. Peters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reconstructs R. S. Peters' underlying theory of ritual in education, highlighting his proposed link between ritual and the imitation of teachers. Rituals set the stage for the imitation of teachers and they invite students to experience practices whose value is not easily discernable from the outside. For Peters, rituals facilitate…

  13. Transformations of Rituals in Contemporary Lithuanian Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sakalauskaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze how the religious rituals are being transformed and interpreted with the help of contemporary art. The author argues that the relation between art and religion is changed in nowadays society, contemporary art is eagerly discussing religious doctrines or even neglecting them. The article is attempting to answer the question of what is being used for the religious rituals by artists and how they could mediate conceptions and ideas. The author aims to disclose expression of religious rituals in contemporary visual art, and to investigate their means of conveyance. 

  14. "Ritual Rhythms" - a collaborative WebDocumentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Perle

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative web-based filmproject in 11 vignettes about the rituals and rhythms of daily life in various locations & settings in the city of Copenhagen. Created by Perle Møhl and the students on the 2014 courses in Visual Anthropology in Practice. We use the concepts of Ritual and Rhythm...... to investigate how various forms of daily life may be analysed as ritual events, how they order, unite or transform people, places & objects, installing particular social aesthetics that make them familiar to those who know and obscure to those who don't. We perform our analysis with a camera and a microphone...

  15. Using Rituals to Strengthen Your Medical Practice Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Rituals can cement the identity of and strengthen the bonds between any people, including the members of the medical practice team. This article presents the idea that the medical practice manager is in the ideal position to create and use rituals for team building. It defines the term ritual, and explores how rituals differ from customs or traditions. As well, it describes six benefits of rituals and the hallmarks of the most effective team rituals; describes seven creative and interesting corporate rituals that medical practice managers can study for inspiration; suggests 20 excellent opportunities within the medical practice calendar year for medical practice team rituals; and identifies six kinds of rituals that are used in organizations. Finally, this article provides a four-step action plan for ritualizing your medical practice team's morning huddles.

  16. How do rituals affect cooperation? An experimental field study comparing nine ritual types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Callander, Rohan; Reddish, Paul; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Collective rituals have long puzzled anthropologists, yet little is known about how rituals affect participants. Our study investigated the effects of nine naturally occurring rituals on prosociality. We operationalized prosociality as (1) attitudes about fellow ritual participants and (2) decisions in a public goods game. The nine rituals varied in levels of synchrony and levels of sacred attribution. We found that rituals with synchronous body movements were more likely to enhance prosocial attitudes. We also found that rituals judged to be sacred were associated with the largest contributions in the public goods game. Path analysis favored a model in which sacred values mediate the effects of synchronous movements on prosocial behaviors. Our analysis offers the first quantitative evidence for the long-standing anthropological conjecture that rituals orchestrate body motions and sacred values to support prosociality. Our analysis, moreover, adds precision to this old conjecture with evidence of a specific mechanism: ritual synchrony increases perceptions of oneness with others, which increases sacred values to intensify prosocial behaviors.

  17. The Thera inscriptions--ritual or slander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brongersma, E

    1990-01-01

    Inscriptions carved in a rock on the Greek island of Thera and dating from the 6th or 7th century BC have homosexual contents. Originally considered a testimony to ritual sacred acts, they were described by Marrou (1956) and Dover (1978) as vulgar pornographic graffiti. Arguments against this view and in favor of the formal ritual interpretation are proposed. A final explanation is suggested, conforming to local customs and the general conceptions of ancient Greek boy-love.

  18. "Ritual Rhythms" - a collaborative WebDocumentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Perle

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative web-based filmproject in 11 vignettes about the rituals and rhythms of daily life in various locations & settings in the city of Copenhagen. Created by Perle Møhl and the students on the 2014 courses in Visual Anthropology in Practice. We use the concepts of Ritual and Rhythm......, tuning in with all our senses to the details of daily life that often elude the attention of a wordy anthropology....

  19. Ritual healing and mental health in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, William

    2014-12-01

    Ritual healing is very widespread in the Indian state of Uttarakhand, and is by far the most common option for those with serious behavioral disturbances. Although ritual healing thus accounts for a very large part of the actual health care system, the state and its regulatory agencies have, for the most part, been structurally blind to its existence. A decade of research on in this region, along with a number of shorter research trips to healing shrines and specialists elsewhere in the subcontinent, and a thorough study of the literature, suggest that such techniques are often therapeutically effective. However, several considerations suggest that ritual healing may not be usefully combined with mainstream "Western" psychiatry: (a) psychiatry is deeply influenced by the ideology of individualism, which is incompatible with South Asian understandings of the person; (b) social asymmetries between religious healers and health professionals are too great to allow a truly respectful relationship between them; and (c) neither the science of psychiatry nor the regulatory apparatus of the state can or will acknowledge the validity of "ritual therapy"--and even if they did so, regulation would most likely destroy what is most valuable about ritual healing. This suggests that it is best if the state maintain its structural blindness to ritual healing.

  20. Urban Choreography: Bodily Experience, Emotions and Rituals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekaterina Lavrinec

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the mechanism of urban rituals, the paper refers to a concept of the city as a dynamic field of everyday practices as well as to a concept of "urban choreography", which actualizes the interconnection between urban spatial structures, citizens' emotional and bodily experience, and rules and conventions, which are embedded in the spatial structures. Following the notion of "spatial practices", it is distinguished between passive practices, which reproduce conventional everyday scenarios, and active practices, which reveal the hidden potential of the place. One of the forms of practices that extend the functions of urban spaces is urban art interventions, which encourage citizens to use the space in a new, alternative way. Those urban art interventions, which imply an active interpretation and bodily participation of citizens, enable the formation of urban rituals, i.e. repetitive symbolic actions, which are connected with the particular place. In their turn, urban rituals produce a long-term impact on the public space by changing "choreography" of the particular place and (reforming it's "emotional scape". For example, a ritual of making a wish by performing a simple movement at some special place in the city, changes usual trajectories and rhythms of the passers-by and saturates the place with joy and hope. The meaning of an urban ritual and emotions, evoked by it, are collectively shared by citizens, and "ritualized" places become a point of attraction for locals and travellers. Initiating new urban rituals by installing interactive art objects and by introducing simple scenarios of alternative use of public spaces could be considered as an efficient way to raise awareness of the urgent topic of deactivation of public spaces. A possible solutions of this problem are rooted in the understanding of the interplay between the spatial structures and our bodily-emotional experience.  In the paper urban interventions by Lithuanian

  1. Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affective polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulbulia, JosephA.; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Schjoedt, Uffe

    2013-01-01

    Collective rituals are biologically ancient and culturally pervasive, yet few studies have quantified their effects on participants. We assessed two plausible models from qualitative anthropology: ritual empathy predicts affective convergence among all ritual participants irrespective of ritual r...

  2. Death rituals in Albania: an anthropological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VYSHKA GENTIAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure of death rituals differs consistently amongregions of Albania. The death ritual contains very strongpatriarchal features in the Northern part of the country; insouthern regions (next to the seashore and in Albaniancommunities living elsewhere in the Mediterranean basin, thefeatures are more animistic; the females playing an importantrole in grief proclamation, suggesting a more matriarchalorientedritual organization. The wailing of men in the northernAlbania, the so-called gjama, is an organized ritual of cryingfor the dead person, and till recently it has been accompaniedwith self-punishing behaviors such as face scratching etc. Thewailing of women is acceptable and codified as well in thenorthern areas (the so-called wailing of milk. A differentsituation, probably related to the social organization and to thegender role of females, is apparent in southern Albania. Thedeath rituals hereby are mainly accompanied from the socalled“kuja”, (wailing through words more impressive andloquacious than the northern masculine “gjama”. Similaritieswith Greek and Hellenic rituals (“Thrênos” and “Goös” aresuggested; probably embedding multiple cross-acting andinter-related influences.

  3. Review - Revisiting Rituals in a Changing Tibetan World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kilby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Katia Buffetrille (ed. 2012. Revisiting Rituals in a Changing Tibetan World. Leiden: Brill. Volume 31 in Brill's Tibetan Studies Library. Featuring Buddhist ritual life in its diverse manifestations across the Tibetan Plateau, this volume engages the task of defining 'ritual' by analyzing moments of ritual change. Whether political regime change, technological innovation, or social upheaval, external catalysts of religious transformation have been prominently visible in the Tibetan cultural world since the mid-twentieth century. This volume takes up the sociopolitical shifts of the recent period as a call to investigate how rituals change under fire, thereby furthering our understanding of the relationship between ritual structures and the historical contexts in which they find expression. Ritual's intertwinement with political events, symbols, and attitudes is the resounding theme presented herein, as each chapter makes efforts to disambiguate the complex causes and contours of ritual change in a particular case study. Several chapters seek to distinguish deep structural transformation in ritual from the harnessing of ritual elements for single instances of political or social action. Others debate the ambiguous role of spaces, practices, or ideas that are employed in ritual but also in political or economic contexts. Finally, each chapter challenges in some way the polarization of ritual conservatism and the 'invention of tradition' (Ranger and Hobsbawm 1983. Revisiting Rituals is an edited collection of conference papers...

  4. Rituals and Religious Innovation. The Meaning of Rituals in Shan the Rising Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Rothstein

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an example of how rituals may play an important role in the birth of a new religion, and how this religious innovation can be interpreted through the rituals. This example concerns a religious group — Shan the Rising Light — that has managed to introduce a comprehensive body of rituals into a belief system otherwise characteristed by its general lack of rituals and ceremonies (namely the theosophy of Madame Blavatsky, thereby setting the standards for a virtually new religion. Jeanne Morashti was excommunicated from the organization she felt obliged to save, and started her own religious group. During her religious career, she had encountered numerous groups within the broader limits of the theosophical milieu, and when establishing her own group, she formed a synthesis of the various elements. The old process of syncretism and eclecticism, in the case of Shan the Rising Light, have managed to include the rituals too. The systematized mixing of strongly ritualized traditions with a non-ritualized belief system has led to a religious innovation.

  5. Adopting the ritual stance: The role of opacity and context in ritual and everyday actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitány, Rohan; Nielsen, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Rituals are a pervasive and ubiquitous aspect of human culture, but when we naïvely observe an opaque set of ritual actions, how do we come to understand its significance? To investigate this, across two experiments we manipulated the degree to which actions were ritualistic or ordinary, and whether or not they were accompanied with context. In Experiment 1, 474 adult participants were presented with videos of novel rituals (causally opaque actions) or control actions (causally transparent) performed on a set of objects accompanied with neutral-valance written context. Experiment 2 presented the same video stimuli but with negative and aversive written context. In both experiments ritualized objects were rated as physically unchanged, but more 'special' and more 'desirable' than objects subjected to control actions, with context amplifying this effect. Results are discussed with reference to the Ritual Stance and the Social-Action hypothesis. Implications for both theories are discussed, as are methodological concerns regarding the empirical investigation of ritual cognition. We argue that causally opaque ritual actions guide the behavior of naïve viewers because such actions are perceived as socially normative, rather than with reference to supernatural intervention or causation.

  6. Magical beliefs and rituals in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David W; Milanak, Melissa E; Medeiros, Bethany; Ross, Jennifer L

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-one children were administered a structured interview that assessed their beliefs about magic, tricks and wishes. Children were also presented with demonstrations of magic tricks/illusions, and asked to offer explanations as to how they worked. Parents completed the Childhood Routines Inventory (CRI), a 19-item parent report measure that assesses children's rituals, habits and sensory-perceptual experiences that we have termed "compulsive-like" behavior. Results indicated that children's rituals and compulsions were positively related to their magical beliefs, and inversely related to their uses of concrete, physical explanations to describe various phenomena. In particular, children's beliefs about the effects of wishing were most consistently correlated with their compulsive-like rituals and routines. The findings extended the work on magical beliefs and obsessive-compulsive phenomena to the normative manifestation of compulsive behaviors found in typical development.

  7. Ritual Black Drink consumption at Cahokia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, Patricia L; Emerson, Thomas E; Gu, Jiyan; Hurst, W Jeffrey; Pauketat, Timothy R; Ward, Timothy

    2012-08-28

    Chemical analyses of organic residues in fragments of pottery from the large site of Cahokia and surrounding smaller sites in Illinois reveal theobromine, caffeine, and ursolic acid, biomarkers for species of Ilex (holly) used to prepare the ritually important Black Drink. As recorded during the historic period, men consumed Black Drink in portions of the American Southeast for ritual purification. This first demonstrated discovery of biomarkers for Ilex occurs in beaker vessels dating between A.D. 1050 and 1250 from Cahokia, located far north of the known range of the holly species used to prepare Black Drink during historic times. The association of Ilex and beaker vessels indicates a sustained ritual consumption of a caffeine-laced drink made from the leaves of plants grown in the southern United States.

  8. Ritual and cohesion. What is the place of euphoric arousal?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Commentary on H. Whitehouse & J. A. Lanman, “The Ties that Bind Us: Ritual, Fusion, and Identification”,......Commentary on H. Whitehouse & J. A. Lanman, “The Ties that Bind Us: Ritual, Fusion, and Identification”,...

  9. Las medidas corporales en los rituales mexicanos

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Los rituales indígenas de ayer y hoy otorgan un lugar importante a la numeración. El artículo ofrece una comparación entre el sistema nahua de medidas recopilado en tiempos de la Conquista española y el sistema tlapaneco observado hoy en día. Muestra que ambos se basan en las dimensiones del cuerpo humano; el sistema interno de conversión de las medidas es de origen prehispánico. También existe una semejanza en los usos rituales de dichas medidas. Las ceremonias exigía el conteo de los objeto...

  10. The Psychological Benefits of Superstitious Rituals in Top Sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Schippers (Michaéla); P.A.M. van Lange (Paul)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe current research addresses the psychological benefits of superstitious rituals in top sport, examining the circumstances under which top-class sportsmen are especially committed to enacting rituals prior to a game (ritual commitment). Consistent with hypotheses, findings revealed

  11. Practice, Ritual and Community Music: Doing as Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Helen

    2008-01-01

    As a specialist in ritual theory and performance, with some professional experience of community music, I have always been struck by the robust resistance to clear-cut definitions or identities, by both "ritual" and "community music". This article takes as its point of departure the proposal of ritual scholar Catherine Bell, that we abandon the…

  12. Maya Divination: Ritual Techniques of Distributed Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGraw, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Based on more than 24 months of ethnographic research among Maya ritualists in the western highlands of Guatemala, this article examines how pajooneem, or tz’ite’ seed divination, facilitates decision-making and distributes cognition between client, diviner, and ritual techniques. Tz’ite’ seed...

  13. Ritualized Space and Objects of Sacrosanctity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    : such areas, buildings, places, and objects, stand out as ritualized physical structures. In the West, historically, such traditions have included hierarchies of sacred places (e.g. Jerusalem, Mecca, Rome), defined by mythical events and religious memory; sacred bodies (dead or alive) as manifested...

  14. Film Remakes as Ritual and Disguise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanger, Anat

    2006-01-01

    The first book-length account of the symbolic chains that link remakes and explain their disguises, Film Remakes as Rituals and Disguise is also the first book to explore how and why these stories are told. Anat Zanger focuses on contemporary retellings of three particular tales-Joan of Arc, Carmen,

  15. RITUAL AND IDENTITY CONSTRUCTION IN NIGERIAN IGBO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    Federal University, Ndufu-Alike, Ikwo, Ebonyi state, Nigeria. Abstract. Video films are a ... film, “without really delving into the source culture, which the art negotiates in terms of .... corruption, sex, violence, fetishism, ritualism and other negative ...

  16. Film Remakes as Ritual and Disguise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanger, Anat

    2006-01-01

    The first book-length account of the symbolic chains that link remakes and explain their disguises, Film Remakes as Rituals and Disguise is also the first book to explore how and why these stories are told. Anat Zanger focuses on contemporary retellings of three particular tales-Joan of Arc, Carmen,

  17. 169 DIFFERENT RITUAL SYMBOLS IN IGBO TRADITIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of history, which ritual-symbolism is a part of , on basic to human science and, also that meaning .... It captures and mediates the experiment of any given reality. The pictures ... In the depiction of natural happenings, plants and animals.

  18. The talking cure as action: Freud's theory of ritual revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowitz, Naomi

    2011-09-01

    Freud made creative use of late Victorian theories of ritual as empty modes of behavior, using the idea of "seemingly meaningless" ritual to offer a compelling comparison with obsessive behavior. However, analytic hours, with their repetitive frame and repetition of unconscious conflicts, have stronger links with rituals than Freud admitted. Recent theories highlight the extensive power of rituals to organize and instantiate models of effective action, especially in terms of the multifunctionality of language. These new theories of ritual offer in turn new tools for understanding the therapeutic action of analytic hours.

  19. Ritual, Performance, and Transmission: The Gaddi Shepherds of Himachal Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Sharma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nawala, a sacrificial ritual offering made to Shiva, is central to the identity of the Gaddis, nomadic mountain shepherds of Himachal Pradesh in Northern India. Over a long period of time the Gaddis were encouraged to abandon shepherding and settle on the plains among agricultural communities. Displaced from their ancestral habitat and nomadic ways, the focus of their ritual performances changed. Examining one ritual text as a prism for folklore and social change, Sharma analyzes how dislocated “identity” negotiates and reinvents itself through ritual performance. The transformation of ritual text, disappearing lineages of traditional singers and ritual specialists, new interpretations and transmission agencies, as well as the eventual preservation and transmission of ritual-lore through audio and video technology, chart the trajectory of identity transformation and engagement with modernity.

  20. Ritual encounters of the queer kind: a political analysis of jewish lesbian ritual innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettschneider, Marla

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Jewish feminist and queer engagement in Jewish life and Judaism are transforming the practices and foundational orientations of traditional modes. Jewish feminist, queer ritual innovation in particular is inspired by an array of secular and radical critical theories as much as it is by the historic concrete experiences of a diversity of Jews in different Jewish communities. It is important to hold all of us who are involved in religious ritual innovation responsible to the knowledges we have developed and learned in critical theory or we risk, even with the best of intentions and creativity, re-inscribing some of the very problems of traditional ontological norms that we might have originally sought to disrupt and subvert. This article looks specifically at examples of new "coming out" rituals for Jewish queers explored over time in the Jewish Queer Think Tank: honoring them as well as offering tools from secular critical theory to assist our work in keeping them accountable to our aspirations to both love and fundamentally transform Jewishness. Here I redefine the function of religious ritual itself in political terms as an identity-producing performance. As such I utilize social constructionist queer theories (i.e., Shane Phelan and Judith Butler), anarchists (i.e., Emma Goldman), and those involved in radical theatre (i.e., Augusto Boal) to articulate the revolutionary potential of ritual innovation.

  1. Kulpuja: A Ritual and Behavior of Magar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Prasad Sapkota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human beings take themselves superior for having the capacity of development of culture to their environment for survival. From the beginning of civilization, people prepared, accumulated the knowledge and preserved it as a form of culture. Culture is the body of thought and knowledge both theoretical and practical, which only man can possess. It is the sum total of achievements which develops traits by traits. Among them kulpuja ritual is one of the central traits. In this paper, I explore why rituals like kulpuja are celebrated and what relation they have with the behavior of the indigenous people—the Magars of Langaun of Baglung district, western Nepal. The research was carried out by using descriptive and explanatory research design. Participant observation, group discussion and key informant interview were carried out to collect the primary data. The Magars are rich in their ritual activities; among them kulpuja is the most important one. Like other castes and many ethnic groups of the world, the Magars of Langaun also sacrifice and offer chicken and black pig’s heart for their ancestral god. They believe on supreme power which is able for the termination of the evil eyes as well as other obstacles and illness by the happiness of their ancestral god. The offering of a live heart is a unique feature which is carried out emotionally. The rate of generation gap is clearly seen between the members of Magars. The elders are worried about the increasing rate of dependency in their offspring and feel how the children are able to survive within their environment. The importance of this ritual bind among the members of the community is deteriorating continuously in the name of modernization in younger members of the community.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v5i0.6366 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 5, 2011: 235-46 

  2. Urinary tract infection following ritual Jewish circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M; Barr, J; Bistritzer, T; Aladjem, M

    1996-11-01

    Circumcision seems to reduce the overall incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI), although a few studies have suggested that ritual circumcision may be a predisposing factor for UTI within the first 2 weeks following the procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible causal relationship between ritual circumcision and UTI. The study comprised 82 infants with UTI, 55 females and 27 males under the age of 1 year. All males were circumcised on the eighth day of life. The median age of infection was 0.75 and 7.0 months for males and females, respectively. Fifty-two percent (14/27) of UTI episodes were diagnosed within the 2 weeks following circumcision. A significantly lower incidence in Escherichia coli-induced UTI was observed in males compared to females, 67% and 93%, respectively. Similarly, the incidence of E. coli-induced UTI was also significantly lower in males presenting within 2 weeks following circumcision (57%) compared to infants presenting prior or more than 2 weeks following the procedure (92%). Positive blood cultures of an identical microorganism were observed in 6/27 males compared to 2/55 females. The incidence of urinary tract malformations and their severity were similar in both sexes. We conclude that the high incidence of UTI following a ritual Jewish circumcision, as well as the relatively high preponderance of bacteria other than E. coli, may suggest a causal relationship between circumcision and UTI.

  3. Caring for the Dead Ritually in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Clifford Holt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Buddhist conceptions of the after-life, and prescribed rites in relation to the dead, were modified adaptations of brahman ical patterns of religious culture in ancient India. In this article, I demonstrate how Buddhist conceptions, rites and dispositions have been sustained and transformed in a contemporary annual ritual of rising importance in Cambodia, pchum ben. I analyze phcum ben to determine its fundamental importance to the sustenance and coherence of the Khmer family and national identity. Pchum ben is a 15-day ritual celebrated toward the end of the three-month monastic rain retreat season each year. During these 15 days, Buddhist laity attend ritually to the dead, providing special care for their immediately departed kin and other more recently deceased ancestors. The basic aim of pchum ben involves making a successful transaction of karma transfer to one’s dead kin, in order to help assuage their experiences of suffering. The proximate catalyst for pchum ben’s current popularity is recent social and political history in Southeast Asia, especially the traumatic events that occurred nationally in Cambodia during the early 1970s through the 1980s when the country experienced a series of convulsions. Transformations in religious culture often stand in reflexive relationship to social and political change.

  4. Ritual vicissitudes: the uncertainties of Singaporean suicide rites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulson, Ruth E

    2012-06-01

    In this article, I examine how Singaporean Chinese families and funeral professionals work together to ritually manage the meaning and consequences of a death by suicide. While the now dated literature on Chinese mortuary practice emphasizes the formality and rigidity of death rituals, during fieldwork I noted many moments of confusion within ritual, moments of innovation, when relatives broke away from the already uncertain ritual script, and moments of deceit, when relatives conspired with funeral directors to hide the reason for a death. Through an examination of three funerals for suicide victims, including two cases in which the fact that the death was a suicide was hidden, I suggest that a focus on moments of confusion and of innovation paradoxically better captures the dynamism and efficacy of Chinese funeral rituals: here indeterminacy is indispensable to ritual form.

  5. Child Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or puts a child at risk of harm. Child abuse can be physical, sexual or emotional. Neglect, or not providing for a child's needs, is also a form of abuse. Most abused children suffer greater emotional than physical ...

  6. Usos de la comida ritual entre nahuas de Guerrero

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Based on the author’s long-term fieldwork, this article examines different strategies for interpreting the use of ritual foods in indigenous regions. It argues that ritual uses of food facilitate cultural reproduction and the transmission of local cosmologies. It considers the preparation y distribution of certain foods in agricultural ceremonies, offerings for the dead, and exchange during marriages. Food in ritual contexts appears to be an area for cultural resistance to imposed modernizati...

  7. School Rituals and Educational Practice Los Rituales Escolares y las Prácticas Educativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magister Pablo Daniel Vain

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available This study on school rituals, based on an socio-anthropology view, has arisen from the hypothesis of the anthropologist Roberto Da Matta. This hypothesis supports the theory that rituals are useful, particularly in a complex society, to promote its social identity and develop its character. Da Matta observes that it is as if the ritual domain were a privileged area from whence to enter the cultural kernel of a society, its main ideology, its system of values. This is the reason why we have put forward the proposal that to enquire about rituals at schools can result in a useful contribution to the analysis of this institution in its reproductive dimension or in the construction of a determined social structure. This research was carried out in three schools in the city of Posadas, Misiones, Argentina. In two of them, the research was pursued as a sustained, long-term and ethnographic observation: students, parents, teachers and the managing staff were interviewed. In the third school, just the teachers and the managing staff were interviewed by means of a probing survey; in both cases, strategies, sources and techniques were combined. En este estudio, (Nota 1 de carácter socioantropológico, sobre los rituales escolares se ha partido de la hipótesis del antropólogo Roberto Da Matta quién sostiene que “...los rituales sirven, sobre todo en la sociedad compleja, para promover la identidad social y construir su carácter”. (... “ Es como si el dominio del ritual fuese una región privilegiada para penetrar en el corazón cultural de una sociedad, en su ideología dominante, en su sistema de valores..” (Nota 2 Por ello nos hemos planteado que indagar acerca de los rituales en la escuela, puede resultar un aporte interesante para analizar esta institución en su dimensión reproductora o de construcción de una determinada estructura social. La investigación se realizó en tres escuelas de la Ciudad de Posadas (Misiones; Argentina. En dos

  8. Ritual de casamento e planejamento do primeiro filho Wedding ritual and first-child planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Sobreira Lopes

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou a existência ou não de ritual de casamento e sua relação com o planejamento do primeiro filho. Participaram quarenta e sete casais que esperavam seu primeiro filho, entrevistados conjuntamente no último trimestre da gravidez. Os resultados, analisados através de análise de conteúdo, mostraram que a maior parte dos casais (53% relatou ter tido ritual de casamento e ter planejado a primeira gravidez, enquanto 25% dos casais não relataram nenhuma das duas situações. Desta maneira, constatou-se uma associação estatisticamente significativa entre a presença de ritual de casamento e o planejamento da gravidez do primeiro filho. Os resultados apóiam a expectativa inicial de que o modo como ocorre a transição para o casamento desempenha um papel importante no planejamento da primeira gravidez. O ritual de casamento claramente demarca o início de um novo núcleo familiar, a passagem para a adultez e a potencial transição para a parentalidade.This study investigated the existence of a marriage ritual and the planning of a first-child. Forty-seven couples, who were expecting their first child were interviewed jointly in the last trimester of pregnancy. The results, obtained from content analysis, showed that most couples (53% reported that they had had a marriage ritual and that they had planned the first pregnancy, while 25% of the couples did not report any of the two situations. Therefore a statistically significant association was found between the presence of a marriage ritual and the first-child planning. The results gave support to the initial expectation that the way the transition to marriage takes place, has an important role in the first-child planning. Marriage rituals clearly demarcate the beginning of a new family, the transition to adulthood and the potential transition to parenthood.

  9. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture in Elder Abuse Mental capacity, consent, and undue influence The relationship between elder abuse and substance abuse ... older person's financial resources and to wield significant ... financially or, in the case of illegal drug use, less likely to report. ...

  10. School Ritual as Performance: A Reconstruction of Durkheim's and Turner's Uses of Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantz, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the assumption that ritual performances are not as important in modern, secular, bureaucratic schools as they were in communal, sacred, tribal societies, reviving a concept forged in structuralism and redefining it as a performative text, thus taking advantage of certain poststructural insights while maintaining much of the power of its…

  11. School Ritual as Performance: A Reconstruction of Durkheim's and Turner's Uses of Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantz, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the assumption that ritual performances are not as important in modern, secular, bureaucratic schools as they were in communal, sacred, tribal societies, reviving a concept forged in structuralism and redefining it as a performative text, thus taking advantage of certain poststructural insights while maintaining much of the power of its…

  12. Neo-chamanismo: el ritual transferido

    OpenAIRE

    Lombardi, Denise

    2011-01-01

    XI COLOQUIO INTERNACIONAL SOBRE OTOPAMES 2009 INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES-ANTHROPOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA, ST. PETERSBURGH; Esto articulo está orientado al estudio de la práctica neo-chamánica en Europa . Estas prácticas de interacción social aparecen como lugares para “nuevos rituales performativos”, utilizando y sobreponiendo mútliplicidad de lenguajes que alcanzan registros polisémicos que se refieren a diversos ámbitos del conocimiento. Durante mi investigación sobre el ter...

  13. RITUAL ACTIVITIES OF TARIQAS IN ZANZIBAR

    OpenAIRE

    FUJII, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the activities of tariqas (Islamic ritual orders that perform zikri, the practice of reciting the name of God repeatedly) in Zanzibar, and to show the importance of their practices in local culture. Since the latter half of the 19th century, the spread of tariqas, such as Tariqa Qadiriyya fromsouthern Somalia by Uways b. Muḥammad al-Barawī and Tariqa Shadhiliyya from the Comoros by Muḥammad Ma[c]rūf b. Aḥmad b. Abū Bakr, contributed to the Islamization of ...

  14. HRM and culture: history, ritual, and myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, W L

    1984-01-01

    The concept of organizational culture is here applied to the practice of human resource management. Reasons for the current emphasis on culture as an organizational metaphor are suggested. Cultural indicators which have diagnostic value for human resource professionals include organizational usage of symbols, rituals, ideologies, language, stores, myths, relationships, and humor. Examples of these indicators of culture are drawn from a variety of HRM practices and functions to explore the implications of each indicator. Alternative strategies are presented for improving the management of organizational change through sensitivity to cultural impact and better utilization of existing cultural realities.

  15. A Tibetan Girl's Hair Changing Ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshe dpal rdo rje , and Charles Kevin Stuart

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The most fundamental aspects of Tibetans' lives have gone unnoticed and undocumented in the Western academic literature which, in part, reflects the striking lack of local Tibetan voices in Tibetan studies in the West. This important work begins to remedy this lamentable situation.Contributing to a growing opus of English-language ethnographic studies produced by Tibetan graduates of the English Training Program (ETP in Xining City, Qinghai Province, China, the authors provide a rare view of the complex practices among Tibetans in rural southeast Qinghai associated with the hair-changing rituals that announce the sexual maturity of teenage girls. The hair-changing ritual was once widely practiced inthe Tibetan farming and semi-pastoralist communities of eastern Amdo, the region now divided among the rural counties of China's Qinghai and Gansu provinces. It was arguably the only major rite-of-passage that put girls front and center; there was no equivalent rite for boys. Yet its significance for Tibetans seems to have largely escaped the Chinese and western observers who wrote about the region from the early twentieth century on. As this study makes clear, these practices are about much more than just girls and their hair. In fact, in the days-long rite of passage, the preparations and festivities engage a whole cosmological nexus of fortune, purity, fertility, sexuality, and exchange, recruiting the participation of men and women across the community and entailing future (mutual aid, kinship, and affinal relationships among them. As such, the hair-changing ritual strikingly demonstrates that gender and kinship relations are not marginal concerns but core aspects of all Tibetans' social lives in these regions. This study's rich detail, and its description of a particular instance of the rite in 2007, is fruitful food for thought,especially in light of the rapid social and economic changes now taking place in rural Tibetan regions of China

  16. Official Feasts and Carnivals: Student Writing and Public Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilker, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Considers how students' texts are rituals that should both sanction existing truths and consecrate inventive freedom. Notes that in teaching writing, educators limit students' development by training them to practice only one kind of public ritual: the "official feast" of thesis-and-support writing. (SG)

  17. Examining and Disrupting Rituals of Practice in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Deborah; Henderson, Clare; Price, Graham; Aitken, Viv; Cheesman, Sue; Bevege, Fiona; Klemick, Amanda; Rose, Lisa; Tyson, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    Much of what happens in primary classrooms reflects a number of rituals and routines that have largely become an unconscious part of teachers' repertoires. While these "rituals of practice" provide a framework or structure to learning in classrooms, they are often left unexamined. These taken-for-granted ways of teaching require close…

  18. Ritual Behaviours of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Shing; Ho, Mei-Hwei

    2009-01-01

    Background: Ritual behaviour, while often considered as nonpurposeful or problematic, can also be regarded as functional behaviour for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study investigated the types and characteristics of ritual behaviour in children with ASD in a Taiwan context. Methods: Sixty-four primary school teachers, who…

  19. I Light This Candle: Using Rituals in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of rituals in the classroom can enrich and enhance learning. They can also build a sense of community and belonging which in turn makes the classroom a safer place to risk sharing ideas and engaging in class discussion. Rituals also bring closure to a particular segment of the class learning experience or for the class itself. How many…

  20. Music as a lens to study death rituals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoondert, Martin; Bruin-Mollenhorst, Janieke

    2016-01-01

    In this article we focus on music as a ‘lens’ to understand death rituals in general and cremation rituals in particular. It is linked to current research on music and death, performed by the first author, and can be considered as a programmatic presentation of a PhD project, running from September

  1. Anxiety and ritualization: Can attention discriminate compulsion from routine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krátký, Jan; Martin, Lang; Shaver, John;

    2016-01-01

    Despite the wide occurrence of ritual behavior in humans and animals, much of its causal underpinnings, as well as evolutionary functions, remain unknown. A prominent line of research focuses on ritualization as a response to anxiogenic stimuli. By manipulating anxiety levels, and subsequently as...... participant's locus of attention can discriminate between these 2 models....

  2. The Consumption of Democracy. The Ritual Politics of the Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    and demonstrate continuously renegotiate social identities. In this capacity, they ritually transform democratic processes that constitute the working of society. The argument put forward in this panel is that rituals significantly impact democratic processes both reshaping society and providing the grounds...... for responding to local and global crises. Thus ritual is not just the outcome of social construction, but serves as a precondition of the construction and transformation of society. Description: In the study of democracies and democratic processes, scholars of religion seemed to pay primary attention...... demonstrate rituals can work a privileged medium in the articulation of social memory and the expression of cultural identity. Thus ritual is not just the outcome of social construction, but serves as a precondition of the construction and transformation of society. The focus of this panel is on different...

  3. The bedside evaluation: ritual and reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Abraham; Brady, Erika; Kapur, Cari Costanzo; Horwitz, Ralph I

    2011-10-18

    The bedside evaluation, consisting of the history and physical examination, was once the primary means of diagnosis and clinical monitoring. The recent explosion of imaging and laboratory testing has inverted the diagnostic paradigm. Physicians often bypass the bedside evaluation for immediate testing and therefore encounter an image of the patient before seeing the patient in the flesh. In addition to risking delayed or missed diagnosis of readily recognizable disease, physicians who forgo or circumvent the bedside evaluation risk the loss of an important ritual that can enhance the physician-patient relationship. Patients expect that some form of bedside evaluation will take place when they visit a physician. When physicians complete this evaluation in an expert manner, it can have a salutary effect. If done poorly or not at all, in contrast, it can undermine the physician-patient relationship. Studies suggest that the context, locale, and quality of the bedside evaluation are associated with neurobiological changes in the patient. Recognizing the importance of the bedside evaluation as a healing ritual and a powerful diagnostic tool when paired with judicious use of technology could be a stimulus for the recovery of an ebbing skill set among physicians.

  4. Ritual genital cutting of female minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dena S

    2010-05-01

    The traditional custom of ritual cutting and alteration of the genitalia of female infants, children, and adolescents, referred to as female genital mutilation or female genital cutting (FGC), persists primarily in Africa and among certain communities in the Middle East and Asia. Immigrants in the United States from areas in which FGC is common may have daughters who have undergone a ritual genital procedure or may request that such a procedure be performed by a physician. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that pediatricians and pediatric surgical specialists should be aware that this practice has life-threatening health risks for children and women. The American Academy of Pediatrics opposes all types of female genital cutting that pose risks of physical or psychological harm, counsels its members not to perform such procedures, recommends that its members actively seek to dissuade families from carrying out harmful forms of FGC, and urges its members to provide patients and their parents with compassionate education about the harms of FGC while remaining sensitive to the cultural and religious reasons that motivate parents to seek this procedure for their daughters.

  5. Cesarean section: science or ritual surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, M

    1991-01-01

    Cesarean section has proven to be a powerful weapon in saving fetal and maternal life when scientific criteria are used in a variety of emergency conditions. However, because of the high incidence of false positive readings with fetal heartrate monitoring, cesareans are often resorted to unnecessarily. In addition, there are other marginal, nonscientific human concerns such as patient and doctor preference, convenience, fear of litigation, wish to avoid pain of labor, and other unspoken and often unrecognized issues that can lead to cesarean section. When cesarean section is resorted to for the above reasons, it becomes ritual surgery. It is time to recognize two sets of criteria for cesarean sections: first, scientific criteria that would save the life of the mother or fetus, or unequivocally guarantee better fetal outcome; and second, nonscientific criteria based on personal preference of doctors and patients. If doctors were candid about these two sets of criteria, patients would not be pressured into cesareans by minor, often transient and misleading, abnormalities on fetal monitors. They would not have to experience ritual surgery unless it was clearly their choice to do so.

  6. CONTEMPORARY FUNERAL AND MEMORIAL RITUALS OF CHINESE

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    E. G. Belaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article on the basis of the field material of author of 2015 a modern funeral-mention ceremony of the Chinese is examined in city Harbin, where questioning of respondents, workers of cemetery and columbarium was conducted. 21 peoples (8 women and 13 men were polled. Except questioning of informants was conducted by a photo fixing of registration of columbarium, cemeteries and graves. In China always spared the special attention to the ceremony of funerals of relatives. In work of Confucius “Lun Yu” is such phrase: “Carefully execute the ceremony of funerals of parents, execute all necessary actions to the end and virtue of people will increase”. That is the emphasis that a funeral of parents has to take place in full accordance with ritual is placed. During time a ceremony was passed from a generation in a generation, and although he was placed simplified and mutated, however basic rules remained unchanging. Funeralmention traditions have the developed structure and differ in stability of customs and ceremonies, binding overs in the use of ritual belonging, by vitality of ideas (at times very archaic about death and duties living before memory about gone from life. Behaving to the number of strong ethnic traditions, a funeral-mention rite occupies an important place in the system of traditional connections.

  7. The professional ecstatic in his social and ritual position

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    Birgitte Sonne

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional ecstatic is a religious specialist, who has become recognized as a person able to carry out an ecstatic ritual, corresponding with the local cultural expectations in force. The ecstatic ritual per se comprises a number of persons, i.e. it is a collective ritual. Part of the criteria that may be employed as a measure of the professional ecstatic's social status, is covered by the determining designation, social and cultic position. What ecstatic ritual duties does he have, and how large a part in the whole range of collective rituals within his society will his duties comprise? This question is examined through the social and ritual position among the Eskimos in their traditional, and thus relatively stable, societal cultures. The professional ecstatics among the Eskimos may be defined as shamans. However, the shamans were only part-time specialists among the Eskimos. They did have ritual tasks in the economic rituals of their society, and most of them had to pass a special ritual of initiation to obtain recognition as a shaman. The Eskimos have no juridical institutions, and as their informal leaders have no juridical authority, the shaman must exercise a considerable control of social morality. The shaman can here function simultaneously as informal leader, which is an impossible combination in societies with some degree of political organization. A shaman never became a leader due to his shaman powers in isolation. In societies where hunting demanded organized cooperation under a single man's leadership, he should also have organisatorial gifts. If a shaman, apart from his recognized shaman powers, possessed these qualities, he could attain a leader's status. His advice as a shaman, in common situations of crisis, combined with his authority as a leader, would endow him with particularly great authority.

  8. Rituales de hetzmek¹ en Yucatán

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    Nancy Beatriz Villanueva Villanueva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo hacemos una revisión, sistematización y análisis de los estudios que se han realizado sobre los rituales de hetzmek en Yucatán, para que sirva como punto de partida a investigaciones etnográficas posteriores sobre las celebraciones actuales. Nos interesa conocer cómo han sido analizados e interpretados dichos rituales. Para ello, nos centramos en los siguientes aspectos: a las presunciones que se han hecho sobre su origen, b las problemáticas o temáticas teóricas dentro de las cuales se ha abordado, c las funciones y los propósitos que los estudiosos le asignan y d la manera en que realizan sus interpretaciones. Previamente, para que el lector conozca en qué consiste este ritual, presentamos una descripción basada en los rasgos más comunes e ideales. Finalmente, hacemos algunas reflexiones y recomendaciones metodológicas para futuros análisis de este ritual.In this paper we review, systematize and analyze the studies that have been done on rituals of hetzmek in Yucatán, as a starting point for subsequent ethnographic research on this topic. We are interested in examining how these rituals have been analyzed and interpreted. Our focus is on: a the assumptions that have been made about the ritual's origin, b the theoretical problems within which it has been studies, c the functions and purposes scholars have assigned to it, and d how they have interpreted it. We start by presenting a description based on its ideal form and common characteristics in order for the reader to understand what the ritual consists of. Finally, we discuss some methodological points and make recommendations for future analyses of this ritual.

  9. Autobiographical Memory in a Fire-Walking Ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris; Schjoedt, Uffe; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Anthropological theories have discussed the effects of participation in high-arousal rituals in the formation of autobiographical memory; however, precise measurements for such effects are lacking. In this study, we examined episodic recall among participants in a highly arousing fire......-walking ritual. To assess arousal, we used heart rate measurements. To assess the dynamics of episodic memories, we obtained reports immediately after the event and two months later. We evaluated memory accuracy from video footage. Immediately after the event, participants’ reports revealed limited recall, low...... confidence and high accuracy. Two months later we found more inaccurate memories and higher confidence. Whereas cognitive theories of ritual have predicted flashbulb memories for highly arousing rituals, we found that memories were strongly suppressed immediately after the event and only later evolved...

  10. Bilateral Enucleation for Ritual Purposes - A Case Report | Ojabo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... In Nigeria, irrespective of religious affiliation and literacy level, majority of individuals' beliefs are centered ... Keywords – Blindness, Ritual killing, Spiritual guidance, International campaign ...

  11. An Amdo Tibetan Village New Year Trance Medium Ritual

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    Dpal ldan bkra shis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gling rgyal Village's (Tongren County, Rma lho [Huangnan] Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon [Qinghai] Province, China Mag pa Mountain God lha ba Lo sar (Tibetan New Year Ritual is described. Despite recent scholarly attention to Reb gong klu rol, ritualized lha ba activity and dances in the context of Lo sar in Reb gong have been ignored. Ru zhol ma and Ru gong ma are Gling rgyal groups that held the ritual on the first day of the first month of the Chinese Lunar calendar. This presentation describes preparatory activities, rituals at Mag pa Shrine,and the Ru zhol ma threshing ground in the late twentieth century, illustrating that klu rol embraces certain dances and other activities that that are also performed during Lo sar.

  12. The Consumption of Democracy. The Ritual Politics of the Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    . The second paper “Ritually Addressing Wrongs: Negotiating Citizenship in Rural Uttar Pradesh” presents results of fieldwork conducted on the Women’s Health Rights Forum. This is a network that consists of about 11,000 women leaders with different social and cultural backgrounds. This paper discusses...... the ambiguities of the ritual processes practiced by these women which emerge as an integral component to their negotiation of citizenship. It is argued that for the female Dalit activists being part of the social movement using ritual tools like testimony acts as a deeply egalitarian vehicle in forming...... research conducted on the ritual and musical performances of an interreligious choir in Turkey, the Antakya Choir of Civilizations. Outlining the short history of the choir which started as an interreligious grassroots movement involving various members and leaders of different religious groups in Antakya...

  13. [Failure of a mourning ritual and reactive depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Pape Lamine; Thiam, Mamadou Habib

    2011-01-01

    In some African societies, mourning rituals are a way of isolating death from the territory of the living and to allow the bereaved to regain, after a certain time, their place in society. However, for a young educated woman confronted with the brutal death of her sister, the traditional ritual to which her family subjected her resulted in a prolonged reactive depression combined with cognitive disorders..

  14. AHP 6: The Brag 'go Wolf Begging Ritual

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    Mgon po tshe ring

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A ritual performed in 1999 in Dge rtse (Genzhi 更知 Township, Brag 'go (Luhuo 炉霍 County, Dkar mdzes (Ganzi 甘孜 Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan (四川 Province is described. The ritual involved a man, his son, and his nephew taking a wolf skin, visiting nine villages, and asking for donations to appease the 'owner of the wolves'.

  15. Ritual Commensality between Human and Non-Human Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Bray, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    In anthropology, it has become axiomatic that social relationships are constructed through food practices and embodied in food. This paper suggests that both ritual and quotidian commensality have as either a goal or a consequence the construction of specific relations of sociality, and in this regard are not so different. What may distinguish these spheres of commensality, however, are the types of persons engaged in the act of shared consumption. The paper considers ritual commensality...

  16. RITUAL ISLAM DALAM MOTIF BATIK BESUREK-BENGKULU

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    Rizali Nanang

    2015-11-01

    batik has meaning in the Islamic ritual as one artefact used in funeral activity, tabut tradition, and circumcision ritual. The wearing of besurek batik is a way promote Islamic mission (dakwah. It is the way to glory the God (Allah. Recently, the people removed the verses Al-Qur’an written in Besurek batik and they changed the God verses with calligraphy that looks like Arabic alphabets without meaning called besurek.

  17. Las metáforas comestibles en los rituales mexicanos

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a method of semantic decoding of certain dishes cooked as part of the rituals of the Aztecs at the time of Spanish Conquest and of several contemporary Indian groups. Starting from the idea that, in a ritual nothing is unpredictable and everything has a sense, it introduces a reflection about the categories of metaphor and metonymy conceived as two founding mechanisms of the human mind, at the same time distinct and closely linked, which express themselves in a verbal ...

  18. Altered States of Consciousness during an Extreme Ritual.

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    Ellen M Lee

    Full Text Available Extreme rituals (body-piercing, fire-walking, etc. are anecdotally associated with altered states of consciousness-subjective alterations of ordinary mental functioning (Ward, 1984-but empirical evidence of altered states using both direct and indirect measures during extreme rituals in naturalistic settings is limited. Participants in the "Dance of Souls", a 3.5-hour event during which participants received temporary piercings with hooks or weights attached to the piercings and danced to music provided by drummers, responded to measures of two altered states of consciousness. Participants also completed measures of positive and negative affect, salivary cortisol (a hormone associated with stress, self-reported stress, sexual arousal, and intimacy. Both pierced participants (pierced dancers and non-pierced participants (piercers, piercing assistants, observers, drummers, and event leaders showed evidence of altered states aligned with transient hypofrontality (Dietrich, 2003; measured with a Stroop test and flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; Csikszentmihalyi & Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; measured with the Flow State Scale. Both pierced and non-pierced participants also reported decreases in negative affect and psychological stress and increases in intimacy from before to after the ritual. Pierced and non-pierced participants showed different physiological reactions, however, with pierced participants showing increases in cortisol and non-pierced participants showing decreases from before to during the ritual. Overall, the ritual appeared to induce different physiological effects but similar psychological effects in focal ritual participants (i.e., pierced dancers and in participants adopting other roles.

  19. "The margin for error": Ritual coping with cultural pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broch, T B; Kristiansen, E

    2014-10-01

    Meritocratic sport cultures, media attention, coaches' ambitions, and "enthused" parents create stress and make coping pivotal for athletes' performance. A transdisciplinary dialogue between a sports-sociologist and a sport-psychologist manifests ritual practices in athletes' lived sport experiences as coping strategies. Based on two empirical strands, field observations of boy's handball and interviews with elite male wrestlers', analysis of pregame routines scrutinize psychosocial dimensions of athletes' ritual practice. The implications of ritual meaning making are investigated as a means to cope with sport specific sociocultural anxieties. Rituals are interpreted as psychosocial processes applied to construct perceived order and comfort in stressful sport milieus. We contend that it is reasonable to believe that successful coping is not solely because of athletes' psychological competencies and experiences, but also their ability to ritually use culture in meaningful ways. To manifest important contextual aspects of athletes' lived sport experiences, to nurture task-oriented sport milieus, and to create change in sport and physical cultural contexts, we consequently suggest that the cultural meanings applied in ritual should be an important aspect to address.

  20. Altered States of Consciousness during an Extreme Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ellen M; Klement, Kathryn R; Ambler, James K; Loewald, Tonio; Comber, Evelyn M; Hanson, Sarah A; Pruitt, Bria; Sagarin, Brad J

    2016-01-01

    Extreme rituals (body-piercing, fire-walking, etc.) are anecdotally associated with altered states of consciousness-subjective alterations of ordinary mental functioning (Ward, 1984)-but empirical evidence of altered states using both direct and indirect measures during extreme rituals in naturalistic settings is limited. Participants in the "Dance of Souls", a 3.5-hour event during which participants received temporary piercings with hooks or weights attached to the piercings and danced to music provided by drummers, responded to measures of two altered states of consciousness. Participants also completed measures of positive and negative affect, salivary cortisol (a hormone associated with stress), self-reported stress, sexual arousal, and intimacy. Both pierced participants (pierced dancers) and non-pierced participants (piercers, piercing assistants, observers, drummers, and event leaders) showed evidence of altered states aligned with transient hypofrontality (Dietrich, 2003; measured with a Stroop test) and flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; Csikszentmihalyi & Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; measured with the Flow State Scale). Both pierced and non-pierced participants also reported decreases in negative affect and psychological stress and increases in intimacy from before to after the ritual. Pierced and non-pierced participants showed different physiological reactions, however, with pierced participants showing increases in cortisol and non-pierced participants showing decreases from before to during the ritual. Overall, the ritual appeared to induce different physiological effects but similar psychological effects in focal ritual participants (i.e., pierced dancers) and in participants adopting other roles.

  1. Family rituals, financial burden, and mothers' adjustment in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M Cristina; Alderfer, Melissa A; Kazak, Anne E

    2016-12-01

    The financial burden of childhood cancer may contribute to the distress that parents experience during and after treatment. Inconsistent relationships between financial burden and parental psychological distress highlight the need to identify psychosocial factors that may moderate this relationship. In this study, we aimed to determine if family ritual meaning moderates the relationship between financial burden and anxiety and depression symptoms among mothers of children with cancer. Portuguese mothers of children with cancer on-treatment and off-treatment (N = 244) completed measures of financial burden, anxiety and depression symptoms, and family ritual meaning. Moderating effects were tested using hierarchical multiple regression analyses. Family ritual meaning buffered the effect of financial burden on anxiety, but not on depression symptoms. The relationship between financial burden and anxiety symptoms was not significant when mothers endorsed higher levels of family ritual meaning. Although preliminary, the current findings suggest that high levels of perceived family ritual meaning may constitute a protective factor against the effect of financial burden on mothers' anxiety symptoms. Promoting family ritual meaning might be an effective approach to reducing anxiety symptoms of mothers of children with cancer in the context of financial burden. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Visione, possessione, estasi: sulla teoria della trance rituale - Vision, possession, ecstasy: on the theory of ritual trance

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Luigi Palmisano

    2013-01-01

    The ritual trances are the expression of the institutionalization of modified states of consciousness. This essay identifies and proposes three major paradigms of institutionalization – vision, possession and ecstasy – and proceeds then to the analysis of the modes and modalities of ritualization and institutionalization of modified states of consciousness – initiation, therapy, liturgy and divination – which lead to a thematization of the structure of trance. Beginning with the d...

  3. Ritual Piracy or Creolization with an Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Romberg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Discusses a renewed view on "creolization", in relation to the Caribbean's social and cultural history. Author first points at the different creolization theories, noting a recurrence in these of the concepts of "mixture", "creative mixture", or "dialogue" between cultures, and describes how such "harmonious mix" views of creolization influenced forms of nationalism and nation building in the Caribbean, thereby blurring inequalities. She, however, points at the unequal power relations, or "contentious constitution", historically involved in creolization processes, with hegemonic (cultural and religious colonial power over and against so-called superstitious or other vernacular interpretations. With a specific focus on late-19th c. creolization processes in urban slave and highland peasant-Maroon societies in Puerto Rico, she further shows how vernacular, magical religions and folk healing rechanneled hegemonic religious symbols, like the cross, to purposes other than those intended by the Church. She calls this a form of "ritual piracy", including tactical mimicry, representing thus subversion from within, but with maintained relations to the hegemonic, complicating the "resistance" aspect.

  4. Lean healthcare: rhetoric, ritual and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin J; Bishop, Simon

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic account of the implementation of Lean service redesign methodologies in one UK NHS hospital operating department. It is suggested that this popular management 'technology', with its emphasis on creating value streams and reducing waste, has the potential to transform the social organisation of healthcare work. The paper locates Lean healthcare within wider debates related to the standardisation of clinical practice, the re-configuration of occupational boundaries and the stratification of clinical communities. Drawing on the 'technologies-in-practice' perspective the study is attentive to the interaction of both the intent to transform work and the response of clinicians to this intent as an ongoing and situated social practice. In developing this analysis this article explores three dimensions of social practice to consider the way Lean is interpreted and articulated (rhetoric), enacted in social practice (ritual), and experienced in the context of prevailing lines of power (resistance). Through these interlinked analytical lenses the paper suggests the interaction of Lean and clinical practice remains contingent and open to negotiation. In particular, Lean follows in a line of service improvements that bring to the fore tensions between clinicians and service leaders around the social organisation of healthcare work. The paper concludes that Lean might not be the easy remedy for making both efficiency and effectiveness improvements in healthcare.

  5. The rhetoric of transformation in ritual healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csordas, T J

    1983-12-01

    The problem of reconciling accounts of religious healing from the points of view of comparative religion and medicine suggests the necessity of an interpretive or hermeneutic approach to the analysis of therapeutic process. This paper, in the context of examining psychotherapeutic ritual among Catholic Pentecostals, formulates an interpretive approach in which healing is conceived as a form of discourse that is both religious and psychiatric. This discourse embodies a cultural rhetoric capable of performing three essential persuasive tasks: to create a predisposition to be healed, to create the experience of spiritual empowerment, and to create the concrete perception of personal transformation. It is shown that this threefold process activates and controls healing processes endogenous to the supplicant in healing, and either redirects the supplicant's attention toward new aspects of his actions and experiences, or alters the manner in which he attends to accustomed aspects of those actions and experiences. The result is the creation of both a new phenomenological world, and new self-meaning for the supplicant as a whole and holy person.

  6. Rituals decrease the neural response to performance failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M. Hobson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rituals are found in all types of performance domains, from high-stakes athletics and military to the daily morning preparations of the working family. Yet despite their ubiquity and widespread importance for humans, we know very little of ritual’s causal basis and how (if at all they facilitate goal-directed performance. Here, in a fully pre-registered pre/post experimental design, we examine a candidate proximal mechanism, the error-related negativity (ERN, in testing the prediction that ritual modulates neural performance-monitoring. Participants completed an arbitrary ritual—novel actions repeated at home over one week—followed by an executive function task in the lab during electroencephalographic (EEG recording. Results revealed that relative to pre rounds, participants showed a reduced ERN in the post rounds, after completing the ritual in the lab. Despite a muted ERN, there was no evidence that the reduction in neural monitoring led to performance deficit (nor a performance improvement. Generally, the findings are consistent with the longstanding view that ritual buffers against uncertainty and anxiety. Our results indicate that ritual guides goal-directed performance by regulating the brain’s response to personal failure.

  7. Ritual orders and ritologiques: a terminological quest for some neglected fields of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stausberg

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic presented in this paper lies at the crossroads between ritual studies and ritual theory. In order to get an idea of the field of study, it may be useful to distinguish between the following general approaches to the study of ritual. To begin with, ritual theory in the strict sense, i.e. with explanatory ambitions etc., tends to focus on RITUAL as such: what IT is, what IT does, how IT works ("functions", and why IT is as it is.Softer varieties of ritual theory, e.g. approaches that wish to foster a better "understanding" of what goes on when rituals are being performed, may focus on RITUALS in a semi-empirical and semi-theoretical fashion. As a matter of fact, to a large extent ritual "theory" seems to be the result of theoretical reflections on matters of empirical research. Apart from that, we find studies of this and that phenomenon (e.g. time, space, violence, aesthetics, media, etc. in relation to rituals ("ritual and time", "ritual and space", etc.. Then, of course, we have a good dose of studies on different "types", "classes", or "groups" of rituals. Most popular, (in the absence of any statistical evidence, are studies of "sacrifice", "rites of passage", and "initiations", with "healing rituals" and "pilgrimages" as ever more successful runner-ups. Correspondingly, there is a number of studies about any variety of any class of rituals among the so-and-so people ("initiation among the NN". Moreover, there are plenty of books about the rituals of this and that religion or people — in colonial times often published under such titles as "The customs and ceremonies of the NN". Last but not least, there is an overwhelming amount of studies devoted to the presentation or analysis of single rituals.

  8. The Structual-Semiotic Meaning of Ritual and the Problem Relating to the Transposition of Meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Prilutskii

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The author analyses the semiotic particularities in the formation and development of various levels of meaning of religious ritual. He suggests that various contexts, which reflect the specific design of various religious and cultural processes and give form to a unique semiotic space, affect the development of ritual. He interprets ritual as the union of word and action, which allows him to examine ritual discourse as a type of metalinguistic discourse. Genetically, ritual derives from an utterance in an ordinary language, which later (because of the specific paradigm germane to religious communication takes on ritual form - and in that way special language of religious ritual originates. To explain the specifics of the ritual semiosis, the principles of the theory of the semiotic drift are used, which in this situation permits the author to explain in what way elements of the ritual complex may cause variations in the semiotic attributes of sign and symbol. The author examines various levels of the semiotic drift using the example of the ritualogeme of the veneration of icons in the High Church Lutheranism of the Scandinavian countries. The author examines the structural-semiotic meaning of religious ritual and analyses the mechanisms surrounding the formation of various levels of meaning in ritual communication. He also discusses the particularities of the transformation of meaning of religious rituals, which is made possible by the transposition of rituals (TR from one cultural-religious context to another, an action which provides the semiotic interpretation of this process, a process which does not ignore the meaning of the elements of the religious ritual and their semiotic collaboration in the framework of the ritual complex. The author ends with an analysis of the symbolic levels of the ritual semiosis, defi ned by the characteristics particular to the space and time of the contemporary ritual action.

  9. The Gorani Wedding Ritual – Between Individual and Collective Memory

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    Jadranka Đorđević Crnobrnja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will attempt to determine which contents are present in individual memories of weddings and underline the contents which contribute to the formation of commonplace memories within personal memories. By studying individual personal memories of a ritual practice, I will attempt to answer questions about the relationship between individual and collective memory. In the paper I will also consider the issue of the influence of individual memories on the construction of ethnic identity. The paper is based on an analysis of narrative discourse which has been adapted for ethnographic research. The Gorani wedding ritual represents a social practice which encompasses not only the influence of collective on personal remembrance and memory, but also the reverse. The Gorani wedding ritual is an example of a social holiday which, on a personal level creates a feeling of connection between individuals and their community, while on a collective level it creates conditions for the continuity of the Gorani community.

  10. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual.

  11. Media and identification processes: a ritual and dramatic construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomé Sola-Morales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present theoretical paper analyzes the way mediatic communication construct identifications. The thesis proposed is that the media configure ritually and dramatically identifications made by individuals and groups. First of all, we show the limitations of the concept of “identity” and we propose to use “identification” instead. Second, we explore the extent of social drama theory and role theory and we open it to new theoretical challenges and perspectives. Thirdly, it is shown that the concept of "ritual" is very useful to understand and interpret the identity construction through the media. All this leads us to conclude that both the theatricality and rituality are key to understanding the processes of identification that individuals and groups make in relation to the media.

  12. Opposition and Complicity in Tribal/Ritual Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Castillo Fernández

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Human activities are developed by common rituals, it means, there is a daily sequence that is been repeated, caused by sociocultural roots or personal convenience. Rites and rituals are always under exploration and systematization, which is a big contradiction because it demonstrates that they are not statics; and their dynamics change into new ways of decoding and remaking daily sequences. This research explores this daily sequences, single and collective, that are shown in urban rituals of youth. The objective is to describe and understand the activities of young people, comparing with other activities related with religion, politics and family. This study gives some categories that frame social behavior, and build social networks.

  13. 76 FR 4987 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Bali: Art, Ritual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance..., Ritual, Performance,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are...

  14. Ritual, tiempo y espacio sagrado en el budismo zen argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catón Eduardo Carini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El budismo zen es una religión oriental que desde hace varias décadas se ha esparcido en numerosos países occidentales, incluido la Argentina. Una característica notable de su vida comunitaria es la compleja ritualización de sus prácticas cotidianas. En nuestra aproximación a la dimensión ritual del zen indagaremos la forma en que ésta contribuye a crear un tiempo y un espacio sagrado y observaremos cómo estas prácticas son consideradas por los propios miembros del grupo como un recurso pedagógico que posibilita entrenarse en una diferente manera de estar en el mundo, de vivirse y percibirse tanto a ellos mismos como a los demás. De modo que algunos elementos del complejo ritual zen juegan un rol de primera importancia como una tecnología del ser.Zen Buddhism is an oriental religion that since several decades has expanded in various western countries, Argentina being one of them. The complex ritualization of its everyday practices is a considerable characteristic of Zen Buddhist community life. In our exploration of the ritual dimension of Zen, first we will investigate how this contributes to the creation of a sacred time and place. After this, we will show how ritual practices are considered a pedagogic recourse by group members; a means to make possible their training of a different way of being in the world, of experimenting, living and perceiving both themselves and others in a different way. Some elements of the often complex Zen ritual play a highly important part as technologies of the self.

  15. RITUALITY AS A WAY OF ACTUALIZING THE CATEGORY OF OTHERNESS WITHIN THE JUDICIAL DISCOURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Bogomazova Viktoriya Vladimirovna

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the rituality as one of the ways of actualizing the category of otherness within the judicial discourse, in general, and the court session, in particular. The author analyzes the relevant features of rituality in the judicial discourse, reveals the categorical connection between the rituality and otherness, the speech means which actualize their interaction. The author gives examples illustrating the actualization of the concept by means of rituality in the texts of cou...

  16. Rituals of Madness in the Practices of Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Joel

    2016-03-01

    While completing a PhD in literature with a focus on the practices of physical and linguistic spaces, I was also working and sleeping (on call) at a dilapidated house in a poorer part of Bristol in case I was needed by one of five paranoid or clinically psychotic residents. I gave out medication in the morning, then went home to study in a small rented room. I began to see ritual everywhere--in my professors' routines; my own habits; the behaviours of the mentally ill patients. This paper is the story of a number of madnesses and the problems with reading ritual performance in everything we do.

  17. Visione, possessione, estasi: sulla teoria della trance rituale - Vision, possession, ecstasy: on the theory of ritual trance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luigi Palmisano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ritual trances are the expression of the institutionalization of modified states of consciousness. This essay identifies and proposes three major paradigms of institutionalization – vision, possession and ecstasy – and proceeds then to the analysis of the modes and modalities of ritualization and institutionalization of modified states of consciousness – initiation, therapy, liturgy and divination – which lead to a thematization of the structure of trance. Beginning with the discussion of the preceding ethnographies which contribute to the elaboration of a new general theory of trance and are at the same time the result of this same theory of trance – certainly not wholly formulated although much has been done – the author examines the ethnographic material on the zar cults of Ethiopia on the basis of his many years fieldwork in Ethiopia and in other ethnic, social, political and cultural contexts, always concentrated on ritual trances of vision, possession and ecstasy.

  18. A Perspective on Ritual: Toward a Direction for Revitalizing Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Kathleen E.; Garcia, John L.

    2007-01-01

    Ritual has played an integral role in human development and socialization throughout history. This paper seeks to highlight that role so that the importance of perpetuating ritual becomes obvious and necessary. The purpose of this paper is to re-iterate the significance of ritual in human development, education, and social improvement; discuss the…

  19. Physical Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be acquaintances, sons, daughters, grandchildren, or others. Physical abuse that is perpetrated by spouses or intimate partners in order to gain power and control over the victim is described in ...

  20. The Ritual Dimensions of Resistance: Clowning and Symbolic Inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Peter L.

    1985-01-01

    Draws upon recent fieldwork in a Catholic junior high school to focus on the ritualized behavior of the "class clown," who resists instruction. Calls upon resistance theorists to strive for more conceptual precision in their articulation of the symbolic dimension of transgressive student behavior by utilizing a more multidisciplinary…

  1. Dinner Rituals That Correlate with Child and Adult BMI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, B.; Kleef, van E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: What predicts whether a child will be at risk for obesity? Whereas past research has focused on foods, eating habits, feeding styles, and family meal patterns, this study departs from a food-centric approach to examine how various dinner rituals might influence the BMIs of children and ad

  2. On the Elementary Neural Forms of Micro-Interactional Rituals:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    2016-01-01

    prosocial behavior. The ritual ingre-dients of mutual attention and shared mood may, moreover, be specified as part of a social engagementsystem, neurally regulating attention and emotional arousal via a face–heart connection. The article suggeststhat this social engagement system provides part of the neural...

  3. On the Elementary Neural Forms of Micro-Interactional Rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    2016-01-01

    prosocial behavior. The ritual ingredients of mutual attention and shared mood may, moreover, be specified as part of a social engagement system, neurally regulating attention and emotional arousal via a face–heart connection. The article suggests that this social engagement system provides part...

  4. "Assembling" the Ideal Learner: The School Assembly as Regulatory Ritual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, Patti; Jacklin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    "School assemblies" are rituals that celebrate and mark the school community. They carry messages of allegiance and belonging that are disseminated both verbally and nonverbally. Although verbal messages are explicitly stated, nonverbal messages are conveyed through subjection to habits, rules, and orders (Foucault 1977) and are…

  5. Rituals and Routines: Supporting Infants and Toddlers and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Linda; Petersen, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The words "routine" and "ritual" are sometimes used interchangeably. Yet there are some important differences. Routines are repeated, predictable events that provide a foundation for the daily tasks in a child's life. Teachers can create a predictable routine in early childhood settings for infants and toddlers, and they can individualize those…

  6. Reinscribing the birthing body: homebirth as ritual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyney, Melissa

    2011-12-01

    In this article, I examine the clinical practices engaged in by U.S. homebirth midwives and their clients from the beginning of pregnancy through to the immediate postpartum period, deconstructing them for their symbolic and ritual content. Using data collected from open-ended, semistructured interviews and intensive participant-observation, I describe the roles ritual plays in the construction, performance, and maintenance of birth at home as a transgressive rite of passage. As midwives ritually elaborate approaches to care to capitalize on their semiotic power to transmit a set of counterhegemonic values to participants, they are attempting, quite self-consciously, to peel away the fictions of medicalized birthing care. Their goal: to expose strong and capable women who "grow" and birth babies outside the regulatory and self-regulatory processes naturalized by modern, technocratic obstetrics. Homebirth practices are, thus, not simply evidence-based care strategies. They are intentionally manipulated rituals of technocratic subversion designed to reinscribe pregnant bodies and to reterritorialize childbirth spaces (home) and authorities (midwives and mothers).

  7. Intellectual Integrity: Examining Common Rituals in Early Childhood Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ramona; Swim, Terri Jo

    2009-01-01

    This article examines two constructs--ritual and intellectual integrity--as they might unfold in early childhood settings. The authors use the popular practices of closed-ended crafts, calendar exercises, and worksheets to highlight the difference between learning experiences that have become formulaic habits and those that reflect rich and potent…

  8. Optimal religion: optimality theory accounts for ritual dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biró, T.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, religious rituals, or religious actions in general, were seen as transactions between a human agent and a culturally postulated superhuman agent. We have hypothesised that the human agent maintains a behavioural grammar driving their own actions, as well as a theory of mind for each

  9. The Ifugao Alim: Chanted Narrated Dramatic Discourse in Ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Bona de Santos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper, by way of introducing the little-known Ifugao alim, gives the readers an idea of what has been written about it by Ifugao and non-Ifugao writers and scholars, and recounts my own discovery and study of it. It will focus on the Piwong alim, which was the topic of my dissertation (Rosario de Santos del Rosario 2003, and which I recorded during a live performance in 1975 in Piwong, Hingyon, during the ritual called hongan di tagu—a prestige ritual of the kadangyan, for the welfare of a sick woman. In particular, the paper discusses the Piwong alim’s significance, structure, content and voice, and presents illustrations, through excerpts, which give the reader an insight into its ideological direction and unique aesthetics. The Piwong alim uses a mix of ritual genres, external and internal narration and dramatic character dialogues and monologues.The alim has been considered, by varied Ifugaos, as the crown jewel of its elaborate ritual; a sociological charter; and a magical myth that brings wellbeing.

  10. Celebrating the Family: Ethnicity, Consumer Culture, and Family Rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleck, Elizabeth H.

    This book examines family traditions of over two centuries in the United States and finds a complicated process of change in the way Americans have celebrated holidays such as Christmas, Easter, Thanksgiving, Passover, and Chinese New Year as well as the life cycle rituals of birth, birthdays, coming of age, marriage, and death. The book notes…

  11. Film Remakes as Ritual and Disguise : From Carmen to Ripley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanger, Anat

    2006-01-01

    Wat is de reden van filmproducenten voor het maken van een 'remake', waarin een succesvol verhaal opnieuw verteld wordt? En waarin schuilt de aantrekkingskracht voor het publiek om deze verhalen steeds opnieuw te beleven? Wat maakt Carmen, Jeanne d'Arc of Ripley zo bijzonder? Film Remakes as Ritual

  12. Film Remakes as Ritual and Disguise : From Carmen to Ripley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanger, Anat

    2006-01-01

    Wat is de reden van filmproducenten voor het maken van een 'remake', waarin een succesvol verhaal opnieuw verteld wordt? En waarin schuilt de aantrekkingskracht voor het publiek om deze verhalen steeds opnieuw te beleven? Wat maakt Carmen, Jeanne d'Arc of Ripley zo bijzonder? Film Remakes as Ritual

  13. Dinner Rituals That Correlate with Child and Adult BMI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, B.; Kleef, van E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: What predicts whether a child will be at risk for obesity? Whereas past research has focused on foods, eating habits, feeding styles, and family meal patterns, this study departs from a food-centric approach to examine how various dinner rituals might influence the BMIs of children and

  14. Dinner Rituals That Correlate with Child and Adult BMI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, B.; Kleef, van E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: What predicts whether a child will be at risk for obesity? Whereas past research has focused on foods, eating habits, feeding styles, and family meal patterns, this study departs from a food-centric approach to examine how various dinner rituals might influence the BMIs of children and ad

  15. Leading rites: An examination of ritualization in faculty leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Shah M.

    This study is an examination of the self-reflective narratives of faculty members from a selective liberal arts college in the Midwest. Participants' narratives regarding their faculty leadership are examined for patterns of ritualization. Narrative profiles were constructed by the researcher from the transcripts of extended interviews of four faculty research participants. The narrative profiles were then examined for patterns and motifs utilizing the qualitative research strategies of narrative analysis and narrative inquiry. An examination of the narrative profiles yields major themes of personal ritualization and informal leadership. Research participants remember their ritualization as marking transitions of significance accompanied by pivotal persons who ignited their incipient interest in teaching and scholarship, who helped make professionally useful connections, and who served as admirable role models. Also reported are a set of ambient values, commitments and convictions that surround and inscribe the ritualization experiences of research participants. Research participants remember their faculty leadership work as comprising self-appointed initiatives that served students, the academic department, and the college, commitments or stances toward their work and their colleagues, and opportunities to serve as pivotal persons for students and colleagues in their own transitions of significance.

  16. Afro-Venezuelan Music Rituals for Health and Community Wel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-16

    Dec 16, 2016 ... music, and ritual as a part of social and cultural identity in each town where the festivals of ... sustaining dynamics and processes of self-determination that ... with Europe and Africa were Havana in Cuba, Veracruz in Mexico, ...

  17. Death and Its Rituals in Novels on AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joseph J.; Nouss, Alexis

    1993-01-01

    Reviews novels dealing with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, noting that their perspectives on death can be extracted through content analysis. Concludes that, overall, these novels present weak symbolization about death with rituals that are not highly elaborated and that complex images of the afterlife are not offered.…

  18. Pluralist Democracy or Scientistic Monocracy? Debating Ritual Slaughter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Valenta (Markha)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Many participants in the recent fierce debate on ritual slaughter in the Netherlands have understood this to be a conflict between religious and secular values, pitting religious freedom against animal welfare. The great variety in viewpoints among all groups involved,

  19. Toward a Ritual Poetics: Dream of the Rood as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Maring

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion of “ritual poetics” explored in this essay weds the findings of John Miles Foley’s immanent art to ritual theories of signification in order to show that some features of early medieval verse may carry a metonymic force linking the spoken or oral-related written word to the vivid, multilayered experience of ritualized situations. The hypothesis that ritual features, when integrated into oral-related poems, preserve their association with lived, emergent ritual processes is examined through close analysis of _Dream of the Rood_.

  20. Ritual Art: a Key to the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Podemann Sørensen

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bambara sculpture is a ritual object, in fact one of the dramatis personae of a ritual drama. The Civara, as it is called, is carried on the head during the ritual dance as a token of the presence of the mythical antilope which brought agriculture to the Bambara. Besides the male Civara there is also a female one, and in their dance, the two of them dramatize the fertilizing interaction of sun and soil. Without further exploring Bambara ritual, we may notice that a piece of pictorial art is here an integral part of a ritual. It is a mask, carried during the dance and designating its bearer as the mythical antilope. Also belonging to a ritual are the space and the surroundings in which it is carried out. It is well known how ritual places and temple rooms are often structured and decorated to make out the background and the framework of ritual acts. The place of ritual may be designed as an imago mundi, or it may be chosen or named according to mythical prototypes. Temple rooms may be decorated with mythological and cosmological motifs to identify the ritual acts that take place in them as mythical deeds and cosmologically significant events, exactly as the civara-mask identifies the ritual dance in its mythological and cosmological significance.

  1. Teaching Family Communication Concepts through Family Stories: An Analysis of Stories and Rituals in David Bradley's "Harvest Home"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Marcia D.

    2006-01-01

    In this activity, students will be able to apply the concepts of stories and rituals to an analysis of the ritual in the short story "Harvest Home" by David Bradley, gaining understanding of how stories and rituals affect and reflect family values, power structures and identities. "Harvest Home" talks about the rituals involved in a…

  2. Ritual y poder en los centros budistas zen argentinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catón Eduardo Carini

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El presente artículo es un estudio de los grupos budistas zen argentinos desde la perspectiva de la antropología política. El objetivo es, en primer lugar, explorar las distintas posiciones sociales que los miembros pueden ocupar al interior de un grupo zen y los sistemas nativos de clasificación social, es decir, las categorías que nombran y crean distinciones rituales. En segundo lugar, analizar la estructura de autoridad y de poder al interior de una comunidad zen, indagando los vínculos entre el sistema ritual de posiciones sociales y la distribución del poder y la autoridad. La investigación etnográfica se efectuó siguiendo una metodología cualitativa, que incluyó la observación participante en los encuentros que los centros zen organizan periódicamente y la realización de entrevistas semi-estructuradas e historias de vida a sus miembros. Las conclusiones giran en torno a la importancia del ritual para la vida política de la comunidad, y la centralización del poder en la figura del maestro zen mediante la particular dinámica que evidencia la estructura de autoridad. Palabras clave: Argentina; Budismo zen; Política; Poder. Abstract The present anthropological study takes a political approach to the Argentinean Zen Buddhism groups. The first objective is to explore the variety of native social classification systems, that is to say the categories naming and creating rituals. Secondly, we try to analyze the authority and power system within a Zen community, investigating the relation between the ritual system of social positions and the distribution of power and authority. This article is based on qualitative research, which included periodic participant observation in gatherings organized by the Zen Buddhism centres and semistructured interviews with and life histories of their members. The conclusions focus on the importance of ritual for the community’s political life, and the centralization of power in the

  3. The fire-walker's high: affect and physiological responses in an extreme collective ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Mitkidis, Panagiotis; Reddish, Paul; Tok, Penny; Konvalinka, Ivana; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    How do people feel during extreme collective rituals? Despite longstanding speculation, few studies have attempted to quantify ritual experiences. Using a novel pre/post design, we quantified physiological fluctuations (heart rates) and self-reported affective states from a collective fire-walking ritual in a Mauritian Hindu community. Specifically, we compared changes in levels of happiness, fatigue, and heart rate reactivity among high-ordeal participants (fire-walkers), low-ordeal participants (non-fire-walking participants with familial bonds to fire-walkers) and spectators (unrelated/unknown to the fire-walkers). We observed that fire-walkers experienced the highest increase in heart rate and reported greater happiness post-ritual compared to low-ordeal participants and spectators. Low-ordeal participants reported increased fatigue after the ritual compared to both fire-walkers and spectators, suggesting empathetic identification effects. Thus, witnessing the ritualistic suffering of loved ones may be more exhausting than experiencing suffering oneself. The findings demonstrate that the level of ritual involvement is important for shaping affective responses to collective rituals. Enduring a ritual ordeal is associated with greater happiness, whereas observing a loved-one endure a ritual ordeal is associated with greater fatigue post-ritual.

  4. The fire-walker's high: affect and physiological responses in an extreme collective ritual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Fischer

    Full Text Available How do people feel during extreme collective rituals? Despite longstanding speculation, few studies have attempted to quantify ritual experiences. Using a novel pre/post design, we quantified physiological fluctuations (heart rates and self-reported affective states from a collective fire-walking ritual in a Mauritian Hindu community. Specifically, we compared changes in levels of happiness, fatigue, and heart rate reactivity among high-ordeal participants (fire-walkers, low-ordeal participants (non-fire-walking participants with familial bonds to fire-walkers and spectators (unrelated/unknown to the fire-walkers. We observed that fire-walkers experienced the highest increase in heart rate and reported greater happiness post-ritual compared to low-ordeal participants and spectators. Low-ordeal participants reported increased fatigue after the ritual compared to both fire-walkers and spectators, suggesting empathetic identification effects. Thus, witnessing the ritualistic suffering of loved ones may be more exhausting than experiencing suffering oneself. The findings demonstrate that the level of ritual involvement is important for shaping affective responses to collective rituals. Enduring a ritual ordeal is associated with greater happiness, whereas observing a loved-one endure a ritual ordeal is associated with greater fatigue post-ritual.

  5. From Wasteland to Flower Bed: Ritual in the Website Communication of Urban Activist Gardeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to explore the website communication of urban activist gardeners by focusing on the concept of ritual as a heuristic category. In contrast to the majority of those doing research on ritual, I use a systems-theoretical approach in applying the concept of ritual to communication processes. I explore the role played by ritual in communication in order to answer questions such as, "What is specifically unique about the ritual mode of communicating?" and, following from this, "What function do these rituals serve in communication?" My subject, urban garden activism, is thus addressed from the perspective of media- and communication research. First, I briefly describe urban activist gardening and how communication is usually structured on their websites. Second, I present an outline of some theories and concepts of communication and ritual within media studies, and give a brief account of the systems-theoretical approach that I use. Third, I define some areas of ritual - that is, ritualized patterns of communication found in the urban activist gardeners' empirical material - so as to provide answers regarding the means and function of ritual in communication.

  6. The comparative and functional analysis of myth and ritual as constituent parts of a mythoritual religious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Davydov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The author treats the problem of ritual studies as relevant to the study of religion. Mytho-ritual is a relatively new concept, unfamiliar to many specialists. The author tries to define this concept, trace its origin and essential characteristics, and finally, on the basis of all this, posit a link uniting myth and ritual. Importance is given to the functional analysis of ritual, highlighting the essential role of ritual and rite. The theories of the Bielefeld and Moscow schools, the theory of V. N. Toporov regarding religious ritual, and those regarding ritual and rite proposed by A. K. Baiburin and K. S. Saringulyan are examined. The author then proceeds to an analysis of the functions of myth and examines the theories of M. Eliade and the Cambridge School. Finally the author compares the various functions of myth and ritual and fi nds that the number of actual functions of myth proposed by Russian and foreign experts, sociologists, ethnologists and folklorists, is rather small and closer in number to that of the functions of religion rather than of ritual. The author enumerates 36 functions of ritual as compared to only 12 functions of myth and 24 functions of religion

  7. Bedrock and surficial geologic map of the Satan Butte and Greasewood 7.5’ quadrangles, Navajo and Apache Counties, northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Lee; Priest, Susan S.; Hiza-Redsteer, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The geologic map of the Satan Butte and Greasewood 7.5’ quadrangles is the result of a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Navajo Nation to provide regional geologic information for management and planning officials. This map provides geologic information useful for range management, plant and animal studies, flood control, water resource investigations, and natural hazards associated with sand-dune mobility. The map provides connectivity to the regional geologic framework of the Grand Canyon area of northern Arizona. The map area encompasses approximately 314 km2 (123 mi2) within Navajo and Apache Counties of northern Arizona and is bounded by lat 35°37'30" to 35°30' N., long 109°45' to 110° W. The quadrangles lie within the southern Colorado Plateau geologic province and within the northeastern portion of the Hopi Buttes (Tsézhin Bií). Large ephemeral drainages, Pueblo Colorado Wash and Steamboat Wash, originate north of the map area on the Defiance Plateau and Balakai Mesa respectively. Elevations range from 1,930 m (6,330 ft) at the top of Satan Butte to about 1,787 m (5,860 ft) at Pueblo Colorado Wash where it exits the southwest corner of the Greasewood quadrangle. The only settlement within the map area is Greasewood, Arizona, on the north side of Pueblo Colorado Wash. Navajo Highway 15 crosses both quadrangles and joins State Highway 264 northwest of Ganado. Unimproved dirt roads provide access to remote parts of the Navajo Reservation.

  8. On the elementary neural forms of interaction rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    Randall Collins’ interaction ritual (IR) theory suggests solidarity as neurologically hardwired in the capacity for rhythmic entrainment. Yet, this article suggests that IR theory may benefit from being tied more firmly to recent neurological research, specifically Stephen W. Porges......’ neurophysiological polyvagal theory. IR theory does not sufficiently acknowledge the autonomic nervous system as a system involving a phylogenetically ordered response hierarchy, of which only one subsystem supports prosocial behavior. The ritual ingredients of shared attention and mood may be clarified as part...... of a social engagement system, neurally regulating attention and arousal via brain-face-heart circuits. This allows rhythmic entrainment to be specified as a neural epiphenomenon of the social engagement system. The polyvagal perspective, moreover, challenges IR theory to reconsider the importance...

  9. On the Elementary Neural Forms of Micro-Interactional Rituals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    2016-01-01

    of the neural basis for rhythmic entrainment. The polyvagal theory furthermore challenges IR theory to reconsider the importance of individual biological differences ritual success may not merely be ascribed to interactional effects, but also to reciprocal causality between situations and neurobiological......Randall Collins’s interaction ritual (IR) theory suggests social solidarity as hardwired in the human neurological capacity for rhythmic entrainment. Yet, this article suggests that IR theory may benefit from being tied more firmly to recent neurobiological research, specifically Stephen W. Porges......’s polyvagal theory that proposes autonomic nervous system functioning as a basis for emotions and social behavior. In this perspective, IR theory does not sufficiently acknowledge the human nervous system as a system involving a phylogenetically ordered response hierarchy, of which only one subsystem supports...

  10. Ritual, rage and revenge in 2 Maccabees 6 and 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre J. Jordaan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The martyrs in 2 Maccabees 6 and 7 have been explored in various ways. In their commentaries on 2 Maccabees, Jan Willem van Henten and Daniel Schwartz proposed that the deaths of the martyrs should be seen as human sacrifices to please the deity. This idea has either been challenged or supported by scholars. This article supported the idea of human sacrifice, and applied the view of Richard DeMaris of the martyr’s deaths as exit rite to the above-mentioned texts. In essence this amounts to ritual critique. The results were surprising, and proved the model of DeMaris as a useful tool to examine rituals. The conclusion was reached that 2 Maccabees 6 and 7 is indeed an exit rite.

  11. Symbolic, ritual and social dynamics of spiritual healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, D C

    1988-01-01

    Participant observation among white, middle class spiritual healing groups in the Baltimore area (1981-1983) revealed distinct sociocultural and interpersonal patterns of action and influence among two types of groups found. Types of groups were (1) Christian, Pentecostal, neo-Pentecostal or 'charismatic' healing groups and (2) 'New Age', or 'metaphysical' healing groups. Qualitative findings highlight similarities and differences between these two types of groups through examination of organizational characteristics, leadership patterns, ideological systems, and ritual processes. Illness and social characteristics of participants are also compared. Analysis of characteristics of groups and participants shows how the incorporation of explanatory models, social roles, myths, and symbols into the social, ideational, and ritual context of spiritual healing is essential to its therapeutic effect, and that spiritual healing exemplifies a symbolic healing system. Finally, a substantive theoretical model for healing research is suggested.

  12. Mesolithic heritage in early Neolithic burial rituals and personal adornments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lenneis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Some burial rituals such as cremation or the use of colorants, especially ochre, have old roots in the preceding Mesolithic and even in the Palaeolithic. The evidence for these old rituals is more dense in central or western Europe than in south east Europe, whence most of the new Neo- lithic ideas came. Among the personal adornments a small amount of snail-shell ornaments, stag tusks, tusks of wild boar and pendants made from antler are of special interest. People wearing these very traditional, old adornments are generally equipped with precious ‘new’ things such as Spondylus, ceramics, adzes etc, and therefore show them as high status people in early Neolithic society.

  13. AHP 5: A Tibetan Girl's Hair Changing Ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshe dpal rdo rje ཚེ་དཔལ་རྡོ་རྗེ།

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a remarkably careful study of a little known Tibetan coming-of-age ritual as still practiced in rural Amdo, Qinghai Province, China. Structural analysis is complemented by a case study based on observations, interviews, recordings, and authentic folklore material in the original language. Pictures, tables, and a glossary complete the work. This is field anthropology at its best. Juha Janhunen, Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Helsinki The achievements of this book are many: it is analytically rigorous, rich in contextualized detail, and fascinating in subject matter. The authors' diverse backgrounds and strengths are manifested throughout this truly collaborative work which follows a major rite of passage in the life of a thirteen year-old Tibetan girl. For all scholars of Tibetan culture and society, and for any student of ethnography interested in learning how to thoroughly document a ritual, this book will be of great interest and lasting use. Mark Turin Director, Digital Himalaya Project & World Oral Literature Project, University of Cambridge This is an important contribution to Tibetan ethnography. The study is based on careful fieldwork, analysis, introduction, and translation of relevant myths and literary compositions, and comprehensive description of core components of Tibetan community life. The value of the work is that the study of a distinctively Tibetan women's ritual is accurately and fully presented in its own context. It is a unique record of an endangered tradition. Paul K Nietupski, John Carroll University This study has great value in examining in detail the coming-of-age ritual of girls in a single Tibetan village, thus providing a window through which to better view and understand community-based life, which is soon to change in the face of China-wide modernization. Huadan Zhaxi, Humbolt University

  14. Rituales dionisiacos: asaltos a la negación.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Salas.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available La relación ambigua que se da en Occidente entre la razón y el ritual se inaugura desde el antiguo mundo griego. Los rituales dionisiacos, el de las Tesmoforias y las fiestas de Adonis, constituyen tres maneras de saltar de los símbolos de la negación propios del naciente logos. Se trata de festividades en las que acontecen enormes dimensiones que en la cotidianidad están cubiertas por el manto oscuro de la razón. Hoy diríamos que algo de la enunciación y del ser se ponen en juego en la marginalidad de estos ritos. Queda suspendida a través de este texto la pregunta por el fenómeno de la prostitución como asunto solidario de tales formas rituales de enunciación: la prostituta tal vez como una pálida verdad que recorre los márgenes de los símbolos de la negación, como una instancia donde el culto orgiástico dionisiaco deviene en una mueca triste y cansada o como una mujer que vende una fallida orgía.

  15. Ancient Item Spoilage Ritual Used in Nomadic Burial Rite

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    Beisenov Arman Z.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the findings of items in ancient burials which were intentionally spoiled prior to deposition in graves. This tradition was widely spread both in terms of chronology and geography, and therefore cannot be attributed to any individual cultures or regions. The authors present new information on the ritual obtained during an investigation of Borsyk burial mound of the Middle Sarmatian period located in West Kazakhstan. The central grave of barrow 6 contained a heavily damaged bronze cauldron. The grave was looted in antiquity. Individual scattered bones of a human skeleton and minor gold foil adornments from the ceremonial dress of a nobleman were discovered in the grave. The authors suggest that the cauldron was intentionally deformed by the participants of an ancient mortuary and memorial ritual. According to the principal hypothesis concerning the essence of this ritual, spoilage of the items was related to the idea of assign the items with “different” and “transcendent” properties, which resulted from the necessity of burying the owner. Cauldrons played an important role in the life of steppe leaders. The authors assume a sacral nature of the use of cauldrons in the culture of steppe peoples associated with feasts, battles, and sacred hunting. Perhaps, there was a tradition of burying cauldrons together with their owners after spoiling the items in view of the concept of the other world and the role of a heroic leader therein.

  16. Dinner rituals that correlate with child and adult BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; van Kleef, Ellen

    2014-05-01

    What predicts whether a child will be at risk for obesity? Whereas past research has focused on foods, eating habits, feeding styles, and family meal patterns, this study departs from a food-centric approach to examine how various dinner rituals might influence the BMIs of children and adults. In this study of 190 parents (BMI = 29.1 ± 7.2) and 148 children (BMI = 20.3 ± 4.4), the relationship between their BMIs and everyday family dinner rituals was examined using both correlation and regression analysis (controlled for educational level of parents). Families who frequently ate dinner in the kitchen or dining room had significantly lower BMIs for both adults (r = -0.31) and children (r = -0.24) compared to families who ate elsewhere. Additionally, helping cook dinner was associated with higher BMI for girls (r = 0.26), and remaining at the table until everyone is finished with eating was associated with lower BMI for boys (r = -0.31). Dinner tables may be one place where social support and family involvement meet-both of which relate to the BMI of children as well as parents. Family meals and their rituals might be an underappreciated battleground to fight obesity. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  17. DARI RITUAL KE PANGGUNG PERTUNJUKAN: PERKEMBANGAN TARI DALAM KEHIDUPAN MASYARAKAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Narawati

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available There are three primary functions of dance in human life, i.e., for ritual,for personal entertainment, and for aesthetic presentation. All dance experts believe that the oldest function of dance in human life is for ritual. Dance is needed on the occasion of birth, circumcision, marriage, death, war, changes of the moon and sickness. Bali is the richest island of dance in Indonesia and known as "paradise in the world of arts. The Balinese dance ritual dances for gods, for spirits of the ancestors, for religious seers, for human beings, and also for the underworld spirits. Indonesia is rich in dance for personal entertainment, such as tayuban in Central and East Java, Jaipongan in West Java, gandrung in East Java, joget in Bali, ronggeng Melayu in Sumatera, etc. The development of urban population with sufficient income has influenced the development of dance as aesthetic presentation, because the urban people, categorized as the cultural consumers, need some aesthetic entertainment for their leisure time. The best country in the world whose amazing development of her dance as aesthetic presentation is the United States of America and New York is widely known as "the mecca of performing arts".

  18. Sound : Albumid / Satanizer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Satanizer

    1998-01-01

    Uutest albumitest Paragon Of Beauty "The Spring",Vibratsioon vol.2 (eesti pop undergroundikogumik), Crossing all over! vol.7(laia ampluaaga duubelkogumik), Rappers paradise V' ja Monkey Maffia "Shoot the boss" lühitutvustused

  19. Sound : Albumid / Satanizer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Satanizer

    1998-01-01

    Uutest albumitest Paragon Of Beauty "The Spring",Vibratsioon vol.2 (eesti pop undergroundikogumik), Crossing all over! vol.7(laia ampluaaga duubelkogumik), Rappers paradise V' ja Monkey Maffia "Shoot the boss" lühitutvustused

  20. Finding meaning in religious practices: the relation between religious holiday rituals and marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, B H; Tomcho, T J

    2001-12-01

    This study examined the relation between marital satisfaction and religious holiday ritual practices. One hundred twenty couples, married 9 years on average, completed measures of religious holiday practices (current family and family-of-origin) and marital satisfaction. Couples were interviewed about how important religion was to their family life. Marital satisfaction was related to religious holiday rituals beyond a global indication of religiousness. A different pattern was found for husbands and wives, with husbands' satisfaction more closely linked to ritual meaning and wives' satisfaction associated with routine practices. Family-of-origin rituals were connected across generations. Wives' marital satisfaction was related to husbands' report of religious holiday rituals but not the converse. Results are discussed in terms of how rituals affirm relationships, connect values and beliefs, and may have differential meaning for men and women.

  1. “Tonight’s Secret Ingredient Is...”: Iron Chef America as Media Ritual

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    Christopher Bell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Food Network program Iron Chef America creates a media ritual space in which public displays of virtuosity and the engendering of parasocial relationships combine to present both the media ritual itself (the cooking competition and the media ritual it engenders (the viewing of and parasocial interaction with the cooking competition. These rituals though separate and distinct are inextricably tied together. Couched in the ritual tropes and memes of sporting events, Iron Chef America is an attempt to mediate mundane activity by transforming it into competitive action. As a result, the program ritualises the ‘deep play’ aspect of cooking as spectator sport, and in the process, reinforces the ritual structures of American society, celebrating the triumph of skill, determination, and hard work so valued in contemporary USA.

  2. Malinowski goes to college: factors influencing students' use of ritual and superstition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudski, Jeffrey M; Edwards, Ashleigh

    2007-10-01

    Anthropologists have long noted that the use of ritual and magic is linked to conditions of risk and uncertainty. In this study, the authors examined how perceived task difficulty, participants' level of preparation, and the value of the outcome interact to influence the self-reporting of superstition and ritual. College students rated the likelihood of their using charms or rituals for various scenarios involving academic, artistic, and athletic performances. Reports of use of ritual increased as the stakes of the event increased and decreased with perceived expertise or level of preparation. Additional findings included participants' reporting frequent use of ritual while denying any causal effectiveness. The authors discuss results in terms of the rituals providing participants with an illusion of control.

  3. An Investigation on the Use of Dough Figures in Naxi Dongba Rituals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hongrong

    2015-01-01

    Dongba rituals are one of the im-portant expressions of Naxi polytheistic worship, and they reflect the Naxi ancestor's view of ani-mism.Relying on a large number of manuscripts written using Dongba pictographs which contain the content and procedure of Dongba rituals, a com-plete religious ritual system has been formed.A-mong the large number of Dongba ancient manu-scripts, there are many descriptions of the dough figures depicting deities, ghosts and animals, the materials for making them, and the way to use them in the rituals.This shows clearly that the dough figures, a traditional style of art, are very popular in Dongba rituals.Because the materials for making the dough figures used in Dongba rituals are mostly fried wheat flour, buckwheat flour and highland barley flour, they are called as “haxi duoma” by the local people, meaning “dough fig-ures of deities and ghosts made of grain”.

  4. Religious ritual contested: anti-religious activities and women’s ritual practice in rural Soviet Karelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja-Liisa Keinänen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available After the October Revolution, the Bolsheviks sought to establish a new atheistic order which would eradicate from the public consciousness all vestiges of "religious prejudices", which were regarded as a residue from the imperial era and an instrument used to exploit the masses. Even though it was generally held that religion would automatically disappear from socialist society when its material precondition, the class society, was abolished, the regime made concentrated efforts to speed up the process by means of virulent anti-religious propaganda. The ultimate goal was to wipe out the persistent remains of the bourgeois system of values. No force was to be used since it was feared this would merely offend the religious sentiments of the people and strengthen their adherence to religion. Theoretically, the ultimate goal was to be achieved through education and information, but in practice, anti-religious activities were at times quite brutal. These attacks were successful in curtailing the activities of religious institutions in Karelia, but did not bring to an end the religious practices of lay people, which were continued, in one form or another, throughout the entire Soviet period. One fundamental reason for the survival of religious rituals, both Christian and indigenous, was the fact that they were so deeply embedded in people's consciousness and intimately integrated with their everyday lives. Every important phase and turn in human life was sanctified by rituals. The goal of the present paper is to examine what forms anti-religious attacks took in Soviet Karelia and how people reacted to them. The focus is on the attacks against the very fundaments of the ritual complex of the church and, by extension, on the effects of these attacks on the indigenous ritual complex, which co-existed in parallel with that of the "official" religious institutions.

  5. La noción de tiempo y espacio en el calendario ritual de Cariquima

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    Patricia Beltrán Henríquez

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available El acercamiento al estudio de los rituales en Cariquima sobrellevó la reflexión crítica de sopesar en qué medida el sistema de creencias y los rituales locales eran tributarios de las prácticas cristianas, por cuanto se percibía que la mayor parte de las fiestas y rituales aducían un motivo y una liturgia aparentemente católicos.

  6. The heroized dead. People, animals, and materiality in Scandinavian death rituals, AD 200-1000

    OpenAIRE

    Jennbert, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    The Scandinavian death rituals are expressions of agency (war, negotiations, hunting, and personal attraction), and the outcome of the investigation of depositional practices archaeo- logically. Thus, the death rituals cannot be interpreted as self- explanatory afterlife constructions. The wealth depended on political mobilization and a narration of a sense of belonging. As such, the death rituals acted for social identity in diasporic relations and networking, a kind of cultural hybridity as...

  7. Máatan k'ol: la flexibilidad en el ritual Máatan k'ol: the flexibility of ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Balam Gómez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se describe y analiza el máatan k'ol, un ritual agrícola y colectivo realizado en el municipio de Santa Elena, al sur de Yucatán. Se destacarán la presencia de una mujer como especialista ritual, los objetivos del mismo y la ofrenda como elementos clave para entender los cambios y transformaciones en este tipo de rituales; sin perder de vista que en la cosmovisión maya, el monte, la milpa y el rancho son espacios masculinos.In the present work is described and analyzed the máatan k'ol, an agricultural and collective ritual realized in the municipality of Santa Elena, in the south of Yucatán. The presence of a woman as the ritual specialist, the objectives of the ritual and the sacrifice are emphasized as key elements in order to understand the changes and transformations in this type of rituals; without loosing the idea that in the Maya cosmos view, the forest, the milpa and the ranch are masculine spaces.

  8. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter medications. National Institute on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/prescription-over-counter- ... 2015. Prescription drug abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/prescription-drugs/ ...

  9. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Whether they're using street drugs or medications, drug abusers often have trouble at school, at home, with ... a short period of time may make a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not ...

  10. Prevent Child Abuse America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... call the police . Crisis and support contacts For Child Abuse Reporting Numbers in your State please visit: Child ... suspected child abuse and neglect. Parent Resources Prevent Child Abuse America (800) CHILDREN A resource for tips, referrals, ...

  11. Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual abuse is one form of child abuse. It includes a wide range of actions between a child ... to children or pressuring them for sex is sexual abuse. Using a child for pornography is also sexual ...

  12. The plants, rituals and spells that 'cured' helminthiasis in Sicily

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    Napoli Mariangela

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The author reports on the plants, rituals and spells used against worms and the so-called scantu (fright in some areas of Sicily. The work is based on ethnobotanical research carried out, prevalently, between 2002-2006, in some areas of Eastern, South-Eastern, North-Central and South-Central Sicily. Methods This research is based on dialogue. Senior 'healers' were contacted; furthermore, doctors, teachers, farmers and in general 'experts' with herbs and 'magic' rituals. Information was collected about the way the plants of folk medicine are prepared. The interviewees were also invited to recite prayers and spells against helminthiasis. Results The author has highlighted the importance of how, in some parts of Sicily, some ailments like helminthiasis and other correlated pathologies like scantu are 'treated' and, especially within the rural social classes, by folk medicine remedies, herbal practises, particular prayers, rituals and spells. Conclusion As regards health/illness, it should be noted that in the last ten years conventional medicine has provided very satisfactory results even resolving potentially mortal pathologies. However, in certain social classes, there is no real collaboration between conventional and folk medicine; so for some senior citizens, the 'healer' with his rituals and empirical and magical herbs is still the person to turn to for the 'cure' of particular ailments. Interest in these practises from ancestral heritage in an advanced country like Italy, is only relevant if the aim is to recoup a cultural identity which is already in decline. It is significant to report a piece: on 14 October 2007 the news on a well-known national Italian TV channel reported an interview with a 94 year-old man from Arbatax (Sardinia referred to as a 'healer' because both his townspeople and others from all over the world go to him for his cures. He is not paid except in kind and has been known to cure St. Anthony's fire

  13. Los rituales de pasaje según adolescentes

    OpenAIRE

    José Roberto da Silva Brêtas; Rafael Souza Moreno; Daniella Soares Eugenio; Danila Cristina Paquier Sala; Thais Fernanda Vieira; Priscila Rabelo Bruno

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Identificar as impressões de adolescentes acerca do que poderia representar um ritual de passagem. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo realizado junto a 751 adolescentes de ambos os sexos, entre 12 e 20 anos, que freqüentavam três escolas públicas do ensino fundamental e médio da região de Santo Eduardo do município de Embu, São Paulo. RESULTADOS: Após análise de conteúdo desvelamos as categorias: mudanças físicas; mudanças psicológicas (subcategorias: responsabilidade, experiências, conflit...

  14. Rituales de invocación a deidades ancestrales zoques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureano Reyes Gómez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia la persistencia de prácticas de rituales ancestrales zoques, en la invocación a deidades en eventos donde se requiere el concurso de sus dioses nativos. No obstante el largo proceso de evangelización, este conocimiento está en manos de los católicos tradicionalistas identificados localmente como “costumbreros”, y lo desarrollan en tres planos de espacios socio-religiosos muy importantes: el ambiente privado (casas, cuevas, cerros, el público, en contextos religiosos católicos (la iglesia, la ermita y otros lugares “sagrados”, y el nivel público social.

  15. RITUAL RAMBUT GEMBEL DALAM ARUS EKSPANSI PASAR PARIWISATA

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    Moh. Soehadha

    2013-12-01

    Tulisan ini mengambil fokus pada agama dan perubahan sosial akibat ekspansi pasar pariwisata di dataran tinggi Dieng, dan hubungannya dengan kapitalisme negara. Pemerintah telah mengusahakan ritual rambut gembel sebagai komo­ditas pariwisata di dataran tinggi Dieng. Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa ada dua varian respon sosial terhadap perubahan akibat ekspansi pasar pariwisata, yaitu masyarakat yang menerima dan masyarakat yang menolak. Masyarakat penerima adalah orang-orang yang memiliki kepentingan di bidang ekonomi dalam kegiatan pengembangan pariwisata, sedangkan masyarakat yang menolak adalah orang-orang yang memegang keyakinan dan tradisi lokal. Secara teoritis, studi ini memberi penjelasan bahwa religiusitas masyarakat dipengaruhi oleh moda produksi ekonomi yang ada.

  16. Snert: Ritual-liturgical measurements and recipes for social capital

    OpenAIRE

    Cas Wepener

    2010-01-01

    The questions of how social capital is measured and how it is generated have received ample attention in recent years. This article is an attempt at making a modest contribution towards addressing these issues and specifically also as a contribution from the fields of Liturgical and Ritual Studies. It is argued that commensality can be taken as both lens/barometer with regard to the presence or absence of social capital, as well as being a potential generator of social capital. In order to ar...

  17. The Tomba dei Tori at Tarquinia: A ritual approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rasmus Brandt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In a recent publication (Brandt 2014b an attempt was made to single out recurring pictorial motifs in Etruscan tomb paintings and to interpret them as elements of funerary ritual procedures with reference to Arnold van Gennep’s rites-de-passage model (1908 and Mary Douglas’ views on purity and danger (1996. The model is here applied on the Archaic and well-known Tomba dei Tori at Tarquinia in order to see if the tomb’s many enigmatic pictorial scenes can be read as coherent elements of such procedures.

  18. Forced Migration and Muslim Rituals: An Area of Cultural Psychology?

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    Nora Ahlberg

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychological foundation of rites de passage have long been debated within the history of religion and related areas. The significance of such rites in facilitating emotional readjustment to a new life situation have been particularly stressed. Emotional reactions on the individual level largely remain outside the competence of anthropologists, despite their awareness of the general influence of culture on this as on other areas of human endeavour. Focusing on traumatized female refugees from Iran, a critical question is whether the changing living conditions which have provoked traumatic experiences in the lives of these refugees have been in any way related to Muslim ritual requirements or rites de passage.

  19. Between Traditions: The Franciscans of Mount Sion and their rituals (1330-1517)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Covaci, V.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examines the role of rituals in the first two centuries of Franciscan presence in Jerusalem. In this period, Jerusalem was an Islamic city, part of the Mamluk Empire. The friars’ ceremonial life in Jerusalem and its replication in Franciscan European outposts shows that rituals con

  20. Ritual Associated with Participation in Physical Education: The Power of Excuse Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Physical education (PE) is steeped in history, tradition and ritual. The accepted tradition of excuse notes allowing pupils to self-exempt from lessons is one such ritual associated with the subject in schools. This paper explores the impact of this phenomenon, focusing on participation and engagement levels within PE lessons. Data was collected…

  1. Generative Ritual among Nonmetropolitan Lesbians and Gay Men: Promoting Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Ramona Faith; Masciadrelli, Brian P.

    2008-01-01

    Generativity is typically studied as a normative adult inclination expressed through social roles (D.P. McAdams & E. de St. Aubin, 1992). We extend this research by examining generativity through the lenses of social marginality and ritual. Toward this end, we utilize in-depth interview and observational data about family rituals from 49…

  2. Conventions of Courtship: Gender and Race Differences in the Significance of Dating Rituals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Pamela Braboy; Kleiner, Sibyl; Geist, Claudia; Cebulko, Kara

    2011-01-01

    Dating rituals include dating--courtship methods that are regularly enacted. This study explores gender and race differences in the relative importance placed on certain symbolic activities previously identified by the dating literature as constituting such rituals. Using information collected from a racially diverse sample of college students (N…

  3. The Essential Role of Ritual in the Transmission and Reinforcement of Social Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Matt J.

    2012-01-01

    Social norms are communally agreed upon, morally significant behavioral standards that are, at least in part, responsible for uniquely human forms of cooperation and social organization. This article summarizes evidence demonstrating that ritual and ritualized behaviors are essential to the transmission and reinforcement of social norms.…

  4. Placebo studies and ritual theory: a comparative analysis of Navajo, acupuncture and biomedical healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2011-06-27

    Using a comparative analysis of Navajo healing ceremonials, acupuncture and biomedical treatment, this essay examines placebo studies and ritual theory as mutually interpenetrating disciplines. Healing rituals create a receptive person susceptible to the influences of authoritative culturally sanctioned 'powers'. The healer provides the sufferer with imaginative, emotional, sensory, moral and aesthetic input derived from the palpable symbols and procedures of the ritual process-in the process fusing the sufferer's idiosyncratic narrative unto a universal cultural mythos. Healing rituals involve a drama of evocation, enactment, embodiment and evaluation in a charged atmosphere of hope and uncertainty. Experimental research into placebo effects demonstrates that routine biomedical pharmacological and procedural interventions contain significant ritual dimensions. This research also suggests that ritual healing not only represents changes in affect, self-awareness and self-appraisal of behavioural capacities, but involves modulations of symptoms through neurobiological mechanisms. Recent scientific investigations into placebo acupuncture suggest several ways that observations from ritual studies can be verified experimentally. Placebo effects are often described as 'non-specific'; the analysis presented here suggests that placebo effects are the 'specific' effects of healing rituals.

  5. Using Rituals and Traditions to Create Classroom Community for Children, Teachers, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Patricia; Howell, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the value of teachers establishing rituals and traditions in early childhood classrooms. Using the lens of a particular preschool classroom, where one of the co-authors taught for many years, the article describes specific traditions that have been established over the years and how these rituals, activities, and events…

  6. Ritual Slaughter and the Freedom of Religion: Some Reflections on a Stunning Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zoethout

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with ritual slaughter and the consequences of a possible ban on un-stunned slaughter for the freedom to manifest one's religion. Following a discussion of the religious origins of ritual slaughter, the article examines the general consequences of the practice on animal welfare. Th

  7. Truth-Telling, Ritual Culture, and Latino College Graduates in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve, Ryan Evely

    2017-01-01

    This article seeks to trace the cartography of truth-telling through a posthuamanist predicament of ritual culture in higher education and critical inquiry. Ritual culture in higher education such as graduation ceremony produces and reflects the realities of becoming subjects. These spaces are proliferating grounds for truth telling and practical…

  8. The semiotics of ritual healing in a North Indian Muslim shrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, B

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports phenomenological and semiotic research on therapeutic rituals in a Muslim shrine, concentrating on three cases studies. Women describe their experiences while being possessed by evil spirits and while undergoing ritual healing in the shrine. The semiotic structuring of their experiences and perceptions are analyzed as a culturally coded system of exorcism.

  9. Fostering Social Relationships through Food Rituals in a New Zealand School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Eva; Walton, Mat; Stephens, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Food practices, including associated routines, rituals, and habits, are an unexplored area in school health promotion. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap through exploring how food rituals act as vehicles for young people to establish, maintain, and strengthen social relationships. Design/methodology/approach: Through an…

  10. Ties That Bind: Building and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Relationships through Family Traditions and Rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Diane, Ed.; Bankston, Karen, Ed.

    This booklet discusses the importance of family rituals as a way of staying connected to children as they move through adolescence. Family rituals give teens a sense of being part of a family that values its time together. Even something as simple as a family meal together can have great impact on maintaining a bond between parents and children.…

  11. Sacrifice in Modernity: Community, Ritual, Identity : From Nationalism and Nonviolence to Health Care and Harry Potter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyndam, J.; Korte, A.-M.; Poorthuis, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Sacrifice seems to belong to a religious context of the past. In Sacrifice in Modernity: Community, Ritual, Identity it is demonstrated how sacrificial themes remain an essential element in our post-modern society. The shaping of community, performing rituals and the search for identity, three main

  12. Simbolismo del ritual de paso femenino entre los Wayuu de la alta Guajira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Mazzoldi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La interpretación de los relatos recopilados entorno al ritual de paso femenino celebrado en la tradición de la etnia wayúu se enfoca en los actos rituales que dan cuenta del paso de la niña a la mujer ideal.

  13. Generative Ritual among Nonmetropolitan Lesbians and Gay Men: Promoting Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Ramona Faith; Masciadrelli, Brian P.

    2008-01-01

    Generativity is typically studied as a normative adult inclination expressed through social roles (D.P. McAdams & E. de St. Aubin, 1992). We extend this research by examining generativity through the lenses of social marginality and ritual. Toward this end, we utilize in-depth interview and observational data about family rituals from 49…

  14. The Symbolism and Ritual Function of the Middle Classic Ball Game in Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohodas, Marvin

    1975-01-01

    A model depicting Mesoamerican religion in terms of the links between time/space and mythic, ritual, and agricultural cycles is presented to illustrate the ritual function of the Mesoamerican ball game as it existed during Middle Classic times at the height of its development. (JC)

  15. Sacrifice in Modernity: Community, Ritual, Identity : From Nationalism and Nonviolence to Health Care and Harry Potter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyndam, J.; Korte, A.-M.; Poorthuis, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Sacrifice seems to belong to a religious context of the past. In Sacrifice in Modernity: Community, Ritual, Identity it is demonstrated how sacrificial themes remain an essential element in our post-modern society. The shaping of community, performing rituals and the search for identity, three main

  16. Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruca, Marta; van Andel, Tinde; Balslev, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    ethnomedicine. We studied over 200 publications on uses of African palms and found information about ritual uses in 26 of them. At least 12 palm species in sub-Saharan Africa are involved in various ritual practices: Borassus aethiopum, Cocos nucifera, Dypsis canaliculata, D. fibrosa, D. pinnatifrons, Elaeis...

  17. Making Catholics: The Ritual Production of Conformity in a Catholic Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Considers classroom instruction in a Catholic junior high school as part of an intricate ritual system supporting the values of the larger society. Corporate capitalist values associated with "becoming a worker" closely complemented values associated with "becoming a Catholic." Together these create the "ritual character" of the school.…

  18. 124 The Relevance of Ali (Earth Deity): Ritual Forms And Processes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    icons and expressed in metaphors, religious rituals and symbols convey a people's .... whereby certain benefits are derived from a ritual or symbolic undertaking. (c) ..... that gratitude of thanks giving has to be shown to Ali. In any of these cases ...

  19. Images From a Jointly-Arousing Collective Ritual Reveal Affective Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Bulbulia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Collective rituals are biologically ancient and culturally pervasive, yet few studies have quantified effects on participants. We assessed two plausible models from qualitative anthropology: ritual empathy predicts affective convergence among all ritual participants irrespective of ritual role; rite-of-passage predicts emotional differences, specifically that ritual initiates will express relatively negatively valence when compared with non-initiates. To evaluate model predictions, images of participants in a Spanish fire-walking ritual were extracted from video data and assessed by nine Spanish raters for arousal and valence. Consistent with rite-of-passage, we found that arousal jointly increased for all participants but that valence differed by ritual role: fire-walkers exhibited increasingly positive arousal and increasingly negative valence when compared with passengers. This result offers the first quantified evidence for rite of passage dynamics within a highly arousing collective ritual. Methodologically, we show that surprisingly simple and non-invasive data structures (rated video images may be combined with methods from evolutionary ecology (Bayesian Generalized Linear Mixed Effects models to clarify poorly understood dimensions of the human condition.

  20. Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affective polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbulia, Joseph A; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Schjoedt, Uffe; Fondevila, Sabela; Sibley, Chris G; Konvalinka, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Collective rituals are biologically ancient and culturally pervasive, yet few studies have quantified their effects on participants. We assessed two plausible models from qualitative anthropology: ritual empathy predicts affective convergence among all ritual participants irrespective of ritual role; rite-of-passage predicts emotional differences, specifically that ritual initiates will express relatively negative valence when compared with non-initiates. To evaluate model predictions, images of participants in a Spanish fire-walking ritual were extracted from video footage and assessed by nine Spanish raters for arousal and valence. Consistent with rite-of-passage predictions, we found that arousal jointly increased for all participants but that valence differed by ritual role: fire-walkers exhibited increasingly positive arousal and increasingly negative valence when compared with passengers. This result offers the first quantified evidence for rite of passage dynamics within a highly arousing collective ritual. Methodologically, we show that surprisingly simple and non-invasive data structures (rated video images) may be combined with methods from evolutionary ecology (Bayesian Generalized Linear Mixed Effects models) to clarify poorly understood dimensions of the human condition.

  1. Rituals as Dance and Dance as Rituals. The Drama of Kok Nji and Other Festivals in the Religious Experience of the Ngas, Mupun and Mwaghavul in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Habila Dadem Danfulani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Chadic-speakers perform annual festivals of the ancestors, kok nji; cropping kop; harvesting, dyip and hunting kwat, which are usually accompanied by dancing, singing and other numerous rites and rituals. These ritual dramas symbolically and overtly express the religious experience, feelings and emotions that are deeply buried in the religious consciousness of the people. This article intends to provide a vivid description of some of these festivals, particularly those of the Ngas, Mupun and Mwaghavul.

  2. Relationships among Sensory Responsiveness, Anxiety, and Ritual Behaviors in Children with and without Atypical Sensory Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Shalita, Tami; Mansour, Hanin; Dar, Reuven

    2017-08-01

    To explore relationships between sensory responsiveness, anxiety, and ritual behaviors in boys with typical and atypical sensory responsiveness. Forty-eight boys, ages 5-9 participated in the study (28 boys with atypical sensory responsiveness and 20 controls). Atypical sensory responsiveness was defined as a score of ≤154 on the Short Sensory Profile. Parents completed the Sensory Profile, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, and the Childhood Routines Inventory. Children with atypical sensory responsiveness had significantly higher levels of anxiety and a higher frequency of ritual behaviors than controls. Atypical sensory responsiveness was significantly related to both anxiety and ritual behaviors, with anxiety mediating the relationship between sensory modulation and ritual behaviors. The findings elucidate the potential consequences of atypical sensory responsiveness and could support the notion that ritual behaviors develop as a coping mechanism in response to anxiety stemming from primary difficulty in modulating sensory input.

  3. Performative Rituals for Conception and Childbirth in England, 900–1500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter Murray; Olsan, Lea T

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study proposes that performative rituals—that is, verbal and physical acts that reiterate prior uses—enabled medieval women and men to negotiate the dangers and difficulties of conception and childbirth. It analyzes the rituals implicated in charms, prayers, amulets, and prayer rolls and traces the circulation of such rituals within medieval English society. Manuscript records from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late Middle Ages offer evidence of the interaction of oral and written means of communicating these rituals. Certain rituals were long-lived, though variants were introduced over time that reflected changing religious attitudes and the involvement of various interested parties, including local healers, doctors, and medical practitioners, as well as monks, friars, and users of vernacular remedy books. Although many of those who recommended or provided assistance through performative rituals were males, the practices often devolved upon women themselves, and their female companions or attendants. PMID:26521667

  4. Neurobiological and anthropological aspects of compulsions and rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, A

    1999-11-01

    Obsessions and compulsions frequently accompany motor and vocal tics in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). The occurrence of motor tics and compulsions helps to understand the neurobiological foundation of repetitive behavior patterns. Based on a review of the literature and our own studies in GTS, we suggest that simple motor tics are caused by a stimulus-dependent disinhibition of stereotypies encoded in the head of the caudate, while more complex compulsions are associated with a serotonergic disinhibition of frontocortical-striatal circuits in GTS and obsessive-compulsive disorder. These findings indicate that obsessions and compulsions do not simply result from a lack of cortical control of phylogenetically primitive behavior patterns. Rather, an activation of the orbitofrontal cortex seems to be essential for the induction of anxiety and the disinhibition of subcortical stereotypies. The neurobiological findings may help to clarify why compulsions differ from cultural rituals. Cultural rituals are performed cyclically, represent important social conflicts and are usually not accompanied by fear or anxiety. Obsessions, on the other hand, seem to be generated in a self perpetuating cycle of cortico-subcortical activation and are associated with anxiety and ineffective repetition of stereotypies.

  5. The Apparatus of Belief: Prayer, Technology, and Ritual Gesture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Blanton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Through a focus on the early history of a mass mediated ritual practice, this essay describes the “apparatus of belief,” or the specific ways in which individual religious belief has become intimately related to tele-technologies such as the radio. More specifically, this paper examines prayers that were performed during the immensely popular Healing Waters Broadcast by Oral Roberts, a famous charismatic faith healer. An analysis of these healing prayers reveals the ways in which the old charismatic Christian gesture of manual imposition, or laying on of hands, took on new somatic registers and sensorial attunements when mediated, or transduced, through technologies such as the radio loudspeaker. Emerging from these mid-twentieth century radio broadcasts, this technique of healing prayer popularized by Roberts has now become a key ritual practice and theological motif within the global charismatic Christian healing movement. Critiquing established conceptions of prayer in the disciplines of anthropology and religious studies, this essay describes “belief” as a particular structure of intimacy between sensory capacity, media technology, and pious gesture.

  6. Divine Intersections: Hindu Ritual and the Incorporation of Religious Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathinka Frøystad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article throws the study of multireligious sociality in Western contexts into sharp relief by examining the case of India. Much of the current scholarship of cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism tends to assume that religious beliefs, practices and spaces make the respective religious communities close entirely in upon themselves. While this assumption may hold true for most of the Western settings we study, it does not necessarily give an accurate description of the conditions for multireligious sociality in other parts of the world. In India, for instance, religious boundaries still display signs of malleability despite the religious politicization and occasional interreligious violence of the past decades. Drawing on recent anthropological research, this article shows that people of different religious denominations still visit Sufi shrines, that Hindus still incorporate ritual elements and divine beings from the religious traditions of their Others and that they exercise a wide personal choice in terms of spiritual activities, thus enabling spiritual paths that cross in and out of Hinduism. In a Hindu context rituals do not necessarily have an insulating effect; they may also provide points of intersection that open up toward the Other, thus fostering familiarity and recognition. Similar arguments have been made for Buddhist settings. The question is thus whether the current scholarship of cosmopolitanism may entail a certain monotheistic bias that needs to accounted for, something that is of particular importance when theorizing in ways that make universal claims.

  7. Os rituais de passagem segundo adolescentes Los rituales de pasaje según adolescentes Passage rituals according to adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto da Silva Brêtas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as impressões de adolescentes acerca do que poderia representar um ritual de passagem. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo realizado junto a 751 adolescentes de ambos os sexos, entre 12 e 20 anos, que freqüentavam três escolas públicas do ensino fundamental e médio da região de Santo Eduardo do município de Embu, São Paulo. RESULTADOS: Após análise de conteúdo desvelamos as categorias: mudanças físicas; mudanças psicológicas (subcategorias: responsabilidade, experiências, conflitos; mudanças sociais (subcategorias: identidade social, corpo social, inter-relacionamentos; comportamento sexual (subcategorias: interesse sexual, intercurso sexual; fatos traumáticos (subcategorias: sentimento de perda, luto pela infância perdida; independência. CONCLUSÃO: Os rituais de passagem relacionam-se diretamente com a mudança corporal, produto do adolescer, sendo ocorrências marcantes e significativas na vida do individuo.OBJETIVO: Identificar las impresiones de adolescentes respecto a lo que podría representar un ritual de pasaje. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo realizado con 751 adolescentes de ambos sexos, entre 12 y 20 años, que frecuentaban tres escuelas públicas de enseñanza primaria y secundaria de la región de San Eduardo del municipio de Embu, Sao Paulo. RESULTADOS: Después del análisis de contenido develamos las categorías: cambios físicos; cambios psicológicos (subcategorías: responsabilidad, experiencias, conflictos; cambios sociales (subcategorías: identidad social, cuerpo social, interrelaciones; comportamiento sexual (subcategorías: interés sexual, intercurso sexual; hechos traumáticos (subcategorías: sentimiento de pérdida, duelo por la infancia perdida; independencia. CONCLUSIÓN: Los rituales de pasaje se relacionan directamente con el cambio corporal, producto del adolecer, siendo ocurrencias que dejan huellas y que son significativas en la vida del individuo.OBJECTIVE: To identify

  8. Rituals, Territories and Powers in the Sino-Indian Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking Paul Mus’s idea of a “cadastral religion” as part of the socio-religious organisation of the “Asian base” further, we propose approaching rituals linked to the territorial prosperity of groups living on the margins of state power in the Chinese and Indian worlds in a comparative way. These rituals are organised around the recurring schema of a force of place, both natural and wild, which was pacified by a founding ancestor who, along with his descendants, became the sacrificers representing the entire community—a schema the details and variations of which we have analysed. By legitimising the occupation of a space by one group and promoting its fertility, these rituals are where many interlocking stakes are crystallised. These involve the sources of subsistence and the legitimacy to occupy a territory and also membership and power-play forms, both within the group and in its relations with its neighbours and the umbrella power centres.Faisant suite à l’idée de Paul Mus concernant l’existence d’une « religion cadastrale » constitutive de l’organisation socio-religieuse du « socle asien », nous proposons d’approcher de manière comparative les rituels liés à la prospérité du territoire des populations vivant en marge des pouvoirs étatiques du monde chinois et indien, ce que nous appelons ici les « marges sino-indiennes ». Ces rituels s’organisent autour d’un schéma récurent d’une force du lieu, naturelle et sauvage, pacifié par un ancêtre fondateur dont lui et ses descendants deviennent les sacrificateurs représentant la communauté toute entière – schéma dont nous analysons les détails et les variantes. En légitimant l’occupation d’un espace par un groupe et en favorisant sa fertilité, ces rituels sont le lieu de cristallisation de nombreux enjeux imbriqués qui impliquent tout à la fois les sources de la subsistance, la légitimité d’occuper un territoire, mais aussi les formes

  9. Health-related religious rituals of the Greek Orthodox Church: their uptake and meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouka, Georgia; Plakas, Sotirios; Taket, Ann; Boudioni, Markella; Dandoulakis, Michael

    2012-12-01

    To examine the uptake of religious rituals of the Greek Orthodox Church by relatives of patients in critical condition in Greece and to explore their symbolic representations and spiritual meanings. Patients and their relatives want to be treated with respect and be supported for their beliefs, practices, customs and rituals. However nurses may not be ready to meet the spiritual needs of relatives of patients, while the health-related religious beliefs, practices and rituals of the Greek Orthodox Christian denomination have not been explored. This study was part of a large study encompassing 19 interviews with 25 informants, relatives of patients in intensive care units of three large hospitals in Athens, Greece, between 2000 and 2005. In this paper data were derived from personal accounts of religious rituals given by six participants. Relatives used a series of religious rituals, namely blessed oil and holy water, use of relics of saints, holy icons, offering names for pleas and pilgrimage. Through the rituals, relatives experience a sense of connectedness with the divine and use the sacred powers to promote healing of their patients. Nurse managers should recognize, respect and facilitate the expression of spirituality through the practice of religious rituals by patients and their relatives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Family routines and rituals in the context of chronic conditions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Carla; Santos, Susana; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Kielpikowski, Magdalena; Pryor, Jan; Féres-Carneiro, Terezinha

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of 39 empirical studies on family routines and rituals in the context of a chronic condition of a family member. The search strategy encompassed a wide spectrum of chronic conditions affecting family members from childhood/adolescence to adulthood. Twenty quantitative, 13 qualitative, 3 mixed-methods, and 3 intervention studies published between 1995 and 2012 were reviewed. A conceptual framework of routines and rituals as key elements of family health was adopted, resulting in three main findings. First, a chronic condition in a family member impacted the frequency and nature of family's routines and rituals. Second, these whole-family interactions held important functions for individuals and families, constituting strategic resources in the condition's management and opportunities for emotional support exchanges, and providing the family with a sense of normalcy amid the challenges posed by chronic conditions. Third, family routines and rituals were linked to positive health and adaptation outcomes for both patients and family members. Implications for future research include the need for the distinction between routines and rituals against a conceptual background, use of validated assessment methods, and empirical examination of predictors of changes in routines and rituals throughout the course of the condition and of the mechanisms linking these family events to positive outcomes. Conclusions support the inclusion of routines and rituals in a family-centered care approach to the understanding and treatment of chronic conditions.

  11. Falling rings: Group and ritual process in a divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, A L

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes, analyzes, interprets, and spells out some implications of a divorce as it was faced and handled by a pastor and congregation. The challenge to work creatively with divorce came when both the husband and wife wished to remain in the congregation as members. The paper briefly sets forth theological perspectives on marriage, divorce, and discipline in the Mennonite Church, a brief case history of the couple, a description of the group and ritual process with which the pastor and congregation responded, and the reflections of the couple and members a year later. The paper offers not a model but, rather, a symbol as presented in the title, "Falling Rings." It is hoped that the symbol will not only give rise to thought, but will also spark the imagination so as to enable other congregations to respond more assertively, creatively, and caringly to those who divorce in their midst.

  12. HITTITE ker/kart- "HEART": FUNCTIONAL AND RITUAL ASPECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenXu

    1995-01-01

    The concept of "heart" occupies an important place in the Hittite worldview. Besides being a physical organ it describes aspects of receptive functions and mental abilities of the personality. It is found in historical, ritual, mythological and prayer texts. Concerning the research of "heart", A. Kammenhuber in "Die hethitischen Vorstellungen von Seele und Leib, Herz und Leibesinnerem, Kopfund Person (ZA 56, 1964, 150-212; 57, 1965, 177-222) has given a clear distinction between "heart" and "soul" during the discussion of the concept of "soul": "Es genge somit die Feststellung, daB fr heth. itanza(na)=ZI nur die Bedeutung ’Seele;-Sinn;-Wille(junger)Wunsch’ brig geblieben sind. Gelegentlich konkurriert mit der Seele das Herz (ker/kard-), das Kǒrperteil ist und das emotionale Prmzip für die Hethiter". The clarification here lays the foundations for the further study of heart.

  13. The blessingway ceremony: ritual, nostalgic imagination and feminist spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Emily

    2015-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in the role of spirituality on the experience of health, wellness and illness, as well as the role of spiritual practice in health care provision. For pregnancy and childbirth, this focus has tended to concentrate on hospital birth settings and care, and religious forms of spirituality. The blessingway ceremony can be described as an alternative baby shower, popular with home-birthing women. Its focus is woman-centred and draws on the power of ritual to evoke a spiritual experience for the pregnant host and her guests. This spirituality is experienced as a strong connection between women, their relationship with 'nature', and forged via the nostalgic imagination of women through time and space. This article will draw on data obtained in 2010 during doctoral fieldwork with 52 home-birthing women across eastern Australia and will examine the blessingway ceremony and its significance as a site of potential spiritual empowerment for pregnant and birthing women.

  14. For one ritual before and after hundred years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiev Galin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this text is to present the role of one calendar rite first of all as factor for the development and the position of local Bulgarian communities in the conditions of dynamic social-economic and cultural-historic changes in the beginning of XXI c. The different feast-ritual forms can be examined as part of the strategies of the small ethnic groups for survival and preserving of their ethnocultural identity. The ethnographic researches in the village of Chushmeley (Krinichnoe, Bolgrad region, the district of Odessa, are made in connection with a project of The Ethnographic Institute with Museum-BAS for studding of the Bulgarians in the region of Bessarabia.

  15. Snert: Ritual-liturgical measurements and recipes for social capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cas Wepener

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The questions of how social capital is measured and how it is generated have received ample attention in recent years. This article is an attempt at making a modest contribution towards addressing these issues and specifically also as a contribution from the fields of Liturgical and Ritual Studies. It is argued that commensality can be taken as both lens/barometer with regard to the presence or absence of social capital, as well as being a potential generator of social capital. In order to arrive at this conclusion regarding food and the eating habits of humankind, the phenomenon of commensality and its relation to social capital is approached here from three different angles, namely Social Anthropology, New Testament Studies and Ethnography.

  16. Word play, ritual insult, and volleyball in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many gay men in the popular sectors of Lima, Peru participate in vóley callejero, or street volleyball. The ethnographic data presented in this article describes verbal and corporal mechanisms through which gay identity emerges within the particular context of the street volleyball game, ultimately highlighting the contextual nature of identity. The volleyball players are not just hitting a ball back and forth, they are engaging in a meaningful activity that illuminates intersections of language, sexuality, and identity. Through the manipulation of the street into a volleyball court, the volleyball players create a space conducive to the articulation of particular verbal and embodied practices that index gay identity. The challenge to the regulations of "proper" volleyball through the practice of ritual insulting and the cultivation of gay volleyball technique are playful reconfigurations of gendered practices prominent in the sites where fieldwork was carried out.

  17. National Theatre of China's Romeo and Juliet and Its Rituals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Lim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the “Chinese-ness” of this brand new production of Romeo and Juliet by the National Theatre of China, from a ritual perspective. Three main areas were discussed. Firstly, this play has got several religious connotations. The absence of religion in this play’s setting is relevant to China’s current high percentage of atheists. Despite that, several religions, such as Buddhism, Daoism and Christianity, are mentioned in this play. Secondly, the play has also incorporated several Chinese culture and traditions. The use of bicycles as one of the main props can be linked to the cultural significance of bicycles in China. The play also incorporated other cultural and traditional elements such as wedding customaries in China, Xinjiang dance, as well as the Chinese tongue twisters. Finally, the play has incorporated multiple Brechtian moments. Perhaps the Brechtian moments can lead audience to think about the current religious and cultural developments in modern China.

  18. El Sonido Numinoso. Música Ritual y Biología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Ramírez Torres

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available La condición biológica y social del ser humano instrumenta su concreción en el propio cuerpo; por ello cualquier creación cultural pasa por su corporeidad, por lo que cobra vital importancia la bio-ritmicidad fisiológica, junto con las ritmicidades elaboradas socialmente; esto, a su vez, es el sustento del constructo de armonías, cadencias y ruidos en el plano de las relaciones sociales. Las cuales son simbolizadas en la música ritual como metáforas de otras ritmicidades. Éstas son pertinentes a la vida de los hom bres en la tierra: calendarios de cultivo y festivos en los que se entretejen sus relaciones sociales necesarias para subsistir.

  19. Ritual, Myth and Tragedy: Origins of Theatre in Dionysian Rites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Berberovic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the deep, dark forests and in the lush green valleys, worshippers of Dionysus celebrated the eternal cycles of death and rebirth, symbolized in the sacred mask of the wild god. Drunk and intoxicated, wearing the mask of Dionysus, the actor is at once the shaman and the priest. Channeling the presence of the fearsome divinity, he drinks the sacred wine and eats the raw flesh of his prey. In this eternal moment, he becomes one with the god and the beast residing inside of him. Within Ancient Greek culture, the sacred rites of Dionysus have been appropriated and transformed to theatre performances. The shaman became the actor, the participants became the audience, the sacred altar became the stage. From myth as a ritual performance emerged the theatre of tragedy, in which the undying spirit of Dionysus, majestic and terrifying, speaks to us even today.

  20. Ritual Aspects of popular Politics in England (c. 1700-1830)

    OpenAIRE

    O'Gorman, F. (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    En este artículo el autor trata sobre de las discusiones teóricas actuales sobre el ritual político popular antes de emprender una breve revisión de su campo de estudio. Esto incluye un examen y una explicación de aquellos aspectos de las política popular, a las que las actividades rituales llegan a estar asociadas. Esto conduce hacia una discusión sobre el estado de la historiografía del ritual. Además este artículo analiza el contexto, tanto del calendario, como geográfico, e...

  1. Childhood sexual abuse.

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim Aktepe

    1993-01-01

    Sexual abuse is defined as use of child or adolescent by the adults for satisfying of sexual urges and needs with forcing, threatening or tricking. Sexual abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse without touch, sexual touch, interfemoral intercourse, sexual penetration, and sexual exploitation. The prevalence of sexual abuse is reported as 10-40%. It is seen in female four times more than in males. Abusers are frequently male, only 5-15% of them are female. The abuse by females is usually tow...

  2. Childhood Sexual Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Aktepe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sexual abuse is defined as use of child or adolescent by the adults for satisfying of sexual urges and needs with forcing, threatening or tricking. Sexual abuse can be in the form of sexual abuse without touch, sexual touch, interfemoral intercourse, sexual penetration, and sexual exploitation. The prevalence of sexual abuse is reported as 10-40%. It is seen in female four times more than in males. Abusers are frequently male, only 5-15% of them are female. The abuse by females is usually towards male child. Thirty-fifty percent of abuse cases among child and adolescent are outside the family including strangers or familiar person. Some features of abusers are introvert personality, pedophilic and antisocial personality. Most of the abusers have a history of sexual abuse or aggression during childhood. Sexual intercourse between two people who are not allowed to marry by law is called as incest. Family pattern of incest is defined globally as disorganized and dysfunctional. The most commonly reported familial pattern is rigid and patriarchal family pattern with a harsh father using force quite frequently. The clinical features and impacts of the sexual abuse on the child varies according to the relation between abusers and the child, form of abuse, duration of abuse, presence of physical assault, developmental phase, child age and psychological development before the abuse. Sexual abuse history may result in psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, substance dependence, suicide act, borderline personality disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder. Abuse negatively affects interpersonal relationships and self esteem of abused individuals. Several studies reported close association between risky sexual behaviors in adulthood and a history of of sexual abuse during childhood. Four traumatic dynamics including traumatic sexuality with abuse, feeling of betrayal, weakness, and stigmatization exist in childhood abuse. Trauma can cause

  3. Attentional Resource Allocation and Cultural Modulation in a Computational Model of Ritualized Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Sørensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    ritualized behaviors are perceptually similar across a range of behavioral domains, symbolically mediated experience-dependent information (so-called cultural priors) modulate perception such that communal ceremonies appear coherent and culturally meaningful, while compulsive behaviors remain incoherent and......How do cultural and religious rituals influence human perception and cognition, and what separates the highly patterned behaviors of communal ceremonies from perceptually similar precautionary and compulsive behaviors? These are some of the questions that recent theoretical models and empirical......, in some cases, pathological. In this study, we extend a qualitative model of human action perception and understanding to include ritualized behavior. Based on previous experimental and computational studies, the model was simulated using instrumental and ritualized representations of realistic motor...

  4. Attentional Resource Allocation and Cultural Modulation in a Computational Model of Ritualized Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Sørensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    ritualized behaviors are perceptually similar across a range of behavioral domains, symbolically mediated experience-dependent information (so-called cultural priors) modulate perception such that communal ceremonies appear coherent and culturally meaningful, while compulsive behaviors remain incoherent and......How do cultural and religious rituals influence human perception and cognition, and what separates the highly patterned behaviors of communal ceremonies from perceptually similar precautionary and compulsive behaviors? These are some of the questions that recent theoretical models and empirical......, in some cases, pathological. In this study, we extend a qualitative model of human action perception and understanding to include ritualized behavior. Based on previous experimental and computational studies, the model was simulated using instrumental and ritualized representations of realistic motor...

  5. Innovations in the Treatment of Bulimia: Transpersonal Psychology, Relaxation, Imagination, Hypnosis, Myth, and Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Written for counselors who must help clients deal with bulimia, this article reviews bulimia's most obvious physical signs and symptoms, etiology, and behavioral characteristics. Considers innovative counseling approaches including Transpersonal Psychology, relaxation training, imagination, fantasy, hypnosis, myths, and rituals. (Author)

  6. Innovations in the Treatment of Bulimia: Transpersonal Psychology, Relaxation, Imagination, Hypnosis, Myth, and Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Written for counselors who must help clients deal with bulimia, this article reviews bulimia's most obvious physical signs and symptoms, etiology, and behavioral characteristics. Considers innovative counseling approaches including Transpersonal Psychology, relaxation training, imagination, fantasy, hypnosis, myths, and rituals. (Author)

  7. Symbolism and ritual practices related to hunting in Maya communities from central Quintana Roo, Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos-Fita, Dídac; Naranjo, Eduardo J; Estrada, Erin I J; Mariaca, Ramón; Bello, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Some Mayan peasant-hunters across the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico still carry out a hunting ritual -Loojil Ts'oon, Loj Ts'oon or Carbine Ceremony- in which they renew the divine permission for hunting...

  8. Magijos ritualas Senekos Medėjoje | Magic Ritual in Seneca’s Medea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovita Dikmonienė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Magic Ritual in Seneca’s Medea Jovita Dikmonienė Summary The present article deals with the magic ritual in Seneca’s Medea. Seneca, following Ovid’s Metamorphoses, created in the tragedy a witchcraft scene which describes magic numbers, herbs, and rituals dedicated to Hecate. Unlike Ovid, Seneca focuses on rituals involving snakes, conjuring up the dead, and supernatural performative utterances, and emphasises the feeling of anger, which inspired Medea to practise infernal magic. In magic, Romans gave particular importance to the number “three” and the numbers that can be divided by three. Seneca also mentions these numbers. During the performance of the ritual by Medea, Hecate barks three times, a dragon with a trident tongue appears, and tripods play during the ritual. Medea sends to Creusa not two, as in Euripides’ tragedy, but three poisoned gifts: a robe, a necklace, and a crown. Seneca’s Medea makes a wreath to Hecate from nine snakes. Magical, hallucinogenic herbs play an important role in magic. Seneca, like Ovid in his Metamorphoses, describes Medea’s ritual whereby she prepares a magical blend of herbs to poison Creusa. Prometheus’ grass used by Medea is probably mandrake. However, Seneca, like Ovid, does not provide the exact names of the herbs used in magic. Some researchers argue that Seneca described the magic ritual in order to highlight Medea’s desire to control the environment. According to the author of the present article, this claim is only partially true. Magic was necessary for Medea not only to control the environment, but also to control herself. The magic ritual helped her to prepare herself for revenge by transforming her consciousness. With the help of magic her sorrow and pity were transformed into aggression, she overcame her fear and prepared herself to kill her children. Medea’s ritual can be described as the magic of the fight, because it allowed her to transform her consciousness into the

  9. Luzes e sombras no dia social: o símbolo ritual em Victor Turner

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    Maria Laura Viveiros de Castro Cavalcanti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O tema do ritual é marcante na obra de Victor Turner, em especial nos trabalhos diretamente baseados em sua experiência de campo entre os lunda-ndembus realizada nos anos 1950. O artigo examina as formulações do autor nessa fase de sua obra, tomando como fio condutor o conceito de símbolo ritual, que condensa aspectos centrais da abordagem dos rituais. O conceito de símbolo ritual é examinado "em ação", ou seja, é enfocado através de diferentes textos e visto como um dos lugares da obra turneriana onde o esforço de teorização se associou à apreensão etnográfica dos sentidos do ritual. Com essa noção, ao articular reflexões sobre as dimensões cognitivas e experienciais da vida social, Turner buscou abranger dimensões inconscientes do pensamento e da ação. O exame de sua hermenêutica do símbolo indica uma solução de compromisso entre duas direções de pensamento turneriano: a tendência metafísica e religiosa e sua aproximação de formulações psicanalíticas freudianas.Ritual is one of Victor Turner's main themes. The author's interest in the subject emerges since his early works based in the fieldwork among the Lunda-Ndembu in the 1950's. The paper examines Turner's approach to ritual in this initial phase of his career and takes the concept of ritual symbol as a guideline. This concept encapsulates the core aspects of Turner's view of ritual and is examined "in action", that means in its movement through different texts. The ritual symbol is seen as one locus of Turner's work in which his efforts of conceptualization are strongly associated with his keen ethnographic sense of ritual. With this notion, Turner articulated cognitive and experiential dimensions of social life, and sought to unravel its unconscious dimensions. Turner's development of a semantic and hermeneutic approach to the ritual symbol emerges as a compromise between two quite different directions of his thought: his metaphysical and religious

  10. Drugs of Abuse Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Drug Abuse Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... of Abuse Screen Related tests: Emergency and Overdose Drug Testing ; Ethanol ; Nicotine ; Phenobarbital ; Testosterone ; Growth Hormone ; Erythropoietin ; IGF- ...

  11. Child abuse - physical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001552.htm Child abuse - physical To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Physical child abuse is a serious problem. Here are some facts: ...

  12. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  13. Who Owns Child Abuse?

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    Gerald Cradock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Expectations of contemporary child protection apparatuses are strongly influenced by beliefs inherited from the nineteenth century child rescue movement. In particular, the belief that child abuse determination is obvious. However, this assumption fails to make a distinction between nineteenth century’s emphasis on impoverished environments and the twentieth century introduction of the pathological child abuser. Moreover, the proliferation of kinds of child abuse, and the need to distinguish child abusers from non-abusers, means knowledge is now spread across an array of disciplines and professions, which necessarily destabilizes the definition of child abuse. The increasing exposure of alternate care systems as potentially abusive has similarly destabilized the old common sense solution to neglected children—namely removal. Finally, as uncertainty increases, and definitions become more divergent, the question of what child abuse is, and what should be done about it, becomes increasingly politicized.

  14. What is Elder Abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Strategic Plan Federal Initiatives Career Opportunities Contact Us Administration on Aging (AoA) What is Elder Abuse? What ... Elder Justice & Adult Protective Services Elder Justice Coordinating Council Prevention of Elder Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation (Title ...

  15. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include opioids, sedatives, ...

  16. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  17. Rituals to free the spirit – or what the cremation pyre told

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Høilund

    2009-01-01

    Sammenligning og diskussion af begravelsesriterne på gravpladsen Lindholm Høje (400-800 e.kr.) og skriftlige overleveringer om brandbegravelser og ledsagende ritualer, herunder hos Ibn Fadlan og i Beowulf-kvadet.......Sammenligning og diskussion af begravelsesriterne på gravpladsen Lindholm Høje (400-800 e.kr.) og skriftlige overleveringer om brandbegravelser og ledsagende ritualer, herunder hos Ibn Fadlan og i Beowulf-kvadet....

  18. El rezo del pescado, ritual de pubertad femenina entre los sikuani y cuiba

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    Francisco Ortíz G.

    2010-03-01

    En este trabajo se presenta una descripción del ritual de acuerdo a nuestras observaciones en las comunidades Cuiba de Mochuelo y Sikuani de Tsamani en Casanare. Se incluyen igualmente los textos de los rezos que aunque hasta el momento sólo han sido parcialmente traducidos, presentan un interés especial para la comprensión del simbolismo y el ritual.

  19. Gufa, a Unique Cultural Ritual-a Tale of a Forbidden Sun and a Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pritisha

    2016-10-01

    Gufa, one of the traditional rituals, has been performed in Nepal since time immemorial by indigenous Newar people. In Gufa, a young girl who just had her first period is hidden in a sunless room for twelve consecutive days. This paper expounds the importance of ritual and its nexus with astronomy especially while interpreting how the daily motions of celestial objects have influenced the establishment and devolvement of a deep-rooted custom of Gufa.

  20. Ritual folklórico y representaciones colectivas. Modelo de análisis comunicacional

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    Antonio Muñoz Carrión

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available An interesting analysis proposal of the folkloric ritual from a communications theory perspective, following the methodological line of formalism. The author conducts a thorough following of "Russian formalism" and explains its reformation by different trends in social thought, and its breaking away from ingenuous attitudes revealing the "hidden" relations underlying social phenomena, as is the case of the ritual and so many other cultural manifestations. The work constitutes a very interesting introduction to the anthropological perspective.

  1. Ritual folklórico y representaciones colectivas. Modelo de análisis comunicacional

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    An interesting analysis proposal of the folkloric ritual from a communications theory perspective, following the methodological line of formalism. The author conducts a thorough following of "Russian formalism" and explains its reformation by different trends in social thought, and its breaking away from ingenuous attitudes revealing the "hidden" relations underlying social phenomena, as is the case of the ritual and so many other cultural manifestations. The work cons...

  2. Defining and Transgressing the Boundaries between Ritual Commensality and Daily Commensal Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    Ritual commensality is a well documented social practice in texts and visual arts of the Ancient Near East. However, no information about daily commensality can be derived from these sources. The mere fact that a daily procedure as simple as eating and drinking was depicted hints at the meaning of this scene as a social event with a high symbolic value, while ordinary daily meals never seem to be represented. This paper argues that in everyday life, the boundaries between ritual and dail...

  3. Funerary ritual and commensality in the Bronze Age of South-Eastern Iberia: the Argar Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda Jiménez, Gonzalo; Esquivel Guerrero, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we will explore the relationship between commensality and the funerary ritual of the Argaric culture. Evidences of feasting can be related to two main archaeological domains; firstly, the production of special ritual pottery vessels with a high degree of standardization linked to the presentation and consumption of food and drink. In these vessels the visual and display properties have been clearly emphasised, which probably means their performance in social practises based on d...

  4. Kumbakonam: the ritual topography of a sacred and royal city of South India

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    Vivek Nanda

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available South India is renowned worldwide for the architectural splendour of its temples and the elaborate sculpture that adorns them, but their symbolism, still ritually enacted today, is less well understood outside India. Complex interrelationships of art, architecture and ritual are expressed in the evolution, through the past thousand years, of the topography of one of th most important of the temple cities.

  5. Rediscovering the ritual technology of the placebo effect in analytical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwyn, Erik

    2017-06-01

    Technology, viewed more generally, is a collection of skills and methods that are used to accomplish an objective of some kind. Modernity has produced many kinds of ever-expanding new technologies, but it is also evident that technologies can be lost or fall out of use. A cross-cultural survey of ritual reveals a rather startling observation: that while developed nations often exceed other cultures in terms of material technology, they often pale by comparison in their use of ritual technology. In this essay we will see how ritual is a powerful sort of technology that developed nations have mostly allowed to drift out of regular, vigorous use, despite its numerous psychological and biological effects. This tendency has left one of the rituals we still have - psychotherapy itself - to be bereft of some of the typical tools for concretizing the symbolic in recurrent patterns around the world. Jung himself could be accused of being somewhat anti-ritual himself, enmeshed as he was in the post-Protestant, post-Enlightenment cultural environment that defines the West in many ways. But these under-utilized elements of ritual technology may be a natural fit for Jungian therapy due to its use of symbols. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  6. Objects of Power, People of Prestige: The biographical temporality of Xinguano rituals and the Wauja cosmopolitics

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    Aristoteles Barcelos Neto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO JA X-NONE From puberty to old age, a Xinguano aristocrat will participate in, help perform and sponsor dozens of intra and inter-village rituals. These rituals, in turn, lie at the root of the production and maintenance of a singular type of political status (amunaw whose source of power is both external (pathogenic/shamanic spirits-monsters and internal (family networks of ritual work. The relation between these sources results in the production of ritual objects that also work to boost the prestige of the amunaw. However, it is only in their funerary rituals that the glory of the amunaw can be fully celebrated. After his death, what remains of the personified power of an amunaw are the names to which he conferred fame. In this article I attempt to show how this ritual system can maximize or minimize the amunaw’s power and its transmission to his descendants. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}

  7. Causes of Child Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Deveci,S.Erhan; Açık, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    Child abuse is an important public health problem that is present almost in every society and environment at different level and intensities. For implementation of child abuse protection measures it is necessary to investigate its causes. In this review, causes of child abuse was attempted to investigate with respects to the society and institution, family and individual and child related factors.

  8. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan.

  9. Embracing the lash: pain and ritual as spiritual tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Pearson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the use of flagellation for the purposes of purification, punishment or redemptive salvific activity has long been accepted in Christianity, its use in newly emergent religions such as Wicca, where the religious use of pain cannot be sidelined as an historical aberration but must instead be understood within the context of (postmodern spirituality, has elicited little debate. Whilst purification and, to a far lesser extent, punishment still have their place, in Wicca submission to pain must also be explored in terms of initi­atory ordeal, as well as an opportunity for transcendence and as arousal, sensation, and energy generation. However, voluntary submission to the infliction of pain, especially in order to enable religious/spiritual experience, tends to be regarded as anathema and as such, remains largely hidden, concealed behind a veil of categorisations of sexuality and psychopathology. Whilst acknowledging that BDSM remains taboo amongst most practitioners of Wicca, this 60 year old religion contains within its practices elements of techniques often associated with BDSM, techniques which, though having an established history in the world’s religions, are now being pioneered by a small cohort of priests and priestesses within the ritual framework of a twentieth/twenty-first century religion. This article concentrates on those elements now more or less stripped of their association with medieval Christianity, and more commonly framed within the context/s of BDSM.

  10. Ritual plants of Muslim graveyards in northern Israel

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    Dafni Amots

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article surveys the botanical composition of 40 Muslim graveyards in northern Israel, accompanied by an ethnobotanical study of the folkloristic traditions of the use of these plants in cemeteries. Three groups of plants were found to be repeated systematically and were also recognized for their ritual importance: aromatics herbs (especially Salvia fruticosa and Rosmarinus officinalis, white flowered plants (mainly Narcissus tazetta, Urginea maritima, Iris spp. and Pancratium spp. and Cupressus sempervirens as the leading cemetery tree. As endemic use we can indicate the essential role of S. fruticosa as the main plant used in all human rites of passage symbolizing the human life cycle. The rosemary is of European origin while the use of basil is of Indian influence. The use of white flowers as cemeteries plants reflects an old European influence and almost the same species are used or their congeners. Most of the trees and shrubs that are planted in Muslim cemeteries in Israel have the same use in ancient as well in modern European cultures. In conclusion, our findings on the occurrence of plants in graveyards reflect the geographic situation of Israel as a crossroads in the cultural arena between Asia and Europe. Most of the traditions are common to the whole Middle East showing high relatedness to the classical world as well as to the present-day Europe.

  11. Ritual plants of Muslim graveyards in northern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafni, Amots; Lev, Efraim; Beckmann, Sabine; Eichberger, Christian

    2006-09-10

    This article surveys the botanical composition of 40 Muslim graveyards in northern Israel, accompanied by an ethnobotanical study of the folkloristic traditions of the use of these plants in cemeteries. Three groups of plants were found to be repeated systematically and were also recognized for their ritual importance: aromatics herbs (especially Salvia fruticosa and Rosmarinus officinalis), white flowered plants (mainly Narcissus tazetta, Urginea maritima, Iris spp. and Pancratium spp.) and Cupressus sempervirens as the leading cemetery tree. As endemic use we can indicate the essential role of S. fruticosa as the main plant used in all human rites of passage symbolizing the human life cycle. The rosemary is of European origin while the use of basil is of Indian influence. The use of white flowers as cemeteries plants reflects an old European influence and almost the same species are used or their congeners. Most of the trees and shrubs that are planted in Muslim cemeteries in Israel have the same use in ancient as well in modern European cultures. In conclusion, our findings on the occurrence of plants in graveyards reflect the geographic situation of Israel as a crossroads in the cultural arena between Asia and Europe. Most of the traditions are common to the whole Middle East showing high relatedness to the classical world as well as to the present-day Europe.

  12. THE USE OF RELIGIOUS AND POLITICAL RITUALS IN CONTEMPORARY COMMUNICATION

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    IOVAN MARTIAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies the main characteristics and trends inthe development of media power in the context of increasing its connection with the otherpowers in the society, especially with the political and ecclesiastic power. The developmentof communication technologies, especially during the last half of a century, has led to theimprovement and increase of the efficiency of communication functions at all levels,regardless of the distances between those who manage communication and the targetpublic. The sacerdotal and political powers of our days have taken over the results ofmass–media development in order to use them intensively in the attainment of their ownmission and strategies, seeking to be as successful as possible. An essential way forfulfilling the goals of political and ecclesiastic power is the intentional use of specificceremonies and rituals in the communication exchanges with the public. The “directors”and “screenwriters” involved in the organization of such spectacles and their mediacoverage all over the planet have so perfected this art that the powers receiving extensivemedia coverage have become seductive celebrities, increasingly capable of manipulation, foran increasingly wider public. The author taps into a comprehensive historical,philosophical, sociological and practical documentation in order to demonstrate theincrease in the functions of audiovisual, verbal and nonverbal communication in our days,and some perverse effects of this evolution.

  13. Ritual mutilation between tradition and law: juridical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Carobene

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The mgf expression refers to ritual practices, such as lesions of the body, found mainly in Africa, related to the interpretations of cultural/religious principles which have based their own legal and social legitimacy. It has became an official word, in international documents, just starting from 1990, with a negative meaning strongly supported by Western culture. At first those has been considered as dangerous methods according to a medical-sanitary opinion, then as a serious violation of women’s and girls’ rights. In Italy the specific offense has been granted by a law in 2006 and there is just one case law processed by the Court of Verona in 2010. This matter focuses on the most significant issues of the current policies in a multicultural society with reference to the value that the legal system must give to cultural conditioning on people for criminal conducts due to membership. It must underline that these cases involve the most serious crime of permanent and irreversible injury against children, made by their legal guardians, in the name of alleged cultural-religious principles, which should have no place in a secular state.

  14. Mesolithic-Neolithic contacts as reflected in ritual finds

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    Eszter Bánffy

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The beginnings of settled life in Central Europe were marked by a series of interactions between local foragers and immigrants of southern origin. The Carpathian Basin is the last region to have had direct contact with Balkan peoples in the early Neolithic. In the course of the interaction, not only did two groups of different origin and manners meet and merge: two ways of symbolic thinking, two kinds of cult life, two perceptions of space and time must have come face to face. We know much more about south-east European Neolithic cults and ritual life, as reconstructed from enormously rich finds of material consisting of figurines, house models, anthropomorphic vessels etc. In the western part of the Carpathian Basin there are local imitations of these finds, thanks to contact. However, the figural representations almost entirely disappear by the developed phase of the Linear Pottery culture in Central Europe. Thus, we may find some hints about the other, local way of thinking. The possible causes of this change and also different perspectives in the symbolic meaning of this process are discussed in this short paper.

  15. Athletes confessions: the sports biography as an interaction ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thing, L F; Ronglan, L T

    2015-04-01

    Commercialization of emotions is not a new phenomenon but in Denmark there is a new general trend to tell and sell personal stories in the media. Personal deprivation and crises are also major topics in sports media. This paper focuses on sports biographies as a book genre that is reviving in popularity. The paper approaches the topic through the biographies of one Danish athlete: the former professional cyclist, Jesper Skibby, who writes about his doping disclosure and shares his personal dilemmas as a former elite sportsman. The thematic text analysis orientates around social interactions, emotions, and personality constructions. Inspired by microsociology with a Durkheimian flavor of Goffman and Hochschild, themes including "face work," "interaction rituals," and "emotions management" are discussed. The analysis claims that sharing personal information in the media is not only a means of confession and reclaiming status but is also business and management - on an intimate level. Telling the story of the corrosion of a sporting character has become a hot issue, an entertainment, and not least a commercial commitment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Género y Ritual entre los Otomíes de Guanajuato Género y Ritual entre los Otomíes de Guanajuato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Uzeta Iturbide

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo propone que el sistema ritual indígena regula el impacto de los cambios sociales que vive actualmente la Congregación otomí de San Ildefonso de Cieneguilla, municipio de Tierra Blanca, Guanajuato. Mediante los símbolos y rituales del sistema señalado se presenta la imagen de un orden social ideal, una mitificación de las relaciones sociales en la que mujeres y hombres encuentran posiciones definidas. Con ello se genera un sentido de continuidad por sobre las diferencias creadas en el mercado laboral, contribuyendo así a perfilar el carácter de la Congregación como actor político.This work proposes, that the indigenous ritual system regulates the social impact changes lived nowdays on the Otomi Congregation, from San Ildefonso de Cieneguilla Tierra Blanca municipality in Guanajuato, Mexico. Through symbols and rituals of the previously mentioned system, the image of an ideal social order is presented, a mythification of the social relations in which women and men find defined positions. This generates a sense of continuity over the differences created on the labor market, contributing to profile the Congregation’s character as a political actor.

  17. Los rituales escolares en la escuela pública polimodal Argentina

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    Cristina Irma Guillén

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente artículo es responder a los siguientes interrogantes: ¿qué mantiene los rituales escolares? ¿Cuál es la motivación que subyace en directivos y docentes para mantenerlos? Con el fin de indagar y responder a estas cuestiones, en primer lugar se desarrollan los conceptos de ritual, rutina, símbolo y creencias. Para luego realizar un breve recorrido histórico que pone en contexto los actos escolares. La metodología utilizada es la entrevista, la observación participante y encuestas en dos escuelas polimodales de la ciudad de Mar del Plata, tanto a alumnos como a docentes y jefa de preceptores. La idea que sigo es que estos rituales patrióticos en la escuela permiten la reproducción de un modelo de obediencia, disciplina y verticalismo alejado de la espontaneidad. Este modelo de ritual, solemne y formal, sostiene y perpetúa, a veces por inercia, una historia alejada de las luchas sociales, políticas e ideológicas. El discurso escolar mantiene así la historia oficial, reforzando la intención ideológica original.This article tries to find some answers to the following questions: How do pre-established rituals in public education maintain and perpetuate themselves? Which reasons have teachers to maintain them? In order to investigate this issue, I analyze the concepts of rituals, routines, symbolism, and beliefs. Then I review the historical context of these practises. The results I present have been obtained from my experience in two schools in Mar del Plata, Argentina. I think that these series of pre-established patriotic rites perpetrate a system of obedience, discipline and command. These rituals are also associated to certain scholar discourse that reinforces the Official History and its ideological intentions.

  18. A multidisciplinary overview of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Smet, P A

    1985-03-01

    Part one of the paper discusses ethnobotanical, chemical and general pharmacological aspects of intoxicating snuff rituals in the western hemisphere. Four categories of ritual snuff ingredients arise from this multidisciplinary approach: It is well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles and the Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is confirmed or quite probable: Anadenanthera, Erythroxylum, Nicotiana, Virola; It is well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles, but the Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is not well recorded or even unlikely: Banisteriopsis, Cannabis, Datura, Ilex guayusa; The Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is confirmed or quite probable, but it is not well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles: Justicia pectoralis, Pagamea macrophylla, Tanaecium nocturnum; The Indian use of the plant as a ritual snuff ingredient is not well recorded, and it is not well established that the plant contains one or more psychoactive principles: Acorus calamus, Capsicum, Macquira sclerophylla, Piper interitum. Part two of the paper discusses the nasal pharmacokinetics and efficacy of possible ritual snuff constituents. The literature yields convincing clinical evidence that atropine, cocaine, nicotine and scopolamine are effective following nasal application, but experimental confirmation of the efficacy of nasal tryptamine alkaloids is still awaited. In self-experiments, 6.4 mg/kg of caffeine produced substantial plasma levels via the nasal route, but 0.5 mg/kg of harmine did not produce measurable plasma levels, when taken as a nasal powder. Without additional experiments, it is difficult to give a definite explanation for this negative result.

  19. Funerary ritual and commensality in the Bronze Age of South-Eastern Iberia: the Argar Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda Jiménez, Gonzalo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will explore the relationship between commensality and the funerary ritual of the Argaric culture. Evidences of feasting can be related to two main archaeological domains; firstly, the production of special ritual pottery vessels with a high degree of standardization linked to the presentation and consumption of food and drink. In these vessels the visual and display properties have been clearly emphasised, which probably means their performance in social practises based on display and dramatization. Secondly, the appearance of faunal remains, as part of the funerary ritual, implies the slaughter of cattle and ovicaprids mainly in young ages, the ideal moment to be consumed. The eating of these species would be part of ritual feasting, with the exception of the legs of these animals that were introduced in the burial as grave goods. The clearly differential social access to these commensal practices would involve not only the construction of a strong sense of community but principally the naturalization of unequal social relationship.

    En el presente trabajo se plantea el desarrollo de rituales de comensalidad asociados al ritual funerario argárico. Las evidencias arqueológicas de estos rituales estarían relacionadas por una parte con la producción de un conjunto normalizado de vasijas cerámicas asociadas con la presentación y consumo de alimentos y bebidas, y en donde destacan sus propiedades visuales relacionadas con prácticas sociales de exhibición y escenificación. Por otra parte, la aparición de restos faunísticos en las sepulturas argáricas supone que, como parte de ritual, se procedió al sacrificio de bóvidos u ovicápridos, fundamentalmente en edades jóvenes de los que una parte, los extremos distales, fueron introducidos en las tumbas. El resto de la especie o especies sacrificadas, en un momento óptimo para su consumo, serían consumidas como parte de los rituales de comensalidad. El acceso

  20. FROM THE SACRED TO THE PROFANE: THE OBLATION RITUALIZED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Ramas Cañete

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study approaches the historical construction of the narratives surrounding the statue titled Oblation, deemed as the symbol of the University of the Philippines (UP, from the theoretical perspective of Eric Hobsbawn’s notion of “invented traditions,” as well as Judith Butler’s theory of performativity. The study looks at the genesis of this narrative as informed by the anti-colonial struggle of the late-19th and early 20th century, but amplified and “sacralised” through the symbolic power of the UP Presidency, particularly under Jorge C. Bocobo (1935-1939 under whose auspices the Oblation was erected on November 30, 1935. The study also foregrounds the key term “Sacrificial Body” as a determinant of the Oblation’s narrational focus of itself as subject, and its function as idealized model or template to be “followed” by the UP community. The ambivalence of this narrative, however, is central to the production of contradicting discourses throughout its history, from the “sacred” Pre-War image akin to a secular Crucifixion upon which rituals supervised by a “priesthood” composed of the University’s officials were enacted; to the Post- War secular (and thus “profane” image of the Oblation as that “representing academic freedom” from the viewpoint of its progressive student body and faculty. The common assertion of a sacrificial representation of anti-colonial struggle, however, is intuited by the study as exemplifying the epistemic problematics of postcolonial nationalism.

  1. Evidence of a link between taboos and sacrifices and resource scarcity of ritual plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Diana; van Andel, Tinde

    2015-01-08

    One of the main obstacles for the mainstreaming of religious traditions as tools for the conservation of nature is the limited applicability of research results in this field. We documented two different restrictions implemented by local people (taboos and sacrifices) related to the use of ritual plants in Benin (West Africa) and Gabon (Central Africa). To see whether these restrictions reflected plant scarcity from an etic perspective (official threat status) and an emic viewpoint (perceived scarcity by local people), we conducted 102 interviews with traditional healers and adepts of traditional faiths. We documented a total of 618 ritual plants, from which 52 species were used in both countries. In Benin, the use of 63 of the 414 ritual plant species was restricted; while in Gabon 23 of the 256 ritual plants were associated with taboos and sacrifices. In Benin, restricted plants were significantly more often officially threatened, perceived as scarce, and actively protected than non-restricted plants. In the more forested and less densely populated Gabon, plants that were perceived as scarce were more often associated to local restrictions than officially threatened species. These results prove the presence of a form of adaptive management where restrictions are related to resource scarcity and protection of ritual plant species. By providing baseline data on possibly endangered species, we demonstrate how plant use in the context of religious traditions can yield important information for conservation planning.

  2. 论庾信礼学观%On YU Xin’ s Concept of Ritual Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳洋峰

    2014-01-01

    庾信的作品可谓篇篇有“礼”。从具体的作品考察可知,庾信知耻铭辱的礼学观念与其所处的时代背景、家学传统、个人学养以及上层统治者对“礼”教化功能的重视都是紧密相连的。庾信怀国以礼、弘扬至孝及事君以礼等观念对后世所起的影响亦不可忽视。%Each of YU Xin’ s works can be described with the word "ritual". The study of his specific works shows that YU Xin’ s ritual concept of shame and disgrace is closely related to his historical back-ground, family tradition, personal knowledge and cultivation as well as the upper ruler’ s emphasis on the educational function of rituals. YU Xin yearned for his country with ritual, promoted piety and served the emperor with ritual, all of which have great influence on the following generations.

  3. Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Marta; van Andel, Tinde R; Balslev, Henrik

    2014-07-23

    Palms (Arecaceae) are prominent elements in African traditional medicines. It is, however, a challenge to find detailed information on the ritual use of palms, which are an inextricable part of African medicinal and spiritual systems. This work reviews ritual uses of palms within African ethnomedicine. We studied over 200 publications on uses of African palms and found information about ritual uses in 26 of them. At least 12 palm species in sub-Saharan Africa are involved in various ritual practices: Borassus aethiopum, Cocos nucifera, Dypsis canaliculata, D. fibrosa, D. pinnatifrons, Elaeis guineensis, Hyphaene coriacea, H. petersiana, Phoenix reclinata, Raphia farinifera, R. hookeri, and R. vinifera. In some rituals, palms play a central role as sacred objects, for example the seeds accompany oracles and palm leaves are used in offerings. In other cases, palms are added as a support to other powerful ingredients, for example palm oil used as a medium to blend and make coherent the healing mixture. A better understanding of the cultural context of medicinal use of palms is needed in order to obtain a more accurate and complete insight into palm-based traditional medicines.

  4. Ritual works and practices: a case study from a Muslim community in Cambodia

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    Ing-Britt Trankell

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The function of the ritual is to assert a transcendental power over everyday experience and rituals therefore tend to be formalized, repetitive and conservative events. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance for ritual studies of ritualised strategies for the negotiation of power and influence. Here, research on a spirit possession cult among the Muslim Cham in Cambodia will serve as an empirical basis for a discussion of the open-ended and unbounded features of ritual in contemporary society, since the performances of this cult may be seen both as a kind of "state ritual" and as exorcism. Through the cult, the Cham tend to take refuge in their memories of the distant past rather than in their more immediate memories of terror and political violence, during the civil war and the Khmer Rouge regime. Rephrased as songs of the spirits, the present and the past intermingle in narrating the difficulties, the conflicts and the struggle in the world of the spirits who live next to, and mingle in, the world of ordinary human beings.

  5. A week of Danjiki (Buddhist fasting ritual) on cardiometabolic health: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Danjiki is an ascetic traditional fasting ritual in the Japanese Buddhism training. Here we present a case of a 48-year-old man who underwent a 1-week-long Danjiki fasting ritual in a remote Buddhist temple. The daily ritual consisted of waking up at 3:30 am, hiking strenuously in the steep mountains followed by meditations on the rocks, focused calligraphy of religious drawings and documents, recital of Buddhist prayer chanting, and standing under waterfalls while reciting prayers. He was allowed to drink water ad libitum and a cup of carrot juice a day. After a week of the Danjiki ritual, his body weight decreased by 5 kg. Resting metabolic rate did not change. Fasting blood glucose did not change but plasma triglyceride decreased 35 %. There were no changes in blood pressure. Arterial stiffness increased 15-25 % and endothelium-dependent vasodilation decreased 5 %. These results indicate that the Danjiki ritual produced significant weight loss but unexpectedly reduced vascular functions.

  6. RITUALITY AS A WAY OF ACTUALIZING THE CATEGORY OF OTHERNESS WITHIN THE JUDICIAL DISCOURSE

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    Bogomazova Viktoriya Vladimirovna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the rituality as one of the ways of actualizing the category of otherness within the judicial discourse, in general, and the court session, in particular. The author analyzes the relevant features of rituality in the judicial discourse, reveals the categorical connection between the rituality and otherness, the speech means which actualize their interaction. The author gives examples illustrating the actualization of the concept by means of rituality in the texts of court sessions' records. In addition, the author identifies the main communicative strategies and tactics used by the participants of judicial discourse. They serve as a means of expressing the analyzed categories. It is shown that a convict often uses the communicative strategy of self-defense, a defender and/or lawyer – the communicative strategy of defense or psychological impact, the prosecutor often appeals to the strategy of accusation and psychological impact. The author makes conclusion that the ritual character of judicial communication as a whole contributes to the distinction of discourse participants according to the features of "friend" and "enemy" thus actualizing the category of otherness.

  7. Rethinking 'Efficacy': Ritual Healing and Trance in the Mahanubhav Shrines in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Shubha

    2015-09-01

    Ritual healing has been one of the core topics in anthropology and, to a lesser extent, in psychology as well. Much of the research on ritual healing has focused on how healing works, and what factors constitute the efficacy of healing. In answering this question, scholars have focused primarily on two main factors-the symbolic significance of rituals, and the relationship between the healer and the patient. This paper explores understandings about efficacy in a context where elaborate rituals do not occur, the role of the healer is minimal, and the sufferers do not have expectations of complete wellness. In the Mahanubhav temples in India, healing is not understood as the removal of symptoms. The healing process involves amplifying unpleasant and painful symptoms, thereby 'drawing out' the illness from the body. Moreover, the temple narratives emphasize the transient nature of temple healing, where people rarely become completely well. They therefore frequently return to stay in the temple as and when their symptoms recur, thus forging long-term bond with the temple community and sect. These findings suggest that temple healing is powerful not so much for the practice of specific exorcist rituals, but for providing a refuge and a community for suffering individuals.

  8. Solvent abuse: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G E

    1979-01-01

    The literature on solvent abuse is reviewed. Methods of use, symptoms of use, and effects of long-term solvent abuse are discussed. Several surveys on solvent use are summarized. The highest prevalence of solvent abuse seems to occur in native peoples undergoing periods of cultural change. Environmental conditions which are postulated as leading to psychological vulnerability and solvent abuse include: low social assets, parental drug use, peer and sibling influence, and acculturative stress. Solvent abuse seems to provide a pharmacological way out of a stressful environment for people who feel helpless to improve their situation in other ways. Methods of intervention that have been proposed for dealing with solvent abuse are discussed. Methods of intervention thus far employed generally have not been evaluated in any systematic fashion. Suggestions for future research are provided.

  9. SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN INDIA

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    Bano Rubeena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidemic of substance abuse in young generation has assumed alarming dimensions in India. Changing cultural values, increasing economic stress and dwindling supportive bonds are leading to initiation into substance use. Cannabis, heroin, and Indian-produced pharmaceutical drugs are the most frequently abused drugs in India. Drug use, misuse or abuse is also primarily due to the nature of the drug abused, the personality of the individual and the addict’s immediate environment. The processes of industrialization, urbanization and migration have led to loosening of the traditional methods of social control rendering an individual vulnerable to the stresses and strains of modern life.

  10. Elder Abuse and Neglect

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    Muge Gulen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abuse and neglect are preventable societal problems that influence elderly individuals physically, spiritually and socially. Elder abuse is neglected for many years and is a growing problem all over the world. The aim of this article is to review the evaluation of elderly individuals who are exposed to abuse and neglect with systematic detailed history and physical examination and to describe individual, familial, and social measures that should be taken to prevent these abuses. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 393-407

  11. Sexual abuse of boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sharon M

    2005-01-01

    Sexual abuse in childhood can disable self-esteem, self-concept, relationships, and ability to trust. It can also leave psychological trauma that compromises a boy's confidence in adults. While some boys who willingly participate may adjust to sexual abuse, many others face complications, such as reduced quality of life, impaired social relationships, less than optimal daily functioning, and self-destructive behavior. These problems can respond to treatment if detected. In this paper, we examine the prevalence, characteristics, psychological consequences, treatment, and coping patterns of boys who have been sexually abused and their failure to disclose abuse unless asked during a therapeutic encounter. Nurses have a responsibility to detect the clues to sexual abuse, diagnose the psychological consequences, and advocate for protection and treatment. Computerized literature search of the Medline and PsychInfo literature and books on sexual abuse of boys. Psychological responses to abuse such as anxiety, denial, self-hypnosis, dissociation, and self-mutilation are common. Coping strategies may include being the angry avenger, the passive victim, rescuer, daredevil, or conformist. Sexual abuse may precipitate runaway behavior, chronic use of sick days, poor school or job performance, costly medical, emergency and or mental health visits. In worst cases, the boy may decide that life is not worth living and plan suicide. The nurse has a key role to play in screening, assessing, and treating sexual abuse children.

  12. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Know Getting Rid of Old Medicines Dealing With Addiction Understanding Medications and What They Do Prescription Drug Abuse Bath Salts Depressants Ketamine MDMA (Ecstasy) Contact Us Print Resources ...

  13. Creating Modern Japanese Subjects: Morning Rituals from Norito to News and Weather

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    Wilburn Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This original research on Restoration Shinto Norito seeks to explain the rhetorical devices used in the composition of a morning prayer ritual text. The nativist scholar, Hirata Atsutane, crafted this ritual to create a Japanese imperial subject with a particular understanding of native identity and national unity, appropriate to the context of a Japan in the shadow of impending modernity and fear of Western domination. The conclusions drawn concerning Hirata’s rhetoric are meant to inform our understanding of the technique and power of the contemporary Japanese morning television viewing ritual used to create post-modern Japanese citizens with an identity and unity appropriate to a global secular context.

  14. Congruence of rituals and theatre. The use of drama for religious ceremony

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    Cosmin Tudor Ciocan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available I have started this research as a response to a pejorative question that religious rituals are merely theatrical, and the personnel involved nothing else but actors; beyond this there is nothing any religion suggests, e.g. healing, divine touch, blessings et.al. This paper is about rituals and their meanings and roles played as in social drama and theatre play. Considering the relationship between ritual and theatre to be reciprocal I will use their functions to evaluate the process of religious ceremonies and the role they play for adherents/participants, as if they would be attending a play. Religious Studies and Drama joint study offers the opportunity to combine two complementary humanities subjects, as both drama and religion are mainstays of cultural practice.

  15. A semiotics of comedy: Moving figures and shifting grounds of Chapayeka ritual clown performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keisalo, Marianna Päivikki

    2016-01-01

    This article develops an analytic approach to comedic performance by examining the performance of the Chapayeka ritual clowns as a series of semiotic shifts and reversals: the Chapayekas play with images and contexts, introducing unpredictable figures to effectively shift the grounding conditions...... to function as both symbolic figures in the ritual and self-contained contextual grounds, which enables them to produce further signs and manipulate figure-ground relations within and beyond the ritual. The analytic view developed here is informed by the complex and multilayered semiotics of comedic...... performance; this exploration offers a novel perspective on how comedic performances create and wield semiotic force through establishing grounds and evoking figure-ground relations....

  16. Materializing Performance and Ritual: Decoding the Archaeology of Movement in Tallensi Shrines in Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoll, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Within much archaeological interpretation and conceptualization in relation to ritual and religion the static is often given prominence. This is potentially due to the fact that static material residues are being considered and, in turn, this static image is transferred onto the ritual practices, beliefs, and communities that generated the archaeological material. Instead some of the material encountered archaeologically might be structured by much more dynamic, fluid, and active ritual behaviors. Considering performance, movement, and bodily understandings in relation to space and material culture offers a potential mechanism to begin to explore this, and will be considered with reference to the Golib festival and the archaeology of Tallensi shrines in the Tongo Hills of the Upper East Region in Northern Ghana. PMID:22318869

  17. Child Abuse: The Hidden Bruises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5; Updated November 2014 The statistics on physical child abuse are alarming. It is estimated hundreds of thousands ... Physical abuse is not the only kind of child abuse. Many children are also victims of neglect, or ...

  18. What is the importance of executing rituals ‘correctly’ and why do people continue to engage in them?

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    Hennie Viviers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituals, borne out of our embodied practical reason, are deeds that are counterintuitive in terms of cause and effect. From a cognitive point of view, two kinds of religious rituals can be identified: special agent rituals, where superhuman agents act on human patients (onceoff, highly emotional; e.g. initiations, weddings and special instrument and patient rituals, where human agents act on superhuman patients (repeated, less emotional; e.g. sacrifices, Holy Communion. The idea of ‘correctness’ applies more stringently to the first kind than the second, for instance: Jacob’s blessing of Ephraim and Manasseh in Genesis 48. Rituals stabilise, reconstitute and replicate our ‘cosmos’ or imaginative worlds as they realign our intersubjective relations. They are tenacious and persistent, because they evoke, usually in an emotional and motivational way, our sense of urgency, our deeply felt need to maintain sound social relations and our intuitive ability to form notions of a counterintuitive world. The aim of this article was therefore to highlight and illustrate the role our evolved mental tools play when conducting rituals, especially when conducting some rituals ‘correctly’ and others less stringently so. Furthermore, the psychological appeal that rituals have on the human mind was also explained.

  19. Rituals between religion and politics: the case of VHP’s 2001-2002 Ayodhya-campaign

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    Erik Reenberg Sand

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with rituals in a political discourse, namely the rituals employed by the right wing, Hindu nationalist movement, Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP, in its campaign for a Rama temple in the north Indian town of Ayodhya. As is probably well-known, VHP is part of a group of organizations known as the Sangh Parivar, or sangh family, which also includes the presently ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP, and the ultranationalistic organization Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, or RSS. The rituals of VHP are instruments of the construction of an ideal Hindu society and part of an encounter between Hindu-nationalist tenets and the secular, political establishment. However, the rituals employed by VHP can not be said to represent a separate ritual genre, since they are not different from similar, traditional Hindu rituals. What makes them different is their context and their motives, the fact that they do not serve ordinary material, eschatological, or soteriological aims, but rather political aims, as well as the fact that the ritual agents in this case do not seem to have a satisfactory juridical legitimacy to perform the rituals.

  20. Classic Maya bloodletting and the cultural evolution of religious rituals: quantifying patterns of variation in hieroglyphic texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Jessica; Amati, Viviana; Collard, Mark; Macri, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Religious rituals that are painful or highly stressful are hypothesized to be costly signs of commitment essential for the evolution of complex society. Yet few studies have investigated how such extreme ritual practices were culturally transmitted in past societies. Here, we report the first study to analyze temporal and spatial variation in bloodletting rituals recorded in Classic Maya (ca. 250-900 CE) hieroglyphic texts. We also identify the sociopolitical contexts most closely associated with these ancient recorded rituals. Sampling an extensive record of 2,480 hieroglyphic texts, this study identifies every recorded instance of the logographic sign for the word ch'ahb' that is associated with ritual bloodletting. We show that documented rituals exhibit low frequency whose occurrence cannot be predicted by spatial location. Conversely, network ties better capture the distribution of bloodletting rituals across the southern Maya region. Our results indicate that bloodletting rituals by Maya nobles were not uniformly recorded, but were typically documented in association with antagonistic statements and may have signaled royal commitments among connected polities.

  1. Nature and Culture in the Rituals of San Antonio

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    Velasco Maíllo, Honorio M.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I analyze the cult of San Antonio Abad, San Antón, as an example of the ritual fusion of nature and culture in the different communities commemorating this Saint. The festive practices of this «old Saint» are associated to preChristian rites related to fire and the protection of animals. The cult to this Saint was very pread out in Europe, and was even exported to the American colonies. It is a clear example of how popular practices appropriate Church initiatives within their own logic, bordering heterodoxy at times, while expressing mechanisms of resistance to change. Yet it is clear that this cult has survived because it has adapted. When industrialization came to the countryside, the animal blessing gave way to machine blessing. When stockbreeding is on the wane, the cult adjusts to new ecological sensibilities and the blessings go to pets. St. Antonio unifies nature and culture, rural and urban, remote cults with ecology.

    En este artículo reflexiono en torno al culto de San Antonio Abad o San Antón como una muestra de la fusión naturaleza y cultura a través de los ritos que llevan a cabo las distintas poblaciones que festejan a este santo. Las prácticas festivas de este “santo viejo” están asociadas a prácticas precristianas relacionadas con el culto al fuego y la protección de los animales. El culto de este santo popular estuvo muy extendido por Europa y fue exportado a las colonias americanas. Sirve como expresión muy clara de cómo las apropiaciones populares se han producido una y otra vez estimuladas por iniciativas eclesiásticas y se han desarrollado según los modos propios las prácticas propuestas, rozando en ocasiones la heterodoxia y expresando mecanismos de resistencia al cambio. Aunque por otra parte este culto se ha mantenido gracias a que se ha adaptado; el campo se industrializó y dejó de celebrarse la bendición de animales para pasar a bendecir las máquinas. Cuando prácticamente se

  2. Rituals in Death and Dying: Modern Medical Technologies Enter the Fray

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    Michael Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of immortality, the human species has over the millennia developed rites and rituals to help in the passing of life to honor the person who is dying or has died or in some way demonstrate their “courage” and perseverance as well as duty even in the face of almost certain death. The centuries-old traditions of the gathering of loved ones, the chanting of prayers, the ritual religious blessings are in the process of being replaced by the “miracles” of modern medical technology.

  3. Anthropology of the memorial: observations and reflections on American cultural rituals associated with death

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmingson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Dieser Beitrag befasst sich mit zeitgenössischen amerikanischen Todesritualen, konkreter mit der Kultur des Gedenkens. Hierzu greife ich auf den Vorschlag von David R. MAINES zurück, Erzählungen zu verwenden, um soziale (und für die Anthropologie relevante) Ereignisse zu untersuchen. In Bezug auf Gedenken und Gedenkstätten gibt es spezifische soziale Erwartungen, es gibt Rituale, über Tote nur Gutes zu berichten, Rituale von Trauer. Bekannte und Familienangehörige kommen zusammen und sprec...

  4. INLAND-COASTAL PHILIPPINE HYBRIDITY: HETEROGLOSSIA IN AGUSAN MANOBO MUSIC AND RITUAL

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    José S. Buenconsejo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the hybridity of contemporary Agusan Manobo music as evident in its repertory and in the heteroglossia of possession ritual performances, where various archaic and modern speech styles (including song and ritual dance music co-exist. This hybridity is consequent to the history of Agusan Manobo relations with outsiders, especially Visayan-speaking settlers whose markers of group identity have been incorporated into Manobo rites. Such incorporation indicates the Manobo presence to a social world that is characterized by a mix between inland Manobo and coastal Visayan cultures.

  5. Female genital interventions: Between the plastic surgeon’s scalpel and the ritual knife

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    La Barbera, MariaCaterina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available While enormous and growing sums of money are spent each year in genital cosmetic surgeries, ritual female genital interventions increasingly meet strong political and social opposition. Which interpretative models have been adopted to define some interventions as “cosmetic” and the others as “criminal”? Is there a colonialist attitude implicit in banning ritual female genital interventions? This appear to be the case after a joint examination of the health risks associated with the breast implant, the symbolic meanings of the ritual interventions, the strategic reinvention of traditional practices, and the use of the binomy health/pathology as a “controlling process”. This paper challenges the assumption that who is exposed to the plastic surgeon’s scalpel enjoys freedom and autonomy in an oppression-free society, while who is subjected to the ritual knife is a passive victim of traditional patriarchal societies.

    Mientras se gastan cifras enormes y cada año crecientes en intervenciones quirúrgicas que modifican los órganos sexuales, las intervenciones rituales sobre los genitales femeninos encuentran una oposición política y social cada vez más fuerte. ¿Cuáles son los modelos interpretativos adoptados para definir como estéticas a unas y criminales a las otras? ¿Existe una actitud colonialista implícita en la condena de las intervenciones rituales sobre los genitales femeninos? Este parece ser el caso cuando se examinan conjuntamente los daños para la salud derivados del implante mamario, los significados simbólicos de las intervenciones rituales, la reinvención estratégica de las prácticas tradicionales y el uso del binomio salud/patología como “proceso de control”. Este artículo propone cuestionar la idea de que quien se somete al bisturí del cirujano plástico disfruta de libertad y autonomía en una sociedad libre de opresión, mientras que quien se expone al cuchillo ritual es víctima pasiva de

  6. The use of (perfumed) oil in Hittite rituals with particular emphasis on funerary practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    According to the Hittite texts, Late Bronze Age Anatolia was known for the diversity of its agricultural products. Oil-bearing plants are listed among them. Hittite scholars distinguish ‘oil’, ‘fat’ and similar products on the basis of their attestations. Additionally, lexical analysis of Hittite...... of the rituals we can infer that oil was used for several purposes. In this article attention is placed on the use of ‘perfumed oil’ in rituals with particular emphasis on funerary practices. In addition, selected possible comparisons with other funerary contexts are briefly presented....

  7. La muerte y el ritual funerario en Caravaca de la Cruz. Siglos XVIII al XX.

    OpenAIRE

    Melgares Guerrero, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    La relación de la sociedad con la muerte en los pueblos de la región de Murcia y, concretamente en Caravaca de la Cruz, apenas varió en sus manifestaciones externas desde el siglo XVIII hasta la primera mitad del XX. Las costumbres vinculadas a ella constituyeron un verdadero ritual fúnebre que daba comienzo en el momento mismo del óbito y se prolongaba hasta la conclusión del luto, mucho tiempo después. Este ritual, que a veces lo iniciaba el propio finado preparándose social ...

  8. La muerte y el ritual funerario en Caravaca de la Cruz. Siglos XVIII al XX

    OpenAIRE

    Melgares Guerrero, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    La relación de la sociedad con la muerte en los pueblos de la región de Murcia y, concretamente en Caravaca de la Cruz, apenas varió en sus manifestaciones externas desde el siglo XVIII hasta la primera mitad del XX. Las costumbres vinculadas a ella constituyeron un verdadero ritual fúnebre que daba comienzo en el momento mismo del óbito y se prolongaba hasta la conclusión del luto, mucho tiempo después. Este ritual, que a veces lo iniciaba el propio finado preparándose social ...

  9. The use of (perfumed) oil in Hittite rituals with particular emphasis on funerary practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    According to the Hittite texts, Late Bronze Age Anatolia was known for the diversity of its agricultural products. Oil-bearing plants are listed among them. Hittite scholars distinguish ‘oil’, ‘fat’ and similar products on the basis of their attestations. Additionally, lexical analysis of Hittite...... of the rituals we can infer that oil was used for several purposes. In this article attention is placed on the use of ‘perfumed oil’ in rituals with particular emphasis on funerary practices. In addition, selected possible comparisons with other funerary contexts are briefly presented....

  10. Rituales, descentramientos territoriales y niveles de identidad: La Semana Santa Marinera de Valencia

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    García Pilán, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study how the processes of spatial and identity recomposition brought about by a globalized world affect traditional religious rituals, with particular reference to the Semana Santa Marinera processions in Valencia (Spain. Instead of the ritual giving rise to a single local identity, it can be seen that levels of local identity —while not disappearing— overlap more and more with increasingly vague new territorialities ranging from processional networks based on canon law to state-organized meetings. Media coverage of the ritual means that new virtual communities with no fixed territorial base are created, and the complexity of this phenomenon further increases with the creation of virtual online communities. The spatial decentration of ritual, therefore implies the creation of new forms of identity constructed along hybrid and cross-sectional lines, thereby strengthening the process of secularization.

    El propósito del artículo es estudiar los procesos de recomposición identitaria y espacial que la modernidad globalizada opera sobre los rituales religiosos tradicionales, a partir del caso de la Semana Santa Marinera de Valencia (España. Frente a la visión del ritual como reproductor de una única identidad local, se constata cómo los niveles de identidad locales, sin desaparecer, se ven progresivamente solapados con nuevas territorialidades de base cada vez más incierta, que incluyen desde redes de procesiones basadas en el derecho canónico hasta encuentros de extensión estatal. Por fin, la proyección mediática del ritual supone la creación de nuevas comunidades virtuales y desterritorializadas, fenómeno cuya complejidad se incrementa con la creación de comunidades virtuales a través de Internet. El descentramiento espacial del ritual supone así la activación de nuevas formas de identidad, construidas de manera híbrida y transversal, y refuerza su proceso de secularización.

  11. Catherine Halpern, Michèle Bitton, Lilith, l’épouse de Satan, Paris, Larousse, coll. « Dieux, Mythes et Héros », 2010, 191 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Roucoux

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lilith, l’épouse de Satan est la quatrième figure féminine à s’inscrire dans la collection de « Dieux, Mythes & Héros » qui ne cache pas « le caractère profondément masculin de la mythologique en général » (p. 167, pour mieux lui résister. Ce portrait en six chapitres, dressé par la journaliste Catherine Halpern et la sociologue Michèle Bitton à partir de textes théologiques judéo-chrétiens et d’analyses scientifiques, nous donne à voir une Lilith plurielle mais dont « la plus grande partie ...

  12. Abuse during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can trigger abuse during pregnancy? For many families, pregnancy can bring about feelings of stress, which is normal. But it's not okay for your partner to react violently to stress. Some partners become abusive during pregnancy because they feel: Upset because this was an ...

  13. Child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, K P; Jenny, C

    1997-08-01

    Multiple obstacles can hinder the medical evaluation of suspected child sexual abuse in pediatric primary care. The need for diagnostic accuracy is high. Knowledge of sexual abuse risk factors, an understanding of the victimization process, and awareness of the varied clinical presentations of sexual abuse can be of assistance. Open-ended questioning of the suspected victim is the most critical component of the evaluation. Skillful medical interviewing requires time, training, patience, and practice. Pediatricians lacking any of these four requirements should defer interviewing in sexual abuse cases to other professionals. Abnormal physical findings from sexual abuse are uncommon. Colposcopy has assisted pediatricians greatly in reaching consensus regarding diagnostic physical findings. Cases of acute sexual assault require familiarity with the forensic rape examination, STD screening and prophylaxis, and pregnancy prevention. Victimization from sexual abuse continues long after the abusive acts end, often requiring long-term therapeutic intervention. An emerging standard of care for medical evaluations of suspected child sexual abuse recognizes the requirement for patience and compassion while retaining objectivity. The pediatrician's primary concern must be for the child's physical and emotional well-being.

  14. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  15. SNL Abuse Testing Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orendorff, Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, Leigh Anna Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes recommended abuse testing procedures for rechargeable energy storage systems (RESSs) for electric vehicles. This report serves as a revision to the FreedomCAR Electrical Energy Storage System Abuse Test Manual for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications (SAND2005-3123).

  16. 《失乐园》中撒旦英雄形象的文学伦理学探析%Ethical Literary Study on the Heroic Image of Satan in Paradise Lost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成峰

    2015-01-01

    As the evil archetype in western mainstream culture, Satan is in lively controversy because of the he⁃roic character created by John Milton in his poetical work Paradise Lost. By applying the approach of ethical liter⁃ary criticism advocated by Mr. Nie Zhenzhao, however, the possibility of Satan's heroic image created by Milton can be demonstrated through the analysis of Milton's growth, especially his father's educating model in family, all the discontent with Cambridge's educational system and the fetters in Church and thereby Milton's sympathy and support to English Bourgeois Revolution.%作为西方主流文化中的邪恶原型,约翰·弥尔顿在其史诗巨著《失乐园》中创造的撒旦英雄备受学界争议。然而,通过运用聂珍钊先生倡导的文学伦理学批评方法,分析弥尔顿的成长经历尤其是家庭环境中父亲的教育模式、求学游历阶段对剑桥教育制度和模式以及教会桎梏的种种不满,并且剖析所有这一切最终所导致的弥尔顿对英国资产阶级革命的同情与支持,从而证实弥尔顿在《失乐园》中塑造撒旦英雄形象的可能性。

  17. Abuse Potential of Pregabalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning, Ole; Rosenzweig, Mary; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several case reports and epidemiological studies have raised concern about the abuse potential of pregabalin, the use of which has increased substantially over the last decade. Pregabalin is, in some cases, used for recreational purposes and it has incurred attention among drug abusers...... for causing euphoric and dissociative effects when taken in doses exceeding normal therapeutic dosages or used by alternative routes of administration, such as nasal insufflation or venous injection. The magnitude of the abuse potential and the mechanism behind it are not fully known. OBJECTIVE: The aim...... of this study was to present a systematic review of the data concerning the abuse potential of pregabalin. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search and reviewed the preclinical, clinical and epidemiological data on the abuse potential of pregabalin. RESULTS: We included preclinical (n = 17...

  18. Dextromethorphan Abuse in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, Jodi K.; Wang, Uerica K.; Hui, Jenny W.; Bedodo, Merilin; MacDougall, Conan; Anderson, Ilene B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the trend of dextromethorphan abuse in California and to compare these findings with national trends. Design A 6-year retrospective review. Setting California Poison Control System (CPCS), American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), and Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) databases from January 1, 1999, to December 31, 2004. Participants All dextromethorphan abuse cases reported to the CPCS, AAPCC, and DAWN. The main exposures of dextromethorphan abuse cases included date of exposure, age, acute vs long-term use, coingestants, product formulation, and clinical outcome. Main Outcome Measure The annual proportion of dextromethorphan abuse cases among all exposures reported to the CPCS, AAPCC, and DAWN databases. Results A total of 1382 CPCS cases were included in the study. A 10-fold increase in CPCS dextromethorphan abuse cases from 1999 (0.23 cases per 1000 calls) to 2004 (2.15 cases per 1000 calls) (odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.43–1.54) was identified. Of all CPCS dextromethorphan abuse cases, 74.5% were aged 9 to 17 years; the frequency of cases among this age group increased more than 15-fold during the study (from 0.11 to 1.68 cases per 1000 calls). Similar trends were seen in the AAPCC and DAWN databases. The highest frequency of dextromethorphan abuse occurred among adolescents aged 15 and 16 years. The most commonly abused product was Coricidin HBP Cough & Cold Tablets. Conclusions Our study revealed an increasing trend of dextromethorphan abuse cases reported to the CPCS that is paralleled nationally as reported to the AAPCC and DAWN. This increase was most evident in the adolescent population. PMID:17146018

  19. On the Reappearance of Ritual Literature and the Evolution of Ritual Study in Han Dynastymto interprete%礼学文献的重现与两汉礼学的演变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁进

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: There were two ritual schools as Ritual theory and Ritual performance in the early Han Dynasty. The leader of performance was Xu sir and the other one was Gao-tang sir. An interaction was formed between the performance school and royal ritual office. The scholars from the ritual performance always be appointed as ritual officials. Gao-tang sir collated seventeen ritual articles and founded the academic tradition himself. Hou Cang who writed a book as QuTai Ji speculated the royal etiquette according to common etiquette and founded a new ritual academic tradition. Dai Sheng who editor tho book Li Ji 《礼记》get thought material form the Ancient Ritual Classics《礼古经》,the Explanation for Ancient Ritual Classics (《礼古文记》)and MingtangYinyang Ji(《明堂阴阳记》), and founded his private ritual schools as Xiao dai li jia fa(小戴礼家法).Dai De who editted another book as Da Dai Li Ji(《大戴礼记》)showing the strong interests inhuman nature,human history and political technology and founded his private ritual schools as Da dali jia fa (大戴礼家法).Academic group of Qingpu(庆普学派)committed to national etiquetteconstruction in the Eastern Han Dynasty and developed their own ritual study. Zheng Xuan whocollated the Ancient Ritual Classics(《古文礼经》)and the Ritual Classics Written with New Font (《今文礼经》),, discard the defects of private ritual schools and use the book Zhou Li(《周礼》)the Ritual Classics, has achieved unprecedented achievement in ritual study and end the tradition whichmarked on Private method(家法)and School method(师法)in Han Confucian rites.%汉初礼学研习分化为礼义和容礼两派。徐生的容礼派与朝廷太常机构形成朝野互动,仕途目标为太常礼官大夫。高堂生完成了《礼经》十七篇的恢复和整理,初步形成了礼经家法传统。后仓撰成《曲台记》,推士礼而

  20. Methylphenidate and dextroamphetamine abuse in substance-abusing adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert J; Goodale, Leslie A; Shay-Fiddler, Michele A; Gloster, Susan P; Chang, Samuel Y

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of methylphenidate and dextroamphetamine misuse and abuse was examined in 450 adolescents referred for substance abuse treatment. Twenty three percent reported nonmedical use of these substances and six percent were diagnosed as methylphenidate or dextroamphetamine abusers. Abuse was more common in individuals who were out of school and had an eating disorder. Methylphenidate and dextroamphetamine abuse appears to be much less common than abuse of most other substances. It does occur, however, and parents and schools need to exert greater control over the dispensing of these medications. Physicians are advised to prescribe non-stimulant medications (eg, bupropion) when treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in substance-abusing individuals.

  1. The Nature and Treatment of Compulsions, Obsessions, and Rituals in People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Dempsey, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Developmental disabilities such as intellectual disability and autism are often accompanied by special sets of behaviors which are major challenges for the person and those in their community. Among the most worrisome of these are compulsions, rituals and obsessions. Often these behaviors are left untreated; however, when intervention does occur…

  2. Brief Report: Avoidance Extinction as Treatment for Compulsive and Ritual Behavior in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J.; Hupp, Susan C.; Symons, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for maladaptive repetitive behaviors associated with autism are limited. This is particularly so for ritual and compulsive forms of repetitive behavior, which commonly interfere with adaptive activities and may cause distress to individuals with autism and their families. The present study assessed an avoidance extinction…

  3. Functional Communication Training in the Treatment of Problem Behavior Maintained by Access to Rituals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Mandy; Camargo, Síglia; Machalicek, Wendy; Lang, Russell; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the assessment and treatment of problem behaviors related to rituals for children with autism. After functional analyses, we used a multiple-probe design to examine the effects of functional communication training (FCT) plus extinction and schedule thinning as a treatment package for problem behavior and appropriate…

  4. Tayub as a Symbolic Interaction Medium in Sedekah Bumi Ritual in Pati Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisca Dwi Suryani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find, understand, and describe the process of symbolic interaction in sedekah bumi ritual and the supporting symbols of Tayub as the symbolic interaction medium in the ritual. This study applies qualitative methods with the holistic approach. The research was conducted in Dukuh Guyangan, Desa Sidoluhur, Kecamatan Jaken, Kabupaten Pati. In collecting the data, observation, interview, and documentation technique were implemented. Further, the data were analyzed using the technique of data reduction, data presentation, drawing conclusion, as well as verification. The data was validated using the sources triangulation, the technique triangulation, and the time triangulation. Tayub as the medium of symbolic interaction realizes in four interaction processes, as follows: 1 symbolic interaction processes between the ritual actors and the spirits of ancestors reflected in kenduren procession held in punden, 2 symbolic interaction process between ledhek and pengibing that is embodied in ibingan, 3 symbolic interaction process between wiraswara and the audiences that is seen during the dance performance, 4 symbolic interaction process between pengrawit and ledhek that is reflected in the dance movements and the accompanying music. The meanings of symbol behind the ritual itself are reflected through the realization of symbolic interaction. It consists of three elements, as follows: 1 kenduren prayer, 2 offerings and ambeng, 3 Tayub dance.

  5. The Apperception of Musical Creativity: Performance as Ritual, Composition as Self-Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Musical invention is defined in this article as a form of inward creativity. The creative acts of musical performance are understood in terms of ritual-like symbolic and stylized actions, and those of musical composition as the mind's enactment of meditation and reflection. This article draws on the relationship between two psychological…

  6. Toddlers' Use of Peer Rituals at Mealtime: Symbols of Togetherness and Otherness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Mealtimes and their associated rituals are recognised as important aspects of human socialisation; however, much of the research about mealtimes in early childhood education settings has focused on health or on adult-child discursive exchanges. The present study aimed to investigate children's interactions with each other and their influence on…

  7. The Regulation of Teaching as Symbolic Politics: Rituals of Order, Blame and Redemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefstein, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the school inspection as a political ritual for the management of tensions between competition and equality inherent in neo-liberal educational regulatory regimes. At the centre of the article is a case study of how teachers in an allegedly failing working-class English primary school coped with issues of social class,…

  8. Searching for Control: Priming Randomness Increases the Evaluation of Ritual Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H.; Souza, André L.

    2014-01-01

    Reestablishing feelings of control after experiencing uncertainty has long been considered a fundamental motive for human behavior. We propose that rituals (i.e., socially stipulated, causally opaque practices) provide a means for coping with the aversive feelings associated with randomness due to the perception of a connection between ritual…

  9. School as Ceremony and Ritual: How Photography Illuminates Performances of Ideological Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Drew; Chappell, Sharon; Margolis, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Images of the places and activities called "school" as a formal institution are rich data for the inquiring gaze. This article focuses specifically on historical photos of school rituals and ceremonies through which young people perform particular narratives of schooling through repetitive embodied practice and in turn construct values and beliefs…

  10. Feeding practices in infants: ritual factors dominating mother's education - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Ritual and customary factors have much impact then mother's education on breast feeding practices of infants. Apart from education, breast feeding awareness programme should be increased including both literate and illiterate mothers. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1642-1647

  11. The 11th Panchen Erdeni Presides Over Abhiseka Rituals In Yonghegong Lamasery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Lamps lit up the hall,where religioushorns were blown as the 11thPanchen Erdeni reached theYonghegong Lamasery in Beijing.He was to preside over the Abhiseka ritu-als and give a blessing touch to the fore-heads of monks and worshippers.

  12. Synchronized arousal between performers and related spectators in a fire-walking ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Bulbulia, Joseph; Schjødt, Uffe; Jegindø, Else-Marie; Wallot, Sebastian; Van Orden, Guy; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2011-05-17

    Collective rituals are present in all known societies, but their function is a matter of long-standing debates. Field observations suggest that they may enhance social cohesion and that their effects are not limited to those actively performing but affect the audience as well. Here we show physiological effects of synchronized arousal in a Spanish fire-walking ritual, between active participants and related spectators, but not participants and other members of the audience. We assessed arousal by heart rate dynamics and applied nonlinear mathematical analysis to heart rate data obtained from 38 participants. We compared synchronized arousal between fire-walkers and spectators. For this comparison, we used recurrence quantification analysis on individual data and cross-recurrence quantification analysis on pairs of participants' data. These methods identified fine-grained commonalities of arousal during the 30-min ritual between fire-walkers and related spectators but not unrelated spectators. This indicates that the mediating mechanism may be informational, because participants and related observers had very different bodily behavior. This study demonstrates that a collective ritual may evoke synchronized arousal over time between active participants and bystanders. It links field observations to a physiological basis and offers a unique approach for the quantification of social effects on human physiology during real-world interactions.

  13. How does male ritual behavior vary across the lifespan? An examination of Fijian kava ceremonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sosis, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Ritual behaviors of some form exist in every society known to anthropologists. Despite this universality, we have little understanding of how ritual behavior varies within populations or across the lifespan, nor the determinants of this variation. Here we test hypotheses derived from life history theory by using behavioral observations and oral interview data concerning participant variation in Fijian kava-drinking ceremonies. We predicted that substantial variation in the frequency and duration of participation would result from (1) trade-offs with reproduction and (2) the intrinsic status differences between ritual participants. We demonstrate that when controlling for household composition, men with young offspring participated less frequently and exhibited greater variance in their time spent at ceremonies than men without young children. However, men with a larger number of total dependents in their household participated more frequently than those with fewer. Moreover, we found that men's ascribed rank, level of education, and reliance on wage labor all significantly predict their frequency of attendance. We also found that the number of dependents a man has in his household is positively correlated with total food production, and the amount of kava he cultivates. In general, these results suggest that ritual participation is part of an important strategy employed by Fijian men for both achieving status and developing social alliances. Variation in participation in kava ceremonies by Fijian men therefore reflects the constraints of their current life history condition and their inherited rank.

  14. Educational Discipline, Ritual Governing, and Chinese Exemplary Society: Why China's Curriculum Reform Remains a Difficult Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinting

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the exam-oriented, ritualistic, and exemplary Chinese education system through a double-layered historical and ethnographic analysis. Firstly, I examine three aspects of the educational governing complex--exemplarity, ritual, and examination. Historically, education has been a key locus to craft exemplary subjects through…

  15. Moral agency, identity crisis and mental health: an anthropologist's plight and his Hmong ritual healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postert, Christian

    2010-03-01

    During anthropological fieldwork, the author had a serious accident on the outskirts of a Hmong village in the highland of Laos. However, this dramatic incident turned out to be the occasion of his ritual initiation into the local village community. An analysis of narratives of the incident reveals Hmong conceptions of the anthropologist's physical, mental and moral affliction, its causative concomitants and his ritual healing. Hmong mental health and identity are situated in a moral space of exchange relationships to significant others, challenging basic assumptions of concepts of the person widely held in psychiatry and beyond. The healing ritual transformed the author's being from indeterminate "other," in a life-threatening state of identity crisis, to a wholesome Hmong "self," in a state of health and moral agency. This exemplary rite de passage highlights the affinity of ritual healing and constitution of self in a moral space. The underlying relational concept of the person is in sharp contrast to psychiatry's concepts of the person, which are deeply shaped by values of individualism. Psychiatric services must accommodate substantial differences in the concepts of the person when treating Hmong migrants from Laos.

  16. Transfer of the Kenyan Kikuyu Male Circumcision Ritual to Future Generations Living in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbito, Michael N.; Malia, Julia A.

    2009-01-01

    This phenomenological research report from analysis of interviews with 18 participants focuses on the theme of transferring an age-old initiation-into-manhood circumcision ritual to future generations of Kenyan Kikuyu who are living in the US. We identified three subthemes and found a strong indication that, while personally meaningful to the…

  17. A peculiar case of suicide enacted through the ancient Japanese ritual of Jigai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Aniello; Gitto, Lorenzo; dell'Aquila, Massimiliano; Bolino, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    In the past, self-infliction of sharp force was a classic form of suicide, while in modern times it is quite rare, constituting only 2% to 3% of all self-inflicted deaths. In Japan, the jigai (Japanese characters: see text) ritual is a traditional method of female suicide, carried out by cutting the jugular vein using a knife called a tantō. The jigai ritual is the feminine counterpart of seppuku (well-known as harakiri), the ritual suicide of samurai warriors, which was carried out by a deep slash into the abdomen. In contrast to seppuku, jigai can be performed without assistance, which was fundamental for seppuku.The case we describe here involves an unusual case of suicide in which the victim was a male devotee of Japanese culture and weapons. He was found dead in his bathtub with a deep slash in the right lateral-cervical area, having cut only the internal jugular vein with a tantō knife, exactly as specified by the jigai ritual.

  18. Continuity and Change: Patterns of Mate Selection and Marriage Ritual in a Malay Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Heather

    1976-01-01

    Data were collected primarily through participant observation, open-ended interviews and discussions with selected informants. A description is given of the village, occupants, and traditional patterns of mate selection and marriage rituals. The second section deals with changing patterns, those of young village women with postsecondary education…

  19. Leaving Quietly? A Quantitative Study of Retirement Rituals and How They Affect Life Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaard, L.

    2017-01-01

    This study quantitatively explores the understudied topic of retirement rituals, what factors influence them, and how the experience of such rites of passage may affect postretirement satisfaction with life (SWL). Various regression techniques are applied to 2 waves of Dutch panel data gathered

  20. Drug use as a social ritual : Functionality, symbolism and determinants of self-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P.C. Grund (Jean-Paul)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation brings together results of my NWO-funded ethnography --into the drug taking rituals of regular users of heroin, cocaine and other psychoactive substances--, resulting studies and some twenty years of puzzlement and subsequent pondering. The NWO study was initiated in

  1. A semiotics of comedy: Moving figures and shifting grounds of Chapayeka ritual clown performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keisalo, Marianna Päivikki

    2016-01-01

    This article develops an analytic approach to comedic performance by examining the performance of the Chapayeka ritual clowns as a series of semiotic shifts and reversals: the Chapayekas play with images and contexts, introducing unpredictable figures to effectively shift the grounding conditions...

  2. Drug use as a social ritual : Functionality, symbolism and determinants of self-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P.C. Grund (Jean-Paul)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation brings together results of my NWO-funded ethnography --into the drug taking rituals of regular users of heroin, cocaine and other psychoactive substances--, resulting studies and some twenty years of puzzlement and subsequent pondering. The NWO study was initiated in th

  3. Enacting Identity and Transition: Public Events and Rituals in the University (Mexico and South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansters, Wil G.; van Rinsum, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of ethnographic and historical material this article makes a comparative analysis of the relationship between public events, ceremonies and academic rituals, institutional identity, and processes of transition and power at two universities, one in Mexico and the other in South Africa. The public events examined here play a major role…

  4. Quantifying collective effervescence: Heart-rate dynamics at a fire-walking ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris; Konvalinka, Ivana; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    solidarity, yet quantitative evidence for these conjectures is scarce. Our recent study measured the physiological effects of a highly arousing Spanish fire-walking ritual, revealing shared patterns in heart-rate dynamics between participants and related spectators. We briefly describe our results...

  5. The Fire-Walker’s High: Affect and Physiological Responses in an Extreme Collective Ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Ronald; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Mitkidis, Panagiotis;

    2014-01-01

    -walking ritual in a Mauritian Hindu community. Specifically, we compared changes in levels of happiness, fatigue, and heart rate reactivity among high-ordeal participants (fire-walkers), low-ordeal participants (non-fire-walking participants with familial bonds to fire-walkers) and spectators (unrelated...

  6. Routine and Ritual Elements in Family Mealtimes: Contexts for Child Well-Being and Family Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H.; Foley, Kimberly P.; Spagnola, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how the routine elements of family mealtimes such as assigned tasks and the more emotional ritual aspects such as recognition of feelings are related to children's well-being and the creation of a family identity. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  7. A spiritual contact zone: Re-inventing ritual space in The Netherlands' Afrika Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleuskens, E.; School, F.; Thijs, S.; Westendorp, M.F.; Venbrux, H.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The research project Holy Ground, led by Paul Post and Arie Molendijk, has drawn attention to the process of 're-inventing ritual space in modern Western culture' by examining various places, such as 'rooms of silence and memorial shrines for victims of disease and violence'. Here we want to address

  8. Death in the family revisited : Ritual expression and controversy in a Creole transnational mortuary sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pijl, I.H.

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of an ethnographic analysis of the ritual process following the sudden death of a Surinamese migrant, this article shows that while the conceptual polarity of death (good versus bad death) might be clear-cut, the morality of death is both bound and unbound in space and time, and relativ

  9. The Apperception of Musical Creativity: Performance as Ritual, Composition as Self-Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Musical invention is defined in this article as a form of inward creativity. The creative acts of musical performance are understood in terms of ritual-like symbolic and stylized actions, and those of musical composition as the mind's enactment of meditation and reflection. This article draws on the relationship between two psychological…

  10. O vermelho e o negro: um experimento para pensar o ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houseman Michael

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata da performance de um rito de iniciação inventado pelo autor, realizado como um experimento para pensar certos traços recorrentes da ação ritual e, em particular, da iniciação (masculina. O ritual em questão, O Vermelho e o Negro, foi planejado para consistir essencialmente, se não exclusivamente, em um padrão específico de interação: O Vermelho e o Negro não pertence a nenhuma tradição cultural reconhecível, não envolve quase nenhum simbolismo explícito, suas "crenças" subjacentes são abertamente despropositadas, suas qualidades cênicas mínimas e não se pode atribuir a ele praticamente nenhuma função social. Um dos objetivos do exercício é explorar e fundamentar uma abordagem relacional da análise do ritual na qual este é visto como atuação de relações específicas. Entre os temas discutidos estão os do enquadramento, da simulação, do sigilo, da imposição de sofrimento, da eficácia cerimonial, da condensação ritual e do complexo jogo de perspectivas internas e externas ao grupo.

  11. Ritual Literacy: The Simulation of Reading in Rural Indian Mexico, 1870-1930

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Rodrigo, Ariadna

    2008-01-01

    Focusing on reading methods and practices in rural Indian Mexico at the turn of the twentieth century, this article explains why schooling had little impact in terms of literacy in Spanish yet played a successful political and ceremonial role resulting in what I call a ritual literacy. At the time, the emerging educational system did not consider…

  12. Magia y estadística. Rituales sociales contra la incertidumbre

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korstanje, Maximiliano Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    ... (o rituales adivinatorios) y sólo es una expresión moderna de la misma. En este sentido, la Antropología social y política se predispone como una disciplina útil ya que provee casos prácticos (etnográficos) que permiten una relación entre ambos fenómenos.

  13. Television, Rituals, Struggle for Public Memory in Serbia during 1990s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Erdei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to point to the the role of television (mainly state owned and controlled and ritual actions, in creating and distributing messages concerning important social and political events during the 1990s. The main argument is that the urban street political protest actions that were performed by the political and social opponents of the ruling regime, mainly in Belgrade streets and squares, were a logical outcome of the regime’s media policy, and closely dependent on it. The aim of that policy was to silence the opposing voices and make them invisible, but also to avoid speaking about events that might threaten the image of the ruling regime as tolerant, peaceful and patriotic, the examples of which were information on war crimes, and devastations of Vukovar, Dubrovnik and Sarajevo. Political protests and ritual actions have created a place where these issues could safely be spoken out, thus creating an emerging public counter sphere. Instead of considering media and rituals as separated ways of communication, it will be showed how in particular social and political context in Serbia during 1990s, television and rituals have reached a point of mutual constitution and articulation.

  14. Community spirit and competition in Idols. Ritual meanings of a TV talent quest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, S.L.; Rooijakkers, G.; van Zoonen, L.

    2007-01-01

    The TV talent show Idols has been one of the most successful entertainment programmes internationally in recent years. In an attempt to explain the song contest's popularity, this article analyses the content of two seasons of the Dutch version of Idols, with particular attention to the ritual

  15. Sandhyopaasan:The Hindu Ritual as a Foundation of Vedic Education

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    Rajendra Raj Timilsina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yoga, meditation and Hasta Mudra Chikitsa (medication through the exercise or gesture of hands known as spiritual activities in the past have been emerged as bases to maintain  one’s health, peace and tranquility. Some people follow yoga, some focus on meditation and others apply “Hasta Chikitsa” or “Mudra”. They are separate traditional exercises. They require to spend 10 to 30 minutes once or twice a day for their optional exercise/s. It is proved that such practice has productive effect in different health treatments. This paper has applied the methods of observation, interview and literature review as qualitative paradigm in exploring their original roots of Vedic Sandhyopaasan. Twice born castes (Brahman, Chhetri and Baishya of Nepali Hindu society has been found practicing all components of the exercises as a unified ritual of Sandhyopaasan. Upanayan (Bratabandha ritual teaches Sandhyopaasan procedures for self control and self healing of the performers. Brahman is not eligible as Brahman without doing the ritual daily. However, this study has found that some Dalits have also been practicing Sandhyopaasan daily and feeling relaxed. Findings of this study show that Sandhyopaasan is a compact package of yoga, meditations and Hasta Chikitsa. Students and gurus of Vedas have been regularly following the compact package for inner peace and self control. Root of yoga, meditation and “Mudra” is Sandhyopaasan and this is the base of Hindu education system. The paper analyzes the ritual through Hindu educational perspective.

  16. Savonarola at the stake: the rise and fall of Roy Meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the role of prominent paediatrician Professor Sir Roy Meadow in the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) in mothers accused of murdering their children. The MSBP saga is a further chapter of an era of moral panic that started several decades ago with repressed memory therapy, satanic ritual abuse and multiple personalities. The fall of medieval sage Savonarola is an apt analogy for the fate of Roy Meadow. The history of medicine is rife with figures who become their own authority and rule by force of personality.

  17. Child Abuse and Mandated Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woika, Shirley; Bowersox, Carissa

    2013-01-01

    Teachers and teachers-in-training are mandated reporters; they are legally required to report any suspected child abuse or neglect. This article describes: (1) How to file a report; (2) How prevalent child abuse is; (3) What abuse is; (4) What it means to be a mandated reporter; (5) When the report should be made; and (6) What to do if abuse is…

  18. Child Abuse and Mandated Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woika, Shirley; Bowersox, Carissa

    2013-01-01

    Teachers and teachers-in-training are mandated reporters; they are legally required to report any suspected child abuse or neglect. This article describes: (1) How to file a report; (2) How prevalent child abuse is; (3) What abuse is; (4) What it means to be a mandated reporter; (5) When the report should be made; and (6) What to do if abuse is…

  19. Encountering Child Abuse at Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Defines child abuse, including the three categories: physical, sexual, and psychological. Presents characteristics and behaviors of each type of abuse, and long-term effects. Discusses how to handle abuse that occurs at camp, and the effects on the camp. Sidebars present abuse statistics, 15 activities that promote psychological wellness, and 8…

  20. Resurrection imageries: A study of the motives for extravagant burial rituals in ancient Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jock M. Agai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Unlike in the New Testament whereby faith in Christ can resurrect the dead, the ancient Egyptians believed that the bereaved created the resurrection of their deceased through burial rituals and by encouraging the living to serve their kings. They thought that faith alone in god or the gods was not enough to resurrect the dead, thus they seemingly superimposed resurrection alongside burials. Using the various forms of Egyptian burial rituals and evaluated from the perspective of the Christian concept of resurrection, this researcher attempts to search for the motives behind specific Egyptian burial rituals. The researcher proposes that the activities of the bereaved or of the living over the dead were paramount in resurrecting the dead in ancient Egypt. The purpose of this research is, firstly, to explain how the Egyptian burial rituals influenced their thoughts on resurrection and, secondly, to show that the Egyptian god(s might have depended on the living to raise the dead.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The ancient Egyptians lived their lives mainly to satisfy the interests of the dead, hence their extensive burial rituals. Whilst they believed in the power of the gods to raise the dead, there seemed to be another motive behind their burial practices which suggested that the living may have had more power to raise the dead. The power was realised in the activities of the living in the form of burials, tomb designs, mummification, food offering, and in remembering the dead. This research explains that these burial activities were relevant in resurrecting the dead without which the gods alone were not able to do that.

  1. Reflections on the Ritual process in Mexican Communities of Alcoholics Anonymous

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    Palacios Ramírez, José

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The author conveys his reflections on the symbolic aspects and ritual character of the therapeutic communities of rehabilitation of alcoholics, known as “Alcoholic Anonymous” (AA. He did ethnographic fieldwork among AA communities of Ciudad Victoria, in Tamaulipas, northern Mexico. These communities, facing a problem often neglected by both government and society in Mexico, yet holding a position of subalternity and marginality in the country, offer a spiritual way out to those alcoholics who approach them. Their activities are of interest for a discussion of ritual in current contexts. In addition, the communities are illuminating for many of the key aspects of the comparative ethnographic analysis of ritual.

    El objeto de este trabajo es apuntar algunas líneas de reflexión sobre los aspectos simbólicos y de carácter ritual que presentan las comunidades terapéuticas de rehabilitación de alcohólicos, Alcohólicos Anónimos (AA. Para ello parto del trabajo de campo etnográfico realizado en agrupaciones de AA en Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, al norte de México. Estas comunidades de apoyo a alcohólicos, desde una posición de subalternidad y marginalidad, ante una problemática casi siempre obviada por la sociedad y el gobierno mexicano, ofrecen una “salida” de corte espiritual a quienes se acercan a ellas, por lo que resultan interesantes para la reflexión sobre el ritual en contextos actuales. Por otro lado, estas comunidades presentan muchos de los aspectos clave en el análisis etnográfico comparativo de los ritos.

  2. Recuerdo y comunicación: sociohermenéutica de rituales de memoria

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    Schnettler, Bernt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of memory rituals represents a methodological challenge for an interpretative social science. Ritual interactions are inscribed in a broader context, which is determined by symbolic traditions and the institutional agreements that configure the general framework of ceremonies. The study of rituals held on International Holocaust Remembrance Day on January 27th is an opportunity to highlight the linkages between these different levels in the analysis. Our data is based on a videographic research project that probes into the thesis of a “global” memory culture, according to which particular memories coexist and at the same time converge and interact with transnational forms of remembrance. For the analysis we follow methodological approaches rooted in the sociology of knowledge and the sociology of communicative genres.El análisis de rituales performativos de memoria supone un reto metodológico para la investigación social interpretativa, ya que las interacciones rituales están inscritas en un contexto más amplio, que está determinado por las tradiciones simbólicas y por los acuerdos institucionales que configuran el marco de las ceremonias. A partir del estudio de ceremonias conmemorativas del Día Internacional de Recuerdo del Holocausto se mostrará la interconexión en el análisis de estos distintos niveles. Para ello nos basamos en datos videográficos de un proyecto de investigación en curso sobre ceremonias de memoria del Holocausto en Espana y Alemania, que examina la tesis sobre una incipiente “cultura de la memoria global”. En el análisis de los materiales seguimos enfoques metodológicos que provienen de la sociología del conocimiento hermenéutica y la sociología de géneros comunicativos.

  3. Sexual abuse of children as a form of power abuse and abuse of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sexual abuse of children as a form of power abuse and abuse of the body. ... This article investigates the relationship between sexual abuse, power and the body from a Catholic theological viewpoint. ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/actat.v35i1.11.

  4. Reclaiming space for learning in liturgical contexts: Cracks in the maxim of the uselessness of liturgical ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Barnard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem addressed in this article is, that empirical and theoretical research appears to demonstrate that liturgy often aims at certain results. This, however, puts the widely accepted notion in Liturgical Studies of the so-called uselessness of liturgical ritual under pressure. Against this background in Liturgical Studies the aim of this article is to reclaim space in academic discourses on liturgy for learning in liturgical contexts. The latter is done by presenting several liturgical models, revisiting arguments regarding the (non functionality of ritual or religion and also by reflecting on ritual-liturgical data that the authors personally collected as part of two research projects.

  5. Ritual funerario y comensalidad en las sociedades de la Edad del Bronce del Sureste Peninsular: la Cultura de el Argar

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda Jiménez, Gonzalo; Esquivel Guerrero, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se plantea el desarrollo de rituales de comensalidad asociados al ritual funerario argárico. Las evidencias arqueológicas de estos rituales estarían relacionadas por una parte con la producción de un conjunto normalizado de vasijas cerámicas asociadas con la presentación y consumo de alimentos y bebidas, y en donde destacan sus propiedades visuales relacionadas con prácticas sociales de exhibición y escenificación. Por otra parte, la aparición de restos faunísticos en l...

  6. Te Deum in political ritual: Uses and meanings of an agreement devise in Spanish America and the May Revolution

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    Pablo Ortemberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Te Deum had determined functions in the political ritual in colonial and independence era. The wars in the peninsula from the middle of the XVIII century and the growing political instability -especially from 1808- increased its use. This article will analyze the characteristics of political ritual in general and then Te Deum in particular, in Spanish America. Secondly it will observe how it was the key ritual during Independence used to seal pacts and to allow for political opportunities, as well as to legitimate the new order accompanying the changes in concept and exercise of power

  7. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  8. Opioid Abuse after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0373 TITLE: " Opioid Abuse after TBI...2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE " Opioid Abuse after TBI" 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...the brain’s reward circuitry which may make an injured brain more susceptible to the rewarding effects of opioids . We are currently conducting

  9. Mal tiempo, tiempo maligno, tiempo de subversión ritual. La temposensitividad agrofestiva invernal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Campo Tejedor, Alberto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the light of a number of festive, ritual, poetico-musical and literary expresions, from Andalusia and elsewhere, the author discusses time as lived by agrarian cultures: a syncretic time, resulting from the superposition of civico-political, religious and peasant calendars; a cyclic time, given the effects of astronomico-meteorological time on nature and the subsequent cultural response on both the instrumental dimension (the work in the fields and the expresive dimension (the rituals and the festivals; and, finally, an ages-old bipolar time, experienced as the succession of two alternating seasons —wintertime and summertime—which also underlies a dichotomous agrofestive time-sensitiveness analyzed here under the following hypothesis: during the months of «good weather,» especially May and June, the rituals have a propitiatory and positively extolling sense; they mimetically dramatize the union between earth, vegetation, animals and humans by means of prototypes and archetypes that symbolically recreate the natural order of things. By contrast, the wintertime rituals and festivals—from 1st November till Carnival, and particularly around Christmas—all have in common a grotesque character and a sense of inverted order, symbolically signifying, with a logic at once serio-comic and ambiguous, the dark side of existence, while ritually conjuring up the fears of bad weather, of fateful and pernicious time, the time of cold nights, hunger and death.

    A la luz de algunas expresiones festivas, rituales, poético-musicales y literarias, de Andalucía y otros contextos, el artículo aborda el tiempo vivido por las culturas agroganaderas: un tiempo sincrético, como consecuencia de la superposición de los calendarios civil-político, religioso y campesino; un tiempo cíclico, fruto de la incidencia del tiempo astronómico-meteorológico en la naturaleza y la consiguiente respuesta cultural en el plano instrumental (los trabajos agr

  10. Gufa, a unique cultural ritual--a tale of forbidden sun and a girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pritisha

    2015-08-01

    Gufa, one of the traditional rituals has been performed in Nepal since time immemorial by an especial indigenous Newar people. Gufa, in its literal translation means cave. Just like in the cave where darkness seeps deep within its wall as the sun’s ray cannot penetrate, in the ritual of Gufa, a young girl who just had her first period is hidden in a dark room for twelve consecutive days. The girl, by strict custom and ritual performance stays in the room, protected from the sun’s light. From her female elders, she also receives informal education on family and societal values and norms.Sun, the reason behind our existence, is forbidden for the girl to observe. This very aspect of purely shunning away from the sun has become the crucial aspect for delving into the explanations offered by cultural astronomy. The present paper would argue that astronomy and astronomy education should not only focus on looking into the future, but also should go back to the ancient civilization to comprehend ritual performance our forefathers had learned from gazing the sky.After twelve days, the girl is carefully brought out to an open space where she sees the forbidden sun and symbolically marries the star via ritual. The logic behind the union after a pure restriction is to protect her sensitive young body and to ward off any harm to her reproductive parts from the sun’s harsh rays.From astronomical point, this logic behind protecting the girl from the effects of then deemed harmful rays should be studied. In ancient times, who with which instruments could have possibly fathom the life-giving sun could harness harmful solar rays. Although it looks like a primitive custom of hiding the girl immediately during her first period, there are logical social, cultural and scientific reasons for doing it even today in modern, urban and among the educated Newar households of Nepal and abroad.The paper would expound the importance of traditional ritual performance and its nexus with

  11. RELIGION AND THE LOCAL TRADITION OF LIFE CYCLE RITUALS IN KAMPUNG NAGA, WEST JAVA

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    Abdurrahman Misno Bambang Prawiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available West Java is one of the provinces in Indonesia which is culturally rich and diverse. The cultural wealth in Tatar Sunda (West Java is centered on several areas that serve as the settlement of indigenous communities, from the eastern region of Ciamis, to Sukabumi. Each region has its own cultural uniqueness. Among the cultural heritage which is still in existence and preserved is Kampung Naga. It was a traditional village that firmly preserves its ancestral tradition (karuhun passed down from generation to generation. One of the interesting features of the community of Kampung Naga is the life cycle ritual which they perform with no outside influence. This article will describe the life cycle ritual performed by the indigenous community of Kampung Naga. The ethnographic method approach is used in this study, where the author was directly involved in the process of performing the ritual. Observations, in-depth interviews and participation in any activity were used to collect verifiable data. This research showed that the daur hidup (life cycle ritual performed by the traditional community of Kampung Naga included the rituals for pregnant mother, child birth, circumcision, gusaran, marriage, and prayer to the dead. The ritual carried out by the community is derived from the old Sundanese belief combined with Islamic culture that came in later

  12. El juicio de residencia como ritual político en la colonia (Gobernación de Tucumán, siglo XVIII: A political ritual. Tucumán 18th Century Impeachment proceeding in Colonial times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Smietniansky

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo se propone analizar un juicio de residencia, llevado a cabo en los años 1775 y 1776 en la gobernación de Tucumán, como un ritual político. Entendemos que, al teatralizar una forma ideal de funcionamiento de las instituciones y comportamiento de los funcionarios, el juicio de residencia como ritual político actuaba fortaleciendo el poder monárquico en las colonias, transmitiendo un conjunto de valores y congregando y cohesionando a la comunidad local. Partiendo de esta perspectiva ritual, abordamos el problema de la tensión existente entre las normas y objetivos que ordenaban la institución de la residencia y las implicancias y consecuencias que, en la práctica, acarreaba su celebración.This article analyzes an impeachment proceeding that took place in 1775-1776 in colonial Tucumán, in terms of a political ritual. We understand that by performing the ideal way of government institution's operation and officials' behaviour, the impeachment proceeding acted as a political ritual, reinforcing monarchical power in the colonies, transmitting a set of social values and congregating the local community. From this ritual perspective, we approach the problem of the tension between the norms and aims of the impeachment procedure, and the consequences and implications of its practice.

  13. Modes of interculturality: Dancing within the wedding ritual of the Banat Serbs

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    Rakočević Selena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dance practice of the Banat Serbs has been significantly investigated within the ethnochoreology in Serbia. Although a lot of data have been recorded, ethnographic papers about dancing within the wedding ritual of the Banat Serbs are imprecise considering the positioning of the particular dances diachronically and synchronically. Beside that, intensive intercultural processes which have been shaping traditional practice of this multi-ethnic and multicultural region has been neglected. Using the ethnographic literature, and, in a greater measure, relying upon data collected within field research of this region (which I started in 1994, I will present comprehensive ethnography of dancing within the wedding ritual of the Serbs and focus on the identification of the intercultural drifts which shaped traditional cultural practice of the Banat. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177024: Muzička i igračka tradicija multietničke i multikulturne Srbije

  14. Emission of volatile organic compounds from religious and ritual activities in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Shippi; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Zielinska, Barbara; Pervez, Shamsh

    2013-11-01

    Worshipping activity is a customary practice related with many religions and cultures in various Asian countries, including India. Smoke from incense burning in religious and ritual places produces a large number of health-damaging and carcinogenic air pollutants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as formaldehyde, benzene, 1,3 butadiene, styrene, etc. This study evaluates real-world VOCs emission conditions in contrast to other studies that examined emissions from specific types of incense or biomass material. Sampling was conducted at four different religious places in Raipur City, District Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India: (1) Hindu temples, (2) Muslim graveyards (holy shrines), (3) Buddhist temples, and (4) marriage ceremony. Concentrations of selected VOCs, respirable particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter, ritual venues have shown different pattern of VOC EFs compared to laboratory-based controlled chamber studies.

  15. Ritual and ceremony in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging-assisted brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Vance

    2012-01-01

    Previous photographic research into traditional and shamanic healing practices in Peru and Bolivia and a review of the literature suggested that all medical practices have cultural determined nonmedical activities as integral parts of the healing encounter. These include costume, ritual, ceremony, environment factors that were looked for in a western clinical encounter for this paper. A patient was followed through pre-op preparation and iMRI assisted brain surgery. All activities were photographed extensively and evaluated in a broader healing context. A number of activities were visually and metaphorically comparable with those seen in other practices. These are discussed as rituals of intention on the part of the caregivers to focus their skills on healing and also to mindfully engage the patient in the healing process. Artistic observation and analysis may be an effective way to identify these non quantifiable elements of the healing encounter and suggest directions for further research into the emotional components of the healing process.

  16. Experiencias e interpretaciones en performances rituales (Iruya y El Cajón, noroeste argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Avenburg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo se propone reflexionar acerca del modo en que dos performances rituales del noroeste argentino recrean en sus puestas en escena diferentes experiencias. Desde un enfoque etnográfico apoyado en los respectivos trabajos de campo de las autoras, se analizan comparativamente la Fiesta Patronal de la Virgen del Rosario de Iruya (Salta y la Semana Santa de El Cajón (Catamarca. En particular, se discuten algunas de las razones por la cuales en un contexto ritual la puesta en escena implica la recreación de su historia sociocultural y política, mientras que en el otro el eje central transcurre reactualizando eventos cosmológicos. El marco teórico utilizado se basa en el concepto de performance y su relación con la experiencia, siguiendo los aportes realizados por Edward Bruner y Victor Turner.

  17. Negative Emotional Energy: A Theory of the “Dark-Side” of Interaction Ritual Chains

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    David Boyns

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Randall Collins’ theory of interaction ritual chains is widely cited, but has been subject to little theoretical elaboration. One reason for the modest expansion of the theory is the underdevelopment of the concept of emotional energy. This paper examines emotional energy, related particularly to the dynamics of negative experiences. It asks whether or not negative emotions produce emotional energies that are qualitatively distinct from their positive counterparts. The analysis begins by tracing the development of Interaction Ritual Theory, and summarizes its core propositions. Next, it moves to a conceptualization of a “valenced” emotional energy and describes both “positive” and “negative” dimensions. Six propositions outline the central dynamics of negative emotional energy. The role of groups in the formation of positive and negative emotional energy are considered, as well as how these energies are significant sources of sociological motivation.

  18. AJAPÜJAWA (DREAM SPIRIT IN THE WAYUU DEATH AND VENGEANCE RITUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Longa Romero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The wayuu are an Indian people of the Arawak linguistic family which lives in the Guajira Peninsula, in Northeast Colombia, on the Caribbean Sea, and the Western border of Venezuela. This paper studies the relation between existing and expressed ajapüjawa (dream spirit and other beings (plants, dead people, with intent, that will guide and influence the daily practices of the wayuu. The purpose here is to explore the agency from these existing rituals of death and revenge. I claim that these rituals provide information about the construction of the notion of person by the wayuu people through a symbolic economy of alterity. The wayuu people build, experience, and signify their cultural dynamics through the interference of active spiritual entities that impinge both upon life and death as two continuous, though separate, realms of social life.

  19. The Ritualized Bodies of Cybele's Galli and the
 Methodological Problem of the Plurality of Explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Peter Södergård

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The explanandum in this article is the self-castration of Cybele's Galli. The explanans is the various theories that have been put forward to elucidate this phenomenon. The author begins by sketching out the complicated religio-historical scene for this ritual, then introduces the plurality of theories concerning Galli's ritual self-castration, so that the intellectual dilemma of evaluation and preference is obvious; which one of the theories is decisive? Are they necessary or sufficient? Do they compete or cooperate? The aim of this article is also to make a critical methodological evaluation of the use of psychological determinants in religio-historical studies of the self-castration of the Galli in the cult of Cybele and Attis.

  20. Mermaids and Spirit Spouses: Rituals as Technologies of Gender in Transnational African Pentecostal Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Rey

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the construction of gender in transnational spacesby focusing on the ritual practice of African Pentecostal migrants in Europeand in Africa. One dimension of African Pentecostalism is its insistence on thepractice of exorcism called ‘deliverance’ where malevolent spirits are expelledfrom one’s body. Within the Pentecostal demonology, several categories ofspirits carry implications for how gender is constructed. This article will analyseeffects of the appearance of these spirits on the construction of genderamong Ghanaian and Congolese Pentecostal churches in Geneva and in Accra.It will show that variations in the appearance of spirits within rituals can beinterpreted as a negotiation of gender roles in a migratory context. Shifts inPentecostal demonology can therefore be interpreted as a response to thereconfiguration of gender roles associated with the broader gender contextand work opportunities in Europe.

  1. Affectivity and Liminality in Ritualized Protest: Politics of Transformation in the Kiev Uprising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn; Scott Georgsen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    This article takes departure from recent events in Kiev, Ukraine. The empirical material builds on interviews and informal talks with young protesters, made online or on location during spring 2014. We argue that the uprisings – some call it a revolution – involve all essential features of limina......This article takes departure from recent events in Kiev, Ukraine. The empirical material builds on interviews and informal talks with young protesters, made online or on location during spring 2014. We argue that the uprisings – some call it a revolution – involve all essential features...... in ritualized action, unified by confronting the same essential dangers. Engaging this social drama we further wish to discuss how affectivity plays a central role in the ritualization of protest – and that subjectivity and affectivity, as relatively unformed potentials, bring qualities of heightened...

  2. What ever happened to ritualized homosexuality? Modern sexual subjects in Melanesia and elsewhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauft, Bruce M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the legacy of ritualized homosexuality as a behavioral practice and as an analytic category of research in Melanesia since the early 1980s. A case study of striking change among the Gebusi of Papua New Guinea suggests that ritualized homosexuality and insemination of boys have become behaviorally vestigial or moribund and that characterizing sexual practices in these terms has been difficult to begin with (as the original proponent of these terms has himself suggested). Historical change in Melanesia reveals linkage between the contemporary construction of heterosexual norms and desires for locally modern development and progress. A larger issue is how researchers of sexuality may unwittingly accept Western ideologies of sexual choice and freedom while positing historical and non-Western practices as culturally bound rather than being open to individual exploration and interpersonal diversity.

  3. ¿Es necesario seguir un ritual? explorando los usos sociales de los medios de comunicación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Steeg Larsen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Has media use anything to do with rituals? This question has not gone unanswered in media research. And there is much evidence that some kinds of media use actually liave the fonn and the functions of rituals. Most notably, perhaps, are the so called media events (royal weddings, Olympic Games, state funerals etc. that can be seen as occasional ritual celebrations of society, constructed and transmitted by electronic media. This article is a preliminary study, employing the concept of ritual on a few extracts from two different empirical studies, one from Brazil and one from Denmark. First we present some empirical examples in order to introduce the main concerns of the article. Tlien we define ritual as a primarily anthropological concept and consider its qualifications as an analytical tool in media studies. We then go on to a critical reading of some of the ways the concept of ritual is applied in media research, and, finally, we re-analyze our empirical examples in order to point out further theoretical and analytical perspectives.

  4. Application of the Ritual Banquet Empresses in Mongolia and Yuan Dynasty%蒙元后妃宴礼探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楠; 贾陈亮

    2012-01-01

    The ritual banquet of Mongolia and Yuan Dynasty is complicated, after the founding of the Yuan Dynasty, although formulate a ritual banquet which refers the system of Song Dynasty and Jin Dynasty and the Mongols' Customs, mongolian often according to the older customs at the banquet. The ritual banquet has a lot of characters by comparison with The previous dynasties, empresses attend and sponsor many banquets sat court and study their ritual at ritual banquet, which is of value to know their important roles in the political life and represent the heritage and development of the ritual banquet of Mongolia and Yuan Dynasty .%蒙元时期宴礼错综复杂,元朝建立后虽采择宋金遗制、参酌国俗制定了一套宴仪,但蒙古人饮宴仍多按旧俗。宴礼较前代颇具特色,其中后妃多参与并主办多种宫廷宴会,考察后妃在宴会中的礼仪,对我们了解蒙元后妃在政治生活中的重要角色有一定的价值,且能再现蒙元宴礼的传承与发展。

  5. Sexual abuse in children - what to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual abuse - children ... boys are sexually abused before they turn 18. Sexual abuse of children is any activity that the ... anus or vagina Tongue kissing Oral sex Intercourse Sexual abuse can also happen without physical contact, such ...

  6. The complexities of elder abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    Elder abuse is a growing societal concern, affecting at least 1 in 10 older Americans. Researchers and practitioners alike consistently assert that a dramatic discrepancy exists between the prevalence rates of elder abuse and the number of elder abuse cases reported. As a field of study, recognition and understanding of elder abuse is still emerging. Comparing findings of a small, but growing, body of literature on perceived and substantiated cases of elder abuse is challenging because there is no uniform term or agreed-upon definition used among state governments, researchers, health care and service providers, and advocates. This article summarizes current understanding of elder abuse, including what constitutes elder abuse, risk factors for elder abuse, perpetrators of elder abuse, and outcomes of elder abuse. Issues associated with the detection of elder abuse and intervention strategies for victims of abuse are addressed. In the final section, potential roles and contributions of psychologists for advancing elder abuse research, professional practice, and policy development are highlighted. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Midichlorians--the biomeme hypothesis: is there a microbial component to religious rituals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchin, Alexander Y; Tuzhikov, Alexander I; Panchin, Yuri V

    2014-07-02

    Cutting edge research of human microbiome diversity has led to the development of the microbiome-gut-brain axis concept, based on the idea that gut microbes may have an impact on the behavior of their human hosts. Many examples of behavior-altering parasites are known to affect members of the animal kingdom. Some prominent examples include Ophiocordyceps unilateralis (fungi), Toxoplasma gondii (protista), Wolbachia (bacteria), Glyptapanteles sp. (arthropoda), Spinochordodes tellinii (nematomorpha) and Dicrocoelium dendriticum (flat worm). These organisms belong to a very diverse set of taxonomic groups suggesting that the phenomena of parasitic host control might be more common in nature than currently established and possibly overlooked in humans. Some microorganisms would gain an evolutionary advantage by encouraging human hosts to perform certain rituals that favor microbial transmission. We hypothesize that certain aspects of religious behavior observed in the human society could be influenced by microbial host control and that the transmission of some religious rituals could be regarded as the simultaneous transmission of both ideas (memes) and parasitic organisms. We predict that next-generation microbiome sequencing of samples obtained from gut or brain tissues of control subjects and subjects with a history of voluntary active participation in certain religious rituals that promote microbial transmission will lead to the discovery of microbes, whose presence has a consistent and positive association with religious behavior. Our hypothesis also predicts a decline of participation in religious rituals in societies with improved sanitation. If proven true, our hypothesis may provide insights on the origin and pervasiveness of certain religious practices and provide an alternative explanation for recently published positive associations between parasite-stress and religiosity. The discovery of novel microorganisms that affect host behavior may improve our

  8. Recognizing religion's dark side: Religious ritual increases antisociality and hinders self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Nicholas M; Inzlicht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The target article develops an account of religious prosociality that is driven by increases in self-control. We suggest this account is incomplete. Although religion might increase prosociality to the in-group, it decreases it to the much larger out-group. Rituals, for example, lead to out-group derogation. We also challenge the link between religion and improved self-control, offering evidence that religion hinders self-control.

  9. Treatment of Sexual-Orientation Obsessions in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Using Exposure and Ritual Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Monnica T.; Crozier, Marjorie; Powers, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Presented is a case report of exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP) therapy administered to a 51-year-old, White, heterosexual male with sexual-orientation obsessions in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The patient had been previously treated with pharmacotherapy, resulting in inadequate symptom reduction and unwanted side effects. OCD symptoms included anxiety about the possibility of becoming gay, mental reassurance, and avoidance of other men, which resulted in depressive symptoms and...

  10. Symptom Dimensions in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Phenomenology and Treatment Outcomes with Exposure and Ritual Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Monnica T.; Mugno, Beth; Franklin, Martin; Faber, Sonya

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe condition with varied symptom presentations. The cognitive-behavioral treatment with the most empirical support is currently exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP); however, clinical impression and some empirical data suggest that certain OCD symptoms are more responsive to treatment than others. Prior work identifying symptom dimensions within OCD is discussed, including epidemiological findings, factor analytic studies, and biological findings...

  11. The ritual of coffee break inside organizations: toward social efficiency and/or performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécilia BRASSIER-RODRIGUES

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research examines a non-formal ritual practice – the coffee break – inside organizations. Based on a survey conducted on 12 marketing and commercial teams in France, we analyse if the coffee break has an objective of social efficiency or of performance. While solving this question, our results also reveal the importance of seniority in the observed behaviors, suggesting that it symbolizes an informal level of authority in front of the formal authority symbolized by the status.

  12. Efectos psicosociales de la participación en rituales de justicia transicional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martín Beristaín

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de las experiencias de la Comisión de la Verdad y la Reconciliación en Sudáfrica, los juicios populares o Gacaca en Ruanda y los rituales de los procesos de transición a la democracia concluye que la participación en comisiones y juicios implica un coste emocional para los participantes (aumenta la emocionalidad negativa y los síntomas y aumenta el clima emocional negativo en la sociedad, pero también aumenta la sensación de control y eficacia de los participantes, disminuye algunas emociones negativas en los sobrevivientes como la vergüenza, y aumenta los estereotipos positivos y una visión más diferenciada del exogrupo. En países de América Latina donde se han desarrollado procesos y comisiones de verdad más eficaces, se constató una mejora del respeto a los derechos humanos.---This article examines the effects of participation in transitional justice rituals. Truth Commissions and trials have instrumental goals of distributive justice, and serve as rituals given their marked symbolic character, helping to achieve reconciliation and the reconstruction of social norms. Evidence suggests that participation in trials increases negative emotion and negative emotional climate. However participants in such rituals have evidenced increased empowerment, despite conditions of limited justice and reparation. Moreover, participation in Gacaca or popular trials in Rwanda, decreases shame in victims, and decreases negative stereotypes and increases individualization of out-groups. Finally, a collective analysis of 16 Latin America nations found that trials and a successful Truth Commission reinforces respect for human rights.

  13. Entre las devociones populares y el culto a los muertos en el paisaje ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Azucena Colatarci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene por objetivo reflexionar sobre las vinculaciones y desvinculaciones entre las devociones populares y el culto a los muertos en contextos sociales de tradición católica ya que entendemos que dichas devociones tienen su origen en el culto a los muertos del cual se escinden para erigirse en devociones con dinámica propia. Asimismo se plantea que en el denominado paisaje ritual se plasman los signos de la religiosidad popular.

  14. Reigniting tobacco ritual: waterpipe tobacco smoking establishment culture in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Mary V; Chang, Judy; Sidani, Jaime E; Barnett, Tracey E; Soule, Eric; Balbach, Edith; Primack, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS) is an increasingly prevalent form of tobacco use in the United States. Its appeal may stem from its social, ritualistic, and aesthetic nature. Our aim in this study was to understand WTS as a social ritual with the goal of informing prevention efforts. We conducted a covert observational study consisting of 38 observation sessions in 11 WTS establishments in 3 U.S. cities. Data collection was based on an established conceptual framework describing ritualistic elements of tobacco use. Iterative codebook development and qualitative thematic synthesis were used to analyze data. Atmospheres ranged from quiet coffee shop to boisterous bar party environments. While some children and older adults were present, the majority of clientele were young adults. Men and women were evenly represented. However, there were 19 occurrences of a male smoking by himself, but no women smoked alone. The vast majority (94%) of the clientele were actively smoking waterpipes. All 83 observed groups manifested at least 1 of the ritual elements of our conceptual framework, while 41 of the 83 observed groups (49%) demonstrated all 4 ritual elements. Despite its heterogeneity, WTS is often characterized by 1 or more established elements of a tobacco-related social ritual. It may be valuable for clinical and public health interventions to acknowledge and address the ritualistic elements and social function of WTS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Murderous Ritual versus Devotional Custom: The Rhetoric and Ritual of Sati and Women’s Subjectivity in Amitav Ghosh’s Sea of Poppies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnali Sarkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The representation of the practice of sati, the immolation of widows on their husbands’ funeral pyre, has garnered interest for long from postcolonial and feminist discourses among others. While advocates of Western modernity perceive sati as a murderous ritual, the proponents of orthodox Hinduism, on the contrary, claim sati to be a courageous cult of “wifely devotion”. In both bigoted beliefs, as poststructuralists observe, women largely appear as “mute objects”. Amitav Ghosh’s Sea of Poppies (2008 brilliantly sidelines the conundrum of polarizing representation of sati along the East-West axis and reflects instead the subjective experience of women as sati. The article examines how the rhetoric and ritual of sati in the novel enable marginalized women to acquire consciousness of their subjectivity in a colonized society. To this end, the paper analyzes deconstructive readings of sati, such as by Gayatri Spivak, and explores the way the novel uses religion as a ploy, which, instead of perpetrating violence, confers a subjective entity on the sati that can even subvert the constrictive norms of a colonized society.

  16. Extreme rituals in a BDSM context: the physiological and psychological effects of the 'Dance of Souls'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Kathryn R; Lee, Ellen M; Ambler, James K; Hanson, Sarah A; Comber, Evelyn; Wietting, David; Wagner, Michael F; Burns, Valerie R; Cutler, Bert; Cutler, Nadine; Reid, Elwood; Sagarin, Brad J

    2017-04-01

    Participation in extreme rituals (e.g., fire-walking, body-piercing) has been documented throughout history. Motivations for such physically intense activities include religious devotion, sensation-seeking and social bonding. The present study aims to explore an extreme ritual within the context of bondage/discipline, dominance/submission and sadism/masochism (BDSM): the 'Dance of Souls', a 160-person ritual involving temporary piercings with weights or hooks attached and dancing to music provided by drummers. Through hormonal assays, behavioural observations and questionnaires administered before, during and after the Dance, we examine the physiological and psychological effects of the Dance, and the themes of spirituality, connectedness, transformation, release and community reported by dancers. From before to during the Dance, participants showed increases in physiological stress (measured by the hormone cortisol), self-reported sexual arousal, self-other overlap and decreases in psychological stress and negative affect. Results suggest that this group of BDSM practitioners engage in the Dance for a variety of reasons, including experiencing spirituality, deepening interpersonal connections, reducing stress and achieving altered states of consciousness.

  17. Reading Romance: The Impact Facebook Rituals Can Have On A Romantic Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Bowe B.A. Mod

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that research has identified intimate relationships as being an important factor in how people look to present themselves on social networking sites, there still remains a lack of research in this domain. By comparing trends inside the rituals of the relationship status, public displays of affection and photographs on Facebook this paper examines how they can impact a relationship in the offline world by discussing the extent to which the design and features of the site can impact the emotional repertoire of its users. Results highlighted that the website has the potential to provide a new focus and channel for a person to depict where their relationship is going, feeling rules can be attached to certain rituals on the website. By focusing on the relationship statusoption and public displays of affection, it was emphasized that these rituals accentuate themes of possession and territory and can be used to configure a couple’s superiority. The discussion on photographs illustrated how the website can bring problems and jealousy to the relationship, particularly when the ‘ex-partner’ was taken into account.

  18. Were there Astronomical Rituals at the Minoan Peak Sanctuaries on Crete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, P. E.

    2009-08-01

    The Uppsala Group have studied the so-called Peak Sanctuaries and other Minoan buildings on Crete for the past 10 years or so. The study has been directed towards indications of a Minoan interest in the sky i.e. the movements of the heavenly bodies, sun, moon, stars etc. It is found that almost all studied buildings have parts that were directed towards celestial events making it possible to adjust a calendar correct for the solar year. The finds from the peak sanctuaries indicate a Minoan interest in the sun, moon, stars and constellations making it possible to use the stars for navigation and calendaric indications. During the last few years papers have been presented on a new understanding of the Minoan peak sanctuaries, an interpretation indicating some kind of ritual on those peaks. The kind of ritual has however not been explained in those studies. This paper discusses this new approach. It is shown that the ideas and method presented in those papers indicate an astronomical orientated ritual and supports the understanding of the peak sanctuaries as places used for understanding and studying the stars and other heavenly bodies.

  19. RITUAL YA QOWIYU: Pergulatan Makna Modernitas, Agama, Budaya Lokal dan Kapitalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Basri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the writer tries to analyze the contrast between modernity, religion, and culture. Shortly, the contrast between religious teaching (Islam taught by Ki Ageng Gribig, modernity, and culture (Javanese is shown in the rituals and social-economic life (capitalism spirit of Jatinom Society, both symbolically and practically. The contrast and meaning relation of the three domains not only result in conflict, tension, and resistance but also relation and new interpretation among the members of society, so that the celebration is held annually. Therefore, the process of interpretation and the different economic, social, cultural, and politic influences will continue from time to time to match with the change experienced by Jatinom society specifically and the population around the area generally. The process of interpretation on religion has changed because of its contrast with the value of modernity. In Jatinom society, the religious process has been formed and influenced by modernity ideas, such as, the process of rationalization on the rituals, that is, the decrease of their belief in ‘blessing’ in apem, but on the other side, they still preserve the rituals to honor their ancestors and customs. They also think that it is economically beneficial because of the visit of thousands of people in the celebration.

  20. Mitos y rituales familiares en familias desplazadas reubicadas en Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianda Sarmiento

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo expone los resultados de un proceso conversacional acerca de los mitos y rituales creados, comparando el lugar de origen con el sitio actual de residencia, como parte de una investigación con tres familias en situación de desplazamiento forzado que se han reubicado en Bogotá. El objetivo general fue construir con estas familias una comprensión acerca de la relación entre la situación de desplazamiento y las formas cómo se modifican, se mantienen o se crean mitos y rituales en torno a categorías tales como la cultura, la idiosincrasia familiar, la vida cotidiana y los eventos de ciclo vital, comparando el sitio de origen con el lugar actual de residencia. El método fue descriptivo y comprensivo con una estrategia cualitativa. Se encontró que los mitos y rituales cambian adaptándose a la vida urbana. Se fortalecen los que promueven la unión al interior de la familia, pero los relacionados con la comunidad disminuyen por falta de recursos, falta de pertenencia y como forma de protegerse de peligros externos. Esto genera en las familias la percepción de un empobrecimiento de su vida social, pero también la sensación de fortaleza al interior para afrontar el evento del desplazamiento.

  1. The Political Economy of Desire in Ritual and Activism in SriLanka (abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Van Daele

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Amidst the complexity of the development-religion nexus, this chapter examines desire and its varying expressions as fundamental concerns of many religions motivating both development and alternatives to development. In Sri Lanka, as people deal with social change, the neoliberal and globalised development is understood and re-interpreted through local idioms and formations of desire. The neoliberal economy cultivates desire and, as such, leads to a perceived increase in the presence of pretas (greedy, hungry ghosts that occasionally emerge when people die. The hungry ghosts, as fetishised formations of desire, resonate with consumers and entrepreneurs, who exhibit an insatiable hunger for ever more material wealth. Hence, the ritual appeasement of hungry ghosts and the social activism of groups such as the Movement for National Land and Agricultural Reform are clearly linked by their mutual concern with the existential insecurity of fellow human and non-human beings caused by excessive and unbalanced desire. However, the explicit articulation of specific concerns regarding desire diverges between ritual action and social activism. Ritual materialises and condenses the anxiety related to desire, whereas social activism describes the fetishisation of desire in more abstract economic, political and scientific terms.

  2. Religion,Order and Metaphor:Reading Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chao

    2016-01-01

    Western social scientists have fo-cused on the religion and ritual of China for a long time. Since modern times, a number of western si-nologists have committed themselves to conducting detailed and in-depth research on aspects of Chi-nese society and history in order to explain the be-liefs and practices of Chinese people. It is within such an academic background that Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society, edited by Arthur Wolf, an American anthropologist, compiled a series of studies on the religions and rituals of Taiwan and Hong Kong done by fifteen western scholars from the 1950s to the 1970s. The advent of this book not only characterizes the western academic study of Chinese society and culture of that era, but also causes us to reflect on current research. This book is a work of great academic value, as well as serves as a model for the study of sinology in the field of western anthropology.

  3. TO THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE WEST POLESIANBELARUSIAN RITUAL TERM “KUST”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Antropov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The etymology of the ritual term “Kust”  is still an unresolved problem. Attempts to associate it with the semantic field “genus” cannot be accepted as куст in the sense of ‘genus’ is a secondary metaphorical form on the semantic basis of the primary eastern Slavic  куст ‘frutex’. Also, apparently, куст ‘frutex’ and the ritual term do not share a com   mon source, but rather a relationship of homonymy  and secondary mutual influences. The article suggests a justification for the hypothesis of the genesis of the ritual term Куст (Кост/Кошт/Густ  from the Proto-Slavic dialecticism of the South Slavic origin *gozd ‘forest, silva’, which, together with the prototype of the rite “vojdenije Kústa” ‘walking of the Kyst’,  was brought to the western region of eastern Slavia  by the Proto-Dregovichi.

  4. The Child Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein abbasnezhadriyabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While a large number of children are losing their lives due to poverty, malnutrition, contagious diseases and war, we are witnessing hundreds of children death by reason of misbehaving. Today, "child abuse" as a social-cultural phenomenon which shows crisis in a society, has a growing process in our country. The goal of this research was to investigate the base factors of child abuse that according to the results are consist as follows, poverty, unemployment, addiction, large families, single-parent, Considering the increase of factors such as poverty, addiction, unemployment, divorce, temporary marriage, street children and other effective factors, the hypothesis based on growth of child abuse was proved in Iran.

  5. Substance abuse and child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kathryn

    2009-04-01

    Pediatricians and other medical providers caring for children need to be aware of the dynamics in the significant relationship between substance abuse and child maltreatment. A caregiver's use and abuse of alcohol, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and other drugs place the child at risk in multiple ways. Members of the medical community need to understand these risks because the medical community plays a unique and important role in identifying and caring for these children. Substance abuse includes the abuse of legal drugs as well as the use of illegal drugs. The abuse of legal substances may be just as detrimental to parental functioning as abuse of illicit substances. Many substance abusers are also polysubstance users and the compounded effect of the abuse of multiple substances may be difficult to measure. Often other interrelated social features, such as untreated mental illness, trauma history, and domestic violence, affect these families.

  6. Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) Toolkit

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) Toolkit provides information and strategies on how to: incorporate abuse prevention into programming; conduct staff training;...

  7. Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides on-line resource for locating drug and alcohol abuse treatment programs. The...

  8. Child neglect and emotional abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poor weight gain Emotional issues such as low self-esteem, depression, and anxiety Extreme behavior such as acting ... child was abused The success of therapy and parenting classes Alternative Names Neglect - child; Emotional abuse - child ...

  9. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    AAS Childhood Sexual Abuse and Suicide 2014 One third of sexual assault victims were under the age of 12. 1 1 Lifetime prevalence of childhood sexual abuse in the U.S. is approximately 10% and also ...

  10. Child Abuse or Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Abuse or Osteogenesis Imperfecta? 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981-2663 (301) ... welfare services to report a suspected case of child abuse. The child is taken away from the parents ...

  11. Synthetic cathinone abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capriola M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Capriola Thomasville Medical Center, Thomasville, NC, USA Abstract: The abuse of synthetic cathinones, widely known as bath salts, has been increasing since the mid-2000s. These substances are derivatives of the naturally occurring compound cathinone, which is the primary psychoactive component of khat. The toxicity of synthetic cathinones includes significant sympathomimetic effects, as well as psychosis, agitation, aggression, and sometimes violent and bizarre behavior. Mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone are currently the predominantly abused synthetic cathinones. Keywords: designer drugs/chemistry, street drugs/pharmacology, substance-related disorders/epidemiology, alkaloids/poisoning

  12. Power and prestige in argar culture societies. The commensal consumption of bovids and ovicaprids during funerary rituals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda Jiménez, Gonzalo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The regular appearance of meat offerings in Argaric pmbs enables us to point out that the slaughter and consumption of cattle and sheep or goat took place as a part of rituals of commensality. A portion of meat of theses animals, always belonging to a leg, was introduced as grave goods involving the symbolic performance of the death in the ritual itself. The type of meat consumed in these rituals was linked to the social status of Argaric people. Cattle would be slaughtered during the commensal practices associated with the highest social groups in contrast to the performance developed in the lowest social levels that include goat or sheep but never cattle. The ritual of commensality in Argaric societies would contribute to maintaining the social solidarity at the same time that it legitimated and naturalised a clear situation of social asymmetry. Cohesion and social distance play an important role in the commensal practices of Argaric funerary rituals.

    La fuerte normalización de los ajuares cárnicos en las sepulturas argáricas permite plantear que, como parte de ritual funerario, se procedió al sacrificio de bóvidos y ovicápridos que serían consumidos en rituales de comensalidad. Un trozo de carne de estas especies animales, siempre correspondiente a una de las extremidades, formaría parte del ajuar funerario, lo que supondría la participación simbólica del muerto en el propio ritual. La adscripción social de los individuos determinaría el tipo de carne consumida. Los bóvidos serían sacrificados sólo como parte de la ceremonia de comensalidad de los sectores sociales más elevados, frente a aquellos individuos de un nivel social inferior y con menor capacidad de amortización cuyo ritual incluirían el sacrificio y consumo de ovicápridos. En las sociedades argáricas el ritual de comensalidad contribuiría a la creación de un sentido de comunidad al tiempo que legitima y naturaliza una situación de clara asimetr

  13. Creativity, alcohol and drug abuse: the pop icon Jim Morrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Hadulla, Rainer M; Bertolino, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse is frequent among performers and pop musicians. Many of them hope that alcohol and drugs will enhance their creativity. Scientific studies are scarce and conclusions limited for methodological reasons. Furthermore, extraordinary creativity can hardly be grasped by empirical-statistical methods. Thus, ideographic studies are necessary to learn from extraordinarily creative persons about the relationship of creativity with alcohol and drugs. The pop icon Jim Morrison can serve as an exemplary case to investigate the interrelation between alcohol and drug abuse and creativity. Morrison's self-assessments in his works and letters as well as the descriptions by others are analyzed under the perspective of creativity research. In the lyrics of Jim Morrison and in biographical descriptions, we can see how Jim Morrison tried to cope with traumatic events, depressive moods and uncontrolled impulses through creative activities. His talent, skill and motivation to write creatively were independent from taking alcohol and drugs. He used alcohol and drugs to transgress restrictive social norms, to broaden his perceptions and to reinforce his struggle for self-actualization. In short, his motivation to create something new and authentic was reinforced by alcohol and drugs. More important was the influence of a supportive group that enabled Morrison's talents to flourish. However, soon the frequent use of high doses of alcohol and drugs weakened his capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is an exemplary case showing that heavy drinking and the abuse of LSD, mescaline and amphetamines damages the capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is typical of creative personalities like Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones and Jimmy Hendrix who burn their creativity in early adulthood through alcohol and drugs. We suppose that the sacrificial ritual of their decay offers some benefits for the excited spectators. One of these is the

  14. Substance abuse and criminal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, J M; Greenberg, D M; Motayne, G G

    1992-09-01

    As forensic psychiatry develops as a clinical subspecialty, clinical skill in understanding, treating, and predicting violent behavior will become more important. This article addresses the importance of understanding the relationship between substance abuse and violent behavior. This article also discusses morbidity and mortality in substance abuse, the demographics of substance abuse and criminality, and the clinical aspects of the forensic psychiatric evaluation.

  15. The Drug-Abuse Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The drug-abuse questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the alcoholism questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about drug abuse and drug abusers, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  16. Recognizing the adolescent drug abuser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, R G; Jacobs, E A

    1987-03-01

    Adolescents are at high risk for using and abusing illicit drugs. Guidelines for recognizing drug abusers are presented as well as a staging process for progression of drug use. The family physician is in an ideal position to identify young users/abusers and to assist them and their families in obtaining much needed assistance.

  17. Drug Abuse in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, James F.

    This report examines the incidence of drug abuse and the methods of treatment and prevention of drug abuse used in Southeast Asia. Countries studied include Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Because of Malaysia's intensive effort to eliminate its drug abuse problem, emphasis is placed on this country's treatment and…

  18. Geriatric Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, Marc A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature and presents new data on alcohol and drug problems in older individuals. Drug abusers include users of opiates, inadvertent misusers, and deliberate abusers of nonopiates. Two to 10 percent of the elderly are alcoholic, and these are usually individuals beginning alcohol abuse after age 40. (Author)

  19. Concept of the Ritual and the relationship Between Ritual and Benevolence%《论语》中的“礼”之内涵及“仁”“礼”关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雨亭

    2015-01-01

    “礼”是《论语》中非常重要的概念之一,在书中多次出现。自先秦以后,历代学者都对《论语》中“礼”之内涵做出过自己的解读和评价。“礼”的实质是爱人之心的自然流露,对“礼”的实践贯穿于一个人成长各个阶段。在“礼”与“仁”的关系方面,二者是内在与外在的有机统一,“克己复礼为仁”,“仁”不仅以“礼”为评判维度,同时在孔子的思想体系中“仁”更有超越“礼”的部分,即是对全体人的大爱和对人的生命的尊重。%The ritual is one of the most important concept in The Analects of Confucius , and it appears many times in the book . Since the pre-Qin Dynasty in China , many scholars have explained the ritual .The essence of ritual is not only the natural expres-sion for love in one’s heart, but also the practice to ritual which is throughout the various growth stages for one person .The rela-tionship between the ritual and the benevolence is the unity of the internal and external aspects of ritual , self-restraint and restora-tion of rites are taken as benevolence .The Confucius considered that the benevolence is beyond the ritual and is the universal love and the respect for life .

  20. Interpersonal types among alcohol abusers: a comparison with drug abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J A; Mayr, S

    1990-07-01

    Interpersonal types among alcohol abusers were examined with Calsyn, Roszell, and Anderson's (1988) nine-type system for classifying FIRO-B profiles. The frequencies of the nine FIRO-B types among a sample of 135 male veteran alcohol abusers were compared with Calsyn et al.'s (1988) previously published data for a sample of male veteran drug abusers, a normative veteran sample, and a general population sample. The alcohol abusers, like Calsyn et al.'s sample of drug abusers, were more likely to be categorized as "loners," "rebels," and "pessimists" than was the general population sample. While exhibiting preferences for interpersonal types that emphasized social withdrawal, avoidance of responsibility, and mistrust of others, both the alcohol abusers and the drug abusers were heterogeneous groups whose members demonstrated a variety of interpersonal types.

  1. Drugs and Drug Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Robert, Comp.; And Others.

    GRADES OR AGES: Secondary grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Drugs and drug abuse. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into several sections, each of which is in outline or list form. It is xeroxed and spiral-bound with a paper cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: No objectives are mentioned. The major portion of the guide contains a…

  2. sexually abused children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for all types of mental health problems. Outcome measures. ... and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd edition, revised). ... children and adolescents receiving treatment for psychological ... fathers and 25% of those abused by other trusted adults exhibited .... development these older children have also acquired the.

  3. Infant crying and abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; van der Wal, M.F.; Brugman, E.; Hira Sing, R.A.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important causes of child morbidity and death. We assessed potentially detrimental parental actions induced by infant crying in 3259 infants aged 1-6 months, in the Netherlands. In infants aged 6 months, 5.6% (95% CI 4.2-7.0) of parents reported having smothered, slapped,

  4. Drug abuse in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana dos Reis Nunes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the case of a pregnant woman admitted to cocaine overdose and discuss maternal and fetal complications of cocaine abuse in pregnancy. Considering the increased frequency of users in the female population, the obstetric team should be able to make the patient's care and your baby.

  5. New drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases.

  6. Intrafamilial Child Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Mickey; Nagle, Richard J.

    This paper reviews information regarding the incidence, demographic characteristics, family characteristics, and immediate/ongoing characteristics of incest victims. The characteristics reported include behavioral indicators of abuse, such as acting-out behavior, self-destructive behaviors, and provocative and inappropriate sexual behaviors;…

  7. Other Drugs of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OtherDrugsofAbuse_012017.pdf Previous Index Español English Español PDF Version Download Treatment & Recovery Information Treatment and Recovery ... the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft Word ...

  8. Treatment for Child Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, James J.; Clark, Elizabeth H.

    1974-01-01

    Staff of a child abuse program in a Philadelphia hospital worked with parents in their own homes to help them develop greater competence as adults and as parents. This article describes the use of social learning theory, with some techniques of behavior therapy, as the basis for treatment. (Author)

  9. Drug abuse in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon CL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. Keywords: doping, athletes, steroids, drug abuse, mental illness

  10. The phenomenon of prehistoric ritual pits: Several examples from the central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulatović Aleksandar P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the phenomenon of pits with special deposits, i.e. ritual pits, seems to have, once again, attracted attention both in Europe and in the Balkans. In the central Balkans, scientific literature related to this topic is still deficient, hence one of the objectives of this paper is to change the current state and rekindle interest in the study of this form of manifestation of the spiritual culture of prehistoric man. It appears that one of the oldest reasons for sacrificial offerings is primal, instinctive fear. The fear of the transience of life or of death compelled our ancient ancestors to make some sort of “agreement” with the surrounding forces, bestowing particular sacrifices onto them. Sacrifice represents one of the rituals of prehistoric communities which could have been performed in a number of ways and in different circumstances. One of these are offerings placed in pits, in the form of specific objects, food, drink or living beings sacrificed to higher powers and accompanied by certain symbolic actions, for the purpose of gaining their favour or help. When interpreting pits, what should further be considered is that the fundamental difference between a discarded object and an object used for a ritual purpose lies in the fact that the object of ritual character is still meaningful to man, performing a symbolic function, unlike the former, whose role is lost after being disposed of. Aritual object, an item or a living being sacrificed in a pit, is no longer of common, worldly significance (food, drink, tools, etc., but rather possesses a symbolic, sacral meaning, intended for higher powers, to propitiate and appease them, that is to create some form of the oldest religious communication. Not only is it difficult to identify the pits used for ritual purposes in the course of fieldwork, but it is even more challenging to interpret them and practically impossible to accurately reconstruct the actions performed during the

  11. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M Cristina; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-08-01

    Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children's QoL was related to parents' family rituals through the child's family cohesion. This model was valid across child's age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent-child interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A rebirth for the pharaoh: reflections on the classification of the new kingdom divine birth cycle as a ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Rikala

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of rituals enacted, or represented,in the temples of Egypt is limited by the often sparse survival of evidence; most of our knowledge of the Egyptian temple cult comes from the temples of the Graeco-Roman period. This paper deals with an aspect of ancient Egyptian divine kingship, the divine birth cycle, and the question of its rituality. The focus is on the well-known but somewhat enigmatic event of engendering the divine child (i.e. the king, as depicted during the New Kingdom period. Following the various types of ritual classification, one might be tempted to interpret the divine birth cycle as a political ritual designed to legitimize the pharaoh's rule. At the same time, it coequals with various aspects of religious renewal, such as the annual re-creation, and rebirth of the pharaonic state through its socio-ideological self, represented by the king. In this respect, one might categorize divine birth as a festival or calendrical rite. The purpose of this paper is to explore various ways of interpreting the divine birth cycle as a ritual, or as a religious representation of a different type.

  13. How have people who have stopped or reduced their alcohol consumption incorporated this into their social rituals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Ashlea; Eliott, Jaklin; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Crabb, Shona

    2017-06-01

    Limiting alcohol consumption is beneficial for health, but can be challenging given the role alcohol plays in the rituals of many social occasions. We examined how people who stopped or reduced their alcohol consumption incorporated this change within their social rituals. We conducted 16 semi-structured one-on-one interviews with adults aged 25-65 years, who lived in Australia and had stopped or significantly reduced their alcohol consumption in the previous year. Through thematic analysis, we identified four approaches to adapting drinking rituals: replacing alcohol with other drinks, replacing drinking with other social activities, changing the meaning of drinking rituals and replacing drinking occasions with activities that achieve different goals. These approaches varied in the extent to which they reflected a low or high change in the meanings and/or behaviours attached to the ritual. Approaches involving little change, such as using alternative drinks, were more readily accepted by participants' social companions than approaches involving more substantial changes such as replacing drinking with activities achieving different goals. Considering both the role and meaning alcohol carries in social interactions, and how else these might be achieved, may assist people to stop or reduce their drinking, without sacrificing their social lives.

  14. Quality of life and adjustment in youths with asthma: the contributions of family rituals and the family environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Silva, Neuza; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2012-12-01

    This cross-sectional study explored the relationships among family ritual meaning, cohesion, conflict, and health-related quality of life (both specific to chronic health conditions and in general), and the emotional and behavioral problems reported by youths with asthma. Participants included 149 Portuguese children and adolescents between the ages of 8 and 18 who had been diagnosed with asthma and attended outpatient services at three public hospitals. The results showed that stronger family ritual meaning predicted a more positive family environment (i.e., higher cohesion levels and lower conflict levels), better health-related quality of life, and fewer emotional and behavior problems in youths. Furthermore, family cohesion and conflict mediated the links between family ritual meaning and health-related quality of life, and emotional and behavioral problems. These results did not change after controlling for participant age, gender, and asthma severity. The findings of this study suggest that family ritual meaning contributes to the adaptation of youths with asthma via its positive association with the family environment. The implications for multicontextual interventions with families are briefly discussed with regard to the positive role of family rituals and of their potential as a modifiable factor in families with increased health challenges.

  15. Trauma e Limpeza Ritual de Veteranos em Moçambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Granjo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo descreve e discute os rituais de limpeza oficiados aos veteranos da guerra civil de Moçambique por parte de médicos tradicionais do sul do país. Reinventados nas últimas décadas, a partir de tratamentos para outras situações e importando a sua lógica explicativa, esses rituais apresentam uma eficácia na reintegração social dos veteranos que se deve em grande medida à coerência que mantêm com os sistemas locais de interpretação do infortúnio, com o problema que pretendem resolver e com procedimentos previamente conhecidos e respeitados. O seu papel superou contudo a reintegração individual, tendo contribuído para a aceitabilidade dos antigos inimigos enquanto “personas como as outras” e da competição democrática por meios pacíficos, em substituição do confronto militar.This article presents and discusses the cleansing rituals performed by healers on veterans of the Mozambican civil war, in the south of the country. Those rituals recycled treatments previously used for other stressful social situations, together with their rationale. Such cleansing rituals had a remarkably successful contribution to veterans’ social reintegration, largely due to their coherence with the local systems of misfortune interpretation, with the problem they intended to solve, and with well known and respected proceedings. However, their role was deeper than the reintegration of individual veterans; they also contributed to the acceptance of the former enemies as “people like the other” and of the pacific democratic competition, as a substitute to the military confrontation.

  16. Elucidation of Rituals in Marriage%婚姻中的“礼”性阐微

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾淑玲; 王江波

    2011-01-01

    Ritual plays an essential role in maintaining social stability in ancient China.It is shown as "Six Rituals" and "Five Refuse-to-accept Marriages" before marriage and "Three Obedience" and "Four Virtues" after marriage.When some problems appear in marriage,it is mainly shown as divorce in "Seven or three situations".When we reflect on the problems in modern marriage,we find they are in some degree the negative effects caused by the lack of traditional rituals.Therefore, it is necessary to reexamine the marriages the rituals in ancient China,which may be of instructive significance and great value to modern marriage.%礼对于维系我国古代社会稳定起着不容忽视的作用。礼在婚姻缔结之前,主要表现为"六礼"和"五不取";在婚后体现为"三从"和"四德";当婚姻出现问题时,主要体现为"七出"和"三不去"。反观现代婚姻关系中出现的诸多问题,在一定程度上体现了礼制缺失造成的不良后果。因此,我们有必要重新审视我国古代"礼制下的婚姻",对于现实婚姻问题,具有积极的指导意义和思考价值。

  17. Incense and ritual plant use in Southwest China: A case study among the Bai in Shaxi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub Peter O

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ritual and religious uses of plant-derived smoke are widespread throughout the world. Our research focuses on Southwest China, where the use of incense is very common. This study aims to document and analyze contemporary ritual plant uses by the Bai people of Shaxi Township (Jianchuan County, Dali Prefecture, Yunnan Province, including their related ethnobotanical knowledge, practices, and beliefs. Methods The present study builds on previous ethnobotanical research in Shaxi, which started in 2005. Interviews focusing on ritual plant use and associated beliefs were carried out with a total of 44 Bai informants in September 2009 and May and June 2010. The results are supplemented with information on the local religion collected from June to December 2010. All documented species were vouchered, and are deposited at the herbaria of Kunming Institute of Botany (KUN and the University of Zurich (Z/ZT. Results A total of 17 species have been documented for use in incense. They are always used in mixtures and are either burned in the form of powders in a censer or as joss sticks. The smell of the smoke is the main criterion for the selection of the incense plants. Incense is burned for communication with spiritual entities at graves, temples, and cooking stoves, as well as for personal well-being. Cupressus funebris Endl., Gaultheria fragrantissima Wall., and Ligustrum sempervirens (Franch. Lingelsh. are the most important incense species. Others serve as substitutes or are used to stretch incense powders. Conclusions In Shaxi the use of incense mixtures at the household and community level is regularly practiced for communication with ancestors, ghosts, and deities and in some cases to strengthen self-awareness. Some of the documented species are widely used in central Asia and Europe, hinting at the well documented knowledge exchange that occurred in Shaxi, which was a major hub along the influential Southern Silk Road.

  18. Abuse Tolerance Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orendorff, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fenton, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allcorn, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    As lithium-ion battery technologies mature, the size and energy of these systems continues to increase (> 50 kWh for EVs); making safety and reliability of these high energy systems increasingly important. While most material advances for lithium-ion chemistries are directed toward improving cell performance (capacity, energy, cycle life, etc.), there are a variety of materials advancements that can be made to improve lithium-ion battery safety. Issues including energetic thermal runaway, electrolyte decomposition and flammability, anode SEI stability, and cell-level abuse tolerance continue to be critical safety concerns. This report highlights work with our collaborators to develop advanced materials to improve lithium-ion battery safety and abuse tolerance and to perform cell-level characterization of new materials.

  19. [Resilience and child abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Maria de Fátima Pinheiro da Silva; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    The article discusses the resilience concept from a critical review. It prioritizes texts produced by organizations with leading roles in the field of child and adolescent health (PAHO, Pan-American Health Organization; ASBRA, the Brazilian Association for Adolescence). The main definitions of resilience are discussed, along with a debate on the contributions and limitations of the current literature. Furthermore, the conceptual and operative possibilities of resilience when confronted with child abuse are discussed, specifically using intra-familial sexual abuse as an example. The authors conclude that the concept of resilience presents polarization around certain axes: "adaptation/overcoming process", "innate/acquired" "permanent/circumstantial". However, they all point to a common ground: the singularity and delicacy of micro-social health-promoting relationships.

  20. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD.

  1. PTSD and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Psychological Association’s addiction syndrome handbook. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 35. Najavits, L.M., Highley, J., Dolan, S., Fee...Version (total and criterion D); and the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40 (sexual abuse trauma index and anxiety subscale); functioning on the Sheehan ...months (scaled 0-4). Functioning. The Sheehan Disability Scale [15] has 5 items assessing functioning in work/school, social life, and family life

  2. Midichlorians - the biomeme hypothesis: is there a microbial component to religious rituals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cutting edge research of human microbiome diversity has led to the development of the microbiome-gut-brain axis concept, based on the idea that gut microbes may have an impact on the behavior of their human hosts. Many examples of behavior-altering parasites are known to affect members of the animal kingdom. Some prominent examples include Ophiocordyceps unilateralis (fungi), Toxoplasma gondii (protista), Wolbachia (bacteria), Glyptapanteles sp. (arthropoda), Spinochordodes tellinii (nematomorpha) and Dicrocoelium dendriticum (flat worm). These organisms belong to a very diverse set of taxonomic groups suggesting that the phenomena of parasitic host control might be more common in nature than currently established and possibly overlooked in humans. Presentation of the hypothesis Some microorganisms would gain an evolutionary advantage by encouraging human hosts to perform certain rituals that favor microbial transmission. We hypothesize that certain aspects of religious behavior observed in the human society could be influenced by microbial host control and that the transmission of some religious rituals could be regarded as the simultaneous transmission of both ideas (memes) and parasitic organisms. Testing the hypothesis We predict that next-generation microbiome sequencing of samples obtained from gut or brain tissues of control subjects and subjects with a history of voluntary active participation in certain religious rituals that promote microbial transmission will lead to the discovery of microbes, whose presence has a consistent and positive association with religious behavior. Our hypothesis also predicts a decline of participation in religious rituals in societies with improved sanitation. Implications of the hypothesis If proven true, our hypothesis may provide insights on the origin and pervasiveness of certain religious practices and provide an alternative explanation for recently published positive associations between parasite-stress and

  3. Ictal movements mimicking Islamic praying rituals: localizing value in a series of 12 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Gonul; Irsel Tezer, F; Saygi, Serap

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the lateralizing value of the ictal praying gesture and of ictal religious speech in patients who are candidates for epilepsy surgery. We retrospectively searched video/EEG data of 1430 patients who were evaluated at an epilepsy center from 1999 to 2014. Twelve patients were found to have demonstrated ictal praying during their complex partial seizures. Among all patients, the ictal focus was in the right temporal region. Ictal behavior simulating prayer, which includes both hands as in the Islamic ritual tradition is a rare automatism that lateralizes the ictal focus.

  4. A developmental approach to gifts in long-term group psychotherapy extending from an anniversary ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolar, Andrew I; Eichen, Ann E

    2013-01-01

    Therapists have been quietly receiving gifts from patients for many years, but only recently have they been acknowledging and reporting such transactions. Most of the literature on the subject, which has been sparse, has been limited to the individual psychotherapy setting. In this article, we take up the issue within the group psychotherapeutic setting, surveying the literature, and describing our own experience with what became a gift-giving ritual in our long-term open-ended therapy group. We offer a group developmental perspective for informing therapeutic responses to gifts, and suggestions for the technical management of this kind of transaction.

  5. Ritual drinks in the pre-Hispanic US Southwest and Mexican Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, Patricia L; Gu, Jiyan; Hurst, W Jeffrey; Ward, Timothy J; Bravenec, Ardith D; Ali, Syed; Kebert, Laura; Berch, Marlaina; Redman, Erin; Lyons, Patrick D; Merewether, Jamie; Phillips, David A; Reed, Lori S; Woodson, Kyle

    2015-09-15

    Chemical analyses of organic residues in fragments of pottery from 18 sites in the US Southwest and Mexican Northwest reveal combinations of methylxanthines (caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline) indicative of stimulant drinks, probably concocted using either cacao or holly leaves and twigs. The results cover a time period from around A.D. 750-1400, and a spatial distribution from southern Colorado to northern Chihuahua. As with populations located throughout much of North and South America, groups in the US Southwest and Mexican Northwest likely consumed stimulant drinks in communal, ritual gatherings. The results have implications for economic and social relations among North American populations.

  6. El papel de la vestimenta en los rituales mexicas de “personificación”

    OpenAIRE

    Dehouve, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Los mexicas o aztecas del centro de México utilizaban en sus ceremonias ciertas prendas de vestir tejidas de algodón o de fibras vegetales, o simplemente hechas de papel de amate, y cubiertas de diseños. El presente artículo procura explicar la variedad de dicha indumentaria ritual con la ayuda del concepto nativo de “personificación” (ixiptla, en náhuatl), en función del cual se cubría un soporte (el “personificador”) con una indumentaria y varios adornos pertenecientes a un dios (el “person...

  7. The significance of the use of ganja as a religious ritual in the Rastafari movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SP Pretorius

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2000, the South African Constitutional Court ruled that religious freedom, including the exercise of religious rituals, may not contradict the laws of the country. This ruling came as a result of the Western Cape Law Society�s refusal to admit a Rastafarian as lawyer because of his habit of smoking marijuana. He appealed to the Constitutional Court and claimed that the ruling infringed upon his right to religious freedom. The Constitutional Court upheld the decision that no exception may be made for one religion.�

  8. Stable isotope and DNA evidence for ritual sequences in Inca child sacrifice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew S.; Taylor, Timothy; Ceruti, Maria Constanza; Chavez, Jose Antonio; Reinhard, Johan; Grimes, Vaughan; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Cartmell, Larry; Stern, Ben; Richards, Michael P.; Worobey, Michael; Barnes, Ian; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    Four recently discovered frozen child mummies from two of the highest peaks in the south central Andes now yield tantalizing evidence of the preparatory stages leading to Inca ritual killing as represented by the unique capacocha rite. Our interdisciplinary study examined hair from the mummies to obtain detailed genetic and diachronic isotopic information. This approach has allowed us to reconstruct aspects of individual identity and diet, make inferences concerning social background, and gain insight on the hitherto unknown processes by which victims were selected, elevated in social status, prepared for a high-altitude pilgrimage, and killed. Such direct information amplifies, yet also partly contrasts with, Spanish historical accounts. PMID:17923675

  9. Divination & Decision-Making: Ritual Techniques of Distributed Cognition in the Guatemalan Highlands

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In a highland Maya divination ritual called pajooneem (Tz’utujil, “weighing” or “balancing”), the bright red seeds of the tz’ite’ tree (Erythrina corallodendron) are utilized in conjunction with the 260-day calendar known as the Cholq’iij in order to involve revered “other-than-human persons” (Hallowell 2002) in a decision-making activity. The tz’ite’ seeds serve as “mediating artifacts” (Hutchins 1995:292) that help to coordinate various elements in an “ecology of mind” (Bateson 2000). In ...

  10. Pilgrims past and present: the ritual landscape of Raqchi, southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Sillar

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1533 the Spanish overthrew the Inka1 empire that then dominated the Andean region and much of the west coast of South America. Most tourists going to Peru visit Cuzco and Machu Pichu, but few see any of the other spectacular Ink a ruins, such as the mythical and ritual site at Raqchi. There research is focusing on the site itself and on the long-term history of the Vilcanota Valley, including the changes wrought by the Spanish invasion. The project is also working with the local community to promote sustainable tourism.

  11. Rationality and ritual participation and exclusion in nuclear decision-making

    CERN Document Server

    Wynne, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In Rationality and Ritual, internationally renowned expert Brian Wynne offers a profound analysis of science and technology policymaking. By focusing on an episode of major importance in Britain's nuclear history - the Windscale Inquiry, a public hearing about the future of fuel reprocessing - he offers a powerful critique of such judicial procedures and the underlying assumptions of the rationalist approach. This second edition makes available again this classic and still very relevant work. Debates about nuclear power have come to the fore once again. Yet we still do not h

  12. Authority in the Virtual Sangat : Sikhism, Ritual and Identity in the Twenty-First Century

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsh, Doris R.

    2006-01-01

    In her paper Authority in the Virtual Sanga. Sikhism, Ritual and Identity in the Twenty-First Century, Doris Jakobsh analyses the change of authority based on her research on Sikhs on the Internet. She stresses the Web as a ‘third place’ of communication among the Sikhs as well as the phenomenon of new authorities online. However, this does not imply the replacement of the traditional seats of authority, the Akal Takht, SGPC, or gurdwara managements, but one can recognize a significant shift ...

  13. Etnografía del budismo zen argentino: rituales, cosmovisión e identidad

    OpenAIRE

    Carini, Catón Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    El propósito de la tesis es realizar un estudio antropológico de los grupos budistas zen que se han establecido en la Argentina en las últimas décadas, indagando en la diversidad de tradiciones y escuelas locales y en los procesos de recreación y adaptación al ámbito argentino que manifiestan. La investigación propone inquirir etnográficamente en temáticas relacionadas al ritual, la cosmovisión y la identidad, a fin de hallar los procesos sociales y culturales que posibilitan el surgimiento, ...

  14. Gender and age identities in rituals of comensality. The argaric societies

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Romero, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of meat offerings included in the grave goods of Argaric burials has shown the importance of commensality practices for these societies not only as a part of the funerary ritual but also as a way to manifest social inequalities. Our main interest in this paper will be to understand how gender and age identities are incorporated in this social negotiation. El análisis de ofrendas cárnicas que se incluyen en los ajuares funerarios argáricos de la Edad del Bronce del sudeste de la Pe...

  15. Cornici di tortura Lo scandalo di Abu Ghraib come rituale mediatizzato tra fotogiornalismo e arte contemporanea

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    Marco Solaroli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the scandal of Abu Ghraib. The diffusion of the torture photographs is analyzed as a peculiar form of mediatized ritual, which has cristallized them in the public memory and performatively activated a number of practices of creative re-contextualization and symbolic re-articulation. In particular, the paper problematizes a wide range of forms of artistic representations of the torture photographs, according to three main analytical dimensions: inter-iconic translation, authorial intentions, degree of institutionalization.

  16. Controversias ante la significación: del formalismo al ritual

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    Raymundo Mier

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of significance arising from its dual characterization has passed through semantics under distinct polemic qualities analyzed in this text.. The pragmatic as an alternative to the difficulties of the semiotic and its particular ulterior developments, has defined the place of significance as a "universe populated by rituals and narrations". The author goes a step further and proposes, echoing Malinowski, the passing from the pragmatic to ethnography: language as pure action; the only act capable of generating and, paradoxically, denying meaning

  17. Synchronized arousal between performers and related spectators in a fire-walking ritual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Collective rituals are present in all known societies, but their function is a matter of long-standing debates. Field observations suggest that they may enhance social cohesion and that their effects are not limited to those actively performing but affect the audience as well. Here we show...... synchronized arousal over time between active participants and bystanders. It links field observations to a physiological basis and offers a unique approach for the quantification of social effects on human physiology during real-world interactions....

  18. EL FUEGO Y EL AGUA EN LOS RITUALES DE CURANDEROS OTOMÍES

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    Felipe Gonz\\u00E1lez Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un intenso trabajo etnográfico con grupos de curación otomíes que habitan en zonas metropolitanas del México central, se presenta una descripción e interpretación de sus prácticas rituales para curar a los individuos y ofrecer ceremonias a los Dioses en los cerros y manantiales. El fuego y el agua contienen las cualidades de calor y frío; húmero y seco, vida y muerte.

  19. Cultures of education and rituals of transition from home to the infant toddler center. Observing interactions and professional development

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    Chiara Bove

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available At the infant-toddler center, the rituals of transition that mark children’s arrival and going home times offer interesting kaleidoscopes for the study of interactive dynamics with the associated meanings and implicit educational models. Numerous pedagogical studies have investigated the meanings of these events, for the most part drawing on the monocultural model of classical attachment theory to analyze interactions between adults and children. Far less research has approached these rituals using triadic, systemic and intercultural categories of analysis in order to explore not only educators’ actions but also what is going on in their minds. In this paper, we discuss examples from a recent study on rituals of transition in the multicultural context of an infant toddler center, combining description of the timing, behaviors and interactive styles of children and adults, with analysis of the thoughts and representations of the educators.

  20. Taiwans multi-etniske samfund og den oprindelige befolknings postkoloniale situation eksemplificeret ved genindførelsen af traditionelle ritualer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Since the middle of the 1990s, traditionalist performances were on the rise in Taiwan. Generously subsidized by government bodies, aboriginal elites now not only publicly worshipped ancestor gods and enacted animal sacrifices in so called revitalized rituals, but also used these occasions to point...... side, Taiwan’s Han-Chinese were eager to present traditional aboriginal culture to a broad public as representatives of a specific Taiwanese culture. Simultaneously, they considered traditionalist events as indicators of the independent and emancipated identity of so called ‘inferior population groups......, the social role of contemporary aboriginal ritual is discussed. A couple of examples from my field studies from 2001-2005 (these latter examples can only be found in the German language version of the article) show how aboriginal ritual on the one hand side got appropriated by the nation state, and how...

  1. 流散主体的身份建构--解读拉什迪《撒旦诗篇》中的双主角%Self-Identity of Diaspora Subject:Understanding the Double Protagonists in Rushdie’s Satanic Verses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田行宇

    2014-01-01

    通过解读拉什迪《撒旦诗篇》中双主角不同的身份认同与身份建构,分析其不同的命运结局,进而指出双主角实为流散主体自我认同的一体两面。%The paper describes the double protagonists of Rushdie’s Satanic Verses and tries to understand their different destiny by analyzing their different self-identification and identity construction and finally points out that the double protagonists are the two facets of self-identity of diaspora subject.

  2. El depósito ritual. Una práctica mesoamericana de larga duración

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    Danièle Dehouve

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesoamerica is a cultural area known by the resistance of several of its features to the passage of time. One of them remained in existence in the long duration: the "ritual deposit", also named offerings, is defined as a figurative ritual, based on material and miniaturized representations, generally accompanied by the sacrifice of animals or men and / or the gift of food ; it has a great antiquity and persists in use in the indigenous contemporary populations. The article examines the evidences of this ceremonial practice, as well as its characteristics.

  3. Rituals of commensality and the politics of state formation in the "princely" societies of early Iron Age Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Dietler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction My task in this essay is to address the question «what can an examination of rituals of commensality add to our understanding of political structure and process in the so-called "princely" societies of Early Iron Age Europe ? ». The short answer is, I believe, a great deal. This is both because rituals are potentially recoverable as distinct events in the archaeological record and because, as will be shown, they are a fundamental instrument and theater of political relations. The...

  4. Interpretando el genesis del descanso: una aproximación a los mitos y rituales del turismo

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    Maximiliano Korstanje

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los mitos y los rituales han sido analizados durante mucho tiempo por la antropología. Sin embargo, existen pocos estudios que los vinculen a los procesos de descanso, y a la lógica del trabajo. El siguiente artículo pretende ser un aporte novedoso, a la función de las vacaciones como procesos rituales de expiación. El marco referencial utilizado se basa en dos trabajos del historiador Mircea Eliade titulados Mito y Realidad, publicado en 1968; y El Mito del Eterno Retorno, de última reimpresión en 2006.

  5. La Capacocha como ritual político. Negociaciones en torno al poder entre Cuzco y los curacas

    OpenAIRE

    Schroedl, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Este artículo estudia las funciones que los rituales políticos tenían en el estado inca a través del análisis de la fiesta de la Capacocha. Las ceremonias públicas de la religión estatal proporcionaban el escenario en el cual se negociaron las relaciones políticas entre el soberano y sus súbditos, entre Estado y pueblos conquistados por los incas e incorporados en su imperio. De este modo, los rituales políticos contribuyeron a la consolidación del dominio de los incas sobre los pueblos andin...

  6. Entre el orden y la transgresión: el consumo ritual del peyote entre los coras

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Benciolini

    2012-01-01

    En este artículo presento una etnografía de dos rituales coras en los que se consume peyote. Propongo que, en los dos casos que tomo en consideración, el cacto es utilizado para subrayar momentos especiales en los que las autoridades tradicionales pierden, en parte, su control sobre la comunidad. Tomaré en cuenta algunos aspectos relativos al estado y a las modalidades de consumir el peyote, para relacionar estos datos con otros elementos del ritual. A partir de esto, propondré una comparació...

  7. Proceso evolutivo de los rituales de conquista en España

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    Brisset, Demetrio

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a vast ritualized festive complex which was, and still is, very popular in Hispanic culture, that of the dramatized representations of wars of conquest. In order to unravel their deep significance, the author first defines and then discusses these representations comparatively at various levéis —morphological, historical, and cultural—, along the Unes developed by J. Caro Baroja. He aims at identifying the different influences which have transformed this festive complex over the centuries, to the point of concealing its original messages.Hay un vasto complejo festivo ritual que ha tenido y sigue teniendo gran popularidad en la cultura hispánica: el de las teatralizadas representaciones de la conquista de un bando sobre otro. Con el fin de interpretar su más profundo significado, se delimitará y someterá a un estudio comparativo morfológico, histórico y cultural (en la línea desarrollada por Caro Baroja, en busca de las diversas influencias que, a lo largo de muchos siglos, lo han ido transformando, hasta ocultar sus mensajes originarios.

  8. The "Endura" of The Cathars' Heresy: Medieval Concept of Ritual Euthanasia or Suicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiamis, Costas; Tounta, Eleni; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the medieval concepts on the voluntary death of severely sick people, as they emerge through the endura (endurance) of the heresy of the Cathars in France (twelfth to fourteenth centuries). The endura was the prerequisite act of repentance that would allow the fallen soul to return to heaven. The endura was a necessary act of repentance, after the performance of a ceremonial purification of the soul (consolamentum), and consisted of the patients' voluntary abstention from vital food. The consolamentum and endura could be performed in the final stage of a disease with the consent of the patients or their relatives. The role of the Cathar physician was only to determine the severity of the disease and the forthcoming death of the patient. The physician was not allowed to take steps that would deprive the life of the patient, and the performance of the ritual endura was duty of the spiritual leaders of the community. The modern ethical approach to this subject is dictated by the medieval belief on the salvation of the soul and tries to answer the question of whether the endura could be seen as a medieval concept of a ritual euthanasia or fell within the theological sin of suicide.

  9. Ritual and performance in domestic violence healing: from survivor to thriver through rites of passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Danielle F; Allen, Karen Neuman

    2012-03-01

    This article describes a group for domestic violence survivors to help them move past a "liminal" state in which their social identity is characterized by being "victim" or "survivor" to one of "incorporation" defined by "thriving" and joy. Through the creation and use of healing rituals, blessings, poetry, art and music, the women in the group establish "communitas" and support each other in the work of self-reclamation and healing. The group, "Rites of Passage" is intended for women who have completed shelter-based crisis interventions, and uses a structured curriculum that integrates theoretical and philosophical concepts from anthropology, post-modernism, humanistic psychology, social work, and existentialism. Through the Rites of Passage group, women identify and traverse a healing trajectory to construct an identity founded on strength and fulfillment. Patterned after non-western sex-segregated rites of transition, those who go through the group celebrate its conclusion with a defining ritual that publically marks their change in identity and status.

  10. El kyphi, un perfume ritual, mágico y medicinal en el universo egipcio grecorromano

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    Sabino Perea Yébenes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muchas fuentes antiguas, literarias y epigráficas, hablan de un singular producto típicamente egipcio: el kyphi. Se trata de un compuesto «químico» muy complejo, hecho con productos naturales, que toma la forma de incienso. De hecho, se traduce normalmente como «incienso», aunque éste sea sólo una parte de su composición. Su uso es muy variado: se emplea en los rituales de los templos egipcios, y en ceremonias mágicas, y también, por sus propiedades, tiene aplicaciones en medicina, desde época griega a la Edad Media.Many ancient sources, literary and epigraphic, speak of kyphi, a singular product typically Egyptian. This is a «chemical» product very complex, made with natural products, which takes the form and texture of incense. In fact, it is usually translated as «incense», although this is only part of its composition. Its use is very varied, in the rituals of the Egyptian temples and also, and magical ceremonies. For their properties, is used in medicine, from Greek times to the Middle Ages.

  11. Limits of Enlightenment and the Law - On the Legality of Ritual Male Circumcision in Europe today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Swatek-Evenstein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The legality of ritual circumcision of male infants is a subject not regularly discussed under European or international Human Rights Law, let alone national law. In Germany, this changed dramatically in 2012, when a regional court declared ritual circumcision of a male infant illegal, even if performed at the parents' request and according to current medical standards. After a fierce public discussion, the German parliament voted towards the end of the year in favour of a bill that explicitly permits male infant circumcision. The discussion on whether this new law is in line with European human rights law and international law is expected to continue. This paper takes no position on whether infant male circumcision should be legal and takes no position on the medical questions attached to the subject. It argues for the legality of infant male circumcision in Western democracies like Germany for historic reasons: Jewish emancipation in the 18th and 19th century throughout Europe meant an incorporation of Jewish laws and customs into the legal fabric of European countries. Taking into account the relatively wide acceptance of the practice of infant male circumcision in communities worldwide, the paper suggests that arguments from international human rights law make simple equations difficult to sustain. Gender and children's rights-based approaches may be utilized to develop a deeper sensibility for the issues related to circumcision, but must not obscure the fact that minority rights sometimes rightfully allow a minority to do things the majority does not understand.

  12. Mummy Lake: An unroofed ceremonial structure within a large-scale ritual landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Larry V.; Griffin, Eleanor R.; Stein, J.R.; Friedman, R. A.; Andrae, S. W.

    2014-01-01

    The structure at Mesa Verde National Park known historically as Mummy Lake and more recently as Far View Reservoir is not part of a water collection, impoundment, or redistribution system. We offer an alternative explanation for the function of Mummy Lake. We suggest that it is an unroofed ceremonial structure, and that it serves as an essential component of a Chacoan ritual landscape. A wide constructed avenue articulates Mummy Lake with Far View House and Pipe Shrine House. The avenue continues southward for approximately 6 km where it apparently divides connecting with Spruce Tree House and Sun Temple/Cliff Palace. The avenue has previously been interpreted as an irrigation ditch fed by water impounded at Mummy Lake; however, it conforms in every respect to alignments described as Chacoan roads. Tree-ring dates indicate that the construction of Spruce Tree House and Cliff Palace began about A.D. 1225, roughly coincident with the abandonment of the Far View community. This pattern of periodically relocating the focus of an Anasazi community by retiring existing ritual structures and linking them to newly constructed facilities by means of broad avenues was first documented by Fowler and Stein (1992) in Manuelito Canyon, New Mexico. Periods of intense drought appear to have contributed to the relocation of prehistoric Native Americans from the Far View group to Cliff Palace/Spruce Tree House in the mid-13th century and eventually to the abandonment of all Anasazi communities in southwestern Colorado in the late-13th century.

  13. The Role of Astronomical Alignments in the Rituals of the Peak Sanctuary at Kokino, Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanovska-Barandovska, Olgica; Stankovski, Jovica

    2011-11-01

    The archaeological locality 'Taticev Kamen' (Tatic Rock) is located in the north-eastern part of Macedonia, near the village of Kokino. During the Bronze Age, it was used as a mountain sanctuary by the people living in the region. The large number of excavated artefacts have confirmed the practise of several different cults. The site also has many characteristics of a megalithic observatory. The detailed archaeoastronomical analysis of the locality indicates that the periodic movements of the Sun and other celestial objects were observed from three different platforms, and their positions on particular dates were marked by notches on the nearby stone blocks. From the first platform, a marker for the midsummer sunrise was carved for the purpose of performing the ritual that has solar characteristics. The second platform is a central site from which the Sun was observed throughout the year, and the extreme sunrise positions on the days of the solstices and the equinoxes were marked. The newly-discovered third platform contains evidence of ritual activities similar to those at the Minoan peak sanctuaries on Crete. Using this platform as an observational site, we found four markers that pointed to the rising of Aldebaran over an interval of several centuries (from 1900 BC to 1500 BC). The heliacal rising of this star before summer and its rising in the evening sky in early autumn were probably connected with vegetative cycles and the organization of agricultural activities.

  14. QUARUP: TRANSFORMAÇÕES DO RITUAL E DA POLÍTICA NO ALTO XINGU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Guerreiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O famoso Quarup - um grande ritual mortuário realizado pelos povos do Alto Xingu em honra a chefes falecidos - tem sido cada vez mais visto pelos xinguanos como uma ocasião apropriada para receber visitantes brancos, a fim de obter recursos materiais, criar alianças políticas e chamar a atenção da mídia para assuntos indígenas. A partir da descrição de alguns rituais mortuários organizados nos últimos anos, este artigo discute como a objetificação dos rituais como "cultura" para os não índios põe em movimento processos políticos de escala local, regional e nacional. A intenção é compreender como os rituais se tornaram uma dobradiça entre o mundo dos brancos e a política ritual indígena, e como isso pode afetar as formas xinguanas de produzir pessoas e coletivos. Além disso, espera-se esclarecer alguns aspectos das ideias xinguanas sobre a chefia e a noção de "dono".

  15. RELIGION, CULTURE AND LOCAL WISDOM IN THE DEATH RITUAL OF PONTIANAK MALAY SOCIETY

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    Sumarman Muhammad Djar’ie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Death is inevitable and will occur to every living creature, including humans no mater what religion or belief they have; however, no one knows for sure when it happens. Humans can only predict death based on indicators that can be seen before it occurs. Still until now, there are many people who attempt to oppose death, even though in the end they have to admit that Allah is the Almighty. Therefore, no wonder if the death is still considered a tragedy rather than the culmination of happiness when humans finally harvest of deeds they have done all their life. In this light, death rituals are often accompanied by the tears of the family of the deceased, even some cry hard to express their pain as someone they love is gone, coupled with the arrival of relatives and acquaintances who mourn, and condolences as well as the phrase “inna lillâh wa inna ilaihi raji’ȗn”. A day of joy has turned into a day of sorrow, although it always ends with kendurian (gathering for remembering the dead, whose excitement is like that of selamatan (communal feast and syukuran (celebration of thankfulness. This paper tries to present the infiltration of religion and culture in the death ritual in Pontianak Malay community as an object of discussion of local wisdom by using mafhȗm mukhâlafah approach, to provide a new understanding of the meaning of death.

  16. Upon Meeting the Ancestors: The Hmong Funeral Ritual in Asia and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Falk

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will describe how the text affects its own tellingat a specific moment in the death rites of the Hmong people,drawing chronologically on seven accounts dating from the1890s to 1992 and ranging geographically from southern Chinato Thailand, Laos and Australia. To the Hmong --traditionally a migratory people -- the long song of death isthe most important ritual text. It is transmitted orally anddoes not exist in written form. Since oral literature isverbal and auditory by its very nature it is supposedly freeto change with each telling and each teller. The factors ofboth a long history of dispersal by migration and an oraltradition could indicate, superficially, that substantialchange would occur in the oral literature of the Hmong overtime and place. In this paper, the evidence of translationsof the death song shows, however, a remarkable stability inthese texts and from this it will be concluded that the veryessence of Hmongness - of Hmong history, ethnicity and worldview - is invested in the stability of the texts of the deathnarrative, which is in essence a reflexive metacommentary onHmong society. Finally, some of the indicators for change inthe funeral ritual of the Hmong following their diaspora tothe West will be discussed.

  17. Meaning-making of female genital cutting: children's perception and acquired knowledge of the ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jon-Håkon; Lien, Inger-Lise

    2013-01-01

    How do girls who have undergone female genital cutting understand the ritual? This study provides an analysis of the learning process and knowledge acquired in their meaning-making process. Eighteen participants were interviewed in qualitative indepth interviews. Women in Norway, mostly with Somali or Gambian backgrounds, were asked about their experiences of circumcision. Two different strategies were used to prepare girls for circumcision, ie, one involving giving some information and the other keeping the ritual a secret. Findings indicate that these two approaches affected the girls' meaning-making differently, but both strategies seemed to lead to the same educational outcome. The learning process is carefully monitored and regulated but is brought to a halt, stopping short of critical reflexive thinking. The knowledge tends to be deeply internalized, embodied, and morally embraced. The meaning-making process is discussed by analyzing the use of metaphors and narratives. Given that the educational outcome is characterized by limited knowledge without critical reflection, behavior change programs to end female genital cutting should identify and implement educational stimuli that are likely to promote critical reflexive thinking.

  18. Limits of Enlightenment and the Law - On the Legality of Ritual Male Circumcision in Europe today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Swatek-Evenstein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The legality of ritual circumcision of male infants is a subject not regularly discussed under European or international Human Rights Law, let alone national law. In Germany, this changed dramatically in 2012, when a regional court declared ritual circumcision of a male infant illegal, even if performed at the parents' request and according to current medical standards. After a fierce public discussion, the German parliament voted towards the end of the year in favour of a bill that explicitly permits male infant circumcision. The discussion on whether this new law is in line with European human rights law and international law is expected to continue. This paper takes no position on whether infant male circumcision should be legal and takes no position on the medical questions attached to the subject. It argues for the legality of infant male circumcision in Western democracies like Germany for historic reasons: Jewish emancipation in the 18 and 19 century throughout Europe meant an incorporation of Jewish laws and customs into the legal fabric of European countries. Taking into account the relatively wide acceptance of the practice of infant male circumcision in communities worldwide, the paper suggests that arguments from international human rights law make simple equations difficult to sustain. Gender and children's rights-based approaches may be utilized to develop a deeper sensibility for the issues related to circumcision, but must not obscure the fact that minority rights sometimes rightfully allow a minority to do things the majority does not understand.

  19. Ponis, santuarios y guerreros: la dimensión ritual del caballo en el mundo galo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabaldón Martínez, María del Mar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In ancient Gaul —and in Celtic culture as a whole— horse was a special animal not only because of its role as symbol of prestige and richness but also because of its strong religious and ritual dimension. There are horses in burials and in sanctuaries (like Vertault in Côte d´Or being sacrified together with other domestic animals or with the warriors as we see in some cult places in Picardy as the well known of Gournay-sur-Aronde (Oise or the so called ‘trophy’ of Ribemont-sur-Ancre (Somme.

    Entre los pueblos galos —y en la Céltica en general— el caballo fue un animal especial, no sólo por ser un símbolo de prestigio y de riqueza, sino también por su indudable valor religioso y ritual, apareciendo —de manera directa o indirecta— en las sepulturas y siendo sacrificado junto a otras especies domésticas en los santuarios, como Vertault (Côte d´Or, o con el guerrero, poniéndolo a su misma altura, como sucede en algunos lugares de culto de Picardía como el conocido Gournay-sur-Aronde (Oise o el llamado «trofeo» de Ribemont-sur-Ancre (Somme.

  20. Therapeutic effects of ritual ayahuasca use in the treatment of substance dependence--qualitative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizaga-Velder, Anja; Verres, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative empirical study explores the ritual use of ayahuasca in the treatment of addictions. Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychedelic plant compound created from an admixture of the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and the bush Psychotria viridis. The study included interviews with 13 therapists who apply ayahuasca professionally in the treatment of addictions (four indigenous healers and nine Western mental health professionals with university degrees), two expert researchers, and 14 individuals who had undergone ayahuasca-assisted therapy for addictions in diverse contexts in South America. The study provides empirically based hypotheses on therapeutic mechanisms of ayahuasca in substance dependence treatment. Findings indicate that ayahuasca can serve as a valuable therapeutic tool that, in carefully structured settings, can catalyze neurobiological and psychological processes that support recovery from substance dependencies and the prevention of relapse. Treatment outcomes, however, can be influenced by a number of variables that are explained in this study. In addition, issues related to ritual transfer and strategies for minimizing undesired side-effects are discussed.