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Sample records for sat analysis laboratory

  1. DebriSat Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Semiquantitative elemental composition. – Elemental mapping and line scans. • Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy – Identification of chemical...Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy – Nicolet 6700 spectrometer. – Harrick Scientific “praying mantis” diffuse reflectance accessory. • Qualitative...VIS-NIR Spectroscopy Dianna Alaan © The Aerospace Corporation 2015 DebriSat Laboratory Analyses 5 January, 2015 Paul M. Adams1, Zachary Lingley2

  2. DebriSat Pre Preshot Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-27

    to be line of sight since witness plates protected by Whipple shield showed little change. LWIR spectral features from the deposited material are...Radhakrishnan Charles Griffice C. C. Wan UV -VIS-NIR Spectroscopy Dianna Alaan FIB/TEM Sample Preparation Miles Brodie © The Aerospace Corporation 2015 DebriSat...conditions responsible for the darkening. – UV -VIS-NIR-LWIR reflectance spectra were measured of post test debris for comparison with pre test

  3. Small Sat Analysis Laboratory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Low-Cost Small Spacecraft Program is focused on the technologies, subsystems, methodologies, and mission concepts for space missions which lower the...

  4. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  5. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  6. Analysis of WindSat Data over Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radiation of the 3rd and 4th Stokes components emitted by Arctic sea ice and observed by the spaceborne fully polarimetric radiometer WindSat is investigated. Two types of analysis are carried out, spatial (maps of different quadrants of azimuth look angles) and temporal (time series of daily av...

  7. Thermal Analysis of Iodine Satellite (iSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the progress of the thermal analysis and design of the Iodine Satellite (iSAT). The purpose of the iSAT spacecraft (SC) is to demonstrate the ability of the iodine Hall Thruster propulsion system throughout a one year mission in an effort to mature the system for use on future satellites. The benefit of this propulsion system is that it uses a propellant, iodine, that is easy to store and provides a high thrust-to-mass ratio. The spacecraft will also act as a bus for an earth observation payload, the Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) Camera. Four phases of the mission, determined to either be critical to achieving requirements or phases of thermal concern, are modeled. The phases are the Right Ascension of the Ascending Node (RAAN) Change, Altitude Reduction, De-Orbit, and Science Phases. Each phase was modeled in a worst case hot environment and the coldest phase, the Science Phase, was also modeled in a worst case cold environment. The thermal environments of the spacecraft are especially important to model because iSAT has a very high power density. The satellite is the size of a 12 unit cubesat, and dissipates slightly more than 75 Watts of power as heat at times. The maximum temperatures for several components are above their maximum operational limit for one or more cases. The analysis done for the first Design and Analysis Cycle (DAC1) showed that many components were above or within 5 degrees Centigrade of their maximum operation limit. The battery is a component of concern because although it is not over its operational temperature limit, efficiency greatly decreases if it operates at the currently predicted temperatures. In the second Design and Analysis Cycle (DAC2), many steps were taken to mitigate the overheating of components, including isolating several high temperature components, removal of components, and rearrangement of systems. These changes have greatly increased the thermal margin available.

  8. Flight Technical Error Analysis of the SATS Higher Volume Operations Simulation and Flight Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Adams, Catherine H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of Flight Technical Error (FTE) from recent SATS experiments, called the Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Simulation and Flight experiments, which NASA conducted to determine pilot acceptability of the HVO concept for normal operating conditions. Reported are FTE results from simulation and flight experiment data indicating the SATS HVO concept is viable and acceptable to low-time instrument rated pilots when compared with today s system (baseline). Described is the comparative FTE analysis of lateral, vertical, and airspeed deviations from the baseline and SATS HVO experimental flight procedures. Based on FTE analysis, all evaluation subjects, low-time instrument-rated pilots, flew the HVO procedures safely and proficiently in comparison to today s system. In all cases, the results of the flight experiment validated the results of the simulation experiment and confirm the utility of the simulation platform for comparative Human in the Loop (HITL) studies of SATS HVO and Baseline operations.

  9. Function analysis of a new type I PKS-SAT domain by SAT-EAT domain replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y L; Wang, L H; Jiao, B H; Wang, S J; Fang, Y W; Liu, S

    2010-01-01

    The function of a new starter unit acyltransferase (SAT) domain SAT-EF080951 (GenBank accession number) encoded in a new type I polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster EF568935 (GenBank accession number) isolated for this study was analyzed by domain replacement with an extender unit AT (EAT) domain of avermectin PKS. It was shown that the SAT-EF080951 incorporated malonyl-CoA specifically in vivo, which contradicted the specificity that we had previously determined by substrate binding test in vitro. The result of this study indicates that type I PKS-SAT can alter its specificity in vivo and functions well in extender units and proved the feasibility of the SAT-EAT domain replacement in type I PKS. We propose that SAT-EAT replacement strategy could be a novel route for increasing the diversity of new polyketides combinatorially biosynthesized. The new type I PKS-SAT-EF080951 studied herein may be further employed for related studies on enzymology or combinatorial biosynthesis of polyketides.

  10. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  11. The SAT solving method as applied to cryptographic analysis of asymmetric ciphers

    CERN Document Server

    Faizullin, R T; Dylkeyt, V I

    2009-01-01

    The one of the most interesting problem of discrete mathematics is the SAT (satisfiability) problem. Good way in SAT solver developing is to transform the SAT problem to the problem of continuous search of global minimums of the functional associated with the CNF. This article proves the special construction of the functional and offers to solve the system of non-linear algebraic equation that determines functional stationary points via modified method of consecutive approximation. The article describes parallel versions of the method. Also gives the schema of using the method to important problems of cryptographic analysis of asymmetric ciphers, including determining concrete bits of multipliers (in binary form) in large factorization problems and concrete bits of exponent of discrete logarithm problem.

  12. The CarbonSat Earth Explorer 8 candidate mission: Error analysis for carbon dioxide and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Reuter, Maximilian; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Meijer, Yasjka; Sierk, Bernd; Caron, Jerome; Loescher, Armin; Ingmann, Paul; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    CarbonSat is one of two candidate missions for ESA's Earth Explorer 8 (EE8) satellite to be launched around 2022. The main goal of CarbonSat is to advance our knowledge on the natural and man-made sources and sinks of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) on various temporal and spatial scales (e.g., regional, city and point source scale), as well as related climate feedbacks. CarbonSat will be the first satellite mission optimised to detect emission hot spots of CO2 (e.g., cities, industrialised areas, power plants) and CH4 (e.g., oil and gas fields) and to quantify their emissions. Furthermore, CarbonSat will deliver a number of important by-products such as Vegetation Chlorophyll Fluorescence (VCF, also called Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF)) at 755 nm. These applications require appropriate retrieval algorithms which are currently being optimized and used for error analysis. The status of this error analysis will be presented based on the latest version of the CO2 and CH4 retrieval algorithm and taking the current instrument specification into account. An overview will be presented focusing on nadir observations over land. Focus will be on specific issues such as errors of the CO2 and CH4 products due to residual polarization related errors and errors related to inhomogeneous ground scenes.

  13. SBML-SAT: a systems biology markup language (SBML) based sensitivity analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Zhike; Zheng, Yanan; Rundell, Ann E; Klipp, Edda

    2008-08-15

    It has long been recognized that sensitivity analysis plays a key role in modeling and analyzing cellular and biochemical processes. Systems biology markup language (SBML) has become a well-known platform for coding and sharing mathematical models of such processes. However, current SBML compatible software tools are limited in their ability to perform global sensitivity analyses of these models. This work introduces a freely downloadable, software package, SBML-SAT, which implements algorithms for simulation, steady state analysis, robustness analysis and local and global sensitivity analysis for SBML models. This software tool extends current capabilities through its execution of global sensitivity analyses using multi-parametric sensitivity analysis, partial rank correlation coefficient, SOBOL's method, and weighted average of local sensitivity analyses in addition to its ability to handle systems with discontinuous events and intuitive graphical user interface. SBML-SAT provides the community of systems biologists a new tool for the analysis of their SBML models of biochemical and cellular processes.

  14. FiSAT Ⅱ软件支持下的体长股分析法探讨%FiSAT Ⅱ Software supported Length based Cohort Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴斌; 方春林; 贺刚; 傅培峰

    2013-01-01

    文章重点介绍了运用FiSAT Ⅱ软件以迭代法求解捕捞死亡系数的具体过程,同时比较了传统与FiSAT Ⅱ下的体长股分析法的结果.结果发现,2种方法计算的资源量比值(NF/ NT)总体表现为随体长增加而增大,但对于中间体长组,两者差异更小.FiSAT Ⅱ软件中的实际种群分析模块是推算捕捞死亡系数(F)的好方法.理论上来说,因其利用了反复迭代,使精度提高,其所得鱼类资源量更加真实准确.通过自我控制体长组缺失实验发现,在运用体长股法估算鱼类资源量时,最小体长组的缺失引起最大偏离,达到10%以上.%We introduced the application of FiSAT Ⅱ software in the specific process of using iteration method to estimate fishing death coefficient,and compared the results from traditional Length based Cohort Analysis (LCA) with the data from FiSAT Ⅱ software supported LCA.It is not difficult to find that NF/NT ratio of the two methods increases with increasing body length,while the difference between the two methods for intermediate group of the body length is smaller.The Virtual Population Analysis module of FiSAT Ⅱ software is a good method for extrapolating to fishing mortality coefficient (F).In this method,theoretically,precision is improved by using iteration,thus the estimation of fish stock becomes more accurate.Self-control group of body length deletion experiments show that in the use of LCA for fish stock estimation,the loss of minimum body length group data causes the maximum deviation,reaching more than 10%.

  15. Development and laboratory validation of a lateral flow device for the detection of serotype SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease viruses in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Nigel P; Nordengrahn, Ann; Hutchings, Geoffrey H; Paton, David J; Kristersson, Therese; Brocchi, Emiliana; Grazioli, Santina; Merza, Malik

    2010-02-01

    A lateral flow device (LFD) for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) of the SAT 2 serotype was developed using a monoclonal antibody (Mab 2H6). The performance of the LFD was evaluated in the laboratory on suspensions of vesicular epithelia: 305 positive for FMDV type SAT 2 from suspected cases of vesicular disease collected from 30 countries and 1002 samples shown to be negative for FMDV type SAT 2 collected from 67 countries between 1968 and 2008. The diagnostic sensitivity of the LFD for FMDV type SAT 2 was higher at 88% compared to 79% obtained by the reference method of antigen ELISA, and the diagnostic specificity of the LFD was approximately 99% compared to 100% for the ELISA. The device recognized FMDV strains of wide diversity within the FMDV SAT 2 serotype and gave a superior performance for their detection compared to the 1F10 LFD which had been developed previously and shown to perform less well for the detection of FMDVs of this particular serotype. Reactions in the SAT 2 2H6 LFD with the viruses of other FMDV serotypes and swine vesicular disease (which produces a clinically indistinguishable syndrome in pigs), did not occur. These data illustrate the potential for the LFD to be employed to complement the 1F10 device next to the animal in the pen-side diagnosis of FMD, for providing rapid and objective support to veterinarians in their clinical judgment of the disease and for specific confirmation of a FMDV type SAT 2 infection.

  16. Math review for the SAT

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    Maximize your math score on the new SAT with REA's Math Review for the SAT! This new edition features a comprehensive analysis of the SAT's Multiple Choice and Student Response math questions: Number and Operation Questions; Algebra and Function Questions; Geometry and Measurement Questions; and Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability Questions. Build your test skills with over 200 math drills that sharpen and focus your understanding of SAT math.DETAILS - New edition reflects all the math changes on the new SAT including Algebra II - Concentrated subject question analyses that hone test sk

  17. Laboratory analysis of stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Ernst

    2013-02-01

    Tiny dust grains extracted from primitive meteorites are identified to have originated in the atmospheres of stars on the basis of their anomalous isotopic compositions. Although isotopic analysis with the ion microprobe plays a major role in the laboratory analysis of these stardust grains, many other microanalytical techniques are applied to extract the maximum amount of information.

  18. Exploration Laboratory Analysis - ARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Fung, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL). The SMEMCL provided diagnosis and treatment for the evidence-based medical conditions and hence, a basis for developing ELA functional requirements.

  19. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  20. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  1. ROC analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top) in female coronary heart disease patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Sandra Johanna; Horejsi, Renate; Zweiker, Robert; Watzinger, Norbert; Möller, Reinhard; Schnedl, Wolfgang Johann; Schauenstein, Konrad; Tafeit, Erwin

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top) is different in female CHD patients (n=26) and healthy controls (n=36) matched to age, body size, weight, and BMI. The thicknesses of SAT layers were measured by LIPOMETER at 15 specified body sites. To calculate the power of the different body sites to discriminate between CHD women and healthy controls, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed. For each parameter, sensitivity and specificity were calculated at different cutoff points. CHD women showed a significant decrease to 78.36% (p=0.012) at body site 11-front thigh, 73.10% (p=0.012) at 12-lateral thigh, 72.20% (p=0.009) at 13-rear thigh, 66.43% (pSAT thickness at each measured body site is able to discriminate between the two subject groups. The good discrimination results obtained for the present dataset are encouraging enough to recommend applying LIPOMETER SAT-Top measurements in further studies to investigate individual risks for CHD.

  2. CubeSat evolution: Analyzing CubeSat capabilities for conducting science missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Golkar, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory", and "Technology Demonstration" for in-detail analysis. Additionally, the evolution of CubeSat enabling technologies are surveyed for evaluating the current technology state of the art as well as identifying potential areas that will benefit the most from further technology developments for enabling high performance science missions based on CubeSat platforms.

  3. Multi-year analysis of ice microphysics derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted multi-year analys of ice microphysics using CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Inter-annual variability, land-ocean differences and seasonal changes of ice microphysical properties were reported for the observation periods from 2006 to 2009. CALIPSO changed the laser tilt angle from 0.3 degrees to 3 degrees off nadir direction on November 2007 and the zonal mean properties of backscattering coefficient and depolarization ratio were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, for low altitude after November 2007. This could be explained by the different backscattering behavior of horizontally oriented ice crystals for the different laser tilt angles. On the other hand, inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of reflectivity factor observed by CloudSat showed the very similar characteristics during the four years. In addition, the lidar observables were similar when the monthly mean properties were compared for different years before November 2007 and also the same was true for the comparisons after November 2007. These analyses of observables suggested that the inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of ice microphysics could be considered to be similar. Application of the radar-lidar algorithm showed that the change of the laser tilt angle introduced the large gap between the ice microphysical properties before and after November 2007, if the proper treatment of the oriented ice crystals were not conducted in the retrievals. Global analysis of cloud particle types showed that the frequent occurrence of oriented ice crystals were identified in the temperature range between -10 to -20 degrees C. It is also noted that the significant overestimation of ice water content and significant underestimation of ice effective radius were found if the scattering properties of the horizontally oriented ice particles were not considered. Therefore it is highly demanded that the realistic ice orientation model is implemented in the look up tables

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals a novel function of the kinase Sat4p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Gey

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinase Sat4p has been originally identified as a protein involved in salt tolerance and stabilization of plasma membrane transporters, implicating a cytoplasmic localization. Our study revealed an additional mitochondrial (mt localization, suggesting a dual function for Sat4p. While no mt related phenotype was observed in the absence of Sat4p, its overexpression resulted in significant changes of a specific mitochondrial subproteome. As shown by a comparative two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE approach combined with mass spectrometry, particularly two groups of proteins were affected: the iron-sulfur containing aconitase-type proteins (Aco1p, Lys4p and the lipoamide-containing subproteome (Lat1p, Kgd2p and Gcv3p. The lipoylation sites of all three proteins could be assigned by nanoLC-MS/MS to Lys75 (Lat1p, Lys114 (Kgd2p and Lys102 (Gcv3p, respectively. Sat4p overexpression resulted in accumulation of the delipoylated protein variants and in reduced levels of aconitase-type proteins, accompanied by a decrease in the activities of the respective enzyme complexes. We propose a regulatory role of Sat4p in the late steps of the maturation of a specific subset of mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster proteins, including Aco1p and lipoate synthase Lip5p. Impairment of the latter enzyme may account for the observed lipoylation defects.

  5. Exploiting Artificial Intelligence for Analysis and Data Selection on-board the Puerto Rico CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, J. E. S.; Bruhn, F.; Funk, P.; Isham, B.; Rincón-Charris, A. A.; Capo-Lugo, P.; Åhlén, L.

    2015-10-01

    CubeSat missions are constrained by the limited resources provided by the platform. Many payload providers have learned to cope with the low mass and power but the poor telemetry allocation remains a bottleneck. In the end, it is the data delivered to ground which determines the value of the mission. However, transmitting more data does not necessarily guarantee high value, since the value also depends on the data quality. By exploiting fast on-board computing and efficient artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for analysis and data selection one could optimize the usage of the telemetry link and so increase the value of the mission. In a pilot project, we attempt to do this on the Puerto Rico CubeSat, where science objectives include the acquisition of space weather data to aid better understanding of the Sun to Earth connection.

  6. Experimental Study on Strategy of Combining SAT Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕卫锋; 张玉平

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of many SAT algorithms is mainly reflected by their significant performances on one or several classes of specific SAT problems.Different kinds of SAT algorithms all have their own hard instances respectively.Therefore,to get the better performance on all kinds of problems,SAT solver should know how to select different algorithms according to the feature of instances.In this paper the differences of several effective SAT algorithms are analyzed and two new parameters φand δ are proposed to characterize the feature of SAT instances.Experiments are performed to study the relationship between SAT algorithms and some statistical parameters including φ,δ.Based on this analysis,a strategy is presented for designing a faster SAT tester by carefully combining some existing SAT algorithms.With this strategy,a faster SAT tester to solve many kinds of SAT problem is obtained.

  7. Test anxiety and performance-avoidance goals explain gender differences in SAT-V, SAT-M, and overall SAT scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2012-11-01

    This study uses analysis of co-variance in order to determine which cognitive/learning (working memory, knowledge integration, epistemic belief of learning) or social/personality factors (test anxiety, performance-avoidance goals) might account for gender differences in SAT-V, SAT-M, and overall SAT scores. The results revealed that none of the cognitive/learning factors accounted for gender differences in SAT performance. However, the social/personality factors of test anxiety and performance-avoidance goals each separately accounted for all of the significant gender differences in SAT-V, SAT-M, and overall SAT performance. Furthermore, when the influences of both of these factors were statistically removed simultaneously, all non-significant gender differences reduced further to become trivial by Cohen's (1988) standards. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that gender differences in SAT-V, SAT-M, and overall SAT performance are a consequence of social/learning factors.

  8. Propulsion for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Kristina

    2017-05-01

    At present, very few CubeSats have flown in space featuring propulsion systems. Of those that have, the literature is scattered, published in a variety of formats (conference proceedings, contractor websites, technical notes, and journal articles), and often not available for public release. This paper seeks to collect the relevant publically releasable information in one location. To date, only two missions have featured propulsion systems as part of the technology demonstration. The IMPACT mission from the Aerospace Corporation launched several electrospray thrusters from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and BricSAT-P from the United States Naval Academy had four micro-Cathode Arc Thrusters from George Washington University. Other than these two missions, propulsion on CubeSats has been used only for attitude control and reaction wheel desaturation via cold gas propulsion systems. As the desired capability of CubeSats increases, and more complex missions are planned, propulsion is required to accomplish the science and engineering objectives. This survey includes propulsion systems that have been designed specifically for the CubeSat platform and systems that fit within CubeSat constraints but were developed for other platforms. Throughout the survey, discussion of flight heritage and results of the mission are included where publicly released information and data have been made available. Major categories of propulsion systems that are in this survey are solar sails, cold gas propulsion, electric propulsion, and chemical propulsion systems. Only systems that have been tested in a laboratory or with some flight history are included.

  9. Research on the Solution Space of 2-SAT and Max-2-SAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the properties of 2-SAT and Max-2-SAT problems by analyzing the node adding process on the factor graph. Two important structures, backbones and mutual-determinations are investigated, and the reduced solution graph for the expression of solution space of 2-SAT and Max-2-SAT is defined. For 2-SAT problem, a complete evolution process for the reduced graph is discussed and corresponding algorithm is obtained. For the Max-2-SAT problem, the analysis shows it’s backbone number can evolve in a much harder way by which it can increase or decrease. The research in this paper provide a new view point for understanding the solution space of 2-SAT and Max-2-SAT, which will be benefit for recognizing the complexity nature of the NP-hard problems.

  10. Application of CryoSat-2 altimetry data for river analysis and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Raphael; Nygaard Godiksen, Peter; Villadsen, Heidi; Madsen, Henrik; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Availability of in situ river monitoring data, especially of data shared across boundaries, is decreasing, despite growing challenges for water resource management across the entire globe. This is especially valid for the case study of this work, the Brahmaputra Basin in South Asia. Commonly, satellite altimeters are used in various ways to provide information about such river basins. Most missions provide virtual station time series of water levels at locations where their repeat orbits cross rivers. CryoSat-2 is equipped with a new type of altimeter, providing estimates of the actual ground location seen in the reflected signal. It also uses a drifting orbit, challenging conventional ways of processing altimetry data to river water levels and their incorporation in hydrologic-hydrodynamic models. However, CryoSat-2 altimetry data provides an unprecedentedly high spatial resolution. This paper suggests a procedure to (i) filter CryoSat-2 observations over rivers to extract water-level profiles along the river, and (ii) use this information in combination with a hydrologic-hydrodynamic model to fit the simulated water levels with an accuracy that cannot be reached using information from globally available digital elevation models (DEMs) such as from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) only. The filtering was done based on dynamic river masks extracted from Landsat imagery, providing spatial and temporal resolutions high enough to map the braided river channels and their dynamic morphology. This allowed extraction of river water levels over previously unmonitored narrow stretches of the river. In the Assam Valley section of the Brahmaputra River, CryoSat-2 data and Envisat virtual station data were combined to calibrate cross sections in a 1-D hydrodynamic model of the river. The hydrologic-hydrodynamic model setup and calibration are almost exclusively based on openly available remote sensing data and other global data sources, ensuring transferability of

  11. Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the

  12. Exploiting artificial intelligence for in-situ analysis of high-resolution radio emission measurements on a CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isham, Brett; Bergman, Jan; Krause, Linda; Rincon-Charris, Amilcar; Bruhn, Fredrik; Funk, Peter; Stramkals, Arturs

    2016-07-01

    CubeSat missions are intentionally constrained by the limitations of their small platform. Mission payloads designed for low volume, mass, and power, may however be disproportionally limited by available telemetry allocations. In many cases, it is the data delivered to the ground which determines the value of the mission. However, transmitting more data does not necessarily guarantee high value, since the value also depends on data quality. By exploiting fast on-board computing and efficient artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for analysis and data selection, the usage of the telemetry link can be optimized and value added to the mission. This concept is being implemented on the Puerto Rico CubeSat, which will make measurements of ambient ionospheric radio waves and ion irregularities and turbulence. Principle project goals include providing aerospace and systems engineering experiences to students. Science objectives include the study of natural space plasma processes to aid in better understanding of space weather and the Sun to Earth connection, and in-situ diagnostics of ionospheric modification experiments using high-power ground-based radio transmitters. We hope that this project might point the way to the productive use of AI in space and other remote, low-data-bandwidth environments.

  13. Some Structural Properties of SAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘田

    2000-01-01

    The following four conjectures about structural properties of SAT are studied in this paper. (1) SAT ∈ PSPARSE∩NP; (2) SAT ∈ SRTDtt; (3) SAT ∈ PbttAPP; (4) FPSttAT = FPSATlog. It is proved that some pairs of these conjectures imply P = NP, for example, if SAT ∈ PSPARSE∩NP and SAT ∈ PbttAPP, or if SAT ∈ SRTDtt and SAT ∈ PbttAPP, then P = NP. This improves previous results in literature.

  14. Radio diagnostics and analysis on the Puerto Rico CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, J. E. S.; Bruhn, F.; Isham, B.; Rincon-Charris, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Puerto Rico CubeSat is a collaboration between Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, the University of Puerto Rico, the Ana G. Ḿendez University System, NASA Marshal Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, and M¨alardalens University. Principle goals include providing aerospace and systems engineering experiences to students at the participating institutions. Mission objectives include the acquisition of space weather data to aid in better understanding the Sun to Earth connection. The Puerto Rico Cube- Sat is a 3U configuration, 10 × 10 × 30 cm. Active attitude control will be used to align the long (3U) axis along the orbital path, and the satellite will rotate along the 3U axis to assist in thermal management. The Puerto Rico CubeSat will carry two scientific payloads. One is CARLO (Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillation), which is designed to measure ion turbulence from 0 to 10 kHz. CARLO will operate in a ram configuration, thus giving it the ability to distinguish between ambient and spacecraftinduced irregularities in plasma density. The second payload is GIMMERF, a 0 to 30 MHz radio instrument, consisting of a digital 4-channel direct sampling receiver board, atmospheric-noise-limited preamplifiers, and four electrically short monopole antennas. The antennas are connected electronically, as dipoles, to enable measurements of the full 3-dimensional electric field vector signal, which, in turn makes it possible to characterize the radio emissions in terms of Stokes parameters and to perform direction finding. GIMME-RF will use artificial neural network technology to automatically identify radio data of interest. All radio data will be downloaded at 1% time resolution, and radio data of special interest (automatically identified or human selected) will be downloaded at full time and frequency resolution. CARLO and GIMME-RF are complementary instruments, as CARLO will measure low

  15. Lunar and Lagrangian Point L1 L2 CubeSat Communication and Navigation Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaire, Scott; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat; Bussey, George; Shelton, Marta; Folta, Dave; Gramling, Cheryl; Celeste, Peter; Anderson, Mile; Perrotto, Trish; hide

    2017-01-01

    CubeSats have grown in sophistication to the point that relatively low-cost mission solutions could be undertaken for planetary exploration. There are unique considerations for lunar and L1/L2 CubeSat communication and navigation compared with low earth orbit CubeSats. This paper explores those considerations as they relate to the Lunar IceCube Mission. The Lunar IceCube is a CubeSat mission led by Morehead State University with participation from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Busek Company and Vermont Tech. It will search for surface water ice and other resources from a high inclination lunar orbit. Lunar IceCube is one of a select group of CubeSats designed to explore beyond low-earth orbit that will fly on NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) as secondary payloads for Exploration Mission (EM) 1. Lunar IceCube and the EM-1 CubeSats will lay the groundwork for future lunar and L1/L2 CubeSat missions. This paper discusses communication and navigation needs for the Lunar IceCube mission and navigation and radiation tolerance requirements related to lunar and L1/L2 orbits. Potential CubeSat radios and antennas for such missions are investigated and compared. Ground station coverage, link analysis, and ground station solutions are also discussed. This paper will describe modifications in process for the Morehead ground station, as well as further enhancements of the Morehead ground station and NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) that are being considered. The potential NEN enhancements include upgrading current NEN Cortex receiver with Forward Error Correction (FEC) Turbo Code, providing X-band uplink capability, and adding ranging options. The benefits of ground station enhancements for CubeSats flown on NASA Exploration Missions (EM) are presented. This paper also describes how the NEN may support lunar and L1/L2 CubeSats without any enhancements. In addition, NEN is studying other initiatives to better support the CubeSat community

  16. Analysis and Inter-Calibration of Wet Path Delay Datasets to Compute the Wet Tropospheric Correction for CryoSat-2 over Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Lázaro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most altimetric missions, CryoSat-2 is not equipped with an onboard microwave radiometer (MWR to provide wet tropospheric correction (WTC to radar altimeter measurements, thus, relying on a model-based one provided by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. In the ambit of ESA funded project CP4O, an improved WTC for CryoSat-2 data over ocean is under development, based on a data combination algorithm (DComb through objective analysis of WTC values derived from all existing global-scale data types. The scope of this study is the analysis and inter-calibration of the large dataset of total column water vapor (TCWV products from scanning MWR aboard Remote Sensing (RS missions for use in the WTC computation for CryoSat-2. The main issues regarding the computation of the WTC from all TCWV products are discussed. The analysis of the orbital parameters of CryoSat-2 and all other considered RS missions, their sensor characteristics and inter-calibration is presented, providing an insight into the expected impact of these datasets on the WTC estimation. The most suitable approach for calculating the WTC from TCWV is investigated. For this type of application, after calibration with respect to an appropriate reference, two approaches were found to give very similar results, with root mean square differences of 2 mm.

  17. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  18. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  19. SpinSat Mission Ground Truth Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    SpinSat Mission Ground Truth Characterization Andrew Nicholas, Ted Finne, Ivan Galysh, Anthony Mai, Jim Yen Naval Research Laboratory, Washington...mission overview, ground truth characterization and unique SSA observation opportunities of the mission. 1. MISSION CONCEPT The Naval Research...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SpinSat Mission Ground Truth Characterization 5a. CONTRACT

  20. SAT Participation and Performance for the Class of 2014. Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Geoffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    SAT participation and performance are milestones on the path to college and career readiness. This report provides the results for SAT participation and performance in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) for the class of 2014. Analysis of postsecondary outcomes for MCPS graduates indicates that graduates who took the SAT were more…

  1. A survey of SAT solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weiwei; Zhou, Xu

    2017-06-01

    In Computer Science, the Boolean Satisfiability Problem(SAT) is the problem of determining if there exists an interpretation that satisfies a given Boolean formula. SAT is one of the first problems that was proven to be NP-complete, which is also fundamental to artificial intelligence, algorithm and hardware design. This paper reviews the main algorithms of the SAT solver in recent years, including serial SAT algorithms, parallel SAT algorithms, SAT algorithms based on GPU, and SAT algorithms based on FPGA. The development of SAT is analyzed comprehensively in this paper. Finally, several possible directions for the development of the SAT problem are proposed.

  2. [Laboratory chemical analysis in ascites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satz, N

    1991-04-13

    Chemical analysis of ascitic fluid may be helpful in determining the underlying disease. We discuss the diagnostic accuracy of the common and newer chemical parameters (protein, LDH, lactate, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, fibronectin, albumin gradient [value of serum minus value of ascites], ferritin, tumor markers, immunomodulators, leukocytes, bacterial and cytologic examinations). We also review the pathogenesis and clinical findings of the most frequent ascites forms (benign hepatic, infective, malignant ascites, ascites associated with liver metastases or hepatocellular carcinoma, cardiac and pancreatic ascites) and the most important diagnosis criteria. In the malignant ascites a high cholesterol, a narrow albumin gradient or a high ferritin value have high diagnostic accuracy, but diagnosis is by the finding of malignant cells. For the diagnosis of infective ascites, bacteriology is mandatory even though the results are negative in most cases, particularly in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis where diagnosis has to be established clinically, by a low pH or by a high leukocyte count. Benign hepatic ascites is diagnosed by demonstrating an underlying chronic liver disease and laboratory examinations of the peritoneal fluid to exclude other causes. The laboratory tests in ascites associated with liver metastases or with hepatocellular carcinoma were similar to those in benign hepatic ascites and the two ascites forms must be separated by other clinical and technical findings. Pancreatic ascites can easily be distinguished from the other forms by the high amylase and lipase content.

  3. Thermal Analysis of Iodine Satellite (iSAT) from Preliminary Design Review (PDR) to Critical Design Review (CDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSAT) is a 12U cubesat with a primary mission to demonstrate the iodine fueled Hall Effect Thruster (HET) propulsion system. The spacecraft (SC) will operate throughout a one year mission in an effort to mature the propulsion system for use in future applications. The benefit of the HET is that it uses a propellant, iodine, which is easy to store and provides a high thrust-to-mass ratio. This paper will describe the thermal analysis and design of the SC between Preliminary Design Review (PDR) and Critical Design Review (CDR). The design of the satellite has undergone many changes due to a variety of challenges, both before PDR and during the time period discussed in this paper. Thermal challenges associated with the system include a high power density, small amounts of available radiative surface area, localized temperature requirements of the propulsion components, and unknown orbital parameters. The thermal control system is implemented to maintain component temperatures within their respective operational limits throughout the mission, while also maintaining propulsion components at the high temperatures needed to allow gaseous iodine propellant to flow. The design includes heaters, insulation, radiators, coatings, and thermal straps. Currently, the maximum temperatures for several components are near to their maximum operation limit, and the battery is close to its minimum operation limit. Mitigation strategies and planned work to solve these challenges will be discussed.

  4. Communication Systems Analysis Laboratory (CSAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CSAL conducts electronic warfare investigations of radio frequency communication systems with respect to current and emerging electronic warfare threats. CSAL uses...

  5. Thermal Design, Test and Analysis of PharmaSat, a Small Class D Spacecraft with a Biological Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Aguado, Millan F.; VanOutryve, Cassandra; Ghassemiah, Shakib; Beasley, Christopher; Schooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Small spacecraft have been increasing in popularity because of their low cost, short turnaround and relative efficiency. In the past, small spacecraft have been primarily used for technology demonstrations, but advances in technology have made the miniaturization of space science possible [1,2]. PharmaSat is a low cost, small three cube size spacecraft, with a biological experiment on board, built at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center. The thermal design of small spacecraft presents challenges as their smaller surface areas translate into power and thermal constraints. The spacecraft is thermally designed to run colder in the Low Earth Orbit space environment, and heated to reach the temperatures required by the science payload. The limited power supply obtained from the solar panels on small surfaces creates a constraint in the power used to heat the payload to required temperatures. The pressurized payload is isolated with low thermally conductance paths from the large ambient temperature changes. The thermal design consists of different optical properties of section surfaces, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI), low thermal conductance materials, flexible heaters and thermal spreaders. The payload temperature is controlled with temperature sensors and flexible heaters. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and testing were used to aid the thermal design of the spacecraft. Various tests were conducted to verify the thermal design. An infrared imager was used on the electronic boards to find large heat sources and eliminate any possible temperature runaways. The spacecraft was tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to optimize the thermal and power analysis and qualify the thermal design of the spacecraft for the mission.

  6. Thermal Design, Test and Analysis of PharmaSat, a Small Class D Spacecraft with a Biological Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Aguado, Millan F.; VanOutryve, Cassandra; Ghassemiah, Shakib; Beasley, Christopher; Schooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Small spacecraft have been increasing in popularity because of their low cost, short turnaround and relative efficiency. In the past, small spacecraft have been primarily used for technology demonstrations, but advances in technology have made the miniaturization of space science possible [1,2]. PharmaSat is a low cost, small three cube size spacecraft, with a biological experiment on board, built at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center. The thermal design of small spacecraft presents challenges as their smaller surface areas translate into power and thermal constraints. The spacecraft is thermally designed to run colder in the Low Earth Orbit space environment, and heated to reach the temperatures required by the science payload. The limited power supply obtained from the solar panels on small surfaces creates a constraint in the power used to heat the payload to required temperatures. The pressurized payload is isolated with low thermally conductance paths from the large ambient temperature changes. The thermal design consists of different optical properties of section surfaces, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI), low thermal conductance materials, flexible heaters and thermal spreaders. The payload temperature is controlled with temperature sensors and flexible heaters. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and testing were used to aid the thermal design of the spacecraft. Various tests were conducted to verify the thermal design. An infrared imager was used on the electronic boards to find large heat sources and eliminate any possible temperature runaways. The spacecraft was tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to optimize the thermal and power analysis and qualify the thermal design of the spacecraft for the mission.

  7. SAT math prep course

    CERN Document Server

    Kolby, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive Prep for SAT Math Every year, students pay 1,000 and more to test prep companies to prepare for the math section of the new SAT. Now you can get the same preparation in a book. Features: * Comprehensive Review: Twenty-three chapters provide complete review of SAT math. * Practice: Includes 164 examples and more than 500 exercises! Arranged from easy to medium to hard to very hard. * Diagnostic Test: The diagnostic test measures your strengths and weaknesses and directs you to areas you need to study more. * Performance: If your target is a 700+ score, this is the book!

  8. SmallSat Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-05

    CubeSat. Mr. Alvarez worked with four students on the PCB layout for the solar panels and the construction of the 6U CubeSat mockup . Support for Mr...Hull and Mr. Alvarez was $49k including fringe benefits. !! Purchases: During this time period a license for MatLab software and the Princeton...Satellite ToolBox was purchased using funds from this award. This software adds tremendous capability to the SmallSat Lab by enabling students to analyze

  9. SmallSat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  10. Enhancing SAT-Based Test Pattern Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin; XIONG You-lun

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents modeling tools based on Boolean satisfiability (SAT) to solve problems of test generation for combinational circuits. It exploits an added layer to maintain circuit-related information and value justification relations to a generic SAT algorithm. It dovetails binary decision graphs (BDD) and SAT techniques to improve the efficiency of automatic test pattern generation (ATPG). More specifically, it first exploits inexpensive reconvergent fanout analysis of circuit to gather information on the local signal correlation by using BDD learning, then uses the above learned information to restrict and focus the overall search space of SAT-based ATPG. Its learning technique is effective and lightweight. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  11. The SAT phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许可; 李未

    1999-01-01

    Phase transition is an important feature of SAT problem. For random k-SAT model, it is proved that as r(ratio of clauses to variables) increases, the structure of solutions will undergo a sudden change like satisfiability phase transition when r reaches a threshold point (r=rcr). This phenomenon shows that the satisfying truth assignments suddenly shift from being relatively different from each other to being very similar to each other.##属性不符

  12. Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

  13. Source Code Analysis Laboratory (SCALe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    SCALe undertakes. Testing and calibration laboratories that comply with ISO /IEC 17025 also operate in accordance with ISO 9001 . • NIST National...17025:2005 accredited and ISO 9001 :2008 registered. 4.3 SAIC Accreditation and Certification Services SAIC (Science Applications International...particular implementation, and executing in a particular execution environment [ ISO /IEC 2005]. Successful conformance testing of a software system

  14. CryoSat-2 satellite radar altimetry for river analysis and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Raphael

    households, restaurants and commercial and industrial sources by 2020 in Denmark and throughout the European Union. In Denmark, conventionally organic household waste has been incinerated, so the biological treatment of organic household waste is very limited. Current policies promote moving away from......) Developing a near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS)-based computational model for predicting the methane potential of urban organic waste, (ii) Performance of co-digestion of urban organic waste with mixed sludge from wastewater treatment plants in a continuous reactor operation, (iii) Analysis....... The main objective of this PhD study was systematic quantification of biogas production and biochemical transformation of urban organic waste comprising organic household waste, garden waste and industrial organic waste. The overall objective of this PhD research has been carried out in four phases: (i...

  15. Coprocessor - a Standalone SAT Preprocessor

    CERN Document Server

    Manthey, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    In this work a stand-alone preprocessor for SAT is presented that is able to perform most of the known preprocessing techniques. Preprocessing a formula in SAT is important for performance since redundancy can be removed. The preprocessor is part of the SAT solver riss and is called Coprocessor. Not only riss, but also MiniSat 2.2 benefit from it, because the SatELite preprocessor of MiniSat does not implement recent techniques. By using more advanced techniques, Coprocessor is able to reduce the redundancy in a formula further and improves the overall solving performance.

  16. Science Goals and First Light Analysis from the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Mason, James; McTiernan, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat with deployment from the ISS planned in Q2 2016. Its goal is to measure the solar soft X-ray (SXR) spectral irradiance, an observational signature of hot plasma in the solar corona. Over the last few decades, there have been very few spectrally resolved observations from ~0.2 to ~4 keV (~0.3-6 nm). This range is sensitive to high-temperature plasma and contains many spectral lines (e.g., Mg, Si, Fe, S, Ar), the abundances of which probe plasma transport and provide valuable constraints on plasma heating mechanisms during both flares and quiescence. This solar SXR emission is primarily absorbed in the E-region of Earth's ionosphere, and the subsequently driven dynamical processes are still poorly understood, in large part because the energy distribution of the incident SXRs is not yet well characterized.MinXSS flies a miniature commercial off-the-shelf soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD. The silicon drift detector has 0.5 mm fully depleted thickness and a 25 mm^2 physical area, with a ~16 micron Be entrance window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar SXRs from ~0.5 to 30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. MinXSS also includes a broadband SXR photometer, providing an integrated intensity over a similar energy range for comparison, cross-calibration, and additional data, especially useful during more intense flares at the upper end of the X123 dynamic range.We present the MinXSS science goals for studying hot plasma in the solar corona, including impulsive flare heating and quiescent coronal heating, and the impact of the resultant SXR emission on Earth's ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. We present analysis of MinXSS first light results (depending on deployment date from the ISS), as well as modeling and predictions of future observations over the MinXSS 6-12 month mission lifetime.

  17. Exploring Our Solar System with CubeSats and NanoSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Anthony; Norton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is NASA's lead center for robotic exploration of our solar system. We are known for our large, flagship missions, such as Voyager, which gave humanity its first close look at Jupiter and Saturn; and the Mars Rovers, which have excited millions worldwide with their daring landing exploits. Less familiar to those outside NASA may be our role in developing the Kepler mission, which has discovered more than 2000 planets around other stars; or the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, one of many JPL Earth Science missions. A recent JPL initiative has emphasized low cost missions that use rapidly evolving technology developed for CubeSats and NanoSat s to explore our solar system. Costs are significantly lower (by one or two orders of magnitude) than for conventional JPL missions, and development time is also significantly shorter. At present 21 such CubeSat flight projects are under way at the laboratory with various partners : some in flight, some in development, some in advanced formulation. Four are planned as deep space missions. To succeed in exploring deep space CubeSat/NanoSat missions have to address several challenges: the more severe radiation environment, communications and navigation at a distance, propulsion, and packaging of instruments that can return valuable science into a compact volume/mass envelope. Instrument technologies, including cameras, magnetometers, spectrometers, radiometers, and even radars are undergoing miniaturization to fit on these smaller platforms. Other key technologies are being matured for smallsats and NanoSats in deep space, including micro -electric propulsion, compact radio (and optical) communications, and onboard data reduction. This paper will describe missions that utilize these developments including the first two deep space CubeSats (INSPIRE), planned for launch in 2017; the first pair of CubeSats to be sent to another planet (MARCO), manifested with the In

  18. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  19. Barron's SAT math workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Leff MS, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    This completely revised edition reflects all of the new questions and question types that will appear on the new SAT, scheduled to be administered in Spring 2016. Includes hundreds of revised math questions and answer explanations, math strategies, test-taking tips, and much more.

  20. Analysis of laboratory nucleosynthesis products

    CERN Document Server

    Adamenko, S V

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of the experimental study on synthesis of a wide range of isotopes in a superdense plasma. The initial conditions necessary for plasma bunch formation were provided by specially organized coherent impact on a solid target with a total energy up to 1 kJ. More than 4000 shots were performed with various targets made of light, medium, and heavy elements. Subsequent analysis of the products of the target explosion reveals the presence of a wide range of elements absent in the initial materials. Elements with nuclei three and more times heavier than the nucleus of the target main element are detected in the products. The isotopic composition of the produced elements significantly differs from the natural one. The presence of unknown superheavy elements at the border of the periodic table and beyond it was detected by several different spectroscopic methods of elemental and isotopic analyzes.

  1. QbX - The CubeSat Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Stephen; Armstrong, James; Person, Clark; Tietz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) launched 2 QbX CubeSats from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on December 8, 2010 as secondary payloads aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 launch vehicle, leveraging the flight opportunity provided by the first COTS Demo Flight of SpaceX’s Dragon Module. This paper will describe the development of the QbX CubeSats, present measured flight data, and evaluate the overall mission performance of the QbX CubeSats.

  2. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...

  3. Pre- to Post- CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, J.

    2015-12-01

    CubeSats sprung from a formative picosatellite effort at a university in the heart of Silicon Valley, took root in a university-led university environment, and have grown into complex-shaped explorers in both near and soon-to-be deep space. Private citizens, businesses, government are building and launching a variety of science, technology demonstration, and service missions. A new generation of space explorers is gaining first hand experience in space missions at all educational levels. There is new life and new energy in the space program. However, space is still difficult. The environment is harsh. Funding is sparse. This talk explores this history and the future of CubeSats from the context of a university-centric laboratory that emphasizes teaching, research, and entrepreneurial impact. It will explore the following questions: What sparked the CubeSat innovation? What are longer lasting lessons of this community? Where are places we can go next? What does it take to get there? The talk will draw on lessons learned from building over six on-orbit CubeSat missions and training hundreds of space engineers.

  4. Design and analysis of algorithms for enhancing the quality and the resolution of Dubai Sat-1 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansoori, Saeed

    2011-11-01

    DubaiSat-1 (DS1) captures multispectral images with 5-meter resolution using three visible bands red (420 to 510 nm), green (510 to 580 nm), blue (600 to 720 nm) and one near-IR band (760 to 890 nm). It also has a panchromatic channel with 2.5-meter resolution (420 to 720 nm). [1] Under certain conditions, degradation in quality might occur over DS1 captured images. The aim of this project is to enhance the quality of the image in terms of resolution, sharpness and color quality. It is well known that the enhancement procedure is a very difficult task due to the significant noise increase resulted from any sharpening action. Moreover, sometimes the color of the captured images might become saturated, thus some areas will be given false coloring (i.e., some colors will be presented as gray instead of their original colors).

  5. 7 CFR 160.17 - Laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory analysis. 160.17 Section 160.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) NAVAL STORES REGULATIONS...

  6. Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-07-01

    At the Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory, NREL scientists have more than 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry. They develop, refine, and validate analytical methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before, during, and after conversion processing. These high-quality compositional analysis data are used to determine feedstock compositions as well as mass balances and product yields from conversion processes.

  7. Python Spectral Analysis Tool (PySAT) for Preprocessing, Multivariate Analysis, and Machine Learning with Point Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. B.; Finch, N.; Clegg, S.; Graff, T.; Morris, R. V.; Laura, J.

    2017-06-01

    We present a Python-based library and graphical interface for the analysis of point spectra. The tool is being developed with a focus on methods used for ChemCam data, but is flexible enough to handle spectra from other instruments.

  8. CubeSat Launch Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recognizes the tremendous potential that CubeSats (very small satellites) have to inexpensively demonstrate advanced technologies, collect scientific data, and enhance student engagement in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). The CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) was created to provide launch opportunities for CubeSats developed by academic institutions, non-profit entities, and NASA centers. This presentation will provide an overview of the CSLI, its benefits, and its results.

  9. Near Earth Network (NEN) CubeSat Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaire, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) consists of globally distributed tracking stations, including NASA, commercial, and partner ground stations, that are strategically located to maximize the coverage provided to a variety of orbital and suborbital missions, including those in LEO (Low Earth Orbit), GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit), HEO (Highly Elliptical Orbit), lunar and L1-L2 orbits. The NEN's future mission set includes and will continue to include CubeSat missions. The first NEN-supported CubeSat mission will be the Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) launching into LEO in 2017. The majority of the CubeSat missions destined to fly on EM-1, launching in late 2018, many in a lunar orbit, will communicate with ground-based stations via X-band and will utilize the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)-developed IRIS (Satellite Communication for Air Traffic Management) radio. The NEN recognizes the important role CubeSats are beginning to play in carrying out NASAs mission and is therefore investigating the modifications needed to provide IRIS radio compatibility. With modification, the NEN could potentially expand support to the EM-1 (Exploration Mission-1) lunar CubeSats. The NEN could begin providing significant coverage to lunar CubeSat missions utilizing three to four of the NEN's mid-latitude sites. This coverage would supplement coverage provided by the JPL Deep Space Network (DSN). The NEN, with smaller apertures than DSN, provides the benefit of a larger beamwidth that could be beneficial in the event of uncertain ephemeris data. In order to realize these benefits the NEN would need to upgrade stations targeted based on coverage ability and current configuration ease of upgrade, to ensure compatibility with the IRIS radio. In addition, the NEN is working with CubeSat radio developers to ensure NEN compatibility with alternative CubeSat radios for Lunar and L1-L2 CubeSats. The NEN has provided NEN compatibility requirements to several radio

  10. Advances in Ka-Band Communication System for CubeSats and SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Wong, Yen F.; Altunc, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed that evaluated the feasibility of Ka-band communication system to provide CubeSat/SmallSat high rate science data downlink with ground antennas ranging from the small portable 1.2m/2.4m to apertures 5.4M, 7.3M, 11M, and 18M, for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar CubeSat missions. This study included link analysis to determine the data rate requirement, based on the current TRL of Ka-band flight hardware and ground support infrastructure. Recent advances in Ka-band transceivers and antennas, options of portable ground stations, and various coverage distances were included in the analysis. The link/coverage analysis results show that Cubesat/Smallsat missions communication requirements including frequencies and data rates can be met by utilizing Near Earth Network (NEN) Ka-band support with 2 W and high gain (>6 dBi) antennas.

  11. The TechSAT program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, M.; Lapid, P.

    1992-12-01

    The TechSAT project is described which is intended to establish a wide academic infrastructure for the development of new space technologies. A TechSAT satellite will be used for educational purposes by the academic staff and students as well as by radio amateurs. Tech SAT is a microsatellite weighing 50 kg with 45x45x45 cm dimensions. It is based on a Nadir pointing 3D stabilized platform with body mounted solar panels. The TechSAT hardware includes an autonomous attitude control system, a power supply system, and an onboard computer. Command control and telemetry systems will be based on the amateur radio communications payload.

  12. Comparison of snowfall estimates from the NASA CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Hong, Yang; Kulie, Mark; Behrangi, Ali; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Cao, Qing; You, Yalei; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Junjun; Zhang, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    The latest global snowfall product derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (2C-SNOW-PROFILE) is compared with NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory's Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS/Q3) system precipitation products from 2009 through 2010. The results show that: (1) Compared to Q3, CloudSat tends to observe more extremely light snowfall events (snow and 10% as certain mixed. When possible snow, possible mixed, and certain mixed precipitation categories are assumed to be snowfall events, CloudSat has a high snowfall POD (86.10%). (3) CloudSat shows less certain snow precipitation than Q3 by 26.13% with a low correlation coefficient (0.41) with Q3 and a high RMSE (0.6 mm/h). (4) With Q3 as reference, CloudSat underestimates (overestimates) certain snowfall when the bin height of detected snowfall events are below (above) 3 km, and generally overestimates light snowfall (surface snowfall events are >1 km high above the surface, whereas 76.41% of corresponding Q3 observations are low below 1 km to the near ground surface. This analysis will provide helpful reference for CloudSat snowfall estimation algorithm developers and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) snowfall product developers to understand and quantify the strengths and weaknesses of remote sensing techniques and precipitation estimation products.

  13. Battery Test Facility- Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory (EADL) provides battery developers with reliable, independent, and unbiased performance evaluations of their...

  14. A Generalization of SAT and #SAT for Robust Policy Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    unless the polynomial hierarchy collapses to ΣP2 (a corollary of Dell et al. [2012] and Karp and Lipton [1982]). Proof. Suppose #∃SAT reduces to #P . Then...Klieber, J. Marques-Silva, and E. Clarke. Solving qbf with counterexample guided refinement. In SAT, pages 114–128. Springer, 2012. R.M. Karp and R. Lipton

  15. Force Limited Vibration Testing and Subsequent Redesign of the Naval Postgraduate School CubeSat Launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    piezoelectric JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory LV launch vehicle MPE maximum predicted environment xvi NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration...in San Luis Obispo [1]. Each P-POD can carry anywhere from one to three CubeSats, depending on the CubeSat size, giving NPSCuL the capability of...University, San Luis Obispo, CA, 2007. [2] S. Lee, A. Hutputanasin, A. Toorian, W. Lan and R. Munakata, “CubeSat design specification (revision 12

  16. A Cold Gas Micro-Propulsion System for CubeSats

    OpenAIRE

    Cardin, Joseph; Coste, Keith; Williamson, Dave; Gloyer, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Potential civilian and government users have expressed a strong interest in CubeSat class satellites for military, scientific and commercial purposes. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratories (AFRL), using DARPA funding, have contracted with The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California to develop a CubeSat class spacecraft called the MEMS PicoSat Inspector (MEPSI). In turn, AFRL and Aerospace Corporation selected VACCO to provide a Micro-Propulsion System (MiPS) for MEPSI. This paper d...

  17. Big Software for SmallSats: Adapting CFS to CubeSat Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan P.; Crum, Gary; Sheikh, Salman; Marshall, James

    2015-01-01

    Expanding capabilities and mission objectives for SmallSats and CubeSats is driving the need for reliable, reusable, and robust flight software. While missions are becoming more complicated and the scientific goals more ambitious, the level of acceptable risk has decreased. Design challenges are further compounded by budget and schedule constraints that have not kept pace. NASA's Core Flight Software System (cFS) is an open source solution which enables teams to build flagship satellite level flight software within a CubeSat schedule and budget. NASA originally developed cFS to reduce mission and schedule risk for flagship satellite missions by increasing code reuse and reliability. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which launched in 2009, was the first of a growing list of Class B rated missions to use cFS. Large parts of cFS are now open source, which has spurred adoption outside of NASA. This paper reports on the experiences of two teams using cFS for current CubeSat missions. The performance overheads of cFS are quantified, and the reusability of code between missions is discussed. The analysis shows that cFS is well suited to use on CubeSats and demonstrates the portability and modularity of cFS code.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories analysis code data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, mission is to solve important problems in the areas of national defense, energy security, environmental integrity, and industrial technology. The Laboratories` strategy for accomplishing this mission is to conduct research to provide an understanding of the important physical phenomena underlying any problem, and then to construct validated computational models of the phenomena which can be used as tools to solve the problem. In the course of implementing this strategy, Sandia`s technical staff has produced a wide variety of numerical problem-solving tools which they use regularly in the design, analysis, performance prediction, and optimization of Sandia components, systems and manufacturing processes. This report provides the relevant technical and accessibility data on the numerical codes used at Sandia, including information on the technical competency or capability area that each code addresses, code ``ownership`` and release status, and references describing the physical models and numerical implementation.

  19. Evolutionary analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 1 isolates from east africa suggests two independent introductions from southern africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangula, Abraham K.; Belsham, Graham; Muwanika, Vincent B.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: In East Africa, foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 1 is responsible for occasional severe outbreaks in livestock and is known to be maintained within the buffalo populations. Little is known about the evolutionary forces underlying its epidemiology in the region. To enhance our...... introductions from southern Africa were identified from a maximum clade credibility tree. One group was exclusive to Uganda while the other was present within Kenya and Tanzania. Conclusions: Our results provide a baseline characterization of the inter-regional spread of SAT 1 in sub-Saharan Africa...... appreciation of the epidemiological status of serotype SAT 1 virus in the region, we inferred its evolutionary and phylogeographic history by means of genealogy-based coalescent methods using 53 VP1 coding sequences covering a sampling period from 1948-2007. Results: The VP1 coding sequence of 11 serotype SAT...

  20. Analysis of Designs of Space Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc M.

    2003-01-01

    A report presents a review of the development of laboratories in outer space, starting from the pioneering Skylab and Salyut stations of the United States and the former Soviet Union and progressing through current and anticipated future developments. The report includes textual discussions of space station designs, illustrated with drawings, photographs, and tables. The approach taken in the review was not to provide a comprehensive catalog of each space laboratory and every design topic that applies to it, but, rather, to illustrate architectural precedents by providing examples that illustrate major design problems and principles to be applied in solving them. Hence, the report deemphasizes information from the most recent space-station literature and concentrates on information from original design reports that show how designs originated and evolved. The most important contribution of the review was the development of a methodology, called "units of analysis," for identifying and analyzing design issues from the perspectives of four broad domains: laboratory science, crew, modes of operations, and the system as a whole.

  1. Evolutionary analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 1 isolates from east africa suggests two independent introductions from southern africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangula, Abraham K.; Belsham, Graham; Muwanika, Vincent B.

    2010-01-01

    appreciation of the epidemiological status of serotype SAT 1 virus in the region, we inferred its evolutionary and phylogeographic history by means of genealogy-based coalescent methods using 53 VP1 coding sequences covering a sampling period from 1948-2007. Results: The VP1 coding sequence of 11 serotype SAT...... and highlight the importance of a regional approach to trans-boundary animal disease control in order to monitor circulating strains and apply appropriate vaccines....

  2. A new assay for determining ganglioside sialyltransferase activities lactosylceramide-2,3-sialyltransferase (SAT I and monosialylganglioside-2,3-sialyltransferase (SAT IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Q Sun

    Full Text Available A new assay for the determination of lactosylceramide-2,3-sialyltransferase (SAT I, EC 2.4.99.9 and monosialoganglioside sialyltransferase (SAT IV, EC 2.4.99.2 is described. The assay utilised the commercially available fluorophore labelled sphingolipids, boron dipyrromethene difluoride (BODIPY lactosylceramide (LacCer, and BODIPY-monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1 as the acceptor substrates, for SAT I and SAT IV, respectively. HPLC coupled with fluorescence detection was used to analyse product formation. The analysis was performed in a quick and automated fashion. The assay showed good linearity for both BODIPY sphingolipids with a quantitative detection limit of 0.05 pmol. The high sensitivity enabled the detection of SAT I and SAT IV activities as low as 0.001 μU, at least 200 fold lower than that of most radiometric assays. This new assay was applied to the screening of SAT I and SAT IV activities in ovine and bovine organs (liver, heart, kidney, and spleen. The results provided evidence that young animals, such as calves, start to produce ganglioside sialyltransferases as early as 7 days after parturition and that levels change during maturation. Among the organs tested from a bovine source, spleen had the highest specific ganglioside sialyltransferase activity. Due to the organ size, the greatest total ganglioside sialyltransferase activities (SAT I and SAT IV were detected in the liver of both bovine and ovine origin.

  3. A new assay for determining ganglioside sialyltransferase activities lactosylceramide-2,3-sialyltransferase (SAT I) and monosialylganglioside-2,3-sialyltransferase (SAT IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cynthia Q; Hubl, Ulrike; Hoefakker, Petra; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan K; Johnson, Keryn D

    2014-01-01

    A new assay for the determination of lactosylceramide-2,3-sialyltransferase (SAT I, EC 2.4.99.9) and monosialoganglioside sialyltransferase (SAT IV, EC 2.4.99.2) is described. The assay utilised the commercially available fluorophore labelled sphingolipids, boron dipyrromethene difluoride (BODIPY) lactosylceramide (LacCer), and BODIPY-monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) as the acceptor substrates, for SAT I and SAT IV, respectively. HPLC coupled with fluorescence detection was used to analyse product formation. The analysis was performed in a quick and automated fashion. The assay showed good linearity for both BODIPY sphingolipids with a quantitative detection limit of 0.05 pmol. The high sensitivity enabled the detection of SAT I and SAT IV activities as low as 0.001 μU, at least 200 fold lower than that of most radiometric assays. This new assay was applied to the screening of SAT I and SAT IV activities in ovine and bovine organs (liver, heart, kidney, and spleen). The results provided evidence that young animals, such as calves, start to produce ganglioside sialyltransferases as early as 7 days after parturition and that levels change during maturation. Among the organs tested from a bovine source, spleen had the highest specific ganglioside sialyltransferase activity. Due to the organ size, the greatest total ganglioside sialyltransferase activities (SAT I and SAT IV) were detected in the liver of both bovine and ovine origin.

  4. NASA Facts: SporeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Andres; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Tomko, David

    2013-01-01

    SporeSat is an autonomous, free-flying three-unit (3U) spacecraft that will be used to conduct scientific experiments to gain a deeper knowledge of the mechanisms of plant cell gravity sensing. SporeSat is being developed through a partnership between NASAs Ames Research Center and the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University. Amani Salim and Jenna L. Rickus are the Purdue University Principal Investigators. The SporeSat mission will be flown using a 3U nanosatellite weighing approximately 12 pounds and measuring 14 inches long by 4 inches wide by 4 inches tall. SporeSat will utilize flight-proven spacecraft technologies demonstrated on prior Ames nanosatellite missions such as PharmaSat and OrganismOrganic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (OOREOS) as well as upgrades that increase the hardware integration capabilities with SporeSat science instrumentation. In addition, the SporeSat science payload will serve as a technology platform to evaluate new microsensor technologies for enabling future fundamental biology missions.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 85 reportable events (18 from the 4th Qtr FY-15 and 67 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 25 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (8 from this quarter and 17 from the prior three quarters).

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 60 reportable events (23 from the 4th Qtr FY14 and 37 from the prior three reporting quarters) as well as 58 other issue reports (including not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL from July 2013 through October 2014. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) operates the INL under contract DE AC07 051D14517.

  7. NASA Laboratory Analysis for Manned Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Shaw, Tianna E.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability Element under the NASA Human Research Program. ELA instrumentation is identified as an essential capability for future exploration missions to diagnose and treat evidence-based medical conditions. However, mission architecture limits the medical equipment, consumables, and procedures that will be available to treat medical conditions during human exploration missions. Allocated resources such as mass, power, volume, and crew time must be used efficiently to optimize the delivery of in-flight medical care. Although commercial instruments can provide the blood and urine based measurements required for exploration missions, these commercial-off-the-shelf devices are prohibitive for deployment in the space environment. The objective of the ELA project is to close the technology gap of current minimally invasive laboratory capabilities and analytical measurements in a manner that the mission architecture constraints impose on exploration missions. Besides micro gravity and radiation tolerances, other principal issues that generally fail to meet NASA requirements include excessive mass, volume, power and consumables, and nominal reagent shelf-life. Though manned exploration missions will not occur for nearly a decade, NASA has already taken strides towards meeting the development of ELA medical diagnostics by developing mission requirements and concepts of operations that are coupled with strategic investments and partnerships towards meeting these challenges. This paper focuses on the remote environment, its challenges, biomedical diagnostics requirements and candidate technologies that may lead to successful blood-urine chemistry and biomolecular measurements in future space exploration missions.

  8. Simple Algorithm Portfolio for SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolic, Mladen; Janicic, Predrag

    2011-01-01

    The importance of algorithm portfolio techniques for SAT has long been noted, and a number of very successful systems have been devised, including the most successful one --- SATzilla. However, all these systems are quite complex (to understand, reimplement, or modify). In this paper we propose a new algorithm portfolio for SAT that is extremely simple, but in the same time so efficient that it outperforms SATzilla. For a new SAT instance to be solved, our portfolio finds its k-nearest neighbors from the training set and invokes a solver that performs the best at those instances. The main distinguishing feature of our algorithm portfolio is the locality of the selection procedure --- the selection of a SAT solver is based only on few instances similar to the input one.

  9. TechEdSat Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the Technical Education Satellite (TechEdSat) is to employ a small spacecraft to evaluate, demonstrate, and validate two new technologies for...

  10. Evaluation of the Impact of an Additive Manufacturing Enhanced CubeSat Architecture on the CubeSat Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    methods are needed in the CubeSat development process to reduce the weight and volume of subsystems and decrease integration time. Research Objective and...Investigative Questions This research will quantitatively address the impact of proposed benefits of a 3D printed satellite architecture on the...subsystems of a CubeSat. The objective of this research is to bring a quantitative analysis to the discussion of whether a fully 3D printed satellite

  11. Embankment loading analysis in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoullah Namda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The embankment model has been developed in laboratory conditions, considering actual embankment characteristics. The forces to which it is subjected in the model have been evaluated using shaking table experimental and analytical methods. Excess pore water pressure is measured through pore pressure sensors in the shaking table experiment and embankment stability has been assessed using analytical methods. The results revealed that the embankment suffered nonlinear collapse during increasing pore water pressure, and shaking table dynamic force on the embankment model was very sensitive but was open to failure mitigation. Embankment seismic simulation using shaking table experiments helped identify model stability. The embankment and subsoil pore water pressure theoretical and experimental analysis concluded that nonlinear liquefaction characteristics played a major role in model behaviour.   

  12. Analysis of SAT Type Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Capsid Proteins and the Identification of Putative Amino Acid Residues Affecting Virus Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F.; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A. P.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces. PMID:23717387

  13. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois F Maree

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces.

  14. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces.

  15. Systematic review: Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF, LAMP and SAT methods for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liping; Xiao, Heping; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in nucleic acid amplification have led to breakthroughs in the early detection of PTB compared to traditional sputum smear tests. The sensitivity and specificity of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), simultaneous amplification testing (SAT), and Xpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. A critical review of previous studies of LAMP, SAT, and Xpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis that used laboratory culturing as the reference method was carried out together with a meta-analysis. In 25 previous studies, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of tuberculosis were 93% and 94% for LAMP, 96% and 88% for SAT, and 89% and 98% for Xpert MTB/RIF. The I(2) values for the pooled data were >80%, indicating significant heterogeneity. In the smear-positive subgroup analysis of LAMP, the sensitivity increased from 93% to 98% (I(2) = 2.6%), and specificity was 68% (I(2) = 38.4%). In the HIV-infected subgroup analysis of Xpert MTB/RIF, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 79% (I(2) = 72.9%) and 99% (I(2) = 64.4%). In the HIV-negative subgroup analysis for Xpert MTB/RIF, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 72% (I(2) = 49.6%) and 99% (I(2) = 64.5%). LAMP, SAT and Xpert MTB/RIF had comparably high levels of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of three methods were similar, with LAMP being highly sensitive for the diagnosis of smear-positive PTB. The cost effectiveness of LAMP and SAT make them particularly suitable tests for diagnosing PTB in developing countries.

  16. Tritium Research Laboratory safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.A.

    1979-03-01

    Design and operational philosophy has been evolved to keep radiation exposures to personnel and radiation releases to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. Each experiment will be doubly contained in a glove box and will be limited to 10 grams of tritium gas. Specially designed solid-hydride storage beds may be used to store temporarily up to 25 grams of tritium in the form of tritides. To evaluate possible risks to the public or the environment, a review of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) site was carried out. Considered were location, population, land use, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology. The risks and the extent of damage to the TRL and vital systems were evaluated for flooding, lightning, severe winds, earthquakes, explosions, and fires. All of the natural phenomena and human error accidents were considered credible, although the extent of potential damage varied. However, rather than address the myriad of specific individual consequences of each accident scenario, a worst-case tritium release caused indirectly by an unspecified natural phenomenon or human error was evaluated. The maximum credible radiological accident is postulated to result from the release of the maximum quantity of gas from one experiment. Thus 10 grams of tritium gas was used in the analysis to conservatively estimate the maximum whole-body dose of 1 rem at the site boundary and a maximum population dose of 600 man-rem. Accidental release of this amount of tritium implies simultaneous failure of two doubly contained systems, an occurrence considered not credible. Nuclear criticality is impossible in this facility. Based upon the analyses performed for this report, we conclude that the Tritium Research Laboratory can be operated without undue risk to employees, the general public, or the environment. (ERB)

  17. Miniature scientific-grade magnetic sensors for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronenko, Vira; Belyayev, Serhiy

    2016-07-01

    Micro- and nanosatellites have become more attractive due to their low development and launch cost. A class of nanosatellites defined by the CubeSat standard allows standardizing CubeSat preparation and launch, thus making the projects more affordable. Because of the complexity of sensors miniaturization to install them onboard CubeSat, the majority of CubeSat launches are aimed the technology demonstration or education missions. The scientific success of CubeSat mission depends on the sensors quality. In spite that the sensitivity of the magnetic sensors strongly depends on their size, the recent development in this branch allows us to propose tiny but sensitive both AC and DC magnetometers. The goal of the present report is to introduce the new design of miniature three-component sensors for measurement of vector magnetic fields - for quasi-stationary and slowly fluctuating - flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) - and for alternative ones - search-coil magnetometer (SCM). In order to create magnetometers with the really highest possible level of parameters, a set of scientific and technological problems, mostly aimed at the sensor construction improvement, was solved. The most important parameter characterizing magnetometer quality is its own magnetic noise level (NL). The analysis of the NL influencing factors is made and the ways to decrease it are discussed in the report. Construction details and technical specifications of miniature but sensitive FGM and SCM for the CubeSat mission are presented. This work is supported by EC Framework 7 funded project 607197.

  18. SAT Performance: Understanding the Contributions of Cognitive/Learning and Social/Personality Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary

    2011-07-01

    This study identifies a number of sources of individual differences in SAT performance by examining the simultaneous contributions of factors from two otherwise disparate research areas, namely cognition/learning and social/personality. Preliminary analysis revealed that just the cognitive/learning measures accounted for 37.8, 41.4 and 21.9% of the variance in SAT, V-SAT and Q-SAT performance, respectively while just the social/personality measures accounted for 21.4, 18.2 and 17.3% of the variance. When combined, cognitive/learning and social/personality factors accounted for even larger amounts of variance in performance; specifically 43.4, 44.6 and 28% for the SAT, V-SAT and Q-SAT, respectively. Finally, the results revealed that three measures consistently predicted performance on the SAT, V-SAT and Q-SAT; two measures were the learning/cognitive factors of working memory and integration of new text-based information with information from long-term memory and one measure was the social/personality factor, test anxiety.

  19. Physics First: Impact on SAT Math Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Craig E.

    Improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has become a national priority and the call to modernize secondary science has been heard. A Physics First (PF) program with the curriculum sequence of physics, chemistry, and biology (PCB) driven by inquiry- and project-based learning offers a viable alternative to the traditional curricular sequence (BCP) and methods of teaching, but requires more empirical evidence. This study determined impact of a PF program (PF-PCB) on math achievement (SAT math scores) after the first two cohorts of students completed the PF-PCB program at Matteo Ricci High School (MRHS) and provided more quantitative data to inform the PF debate and advance secondary science education. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA) determined the influence of covariates and revealed that PF-PCB program had a significant (p < .05) impact on SAT math scores in the second cohort at MRHS. Statistically adjusted, the SAT math means for PF students were 21.4 points higher than their non-PF counterparts when controlling for prior math achievement (HSTP math), socioeconomic status (SES), and ethnicity/race.

  20. Emergence of foot-and-mouth disease virus SAT 2 in Egypt during 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, H A; Salem, S A H; Habashi, A R; Arafa, A A; Aggour, M G A; Salem, G H; Gaber, A S; Selem, O; Abdelkader, S H; Knowles, N J; Madi, M; Valdazo-González, B; Wadsworth, J; Hutchings, G H; Mioulet, V; Hammond, J M; King, D P

    2012-12-01

    The epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in North Africa is complicated by the co-circulation of endemic FMD viruses (FMDV), as well as sporadic incursions of exotic viral strains from the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa. This report describes the molecular characterization of SAT 2 FMD viruses that have caused widespread field outbreaks of FMD in Egypt during February and March 2012. Phylogenetic analysis showed that viruses from these outbreaks fell into two distinct lineages within the SAT 2 topotype VII, which were distinct from a contemporary SAT 2 lineage of the same toptype from Libya. These were the first FMD outbreaks due to this serotype in Egypt since 1950 and required the development of a tailored real-time reverse-transcription PCR assay that can be used in the laboratory to distinguish FMD viruses of these lineages from other endemic FMD viruses that might be present in North Africa. These data highlight the ease by which FMDV can cross international boundaries and emphasize the importance of deploying systems to continuously monitor the global epidemiology of this disease.

  1. Analysis of sat type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins: influence of receptor usage on the properties of virus particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The viral mechanism involved in foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) tissue tropism, host range and the events during viral entry into susceptible cells is not well understood. Using infectious cDNA clones of the three South African Territories (SAT) type viruses prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, the biologi...

  2. LABORATORY GUIDELINES FOR ANALYSIS OF BIOTERRORISM SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    With advent of deaths associated with Bacillus anthracis spore contaminated mail, a worldwide need was apparent for increased laboratory capacity to safely analyze bioterrorism samples. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has furnished guidelines for microbiological...

  3. EMC Test Report: StangSat - CubeSat Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Aragona, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I testing performed on the StangSat; the unit under test (UUT). Testing was per the requirements of MIL STD-461F. The UUT was characterized and passed the radiated emissions (RE102 limit for Spacecraft) testing.

  4. CubeSat Cloud: A framework for distributed storage, processing and communication of remote sensing data on cubesat clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Obulapathi Nayudu

    CubeSat Cloud is a novel vision for a space based remote sensing network that includes a collection of small satellites (including CubeSats), ground stations, and a server, where a CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite with a volume of a 10x10x10 cm cube and has a weight of approximately 1 kg. The small form factor of CubeSats limits the processing and communication capabilities. Implemented and deployed CubeSats have demonstrated about 1 GHz processing speed and 9.6 kbps communication speed. A CubeSat in its current state can take hours to process a 100 MB image and more than a day to downlink the same, which prohibits remote sensing, considering the limitations in ground station access time for a CubeSat. This dissertation designs an architecture and supporting networking protocols to create CubeSat Cloud, a distributed processing, storage and communication framework that will enable faster execution of remote sensing missions on CubeSat clusters. The core components of CubeSat Cloud are CubeSat Distributed File System, CubeSat MapMerge, and CubeSat Torrent. The CubeSat Distributed File System has been created for distributing of large amounts of data among the satellites in the cluster. Once the data is distributed, CubeSat MapReduce has been created to process the data in parallel, thereby reducing the processing load for each CubeSat. Finally, CubeSat Torrent has been created to downlink the data at each CubeSat to a distributed set of ground stations, enabling faster asynchronous downloads. Ground stations send the downlinked data to the server to reconstruct the original image and store it for later retrieval. Analysis of the proposed CubeSat Cloud architecture was performed using a custom-designed simulator, called CubeNet and an emulation test bed using Raspberry Pi devices. Results show that for cluster sizes ranging from 5 to 25 small satellites, faster download speeds up to 4 to 22 times faster - can be achieved when using CubeSat Cloud, compared to a

  5. SAT-WIND project. Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Astrup, Poul; Nielsen, Niels Morten;

    in cooperation with GRAS A/S in the innovative project SAT-WIND-SMV (Sagsnr. 2104-05-0084) in the years 2005 and 2006 in parallel with SAT-WIND. The results from the SAT-WIND project are presented. These include ocean wind statistics, offshore wind resource estimates and comparison results for wind-indexing....

  6. VALIDATION GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following guidelines for laboratories engaged in the forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism. This document provides a baseline framework and guidance for...

  7. Kinetic Analysis of Metal Ions: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on the adaptation of a kinetic method of analysis of metal ions for use in an undergraduate teaching laboratory. Background information, procedures used, and analysis of typical results obtained are provided. (JN)

  8. VALIDATION GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following guidelines for laboratories engaged in the forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism. This document provides a baseline framework and guidance for...

  9. PharmaSat: drug dose response in microgravity from a free-flying integrated biofluidic/optical culture-and-analysis satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Parra, Macarena; Niesel, David; Piccini, Matthew; Ly, Diana; McGinnis, Michael; Kudlicki, Andrzej; Hines, John W.; Timucin, Linda; Beasley, Chris; Ricks, Robert; McIntyre, Michael; Friedericks, Charlie; Henschke, Michael; Leung, Ricky; Diaz-Aguado, Millan; Kitts, Christopher; Mas, Ignacio; Rasay, Mike; Agasid, Elwood; Luzzi, Ed; Ronzano, Karolyn; Squires, David; Yost, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    We designed, built, tested, space-qualified, launched, and collected telemetered data from low Earth orbit from Pharma- Sat, a 5.1-kg free flying "nanosatellite" that supported microbial growth in 48 microfluidic wells, dosed microbes with multiple concentrations of a pharmaceutical agent, and monitored microbial growth and metabolic activity using a dedicated 3-color optical absorbance system at each microwell. The PharmaSat nanosatellite comprised a structure approximately 10 x 10 x 35 cm, including triple-junction solar cells, bidirectional communications, power-generation and energy- storage system, and a sealed payload 1.2-L containment vessel that housed the biological organisms along with the fluidic, optical, thermal, sensor, and electronic subsystems. Growth curves for S. cerevisiae (Brewer's yeast) were obtained for multiple concentrations of the antifungal drug voriconazole in the microgravity conditions of low Earth orbit. Corresponding terrestrial control experiments were conducted for comparison.

  10. SpinSat Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    switches (ITW series 65 model 401000 over travel switch) that inhibit SpinSat from powering up until it is deployed from the Cyclops. These switches...the uplink at about 450 MHz and downlink at about 401 MHz. The transceiver cannot switch between the two frequencies due to the range of the VCO

  11. Tensor Network Contractions for #SAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biamonte, Jacob D.; Morton, Jason; Turner, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    The computational cost of counting the number of solutions satisfying a Boolean formula, which is a problem instance of #SAT, has proven subtle to quantify. Even when finding individual satisfying solutions is computationally easy (e.g. 2-SAT, which is in ), determining the number of solutions can be #-hard. Recently, computational methods simulating quantum systems experienced advancements due to the development of tensor network algorithms and associated quantum physics-inspired techniques. By these methods, we give an algorithm using an axiomatic tensor contraction language for n-variable #SAT instances with complexity where c is the number of COPY-tensors, g is the number of gates, and d is the maximal degree of any COPY-tensor. Thus, n-variable counting problems can be solved efficiently when their tensor network expression has at most COPY-tensors and polynomial fan-out. This framework also admits an intuitive proof of a variant of the Tovey conjecture (the r,1-SAT instance of the Dubois-Tovey theorem). This study increases the theory, expressiveness and application of tensor based algorithmic tools and provides an alternative insight on these problems which have a long history in statistical physics and computer science.

  12. Independent Schools and the SAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Amada

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, when the College Board released its average SAT scores for the 2015 graduating class, two details stood out for many educators: (1) the record participation and diversity numbers (close to 1.7 million students took the test, with 50 percent being students of color); and (2) the test's lower average scores compared with previous…

  13. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, P J; Schaffner, D A; Brown, M R; Wicks, R T

    2015-02-01

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge I(sat). The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma.

  14. CryoSat-2 Altimetry Applications over Rivers and Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguang Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the variation of rivers and lakes is of great importance. Satellite radar altimetry is a promising technology to do this on a regional to global scale. Satellite radar altimetry data has been used successfully to observe water levels in lakes and (large rivers, and has also been combined with hydrologic/hydrodynamic models. Except CryoSat-2, all radar altimetry missions have been operated in conventional low resolution mode with a short repeat orbit (35 days or less. CryoSat-2, carrying a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR altimeter, has a 369-day repeat and a drifting ground track pattern and provides new opportunities for hydrologic research. The narrow inter-track distance (7.5 km at the equator makes it possible to monitor many lakes and rivers and SAR mode provides a finer along-track resolution, higher return power and speckle reduction through multi-looks. However, CryoSat-2 challenges conventional ways of dealing with satellite inland water altimetry data because virtual station time series cannot be directly derived for rivers. We review the CryoSat-2 mission characteristics, data products, and its use and perspectives for inland water applications. We discuss all the important steps in the workflow for hydrologic analysis with CryoSat-2, and conclude with a discussion of promising future research directions.

  15. On Optimizing the Satisfiability (SAT) Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Jun; GU Qianping; DU Dingzhu

    1999-01-01

    The satisfiability(SAT) problem is abasic problem in computing theory. Presently, an active area of researchon SAT problem is to design efficient optimization algorithms forfinding a solution for a satisfiable CNF formula. A newformulation, the Universal SAT problem model, which transforms the SAT problem on Boolean space into an optimization problem on real spacehas been developed. Many optimization techniques,such as the steepest descent method, Newton's method, and thecoordinate descent method, can be used to solve the Universal SAT problem. In this paper, we prove that, when the initial solution issufficiently close to the optimal solution, the steepest descent methodhas a linear convergence ratio β<1, Newton's method has aconvergence ratio of order two, and the convergence ratio of thecoordinate descent method is approximately (1-β/m) for the Universal SAT problem with m variables. An algorithm based on the coordinate descent method for the Universal SAT problem is alsopresented in this paper.

  16. Epidemiological analysis of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (serotype SAT2) on a large dairy farm in Kenya using regular vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, N A; Stärk, K D C; van Maanen, C; Thomas, S L; Chepkwony, E C; Sangula, A K; Dulu, T D; Fine, P E M

    2015-03-01

    During August-September 2012, an outbreak of Foot-and-mouth Disease (FMD) due to serotype Southern African Territories-2 (SAT2) occurred on a large, extensively grazed dairy farm in Nakuru County, Kenya. Over 29 days, 400/644 (62.1%) cattle were recorded as displaying clinical signs consistent with FMD. Out of the 18 management groups present, 17 had clinical cases (weighted mean incidence rate 3.5 per 100 cattle-days, 95% CI 2.4, 5.1; range 0.064-10.9). Transmission may have been encouraged when an infected group was moved to a designated isolation paddock. A four to five day minimum incubation period was apparent in five groups for which a point source exposure was evident. Further transmission was associated with the movement of individual animals incubating infection, use of a common dip and milking parlour, and grazing of susceptible groups in paddocks neighbouring to infectious cases. Animals over 18 months old appeared to be at highest risk of disease possibly due to milder clinical signs seen among younger animals resulting in reduced transmission or cases not being recorded. Cows with a breeding pedigree containing a greater proportion of zebu appeared to be at lower risk of disease. The outbreak occurred despite regular vaccination (three times per year) last performed approximately three months before the index case. Incidence risk by the lifetime number of doses received indicated limited or no vaccine effectiveness against clinical disease. Reasons for poor vaccine effectiveness are discussed with antigenic diversity of the SAT2 serotype and poor match between the field and vaccine strain as a likely explanation. Detailed field-derived epidemiological data based on individual animals are rarely presented in the literature for FMD, particularly in East-Africa and with the SAT2 serotype. This study provides a detailed account and therefore provides a greater understanding of FMD outbreaks in this setting. Additionally, this is the first study to provide

  17. Planning and Analysis of Fractured Rock Injection Tests in the Cerro Brillador Underground Laboratory, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Oyarzún L, R.; Villegas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early theories of fluid migration in unsaturated fractured rock hypothesized that matrix suction would dominate flow up to the point of matrix saturation. However, experiments in underground laboratories such as the ESF (Yucca Mountain, NV) have demonstrated that liquid water can migrate significant distances through fractures in an unsaturated porous medium, suggesting limited interaction between fractures and unsaturated matrix blocks and potentially rapid transmission of recharge to the sat- urated zone. Determining the conditions under which this rapid recharge may take place is an important factor in understanding deep percolation processes in arid areas with thick unsaturated zones. As part of an on-going, Fondecyt-funded project (award 11150587) to study mountain block hydrological processes in arid regions, we are plan- ning a series of in-situ fracture flow injection tests in the Cerro Brillador/Mina Escuela, an underground laboratory and teaching facility belonging to the Universidad la Serena, Chile. Planning for the tests is based on an analytical model and curve-matching method, originally developed to evaluate data from injection tests at Yucca Mountain (Fairley, J.P., 2010, WRR 46:W08542), that uses a known rate of liquid injection to a fracture (for example, from a packed-off section of borehole) and the observed rate of seepage discharging from the fracture to estimate effective fracture aperture, matrix sorptivity, fracture/matrix flow partitioning, and the wetted fracture/matrix interac- tion area between the injection and recovery points. We briefly review the analytical approach and its application to test planning and analysis, and describe the proposed tests and their goals.

  18. The AstroSat Production Line: From AstroSat 100 to AstroSat 1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliet, E.; Pawlak, D.; Koeck, C.; Beaufumé, E.

    2008-08-01

    From the late 90s onward, Astrium Satellites has developed and improved several classes of high resolution optical Earth Observation satellites. The resulting product line ranges from micro-satellites (about 120 kg) type to the large satellites (in the range of 1 200 kg). They all make uses of state of the art technologies for optical payloads, as well as for avionics. Several classes of platforms have thus been defined and standardised: AstroSat 100 for satellites up to 150 kg, allowing affordable but fully operational missions, AstroSat 500 for satellites up to 800 kg, allowing complex high resolution missions, and AstroSat 1000 for satellites up to 1 200 kg, providing very high resolution and outstanding imaging and agility capabilities. A new class, AstroSat 250, has been developed by Astrium Satellites, and is now proposed, offering a state-of-the-art 3-axis agile platform for high- resolution missions, with a launch mass below 550 kg. The Astrosat platforms rely on a centralised architecture avionics based on an innovative AOCS hybridising of measurements from GPS, stellar sensors and inertial reference unit. Operational safety has been emphasised through thruster free safe modes. All optical payloads make use of all Silicon Carbide (SiC) telescopes. High performance and low consumption linear CCD arrays provide state of the art images. The satellites are designed for simple flight operations, large data collection capability, and large versatility of payload and missions. They are adaptable to a large range of performances. Astrium satellites have already been selected by various customers worldwide.

  19. Quality assurance for animal feed analysis laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balthrop, J.; Brand, B.; Cowie, R.A.; Danier, J.; Boever, de J.L.; Jonge, de L.H.; Jackson, F.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Piotrowski, C.

    2011-01-01

    Every sector of the livestock industry, the associated services and the wellbeing of both animals and humans are influenced by animal feeding. The availability of accurate, reliable and reproducible analytical data is imperative for proper feed formulation. Only reliable analysis can lead to the gen

  20. Semen analysis standardization: is there any problem in Polish laboratories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Marchlewska, Katarzyna; Oszukowska, Elzbieta; Filipiak, Eliza; Bergier, Leszek; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of compliance of Polish laboratories with World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, with regard to semen analysis methodology. A survey requesting information about methods of semen analysis was distributed to employees of 55 laboratories. Respondents who had participated in external seminological workshops (31%) were termed certified respondents (CR), the remaining (69%)-non-certified respondents (NCR). Only one laboratory (6%) in the CR group and none in the NCR were compliant with WHO guidelines for methods and equipment used to evaluate seminal volume, sperm motility, concentration, vitality and morphology. Most problems were of volume measurement (weighing method was reported by 17% of CR and 10% of NCR) and staining method for sperm morphology (Papanicolau or Diff-Quik were found in 33% of CR and 23% of NCR). A three- or four-point grading of sperm motility was used by the majority of respondents; however, 17% of CR and 37% of NCR did not use a laboratory counter to tally spermatozoa. Although a haemocytometer method was used by 80% of laboratories in each group, the improved Neubauer chamber was used only by 42% of CR and 19% of NCR. In each group, 24% of laboratories did not perform a vitality test. Procedural errors and the interchangeable utilization of two or even three methods to analyse a given parameter was observed in both groups. The results indicate a need for standardisation of the methods and continuous, unified training in semen analysis in Polish laboratories.

  1. A Case for Not Going SAT-Optional: Students with Discrepant SAT and HSGPA Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Kobrin, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Presented at the national conference for the American Educational Research Association (AERA) in 2010. This presentation describes an alternative way of presenting the unique information provided by the SAT over HSGPA, namely examining students with discrepant SAT-HSGPA performance.

  2. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters (CalSat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Vourch, Clement J.; Drysdale, Timothy D.; Kalman, Andrew; Fujikawa, Steve; Keating, Brian; Kaufman, Jon

    2015-10-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five “tones” with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB community and (iii) the Amateur Satellite Service bands in the Table of Frequency Allocations used by the Federal Communications Commission. CalSat would be placed in a polar orbit allowing visibility from observatories in the Northern Hemisphere, such as Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Summit Station in Greenland, and the Southern Hemisphere, such as the Atacama Desert in Chile and the South Pole. CalSat also would be observable by balloon-borne instruments launched from a range of locations around the world. This global visibility makes CalSat the only source that can be observed by all terrestrial and sub-orbital observatories, thereby providing a universal standard that permits comparison between experiments using appreciably different measurement approaches.

  3. Global Tropical Cyclone Winds from the QuikSCAT and OceanSAT-2 Scatterometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, B. W.; Danielson, R. E.; Poulsen, W. L.; Fore, A.; Brennan, M. J.; Shen, T. J.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    We have produced a comprehensive set of tropical cyclone storm wind retrieval scenes for all ten years of QuikSCAT data and one year of OceanSAT-2 data. The wind speeds were corrected for rain and optimized to avoid saturation at high winds using an artificial neural network method similar to that in [1] and [2]. The QuikSCAT wind imagery and the quantitative speed, direction, and backscatter data can be obtained at http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov. The QuikSCAT wind speeds have been validated against best track intensity (i.e., maximum wind speeds), H*WIND tropical cyclone wind model analysis fields, and wind speeds from aircraft overflights (GPS drop wind sondes and step frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR) wind measurements). Storms from all basins are included for a total of 21600 scenes over the ten years of nominal QuikSCAT operations. Of these, 11435 scenes include the best track center of the cyclone in the retrieved wind field. Among these, 3295 were of tropical storms and 788, 367, 330, 289, and 55 were of category 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hurricanes, respectively, on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. In addition to the QuikSCAT hurricane winds, we have also processed one year of wind fields from the Indian Space Research organization (ISRO) OceanSAT-2 satellite. OceanSAT-2 employs a scanning pencil beam Ku-band scatterometer with a design similar to QuikSCAT. JPL and NOAA have been working extensively with ISRO to aid in cross calibration between OceanSAT-2 and QuikSCAT. Toward this end the QuikSCAT instrument has been repointed in order to acquire data at the OceanSAT-2 incidence angles, and several meetings in India between the teams have taken place. The neural network that was trained on QuikSCAT data was used to retrieve OceanSAT-2 winds. The backscatter inputs to the network were transformed to match the histograms of the corresponding values in the QuikSCAT data set. We examine the scatterometer winds to investigate the relationship between

  4. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2011-08-15

    To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by implementing changes in the next fiscal

  5. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Methods Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. Conclusion The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by

  6. SAT, a flexible and optimized Web application for SSR marker development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Jean-François

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites, are among the most powerful genetic markers known. A common method for the development of SSR markers is the construction of genomic DNA libraries enriched for SSR sequences, followed by DNA sequencing. However, designing optimal SSR markers from bulk sequence data is a laborious and time-consuming process. Results SAT (SSR Analysis Tool is a user-friendly Web application developed to minimize tedious manual operations and reduce errors. This tool facilitates the integration, analysis and display of sequence data from SSR-enriched libraries. SAT is designed to successively perform base calling and quality evaluation of chromatograms, eliminate cloning vector, adaptors and low quality sequences, detect chimera or partially digested sequences, search for SSR motifs, cluster and assemble the redundant sequences, and design SSR primer pairs. An additional virtual PCR step establishes primer specificity. Users may modify the different parameters of each step of the SAT analysis. Although certain steps are compulsory, such as SSR motifs search and sequence assembly, users do not have to run the entire pipeline, and they can choose selectively which steps to perform. A database allows users to store and query results, and to redo individual steps of the workflow. Conclusion The SAT Web application is available at http://sat.cirad.fr/sat, and a standalone command-line version is also freely downloadable. Users must send an email to the SAT administrator tropgene@cirad.fr to request a login and password.

  7. Revalidation of the Sat-Chit-Ananda Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamlesh; Khanna, Pulkit; Khosla, Meenakshi; Rapelly, Mounica; Soni, Akarsh

    2016-11-18

    Sat-Chit-Ananda is an indigenous construct that refers to absolute bliss and consciousness. The present study aimed to strengthen the psychometric properties of the newly developed Sat-Chit-Ananda scale (Singh et al. in Int J Vedic Found Manag 1(2):54-74, 2014). A total of 398 students aged 17-36 years (mean age = 21.33 years, SD = 2.2, 70% males) participated in this study. An exploratory as well as confirmatory factor analysis was computed for the 17-item scale. Its' concurrent validity was established by assessing its correlation with other well-being measures, namely Flourishing (Diener et al. in Soc Indic Res 97:143-156 2010) and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (Diener et al. 2010). Satisfactory results were obtained from both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Sat-Chit-Ananda and its factors were found to be significantly positively correlated with Flourishing and Positive Experiences and were negatively correlated with Negative Experiences. Thus, the validity of the Sat-Chit-Ananda (Singh et al. 2014) scale stands further substantiated-offering this scale as a promising new assessment tool.

  8. Comparison of CloudSat and TRMM radar reflectivities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Sindhu; G S Bhat

    2013-08-01

    Comparison of reflectivity data of radars onboard CloudSat and TRMM is performed using coincident overpasses. The contoured frequency by altitude diagrams (CFADs) are constructed for two cases: (a) only include collocated vertical profiles that are most likely to be raining and (b) include all collocated profiles along with cloudy pixels falling within a distance of about 50 km from the centre point of coincidence. Our analysis shows that for both cases, CloudSat underestimates the radar reflectivity by about 10 dBZ compared to that of TRMM radar below 15 km altitude. The difference is well outside the uncertainty value of ∼2 dBZ of each radar. Further, CloudSat reflectivity shows a decreasing trend while that of TRMM radar an increasing trend below 4 km height. Basically W-band radar that CloudSat flies suffers strong attenuation in precipitating clouds and its reflectivity value rarely exceeds 20 dBZ though its technical specification indicates the upper measurement limit to be 40 dBZ. TRMM radar, on the other hand, cannot measure values below 17 dBZ. In fact combining data from these two radars seems to give a better overall spatial structure of convective clouds.

  9. An Optimum Space-to-Ground Communication Concept for CubeSat Platform Utilizing NASA Space Network and Near Earth Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yen F.; Kegege, Obadiah; Schaire, Scott H.; Bussey, George; Altunc, Serhat; Zhang, Yuwen; Patel Chitra

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CubeSat missions are expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. Higher data rate CubeSats are transitioning away from Amateur Radio bands to higher frequency bands. A high-level communication architecture for future space-to-ground CubeSat communication was proposed within NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This architecture addresses CubeSat direct-to-ground communication, CubeSat to Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) communication, CubeSat constellation with Mothership direct-to-ground communication, and CubeSat Constellation with Mothership communication through K-Band Single Access (KSA). A study has been performed to explore this communication architecture, through simulations, analyses, and identifying technologies, to develop the optimum communication concepts for CubeSat communications. This paper presents details of the simulation and analysis that include CubeSat swarm, daughter ship/mother ship constellation, Near Earth Network (NEN) S and X-band direct to ground link, TDRSS Multiple Access (MA) array vs Single Access mode, notional transceiver/antenna configurations, ground asset configurations and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) signal trades for daughter ship/mother ship CubeSat constellation inter-satellite cross link. Results of space science X-band 10 MHz maximum achievable data rate study are summarized. CubeSat NEN Ka-Band end-to-end communication analysis is provided. Current CubeSat communication technologies capabilities are presented. Compatibility test of the CubeSat transceiver through NEN and SN is discussed. Based on the analyses, signal trade studies and technology assessments, the desired CubeSat transceiver features and operation concepts for future CubeSat end-to-end communications are derived.

  10. New Inference Rules for Max-SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Li, C M; Planes, J; 10.1613/jair.2215

    2011-01-01

    Exact Max-SAT solvers, compared with SAT solvers, apply little inference at each node of the proof tree. Commonly used SAT inference rules like unit propagation produce a simplified formula that preserves satisfiability but, unfortunately, solving the Max-SAT problem for the simplified formula is not equivalent to solving it for the original formula. In this paper, we define a number of original inference rules that, besides being applied efficiently, transform Max-SAT instances into equivalent Max-SAT instances which are easier to solve. The soundness of the rules, that can be seen as refinements of unit resolution adapted to Max-SAT, are proved in a novel and simple way via an integer programming transformation. With the aim of finding out how powerful the inference rules are in practice, we have developed a new Max-SAT solver, called MaxSatz, which incorporates those rules, and performed an experimental investigation. The results provide empirical evidence that MaxSatz is very competitive, at least, on ran...

  11. 1U CubeSat Lasercom Terminal for Deep Space Communication Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA SBIR-select Phase 1 program Fibertek, Inc., proposes the design, optimization, and analysis of a 1U CubeSat Lasercom Optical Terminal, optimized for...

  12. Analysis of laboratory intercomparison data: a matter of independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro F. Rebelo

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available When laboratory intercomparison exercises are conducted, there is no a priori dependence of the concentration of a certain compound determined in one laboratory to that determined by another(s. The same applies when comparing different methodologies. A existing data set of total mercury readings in fish muscle samples involved in a Brazilian intercomparison exercise was used to show that correlation analysis is the most effective statistical tool in this kind of experiments. Problems associated with alternative analytical tools such as mean or paired 't'-test comparison and regression analysis are discussed.

  13. CpSAT-1, a transcribed satellite sequence from the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Věchtová, Pavlína; Dalíková, Martina; Sýkorová, Miroslava; Žurovcová, Martina; Füssy, Zoltán; Zrzavá, Magda

    2016-08-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a non-coding component of eukaryotic genomes, located mainly in heterochromatic regions. Relevance of satDNA began to emerge with accumulating evidence of its potential yet hardly comprehensible role that it can play in the genome of many organisms. We isolated the first satDNA of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella, Tortricidae, Lepidoptera), a species with holokinetic chromosomes and a single large heterochromatic element, the W chromosome in females. The satDNA, called CpSAT-1, is located on all chromosomes of the complement, although in different amounts. Surprisingly, the satellite is almost missing in the heterochromatic W chromosome. Additionally, we isolated mRNA from all developmental stages (1st-5th instar larva, pupa, adult), both sexes (adult male and female) and several tissues (Malpighian tubules, gut, heart, testes, and ovaries) of the codling moth and showed the CpSAT-1 sequence was transcribed in all tested samples. Using CpSAT-1 specific primers we amplified, cloned and sequenced 40 monomers from cDNA and gDNA, respectively. The sequence analysis revealed a high mutation rate and the presence of potentially functional motifs, mainly in non-conserved regions of the monomers. Both the chromosomal distribution and the sequence analysis suggest that CPSAT-1 has no function in the C. pomonella genome.

  14. NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) Support for Lunar and L1/L2 CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaire, Scott; Altunc, Serhat; Wong, Yen; Shelton, Marta; Celeste, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Perrotto, Trish

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) consists of globally distributed tracking stations, including NASA, commercial, and partner ground stations, that are strategically located to maximize the coverage provided to a variety of orbital and suborbital missions, including those in LEO, GEO, HEO, lunar and L1/L2 orbits. The NENs future mission set includes and will continue to include CubeSat missions. The majority of the CubeSat missions destined to fly on EM-1, launching in late 2018, many in a lunar orbit, will communicate with ground based stations via X-band and will utilize the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed IRIS radio. The NEN recognizes the important role CubeSats are beginning to play in carrying out NASAs mission and is therefore investigating the modifications needed to provide IRIS radio compatibility. With modification, the NEN could potentially expand support to the EM-1 lunar CubeSats.The NEN could begin providing significant coverage to lunar CubeSat missions utilizing three to four of the NENs mid-latitude sites. This coverage would supplement coverage provided by the JPL Deep Space Network (DSN). The NEN, with smaller apertures than DSN, provides the benefit of a larger beamwidth that could be beneficial in the event of uncertain ephemeris data. In order to realize these benefits the NEN would need to upgrade stations targeted based on coverage ability and current configuration/ease of upgrade, to ensure compatibility with the IRIS radio. In addition, the NEN is working with CubeSat radio developers to ensure NEN compatibility with alternative CubeSat radios for Lunar and L1/L2 CubeSats. The NEN has provided NEN compatibility requirements to several radio developers who are developing radios that offer lower cost and, in some cases, more capabilities with fewer constraints. The NEN is ready to begin supporting CubeSat missions. The NEN is considering network upgrades to broaden the types of CubeSat missions that can be supported and is

  15. Validation Experiments supporting the CryoSat-2 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, R.; Davidson, M.; Wingham, D.

    2009-12-01

    The primary goals of CryoSat are to derive improved estimates of the rates of change concerning land ice elevation and sea ice thickness and freeboard of the Earth’s land and marine ice fields. Validating such retrievals derived from a phase coherent pulse-width limited polar observing radar altimeter such as SIRAL, the primary payload of CryoSat, is not a simple one. In order to understand all the respective error co-variances it is necessary to acquire many different types of in-situ measurements (GPR, neutron probe density profiles, drilled and electromagnetic derived sea-ice thicknesses, for example) in highly inhospitable regions of the cryosphere at times of the year to detect relevant signals. In order to correlate retrievals from CryoSat with the in-situ data it was decided early in the CryoSat development that an aircraft borne radar altimeter with similar functionality to SIRAL would provide the necessary link, albeit on the smaller scale, and provide pre-launch incite into expected performances. In 2001 ESA commenced the development of its own prototype radar altimeter that mimics the functionality of SIRAL to be operated along-side an airborne laser scanner. Similar to SIRAL, but with subtle functional differences, the airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) has now been the centre piece instrument for a number of large scale land and sea ice field campaigns in the Arctic during spring and autumn 2004 and 2006 and 2008. Additional smaller science/test campaigns have taken place in March 2003 (Svalbard), March 2005 (Bay of Bothnia), March 2006 (Western Greenland) and April 2007 (CryoVEx 2007 in Svalbard). It is a credit to all parties that constitute the CryoSat Validation and Retrieval Team (CVRT) for the coordination, planning, acquisition of in-situ and airborne measurements and the subsequent processing and distributing of its data for analysis. CVRT has a robust infrastructure in place for validating and providing measures of

  16. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... is suspended on an air bearing, and rotates freely in 3 degrees of freedom. In order to avoid any influence of the gravitational force the centre of mass of the satellite is placed in the geometric centre of the air bearing by an automatic balancing system. The test spacecraft is equipped with a three......-axis magnetometer, three piezoelectric gyros, and four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. The operation of the spacecraft is fully autonomous. The data flow between the transducers and the onboard computer placed physically outside the satellite is provided by a radio link. The purpose...

  17. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Dryer Lint: An Advanced Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    2008-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry laboratory experiment is described that involves environmental analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Students analyze lint from clothes dryers for traces of flame retardant chemicals, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), compounds receiving much attention recently. In a typical experiment, ng/g…

  18. Transport Energy Impact Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.

    2015-05-13

    Presented at the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Spring 2015 Symposium on May 13, 2015, this presentation by Jeff Gonder of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides information about NREL's transportation energy impact analysis of connected and automated vehicles.

  19. The Social Attribution Task-Multiple Choice (SAT-MC): A Psychometric and Equivalence Study of an Alternate Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Jason K; Lurie, Jessica B; Fiszdon, Joanna M; Bell, Morris D

    2013-01-01

    The Social Attribution Task-Multiple Choice (SAT-MC) uses a 64-second video of geometric shapes set in motion to portray themes of social relatedness and intentions. Considered a test of "Theory of Mind," the SAT-MC assesses implicit social attribution formation while reducing verbal and basic cognitive demands required of other common measures. We present a comparability analysis of the SAT-MC and the new SAT-MC-II, an alternate form created for repeat testing, in a university sample (n = 92). Score distributions and patterns of association with external validation measures were nearly identical between the two forms, with convergent and discriminant validity supported by association with affect recognition ability and lack of association with basic visual reasoning. Internal consistency of the SAT-MC-II was superior (alpha = .81) to the SAT-MC (alpha = .56). Results support the use of SAT-MC and new SAT-MC-II as equivalent test forms. Demonstrating relatively higher association to social cognitive than basic cognitive abilities, the SAT-MC may provide enhanced sensitivity as an outcome measure of social cognitive intervention trials.

  20. Periodically Launched, Dedicated CubeSats/SmallSats for Space Situational Awareness Through NASA Communications Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, E. M.; Shaw, H.; Estabrook, P.; Neilsen, T. L.; Gunther, J.; Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.; Schaire, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is an area where spaceflight activities and missions can directly influence the quality of life on earth. The combination of space weather, near earth orbiting objects, atmospheric conditions at the space boundary, and other phenomena can have significant short-term and long-term implications for the inhabitants of this planet. The importance of SSA has led to increased activity in this area from both space and ground based platforms. The emerging capability of CubeSats and SmallSats provides an opportunity for these low-cost, versatile platforms to augment the SSA infrastructure. The CubeSats and SmallSats can be launched opportunistically with shorter lead times than larger missions. They can be organized both as constellations or individual sensor elements. Combining CubeSats and SmallSats with the existing NASA communications networks (TDRS Space Network, Deep Space Network and the Near Earth Network) provide a backbone structure for SSA which can be tied to a SSA portal for data distribution and management. In this poster we will describe the instruments and sensors needed for CubeSat and SmallSat SSA missions. We will describe the architecture and concept of operations for a set of opportunistic, periodically launched, SSA CubeSats and SmallSats. We will also describe the integrated communications infrastructure to support end-to-end data delivery and management to a SSA portal.

  1. Interplanetary CubeSat Navigational Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Gustafson, Eric D.; Young, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats are miniaturized spacecraft of small mass that comply with a form specification so they can be launched using standardized deployers. Since the launch of the first CubeSat into Earth orbit in June of 2003, hundreds have been placed into orbit. There are currently a number of proposals to launch and operate CubeSats in deep space, including MarCO, a technology demonstration that will launch two CubeSats towards Mars using the same launch vehicle as NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) Mars lander mission. The MarCO CubeSats are designed to relay the information transmitted by the InSight UHF radio during Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) in real time to the antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) on Earth. Other CubeSatts proposals intend to demonstrate the operation of small probes in deep space, investigate the lunar South Pole, and visit a near Earth object, among others. Placing a CubeSat into an interplanetary trajectory makes it even more challenging to pack the necessary power, communications, and navigation capabilities into such a small spacecraft. This paper presents some of the challenges and approaches for successfully navigating CubeSats and other small spacecraft in deep space.

  2. Feasibility Analysis of Extending the Spatial Coverage of Cloud-Base Height from CloudSat%CloudSat云底高度外推估计的可行性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王帅辉; 姚志刚; 韩志刚; 赵增亮

    2012-01-01

    The height of the cloud base has significant effects on the global radiation balance and the aviation. In allusion to the merit and demerit of active and passive observations,a technique of spreading cloud-base height from CloudSat,using the MODIS classification,is advanced.Firstly,based on MODIS and CloudSat data,the method(CSAT) using satellite classification to extend the CloudSat data is compared with a traditional distance-weighted approach(MSAT) using regression analysis method.Then,the uniformity of cloud base over China and its neighborhood is analyzed.Eventually,using the statistic features of cloud base heights for different cloud types from CloudSat,a method combining the MODIS classification with distance-weighted to estimate cloud-base height is established and validated.The result indicates that the standard deviations of cloud-base height errors for all MODIS cloud types are totally less than 1.5 km,and the average values are also less than 1.5 km for all MODIS cloud types except cumulonimbus, of which the mean in the case of the distance between observed and predicted sites being greater than 400 km is slightly greater than 1.5 km.%云底高度对于全球辐射平衡以及航空飞行均具有重要影响。针对CloudSat与MODIS主、被动观测的优缺点,本文提出了利用MODIS云分类信息进行CloudSat云底高度外推估计的技术。首先使用MODIS和CloudSat数据,利用回归分析方法比较了基于云类型(CSAT)与基于距离(MSAT)的云底高度估计方法的优劣。此外,分析了中国及周边地区CloudSat各类云云底高度的均一性特征。最后,利用CloudSat各类云云底高度的统计特征,建立了一种基于云类型和距离权重的云底高度估计方法,并对该方法进行了验证和分析。结果表明,利用该方法得到的MODIS各类云云底高度估计误差的标准差均小于1.5 km,除了积雨云在观测点与待测点距离大于400 km

  3. CloudSat Profiles Tropical Storm Andrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    CloudSat's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a profile across Tropical Storm Andrea on Wednesday, May 9, 2007, near the South Carolina/Georgia/Florida Atlantic coast. The upper image shows an infrared view of Tropical Storm Andrea from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, with CloudSat's ground track shown as a red line. The lower image is the vertical cross section of radar reflectivity along this path, where the colors indicate the intensity of the reflected radar energy. CloudSat orbits approximately one minute behind Aqua in a satellite formation known as the A-Train.

  4. Establishment of a clean chemistry laboratory at JAERI. Clean laboratory for environmental analysis and research (CLEAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-02-01

    The JAERI has established a facility with a cleanroom: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). This report is an overview of the design, construction and performance evaluation of the CLEAR in the initial stage of the laboratory operation in June 2001. The CLEAR is a facility to be used for analyses of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples for the safeguards, for the CTBT verification and for researches on environmental sciences. One of the special features of the CLEAR is that it meets double requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials. As another feature of the CLEAR, much attention was paid to the construction materials of the cleanroom for trace analysis of metal elements using considerable amounts of corrosive acids. The air conditioning and purification system, specially designed experimental equipment to provide clean work surfaces, utilities and safety systems are also demonstrated. The potential contamination from the completed cleanroom atmosphere during the analytical procedure was evaluated. It can be concluded that the CLEAR has provided a suitable condition for reliable analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials and other heavy elements in environmental samples. (author)

  5. Establishment of a clean chemistry laboratory at JAERI. Clean laboratory for environmental analysis and research (CLEAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-02-01

    The JAERI has established a facility with a cleanroom: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). This report is an overview of the design, construction and performance evaluation of the CLEAR in the initial stage of the laboratory operation in June 2001. The CLEAR is a facility to be used for analyses of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples for the safeguards, for the CTBT verification and for researches on environmental sciences. One of the special features of the CLEAR is that it meets double requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials. As another feature of the CLEAR, much attention was paid to the construction materials of the cleanroom for trace analysis of metal elements using considerable amounts of corrosive acids. The air conditioning and purification system, specially designed experimental equipment to provide clean work surfaces, utilities and safety systems are also demonstrated. The potential contamination from the completed cleanroom atmosphere during the analytical procedure was evaluated. It can be concluded that the CLEAR has provided a suitable condition for reliable analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials and other heavy elements in environmental samples. (author)

  6. Intertech Corporation Equipment for Laboratory Analysis and Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanov, S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intertech Corporation is an American company supplying instruments in Ukraine for laboratory analysis and scientific research for 15 years. The Company is an exclusive dealer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, TA Instruments and some other companies. Intertech Corporation offers instrumentation for elemental and molecular analysis, surface and nanostructure investigation, thermal analysis, sample preparation and provides certified service and methodological sup port for supplied equipment. There are two service centers in Ukraine — in Kyiv and Donetsk. More than 100 Ukrainian enterprises use instrumentation supplied by Intertech Corporation including metallurgical, machine-building, chemical and food industries, academic and research institutions, medical institutions and ecology inspections.

  7. A 6-year global cloud climatology from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder AIRS and a statistical analysis in synergy with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Stubenrauch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a six-year global climatology of cloud properties, obtained from observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO combined with CloudSat observations, both missions launched as part of the A-Train in 2006, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the retrieved AIRS cloud properties such as cloud amount and height as well as to explore the vertical structure of different cloud types. AIRS-LMD cloud detection agrees with CALIPSO about 85% over ocean and about 75% over land. Global cloud amount has been estimated as about 66% to 74%, depending on the weighting of not cloudy AIRS footprints by partial cloud cover (0 or 0.3. 40% of all clouds are high clouds, and about 44% of all clouds are single layer low-level clouds. The "radiative" cloud height determined by the AIRS-LMD retrieval corresponds well to the height of the maximum backscatter signal and of the "apparent middle" of the cloud. Whereas the real cloud thickness of high opaque clouds often fills the whole troposphere, their "apparent" cloud thickness (at which optical depth reaches about 5 is on average only 2.5 km. The real geometrical thickness of optically thin cirrus as identified by AIRS-LMD is identical to the "apparent" cloud thickness with an average of about 2.5 km in the tropics and midlatitudes. High clouds in the tropics have slightly more diffusive cloud tops than at higher latitudes. In general, the depth of the maximum backscatter signal increases nearly linearly with increasing "apparent" cloud thickness. For the same "apparent" cloud thickness optically thin cirrus show a maximum backscatter about 10% deeper inside the cloud than optically thicker clouds. We also show that only the geometrically thickest opaque clouds and (the probably surrounding anvil cirrus penetrate the stratosphere in the tropics.

  8. A 6-year global cloud climatology from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder AIRS and a statistical analysis in synergy with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a six-year global climatology of cloud properties, obtained from observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO combined with CloudSat observations, both missions launched as part of the A-Train in 2006, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the retrieved AIRS cloud properties such as cloud amount and height. In addition, they permit to explore the vertical structure of different cloud types. AIRS-LMD cloud detection agrees with CALIPSO about 85% over ocean and about 75% over land. Global cloud amount has been estimated from 66% to 74%, depending on the weighting of not cloudy AIRS footprints by partial cloud cover from 0 to 0.3. 42% of all clouds are high clouds, and about 42% of all clouds are single layer low-level clouds. The "radiative" cloud height determined by the AIRS-LMD retrieval corresponds well to the height of the maximum backscatter signal and of the "apparent middle" of the cloud. Whereas the real cloud thickness of high opaque clouds often fills the whole troposphere, their "apparent" cloud thickness (at which optical depth reaches about 5 is on average only 2.5 km. The real geometrical thickness of optically thin cirrus as identified by AIRS-LMD is identical to the "apparent" cloud thickness with an average of about 2.5 km in the tropics and midlatitudes. High clouds in the tropics have slightly more diffusive cloud tops than at higher latitudes. In general, the depth of the maximum backscatter signal increases nearly linearly with increasing "apparent" cloud thickness. For the same "apparent" cloud thickness optically thin cirrus show a maximum backscatter about 10% deeper inside the cloud than optically thicker clouds. We also show that only the geometrically thickest opaque clouds and (the probably surrounding anvil cirrus penetrate the stratosphere in the tropics.

  9. HaloSat - A CubeSat to Study the Hot Galactic Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Observations of the nearby universe fail to locate about half of the normal matter (baryons) observed in the early universe. The missing baryons may be in hot galactic halos. HaloSat is a CubeSat designed to map oxygen line emission (O VII and O VIII) around the Milky Way in order to constrain the mass and spatial distribution of hot gas in the halo. HaloSat has a grasp competitive with current X-ray observatories. Its observing program will be optimized to minimize contributions from solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission that limit the accuracy of current measurements. We describe the current status of HaloSat.

  10. NASA 3D Models: CloudSat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launched in April 2006, CloudSat monitors the state of the Earth’s atmosphere and weather with a sophisticated radar system. The instrument, jointly developed with...

  11. AgSat Areas of Interest

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The AgSat Areas of Interest map contains area polygons where satellite imagery will be collected for the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to provide imagery coverage for...

  12. AgSat Imagery Collection Footprints

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The AgSat Imagery Collection Footprints map shows the imagery footprints which have been collected under the USDA satellite blanket purchase agreement. Click on a...

  13. PhoneSat - The Smartphone Nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westley, Deborah; Yost, Bruce; Petro, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    PhoneSat 2.4, carried into space on November 19, 2013 aboard a Minotaur I rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASAs Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, is the first of the PhoneSat family to use a two-way S-band radio to allow engineers to command the satellite from Earth. This mission also serves as a technology demonstration for a novel attitude determination and control system (ADCS) that establishes and stabilizes the satellites attitude relative to Earth. Unlike the earlier PhoneSats that used a Nexus One, PhoneSat 2.4 uses the Nexus S smartphone, which runs Googles Android operating system, and is made by Samsung Electronics Co., Suwon, So. Korea. The smartphone provides many of the functions needed by the satellite such as a central computer, data memory, ready-made interfaces for communications, navigation and power all pre-assembled in a rugged electronics package.

  14. The proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize Mississippi State University (MSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL). DOE grant funds are available to the University for the limited purpose of performing preliminary studies, including analysis necessary to conduct this environmental assessment. The proposed facility would be located in the Mississippi Research and Technology Park, adjacent to the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station campus in Starkville, Mississippi. Total project cost is estimated at $7,953,600. This proposed laboratory would be designed to conduct research into combustion devices related to waste management and environmental restoration that is of importance to industry and government. The proposed facility`s role would be to develop diagnostic instrumentation capabilities in the area of combustion and related processes.

  15. Needs analysis and project schedule for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhea, T.A.; Rucker, T.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stafford, M.W. [NUS Corp., Aiken, SC (US)

    1990-09-28

    This report is a needs assessment and project schedule for the Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). After reviewing current and projected HPAL operations, two custom-developed laboratory information management systems (LIMS) for similar facilities were reviewed; four commercially available LIMS products were also evaluated. This project is motivated by new regulations for radiation protection and training and by increased emphasis on quality assurance (QA). HPAL data are used to: protect the health of radiation workers; document contamination levels for transportation of radioactive materials and for release of materials to the public for uncontrolled use; and verify compliance with environmental emission regulations. Phase 1 of the HPAL upgrade project concentrates on four types of counting instruments which support in excess of 90% of the sample workload at the existing central laboratories. Phase 2 is a refinement phase and also integrates summary-level databases on the central Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) VAX. Phase 3 incorporates additional instrument types and integrates satellite laboratories into the HPAL LIMS. Phase 1 will be a multi-year, multimillion dollar project. The temptation to approach the upgrade of the HPAL program in a piece meal fashion should be avoided. This is a major project, with clearly-defined goals and priorities, and should be approached as such. Major programmatic and operational impacts will be felt throughout HSE as a result of this upgrade, so effective coordination with key customer contacts will be critical.

  16. Improved Oceanographic Measurements with CryoSat SAR Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, David; Benveniste, Jérôme; Cipollini, Paolo; Andersen, Ole; Cancet, Mathilde; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco; Nilo Garcia, Pablo; Martin, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    The ESA CryoSat mission is the first space mission to carry a radar altimeter that can operate in Synthetic Aperture Radar "SAR" (or delay-Doppler) and interferometric SAR (SARin) modes. Studies on CryoSat data have analysed and confirmed the improved ocean measuring capability offered by SAR mode altimetry, through increased resolution and precision in sea surface height and wave height measurements, and have also added significantly to our understanding of the issues around the processing and interpretation of SAR altimeter echoes. We present work in four themes, building on work initiated in the CryoSat Plus for Oceans project (CP4O), each investigating different aspects of the opportunities offered by this new technology. The first two studies address the coastal zone, a critical region for providing a link between open-ocean and shelf sea measurements with those from coastal in-situ measurements, in particular tide gauges. Although much has been achieved in recent years through the Coastal Altimetry community, (http://www.coastalt.eu/community) there is a limit to the capabilities of pulse-limited altimetry, which often leaves an un-measured "white strip" right at the coastline. Firstly, a thorough analysis was made of the performance of "SAR" altimeter data (delay-Doppler processed) in the coastal zone. This quantified the performance, confirming the significant improvement over "conventional" pulse-limited altimetry. In the second study a processing scheme was developed with CryoSat SARin mode data to enable the retrieval of valid oceanographic measurements in coastal areas with complex topography. Thanks to further development of the algorithms, a new approach was achieved that can also be applied to SAR and conventional altimetry data (e.g., Sentinel-3, Jason series, Envisat). The third part of the project developed and evaluated improvements to the SAMOSA altimeter re-tracker that is implemented in the Sentinel-3 processing chain. The modifications to the

  17. The achievement gap: Should we rely on SAT scores to tell us anything about it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Whittington

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of students taking the SAT have declined to identify their race/ethnicity. I examined the impact of non-respondents on the validity of reported racial/ethnic differences and year-to-year changes in test performance. Using an analysis reported by Wainer (1988 and SAT data from 1996 to 2003, I confirmed Wainer’s findings that non-respondents prevent accurate estimations of group differences based on SAT data. I then explored the impact of College Board press release information on news reports about the achievement gap. I found frequent reports of racial/ethnic differences in SAT scores and year-to-year changes in scores but negligible consideration of non-respondents. Press releases and media reports should include information about non-respondents and their impact on accuracy of reported differences based on race/ethnicity.

  18. AstroSat – Configuration and Realization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. H. Navalgund; K. Suryanarayana Sarma; Piyush Kumar Gaurav; G. Nagesh; M. Annadurai

    2017-06-01

    AstroSat is India’s first space-based observatory satellite dedicated to astronomy. It has the capability to perform multi-wavelength and simultaneous observations of cosmic bodies in a wide band of wavelengths. This paper briefly summarizes the challenges faced in the configuration of AstroSat spacecraft, accommodation and sizing of its critical subsystems, their realization and testing of payloads and the integrated satellite.

  19. Joint SatOPS Compatibility Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Danford

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) participation in the interagency cooperation committee, the Joint SatOps Compatibility Committee (JSCC), and the compatible Sat 2 efforts. Part of GSFC's participation in the JSCC is to work with the Goddard Mission Systems Evolution Center (GMSEC) to provides a publish/subscribe framework to enable rapid integration of commercially available satellite control products.

  20. The SAT: An Essay in Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodinow, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the release of the most comprehensive study of SAT exams. The headline on the Web site of the College Board, the maker of the test, was, "SAT Studies Show Test's Strength in Predicting College Success." At the same time, a headline on the Web site of the group FairTest, a 23-year-old, nonprofit watchdog…

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in laboratory petrophysical core analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Holland, D. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Fordham, E. J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-known technique in medical diagnosis and materials science. In the more specialized arena of laboratory-scale petrophysical rock core analysis, the role of MRI has undergone a substantial change in focus over the last three decades. Initially, alongside the continual drive to exploit higher magnetic field strengths in MRI applications for medicine and chemistry, the same trend was followed in core analysis. However, the spatial resolution achievable in heterogeneous porous media is inherently limited due to the magnetic susceptibility contrast between solid and fluid. As a result, imaging resolution at the length-scale of typical pore diameters is not practical and so MRI of core-plugs has often been viewed as an inappropriate use of expensive magnetic resonance facilities. Recently, there has been a paradigm shift in the use of MRI in laboratory-scale core analysis. The focus is now on acquiring data in the laboratory that are directly comparable to data obtained from magnetic resonance well-logging tools (i.e., a common physics of measurement). To maintain consistency with well-logging instrumentation, it is desirable to measure distributions of transverse (T2) relaxation time-the industry-standard metric in well-logging-at the laboratory-scale. These T2 distributions can be spatially resolved over the length of a core-plug. The use of low-field magnets in the laboratory environment is optimal for core analysis not only because the magnetic field strength is closer to that of well-logging tools, but also because the magnetic susceptibility contrast is minimized, allowing the acquisition of quantitative image voxel (or pixel) intensities that are directly scalable to liquid volume. Beyond simple determination of macroscopic rock heterogeneity, it is possible to utilize the spatial resolution for monitoring forced displacement of oil by water or chemical agents, determining capillary pressure curves, and estimating

  2. [Advanced data analysis and visualization for clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes visualization techniques that help identify hidden structures in clinical laboratory data. The visualization of data is helpful for a rapid and better understanding of the characteristics of data sets. Various charts help the user identify trends in data. Scatter plots help prevent misinterpretations due to invalid data by identifying outliers. The representation of experimental data in figures is always useful for communicating results to others. Currently, flexible methods such as smoothing methods and latent structure analysis are available owing to the presence of advanced hardware and software. Principle component analysis, which is a well-known technique used to reduce multidimensional data sets, can be carried out on a personal computer. These methods could lead to advanced visualization with regard to exploratory data analysis. In this paper, we present 3 examples in order to introduce advanced data analysis. In the first example, a smoothing spline was fitted to a time-series from the control chart which is not in a state of statistical control. The trend line was clearly extracted from the daily measurements of the control samples. In the second example, principal component analysis was used to identify a new diagnostic indicator for Graves' disease. The multi-dimensional data obtained from patients were reduced to lower dimensions, and the principle components thus obtained summarized the variation in the data set. In the final example, a latent structure analysis for a Gaussian mixture model was used to draw complex density functions suitable for actual laboratory data. As a result, 5 clusters were extracted. The mixed density function of these clusters represented the data distribution graphically. The methods used in the above examples make the creation of complicated models for clinical laboratories more simple and flexible.

  3. SAT Type Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) Chimeric Vaccine Elicits Protection in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent development of infectious cDNA clone technology for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Southern African Territories (SAT) viruses has provided a valuable tool for genetic and biological characterization of field and laboratory strains. Recombinant chimeric viruses, containing the capsid-coding...

  4. Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb CubeSat Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, M.; Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, C.; Marchant, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's lower thermosphere is an important interface region between the neutral atmosphere and the "space weather" environment. While the high-latitude region of the thermosphere responds promptly to energy inputs, relatively little is known about the global/regional response to these energy inputs. Global temperatures are predicted to respond within 3-6 hours, but the details of the thermal response of the atmosphere as energy transports away from high-latitude source regions is not well understood. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) mission aims to characterize this thermal response through observation of the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at mid- and low-latitudes. The OPAL instrument is designed to map global thermospheric temperature variability over the critical "thermospheric gap" region (~100-140 km altitude) by spectroscopic analysis of molecular oxygen A-band emission (758 - 768 nm). The OPAL instrument is a grating-based imaging spectrometer with refractive optics and a high-efficiency volume holographic grating (VHG). The scene is sampled by 7 parallel slits that form non-overlapping spectral profiles at the focal plane with resolution of 0.5 nm (spectral), 1.5 km (limb profiling), and 60 km (horizontal sampling). A CCD camera at the instrument focal plane delivers low noise and high sensitivity. The instrument is designed to strongly reject stray light from daylight regions of the earth. The OPAL mission is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) CubeSat-based Science Missions for Geospace and Atmospheric Research program. The OPAL instrument and mission will be designed, built and executed by a team comprised of students and professors from Utah State University, Dixie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, with support from professional scientists and engineers from the Space Dynamics Laboratory and Hawk Institute for Space Science.

  5. Inter-laboratory consistency of gait analysis measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, M G; Merlo, A; Leardini, A

    2013-09-01

    The dissemination of gait analysis as a clinical assessment tool requires the results to be consistent, irrespective of the laboratory. In this work a baseline assessment of between site consistency of one healthy subject examined at 7 different laboratories is presented. Anthropometric and spatio-temporal parameters, pelvis and lower limb joint rotations, joint sagittal moments and powers, and ground reaction forces were compared. The consistency between laboratories for single parameters was assessed by the median absolute deviation and maximum difference, for curves by linear regression. Twenty-one lab-to-lab comparisons were performed and averaged. Large differences were found between the characteristics of the laboratories (i.e. motion capture systems and protocols). Different values for the anthropometric parameters were found, with the largest variability for a pelvis measurement. The spatio-temporal parameters were in general consistent. Segment and joint kinematics consistency was in general high (R2>0.90), except for hip and knee joint rotations. The main difference among curves was a vertical shift associated to the corresponding value in the static position. The consistency between joint sagittal moments ranged form R2=0.90 at the ankle to R2=0.66 at the hip, the latter was increasing when comparing separately laboratories using the same protocol. Pattern similarity was good for ankle power but not satisfactory for knee and hip power. The force was found the most consistent, as expected. The differences found were in general lower than the established minimum detectable changes for gait kinematics and kinetics for healthy adults.

  6. Canadian inter-laboratory organically bound tritium (OBT) analysis exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Olfert, J; Baglan, N; St-Amant, N; Carter, B; Clark, I; Bucur, C

    2015-12-01

    Tritium emissions are one of the main concerns with regard to CANDU reactors and Canadian nuclear facilities. After the Fukushima accident, the Canadian Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggested that models used in risk assessment of Canadian nuclear facilities be firmly based on measured data. Procedures for measurement of tritium as HTO (tritiated water) are well established, but there are no standard methods and certified reference materials for measurement of organically bound tritium (OBT) in environmental samples. This paper describes and discusses an inter-laboratory comparison study in which OBT in three different dried environmental samples (fish, Swiss chard and potato) was measured to evaluate OBT analysis methods currently used by CANDU Owners Group (COG) members. The variations in the measured OBT activity concentrations between all laboratories were less than approximately 20%, with a total uncertainty between 11 and 17%. Based on the results using the dried samples, the current OBT analysis methods for combustion, distillation and counting are generally acceptable. However, a complete consensus OBT analysis methodology with respect to freeze-drying, rinsing, combustion, distillation and counting is required. Also, an exercise using low-level tritium samples (less than 100 Bq/L or 20 Bq/kg-fresh) would be useful in the near future to more fully evaluate the current OBT analysis methods.

  7. Subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top) development in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafeit, Erwin; Möller, Reinhard; Jurimae, Toivo; Sudi, Karl; Wallner, Sandra Johanna

    2007-06-01

    The importance of body composition measurements to elucidate the dynamics of related diseases in pediatrics is gaining recognition. The methods used should not expose subjects to high doses of radiation and require substantial cooperation. The Lipometer is a new optical device that enables the non-invasive, quick and safe determination of the thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) layers (in mm) at any site of the human body. The topographic specification of 15 evenly distributed body sites, which makes it possible to precisely measure subcutaneous body fat distribution, is called subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top). SAT-Top was determined in more than 1000 children and young adults between the ages of 7 and 21. In this paper we describe the SAT-Top development of these subjects through different age groups and the differences between male and female SAT-Top development in each age group. SAT layer profiles (medians of the 15 body sites) for boys and girls in age group 1 (7-9 yrs) show a very similar pattern for both sexes, followed by slightly decreasing SAT layer thicknesses in boys and increasing values in girls in the subsequent age groups. Between age group 3 (11-13 yrs) and age group 7 (19-21 yrs) male and female SAT-Top is significantly different. The discriminating power between male and female SAT-Top was investigated by stepwise discriminant analysis, which provided no significant results for age group 1 (7-9 yrs), about 73% correct classification for age group 2 (9-11 yrs) and 3 (11-13 yrs), 83% for age group 4 (13-15 yrs), and about 91-93% for the following age groups (15-21 yrs). It is known that SAT development is the same in both sexes until puberty, when girls gain relatively more fat mass than boys to reach a higher body-fat percentage as adults. This paper presents a precise description of SAT development in boys and girls from childhood to adolescence, which provides a basis for further investigations.

  8. Lunar CubeSat Impact Trajectory Characteristics as a Function of Its Release Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Joo Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a part of early system design activities, trajectory characteristics for a lunar CubeSat impactor mission as a function of its release conditions are analyzed. The goal of this mission is to take measurements of surface magnetic fields to study lunar magnetic anomalies. To deploy the CubeSat impactor, a mother-ship is assumed to have a circular polar orbit with inclination of 90 degrees at a 100 km altitude at the Moon. Both the in- and out-of-plane direction deploy angles as well as delta-V magnitudes are considered for the CubeSat release conditions. All necessary parameters required at the early design phase are analyzed, including CubeSat flight time to reach the lunar surface, impact velocity, cross ranges distance, and associated impact angles, which are all directly affected by the CubeSat release conditions. Also, relative motions between these two satellites are analyzed for communication and navigation purposes. Although the current analysis is only focused on a lunar impactor mission, the methods described in this work can easily be modified and applied to any future planetary impactor missions with CubeSat-based payloads.

  9. GHRSST Level 2P Gridded Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from WindSat polarimetric radiometer on the Coriolis satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains sea surface temperature derived from observations made by the WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)...

  10. The identification of mixed pathology laboratory samples by DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşim TUĞ

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Formalin-fixed, and paraffin embedded biopsy samples can be useful sources for DNA analysis. In two cases, two tissue specimens taken from patients during total thyroidectomy operations were sent to pathology laboratory in accordance with the routine application. However, from pathology laboratory, results of the three samples belonging to the same patient were reported. Nodular goitre in two, and papillary carcinoma in one sample were diagnosed. Due to the difference of therapies to be applied, genetic matching between tissue samples sent and the patient had been claimed for the determination of whether all the samples do belong to the same patient or not.For each case totally six tissue samples, fixed in formalin (n=3 and embedded in paraffin (n=3 were sent to the DNA laboratory of the department of forensic sciences. When DNA profiles of blood samples and tissue specimens taken from patients were compared, all samples matched perfectly with respect to 16 analyzed genetic loci, and thus it was concluded that the specimens were unmistakably belonged to the respective biopsied patients. Analyses were completed within three days and the results were sent to the related clinics.

  11. Laboratory intercomparison of the dicentric chromosome analysis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinke, C; Barnard, S; Boulay-Greene, H; De Amicis, A; De Sanctis, S; Herodin, F; Jones, A; Kulka, U; Lista, F; Lloyd, D; Martigne, P; Moquet, J; Oestreicher, U; Romm, H; Rothkamm, K; Valente, M; Meineke, V; Braselmann, H; Abend, M

    2013-08-01

    The study design and obtained results represent an intercomparison of various laboratories performing dose assessment using the dicentric chromosome analysis (DCA) as a diagnostic triage tool for individual radiation dose assessment. Homogenously X-irradiated (240 kVp, 1 Gy/min) blood samples for establishing calibration data (0.25-5 Gy) as well as blind samples (0.1-6.4 Gy) were sent to the participants. DCA was performed according to established protocols. The time taken to report dose estimates was documented for each laboratory. Additional information concerning laboratory organization/characteristics as well as assay performance was collected. The mean absolute difference (MAD) was calculated and radiation doses were merged into four triage categories reflecting clinical aspects to calculate accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The earliest report time was 2.4 days after sample arrival. DCA dose estimates were reported with high and comparable accuracy, with MAD values ranging between 0.16-0.5 Gy for both manual and automated scoring. No significant differences were found for dose estimates based either on 20, 30, 40 or 50 cells, suggesting that the scored number of cells can be reduced from 50 to 20 without loss of precision of triage dose estimates, at least for homogenous exposure scenarios. Triage categories of clinical significance could be discriminated efficiently using both scoring procedures.

  12. An Optimum Space-to-Ground Communication Concept for CubeSat Platform Utilizing NASA Space Network and Near Earth Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yen F.; Kegege, Obadiah; Schaire, Scott H.; Bussey, George; Altunc, Serhat; Zhang, Yuwen; Patel, Chitra

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) CubeSat missions are expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. Higher data rate CubeSats are transitioning away from Amateur Radio bands to higher frequency bands. A high-level communication architecture for future space-to-ground CubeSat communication was proposed within NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This architecture addresses CubeSat direct-to-ground communication, CubeSat to Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) communication, CubeSat constellation with Mothership direct-to-ground communication, and CubeSat Constellation with Mothership communication through K-Band Single Access (KSA).A Study has been performed to explore this communication architecture, through simulations, analyses, and identifying technologies, to develop the optimum communication concepts for CubeSat communications. This paper will present details of the simulation and analysis that include CubeSat swarm, daughter shipmother ship constellation, Near Earth Network (NEN) S and X-band direct to ground link, TDRS Multiple Access (MA) array vs Single Access mode, notional transceiverantenna configurations, ground asset configurations and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) signal trades for daughter mother CubeSat constellation inter-satellite crosslink. Results of Space Science X-band 10 MHz maximum achievable data rate study will be summarized. Assessment of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of current CubeSat communication technologies capabilities will be presented. Compatibility test of the CubeSat transceiver through NEN and Space Network (SN) will be discussed. Based on the analyses, signal trade studies and technology assessments, the functional design and performance requirements as well as operation concepts for future CubeSat end-to-end communications will be derived.

  13. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  14. Structural Analysis and Seismic Design for Cold Neutron Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sangik; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, H. R

    2007-05-15

    This report describes all the major results of the dynamic structural analysis and seismic design for the Cold Neutron Laboratory Building which is classified in seismic class II. The results are summarized of the ground response spectrum as seismic input loads, mechanical properties of subsoil, the buoyancy stability due to ground water, the maximum displacement of the main frame under the seismic load and the member design. This report will be used as a basic design report to maintenance its structural integrity in future.

  15. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters (CalSat)

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Bradley R; Drysdale, Timothy D; Kalman, Andrew; Fujikawa, Steve; Keating, Brian; Kaufman, Jon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact, and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five "tones" with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309 GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB c...

  16. Mission Orbit Design of CubeSat Impactor Measuring Lunar Local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ah Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study designs the mission orbit of the lunar CubeSat spacecraft to measure the lunar local magnetic anomaly. To perform this mission, the CubeSat will impact the lunar surface over the Reiner Gamma swirl on the Moon. Orbit analyses are conducted comprising ΔV and error propagation analysis for the CubeSat mission orbit. First, three possible orbit scenarios are presented in terms of the CubeSat’s impacting trajectories. For each scenario, it is important to achieve mission objectives with a minimum ΔV since the CubeSat is limited in size and cost. Therefore, the ΔV needed for the CubeSat to maneuver from the initial orbit toward the impacting trajectory is analyzed for each orbit scenario. In addition, error propagation analysis is performed for each scenario to evaluate how initial errors, such as position error, velocity error, and maneuver error, that occur when the CubeSat is separated from the lunar orbiter, eventually affect the final impact position. As a result, the current study adopts a CubeSat release from the circular orbit at 100 km altitude and an impact slope of 15°, among the possible impacting scenarios. For this scenario, the required ΔV is calculated as the result of the ΔV analysis. It can be used to practically make an estimate of this specific mission’s fuel budget. In addition, the current study suggests error constraints for ΔV for the mission.

  17. Mission Orbit Design of CubeSat Impactor Measuring Lunar Local Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Ah; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Youngkwang; Bae, Jonghee; Lee, Donghun; Ju, Gwanghyeok

    2017-06-01

    The current study designs the mission orbit of the lunar CubeSat spacecraft to measure the lunar local magnetic anomaly. To perform this mission, the CubeSat will impact the lunar surface over the Reiner Gamma swirl on the Moon. Orbit analyses are conducted comprising ΔV and error propagation analysis for the CubeSat mission orbit. First, three possible orbit scenarios are presented in terms of the CubeSat’s impacting trajectories. For each scenario, it is important to achieve mission objectives with a minimum ΔV since the CubeSat is limited in size and cost. Therefore, the ΔV needed for the CubeSat to maneuver from the initial orbit toward the impacting trajectory is analyzed for each orbit scenario. In addition, error propagation analysis is performed for each scenario to evaluate how initial errors, such as position error, velocity error, and maneuver error, that occur when the CubeSat is separated from the lunar orbiter, eventually affect the final impact position. As a result, the current study adopts a CubeSat release from the circular orbit at 100 km altitude and an impact slope of 15°, among the possible impacting scenarios. For this scenario, the required ΔV is calculated as the result of the ΔV analysis. It can be used to practically make an estimate of this specific mission’s fuel budget. In addition, the current study suggests error constraints for ΔV for the mission.

  18. SAT vocabulary builder interactive flashcards book

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Boost your SAT vocabulary skills with a book, not a box! Welcome to flashcards in a book. There are no loose cards to lose or misplace. Always in order for easier, organized study. Filled with over 900 must-study New SAT words that are simply the best way to check your ""test readiness."" Study smarter using the unique interactive feature not found in other flashcards: Write your answer to a card's question on the front, and then compare it later to the answer on the back. Perfect for self-study, for reference, or just for a quick review!DETAILS- Handy book format keeps information organized a

  19. Laboratory Identity: A Linguistic Landscape Analysis of Personalized Space within a Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides insights into what constitutes a laboratory identity and the ways in which it is spatially constructed. This article explores students' professional identities as microbiologists as manifest in their usage of representational space in a laboratory and as such extends understandings of science identity and spatial identity. The…

  20. SAT: a late NS protein of porcine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zádori, Zoltán; Szelei, József; Tijssen, Peter

    2005-10-01

    The genomes of all members of the Parvovirus genus were found to contain a small open reading frame (ORF), designated SAT, with a start codon four or seven nucleotides downstream of the VP2 initiation codon. Green fluorescent protein or FLAG fusion constructs of SAT demonstrated that these ORFs were expressed. Although the SAT proteins of the different parvoviruses are not particularly conserved, they were all predicted to contain a membrane-spanning helix, and mutations in this hydrophobic stretch affected the localization of the SAT protein. SAT colocalized with calreticulin in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus. A knockout mutant (SAT(-)), with an unmodified VP sequence, showed a "slow-spreading" phenotype. These knockout mutants could be complemented with VP2(-) SAT(+) mutant. The SAT protein is a late nonstructural (NS) protein, in contrast to previously identified NS proteins, since it is expressed from the same mRNA as VP2.

  1. Traking of Laboratory Debris Flow Fronts with Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Scheidl, Christian; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2015-04-01

    Image analysis technique is applied to track the time evolution of rapid debris flow fronts and their velocities in laboratory experiments. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural slopes. The laboratory model consists of a large rectangular channel 1.4m wide and 10m long, with adjustable inclination and other flow configurations. The setup allows investigate different two phase material compositions including large fluid fractions. The large size enables to transfer the results to large-scale natural events providing increased measurement accuracy. The images are captured by a high speed camera, a standard digital camera. The fronts are tracked by the camera to obtain data in debris flow experiments. The reflectance analysis detects the debris front in every image frame; its presence changes the reflectance at a certain pixel location during the flow. The accuracy of the measurements was improved with a camera calibration procedure. As one of the great problems in imaging and analysis, the systematic distortions of the camera lens are contained in terms of radial and tangential parameters. The calibration procedure estimates the optimal values for these parameters. This allows us to obtain physically correct and undistorted image pixels. Then, we map the images onto a physical model geometry, which is the projective photogrammetry, in which the image coordinates are connected with the object space coordinates of the flow. Finally, the physical model geometry is rewritten in the direct linear transformation form, which allows for the conversion from one to another coordinate system. With our approach, the debris front position can then be estimated by combining the reflectance, calibration and the linear transformation. The consecutive debris front

  2. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) CubeSat Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, M.; Miller, J.; Cox, W.; Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, C.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Scherliess, L.; Christensen, A. B.; Cleave, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's lower thermosphere is an important interface region between the neutral atmosphere and the "space weather" environment. While the high-latitude region of the thermosphere responds promptly to energy inputs, relatively little is known about the global/regional response to these energy inputs. Global temperatures are predicted to respond within 3-6 hours, but the details of the thermal response of the atmosphere as energy transports away from high-latitude source regions is not well understood. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) mission aims to characterize this thermal response through observation of the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at mid- and low-latitudes. The OPAL instrument is designed to map global thermospheric temperature variability over the critical "thermospheric gap" region (~100-140 km altitude) by spectroscopic analysis of molecular oxygen A-band emission (758 - 768 nm). The OPAL instrument is a grating-based imaging spectrometer with refractive optics and a high-efficiency volume holographic grating (VHG). The scene is sampled by 7 parallel slits that form non-overlapping spectral profiles at the focal plane with resolution of 0.5 nm (spectral), 1.5 km (limb profiling), and 60 km (horizontal sampling). A CCD camera at the instrument focal plane delivers low noise and high sensitivity. The instrument is designed to strongly reject stray light from daylight regions of the earth. The OPAL mission is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) CubeSat-based Science Missions for Geospace and Atmospheric Research program. The OPAL instrument, CubeSat bus and mission are being designed, built and executed by a team comprised of students and professors from Utah State University, Dixie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, with support from professional scientists and engineers from the Space Dynamics Laboratory and Hawk Institute for Space Science.

  3. Cardiorespiratory fitness and laboratory stress: a meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Erica M; Dishman, Rod K

    2006-01-01

    We performed a meta-regression analysis of 73 studies that examined whether cardiorespiratory fitness mitigates cardiovascular responses during and after acute laboratory stress in humans. The cumulative evidence indicates that fitness is related to slightly greater reactivity, but better recovery. However, effects varied according to several study features and were smallest in the better controlled studies. Fitness did not mitigate integrated stress responses such as heart rate and blood pressure, which were the focus of most of the studies we reviewed. Nonetheless, potentially important areas, particularly hemodynamic and vascular responses, have been understudied. Women, racial/ethnic groups, and cardiovascular patients were underrepresented. Randomized controlled trials, including naturalistic studies of real-life responses, are needed to clarify whether a change in fitness alters putative stress mechanisms linked with cardiovascular health.

  4. Analysis of search in an online clinical laboratory manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechner, Michael; Kish, Joshua; Chadaga, Vivek; Dighe, Anand S

    2006-08-01

    Online laboratory manuals have developed into an important gateway to the laboratory. Clinicians increasingly expect up-to-date laboratory test information to be readily available online. During the past decade, sophisticated Internet search technology has developed, permitting rapid and accurate retrieval of a wide variety of content. We studied the role of search in an online laboratory manual. We surveyed the utilization of search technology in publicly available online manuals and examined how users interact with the search feature of a laboratory handbook. We show how a laboratory can improve its online handbook through insights gained by collecting information about each user's activity. We also discuss future applications for search-related technologies and the potential role of the online laboratory manual as the primary laboratory information portal.

  5. Design for CubeSat-based dust and radiation studies at Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ashish; Krishnamoorthy, Siddharth; Swenson, Travis; West, Stephen; Li, Alan; Crew, Alexander; Phillips, Derek James; Screve, Antoine; Close, Sigrid

    2017-07-01

    Europa is one of the icy moons of Jupiter and the possibility of an ocean of liquid water beneath its icy crust makes it one of the most fascinating destinations for exploration in the solar system. NASA's Europa Multiple Flyby Mission (EMFM, formerly Europa Clipper) is slated to visit the icy moon in a timeframe near the year 2022 to study the habitability of Europa. CubeSats carried along by the primary mission can supplement the measurements made, at a relatively low cost, and with the added benefits of involving students at universities in this challenging endeavor. Further, such a mission holds the key to extending the applicability of CubeSats to interplanetary missions. In this paper, we present the design of the Europa Radiation and Dust Observation Satellite (ERDOS), a 3U CubeSat designed to be deployed by the Europa Multiple Flyby Mission to carry out measurements of the radiation and dust environment, before impacting Europa's surface. We present a detailed design for a CubeSat-based secondary mission, and discuss the science goals that may be accomplished by such a mission. Further, we discuss results from a comprehensive analysis of various engineering challenges associated with an interplanetary CubeSat mission, such as radiation shielding and thermal environment control. Our results show that a short duration CubeSat-based flyby mission is feasible when the CubeSat is carried on board the primary mission until the Jovian system is reached. Such a flyby mission can provide important supplementary information to the primary mission about Europa's environment at a closer range and lead to a substantial increase in scientific knowledge about surface processes on Europa.

  6. HaloSat - A CubeSat to Study the Hot Galactic Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Observations of the nearby universe fail to locate about half of the baryons observed in the early universe. The missing baryons may be in hot galactic halos. HaloSat is a CubeSat designed to map oxygen line emission (O VII and O VIII) around the Milky Way in order to constrain the mass and spatial distribution of hot gas in the halo. HaloSat has a grasp competitive with current X-ray observatories. Its observing program will be optimized to minimize contributions from solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission that limit the accuracy of current measurements. We will describe the HaloSat mission concept, progress towards its implementation, and plans for archiving and distribution of the data.

  7. Quality of HIV laboratory testing in Tanzania: a situation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfinanga, G S; Mutayoba, B; Mbogo, G; Kahwa, A; Kimaro, G; Mhame, P P; Mwangi, C; Malecela, M N; Kitua, A Y

    2007-01-01

    Tanzania is scaling up prevention, treatment, care and support of individuals affected with HIV. There is therefore a need for high quality and reliable HIV infection testing and AIDS staging. The objective of this study was to assess laboratories capacities of services in terms of HIV testing and quality control. A baseline survey was conducted from December 2004 to February 2005 in 12 laboratories which were conveniently selected to represent all the zones of Tanzania. The questionnaires comprised of questions on laboratory particulars, internal and external quality control for HIV testing and quality control of reagents. Source and level of customer satisfaction of HIV test kits supply was established. Of 12 laboratories, nine used rapid tests for screening and two used rapid tests for diagnosis. In the 12 laboratories, four used double ELISA and five used single ELISA and three did not use ELISA. Confirmatory tests observed were Western Blot in three laboratories, DNA PCR in two laboratories, CD4 counting in seven laboratories, and viral load in two laboratories. Although all laboratories conducted quality control (QC) of the HIV kits, only two laboratories had Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Internal and external quality control (EQC) was done at varied proportions with the highest frequency of 55.6% (5/9) for internal quality control (IQC) for rapid tests and EQC for ELISA, and the lowest frequency of 14.3% (1/ 7) for IQC for CD4 counting. None of the nine laboratories which conducted QC for reagents used for rapid tests and none of the five which performed IQC and EQC had SOPs. HIV kits were mainly procured by the Medical Store Department and most of laboratories were not satisfied with the delay in procurement procedures. Most of the laboratories used rapid tests only, while some used both rapid tests and ELISA method for HIV testing. In conclusion, the survey revealed inadequacy in Good Laboratory Practice and poor laboratory quality control process

  8. Percutaneous renal graft biopsy: a clinical, laboratory and pathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda Mazzali

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Renal allograft biopsies have been used as a good method for monitoring the evolution of kidney transplants for at least 20 years.1 Histological analysis permits differential diagnosis of the causes of allograft dysfunction to be made. OBJECTIVES: To correlate the data of urinalysis and serum creatinine with histological diagnosis of renal graft in a group of renal transplant patients. DESIGN: Accuracy study, retrospective analysis. SETTING: A university terciary referral center. SAMPLE: 339 percutaneous allograft biopsies obtained from 153 patients. Blood and urine samples were obtained before the graft biopsy. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Laboratory evaluation and hystological analysis (light microscopy, imunofluorescent eletronic microscopy. RESULTS: Most of the biopsies (58.9% were performed during the first month post-transplant. An increase in serum creatinine was associated with acute tubular and/or cortical necrosis. Proteinuria and normal serum creatinine were associated with glomerular lesions. Non-nephrotic range proteinuria and an increase in serum creatinine were associated with chronic rejection. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of serum creatinine and urinalysis can be useful in suggesting the histological graft diagnosis.

  9. Enhancing SAT Based Planning with Landmark Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elffers, J.; Konijnenberg, D.; Walraven, E.M.P.; Spaan, M.T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches exist to solve Artificial Intelligence planning problems, but little attention has been given to the combination of using landmark knowledge and satisfiability (SAT). Landmark knowledge has been exploited successfully in the heuristics of classical planning. Recently it was also s

  10. An algorithm for 3-SAT problems

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for 3-SAT problems. First, logical formulas are transformed into elementary algebraic formulas. Second, complex trigonometric functions are assigned to the variables in the elementary algebraic formulas, and the sums of the formulas are calculated. The algorithm outputs the number of satisfying assignments. The computational complexity of the algorithm is probably polynomial.

  11. Investigating SATS-36 for a Matriculation Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Saras; Idris, Noraini

    2015-01-01

    Students' attitudes towards statistics have been more often negative due to many factors such as initial perception of the subject, low ability in mathematics and lack of motivation to study statistics. Studies involving SATS-36 included investigation of the different factors in relation to students' attitude towards statistics. Other studies have…

  12. The RadioSat (sm) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Gary K.

    1991-09-01

    The RadioSat network under development by radio Satellite Corporation will use mobile satellite (MSAT) technology to provide diverse personal communications, broadcast, and navigation services. The network will support these services simultaneously for integrated mobile radios throughout Canada and the United States. The RadioSat network takes advantage of several technological breakthroughs, all coming to fruition by the time the first MSAT satellite is launched in 1994. The most important of these breakthroughs is the enormous radiated power of each MSAT spacecraft - orders of magnitude greater than the radiated power of previous L-band spacecraft. Another important breakthrough is the development of advanced digital audio compression algorithms, enabling the transmission of broadcast quality music at moderate data rates. Finally, continuing dramatic increases in VLSI capabilities permit the production of complex, multi-function mobile satellite radios in very large quantities at prices little more than those of conventional car radios. In addition to performance breakthroughs and their economic implications to RadioSat, the design of the RadioSat network is reviewed.

  13. Sampling and sensitivity analyses tools (SaSAT for computational modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson David P

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SaSAT (Sampling and Sensitivity Analysis Tools is a user-friendly software package for applying uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to mathematical and computational models of arbitrary complexity and context. The toolbox is built in Matlab®, a numerical mathematical software package, and utilises algorithms contained in the Matlab® Statistics Toolbox. However, Matlab® is not required to use SaSAT as the software package is provided as an executable file with all the necessary supplementary files. The SaSAT package is also designed to work seamlessly with Microsoft Excel but no functionality is forfeited if that software is not available. A comprehensive suite of tools is provided to enable the following tasks to be easily performed: efficient and equitable sampling of parameter space by various methodologies; calculation of correlation coefficients; regression analysis; factor prioritisation; and graphical output of results, including response surfaces, tornado plots, and scatterplots. Use of SaSAT is exemplified by application to a simple epidemic model. To our knowledge, a number of the methods available in SaSAT for performing sensitivity analyses have not previously been used in epidemiological modelling and their usefulness in this context is demonstrated.

  14. Sampling and sensitivity analyses tools (SaSAT) for computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Alexander; Regan, David G; Wilson, David P

    2008-02-27

    SaSAT (Sampling and Sensitivity Analysis Tools) is a user-friendly software package for applying uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to mathematical and computational models of arbitrary complexity and context. The toolbox is built in Matlab, a numerical mathematical software package, and utilises algorithms contained in the Matlab Statistics Toolbox. However, Matlab is not required to use SaSAT as the software package is provided as an executable file with all the necessary supplementary files. The SaSAT package is also designed to work seamlessly with Microsoft Excel but no functionality is forfeited if that software is not available. A comprehensive suite of tools is provided to enable the following tasks to be easily performed: efficient and equitable sampling of parameter space by various methodologies; calculation of correlation coefficients; regression analysis; factor prioritisation; and graphical output of results, including response surfaces, tornado plots, and scatterplots. Use of SaSAT is exemplified by application to a simple epidemic model. To our knowledge, a number of the methods available in SaSAT for performing sensitivity analyses have not previously been used in epidemiological modelling and their usefulness in this context is demonstrated.

  15. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

  16. Method of resolution of 3SAT in polynomial time

    CERN Document Server

    Salemi, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Presentation of a Method for determining whether a problem 3Sat has solution, and if yes to find one, in time max O(n11). Is thus proved (if I am not mistaken yet) that the problem 3Sat is fully resolved in polynomial time and therefore that it is in P, by the work of Cook and Levin, and can transform a SAT problem in a 3Sat in polynomial time (ref. Karp), it follows that P = NP. Open Source program is available at http://www.visainformatica.it/3sat

  17. Achievements and Future Plan of Interplanetary CubeSats and Micro-Sats in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funase, Ryu

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces Japanese achievements and future plans of CubeSats and Micro-Sats for deep space exploration. As the first step toward deep space mission by such tiny spacecraft, University of Tokyo and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) developed the world's first deep space micro-spacecraft PROCYON (Proximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation). Its mission objective is to demonstrate a micro-spacecraft bus technology for deep space exploration and proximity flyby to asteroids performing optical measurements. PROCYON was launched into the Earth departure trajectory on December 3, 2014 together with Japanese asteroid sample return mission Hayabusa-2. PROCYON successfully completed the bus system demonstration mission in its interplanetary flight. Currently, Japan is not only pursuing the improvement and utilization of the demonstrated micro-sat deep space bus system with a weight of tens of kg or more for more practical scientific deep space missions, but also trying to develop smaller spacecraft with a weight of less than tens of kg, namely CubeSats, for deep space exploration. We are proposing a self-contained 6U CubeSat mission for the rideshare opportunity on the USA's SLS EM-1 mission, which will fly to a libration orbit around Earth-Moon L2 point and perform scientific observations of the Earth and the Moon. We are also seeking the possibility of CubeSats which is carried by a larger spacecraft to the destination and supports the mission by taking advantage of its low-cost and risk-tolerable feature. As an example of such style of CubeSat missions, we are studying a CubeSat for close observations of an asteroid, which will be carried to the target asteroid by a larger mother spacecraft. This CubeSat is released from the mother spacecraft to make a close flyby for scientific observations, which is difficult to be performed by the mother spacecraft if we consider the risk of the collision to the target asteroid or dust particles ejected

  18. Solving All-SAT Problems by P Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ping; JI Jinfang; CHEN Haizhu; LIU Ran

    2015-01-01

    — The satisfiability problem (SAT) is a well known NP-complete problem. Obtaining All of the truth assignments of SAT is called All-SAT and it has numerous applications in artificial intelligence and computer theo-ries. Many algorithms about SAT have been built, but how to solve All-SAT is still diffi cult. P system is a new distributed and parallel computation model. We use mem-brane division, which is frequently investigated to obtain an exponential working space in a linear time, to design a family of P systems to solve All-SAT in polynomial time. Our work provides a new and eff ective solution to All-SAT in a distributed and parallel manner.

  19. Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Effects Research and Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables research into advanced laser countermeasure techniques. DESCRIPTION: This laser facility has a capability to produce very high peak power levels of...

  20. Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Effects Research and Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables research into advanced laser countermeasure techniques.DESCRIPTION: This laser facility has a capability to produce very high peak power levels of...

  1. Enhancing genomic laboratory reports: A qualitative analysis of provider review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Stuckey, Heather; Green, Jamie; Feldman, Lynn; Zallen, Doris T.; Bonhag, Michele; Segal, Michael M.; Fan, Audrey L.; Williams, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the responses of physicians who reviewed provider and patient versions of a genomic laboratory report designed to communicate results of whole genome sequencing. Semi‐structured interviews addressed concept communication, elements, and format of example genome reports. Analysis of the coded transcripts resulted in recognition of three constructs around communication of genome sequencing results: (1) Providers agreed that whole genomic sequencing results are complex and they welcomed a report that provided supportive interpretation information to accompany sequencing results; (2) Providers strongly endorsed a report that included active clinical guidance, such as reference to practice guidelines, if available; and (3) Providers valued the genomic report as a resource that would serve as the basis to facilitate communication of genome sequencing results with their patients and families. Providers valued both versions of the report, though they affirmed the need for a provider‐oriented report. Critical elements of the report included clear language to explain the result, as well as consolidated yet comprehensive prognostic information with clear guidance over time for the clinical care of the patient. Most importantly, it appears a report with this design has the potential not only to return results but also serves as a communication tool to help providers and patients discuss and coordinate care over time. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26842872

  2. Some variants of SAT and their properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new model for the well-known problem, the satisfiablility problem of boolean formula (SAT), is introduced. Based on this model, some variants of SAT and their properties are presented. Denote by NP the class of all languages which can be decided by a non-deterministic polynomial Turing machine and by P the class of all languages which can be decided by a deterministic polynomial-time Turing machine. This model also allows us to give another candidate for the natural problems in ((NP-NPC)-P), denoted as NPI, under the assumption P≠NP, where NPC represents NP-complete. It is proven that this candidate is not in NPC under P≠NP. While, it is indeed in NPI under some stronger but reasonable assumption, specifically, under the Exponential-Time Hypothesis (ETH). Thus we can partially solve this long standing important open problem.

  3. Observing Compact Stars with AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Bhattacharya

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a brief description of India’s AstroSat mission which is a powerful space based observatory for compact star research. An account is given of observational constraints and spectral and timing capabilities as realised post-launch. Some preliminary results of observations of the Crab pulsar and an X-ray binary system GX 301-2 are presented to illustrate some of the capabilities of the mission.

  4. Observing Compact Stars with AstroSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a brief description of India's AstroSat mission which is a powerful space based observatory for compact star research. An account is given of observational constraints and spectral and timing capabilities as realised post-launch. Some preliminary results of observations of the Crab pulsar and an X-ray binary system GX 301-2 are presented to illustrate some of the capabilities of the mission.

  5. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing... Charges § 91.37 Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services. (a) The standard hourly fee rate in this section for the individual laboratory analyses cover the costs of...

  6. ExoplanetSat: detecting transiting exoplanets using a low-cost CubeSat platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew W.; Seager, Sara; Pong, Christopher M.; Villaseñor, Jesus S.; Ricker, George R.; Miller, David W.; Knapp, Mary E.; Farmer, Grant T.; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca

    2010-07-01

    Nanosatellites, i.e. spacecraft that weigh between 1 and 10 kg, are drawing increasing interest as platforms for conducting on-orbit science. This trend is primarily driven by the ability to piggyback nanosatellites on the launch of large spacecraft and hence achieve orbit at greatly reduced cost. The CubeSat platform is a standardized nanosatellite configuration, consisting of one, two, or three 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm units (1, 2, or 3 "U"s) arranged in a row. We present a CubeSat-based concept for the discovery of transiting exoplanets around the nearest and brightest Sun-like stars. The spacecraft prototype - termed ExoplanetSat - is a 3U space telescope capable of monitoring a single target star from low Earth orbit. Given the volume limitations of the CubeSat form factor, designing a capable spacecraft requires overcoming significant challenges. This work presents the initial satellite configuration along with several subsystem-specific solutions to the aforementioned constraints. An optical design based on a modified commercial off-the-shelf camera lens is given. We also describe a novel two-stage attitude control architecture that combines 3-axis reaction wheels for coarse pointing with a piezoelectric translation stage at the focal plane for fine pointing. Modeling and simulation results are used to demonstrate feasibility by quantifying ExoplanetSat pointing precision, signal-to-noise ratio, guide star magnitude, and additional design parameters which determine system performance.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of SATs in 2D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we use Monte Carlo simulation method to deal with SATs on a square lattice and a triangular lattice in two dimensions in the T→∞ limit.Besides that,the SAT model has been generalized in the coordination number q→∞ limit.The characteristics of SATs in the two limits q=3 and q→∞ have been qualitatively discussed.The obtained results reveal that the SATs have intermediate behaviors between that of SAWs and RWs.The critical exponents of SATs have intermediate behaviors between that of SAWs and RWs.The critical exponents of SATs are monotonous functions of q.With different q,SATs correspondingly belong to different universality classes.For example,on a hexagonal lattice,SATs and SAWs belong to the same universality class;in the limiting situation q→∞,SATs and RWs belong to the same universality class;when q=4 or q=6,SATs and SAWs or RWs belong to the different universality class.

  8. Solving SAT problem by heuristic polarity decision-making algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a heuristic polarity decision-making algorithm for solving Boolean satisfiability (SAT). The algorithm inherits many features of the current state-of-the-art SAT solvers, such as fast BCP, clause recording, restarts, etc. In addition, a preconditioning step that calculates the polarities of variables according to the cover distribution of Karnaugh map is introduced into DPLL procedure, which greatly reduces the number of conflicts in the search process. The proposed approach is implemented as a SAT solver named DiffSat. Experiments show that DiffSat can solve many "real-life" instances in a reasonable time while the best existing SAT solvers, such as Zchaff and MiniSat, cannot. In particular, DiffSat can solve every instance of Bart benchmark suite in less than 0.03 s while Zchaff and MiniSat fail under a 900 s time limit. Furthermore, DiffSat even outperforms the outstanding incomplete algorithm DLM in some instances.

  9. Back to Basics: Solving Games with SAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QUER, S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Games became popular, within the formal verification community, after their application to automatic synthesis of circuits from specifications, and they have been receiving more and more attention since then. This paper focuses on coding the "Sokoban" puzzle, i.e., a very complex single-player strategy game. We show how its solution can be encoded and represented as a Bounded Model Checking problem, and then solved with a SAT solver. After that, to cope with very complex instances of the game, we propose two different ad-hoc divide-and-conquer strategies. Those strategies, somehow similar to state-of-the-art abstraction-and-refinement schemes, are able to decompose deep Bounded Model Checking instances into easier subtasks, trading-off between efficiency and completeness. We analyze a vast set of difficult hard-to-solve benchmark games, trying to push forward the applicability of state-of-the-art SAT solvers in the field. Those results show that games may provide one of the next frontier for the SAT community.

  10. Microstructure analysis of laboratory and in-situ compacted silts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and discusses some results of an experimental research aimed at analysing the influence of compaction variables (w and energy and method on the resulting microstructure of a compacted silty soil. In particular, the experimental data here discussed allow to compare the microstructure induced by different dynamic compaction techniques, comparing that characterising specimens obtained by two laboratory methods (Proctor standard and Harvard and that of samples compacted in-situ during the construction of an embankment built for river regimentation purposes. Both undisturbed and disturbed samples have been retrieved from the embankment, the latter one with the purpose of collecting the soil subsequently used for laboratory compaction. Microstructural analyses (SEM, MIP performed on laboratory and in-situ compacted samples evidenced a substantial similarity of the texture induced by the various compaction techniques, highlighting that laboratory compaction is suitable to provide soil samples representative of earth in-situ compacted soil.

  11. The determination of the attitude and attitude dynamics of TeamSat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Riis, Troels

    1999-01-01

    , in space, multiple autonomous processes intended for spacecraft applications such as autonomous star identification, attitude determination and identification and tracking of non-stellar objects, imaging and real-time compression of image and science data for further ground analysis. AVS successfully...... determined the attitude and attitude dynamics of TeamSat....

  12. A systematic risk management approach employed on the CloudSat project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilio, R. R.; Plourde, K. S.; Lam, T.

    2000-01-01

    The CloudSat Project has developed a simplified approach for fault tree analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. A system-level fault tree has been constructed to identify credible fault scenarios and failure modes leading up to a potential failure to meet the nominal mission success criteria.

  13. Big Software for SmallSats: Adapting cFS to CubeSat Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan P.; Crum, Gary Alex; Sheikh, Salman; Marshall, James

    2015-01-01

    Expanding capabilities and mission objectives for SmallSats and CubeSats is driving the need for reliable, reusable, and robust flight software. While missions are becoming more complicated and the scientific goals more ambitious, the level of acceptable risk has decreased. Design challenges are further compounded by budget and schedule constraints that have not kept pace. NASA's Core Flight Software System (cFS) is an open source solution which enables teams to build flagship satellite level flight software within a CubeSat schedule and budget. NASA originally developed cFS to reduce mission and schedule risk for flagship satellite missions by increasing code reuse and reliability. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which launched in 2009, was the first of a growing list of Class B rated missions to use cFS.

  14. TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murbach, Marcus; Martinez, Andres; Guarneros Luna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    TechEdSat-3p is the second generation in the TechEdSat-X series. The TechEdSat Series uses the CubeSat standards established by the California Polytechnic State University Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. With typical blocks being constructed from 1-unit (1U 10x10x10 cm) increments, the TechEdSat-3p has a 3U volume with a 30 cm length. The project uniquely pairs advanced university students with NASA researchers in a rapid design-to-flight experience lasting 1-2 semesters.The TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series provides a rapid platform for testing technologies for future NASA Earth and planetary missions, as well as providing students with an early exposure to flight hardware development and management.

  15. Analysis of students’ generated questions in laboratory learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Llorens-Molina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to attain a reliable laboratory work assessment, we argue taking the Learning Environment as a core concept and a research paradigm that considers the factors affecting the laboratory as a particularly complex educational context. With regard to Laboratory Learning Environments (LLEs, a well known approach is the SLEI (Science Laboratory Environment Inventory. The aim of this research is to design and apply an alternative and qualitative assessment tool to characterize Laboratory Learning Environments in an introductory course of organic chemistry. An alternative and qualitative assessment tool would be useful for providing feed-back for experimental learning improvement; serving as a complementary triangulation tool in educational research on LLEs; and generating meaningful categories in order to design quantitative research instruments. Toward this end, spontaneous questions by students have been chosen as a reliable source of information. To process these questions, a methodology based on the Grounded Theory has been developed to provide a framework for characterizing LLEs. This methodology has been applied in two case studies. The conclusions lead us to argue for using more holistic assessment tools in both everyday practice and research. Likewise, a greater attention should be paid to metacognition to achieve suitable self-perception concerning students’ previous knowledge and manipulative skills.

  16. AstroSat - a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Bhattacharya, D

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite, launched on 2015 September 28. It carries a suite of scientific instruments for multi-wavelength observations of astronomical sources. It is a major Indian effort in space astronomy and the context of AstroSat is examined in a historical perspective. The Performance Verification phase of AstroSat has been completed and all instruments are working flawlessly and as planned. Some brief highlights of the scientific results are also given here.

  17. Finite-Size Scaling in Random K-SAT Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Meesoon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Chanil; Jeong, Hawoong

    2010-03-01

    We propose a comprehensive view of threshold behaviors in random K-satisfiability (K-SAT) problems, in the context of the finite-size scaling (FSS) concept of nonequilibrium absorbing phase transitions using the average SAT (ASAT) algorithm. In particular, we focus on the value of the FSS exponent to characterize the SAT/UNSAT phase transition, which is still debatable. We also discuss the role of the noise (temperature-like) parameter in stochastic local heuristic search algorithms.

  18. [Laboratory diagnosis of cholera: analysis and prospects for improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesmanich, N R; Lomov, Iu M

    2009-11-01

    Microbiological monitoring of the circulation of Vibro cholerae remains one of the key factors contributing to optimization of epidemiological surveillance in a specific area and the laboratory diagnosis of cholera is a basic applied tool for the detection and characterization of isolated cultures. The quality of etiological identification of the pathogen, the competent use of procedures, and the observance of a laboratory diagnosis scheme increases the likelihood of the cholera pathogen being detected in the samples taken from human beings and environmental objects, which allows to timely notify the disease and to prevent it. The current goals of investigations include the development of more accessible and rapid methods that would further find their place in the scheme for the laboratory diagnosis of cholera.

  19. A new laboratory approach to shale analysis using NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry is a non-invasive technique commonly used to assess hydrogen-bearing fluids in petroleum reservoir rocks. Measurements made using LF-NMR provide information on rock porosity, pore-size distributions, and in some cases, fluid types and saturations (Timur, 1967; Kenyon et al., 1986; Straley et al., 1994; Brown, 2001; Jackson, 2001; Kleinberg, 2001; Hurlimann et al., 2002). Recent improvements in LF-NMR instrument electronics have made it possible to apply methods used to measure pore fluids to assess highly viscous and even solid organic phases within reservoir rocks. T1 and T2 relaxation responses behave very differently in solids and liquids; therefore the relationship between these two modes of relaxation can be used to differentiate organic phases in rock samples or to characterize extracted organic materials. Using T1-T2 correlation data, organic components present in shales, such as kerogen and bitumen, can be examined in laboratory relaxometry measurements. In addition, implementation of a solid-echo pulse sequence to refocus T2 relaxation caused by homonuclear dipolar coupling during correlation measurements allows for improved resolution of solid-phase protons. LF-NMR measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions were carried out on raw oil shale samples from the Eocene Green River Formation and pyrolyzed samples of these shales processed by hydrous pyrolysis and techniques meant to mimic surface and in-situ retorting. Samples processed using the In Situ Simulator approach ranged from bitumen and early oil generation through to depletion of petroleum generating potential. The standard T1-T2 correlation plots revealed distinct peaks representative of solid- and liquid-like organic phases; results on the pyrolyzed shales reflect changes that occurred during thermal processing. The solid-echo T1 and T2 measurements were used to improve assessment of the solid organic phases, specifically

  20. Development of Novel Integrated Antennas for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David; Fink, Patrick W.; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Development of Novel Integrated Antennas for CubeSats project is directed at the development of novel antennas for CubeSats to replace the bulky and obtrusive antennas (e.g., whip antennas) that are typically used. The integrated antennas will not require mechanical deployment and thus will allow future CubeSats to avoid potential mechanical problems and therefore improve mission reliability. Furthermore, the integrated antennas will have improved functionality and performance, such as circular polarization for improved link performance, compared with the conventional antennas currently used on CubeSats.

  1. On-Orbit Thermal Design and Validation of 1 U Standardized CubeSat of STEP Cube Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jin Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cube Laboratory for Space Technology Experimental Projects (STEP Cube Lab is a cube satellite (CubeSat classified as a pico-class satellite of 1 U (unit size. Its main mission objective is to exploit core space technologies researched by domestic universities and verify the effectiveness of these technologies through on-orbit tests using the CubeSat. To guarantee a successful mission under extreme space thermal environments, proper thermal design is important. This paper describes the development process undertaken in the thermal design of the STEP Cube Lab, based on a passive approach, and its validation test. The system functionality and thermal design were verified through thermal vacuum and thermal balance tests under space simulated thermal vacuum environment condition. Finally, the orbital temperature of each component was predicted using a highly reliable correlated thermal mathematical model of the CubeSat obtained from the thermal balance test.

  2. QUALITY ASSURANCE GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following quality assurance guidelines to provide laboratories engaged in forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism a framework to implement a quality assura...

  3. QUALITY ASSURANCE GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following quality assurance guidelines to provide laboratories engaged in forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism a framework to implement a quality assura...

  4. IP-Sat: Impact-Parameter dependent Saturation model; revised

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaeian, Amir H; Van de Klundert, Merijn; Venugopalan, Raju

    2013-01-01

    In this talk, we present a global analysis of available small-x data on inclusive DIS and exclusive diffractive processes, including the latest data from the combined HERA analysis on reduced cross sections within the Impact-Parameter dependent Saturation (IP-Sat) Model. The impact-parameter dependence of dipole amplitude is crucial in order to have a unified description of both inclusive and exclusive diffractive processes. With the parameters of model fixed via a fit to the high-precision reduced cross-section, we compare model predictions to data for the structure functions, the longitudinal structure function, the charm structure function, exclusive vector mesons production and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS). Excellent agreement is obtained for the processes considered at small x in a wide range of Q^2.

  5. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  6. Validity of the SAT for Predicting First-Year Grades: 2008 SAT Validity Sample. Statistical Report No. 2011-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brian F.; Mattern, Krista D.

    2011-01-01

    The findings for the 2008 sample are largely consistent with the previous reports. SAT scores were found to be correlated with FYGPA (r = 0.54), with a magnitude similar to HSGPA (r = 0.56). The best set of predictors of FYGPA remains SAT scores and HSGPA (r = 0.63), as the addition of the SAT sections to the correlation of HSGPA alone with FYGPA…

  7. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF LABORATORY GUIDELINES FOR ANALYSIS OF BIOTERRORISM SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    After the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2002, and the subsequent deaths associated with Bacillus anthracis spore contaminated mail, a worldwide need was apparent for increased laboratory capacity to safely analyze bioterrorism samples. The U.S. Department of ...

  8. Amchitka Island Environmental Analysis at Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracy Elias; W. F. Bauer; J.G. Eisenmenger; C.C. Jensen; B.K. Schuetz; T. C. Sorensen; B.M. White; A. L. Freeman; M. E. McIlwain

    2005-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided support to Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in their activities which is supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the impact of past nuclear testing at Amchitka Island on the ecosystemof the island and surrounding ocean. INL participated in this project in three phases, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.

  9. WindSat Polarmetric View of Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    vation model that can describe and separate different effects in the measurements using a small number of model parameters.2 Over Greenland, it is well...known that TV and TH respond mostly to the dielectric proper- ties of the snow,2 ice and firn . WindSat data now show that TU and TF respond most...for 10.7, 18.7, and 37 GHz, and all clearly show very well-defined azimuthal dependences. The solid lines represent the empirical model expressed as

  10. Bacterial Analysis by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry: An Inter-laboratory Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, Sharon C.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.; Schauki, Dunja; Jackman, Joany; Nelson, Chad P.; White, Edward

    2005-04-01

    Bacterial analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has been demonstrated in numerous laboratories, and a few attempts to compare results from different laboratories of the same organism have been made. However, it has been difficult to resolve the spectral differences between laboratories when different instruments, matrices, solvents, etc. are used. In order to establish this technique as a useful tool for bacterial identification, additional efforts in standardizing the methods by which MALDI mass spectra are obtained and comparisons of spectra from different instruments with different operators are needed. Presented here is an extension of our previous single-laboratory reproducibility study with three different laboratories in a controlled experiment with aliquots of the same bacterial culture, matrix stock solution, and calibrant standards. Using automated spectral collection of whole cell bacteria and automated data processing and analysis algorithms, fingerprints from three different laboratories were constructed and compared. Nine of the ions appeared reproducibly within all three laboratories, with additional unique ions observed within each of the laboratories. An initial evaluation of the ability to use a fingerprint generated within one laboratory for bacterial identification of a sample from another laboratory is presented, and strategies for improving identification rates between laboratories is discussed.

  11. OpenSatKit Enables Quick Startup for CubeSat Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David; Melton, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    The software required to develop, integrate, and operate a spacecraft is substantial regardless of whether its a large or small satellite. Even getting started can be a monumental task. To solve this problem, NASAs Core Flight System (cFS), NASA's 42 spacecraft dynamics simulator, and Ball Aerospaces COSMOS ground system have been integrated together into a kit called OpenSatKit that provides a complete and open source software solution for starting a new satellite mission. Users can have a working system with flight software, dynamics simulation, and a ground command and control system up and running within hours.Every satellite mission requires three primary categories of software to function. The first is Flight Software (FSW) which provides the onboard control of the satellites and its payload(s). NASA's cFS provides a great platform for developing this software. Second, while developing a satellite on earth, it is necessary to simulate the satellites orbit, attitude, and actuators, to ensure that the systems that control these aspects will work correctly in the real environment. NASAs 42 simulator provides these functionalities. Finally, the ground has to be able to communicate with the satellite, monitor its performance and health, and display its data. Additionally, test scripts have to be written to verify the system on the ground. Ball Aerospace's COSMOS command and control system provides this functionality. Once the OpenSatKit is up and running, the next step is to customize the platform and get it running on the end target. Starting from a fully working system makes porting the cFS from Linux to a users platform much easier. An example Raspberry Pi target is included in the kit so users can gain experience working with a low cost hardware target. All users can benefit from OpenSatKit but the greatest impact and benefits will be to SmallSat missions with constrained budgets and small software teams. This paper describes OpenSatKits system design, the

  12. Implementation of Time and Frequency Response Analysis for Web-Based Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyana Sapula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Dar Es Salaam has developed the web-based laboratory for Time and Frequency Response Analysis. The purpose of this web-based laboratory is the utilization of real data from real experiments, in terms of instrumentation and experimental circuits, rather than simulations. The use of webbased laboratory came after realizing the difficulties imposed by the traditional laboratories. Web-based laboratories allow students and educators to interact with real laboratory equipment located anywhere in the world at anytime. This paper presents the implementation of web-based laboratory of single stage common emitter, resistor capacitor coupled amplifier using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrument Suite platform. Two components are deployed: time response analysis and frequency response analysis. The experiment allows students to carryout time and frequency analysis of the amplifier. The modular can be used to any microelectronic circuits to carry out any time response and frequency response analysis. Both the time response and frequency response analysis results of the amplifier are validated.

  13. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  14. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  15. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  16. Time-Resolved CubeSat Photometry with a Low Cost Electro-Optics System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasdia, F.; Barjatya, A.; Bilardi, S.

    2016-09-01

    Once the orbits of small debris or CubeSats are determined, optical rate-track follow-up observations can provide information for characterization or identification of these objects. Using the Celestron 11" RASA telescope and an inexpensive CMOS machine vision camera, we have obtained time-series photometry from dozens of passes of small satellites and CubeSats over sites in Florida and Massachusetts. The fast readout time of the CMOS detector allows temporally resolved sampling of glints from small wire antennae and structural facets of rapidly tumbling objects. Because the shape of most CubeSats is known, these light curves can be used in a mission support function for small satellite operators to diagnose or verify the proper functioning of an attitude control system or deployed antenna or instrument. We call this telescope system and the accompanying analysis tools OSCOM for Optical tracking and Spectral characterization of CubeSats for Operational Missions. We introduce the capability of OSCOM for space object characterization, and present photometric observations demonstrating the potential of high frame rate small satellite photometry.

  17. Statistical Properties of Microbursts Derived from the FIREBIRD-II CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumko, M.; Sample, J.; Klumpar, D. M.; Spence, H. E.; Crew, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    The FIREBIRD-II CubeSats have been successfully operating in a high-inclination, low-earth-orbit since January 31st, 2015. The FIREBIRD CubeSats were designed to observe relativistic electron microbursts. A microburst is a sharp increase (often greater than an order of magnitude) in precipitating electron flux lasting 100 ms. Each CubeSat contains two solid state detectors with complementary geometric factors which measure electrons from 200 keV to 1 MeV. Observations are gathered in campaigns, and the two data products are Context and HiRes. Context is an electron count rate from two energy channels at a 6 s cadence, and HiRes is at a cadence as fast as 12.5 ms. Context data is downlinked for the entirety of the campaign, but due to a tight telemetry budget, only a specified subset of HiRes data is downlinked. Microbursts have been simultaneously observed when the CubeSats were separated by as little as 10 km. A technique to automatically identify microbursts in the data using wavelet analysis is evaluated. Various fitting techniques are applied to the bursts and used to determine distributions of microburst parameters such as duration, repetition and dispersion as a function of energy.

  18. CubeSat quantum communications mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, Daniel K.L. [University of Strathclyde, SUPA Department of Physics, Glasgow (United Kingdom); University of Strathclyde, Strathclyde Space Institute, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ling, Alex [National University of Singapore, Centre for Quantum Technologies, Singapore (Singapore); National University of Singapore, Dept. of Physics, Singapore (Singapore); Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo [Universita degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Padova (Italy); Greenland, Steve; Kerr, Emma [University of Strathclyde, Advanced Space Concepts Laboratory, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Macdonald, Malcolm [Technology and Innovation Centre, Scottish Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Weinfurter, Harald [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Kuiper, Hans [Delft University of Technology, Space Systems Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Charbon, Edoardo [AQUA, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Ursin, Rupert [Vienna Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-12-15

    Quantum communication is a prime space technology application and offers near-term possibilities for long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) and experimental tests of quantum entanglement. However, there exists considerable developmental risks and subsequent costs and time required to raise the technological readiness level of terrestrial quantum technologies and to adapt them for space operations. The small-space revolution is a promising route by which synergistic advances in miniaturization of both satellite systems and quantum technologies can be combined to leap-frog conventional space systems development. Here, we outline a recent proposal to perform orbit-to-ground transmission of entanglement and QKD using a CubeSat platform deployed from the International Space Station (ISS). This ambitious mission exploits advances in nanosatellite attitude determination and control systems (ADCS), miniaturised target acquisition and tracking sensors, compact and robust sources of single and entangled photons, and high-speed classical communications systems, all to be incorporated within a 10 kg 6 litre mass-volume envelope. The CubeSat Quantum Communications Mission (CQuCoM) would be a pathfinder for advanced nanosatellite payloads and operations, and would establish the basis for a constellation of low-Earth orbit trusted-nodes for QKD service provision. (orig.)

  19. Resolución de los problemas MaxSAT y MinSAT mediante programación lineal entera

    OpenAIRE

    Belenguer Seuma, Andreu

    2012-01-01

    Presentación de una traducción de los problemas MaxSAT y MinSAT a un problema de programación lineal entera e implementación de un resolutor MaxSAT y MinSAT usando Python y el software de programación lineal entera CPLEX. Evaluación de los resultados comparándolos con los de la MaxSAT Evaluation 2010.

  20. Comparing State SAT Scores Using a Mixture Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungKoung Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Presented at the national conference for AERA (American Educational Research Association) in April 2009. The large variability of SAT taker population across states makes state-by-state comparisons of the SAT scores challenging. Using a mixture modeling approach, therefore, the current study presents a method of identifying subpopulations in terms…

  1. Airborne campaigns for CryoSat prelaunch calibration and validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Henriette; Hanson, Susanne; Hvidegaard, Sine Munk

    2011-01-01

    After the successful launch of CryoSat-2 in April 2010, the first direct validation campaign of the satellite is planned for spring 2011. DTU Space has been involved in ESA’s CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) with airborne activities since 2003. To validate the prelaunch performance of the ...

  2. Along-track Resolution of CryoSat Data for Marine Gravity Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E. M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    The CryoSat mission's primary goal is to monitor elevation changes of ice-covered areas, but its excellent altimeter range precision and dense spatial coverage are providing major improvements to the accuracy of the marine gravity field. Development of optimal methods for combining CryoSat measurements with older altimetry data sets first requires an assessment of this new altimeter's spatial resolution capabilities. This is accomplished by performing a cross-spectral analysis of tracks that repeat to within about 1 kilometer apart. The spectral coherence is a measure of the ratio of the common geoid signal to the time varying oceanographic noise, as a function of spatial wavelength. The value of coherence is close to 1 at longer wavelengths where the signal dominates, and is small (day repeat tracks come from adjacent regions in the North Atlantic Ocean. To obtain statistically significant coherence estimates we used the Welch's modified periodogram method on multiple passes. The data were pre-whitened by taking the along-track derivative, resulting in along-track slope. We found that LRM slope acquisitions have a resolution limit of 28 kilometers, while for SAR, this was at 29 kilometers. In comparison, previously published values using a similar analysis in another area of the Atlantic quote a 33-kilometer resolution for Geosat, and 38-kilometer resolution for ERS-1 (Yale et al, 1995). These preliminary results suggest that the spatial resolution of CryoSat-derived gravity will be at least 1.2 times better than previous models. Additional improvements in resolution will come from averaging all available altimetry data, as well as additional repeat measurements by CryoSat. We note that the geoid signal and oceanographic noise are expected to vary throughout the global ocean. At the meeting, we will present a global investigation of the resolution of CryoSat data, and also a comparison of coherence levels with those from Envisat and Jason-1.

  3. An Analysis of Medical Laboratory Technology Journals' Instructions for Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Martina; Mlinaric, Ana; Omazic, Jelena; Supak-Smolcic, Vesna

    2016-08-01

    Instructions for authors (IFA) need to be informative and regularly updated. We hypothesized that journals with a higher impact factor (IF) have more comprehensive IFA. The aim of the study was to examine whether IFA of journals indexed in the Journal Citation Reports 2013, "Medical Laboratory Technology" category, are written in accordance with the latest recommendations and whether the quality of instructions correlates with the journals' IF. 6 out of 31 journals indexed in "Medical Laboratory Technology" category were excluded (unsuitable or unavailable instructions). The remaining 25 journals were scored based on a set of 41 yes/no questions (score 1/0) and divided into four groups (editorial policy, research ethics, research integrity, manuscript preparation) by three authors independently (max score = 41). We tested the correlation between IF and total score and the difference between scores in separate question groups. The median total score was 26 (21-30) [portion of positive answers 0.63 (0.51-0.73)]. There was no statistically significant correlation between a journal's IF and the total score (rho = 0.291, P = 0.159). IFA included recommendations concerning research ethics and manuscript preparation more extensively than recommendations concerning editorial policy and research integrity (Ht = 15.91, P = 0.003). Some policies were poorly described (portion of positive answers), for example: procedure for author's appeal (0.04), editorial submissions (0.08), appointed body for research integrity issues (0.08). The IF of the "Medical Laboratory Technology" journals does not reflect a journals' compliance to uniform standards. There is a need for improving editorial policies and the policies on research integrity.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group; Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group; Pasqualini, Donatella [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group; Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  5. Analysis of power demand signal in laboratory rotary mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smyksy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises the power measurement data for the main assemblies in a prototype turbine mixers for laboratory applications. Of particular interest are power demand signals in the paddle stirrer and the rotor. Tests were performed for the variable moisture content of the moulding sand containing bentonite. The process is described as dynamic and considered from the standpoint of automatics. Potential applications of the power demand signal are investigated in the context of the study of dynamics of the mixing processes, in terms of control of the water feeding to the moulding sand and for the purpose of evaluating the energy consumption.

  6. Formalization of Abstract State Transition Systems for SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Marić, Filip

    2011-01-01

    We present a formalization of modern SAT solvers and their properties in a form of abstract state transition systems. SAT solving procedures are described as transition relations over states that represent the values of the solver's global variables. Several different SAT solvers are formalized, including both the classical DPLL procedure and its state-of-the-art successors. The formalization is made within the Isabelle/HOL system and the total correctness (soundness, termination, completeness) is shown for each presented system (with respect to a simple notion of satisfiability that can be manually checked). The systems are defined in a general way and cover procedures used in a wide range of modern SAT solvers. Our formalization builds up on the previous work on state transition systems for SAT, but it gives machine-verifiable proofs, somewhat more general specifications, and weaker assumptions that ensure the key correctness properties. The presented proofs of formal correctness of the transition systems c...

  7. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing... collection to final disposition of specimens, and testing laboratories shall use appropriate cutoff levels in...

  8. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Kinetics Laboratory: Enhanced Data Analysis and Student-Designed Mini-Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    A highly instructive, wide-ranging laboratory project in which students study the effects of various parameters on the enzymatic activity of alcohol dehydrogenase has been adapted for the upper-division biochemistry and physical biochemistry laboratory. Our two main goals were to provide enhanced data analysis, featuring nonlinear regression, and…

  9. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Kinetics Laboratory: Enhanced Data Analysis and Student-Designed Mini-Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    A highly instructive, wide-ranging laboratory project in which students study the effects of various parameters on the enzymatic activity of alcohol dehydrogenase has been adapted for the upper-division biochemistry and physical biochemistry laboratory. Our two main goals were to provide enhanced data analysis, featuring nonlinear regression, and…

  10. Laboratory Investigations on Estuary Salinity Mixing: Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. Nuryazmeen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are bodies of water along the coasts that are formed when fresh water from rivers flows into and mixes with salt water from the ocean. The estuaries serve as a habitat to some aquatic lives, including mangroves. Human-induced activities such as dredging of shipping lanes along the bottom estuarine, the disposal of industrial wastes into the water system and shoreline development influence estuarine dynamics which include mixing process. These activities might contribute to salinity changes and further adversely affect the estuarine ecosystem. In order to study at the characteristics of the mixing between salt water (estuary and freshwater (river, a preliminary investigation had been done in the laboratory. Fresh water was released from one end of the flume and overflowing at weir at the other end. Meanwhile, salt water was represented by the red dye tracer released through a weir and intruded upstream as a gravity current. The isohalines are plotted to see the salinity patterns. Besides, to examine the spatial and temporal salinity profiles along the laboratory investigations, the plotted graphs have been made. The results show that the changes in salinity level along the flume due to mixing between fresh water and salt water. This showed typical salt-wedge estuary characteristics.

  11. Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Lal, Bhavya

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study conducted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The study focused on the scientific potential and technological promise of CubeSats. We will first review the growth of the CubeSat platform from an education-focused technology toward a platform of importance for technology development, science, and commercial use, both in the United States and internationally. The use has especially exploded in recent years. For example, of the over 400 CubeSats launched since 2000, more than 80% of all science-focused ones have been launched just in the past four years. Similarly, more than 80% of peer-reviewed papers describing new science based on CubeSat data have been published in the past five years.We will then assess the technological and science promise of CubeSats across space science disciplines, and discuss a subset of priority science goals that can be achieved given the current state of CubeSat capabilities. Many of these goals address targeted science, often in coordination with other spacecraft, or by using sacrificial or high-risk orbits that lead to the demise of the satellite after critical data have been collected. Other goals relate to the use of CubeSats as constellations or swarms, deploying tens to hundreds of CubeSats that function as one distributed array of measurements.Finally, we will summarize our conclusions and recommendations from this study; especially those focused on nearterm investment that could improve the capabilities of CubeSats toward increased science and technological return and enable the science communities’ use of CubeSats.

  12. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  13. Evaluation of sugarcane laboratory ensiling and analysis techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André de Faria Pedroso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the effects of laboratory-silo type and method of silage extract production, respectively, on sugarcane silage fermentation and recovery of fermentation products. Sugarcane was mechanically harvested and ensiled in three different types of laboratory silos (five replicates: 9.7 × 30 cm PVC tubes with tight lids, equipped or unequipped with Bunsen valves, and 20 L plastic buckets with tight lids and Bunsen valves. Three methods were used to produce silage extracts for pH, ethanol, acetic and lactic acids determination: extraction of silage juice by a hydraulic press and production of water extracts using a stomacher or a blender. Total dry matter loss (231 g/kg DM was not affected by silo type. No interactions between silo type and method of silage extract production were observed for ethanol and organic acids contents in the silages. Interaction between silo type and method of silage extract preparation was detected for pH. Silo type affected ethanol content but did not affect lactic and acetic acids concentration in the silages. Dry matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber and ash were not affected by silo type. The method used to produce silage extracts affected the recovery of all fermentation products analyzed in the silages. Recovery of ethanol and acetic acid was higher when silage extracts were produced using a blender. For lactic acid recovery, the hydraulic press method was superior to the other two methods. Silage fermentation pattern is not affected by silo type, but the method used to produce silage extracts and some characteristics of silos affect the recovery of volatile fermentation products.

  14. CubeSats for Astrophysics: The Current Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, David R.; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2017-01-01

    Cubesats are small satellites built to multiples of 1U (1000 cm3). The 2016 NRC Report “Achieving Science with CubeSats” indicates that between 2013 and 2018 NASA and NSF sponsored 104 CubeSats. Of those, only one is devoted to astrophysics: HaloSat (PI: P. Kaaret), a 6U CubeSat with an X-ray payload to study the hot galactic halo.Despite this paucity of missions, CubeSats have a lot of potential for astrophysics. To assess the science landscape that a CubeSat astrophysics mission may occupy, we consider the following parameters:1-Wavelength: CubeSats are not competitive in the visible, unless the application (e.g. high precision photometry) is difficult to do from the ground. Thermal IR science is limited by the lack of low-power miniaturized cryocoolers and by the large number of infrared astrophysical missions launched or planned. In the UV, advances in δ-doping processes result in larger sensitivity with smaller apertures. Commercial X-ray detectors also allow for competitive science.2-Survey vs. Pointed observations: All-sky surveys have been done at most wavelengths from X-rays to Far-IR and CubeSats will not be able to compete in sensitivity with them. CubeSat science should then center on specific objects or object classes. Due to poor attitude control, unresolved photometry is scientifically more promising that extended imaging.3-Single-epoch vs. time domain: CubeSat apertures cannot compete in sensitivity with big satellites when doing single-epoch observations. However, time-domain astrophysics is an area in which CubeSats can provide very valuable science return.Technologically, CubeSat astrophysics is limited by:1-Lack of large apertures: The largest aperture CubeSat launched is ~10 cm, although deployable apertures as large as 20 cm could be fitted to 6U buses.2-Poor attitude control: State-of-the-art systems have demonstrated jitter of ~10” on timescales of seconds. Jitter imposes limits on image quality and, coupled with detector errors

  15. Inter-laboratory comparison of the in vivo comet assay including three image analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Guérard, Melanie

    2015-12-01

    To compare the extent of potential inter-laboratory variability and the influence of different comet image analysis systems, in vivo comet experiments were conducted using the genotoxicants ethyl methanesulfonate and methyl methanesulfonate. Tissue samples from the same animals were processed and analyzed-including independent slide evaluation by image analysis-in two laboratories with extensive experience in performing the comet assay. The analysis revealed low inter-laboratory experimental variability. Neither the use of different image analysis systems, nor the staining procedure of DNA (propidium iodide vs. SYBR® Gold), considerably impacted the results or sensitivity of the assay. In addition, relatively high stability of the staining intensity of propidium iodide-stained slides was found in slides that were refrigerated for over 3 months. In conclusion, following a thoroughly defined protocol and standardized routine procedures ensures that the comet assay is robust and generates comparable results between different laboratories.

  16. Improved Oceanographic Measurements with CryoSat SAR Altimetry: Application to the Coastal Zone and Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, David; Nilo Garcia, Pablo; Cancet, Mathilde; Andersen, Ole; Stenseng, Lars; Martin, Francisco; Cipollini, Paolo; Benveniste, Jérôme; Restano, Marco; Ambrósio, Américo

    2016-04-01

    The ESA CryoSat mission is the first space mission to carry a radar altimeter that can operate in Synthetic Aperture Radar "SAR" (or delay-Doppler) and interferometric SAR (SARin) modes. Studies on CryoSat data have analysed and confirmed the improved ocean measuring capability offered by SAR mode altimetry, through increased resolution and precision in sea surface height and wave height measurements, and have also added significantly to our understanding of the issues around the processing and interpretation of SAR altimeter echoes. We present work in four themes, building on work initiated in the CryoSat Plus for Oceans project (CP4O), each investigating different aspects of the opportunities offered by this new technology. The first two studies address the coastal zone, a critical region for providing a link between open-ocean and shelf sea measurements with those from coastal in-situ measurements, in particular tide gauges. Although much has been achieved in recent years through the Coastal Altimetry community, (http://www.coastalt.eu/community) there is a limit to the capabilities of pulse-limited altimetry which often leaves an un-measured "white strip" right at the coastline. Firstly, a thorough analysis was made of the performance of "SAR" altimeter data (delay-Doppler processed) in the coastal zone. This quantified the performance, confirming the significant improvement over "conventional" pulse-limited altimetry. In the second study a processing scheme was developed with CryoSat SARin mode data to enable the retrieval of valid oceanographic measurements in coastal areas with complex topography. Thanks to further development of the algorithms, a new approach was achieved that can also be applied to SAR and conventional altimetry data (e.g., Sentinel-3, Jason series, EnviSat). The third part of the project developed and evaluated improvements to the SAMOSA altimeter re-tracker that is implemented in the Sentinel-3 processing chain. The modifications to the

  17. Exploiting Dynamically Propositional Logic Structures in SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jingchao

    2011-01-01

    The 32-bit hwb (hwb-n32 for short) problem is from equivalence checking that arises in combining two circuits computing the hidden weighted bit function. Since 2002, it remains still unsolvable in every SAT competition. This paper focuses on solving problems such as hwb-n32. Generally speaking, modern solvers can detect only XOR, AND, OR and ITE gates. Other non-clausal formulas (propositional logic structures) cannot be detected. To solve the hwb-n32 problem, we extract dynamically some special propositional logic structures, and then use a variant of DPLL-based solvers to solve the subproblem simplified by the extracted structure information. Using the dynamic extraction technique, we solved efficiently the hwb-n32 problem, even some of which were solved within 3000 seconds.

  18. CryoSat Data Quality Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzinac, C.; Parrinello, T.; Féménias, P.; Fornari, M.; Mannan, R.

    2011-12-01

    CryoSat data are routinely controlled by ESA-ESRIN-SPPA office with various tools and with the support of the IDEAS industrial consortium. This poster introduces to the structure of the data products, the available quality tools (Quality Checks and Monitoring Facility) and methodology, and shows the main statistical results from the data acquired since the end of the commissioning phase (January 2011). Due to some anomalies still present in the data, ESA is planning to operate a new version of the processors by the end of 2011, followed by a full reprocessing campaign in 2012. This poster presents the reprocessing schedule and the main improvements expected from the new release of the specialized processors at Level 1b and at Level 2.

  19. Integrating advanced reasoning into a SAT solver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Min; TANG Pushan; ZHOU Dian

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a SAT solver based on the combination of DPLL (Davis Putnam Logemann and Loveland) algorithm and Failed Literal Detection (FLD), one of the advanced reasoning techniques. We propose a Dynamic Filtering method that consists of two restriction rules for FLD: internal and external filtering. The method reduces the number of tested literals in FLD and its computational time while maintaining the ability to find most of the failed literals in each decision level. Unlike the pre-defined criteria, literals are removed dynamically in our approach. In this way, our FLD can adapt itself to different real-life benchmarks. Many useless tests are therefore avoided and as a consequence it makes FLD fast. Some other static restrictions are also added to further improve the efficiency of FLD. Experiments show that our optimized FLD is much more efficient than other advanced reasoning techniques.

  20. Identification of Novel Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers by Cross-laboratory Microarray Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋学锋; 朱涛; 杨洁; 李双; 叶双梅; 廖书杰; 孟力; 卢运萍; 马丁

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to pool information in epithelial ovarian cancer by combining studies using Affymetrix expression microarray datasets made at different laboratories to identify novel biomarkers.Epithelial microarray expression information across laboratories was screened and combined after preprocessing raw microarray data,then ANOVA and unpaired T test statistical analysis was performed for identifying differentially expressed genes(DEGs),followed by clustering and pathway analysis for these ...

  1. Operating environmental laboratories--an overview of analysis equipment procurement and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, G H; Shinde, V M; Kanade, G S; Kondawar, V K

    2003-10-01

    Management of equipment in an environmental laboratory requires planning involving assessment of the workload on a particular equipment, establishment of criteria and specification for the purchase of equipment, creation of infrastructure for installation and testing of the equipment, optimization of analysis conditions, development of preventive maintenance procedures and establishment of in-house repair facilities. The paper reports the results of such an analysis carried for operating environmental laboratories associated with R& D work, serving as an Govt. laboratory or attached to an Industry for analysing industrial emissions.

  2. Performance of laboratories in speciation analysis in seafood – Case of methylmercury and inorganic arsenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Ines; Baxter, Malcolm; Devesa, Vicenta;

    2011-01-01

    The international measurement evaluation program (IMEP) has together with the European Reference Laboratory for Heavy Metals in Feed and Food (EU-RL-HM) carried out two interlaboratory comparisons (ILC) in 2010 on the measurement of trace metals, as well as methylmercury and inorganic arsenic...... in seafood. In IMEP-109 only EU National Reference Laboratories (NRL) took part, while IMEP-30 was open to all laboratories. In this article only methylmercury and inorganic arsenic analysis will be discussed, as these appear generally to be more problematic measurands. They are also particularly interesting...... arsenic analysis. Results for inorganic arsenic were spread, but not method dependant. The measurand seems to be difficult to analyse in this matrix and possible method issues were identified. Methylmercury results were satisfactory, but not many laboratories perform this type of analysis because...

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory site data for safety-analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, F.C.

    1982-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory site data contained herein were compiled in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office Order OR 5481.1. That order sets forth assignment of responsibilities for safety analysis and review responsibilities and provides guidance relative to the content and format of safety analysis reports. The information presented in this document is intended for use by reference in individual safety analysis reports where applicable to support accident analyses or the establishment of design bases of significance to safety, and it is applicable only to Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities in Bethel and Melton Valleys. This information includes broad descriptions of the site characteristics, radioactive waste handling and monitoring practices, and the organization and operating policies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The historical background of the Laboratory is discussed briefly and the overall physical situation of the facilities is described in the following paragraphs.

  4. A Content Analysis of General Chemistry Laboratory Manuals for Evidence of Higher-Order Cognitive Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domin, Daniel S.

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory instructional environment is ideal for fostering the development of problem-solving, manipulative, and higher-order thinking skills: the skills needed by today's learner to compete in an ever increasing technology-based society. This paper reports the results of a content analysis of ten general chemistry laboratory manuals. Three experiments from each manual were examined for evidence of higher-order cognitive activities. Analysis was based upon the six major cognitive categories of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The results of this study show that the overwhelming majority of general chemistry laboratory manuals provide tasks that require the use of only the lower-order cognitive skills: knowledge, comprehension, and application. Two of the laboratory manuals were disparate in having activities that utilized higher-order cognition. I describe the instructional strategies used within these manuals to foster higher-order cognitive development.

  5. A scalable and accurate targeted gene assembly tool (SAT-Assembler) for next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Yanni; Cole, James R

    2014-08-01

    Gene assembly, which recovers gene segments from short reads, is an important step in functional analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Lacking quality reference genomes, de novo assembly is commonly used for RNA-Seq data of non-model organisms and metagenomic data. However, heterogeneous sequence coverage caused by heterogeneous expression or species abundance, similarity between isoforms or homologous genes, and large data size all pose challenges to de novo assembly. As a result, existing assembly tools tend to output fragmented contigs or chimeric contigs, or have high memory footprint. In this work, we introduce a targeted gene assembly program SAT-Assembler, which aims to recover gene families of particular interest to biologists. It addresses the above challenges by conducting family-specific homology search, homology-guided overlap graph construction, and careful graph traversal. It can be applied to both RNA-Seq and metagenomic data. Our experimental results on an Arabidopsis RNA-Seq data set and two metagenomic data sets show that SAT-Assembler has smaller memory usage, comparable or better gene coverage, and lower chimera rate for assembling a set of genes from one or multiple pathways compared with other assembly tools. Moreover, the family-specific design and rapid homology search allow SAT-Assembler to be naturally compatible with parallel computing platforms. The source code of SAT-Assembler is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/sat-assembler/. The data sets and experimental settings can be found in supplementary material.

  6. A scalable and accurate targeted gene assembly tool (SAT-Assembler for next-generation sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene assembly, which recovers gene segments from short reads, is an important step in functional analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Lacking quality reference genomes, de novo assembly is commonly used for RNA-Seq data of non-model organisms and metagenomic data. However, heterogeneous sequence coverage caused by heterogeneous expression or species abundance, similarity between isoforms or homologous genes, and large data size all pose challenges to de novo assembly. As a result, existing assembly tools tend to output fragmented contigs or chimeric contigs, or have high memory footprint. In this work, we introduce a targeted gene assembly program SAT-Assembler, which aims to recover gene families of particular interest to biologists. It addresses the above challenges by conducting family-specific homology search, homology-guided overlap graph construction, and careful graph traversal. It can be applied to both RNA-Seq and metagenomic data. Our experimental results on an Arabidopsis RNA-Seq data set and two metagenomic data sets show that SAT-Assembler has smaller memory usage, comparable or better gene coverage, and lower chimera rate for assembling a set of genes from one or multiple pathways compared with other assembly tools. Moreover, the family-specific design and rapid homology search allow SAT-Assembler to be naturally compatible with parallel computing platforms. The source code of SAT-Assembler is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/sat-assembler/. The data sets and experimental settings can be found in supplementary material.

  7. Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, J. W.; Houser, R. M.; Erdman, W. W.

    1991-12-01

    During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document.

  8. Analysis of drying potato kinetics in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatković B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry is in its nature a fundamental science, but nowadays its results are increasingly used in practice. In such a way, many syntheses of important nutrition and industrial compounds (chemical technology, or destruction of harmful substances (chemical ecology have been developed. The analytic part of chemistry (analytical chemistry has found a significant usage even in optimization of technological processes of food technology. One of the oldest ways of food preservation is drying (dehydration. The basis of this process of preservation is to vaporize water, to dry enough the product, in order to stop the activity of enzymes and possibility of microorganisms’ development. Water in agricultural products is not free but bound to dry matter. Therefore, for its vaporizing it is necessary to bring enough heat. The part of the brought heat is used for vaporizing water, but one part of it becomes the energy for activation of several chemical reactions that decrease the nutritive values and the quality of future food. Therefore, the important engineering problem emerges: determination of optimal conditions for drying. For optimization of technological process of drying, it is necessary to do mathematical modeling of dependence of water vaporizing speed from environmental conditions beforehand. The aim of this paper is to determine potato pieces drying kinetics in laboratory dryer, in order to determine the optimal conditions for its industrial dehydration. It was established that in the first quarter of the time of drying evaporated 28.3% of total evaporation of water, and then in order by quarters: 53%, 14.1% and 4.6%, respectively. The greatest speed of drying was realized at moisture of potatoes about 50%.

  9. CryoSat-2 Altimetry Applications over Rivers and Lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Liguang; Schneider, Raphael; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2017-01-01

    pattern and provides new opportunities for hydrologic research. The narrow inter-track distance (7.5 km at the equator) makes it possible to monitor many lakes and rivers and SAR mode provides a finer along-track resolution, higher return power and speckle reduction through multi-looks. However, CryoSat-2...... combined with hydrologic/hydrodynamic models. Except CryoSat-2, all radar altimetry missions have been operated in conventional low resolution mode with a short repeat orbit (35 days or less). CryoSat-2, carrying a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) altimeter, has a 369-day repeat and a drifting ground track...

  10. 3D Printing the Complete CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kief, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The 3D Printing the Complete CubeSat project is designed to advance the state-of-the-art in 3D printing for CubeSat applications. Printing in 3D has the potential to increase reliability, reduce design iteration time and provide greater design flexibility in the areas of radiation mitigation, communications, propulsion, and wiring, among others. This project is investigating the possibility of including propulsion systems into the design of printed CubeSat components. One such concept, an embedded micro pulsed plasma thruster (mPPT), could provide auxiliary reaction control propulsion for a spacecraft as a means to desaturate momentum wheels.

  11. Source Code Analysis Laboratory (SCALe) for Energy Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    and standar - dizing them through the ISO/IEC process should eliminate many of the problems encountered at the NIST SATE and also increase the...view the source code, using both structured and unstruct ons of secure coding rules discovered. However, manua than automated analysis, and the

  12. Laboratory longitudinal diffusion tests: 2. Parameter estimation by inverse analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Hiratsuka, T.

    2008-04-01

    This study focuses on the verification of test interpretations for different state analyses of diffusion experiments. Part 1 of this study identified that steady, quasi-steady and equilibrium state analyses for the through- and in-diffusion tests with solution reservoirs are generally feasible where the tracer is not highly sorptive. In Part 2 we investigate parameter identifiability in transient-state analysis of reservoir concentration variation using a numerical approach. For increased generality, the analytical models, objective functions and Jacobian matrix necessary for inverse analysis of transient-state data are reformulated using unified dimensionless parameters. In these dimensionless forms, the number of unknown parameters is reduced and a single dimensionless parameter represents the sorption property. The dimensionless objective functions are evaluated for individual test methods and parameter identifiability is discussed in relation to the sorption property. The effects of multiple minima and measurement error on parameter identifiability are also investigated. The main findings are that inverse problems for inlet and outlet reservoir concentration analyses are generally unstable and well-posed, respectively. Where the tracer is sorptive, the inverse problem for the inlet reservoir concentration analysis may have multiple minima. When insufficient measurement data is collected, multiple solutions may result and this should be taken into consideration when inversely analyzing data including that of inlet reservoir concentration. Verification of test interpretation by cross-checking different state analyses is feasible where the tracer is not highly sorptive. In an actual experiment, test interpretation validity is demonstrated through consistency between theory and practice for different state analyses.

  13. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  14. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  15. Increasing the resolution of marine gravity from CryoSat-2 using 20 and 80Hz altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abulaitijiang, Adili; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    coverage. With the launch of CryoSat-2 in 2010, the altimeter range precision is improved by the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mode. The tracks also cover up to higher latitudes (88°), providing dense spatial coverage in the polar regions. The gravity signal can be recovered from the along track surface...... retracker to optimally fit to the SAR waveforms in the Arctic by additional amplitude fitting. Then, we use the 20 Hz L1c release of the CryoSat-2 products to estimate the SSH and further derive the sea surface height variations to recover the marine gravity. Precision analysis will also carried out...

  16. Onboard autonomy on the Three Corner Sat Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S.; Engelhardt, B.; Knight, R.; Rabideau, G.; Sherwood, R.

    2001-01-01

    Three Corner Sat (3CS) is a mission of three university nanosatellites scheduled for launch on September 2002. The 3CS misison will utilize significan onboard autonomy to perform onboard science data validation and replanning.

  17. CubeSat Form Factor Thermal Control Louvers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal control of small spacecraft, including CubeSats, is a challenge for the next era of NASA spaceflight. Science objectives and components will still require...

  18. CubeSat Capabilities for Space Science Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CubeSat Capabilities for Space Science Missions combines science and engineering talent at Goddard Space Flight Center and the Wallops Flight Facility to...

  19. Laboratory laser reflectance measurement and applications to asteroid surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Daly, M. G.; Cloutis, E. A.; Tait, K. T.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Hyde, B. C.; Nicklin, I.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Laboratory reflectance measurement of asteroid analogs is an important tool for interpreting the reflectance of asteroids. One dominant factor affecting how measured reflectance changes as a function of phase angle (180° minus the scattering angle) is surface roughness [1], which is related to grain size. A major goal of this study is to be able to use the angular distributions (phase functions) of scattered light from various regions on an asteroid surface to determine the relative grain size between those regions. Grain size affects the spectral albedo and continuum slopes of surface materials, has implications in terms of understanding geologic processes on asteroids and is also valuable for the planning and operations of upcoming missions to asteroids, such as the New Frontiers OSIRIS-REx sample return mission to the asteroid (101955) Bennu [2]. Information on surface roughness is particularly powerful when combined with other datasets, such as thermal inertia maps (e.g., a smooth, low-backscatter surface of low thermal inertia likely contains fine grains). Approach To better constrain the composition and surface texture of Bennu, we are conducting experiments to investigate the laser return signature of terrestrial and meteorite analogs to Bennu. The objective is to understand the nature of laser returns given possible compositional, grain size and slope distributions on the surface of Bennu to allow surface characterization, particularly surface grain size, which would significantly aid efforts to identify suitable sites for sampling by the OSIRIS-REx mission. Setup A 1064-nm laser is used to determine the reflectance of Bennu analogs and their constituents (1064 nm is the wavelength of many laser altimeters including the one planned to fly on OSIRIS-REx). Samples of interest include serpentinites (greenalite, etc.), magnetite, and shungite. To perform the experiments, a goniometer has been built. This instrument allows reflectance measurements

  20. A SAT Encoding for Solving Games with Energy Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaella Gentilini

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a reduction from the problem of solving parity games to the satisfiability problem in propositional logic (SAT) have been proposed in [5], motivated by the success of SAT solvers in symbolic verification. With analogous motivations, we show how to exploit the notion of energy progress measure to devise a reduction from the problem of energy games to the satisfiability problem for formulas of propositional logic in conjunctive normal form.

  1. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  2. Parameterized Complexity of MaxSat Above Average

    CERN Document Server

    Crowston, Robert; Jones, Mark; Raman, Venkatesh; Saurabh, Saket

    2011-01-01

    In MaxSat, we are given a CNF formula $F$ with $n$ variables and $m$ clauses and asked to find a truth assignment satisfying the maximum number of clauses. Let $r_1,..., r_m$ be the number of literals in the clauses of $F$. Then $asat(F)=\\sum_{i=1}^m (1-2^{-r_i})$ is the expected number of clauses satisfied by a random truth assignment (the truth values to the variables are distributed uniformly and independently). It is well-known that, in polynomial time, one can find a truth assignment satisfying at least $asat(F)$ clauses. In the parameterized problem MaxSat-AA, we are to decide whether there is a truth assignment satisfying at least $asat(F)+k$ clauses, where $k$ is the parameter. We prove that MaxSat-AA is para-NP-complete and, thus, MaxSat-AA is not fixed-parameter tractable unless P$=$NP. This is in sharp contrast to MaxLin2-AA which was recently proved to be fixed-parameter tractable by Crowston et al. (arXiv:1104.1135v3). In fact, we consider a more refined version of MaxSat-AA, Max-$r(n)$-Sat-AA, w...

  3. AstroSat: From Inception to Realization and Launch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. C. Agrawal

    2017-06-01

    The origin of the idea of AstroSat multi wavelength satellite mission and how it evolved over the next 15 years from a concept to the successful development of instruments for giving concrete shape to this mission, is recounted in this article. AstroSat is the outcome of intense deliberations in the Indian astronomy community leading to a consensus for a multi wavelength Observatory having broad spectral coverage over five decades in energy covering near-UV, far-UV, soft X-ray and hard X-ray bands. The multi wavelength observation capability of AstroSat with a suite of 4 co-aligned instruments and an X-ray sky monitor on a single satellite platform, imparts a unique character to this mission. AstroSat owes its realization to the collaborative efforts of the various ISRO centres, several Indian institutions, and a few institutions abroad which developed the 5 instruments and various sub systems of the satellite. AstroSat was launched on September 28, 2015 from India in a near equatorial 650 km circular orbit. The instruments are by and large working as planned and in the past 14 months more than 200 X-ray and UV sources have been studied with it. The important characteristics of AstroSat satellite and scientific instruments will be highlighted.

  4. An analysis of microsystems development at Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Gilbert V.; Myers, David R.

    2011-06-01

    While Sandia initially was motivated to investigate emergent microsystem technology to miniaturize existing macroscale structures, present designs embody innovative approaches that directly exploit the fundamentally different material properties of a new technology at the micro- and nano-scale. Direct, hands-on experience with the emerging technology gave Sandia engineers insights that not only guided the evolution of the technology but also enabled them to address new applications that enlarged the customer base for the new technology. Sandia's early commitment to develop complex microsystems demonstrated the advantages that early adopters gain by developing an extensive design and process tool kit and a shared awareness of multiple approaches to achieve the multiple goals. As with any emergent technology, Sandia's program benefited from interactions with the larger technical community. However, custom development followed a spiral path of direct trial-and-error experience, analysis, quantification of materials properties at the micro- and nano-scale, evolution of design tools and process recipes, and an understanding of reliability factors and failure mechanisms even in extreme environments. The microsystems capability at Sandia relied on three key elements. The first was people: a mix of mechanical and semiconductor engineers, chemists, physical scientists, designers, and numerical analysts. The second was a unique facility that enabled the development of custom technologies without contaminating mainline product deliveries. The third was the arrival of specialized equipment as part of a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) enabled by the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989. Underpinning all these, the program was guided and sustained through the research and development phases by accomplishing intermediate milestones addressing direct mission needs.

  5. New results from the Colorado CubeSat and comparison with Van Allen Probes data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the NSF, launched into a highly inclined (650) low-Earth (490km x 790km) orbit on 09/13/12 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a simplified and miniaturized version of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) of University of Colorado for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched on 08/30/12, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination (100) orbit. REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 9 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. Three-month science mission (full success) was completed on 1/05/13. We are now into the extended mission phase, focusing on data analysis and modeling. REPTile measures a fraction of the total population that has small enough equatorial pitch angles to reach the altitude of CSSWE, thus measuring the precipitating population as well as the trapped population. These measurements are critical for understanding the loss of outer radiation belt electrons. New results from CSSWE and comparison with Van Allen Probes data will be presented. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, involving over 65 graduate and undergraduate students and providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  6. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bradley

    2016-06-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact, and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five "tones'" with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309 GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB community, and (iii) The Amateur Satellite Service bands in the Table of Frequency Allocations used by the Federal Communications Commission. CalSat will be placed in a polar orbit allowing visibility from observatories in the Northern Hemisphere, such as Mauna~Kea in Hawaii and Summit Station in Greenland, and the Southern Hemisphere, such as the Atacama Desert in Chile and the South Pole. CalSat also will be observable by balloon-borne instruments launched from a range of locations around the world. This global visibility makes CalSat the only source that can be observed by all terrestrial and sub-orbital observatories, thereby providing a universal standard that permits comparison between experiments using appreciably different measurement approaches.

  7. Preanalytical errors in medical laboratories: a review of the available methodologies of data collection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jamie; Atherton, Jennifer; Costelloe, Seán J; Pourmahram, Ghazaleh; Stretton, Adam; Cornes, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Preanalytical errors have previously been shown to contribute a significant proportion of errors in laboratory processes and contribute to a number of patient safety risks. Accreditation against ISO 15189:2012 requires that laboratory Quality Management Systems consider the impact of preanalytical processes in areas such as the identification and control of non-conformances, continual improvement, internal audit and quality indicators. Previous studies have shown that there is a wide variation in the definition, repertoire and collection methods for preanalytical quality indicators. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry Working Group on Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety has defined a number of quality indicators for the preanalytical stage, and the adoption of harmonized definitions will support interlaboratory comparisons and continual improvement. There are a variety of data collection methods, including audit, manual recording processes, incident reporting mechanisms and laboratory information systems. Quality management processes such as benchmarking, statistical process control, Pareto analysis and failure mode and effect analysis can be used to review data and should be incorporated into clinical governance mechanisms. In this paper, The Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine PreAnalytical Specialist Interest Group review the various data collection methods available. Our recommendation is the use of the laboratory information management systems as a recording mechanism for preanalytical errors as this provides the easiest and most standardized mechanism of data capture.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Event Performance Analysis FY 2013 4th Quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2013-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2 “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable for the previous twelve months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during the period of October 2012 through September 2013.

  9. Quantifying inter-laboratory variability in stable isotope analysis of ancient skeletal remains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Pestle

    Full Text Available Over the past forty years, stable isotope analysis of bone (and tooth collagen and hydroxyapatite has become a mainstay of archaeological and paleoanthropological reconstructions of paleodiet and paleoenvironment. Despite this method's frequent use across anthropological subdisciplines (and beyond, the present work represents the first attempt at gauging the effects of inter-laboratory variability engendered by differences in a sample preparation, and b analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration. Replicate analyses of a 14C-dated ancient human bone by twenty-one archaeological and paleoecological stable isotope laboratories revealed significant inter-laboratory isotopic variation for both collagen and carbonate. For bone collagen, we found a sizeable range of 1.8‰ for δ13Ccol and 1.9‰ for δ15Ncol among laboratories, but an interpretatively insignificant average pairwise difference of 0.2‰ and 0.4‰ for δ13Ccol and δ15Ncol respectively. For bone hydroxyapatite the observed range increased to a troublingly large 3.5‰ for δ13Cap and 6.7‰ for δ18Oap, with average pairwise differences of 0.6‰ for δ13Cap and a disquieting 2.0‰ for δ18Oap. In order to assess the effects of preparation versus analysis on isotopic variability among laboratories, a subset of the samples prepared by the participating laboratories were analyzed a second time on the same instrument. Based on this duplicate analysis, it was determined that roughly half of the isotopic variability among laboratories could be attributed to differences in sample preparation, with the other half resulting from differences in analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration. These findings have serious implications for choices made in the preparation and extraction of target biomolecules, the comparison of results obtained from different laboratories, and the interpretation of small differences in bone collagen and hydroxyapatite

  10. Quantifying inter-laboratory variability in stable isotope analysis of ancient skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, William J; Crowley, Brooke E; Weirauch, Matthew T

    2014-01-01

    Over the past forty years, stable isotope analysis of bone (and tooth) collagen and hydroxyapatite has become a mainstay of archaeological and paleoanthropological reconstructions of paleodiet and paleoenvironment. Despite this method's frequent use across anthropological subdisciplines (and beyond), the present work represents the first attempt at gauging the effects of inter-laboratory variability engendered by differences in a) sample preparation, and b) analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration). Replicate analyses of a 14C-dated ancient human bone by twenty-one archaeological and paleoecological stable isotope laboratories revealed significant inter-laboratory isotopic variation for both collagen and carbonate. For bone collagen, we found a sizeable range of 1.8‰ for δ13Ccol and 1.9‰ for δ15Ncol among laboratories, but an interpretatively insignificant average pairwise difference of 0.2‰ and 0.4‰ for δ13Ccol and δ15Ncol respectively. For bone hydroxyapatite the observed range increased to a troublingly large 3.5‰ for δ13Cap and 6.7‰ for δ18Oap, with average pairwise differences of 0.6‰ for δ13Cap and a disquieting 2.0‰ for δ18Oap. In order to assess the effects of preparation versus analysis on isotopic variability among laboratories, a subset of the samples prepared by the participating laboratories were analyzed a second time on the same instrument. Based on this duplicate analysis, it was determined that roughly half of the isotopic variability among laboratories could be attributed to differences in sample preparation, with the other half resulting from differences in analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration). These findings have serious implications for choices made in the preparation and extraction of target biomolecules, the comparison of results obtained from different laboratories, and the interpretation of small differences in bone collagen and hydroxyapatite isotope values

  11. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  12. Solar neutron observations with ChubuSat-2 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2016-07-01

    Solar neutron observation is a key in understanding of ion accerelation mechanism in the Sun surface since neutrons are hardly affected by magnetic field around the Sun and intersteller mediums unlike charged particles. However, there was only a few tenth detections so far since its discovery in 1982. Actually SEDA-AP Fiber detector (FIB) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) was suffered from a high neutron background produced by the ISS itself. ChubuSat is a series of 50-kg class microsatellite jointly depeloped by universities (Nagoya university and Daido university) and aerospace companies at the Chubu area of central Japan. The ChubuSat-2 is the second ChubuSat following the ChubuSat-1 which was launched by Russian DNEPR rocket on November 6, 2014. It was selected as one of four piggyback payloads of the X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H in 2014 summer, and will be launched by the H-IIA launch vehcles from from JAXA Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) in February 2016. The ChubuSat-2 carries a mission instrument, radiation detector (RD). The main mission of ChubuSat-2 is devoted for monitoring neutrons and gamma-rays which can be background source for ASTRO-H celestrial observations with the RD. The mission also involves a function of solar neutron observations which were originally proposed by graduate students who join the leadership development program for space exploration and research, program for leading graduate schools at Nagoya University. The RD has a similar detection area and efficiency to those of the SEDA-AP FIB, but is expected to have lower backgrounthan the ISS thanks to much smaller mass of the micro-satellite. In this paper, we will describe details of ChubuSat-2 satellite and RD, and in-orbit performance of RD.

  13. CryoSat-2 Wind and Wave Products: Monitoring, Validation and Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Saleh; Janssen, Peter; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2016-08-01

    The Fast Delivery Marine Mode (FDM) wind and wave data from CryoSat-2 radar altimeter instrument SIRAL are made available by ESA. Significant wave height and surface wind speed and its basic ingredient the altimeter backscatter are routinely monitored and validated at ECMWF. Model fields, in-situ observations and measurements from other altimeters are used for this purpose. In general, the CryoSat-2 FDM wind and wave products are of good quality. However, the wind speed product is about 1 m/s higher than the model and what other instruments (in-situ, and other altimeters). It is also about 15% noisier than the other sources. On the other hand, the SWH product is very good. However, the product may need minor adjustment at low wave heights. The timeliness of data delivery is quite good with most of the data are received within 1 hour (of the end of the 6-hour time window). Assimilating the CryoSat-2 SWH in the ECMWF Integrated Forecast System proved to have a good impact on the model analysis and forecasts. Operational assimilation of SWH at ECMWF model was realised in May 2015.

  14. Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer: A Science-Oriented, University 3U CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James P.; Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Rick; Li, Xinlin; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2016-01-01

    The miniature x-ray solar spectrometer is a three-unit CubeSat developed at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Over 40 students contributed to the project with professional mentorship and technical contributions from professors in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at University of Colorado, Boulder and from Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics scientists and engineers. The scientific objective of the miniature x-ray solar spectrometer is to study processes in the dynamic sun, from quiet sun to solar flares, and to further understand how these changes in the sun influence the Earth's atmosphere by providing unique spectral measurements of solar soft x-rays. The enabling technology providing the advanced solar soft x-ray spectral measurements is the Amptek X123, a commercial off-the-shelf silicon drift detector. The Amptek X123 has a low mass (approx. 324 g after modification), modest power consumption (approx. 2.50 W), and small volume (6.86 x 9.91 x 2.54 cm), making it ideal for a CubeSat. This paper provides an overview of the miniature x-ray solar spectrometer mission: the science objectives, project history, subsystems, and lessons learned, which can be useful for the small-satellite community.

  15. Photovoltaic Calibrations at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Uncertainty Analysis Following the ISO 17025 Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, Keith [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of photovoltaic (PV) performance with respect to reference conditions requires measuring current versus voltage for a given tabular reference spectrum, junction temperature, and total irradiance. This report presents the procedures implemented by the PV Cell and Module Performance Characterization Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to achieve the lowest practical uncertainty. A rigorous uncertainty analysis of these procedures is presented, which follows the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. This uncertainty analysis is required for the team’s laboratory accreditation under ISO standard 17025, “General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories.” The report also discusses additional areas where the uncertainty can be reduced.

  16. Photovoltaic Calibrations at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Uncertainty Analysis Following the ISO 17025 Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, Keith

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the photovoltaic (PV) performance with respect to reference conditions requires measuring the current versus voltage with respect to a given tabular reference spectrum, junction temperature, and total irradiance. This report briefly discusses the procedures implemented by the PV Cell and Module Performance Characterization Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to achieve the lowest practical uncertainty. We present a rigorous uncertainty analysis of these procedures following the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement.' This uncertainty analysis is required for our team's laboratory accreditation under ISO standard 17025, 'General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories.' The report also discusses additional areas where the uncertainty can be reduced.

  17. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  18. SAT-WIND project. Final report[Winds from satellites for offshore and coastal wind energy mapping and wind-indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasager, C.B.; Astrup, P.; Nielsen, M. (and others)

    2007-04-15

    The SAT-WIND project 'Winds from satellites for offshore and coastal wind energy mapping and wind-indexing' was a research project funded by STVF/DSF in the years 2003 to 2006 (Sagsnr. 2058-03-0006). The goal of the project was to verify the applicability of satellite wind maps derived from passive microwave, altimeter, scatterometer and imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technologies for wind energy tools for wind resources and wind-indexing. The study area was the Danish Seas including the North Sea, interior seas and the Baltic Sea. The report describes technical details on the satellite data sources including: 1) passive microwave (SSM/I, AMSR-E), 2) passive microwave polarimetric (WindSat), 3) scatterometer (ERS, QuikSCAT, Midori-2 and NSCAT), 4) altimeter (ERS, Topex, Poseidon, GFO-1, Jason-1), 5) SAR (ERS, Envisat). The SAR wind maps were treated in S-WAsP developed by Risoe National Laboratory in cooperation with GRAS A/S in the innovative project SAT-WIND-SMV (Sagsnr. 2104-05-0084) in the years 2005 and 2006 in parallel with SAT-WIND. The results from the SAT-WIND project are presented. These include ocean wind statistics, offshore wind resource estimates and comparison results for wind-indexing. (au)

  19. A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating the Sensitivity and Specificity of Western Blot Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Lovett, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Western blot analysis, commonly known as "Western blotting," is a standard tool in every laboratory where proteins are analyzed. It involves the separation of polypeptides in polyacrylamide gels followed by the electrophoretic transfer of the separated polypeptides onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. A replica of the…

  20. Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

  1. Microfluidic Gel Electrophoresis in the Undergraduate Laboratory Applied to Food Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Bhattacharya, Sanchari; Ros, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidics-based laboratory experiment for the analysis of DNA fragments in an analytical undergraduate course is presented. The experiment is set within the context of food species identification via amplified DNA fragments. The students are provided with berry samples from which they extract DNA and perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR)…

  2. An Inexpensive Electrodeposition Device and Its Use in a Quantitative Analysis Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental procedure, using an apparatus that is easy to construct, was developed to incorporate a quantitative electrogravimetric determination of the solution nickel content into an undergraduate or advanced high school quantitative analysis laboratory. This procedure produces results comparable to the procedure used for the gravimetric…

  3. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurens, Lieve M. L.

    2016-01-13

    This procedure guides the integration of laboratory analytical procedures to measure algal biomass constituents in an unambiguous manner and ultimately achieve mass balance closure for algal biomass samples. Many of these methods build on years of research in algal biomass analysis.

  4. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected…

  5. Analysis of Dextromethorphan in Cough Drops and Syrups: A Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Todd M.; Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the quantity of dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) in over-the-counter (OTC) cough drops and syrups. This experiment is appropriate for an undergraduate medicinal chemistry laboratory course when studying OTC medicines and active ingredients. Students prepare the cough drops and syrups for analysis,…

  6. Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

  7. Microfluidic Gel Electrophoresis in the Undergraduate Laboratory Applied to Food Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Bhattacharya, Sanchari; Ros, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidics-based laboratory experiment for the analysis of DNA fragments in an analytical undergraduate course is presented. The experiment is set within the context of food species identification via amplified DNA fragments. The students are provided with berry samples from which they extract DNA and perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR)…

  8. Data Analysis and Graphing in an Introductory Physics Laboratory: Spreadsheet versus Statistics Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlin, Primoz

    2010-01-01

    Two methods of data analysis are compared: spreadsheet software and a statistics software suite. Their use is compared analysing data collected in three selected experiments taken from an introductory physics laboratory, which include a linear dependence, a nonlinear dependence and a histogram. The merits of each method are compared. (Contains 7…

  9. Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

  10. [SWOT analysis of laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan-hong; Zheng, Bin

    2014-04-01

    This study analyzes the strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) of laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases by SWOT analysis comprehensively, and it puts forward some development strategies specifically, in order to provide some indicative references for the further development.

  11. Data Analysis and Graphing in an Introductory Physics Laboratory: Spreadsheet versus Statistics Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlin, Primoz

    2010-01-01

    Two methods of data analysis are compared: spreadsheet software and a statistics software suite. Their use is compared analysing data collected in three selected experiments taken from an introductory physics laboratory, which include a linear dependence, a nonlinear dependence and a histogram. The merits of each method are compared. (Contains 7…

  12. This Is not Participatory Design - A Critical Analysis of Eight Living Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    Design of Health Technology for elderly and care personnel has a high priority because of a severe increase of elderly citizens in need of health care combined with a decrease of resources in the health care sector. Desires for maintaining and improving the quality of care while reducing costs has resulted in a search for approaches that support co-operation between technology designers, elderly persons and health care professionals on innovating future care technology. Living laboratories, where areas of a care environment are transformed into a so-called platform for technology innovation, are popular. Expectations for living laboratories are high but examinations of how such laboratories support the intended participatory innovation are few. This paper presents and examines eight living laboratories set up in Danish nursing homes for technology innovation. We present the notion of a living laboratory and explicate the aspirations and expectations of this approach, and discuss why these expectations are hard to meet both on a general level and in the investigated labs. We question the basic assumptions of the possibility of reconciling the different interests of the stakeholders involved. In our analysis we focus on users in the living laboratories. We use guiding principles developed within Participatory Design to reveal the role and participation of the users - the health care professionals and the elderly - in the eight living laboratories. In general, these users played a minor role, in the labs where technical problems turned out to be main activity. We conclude that living laboratories do not nullify different/conflicting interests and that a real-life setting by itself is no guarantee for user participation.

  13. Forecasting Evaluation of WindSat in the Coastal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas F.; Bettenhausen, Mike H.; Hawkins, Jeffrey D.; Richardson, Kim; Jedlovec, Gary; Smith, Matt

    2012-01-01

    WindSat has demonstrated that measurements from polarimetric space-based microwave radiometers can be used to retrieve global ocean surface vector winds. Since the date of launch in 2003, substantial incremental improvements have been made to WindSat data processing, calibration, and retrieval algorithms. The retrievals now have higher resolution, improved wind vector ambiguity removal, and enhanced capability to represent high winds. Utilization of WindSat retrievals (wind vectors, total precipitable water, rainrate and sea surface temperature) will be demonstrated in the context of operational weather forecasting applications, especially the monitoring of topographically-forced winds. Examples will be presented from various parts of the world, including inland seas, midlatitude oceans, the tropics, and the United States. We will illustrate retrievals in extreme high- and extreme low-wind regimes, both of which can be problematic. Rain contamination will be addressed. We will include a comparison of WindSat vector maps to corresponding maps from the QuikScat scatterometer. We will discuss how near-realtime data from WindSat is being transitioned to specific offices within the National Weather Service.

  14. A novel solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) scanning scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jin; Yu, Cedric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 22 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 and Xcision Medical System, LLC, 12707 Chapel Chase Drive, Clarksville, Maryland 21209 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) recently gained extensive research interests in both diagnostic and radiation therapy fields. Conventional DTS images are generated by scanning an x-ray source and flat-panel detector pair on opposite sides of an object, with the scanning trajectory on a one-dimensional curve. A novel tomosynthesis method named solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) is proposed, where the x-ray source scans on an arbitrary shaped two-dimensional surface. Methods: An iterative algorithm in the form of total variation regulated expectation maximization is developed for SAT image reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of SAT is corroborated by computer simulation studies using three-dimensional (3D) numerical phantoms including a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom and a volumetric CT image set of a human breast. Results: SAT is able to cover more space in Fourier domain more uniformly than conventional DTS. Greater coverage and more isotropy in the frequency domain translate to fewer artifacts and more accurately restored features in the in-plane reconstruction. Conclusions: Comparing with conventional DTS, SAT allows cone-shaped x-ray beams to project from more solid angles, thus provides more coverage in the spatial-frequency domain, resulting in better quality of reconstructed image.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis for the 2nd Quarter FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of events for the 2nd Qtr FY-15.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 3rd Quarter FY2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-09-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other non-reportable issues identified at INL from July 2013 through June 2014.

  17. A tracking system for laboratory mice to support medical researchers in behavioral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, S; Mainetti, L; Patrono, L; Pieretti, S; Secco, A; Sergi, I

    2015-08-01

    The behavioral analysis of laboratory mice plays a key role in several medical and scientific research areas, such as biology, toxicology, pharmacology, and so on. Important information on mice behavior and their reaction to a particular stimulus is deduced from a careful analysis of their movements. Moreover, behavioral analysis of genetically modified mice allows obtaining important information about particular genes, phenotypes or drug effects. The techniques commonly adopted to support such analysis have many limitations, which make the related systems particularly ineffective. Currently, the engineering community is working to explore innovative identification and sensing technologies to develop new tracking systems able to guarantee benefits to animals' behavior analysis. This work presents a tracking solution based on passive Radio Frequency Identification Technology (RFID) in Ultra High Frequency (UHF) band. Much emphasis is given to the software component of the system, based on a Web-oriented solution, able to process the raw tracking data coming from a hardware system, and offer 2D and 3D tracking information as well as reports and dashboards about mice behavior. The system has been widely tested using laboratory mice and compared with an automated video-tracking software (i.e., EthoVision). The obtained results have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed solution, which is able to correctly detect the events occurring in the animals' cage, and to offer a complete and user-friendly tool to support researchers in behavioral analysis of laboratory mice.

  18. CLIpSAT for Interplanetary Missions: Common Low-cost Interplanetary Spacecraft with Autonomy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, C.

    2015-10-01

    to a useful GEO orbit as a replacement for a failed GEO asset. Interplanetary payload delivery can be undertaken by arraying these spacecraft buses, then staging each one. This approach is implemented by using CLIpSATs as propulsion "packets", delivered independently to low earth orbit and directed to rendezvous individually with a structure. Once all packets have attached themselves, the ensemble burns to follow a trajectory, delivering the payload to the desired planetary or heliocentric orbit. Autonomy technologies in CLIpSAT software include Virtual Machine Language 3 (VML 3) sequencing, JPL AutoNav software, optical navigation, ephemeris tracking, trajectory replanning, maneuver execution, advanced state-driven sequencing, expert systems, and fail-operational strategies. These technologies enable small teams to operate large numbers of spacecraft and lessen the need for the deep knowledge normally required. The consortium building CLIpSAT includes Blue Sun Enterprises, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Millennium Space Systems, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, and the Southwest Research Institute.

  19. Steam Oxidation of FeCrAl and SiC in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Unocic, Kinga A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Numerous research projects are directed towards developing accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concepts that will enhance safety margins in light water reactors (LWR) during severe accident scenarios. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of ATF solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012 [1-3] and this facility continues to support those efforts in the ATF community. Compared to the current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system, alternative cladding materials can offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation that can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident [4-5]. Thus, steam oxidation behavior is a key aspect of the evaluation of ATF concepts. This report summarizes recent work to measure steam oxidation kinetics of FeCrAl and SiC specimens in the SATS.

  20. Hosting a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) on CubeSat Spacecraft Platforms for Global Measurements of Three-Dimensional Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. K.; Neilsen, T. L.; Weston, C.; Frazier, C.; Smith, T.; Shumway, A.

    2015-12-01

    Global measurements of vertically-resolved atmospheric wind profiles offer the potential for improved weather forecasts and superior predictions of atmospheric wind patterns. A small-satellite constellation that uses a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) instrument onboard 12U CubeSats can provide measurements of global tropospheric wind profiles from space at a very low cost. These small satellites are called FTS CubeSats. This presentation will describe a spacecraft concept that provides a stable, robust platform to host the FTS payload. Of importance to the payload are power, data, station keeping, thermal, and accommodations that enable high spectral measurements to be made from a LEO orbit. The spacecraft concept draws on Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) heritage and the recent success of the Dynamic Ionosphere Cubesat Experiment (DICE) and HyperAngular Rainbow Polarimeter (HARP) missions. Working with team members, SDL built a prototype observatory (spacecraft and payload) for testing and proof of concept.

  1. Space Weather Mission of SmartSat Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akioka, M.; Miyake, W.; Nagatsuma, T.; Ohtaka, K.; Kimura, S.; Goka, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Koshiishi, H.

    2009-06-01

    The SmartSat Program is a collaborative program of government agency (NICT,JAXA) and private sector (MHI) in Japan to develop small satellite about 200 Kg. The space weather experiment of the SmartSat consists of Wide Field CME Imager (WCI), Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment (SEDA), and mission processor (MP). Both of the instruments will be principal components of the L5 mission. WCI is a imager to track CME as far as earth orbit. CME brightness near earth orbit is expected 1E-15 solar brightness or 1/200 of zodiacal light brightness. To observe such a extreme faint target, we are developing wide field of view camera with very high sensitivity and large dynamic range. These highly challenging experiment and demonstration will be implemented in SmartSat program.

  2. SATzilla: Portfolio-based Algorithm Selection for SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Lin; Hoos, Holger H; Leyton-Brown, Kevin; 10.1613/jair.2490

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely observed that there is no single "dominant" SAT solver; instead, different solvers perform best on different instances. Rather than following the traditional approach of choosing the best solver for a given class of instances, we advocate making this decision online on a per-instance basis. Building on previous work, we describe SATzilla, an automated approach for constructing per-instance algorithm portfolios for SAT that use so-called empirical hardness models to choose among their constituent solvers. This approach takes as input a distribution of problem instances and a set of component solvers, and constructs a portfolio optimizing a given objective function (such as mean runtime, percent of instances solved, or score in a competition). The excellent performance of SATzilla was independently verified in the 2007 SAT Competition, where our SATzilla07 solvers won three gold, one silver and one bronze medal. In this article, we go well beyond SATzilla07 by making the portfolio constructio...

  3. Performing High-Quality Science on CubeSats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Zurbuchen, Thomas; von Steiger, Rudolf; Bartalev, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    January 2016 the International Space Science Institute in Berne, Switzerland,hosted a two-day Forum to focus on the rapid evolution of CubeSats as an enabling technology platform, with special emphasis on their promise to perform high-quality science.The Forum was initiated in coordination...... in this area of research. Our discussions focused on four themes characteristic of CubeSats and their evolution: 1) identification of appropriate science in avariety of research disciplines, 2) technology development, 3) international vs. national approaches, and 4) educational benefits. These discussions...... with a then ongoing, and recently published study performed by the US National Academies onthe same topic (goo.gl/osCSQ3), and was focused on the international context of CubeSats-enabled science. This report summarizes the conclusions from this Forum to inform the growing international community of the activities...

  4. A Comparison of the SOCIT and DebriSat Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausay, Erick; Blake, Brandon; Boyle, Colleen; Cornejo, Alex; Horn, Alexa; Palma, Kirsten; Pistella, Frank; Sato, Taishi; Todd, Naromi; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, Marlon; Huynh, Thomas; Opiela, John; Krisko, Paula H.; Cowardin, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the differences between, and shares the lessons learned from, two hypervelocity impact experiments critical to the update of orbital debris environment models. The procedures and processes of the fourth Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT) were analyzed and related to the ongoing DebriSat experiment. SOCIT was the first hypervelocity impact test designed specifically for satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). It targeted a 1960's U.S. Navy satellite, from which data was obtained to update pre-existing NASA and DOD breakup models. DebriSat is a comprehensive update to these satellite breakup models- necessary since the material composition and design of satellites have evolved from the time of SOCIT. Specifically, DebriSat utilized carbon fiber, a composite not commonly used in satellites during the construction of the US Navy Transit satellite used in SOCIT. Although DebriSat is an ongoing activity, multiple points of difference are drawn between the two projects. Significantly, the hypervelocity tests were conducted with two distinct satellite models and test configurations, including projectile and chamber layout. While both hypervelocity tests utilized soft catch systems to minimize fragment damage to its post-impact shape, SOCIT only covered 65% of the projected area surrounding the satellite, whereas, DebriSat was completely surrounded cross-range and downrange by the foam panels to more completely collect fragments. Furthermore, utilizing lessons learned from SOCIT, DebriSat's post-impact processing varies in methodology (i.e., fragment collection, measurement, and characterization). For example, fragment sizes were manually determined during the SOCIT experiment, while DebriSat utilizes automated imaging systems for measuring fragments, maximizing repeatability while minimizing the potential for human error. In addition to exploring these variations in methodologies and processes, this paper also presents the

  5. COLD-SAT orbital experiment configured for Atlas launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Bennett, F. O.; Wachter, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The design and requirements for the proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite experiment, which is to be launched by Atlas I, are examined. The COLD-SAT experiments are categorized as class I and II; class I involves technology related to space transportation missions and class II represents alternative fluid management operations and data. The hardware for the COLD-SAT experiments consists of three hydrogen tanks contained in the experimental module; the experimental module is connected to a three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus, and thrusters are positioned on the forward and aft ends of the spacecraft and on the cylindrical portion of the experimental module. The components and systems of the experiment module and the types of experiments that can be conducted in each tank are described. Diagrams of the spacecraft configuration are provided.

  6. Experimental infection of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) with SAT-1 and SAT-2 foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosloo, W; Swanepoel, S P; Bauman, M; Botha, B; Esterhuysen, J J; Boshoff, C I; Keet, D F; Dekker, A

    2011-04-01

    The potential role of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in the epidemiology and spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) SAT types was investigated by experimental infection and detection of virus in excretions using virus isolation on primary pig kidney cell cultures. In two experiments separated by a period of 24 months, groups of four animals were needle infected with a SAT-1 or SAT-2 virus, respectively and two in-contact controls were kept with each group. Viraemia was detected 3-9 days post-infection and virus isolated from mouth washes and faeces only occasionally up to day 13. The SAT-1 virus was transmitted to only one in-contact control animal, probably via saliva that contained virus from vesicles in the mouth of a needle-infected animal. None of the animals infected with the SAT-2 virus had any vesicles in the mouth, and there was no evidence of transmission to the in-contact controls. No virus was detected in probang samples for the duration of the experiments (60 days post-infection), indicating that persistent infection probably did not establish with either of these isolates. Giraffe most likely do not play an important role in FMD dissemination. Transmission of infection would possibly occur only during close contact with other animals when mouth vesicles are evident.

  7. CubeSat mechanical design: creating low mass and durable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Gilbert; Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers the mechanical design of a low-mass, low-cost spacecraft for use in a multi-satellite sensing constellation. For a multi-spacecraft mission, aggregated small mass and cost reductions can have significant impact. One approach to mass reduction is to make cuts into the structure, removing material. Stress analysis is used to determine the level of material reduction possible. Focus areas for this paper include determining areas to make cuts to ensure that a strong shape remains, while considering the comparative cost and skill level of each type of cut. Real-world results for a CubeSat and universally applicable analysis are presented.

  8. The pre-launch status of TanSat Mission: Instrument, Retrieval algorithm, Flux inversion and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Yin, Zengshan; Yang, Zhongdong; Zheng, Yuquan; Yan, Changxiang; Tian, Xiangjun; Yang, Dongxu

    2016-04-01

    After 5 years development, The Chinese carbon dioxide observation satellite (TanSat), the first scientific experimental CO2 satellite of China, step into the pre-launch phase. The characters of pre-launch carbon dioxide spectrometer have been optimized during the laboratory test and calibration. Radiometric calibration shows a SNR of 440 (O2A 0.76um band), 300 (CO2 1.61um band) and 180 (CO2 2.06um band) on average in the typical radiance condition. Instrument line shape was calibrated automatically in using a well design testing system with laser control and record. After a series of test and calibration in laboratory, the instrumental performances meet the design requirements. TanSat will be launched on August 2016. The optimal estimation theory was involved in TanSat XCO2 retrieval algorithm in a full physics way with simulation of the radiance transfer in atmosphere. Gas absorption, aerosol and cirrus scattering and surface reflectance associate with wavelength dispersion have been considered in inversion for better correction the interference errors to XCO2. In order to simulate the radiance transfer precisely and efficiently, we develop a fast vector radiative transfer simulation method. Application of TanSat algorithm on GOSAT observation (ATANGO) is appropriate to evaluate the performance of algorithm. Validated with TCCON measurements, the ATANGO product achieves a 1.5 ppm precision. A Chinese carbon cycle data- assimilation system Tan-Tracker is developed based on the atmospheric chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. Tan-Tracker is a dual-pass data-assimilation system in which both CO2 concentrations and CO2 fluxes are simultaneously assimilated from atmospheric observations. A validation network has been established around China to support a series of CO2 satellite of China, which include 3 IFS-125HR and 4 Optical Spectrum Analyzer etc.

  9. Analysis Methods for Water Quality Evaluation, Applied in Environmental Laboratory, ICIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMAN Cecilia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to human activities, global scale pollution of the environment has increased significantly in the last twocenturies. In the last decades, it was acknowledged that population health is strictly connected with environment quality.As the influence of anthropogenic factors on water sources quality increased, the water quality assessment has a rolethat’s become more and more important. Laboratory for Environment Analysis (LAM from Research Institute forAnalytical Instrumentation is accredited according to the SR EN ISO/CEI 17025:2005, by Romanian AccreditationAssociation and has all the required resourced for quality analysis of environmental samples. Analytical techniquesused in the Laboratory for Environment Analysis for water quality determination are: Gas Chromatography, LiquidChromatography, Ion Chromatography, Flame or Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Inductively CoupledOptical Emission Spectrometry, UV/VIS Spectrophotometry, pHmetry, Potentiometry, Conductometry, Titrimetry andGravimetry.

  10. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  11. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  12. Assessment of implementation of quality management system in laboratory research and food analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mariano Leite

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of the results generated in analytical laboratory either for the development of new methods or for the appropriate use of methodologies already regulated, is essential to ensure that consumers are receiving a nutritionally adequate and safe food. In this context, traceability has been one of the main requirements required in the analysis, once this allows comparability between results of measurements carried out in different situations, usingvalues of metrological references, clearly defined, within internationally accepted criteria. The objective of this research was to assess the activities developed in a laboratory for research and analysis of food, about the accordance of item 4, which is established requirements of Direction, and the item 5, technical requirements of ISO/IEC 17025:2005, to guide correction of non conformities and internal organization. Initially there was a check list for verification of compliance for the activities developed in the laboratory. When the non-conformities were found, the staff was trained and was applied the 5S System. In applying the first check list in accordance with the item 4, the laboratory was classified in Group 3 of the Standard, with 57.14% of non-conformities, after training and implementation of corrective measures. In a new application of check list, the laboratory was classified in Group 2, and was occurred reduction of 37.5% of non-conformities. As to item 5, the laboratory was classified in Group 2, with 44.44% of non-conformities. After the training and corrective measures, there was reduction of 54% of non-conformities. It can be concluded that for elimination of nonconformance is required to train staff and implement tools such as 5S System and especially encourage the involvement of employees

  13. Theoretical analysis of the kinetic performance of laboratory- and full-scale composting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Marco; Silveira, Ana; Antunes, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Composting research at laboratory-scale is critical for the development of optimized full-scale plants. Discrepancies between processes at laboratory-scale and full-scale systems have been investigated in terms of heat balances, but a kinetic analysis of this issue is still missing. In this study, the composting rate at laboratory-scale was, on average, between 1.9 and 5.7 times faster than in full-scale systems for a set of published studies using municipal solid waste, food waste or similar materials. Laboratory-scale performance and full-scale systems were limited to 71 and 46%, respectively, of their maximum potential due to poor management of environmental process conditions far from their optimum. The main limiting environmental factor was found to be moisture content, followed by temperature. Besides environmental factors, waste composition and particle size were identified as factors accounting for kinetic differences between laboratory- and full-scale systems. Overall, this study identifies those factors that affect the kinetics of the composting process most and revealed a significant margin for reducing process time in full-scale composting.

  14. Analytical performances of food microbiology laboratories - critical analysis of 7 years of proficiency testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Massih, M; Planchon, V; Polet, M; Dierick, K; Mahillon, J

    2016-02-01

    Based on the results of 19 food microbiology proficiency testing (PT) schemes, this study aimed to assess the laboratory performances, to highlight the main sources of unsatisfactory analytical results and to suggest areas of improvement. The 2009-2015 results of REQUASUD and IPH PT, involving a total of 48 laboratories, were analysed. On average, the laboratories failed to detect or enumerate foodborne pathogens in 3·0% of the tests. Thanks to a close collaboration with the PT participants, the causes of outliers could be identified in 74% of the cases. The main causes of erroneous PT results were either pre-analytical (handling of the samples, timing of analysis), analytical (unsuitable methods, confusion of samples, errors in colony counting or confirmation) or postanalytical mistakes (calculation and encoding of results). PT schemes are a privileged observation post to highlight analytical problems, which would otherwise remain unnoticed. In this perspective, this comprehensive study of PT results provides insight into the sources of systematic errors encountered during the analyses. This study draws the attention of the laboratories to the main causes of analytical errors and suggests practical solutions to avoid them, in an educational purpose. The observations support the hypothesis that regular participation to PT, when followed by feed-back and appropriate corrective actions, can play a key role in quality improvement and provide more confidence in the laboratory testing results. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Radiation Tolerant, FPGA-Based SmallSat Computer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMeres, Brock J.; Crum, Gary A.; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Tolerant, FPGA-based SmallSat Computer System (RadSat) computing platform exploits a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) with real-time partial reconfiguration to provide increased performance, power efficiency and radiation tolerance at a fraction of the cost of existing radiation hardened computing solutions. This technology is ideal for small spacecraft that require state-of-the-art on-board processing in harsh radiation environments but where using radiation hardened processors is cost prohibitive.

  16. Integrated Solar-Panel Antenna Array for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baktur, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Integrated Solar-Panel Antenna Array for CubeSats (ISAAC) project is to design and demonstrate an effective and efficien toptically transparent, high-gain, lightweight, conformal X-band antenna array that is integrated with the solar panels of a CubeSat. The targeted demonstration is for a Near Earth Network (NEN)radio at X-band, but the design can be easilyscaled to other network radios for higher frequencies. ISAAC is a less expensive and more flexible design for communication systemscompared to a deployed dish antenna or the existing integrated solar panel antenna design.

  17. LEISA: CubeSat for Ionospheric Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suddarth, S. C.; Vera, A.; Pollard, H.; Burgett, T.; King, B.; Hulem, D.; MacGillivray, J.; Montoya, M.; Stanton, W.; Trujillo, B.; Wilson, S.; Heileman, G.

    2012-12-01

    The University of New Mexico / Configurable Space Microsystems Innovation and Applications Center (COSMIAC) is designing a highly affordable research satellite called LEISA (Low Earth Ionospheric Spectrum Analyzer) to characterize Ionospheric properties that affect electromagnetic wave propagation. By measuring spectral distortion of both natural and man-made impulses LEISA will measure Total Electron Content (TEC), magnetic field strength, refractive effects, plasma properties, and higher-order electron density profile effects. Additionally, LEISA may shed light on the relationships between lightning effects and thunderstorm weather in the troposphere and the potential relationship between the acoustic/seismic events around thunderstorms and Ionospheric weather. The LEISA design effort has led to a number of innovations that may be relevant to other small science spacecraft. The design is particularly challenging because of the need to implement broadband RF reception from 20-200 MHz as well as to capture and process the resulting signals within a 1u spacecraft (10cm x 10cm x 10cm) with less than 2 watts of average available power. One particular challenge is the deployable electrically small biconic wideband UHF antenna that deploys to approximately 1.5m in length and .5 m in width. The resulting antenna system deploys from a diminutive 500 cubic centimeter volume. The remaining electronics must fit within the remaining 500 cubic centimeters, leading the team to develop a system-on-a-chip (SoC) design using a Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA. The resulting circuit handles the spectrogram capture as well as all command and data handling functions within an average power footprint of approximately 200mW, reserving energy for analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) during capture events. LEISA builds upon prior work by Los Alamos National Laboratory with FORTE and Cibola Flight Experiment. In addition to being much more affordable, LEISA offers the potential of geo-locating events

  18. AIRS-CloudSat cloud mask, radar reflectivities, and cloud classification matchups V3.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is AIRS-CloudSat collocated subset, in NetCDF 4 format. These data contain collocated: AIRS Level 1b radiances spectra, CloudSat radar reflectivities, and MODIS...

  19. Integrated CubeSat ADACS with Reaction Wheels and Star Tracker Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAI-400SS Space Sextant is a precision attitude determination and control system for CubeSats and Nanosats. The MAI-400SS enables future CubeSat missions with...

  20. CubeSat Power Management Controller and Solar Array Articulation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CubeSat platform represents a valuable architecture from which to develop satellite capabilities, payloads and technologies. However, CubeSat spacecraft must be...

  1. Solar Electric Propulsion CubeSat Bus for Deep Space Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As electronics continue to shrink in size, the capabilities of CubeSats continues to expand. CubeSats can now perform a wide range of sensing and telecommunications...

  2. Selection and Identification of the SAT-chromosome Primary Trisomic of Flowering Chinese Cabbage%菜薹随体—染色体初级三体的筛选与遗传分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申二巧; 张成合; 李晓锋; 轩淑欣; 申书兴

    2011-01-01

    The flowering Chinese cabbage cultiva'rQinglu Caixin'was used for the satellite-chromosome trisomic(SAT-trisomic)selection by karyotype analysis and morphological identification from the backcross progeny of triploid(2n = 3x = 30)× diploid parent(2n = 2x = 20).The results showed that one SAT-trisomic was obtained from the 374 progeny identified by chromosome examination and karyotype analysis.Development of the SAT-trisomic was almost normal,but its stigma was above the stamen.Transmission rate of the extra SAT-chromosome was 6.04% by female gametes and 3.20% by male gametes.%以菜薹品种‘青露菜心’为材料,采用核型分析和形态学鉴定的方法,从三倍体与二倍体的回交子代中筛选SAT-染色体初级三体。共鉴定了374个回交子代,获得了1株SAT-染色体初级三体。SAT-染色体初级三体生长发育基本正常,但柱头高出雄蕊,(n+1)雌、雄配子的传递率分别为6.04%和3.20%。

  3. Analysis of Thermal-Conductivity Measurement Data from International Comparison of National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, B.; Zarr, R.; Stacey, C.; Lira-Cortes, L.; Hammerschmidt, U.; Sokolov, N.; Zhang, J.; Filtz, J.-R.; Fleurence, N.

    2013-05-01

    For the first time under the auspices of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), seven national metrology institutes (NMIs) participated in an international interlaboratory comparison on thermal-conductivity measurements by the guarded hot-plate method. Measurements were conducted successively by all participants on the same set of specimens of insulating materials (mineral wool and expanded polystyrene) at temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 40 °C, according to the International Standard ISO 8302. This protocol aims to minimize issues of material variability by circulating the same pairs of specimens among the laboratories following the strict format of a round-robin test program. This comparison is a pilot study which is intended as a first stage for future key comparisons between NMIs. The descriptive analysis of obtained results shows good agreement between laboratories for the mineral wool (MW) specimens and the thicker specimens of expanded polystyrene (EPS), with relative deviations within the uncertainties of measurement. A positive drift of thermal-conductivity values, which has appeared progressively during the comparison process, seems to be correlated with the size of the metering area of the guarded hot plates used. A statistical analysis was applied to repeated thermal-conductivity measurements at 23 °C, to identify anomalous and outlying data, to assess the within- and between-laboratory variability, and to evaluate the participant laboratories' performance.

  4. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Peña, M.; Sierra, O.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  5. Establishment of a clean laboratory for ultra trace analysis of nuclear materials in safeguards environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] (and others)

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has established a cleanroom facility with cleanliness of ISO Class 5: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). It was designed to be used for the analysis of nuclear materials in environmental samples mainly for the safeguards, in addition to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification and research on environmental sciences. The CLEAR facility was designed to meet conflicting requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials according to Japanese regulations, i.e., to avoid contamination from outside and to contain nuclear materials inside the facility. This facility has been intended to be used for wet chemical treatment, instrumental analysis and particle handling. A fume-hood to provide a clean work surface for handling of nuclear materials was specially designed. Much attention was paid to the selection of construction materials for use to corrosive acids. The performance of the cleanroom and analytical background in the laboratory are discussed. This facility has satisfactory specification required for joining the International Atomic Energy Agency Network of Analytical Laboratories. It can be concluded that the CLEAR facility enables analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials at sub-pictogram level in environmental samples. (author)

  6. An automated image analysis system to measure and count organisms in laboratory microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Mallard

    Full Text Available 1. Because of recent technological improvements in the way computer and digital camera perform, the potential use of imaging for contributing to the study of communities, populations or individuals in laboratory microcosms has risen enormously. However its limited use is due to difficulties in the automation of image analysis. 2. We present an accurate and flexible method of image analysis for detecting, counting and measuring moving particles on a fixed but heterogeneous substrate. This method has been specifically designed to follow individuals, or entire populations, in experimental laboratory microcosms. It can be used in other applications. 3. The method consists in comparing multiple pictures of the same experimental microcosm in order to generate an image of the fixed background. This background is then used to extract, measure and count the moving organisms, leaving out the fixed background and the motionless or dead individuals. 4. We provide different examples (springtails, ants, nematodes, daphnia to show that this non intrusive method is efficient at detecting organisms under a wide variety of conditions even on faintly contrasted and heterogeneous substrates. 5. The repeatability and reliability of this method has been assessed using experimental populations of the Collembola Folsomia candida. 6. We present an ImageJ plugin to automate the analysis of digital pictures of laboratory microcosms. The plugin automates the successive steps of the analysis and recursively analyses multiple sets of images, rapidly producing measurements from a large number of replicated microcosms.

  7. 超越自我 追求卓越——美国"新SAT"(nSAT)介述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐滢

    2005-01-01

    美国将在2005年3月举行第一次"新SAT" (nSAT)考试,引起了公众关注。此次SAT的改革主要以内容改 革为切入点,并新增加了写作技能测试。SAT的本次改革旨在完 善自我,强化SAT的评价功能、选拔功能和教育导向功能。

  8. A second look at the CloudSat/TRMM intersect data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Z.; Kuo, K.; Smith, E. A.; Kiang, D.; Turk, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    The original objective motivating the creation of the CloudSat+TRMM intersect products (by E.A. Smith, K.-S. Kuo et al) was to provide new opportunities in research related to precipitating clouds. The data products consist of near-coincident CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar calibrated 94-GHz reflectivity factors and detection flag, sampled every 240 m in elevation, and the TRMM Precipitation Radar calibrated 13.8-GHz reflectivity factors, attenuation-adjusted reflectivity factors and rain rate estimates, sampled every 250 m in elevation, in the TRMM beam whose footprint encompasses the CloudSat beam footprint. Because retrieving precipitation distributions from single-frequency radar measurements is a very under-constrained proposition, we decided to restrict our analyses to CloudSat data that were taken within 3 minutes of a TRMM pass. We ended up with over 5000 beams of nearly simultaneous observations of precipitation, and proceeded in two different ways: 1) we attempted to perform retrievals based on simultaneous radar reflectivity measurements at Ku and W bands. At low precipitation rates, the Ku-band radar does not detect much of the rain. At higher precipitation rates, the W-band radar incurs high attenuation, and this makes “Hitschfeld-Bordan” retrievals (from the top of the column down toward the surface) diverge because of numerical instability. The main question for this portion of the analysis was to determine if these two extremes are indeed extremes that still afford us a significant number of “in-between” cases, on which we can apply a careful dual-frequency retrieval algorithm; 2) we also attempted to quantify the ability of the Ku-band measurements to provide complementary information to the W-band estimates outside their overlap region, and vice versa. Specifically, instead of looking at the admittedly small vertical region where both radars detect precipitation and where their measurements are unambiguously related to the underlying

  9. The Rise and Demise of the SAT: The University of California Generates Change for College Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few months, news about the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) has made national headlines and not in a good way: "Large SAT Score Decline Shows Failure of No Child Left Behind and State High-Stakes Testing Strategy" (FairTest 2011); "Eshaghoff, Emory University Student, Allegedly Took SAT For Other Students"…

  10. An Alternative Presentation of Incremental Validity: Discrepant SAT and HSGPA Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Kobrin, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined discrepant high school grade point average (HSGPA) and SAT performance as measured by the difference between a student's standardized SAT composite score and standardized HSGPA. The SAT-HSGPA discrepancy measure was used to examine whether certain students are more likely to exhibit discrepant performance and in what direction.…

  11. 美国高考SAT-Ⅱ及其数学考试简析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王奋平

    2008-01-01

    在文[6]、[7]中介绍过美国高校入学考试主要有SAT(Scholastic Assessment Test)和 ACT(American College Testing Assessment)两种.SAT又分SAT-Ⅰ和SAT-Ⅱ两种,大家通常所说的SAT指SAT-Ⅰ.

  12. The Effect of Personality Preferences on the 2005 Version of the SAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrs, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Some researchers suggest the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is biased toward certain personality types. Extant literature lacked examination of personality constructs and their relationship with SAT scores of the newly revised SAT. The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, this study examined the relationship between the Sensing and Intuition…

  13. RIPOSTE: a framework for improving the design and analysis of laboratory-based research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masca, Nicholas Gd; Hensor, Elizabeth Ma; Cornelius, Victoria R; Buffa, Francesca M; Marriott, Helen M; Eales, James M; Messenger, Michael P; Anderson, Amy E; Boot, Chris; Bunce, Catey; Goldin, Robert D; Harris, Jessica; Hinchliffe, Rod F; Junaid, Hiba; Kingston, Shaun; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Nelson, Christopher P; Peacock, Janet; Seed, Paul T; Shinkins, Bethany; Staples, Karl J; Toombs, Jamie; Wright, Adam Ka; Teare, M Dawn

    2015-05-07

    Lack of reproducibility is an ongoing problem in some areas of the biomedical sciences. Poor experimental design and a failure to engage with experienced statisticians at key stages in the design and analysis of experiments are two factors that contribute to this problem. The RIPOSTE (Reducing IrreProducibility in labOratory STudiEs) framework has been developed to support early and regular discussions between scientists and statisticians in order to improve the design, conduct and analysis of laboratory studies and, therefore, to reduce irreproducibility. This framework is intended for use during the early stages of a research project, when specific questions or hypotheses are proposed. The essential points within the framework are explained and illustrated using three examples (a medical equipment test, a macrophage study and a gene expression study). Sound study design minimises the possibility of bias being introduced into experiments and leads to higher quality research with more reproducible results.

  14. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory - Part 2: Elemental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Brenda; Paul Kirkbride, K; Lennard, Chris; Robertson, James

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) are compared in terms of their discrimination power when applied to Australian soil specimens. SEM/EDX and XRF are frequently used in forensic laboratories for the elemental analysis of paint and glass, and for miscellaneous examinations. LIBS is an emerging technique for forensic applications, with a number of researchers promoting its use for the elemental profiling of glass fragments. In this study, 29 soil specimens were analysed, with 12 specimens coming from the Canberra area and the remaining 17 specimens from other sites around Australia. As very good discrimination results were obtained for each of the analytical methods, any of these elemental analysis techniques, available in a trace evidence laboratory, could be used as part of a wider examination protocol to differentiate soil specimens.

  15. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  16. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  17. Profiling brain expression of the spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase 1 (SAT1) gene in suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempan, Timothy A; Rujescu, Dan; Mérette, Chantal; Himmelman, Carla; Sequeira, Adolfo; Canetti, Lilian; Fiori, Laura M; Schneider, Barbara; Bureau, Alexandre; Turecki, Gustavo

    2009-10-05

    Altered stress reactivity is considered to be a risk factor for both major depressive disorder and suicidal behavior. The authors have sought to expand their previous findings implicating altered expression of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 (SAT1), the rate-limiting enzyme involved in catabolism of the polyamines spermidine and spermine in the polyamine stress response (PSR), across multiple brain regions between control individuals and depressed individuals who have died by suicide. Microarray expression of probesets annotated to SAT1 were examined across 17 brain regions in 13 controls and 26 individuals who have died by suicide (16 with a diagnosis of major depression and 10 without), all of French-Canadian origin. Profiling conducted on the Affymetrix U133A/B chipset was further examined on a second chipset (U133 Plus 2.0) using RT-PCR, and analyzed in a second, independent sample. A reduction in SAT1 expression identified through multiple probesets was observed across 12 cortical regions in depressed individuals who have died by suicide compared with controls. Of these, five cortical regions showed statistically significant reductions which were supported by RT-PCR and analysis on the additional chipset. SAT1 cortical expression levels were also found to be significantly lower in an independent sample of German subjects with major depression who died by suicide in comparison with controls. These findings suggest that downregulation of SAT1 expression may play a role in depression and suicidality, possibly by impeding the normal PSR program or through compensation for the increased polyamine metabolism accompanying the psychological distress associated with depressive disorders. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Design of an attitude control system for spin-axis control of a 3U CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Alexander J.

    This paper describes the design process of developing a spin-axis control system for a 3U CubeSat, a relatively small satellite. Design requires the CubeSat to de-spin after deployment and direct its antenna to track Earth nadir position. The one degree of freedom controller is developed for the TechEdSat, which is a CubeSat with a payload that allows for the assumption that rotation pitch and yaw rates are sufficiently close to zero. Satellite torqueing disturbances are modeled with reaction wheel noise for a more complete system analysis. Sensor noise is unmodeled. Frequency domain and time domain analyses are presented; the entire system bandwidth operates at 0.08 hertz with 43.2 decibels of gain and 67.7° of phase margin. During nominal operations, pointing accuracy with perfect state knowledge assumption maintains position with steady state error of 13.7 arc seconds and oscillates by 16.7 arc seconds at a rate of 0.7 mHertz. Artificial wheel noise is injected into the model causing the pointing accuracy to drop to +/- 15 arc seconds. Environmental disturbances are modeled extensively; the magnetic field torque is the worst disturbance, at 4.2e-7 Newton-meters. A 0.2 Amp˙m2 magnetorquer dumps the excess momentum every 7.75 hours and require 1.5 hours to complete. In the deployment simulation, a 1 rotation per minute spin is arrested with no angular offset in 60 seconds. Future plans include utilizing the model to build and fly a prototype reaction wheel on a future TechEdSat mission to verify modeled expectations.

  19. SmartSat Experiment for the L5 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsuma, T.; Akioka, M.; Ohtaka, K.; Miyake, W.; Goka, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Koshiishi, H.

    2004-12-01

    We have planned the L5 mission for space weather research and operational forecasting experiment. In this mission, a spacecraft will be deployed at the L5 point of the Sun - Earth system for remote sensing of the Sun and the interplanetary space, and for in-situ measurements of the solar wind plasma and high energy particles. For this mission, NICT and JAXA develop wide field imager for tracking CME propagation from the Sun to the Earth and advanced high-energy particle sensor for monitoring of solar particle events, respectively. Before proceeding the L5 mission, we are planning orbital demonstration in GTO using a platform of small satellite, called "SmartSat". The SmartSat program is a collaborative program of government agencies (NICT and JAXA), and a private company (Mitsubishi Heavy Industry) in Japan. The wide field coronal imager (WCI) and space environment data acquisition experiment (SEDA) will be tested by this program as the space weather experiment, since both of the instruments will be principal components of the L5 mission. The SmartSat is planned to be launched by 2007, about 1 year after the launch of STEREO spacecrafts. Therefore, we are expecting the coordinated observation with STEREO mission. In this paper, we will report an overview of the space weather experiment in SmartSat program.

  20. CloudSat Reflectivity Data Visualization Inside Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Wright, John R.; Falcon, Pedro C.

    2011-01-01

    We have presented methods to rapidly produce visualization and outreach products from CloudSat data for science and the media These methods combine data from several sources in the product generation process In general, the process can be completely automatic, producing products and notifying potential users

  1. Data Mining the University: College GPA Predictions from SAT Scores

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Stephen D H

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a data set comprised of academic records of undergraduates at the University of Oregon from 2000-2004. We find correlations of roughly 0.35 to 0.5 between SAT scores and upper division, in-major GPA (henceforth, GPA). Interestingly, low SAT scores do not preclude high performance in most majors. That is, the distribution of SAT scores after conditioning on high GPA (e.g., 3.5 or even 4.0) typically extends below 1000 (the average among test takers). We hypothesize that "overachievers" overcome cognitive deficits through hard work, and discuss to what extent they can be identified from high school records. Only a few majors seem to exhibit a "cognitive threshold" -- such that high GPA (mastery of the subject matter) is very unlikely below a certain SAT threshold (i.e., no matter how dedicated or hard working the student). Our results suggest that almost any student admitted to university can achieve academic success, if they work hard enough. In addition to our primary result, we find that the best ...

  2. The CarbonSat End-to-End Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramstedt, Klaus; Noel, Stefan; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Reuter, Max; Burrows, John P.; Jurado Lozano, Pedro Jose; Meijer, Yasjka; Loescher, Armin; Acarreta, Juan R.; Sturm, Philipp; Tesmer, Volker; Sanchez Monero, Ana Maria; Atapuerca Rodreiguez de Dios, Francisco Javier; Toledano Sanchez, Daniel; Boesch, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the CarbonSat mission is to improve our knowledge on natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of CO2 and CH4. CarbonSat was one of the two candidate missions selected for definition studies for becoming Earth Explorer 8 (EE8).The CarbonSat End-to-End Simulator (CSE2ES) simulates the full data flow of the mission with a set of modules embedded in ESA's generic simulation framework OpenSF. A Geometry Module (GM) defines the orbital geometry and related parameters. A Scene Generation Module (SGM) provides simulated radiances and irradiances for the selected scenes. The Level 1 Module (L1M) compromises the instrument simulator and the Level 1b processor, and provide as main output calibrated spectra. The L1M is implemented in two versions, reflecting the instrument concepts from the two competing industrial system studies. The Level 2 Retrieval Module (L2M) performs the retrieval from the input level 1b spectra to the atmospheric parameters (CO2 and CH4).In this paper, we show sensitivity studies with respect to atmospheric parameters, simulations along the orbit and a case study for the detection of a point source emitting carbon dioxide. In summary, the end-to-end simulation with CSE2ES proves the capability of the CarbonSat concept to reach its requirements.

  3. The autonomous vision system on TeamSat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Riis, Troels

    1999-01-01

    The second qualification flight of Ariane 5 blasted off-the European Space Port in French Guiana on October 30, 1997, carrying on board a small technology demonstration satellite called TeamSat. Several experiments were proposed by various universities and research institutions in Europe and five...

  4. Solving SAT by Algorithm Transform of Wu‘s Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺思敏; 张钹

    1999-01-01

    Recently algorithms for solving propositional satisfiability problem, or SAT,have aroused great interest,and more attention has been paid to transformation problem solving.The commonly used transformation is representation transform,but since its intermediate computing procedure is a black box from the viewpoint of the original problem,this approach has many limitations.In this paper,a new approach called algorithm transform is proposed and applied to solving SAT by Wu's method,a general algorithm for solving polynomial equations.B y establishing the correspondence between the primitive operation in Wu's method and clause resolution is SAT,it is shown that Wu's method,when used for solving SAT,,is primarily a restricted clause resolution procedure.While Wu's method introduces entirely new concepts.e.g.characteristic set of clauses,to resolution procedure,the complexity result of resolution procedure suggests an exponential lower bound to Wu's method for solving general polynomial equations.Moreover,this algorithm transform can help achieve a more efficient implementation of Wu's method since it can avoid the complex manipulation of polynomials and can make the best use of domain specific knowledge.

  5. A Taxonomy of Exact Methods for Partial Max-SAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed El Bachir Menai; Tasniem Nasser Al-Yahya

    2013-01-01

    Partial Maximum Boolean Satisfiability (Partial Max-SAT or PMSAT) is an optimization variant of Boolean satisfiability (SAT) problem,in which a variable assignment is required to satisfy all hard clauses and a maximum number of soft clauses in a Boolean formula.PMSAT is considered as an interesting encoding domain to many real-life problems for which a solution is acceptable even if some constraints are violated.Amongst the problems that can be formulated as such are planning and scheduling.New insights into the study of PMSAT problem have been gained since the introduction of the Max-SAT evaluations in 2006.Indeed,several PMSAT exact solvers have been developed based mainly on the DavisPutnam-Logemann-Loveland (DPLL) procedure and Branch and Bound (B&B) algorithms.In this paper,we investigate and analyze a number of exact methods for PMSAT.We propose a taxonomy of the main exact methods within a general framework that integrates their various techniques into a unified perspective.We show its effectiveness by using it to classify PMSAT exact solvers which participated in the 2007~2011 Max-SAT evaluations,emphasizing on the most promising research directions.

  6. The COLD-SAT experiment for cryogenic fluid management technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, J. P.; Vento, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft design experiments are described. COLD-SAT will be placed into an initial 1300 km circular orbit by an Atlas commercial launch vehicle. Electric power, experiment control and data management, attitude control, and propulsive accelarations for the experiments will be provided by the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus. To provide data on the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved, low levels of accelaration will be created. The COLD-SAT experiment will be configured into a module. The spacecraft experiment module will include three liquid hydrogen tanks; fluid transfer, pressurization and venting equipment; and instrumentation. Since the largest tank has helium-purged MLI to prevent ingress and freezing of air on the launchpad, it will contain all the liquid hydrogen at the point of launching. The hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas will load and top off this tank. Atlas, with its liquid hydrogen upper stage, large payload fairing, and large launch margin, simplifies COLD-SAT design and integration.

  7. On belief propagation guided decimation for random k-SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Coja-Oghlan, Amin

    2010-01-01

    Let F be a uniformly distributed random k-SAT formula with n variables and m clauses. Non-constructive arguments show that F is satisfiable for clause/variable ratios m/nc.r(k)/k, for a constant c>0 (independent of k).

  8. Malaria Early Warning: The MalarSat project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, M.; Escorihuela, M. J.; Martínez, D.; Torrent, M.; Aponte, J.; Nunez, F.; Garcia, J.

    2009-04-01

    Malaria is one of the major public health challenges undermining development in the world. The aim of MalarSat Project is to provide a malaria risks infection maps at global scale using Earth Observation data to support and prevent epidemic episodes. The proposed service for creating malaria risk maps would be critically useful to improve the efficiency in insecticide programs, vaccine campaigns and the logistics epidemic treatment. Different teams have already carried out studies in order to exploit the use of Earth Observation (EO) data with epidemiology purposes. In the case of malaria risk maps, it has been shown that meteorological data is not sufficient to fulfill this objective. In particular being able to map the malaria mosquito habitat would increase the accuracy of risk maps. The malaria mosquitoes mainly reproduce in new water puddles of very reduced dimensions (about 1 meter wide). There is no instrument that could detect such small patches of water unless there are many of them spread in an area of several hundreds of meters. MalarSat aims at using the radar altimeter data from the EnviSat, RA-2, to try and build indicators of mosquitoes existence. This presentation will show the scientific objectives and principles of the MalarSat project.

  9. Campaign for vicarious calibration of SumbandilaSat in Argentina

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhengani, LM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available to estimate Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) spectral radiance. A vicarious calibration field campaign was executed in Argentina to support monitoring of the radiometric response of the multispectral imager aboard SumbandilaSat. Results obtained using two Radiative...

  10. Correlative and multivariate analysis of increased radon concentration in underground laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletić, Dimitrije M; Udovičić, Vladimir I; Banjanac, Radomir M; Joković, Dejan R; Dragić, Aleksandar L; Veselinović, Nikola B; Filipović, Jelena

    2014-11-01

    The results of analysis using correlative and multivariate methods, as developed for data analysis in high-energy physics and implemented in the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis software package, of the relations of the variation of increased radon concentration with climate variables in shallow underground laboratory is presented. Multivariate regression analysis identified a number of multivariate methods which can give a good evaluation of increased radon concentrations based on climate variables. The use of the multivariate regression methods will enable the investigation of the relations of specific climate variable with increased radon concentrations by analysis of regression methods resulting in 'mapped' underlying functional behaviour of radon concentrations depending on a wide spectrum of climate variables. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Isotherm Sensor Calibration Program for Mars Science Laboratory Heat Shield Flight Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jose A.; Oishi, Tomo; Martinez, Ed R.

    2011-01-01

    Seven instrumented sensor plugs were installed on the Mars Science Laboratory heat shield in December 2008 as part of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) project. These sensor plugs contain four in-depth thermocouples and one Hollow aErothermal Ablation and Temperature (HEAT) sensor. The HEAT sensor follows the time progression of a 700 C isotherm through the thickness of a thermal protection system (TPS) material. The data can be used to infer char depth and, when analyzed in conjunction with the thermocouple data, the thermal gradient through the TPS material can also be determined. However, the uncertainty on the isotherm value is not well defined. To address this uncertainty, a team at NASA Ames Research Center is carrying out a HEAT sensor calibration test program. The scope of this test program is described, and initial results from experiments conducted in the laboratory to study the isotherm temperature of the HEAT sensor are presented. Data from the laboratory tests indicate an isotherm temperature of 720 C 60 C. An overview of near term arc jet testing is also given, including preliminary data from 30.48cm 30.48cm PICA panels instrumented with two MEDLI sensor plugs and tested in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility. Forward work includes analysis of the arc jet test data, including an evaluation of the isotherm value based on the instant in time when it reaches a thermocouple depth.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 2nd Quarter FY2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-06-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at INL from January 2014 through March 2014.

  13. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent P. Coletta

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292, and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations (r=0.57 and r=0.46, respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  14. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  15. CloudSat Education Network: Partnerships for Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    TeBockhorst, D.

    2014-12-01

    CloudSat Education Network (CEN): Partnerships to improve the understanding of clouds in formal and informal settings. Since The CloudSat satellite launched in 2006 the Formal and Informal education programs for the mission have been focused on bringing an understanding about the mission science and the importance of clouds, climate & weather science. This has been done by creating and strengthening partnership and collaboration within scientific and educational communities around the country and the world. Because CloudSat was formally recognized as a Earth System Science Pathfinder campaign with the GLOBE program, the CEN developed a set of field protocols for student observations that augmented the GLOBE atmosphere protocols when there was a satellite overpass. This shared process between GLOBE & CloudSat resulted in the training & creation of CEN schools that are both GLOBE schools and CloudSat schools, and also produced three GLOBE partnerships that specialize in cloud science education and outreach. In addition, the CEN has developed productive relationships with other NASA missions and EPO teams. Specifically, in collaboration with the NASA CERES mission projects S'Cool and MyNASAData, we have co-presented at NSTA conferences and with schools participating in a NASA EPOESS-funded formal education project. This collaborative work has been a very real benefit to a wide variety of audiences needing to strengthen their understanding of clouds and their roles in the earth system, and we hope will serve as a model to future missions looking to involve the public in mission science.

  16. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Steinert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292 , and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations ( r=0.57 and r=0.46 , respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  17. Evaluation of the Impact of an Additive Manufacturing Enhanced CubeSat Architecture on the CubeSat Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    fabrication method ideally suited to low- quantity, highly customized builds, leading to interest in the application of AM techniques to satellite...x List of Acronyms and Definitions ...................................................................................... xi...of Acronyms and Definitions 1U 10 cm x 10 cm x 10cm, unit volume size for CubeSats 3D Three-Dimensional ABS Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene ABS-M20

  18. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories.

  19. Food adulteration analysis without laboratory prepared or determined reference food adulterant values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, John H; Georgiou, Constantinos A; Moira, Marianna; Tsafaras, Ilias; Petrakis, Eleftherios A; Mousdis, George A

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of food adulterants is an important health and economic issue that needs to be fast and simple. Spectroscopy has significantly reduced analysis time. However, still needed are preparations of analyte calibration samples matrix matched to prediction samples which can be laborious and costly. Reported in this paper is the application of a newly developed pure component Tikhonov regularization (PCTR) process that does not require laboratory prepared or reference analysis methods, and hence, is a greener calibration method. The PCTR method requires an analyte pure component spectrum and non-analyte spectra. As a food analysis example, synchronous fluorescence spectra of extra virgin olive oil samples adulterated with sunflower oil is used. Results are shown to be better than those obtained using ridge regression with reference calibration samples. The flexibility of PCTR allows including reference samples and is generic for use with other instrumental methods and food products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutron activation analysis for assessing the concentrations of trace elements in laboratory detergents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, F.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to assess the concentration of 20 elements in the following laboratory detergents: Micro, Cavi-Clean liquid, RBS-35, Liqui-Nox, Treg-A-Zyme, Alcojet, Alconox, Alcotabs and Radiacwash: and a detergent additive: CaviClean additive. The upper detected limits or the concentration ranges for the detergents are (element concentration in ..mu..g/g): Ba, <20; Ce, <0.8; Cl, 27-10000; Co, <0.1; Cr, <1; Cs, <0.6; Eu, <0.009; Fe, <3-45; Hf, <0.07; Mn, <10; Ni, <5; Rb, <0.08-0.89; Sb, <0.006-1.8; Sc, <0.0003-0.008; Se, <0.05; Sr <30; Th, <0.6; U, <0.1; V, <10; Zn, <0.2-2.0. The concentrations of trace elements in the examined laboratory detergents are below those reported in the literature for household detergents.

  1. Analysis of 2015 Meteorological Data from the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluzzi, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    The Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (Bettis) in West Miffin, PA is required to estimate the effects of hypothetical emissions of radiological material from its facility by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). An atmospheric dispersion model known as CAP88, which was developed and approved by the EPA for such purposes, is used by Bettis to meet this requirement. CAP88 calculations over a given time period are based on statistical data on the meteorological conditions for that period. The Bettis facility has an on-site meteorological tower which takes atmospheric measurements at a frequency ideal for EPA regulatory model input. However, an independent analysis and processing of the meteorological data from the site tower is required to derive a data set appropriate for use in the CAP88 model. The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) was contracted by the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to process the on-site meteorological data for the calendar year 2015.

  2. Mapping of amino acid residues responsible for adhesion of cell culture-adapted foot-and-mouth disease SAT type viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Visser, Nico; Rieder, Elizabeth A

    2010-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects host cells by adhering to the alpha(V) subgroup of the integrin family of cellular receptors in a Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) dependent manner. FMD viruses, propagated in non-host cell cultures are reported to acquire the ability to enter cells via alternative cell surface molecules. Sequencing analysis of SAT1 and SAT2 cell culture-adapted variants showed acquisition of positively charged amino acid residues within surface-exposed loops of the outer capsid structural proteins. The fixation of positively charged residues at position 110-112 in the beta F-beta G loop of VP1 of SAT1 isolates is thought to correlate with the acquisition of the ability to utilise alternative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) molecules for cell entry. Similarly, two SAT2 viruses that adapted readily to BHK-21 cells accumulated positively charged residues at positions 83 and 85 of the beta D-beta E loop of VP1. Both regions surround the fivefold axis of the virion. Recombinant viruses containing positively charged residues at position 110 and 112 of VP1 were able to infect CHO-K1 cells (that expresses GAG) and demonstrated increased infectivity in BHK-21 cells. Therefore, recombinant SAT viruses engineered to express substitutions that induce GAG-binding could be exploited in the rational design of vaccine seed stocks with improved growth properties in cell cultures.

  3. SAT predicts GPA better for high ability subjects: Implications for Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Thomas; Snyder, Anissa; Pillow, David; Kochunov, Peter

    2011-04-01

    This research examined the predictive validity of the SAT (formerly, the Scholastic Aptitude Test) for high and low ability groups. SAT scores and college GPAs were obtained from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Subjects were classified as high or low ability by g factor scores from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. SAT correlations with GPA were higher for high than low ability subjects. SAT g loadings (i.e., SAT correlations with g) were equivalent for both groups. This is the first study to show that the predictive validity of the SAT varies for ability groups that differ in g. The results contradict a presumption, based on Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns, that a test's predictive validity should be lower for high ability subjects. Further research is needed to identify factors that contribute to the predictive validity of the SAT for groups that differ in g.

  4. Development of a Laboratory Cement Quality Analysis Apparatus Based on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Li, Yufang; Gong, Yao; Dong, Lei; Ma, Weiguang; Yin, Wangbao; Wang, Zhe; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Xiangjie; Li, Yi; Jia, Suotang

    2015-11-01

    Determination of the chemical composition of cement and ratio values of clinker plays an important role in cement plants as part of the optimal process control and product quality evaluation. In the present paper, a laboratory laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) apparatus mainly comprising a sealed optical module and an analysis chamber has been designed for possible application in cement plants for on-site quality analysis of cement. Emphasis is placed on the structure and operation of the LIBS apparatus, the sealed optical path, the temperature controlled spectrometer, the sample holder, the proper calibration model established for minimizing the matrix effects, and a correction method proposed for overcoming the ‘drift’ obstacle. Good agreement has been found between the laboratory measurement results from the LIBS method and those from the traditional method. The absolute measurement errors presented here for oxides analysis are within 0.5%, while those of ratio values are in the range of 0.02 to 0.05. According to the obtained results, this laboratory LIBS apparatus is capable of performing reliable and accurate, composition and proximate analysis of cement and is suitable for application in cement plants. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61127017, 61378047, 61205216, 61178009, 61108030, 61475093, and 61275213), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2013BAC14B01), the 973 Program of China (No. 2012CB921603), the Shanxi Natural Science Foundation, China (Nos. 2013021004-1, 2012021022-1), and the Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Nos. 2013-011 and 2013-01)

  5. The Revised SAT Score and Its Potential Benefits for the Admission of Minority Students to Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the predictive validity of the Revised SAT (R-SAT) score, proposed by Freedle (2003) as an alternative to compensate minority students for the potential harm caused by the relationship between item difficulty and ethnic DIF observed in the SAT. The R-SAT score is the score minority students would have received if only the…

  6. Proficiency test for chemical laboratories for the analysis of a pesticide in a formulated product: interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Doyeli; Rani, Anita

    2009-01-01

    A multilaboratory proficiency testing program was conducted by the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories (India) and coordinated by the Institute of Pesticide Formulation Technology. This program was conducted to compare the performance of individual laboratories in the area of pesticide formulation (Chlorpyrifos 20 EC) analysis. A total of 24 laboratories in India participated. Analysis of 2 parameters (i.e., estimation of the active ingredient and the acidity) of 2 samples of Chlorpyrifos 20 EC was the objective of this program. Homogeneity tests were performed before sample distribution. Performance of the participating laboratories was evaluated by using new robust statistics given in the guidelines of the National Association of Testing Authorities, Australia. Results were collated and statistically computed to calculate the value of 2 types of Z-scores (Zwi and Zbi). In addition to the statistical analysis, a graphical representation such as the Youden plot was also generated to evaluate the performance of participating laboratories.

  7. Development and analysis of a meteorological database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Thomas M.; Price, Thomas H.; Ishii, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    A database of hourly values of air temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation from January 1, 1948, to September 30, 2003, primarily using data collected at the Argonne National Laboratory station, was developed for use in continuous-time hydrologic modeling in northeastern Illinois. Missing and apparently erroneous data values were replaced with adjusted values from nearby stations used as 'backup'. Temporal variations in the statistical properties of the data resulting from changes in measurement and data-storage methodologies were adjusted to match the statistical properties resulting from the data-collection procedures that have been in place since January 1, 1989. The adjustments were computed based on the regressions between the primary data series from Argonne National Laboratory and the backup series using data obtained during common periods; the statistical properties of the regressions were used to assign estimated standard errors to values that were adjusted or filled from other series. Each hourly value was assigned a corresponding data-source flag that indicates the source of the value and its transformations. An analysis of the data-source flags indicates that all the series in the database except dewpoint have a similar fraction of Argonne National Laboratory data, with about 89 percent for the entire period, about 86 percent from 1949 through 1988, and about 98 percent from 1989 through 2003. The dewpoint series, for which observations at Argonne National Laboratory did not begin until 1958, has only about 71 percent Argonne National Laboratory data for the entire period, about 63 percent from 1948 through 1988, and about 93 percent from 1989 through 2003, indicating a lower reliability of the dewpoint sensor. A basic statistical analysis of the filled and adjusted data series in the database, and a series of potential evapotranspiration computed from them using the computer program LXPET (Lamoreux Potential

  8. Secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) triggers autophagy in epithelial cells that relies on cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Comenge, Yannick; Ruby, Vincent; Amsellem, Raymonde; Nicolas, Valérie; Servin, Alain L

    2011-07-01

    The secreted autotransporter toxin, Sat, which belongs to the subfamily of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae, acts as a virulence factor in extraintestinal and intestinal pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. We observed that HeLa cells exposed to the cell-free culture supernatant of recombinant strain AAEC185p(Sat-IH11128) producing the Sat toxin (CFCS(Sat) ), displayed dramatic disorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton before loosening cell-to-cell junctions and detachment. Examination of the effect of Sat on GFP-microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) HeLa cells revealed that CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy follows CFCS(Sat) -induced F-actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. The induced autophagy shows an acceleration of the autophagy flux soon after Sat treatment, followed later by a blockade of the flux leading to the accumulation of large GFP-LC3-positive vacuoles in the cell cytoplasm. CFCS(Sat) did not induce cell detachment in autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts in contrast with wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The CFCS(Sat) -induced large GFP-LC3 dots do not display the characteristics of autophagolysosomes including expression of cathepsin D and Lamp-1 and 2 proteins, and Lysotracker Red- and DQ-BSA-positive labelling. We provide evidences that CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy is not a cell response intended to get rid of the intracellular toxin. By a pharmacological blockers approach, we found that the blockade of Erk1/2 and p38 MAPKs, but not JNK, inhibited the CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy and cell detachment whereas phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase blockers inhibiting canonical autophagy were inactive. When attached CFCS(Sat) -treated cells start to detach they showed caspase-independent cell death and rearrangements of the focal adhesion-associated vinculin and paxillin. Collectively, our results support that Sat triggers autophagy in epithelial cells that relies on its cell-detachment effect. © 2011 Blackwell

  9. New insights about cloud vertical structure from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin

    2017-09-01

    Active cloud observations from A-Train's CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites offer new opportunities to examine the vertical structure of hydrometeor layers. We use the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR merged CloudSat-CALIPSO product to examine global aspects of hydrometeor vertical stratification. We group the data into major cloud vertical structure (CVS) classes based on our interpretation of how clouds in three standard atmospheric layers overlap and provide their global frequency of occurrence. The two most frequent CVS classes are single-layer (per our definition) low and high clouds that represent 53% of cloudy skies, followed by high clouds overlying low clouds, and vertically extensive clouds that occupy near-contiguously a large portion of the troposphere. The prevalence of these configurations changes seasonally and geographically, between daytime and nighttime, and between continents and oceans. The radiative effects of the CVS classes reveal the major radiative warmers and coolers from the perspective of the planet as a whole, the surface, and the atmosphere. Single-layer low clouds dominate planetary and atmospheric cooling and thermal infrared surface warming. We also investigate the consistency between passive and active views of clouds by providing the CVS breakdowns of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cloud regimes for spatiotemporally coincident MODIS-Aqua (also on the A-Train) and CloudSat-CALIPSO daytime observations. When the analysis is expanded for a more in-depth look at the most heterogeneous of the MODIS cloud regimes, it ultimately confirms previous interpretations of their makeup that did not have the benefit of collocated active observations.

  10. So These Numbers Really Mean Something? A Role Playing Scenario-Based Approach to the Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannas, Amanda M.; Lagalante, Anthony F.

    2010-01-01

    A new curricular approach in our undergraduate second-year instrumental analysis laboratory was implemented. Students work collaboratively on scenarios in diverse fields including pharmaceuticals, forensics, gemology, art conservation, and environmental chemistry. Each laboratory section (approximately 12 students) is divided into three groups…

  11. Science Case for Planetary Exploration with Planetary CubeSats and SmallSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Raymond, Carol; Jaumann, Ralf; Vane, Gregg; Baker, John

    2016-07-01

    Nano-spacecraft and especially CubeSats are emerging as viable low cost platforms for planetary exploration. Increasing miniaturization of instruments and processing performance enable smart and small packages capable of performing full investigations. While these platforms are limited in terms of payload and lifetime, their form factor and agility enable novel mission architectures and a refreshed relationship to risk. Leveraging a ride with a mothership to access far away destinations can significantly augment the mission science return at relatively low cost. Depending on resources, the mothership may carry several platforms and act as telecom relay for a distributed network or other forms of fractionated architectures. In Summer 2014 an international group of scientists, engineers, and technologists started a study to define investigations to be carried out by nano-spacecrafts. These applications flow down from key science priorities of interest across space agencies: understanding the origin and organization of the Solar system; characterization of planetary processes; assessment of the astrobiological significance of planetary bodies across the Solar system; and retirement of strategic knowledge gaps (SKGs) for Human exploration. This presentation will highlight applications that make the most of the novel architectures introduced by nano-spacecraft. Examples include the low cost reconnaissance of NEOs for science, planetary defense, resource assessment, and SKGs; in situ chemistry measurements (e.g., airless bodies and planetary atmospheres), geophysical network (e.g., magnetic field measurements), coordinated physical and chemical characterization of multiple icy satellites in a giant planet system; and scouting, i.e., risk assessment and site reconnaissance to prepare for close proximity observations of a mothership (e.g., prior to sampling). Acknowledgements: This study is sponsored by the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). Part of this work is

  12. The uncertainty in physical measurements an introduction to data analysis in the physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasini, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    All measurements of physical quantities are affected by uncertainty. Understanding the origin of uncertainty, evaluating its extent and suitably taking it into account in data analysis is essential for assessing the degree of accuracy of phenomenological relationships and physical laws in both scientific research and technological applications. The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory presents an introduction to uncertainty and to some of the most common procedures of data analysis. This book will serve the reader well by filling the gap between tutorial textbooks and highly specialized monographs. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is a phenomenological introduction to measurement and uncertainty: properties of instruments, different causes and corresponding expressions of uncertainty, histograms and distributions, and unified expression of uncertainty. The second part contains an introduction to probability theory, random variable...

  13. Laboratory Simulations of Local Winds in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer via Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Moroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the atmospheric boundary layer, under high pressure conditions and negligible geostrophic winds, problems associated with pollution are the most critical. In this situation local winds play a major role in the evaluation of the atmospheric dynamics at small scales and in dispersion processes. These winds originate as a result of nonuniform heating of the soil, either when it is homogeneous or in discontinuous terrain in the presence of sea and/or slopes. Depending on the source of the thermal gradient, local winds are classified into convective boundary layer, sea and land breezes, urban heat islands, and slope currents. Local winds have been analyzed by (i simple analytical models; (ii numerical models; (iii field measurements; (iv laboratory measurements through which it is impossible to completely create the necessary similarities, but the parameters that determine the phenomenon can be controlled and each single wind can be separately analyzed. The present paper presents a summary of laboratory simulations of local winds neglecting synoptic winds and the effects of Coriolis force. Image analysis techniques appear suitable to fully describe both the individual phenomenon and the superposition of more than one local wind. Results do agree with other laboratory studies and numerical experiments.

  14. Chromatin Isolation and DNA Sequence Analysis in Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerman, Ann E.

    1999-10-01

    A pair of exercises that introduce undergraduate students to basic techniques and concepts of molecular biology and that are appropriate for classes with large enrollments are described. One exercise is a simple laboratory experiment in which chromatin is isolated from chicken liver and is resolved into histone proteins and DNA by ion-exchange chromatography. The other is a series of computer simulations that introduce DNA sequencing, mapping, and sequence analysis to the students. The final step of the simulation is submission of a sequence to a database on the World Wide Web for identification of the protein product of the gene.

  15. In-orbit performance of AstroSat CZTI

    CERN Document Server

    Vadawale, Santosh V; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Bhalerao, Varun B; Dewangan, Gulab Chand; Vibute, Ajay M; S., Mithun N P; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Sreekumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Imager (CZTI) is one of the fi?ve payloads on-board recently launched Indian astronomy satellite AstroSat. CZTI is primarily designed for simultaneous hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources. It employs the technique of coded mask imaging for measuring spectra in the energy range of 20 - 150 keV. It was the ?first scientifi?c payload of AstroSat to be switched on after one week of the launch and was made operational during the subsequent week. Here we present preliminary results from the performance verification phase observations and discuss the in-orbit performance of CZTI.

  16. CloudSat Image of Tropical Thunderstorms Over Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 CloudSat image of a horizontal cross-section of tropical clouds and thunderstorms over east Africa. The red colors are indicative of highly reflective particles such as water (rain) or ice crystals, which the blue indicates thinner clouds (such as cirrus). The flat green/blue lines across the bottom represent the ground signal. The vertical scale on the CloudS at Cloud Profiling Radar image is approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles). The brown line below the image indicates the relative elevation of the land surface. The inset image shows the CloudSat track relative to a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) visible image taken at nearly the same time.

  17. Verification of Authentication Protocols for Epistemic Goals via SAT Compilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Le Su; Qing-Liang Chen; Abdul Sattar; Wei-Ya Yue; Guan-Feng Lv; Xi-Zhong Zheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a new methodology that uses knowledge structures, a specific form of Kripke semantics for epistemic logic, to analyze communication protocols over hostile networks. The paper particularly focuses on automatic verification of authentication protocols. Our approach is based on the actual definitions of a protocol, not on some difficultto-establish justifications. The proposed methodology is different from many previous approaches to automatic verification of security protocols in that it is justification-oriented instead of falsification-oriented, i.e., finding bugs in a protocol. The main idea is based on observations: separating a principal executing a run of protocol from the role in the protocol, and inferring a principal's knowledge from the local observations of the principal. And we show analytically and empirically that this model can be easily reduced to Satisfiability (SAT) problem and efficiently implemented by a modern SAT solver.

  18. A linear time quantum algorithm for 3SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, Zachary B

    2015-01-01

    A quantum algorithm for the NP complete problem of satisfying boolean formulas with three variables per clause (3SAT) is presented. Departing from traditional models of quantum computation, this algorithm makes extensive use of irreversible operations to incoherently transfer population from states which do not solve some problem of interest to states which do. Provided that a solution exists, the algorithm yields exponential decay of nonsolution probability, at a rate controlled by the user.

  19. Dellingr- A Path to Compelling Science with CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Bonalsky, T.; Chornay, D.; Clagett, C.; Cudmore, A.; Ericsson, A.; Hesh, S.; Jones, S.; Kepko, L.; Rodriguez, J.; Sittler, E.; Starin, S.; Santos, L.; Sheikh, S.; Uribe, P.; Zesta, E.

    2015-10-01

    Advancements in the capabilities of miniaturized systems are dramatically increasing interest in achieving science from CubeSats. The Dellingr project targets this interest. It will realize compelling science from a 6U spacecraft while developing human and spacecraft systems required to cost-efficiently deliver small satellites capable of reliably achieving mission objectives in divers environments—from low earth orbit to challenging radiation and thermal environments associated with lunar and planetary missions.

  20. Streamlining CubeSat Solar Panel Fabrication Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Ariel; Smith, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    A critical facet of CubeSat fabrication is solar panel characterization and assembly. Though capable of producing flight quality solar subsystems, traditional methods of solar panel fabrication contain intrinsic inefficiencies and inconsistencies that compromise the subsystem’s overall reliability. Taking Michigan Exploration Laboratory’s (MXL) heritage solar panel procedures as a case study, this investigation sought to streamline the solar panel fabrication process to increase its yield, co...

  1. The Relationship between SAT Scores and Retention to the Second Year: 2007 SAT Validity Sample. Statistical Report No. 2011-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the findings from a replication of the analyses from the report, "Is Performance on the SAT Related to College Retention?" (Mattern & Patterson, 2009). The tables presented herein are based on the 2007 sample and the findings are largely the same as those presented in the original report, and show SAT scores are…

  2. The Relationship between SAT Scores and Retention to the Second Year: Replication with 2009 SAT Validity Sample. Statistical Report 2011-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2012-01-01

    The College Board formed a research consortium with four-year colleges and universities to build a national higher education database with the primary goal of validating the revised SAT for use in college admission. A study by Mattern and Patterson (2009) examined the relationship between SAT scores and retention to the second year of college. The…

  3. Comparison of CryoSat-2 and ENVISAT radar freeboard over Arctic sea ice: toward an improved Envisat freeboard retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Kevin; Fleury, Sara; Zakharova, Elena; Kouraev, Alexei; Rémy, Frédérique; Maisongrande, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, sea-ice freeboard has been monitored with various satellite altimetric missions with the aim of producing long-term time series of ice thickness. While recent studies have demonstrated the capacity of the CryoSat-2 mission (2010-present) to provide accurate freeboard measurements, the current estimates obtained with the Envisat mission (2002-2012) still require some large improvements. In this study, we first estimate Envisat and CryoSat-2 radar freeboard by using the exact same processing algorithms. We then analyse the freeboard difference between the two estimates over the common winter periods (November 2010-April 2011 and November 2011-March 2012). The analysis of along-track data and gridded radar freeboard in conjunction with Envisat pulse-peakiness (PP) maps suggests that the discrepancy between the two sensors is related to the surface properties of sea-ice floes and to the use of a threshold retracker. Based on the relation between the Envisat pulse peakiness and the radar freeboard difference between Envisat and CryoSat-2, we produce a monthly CryoSat-2-like version of Envisat freeboard. The improved Envisat data set freeboard displays a similar spatial distribution to CryoSat-2 (RMSD = 1.5 cm) during the two ice growth seasons and for all months of the period of study. The comparison of the altimetric data sets with in situ ice draught measurements during the common flight period shows that the improved Envisat data set (RMSE = 12-28 cm) is as accurate as CryoSat-2 (RMSE = 15-21 cm) and much more accurate than the uncorrected Envisat data set (RMSE = 178-179 cm). The comparison of the improved Envisat radar freeboard data set is then extended to the rest of the Envisat mission to demonstrate the validity of PP correction from the calibration period. The good agreement between the improved Envisat data set and the in situ ice draught data set (RMSE = 13-32 cm) demonstrates the potential of the PP correction to produce accurate

  4. Comparison of CryoSat-2 and ENVISAT radar freeboard over Arctic sea ice: toward an improved Envisat freeboard retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Guerreiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, sea-ice freeboard has been monitored with various satellite altimetric missions with the aim of producing long-term time series of ice thickness. While recent studies have demonstrated the capacity of the CryoSat-2 mission (2010–present to provide accurate freeboard measurements, the current estimates obtained with the Envisat mission (2002–2012 still require some large improvements. In this study, we first estimate Envisat and CryoSat-2 radar freeboard by using the exact same processing algorithms. We then analyse the freeboard difference between the two estimates over the common winter periods (November 2010–April 2011 and November 2011–March 2012. The analysis of along-track data and gridded radar freeboard in conjunction with Envisat pulse-peakiness (PP maps suggests that the discrepancy between the two sensors is related to the surface properties of sea-ice floes and to the use of a threshold retracker. Based on the relation between the Envisat pulse peakiness and the radar freeboard difference between Envisat and CryoSat-2, we produce a monthly CryoSat-2-like version of Envisat freeboard. The improved Envisat data set freeboard displays a similar spatial distribution to CryoSat-2 (RMSD  =  1.5 cm during the two ice growth seasons and for all months of the period of study. The comparison of the altimetric data sets with in situ ice draught measurements during the common flight period shows that the improved Envisat data set (RMSE  =  12–28 cm is as accurate as CryoSat-2 (RMSE  =  15–21 cm and much more accurate than the uncorrected Envisat data set (RMSE  =  178–179 cm. The comparison of the improved Envisat radar freeboard data set is then extended to the rest of the Envisat mission to demonstrate the validity of PP correction from the calibration period. The good agreement between the improved Envisat data set and the in situ ice draught data set (RMSE

  5. USE OF MULTIPARAMETER ANALYSIS OF LABORATORY BIOMARKERS TO ASSESS RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Novikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key component in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA is regular control of RA activity. The quantitative assessment of a patient’s status allows the development of standardized indications for anti-rheumatic therapy.Objective: to identify the laboratory biomarkers able to reflect RA activity.Subjects and methods. Fifty-eight patients with RA and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy donors were examined. The patients were divided into high/moderate and mild disease activity groups according to DAS28. The serum concentrations of 30 biomarkers were measured using immunonephelometric assay, enzyme immunoassay, and xMAP technology.Results and discussion. Multivariate analysis could identify the factors mostly related to high/moderate RA activity according to DAS28, such as fibroblast growth factor-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukins (IL 1α, 6, and 15, and tumor necrosis factor-α and could create a prognostic model for RA activity assessment. ROC analysis has shown that this model has excellent diagnostic efficiency in differentiating high/moderate versus low RA activity.Conclusion. To create a subjective assessment-independent immunological multiparameter index of greater diagnostic accuracy than the laboratory parameters routinely used in clinical practice may be a qualitatively new step in assessing and monitoring RA activity.

  6. Sugar content of popular sweetened beverages based on objective laboratory analysis: focus on fructose content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Emily E; Davis, Jaimie N; Goran, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    The consumption of fructose, largely in the form of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), has risen over the past several decades and is thought to contribute negatively to metabolic health. However, the fructose content of foods and beverages produced with HFCS is not disclosed and estimates of fructose content are based on the common assumption that the HFCS used contains 55% fructose. The objective of this study was to conduct an objective laboratory analysis of the sugar content and composition in popular sugar-sweetened beverages with a particular focus on fructose content. Twenty-three sugar-sweetened beverages along with four standard solutions were analyzed for sugar profiles using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in an independent, certified laboratory. Total sugar content was calculated as well as percent fructose in the beverages that use HFCS as the sole source of fructose. Results showed that the total sugar content of the beverages ranged from 85 to 128% of what was listed on the food label. The mean fructose content in the HFCS used was 59% (range 47-65%) and several major brands appear to be produced with HFCS that is 65% fructose. Finally, the sugar profile analyses detected forms of sugar that were inconsistent with what was listed on the food labels. This analysis revealed significant deviations in sugar amount and composition relative to disclosures from producers. In addition, the tendency for use of HFCS that is higher in fructose could be contributing to higher fructose consumption than would otherwise be assumed.

  7. Ultra-trace analysis of (41)Ca in urine by accelerator mass spectrometry: an inter-laboratory comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George S; Hillegonds, Darren J; Muzikar, Paul; Goehring, Brent

    2013-10-15

    A (41)Ca interlaboratory comparison between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Purdue Rare Isotope Laboratory (PRIME Lab) has been completed. Analysis of the ratios assayed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) shows that there is no statistically significant difference in the ratios. Further, Bayesian analysis shows that the uncertainties reported by both facilities are correct with the possibility of a slight under-estimation by one laboratory. Finally, the chemistry procedures used by the two facilities to produce CaF2 for the cesium sputter ion source are robust and don't yield any significant differences in the final result.

  8. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  9. CryoSat-2: Post launch performance of SIRAL-2 and its calibration/validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Robert; Francis, Richard; Davidson, Malcolm; Wingham, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    the use of ocean calibration zones and radar transponders. 3. CRYOSAT-2 OVERALL PERFORMANCE & VALIDATION PLANNING Validating such retrievals derived from a phase coherent pulse-width limited polar observing radar altimeter, such as SIRAL, is not a simple one [4]. In order to fully understand all the respective error co-variances it is necessary to acquire many different types of in-situ measurements (GPR, neutron probe density profiles, drilled and electromagnetic derived sea-ice thicknesses, for example) in highly inhospitable regions of the cryosphere at key times of the year. In order to correlate retrievals from CryoSat with the in-situ data it was decided early in the CryoSat development that an aircraft borne radar altimeter with similar functionality to SIRAL would provide the necessary link, albeit on the smaller scale, and provide pre-launch incite into expected performances and issues. In 2001 ESA commenced the development of its own prototype radar altimeter that mimics the functionality of SIRAL. Similar to SIRAL, but with subtle functional differences, the airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) has now been the centre piece instrument for a number of large scale land and sea ice field campaigns in the Arctic during spring and autumn 2004, 2006 and 2008. Additional smaller science/test campaigns have taken place in March 2003 (Svalbard), March 2005 (Bay of Bothnia), March 2006 (Western Greenland) and April 2007 (CryoVEx 2007 in Svalbard). It is a credit to all parties that constitute the CryoSat Validation and Retrieval Team (CVRT) for the coordination, planning, acquisition of in-situ and airborne measurements and the subsequent processing and distributing of its data for analysis. CVRT has a robust infrastructure in place for validating its level 2 products derived from an operational CryoSat-2. 4. REFERENCES [1] http://www.esa.int/livingplanet/cryosat [2] Wingham, D. J., Francis, C. R., Baker, S., Bouzinac, C., Cullen, R., de

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis - 3rd Quarter FY-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (23 from the 3rd Qtr FY-16 and 50 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 45 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (16 from this quarter and 29 from the prior three quarters).

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis - 1st Quarter FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 74 reportable events (16 from the 1st Qtr FY-16 and 58 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 35 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (15 from this quarter and 20 from the prior three quarters).

  12. Safety analysis report for the Heavy-Element Facility (Building 251), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvam, D.J.

    1982-10-11

    A comprehensive safety analysis was performed on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Heavy Element Facility, Building 251. The purpose of the analysis was to evaluate the building and its operations in order to inform LLNL and the Department of Energy of the risks they assume at Building 251. This was done by examining all of the energy sources and matching them with the physical and administrative barriers that control, prevent, or mitigate their hazards. Risk was evaluated for each source under both normal and catastrophic circumstances such as fire, flood, high wind, lighting, earthquake, and criticality. No significant safety deficiencies were found; it is concluded that the operation of the facility presents no unacceptable risk.

  13. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  14. Mars Science Laboratory Launch-Arrival Space Study: A Pork Chop Plot Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciolo, Alicia Dwyer; Powell, Richard; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    Launch-Arrival, or "pork chop", plot analysis can provide mission designers with valuable information and insight into a specific launch and arrival space selected for a mission. The study begins with the array of entry states for each pair of selected Earth launch and Mars arrival dates, and nominal entry, descent and landing trajectories are simulated for each pair. Parameters of interest, such as maximum heat rate, are plotted in launch-arrival space. The plots help to quickly identify launch and arrival regions that are not feasible under current constraints or technology and also provide information as to what technologies may need to be developed to reach a desired region. This paper provides a discussion of the development, application, and results of a pork chop plot analysis to the Mars Science Laboratory mission. This technique is easily applicable to other missions at Mars and other destinations.

  15. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  16. The Synthesis and Analysis of Ammine Complexes of Copper and Silver Sulfate: An Undergraduate Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clareen, Steven S.; Marshall, Shireen R.; Price, Kristin E.; Royall, Margaret B.; Yoder, Claude H.; Schaeffer, Richard W.

    2000-07-01

    An undergraduate chemistry laboratory project involving the synthesis of [Ag(NH3)2]2SO4 and Cu(NH3)4SO4 from the simple sulfate salts is described. Characterization of the stoichiometry of the complexes is accomplished by gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Silver is precipitated as the chloride and copper is precipitated as the hydroxide and converted to the oxide before weighing. The ammonia content of each complex is determined with a back titration using dilute nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. Typical student work gives results for the stoichiometry of the complexes within 1-5% of the theoretical values. The project provides a convenient preparation of two compounds whose identity and formula will not be obvious to the student. The analytical procedures illustrate the fundamentals of gravimetric and volumetric analysis and some basic characteristics of simple coordination complexes. The analytical data allow the student to determine the identity of each product by determining its empirical formula.

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis 4th Quarter FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System, as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 84 reportable events (29 from the 4th quarter fiscal year 2016 and 55 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 39 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (two from this quarter and 37 from the prior three quarters).

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 1st Quarter FY2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (27 from the 1St Qtr FY-15 and 46 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 38 other issue reports (including nine not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions reported during the1st Qtr FY-15) identified at INL during the past 12 months.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis for the 1st Quarter FY2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 82 reportable events (13 from the 1st quarter (Qtr) of fiscal year (FY) 2017 and 68 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 31 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (seven from this quarter and 24 from the prior three quarters).

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  1. Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Laverty

    2005-10-01

    UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

  2. Predicting antigenic sites on the foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid of the South African Territories (SAT) types using virus neutralization data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outer capsid proteins 1B, 1C and 1D contribute to the virus serotype distribution and antigenic variants that exist within each of the seven serotypes. This study presents a phylogenetic, genetic and antigenic analysis of the South African Territories (SAT) seroty...

  3. The Effect of High School Socioeconomic Status on the Predictive Validity of SAT Scores and High School Grade-Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca; Himelfarb, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Research has often found that, when high school grades and SAT scores are used to predict first-year college grade-point average (FGPA) via regression analysis, African-American and Latino students, are, on average, predicted to earn higher FGPAs than they actually do. Under various plausible models, this phenomenon can be explained in terms of…

  4. It Takes a Village (or an Ethnic Economy): The Varying Roles of Socioeconomic Status, Religion, and Social Capital in SAT Preparation for Chinese and Korean American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethnic economies promote interclass contact among East Asian Americans, which facilitates the exchange of information and resources through social capital networks. However, low-income Korean Americans are more likely than low-income Chinese Americans to take SAT prep, although both communities have extensive ethnic economies. In the analysis of a…

  5. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  6. Faculty perspectives of the undergraduate laboratory: A survey of faculty goals for the laboratory and comparative analysis of responses using statistical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Aaron D.

    Qualitative research methods were used in a previous study to discover the goals of faculty members teaching undergraduate laboratories. Assertions about the goals and the unique characteristics of innovative lab programs were developed from categories that emerged from the interviews. The purpose of the present research was to create a survey instrument to measure the prevalence of these themes and faculty goals for undergraduate laboratories with a national sample. This was achieved through a two-stage process that utilized a pilot survey to determine the factor structure and reduce the number of survey items to a manageable size. Once the number of survey questions was reduced, the full survey was given to a national sample of undergraduate laboratory faculty. The 312 responses to the survey were then analyzed using factor analysis. Comparative analyses were conducted using analysis of variance (ANOVA). This dissertation focuses on the processes involved in the creation of this survey and the subsequent analyses of the data the survey produced. The results of these analyses and the implications of this research will also be discussed.

  7. Guidelines for CubeSat's Thermal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, Juan; Patel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop 2015, Silver Spring, MD. NCTS 19104-15. What does it take to thermally designlow cost, low mass cubesats? What are the differences in the approach when you compare with large scale missions?What additional risk is acceptable? What is the approach to hardware? How is the testing campaign run? These aresome of the questions that will be addressed in this course, which is designed to equip the attendees to support thedevelopment of cubesats at their organization.

  8. A review of planetary and space science projects presented at iCubeSat, the Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael

    2015-04-01

    iCubeSat, the Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop, is an annual technical workshop for researchers working on an exciting new standardised platform and opportunity for planetary and space scientists. The first workshop was held in 2012 at MIT, 2013 at Cornell, 2014 at Caltech with the 2015 workshop scheduled to take place on the 26-27th May 2015 at Imperial College London. Mission concepts and flight projects presented since 2012 have included orbiters and landers targeting asteroids, the moon, Mars, Venus, Saturn and their satellites to perform science traditionally reserved for flagship missions at a fraction of their cost. Some of the first missions proposed are currently being readied for flight in Europe, taking advantage of multiple ride share launch opportunities and technology providers. A review of these and other interplanetary CubeSat projects will be presented, covering details of their science objectives, instrument capabilities, technology, team composition, budget, funding sources, and the other programattic elements required to implement this potentially revolutionary new class of mission.

  9. INSPIRE and MarCO - Technology Development for the First Deep Space CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesh, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    INSPIRE (Interplanetary NanoSpacecraft Pathfinder In a Relevant Environment) and MarCO (Mars Cube One) will open the door for tiny spacecraft to explore the solar system. INSPIRE serves as a trailblazer, designed to demonstrate new technology needed for deep space. MarCO will open the door for NanoSpacecraft to serve in support roles for much larger primary missions - in this case, providing a real-time relay of for the InSight project and will likely be the first CubeSats to reach deep space. Together, these four spacecraft (two for each mission) enable fundamental science objectives to be met with tiny vehicles. Originally designed for a March, 2016 launch with the InSight mission to Mars, the MarCO spacecraft are now complete and in storage. When launched with the InSight lander from Vandenberg Air Force Base, the spacecraft will begin a 6.5 month cruise to Mars. Soon after InSight itself separates from the upper stage of the launch vehicle, the two MarCO CubeSats will deploy and independently fly to Mars to support telecommunications relay for InSight's entry, descent, and landing sequence. These spacecraft will have onboard capability for deep space trajectory correction maneuvers; high-speed direct-to-Earth & DSN-compatible communications; an advanced navigation transponder; a large deployable reflect-array high gain antenna; and a robust software suite. This talk will present an overview of the INSPIRE and MarCO projects, including a concept of operations, details of the spacecraft and subsystem design, and lessons learned from integration and test. Finally, the talk will outline how lessons from these spacecraft are already being utilized in the next generation of interplanetary CubeSats, as well as a brief vision of their applicability for solar system exploration. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  10. The relationship of high school graduation exams to graduation rates and SAT scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Marchant

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the effect of high school graduation exams on states' graduation rates, states' aggregated SAT scores, and individual students' SAT scores. Three data sources were used: One source identified states requiring a standardized test for graduation; the NCES provided state aggregated data on graduation rates for the class of 2002; and the College Board provided its 2001 SAT database for all test-takers. After controlling for students' demographic characteristics (e.g., race, family education and income, GPA and class rank, regression analyses revealed that states requiring graduation exams had lower graduation rates and lower SAT scores. Individually, students from states requiring a graduation exam performed more poorly on the SAT than did students from states not requiring an exam. The impact of high stakes tests' on students' motivation to stay in school and on the teaching of critical thinking skills (tested by the SAT are discussed.

  11. Homogeneity study of a corn flour laboratory reference material candidate for inorganic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ana Maria Pinto; Dos Santos, Liz Oliveira; Brandao, Geovani Cardoso; Leao, Danilo Junqueira; Bernedo, Alfredo Victor Bellido; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a homogeneity study of a corn flour reference material candidate for inorganic analysis is presented. Seven kilograms of corn flour were used to prepare the material, which was distributed among 100 bottles. The elements Ca, K, Mg, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn and Mo were quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after acid digestion procedure. The method accuracy was confirmed by analyzing the rice flour certified reference material, NIST 1568a. All results were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA). In the study, a sample mass of 400mg was established as the minimum mass required for analysis, according to the PCA. The between-bottle test was performed by analyzing 9 bottles of the material. Subsamples of a single bottle were analyzed for the within-bottle test. No significant differences were observed for the results obtained through the application of both statistical methods. This fact demonstrates that the material is homogeneous for use as a laboratory reference material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Aerosol-Precipitation Responses Deduced from Ship tracks as Observed by CloudSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, M.; Stephens, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    Ship tracks, produced from the exhaust plumes of ocean going vessels were analyzed using the 94-GHZ cloud profiling radar on the CloudSat satellite to examine the precipitation response of marine stratocumulus to changes in aerosol concentration. Ship tracks provide an ideal laboratory to study this response because the regions of clouds that are heavily contaminated by pollution can be separated from adjacent regions of clouds formed in the clean marine boundary layer. Several hundred ship tracks, coinciding with the radar and lidar observations from CloudSat and Calipso, were identified in MODIS imagery. The results demonstrate that, aerosol plumes from ships tend to decrease the spatial extent of rainfall (rain cover fraction) and intensity compared to the nearby pristine clouds. However, there were a substantial fraction of cases (30%), which exhibited increased rainfall. The sign and strength of the precipitation response was strongly tied to the mesoscale structure of the clouds. When the clouds exhibited closed cellular structures, liquid water amount, rainfall (-63%), and rain cover fraction significantly decreased (-55%). These reductions in rainfall were primarily associated with the decrease in rain cover fraction over the ship track domain. The opposite occurred in the open cell regime. Ship plumes ingested into this regime resulted in deeper, wetter, rainier, and brighter clouds, where rainfall increased by 88% primarily due to changes in intensity and to a lesser extent rain cover fraction. Microphysical changes almost always led to significantly smaller droplet radii in ship tracks, even when precipitation was increased. On the other hand, macrophysical changes (liquid water path) varied in magnitude and sign, and typically followed the direction of the precipitation response. The results presented here underline the need to consider the mesoscale structure of stratocumulus when examining the cloud dynamic response to changes in aerosol concentration.

  13. Cable y satélite: equipamiento del hogar y consumo televisivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lic. Emilio Fernández Peña

    2000-01-01

    Los servicios de difusión de canales de televisión de pago por satélite (Canal Satélite Digital y Vía Digital) y cable son ya una realidad con importante presencia en el sistema televisivo español. Un millón cuatrocientos mil hogares reciben estos servicios con una preponderancia clara de los transmitidos por satélite respecto a los que usan el cable (1,2 millones).

  14. A Hopeful CNF—SAT Algorithm—Its High Efficiency,Industrial Application and Limitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文奇; 李未

    1998-01-01

    From the SAT physical model,a physical hypothesis named PHHY is proposed.By PHY,it is proved that there is a universally efficient algorithm for solving SAT problem.Then,by square packing problem,the authors show that thre are interesting industrial NP-complete problems which can be solved through SAT algorithms,but each way of solving like this will be much worse than that of a certain direct solving.

  15. Meta-analysis of the clinical and laboratory parameters of SFTS patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao-Miao; Lei, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2016-11-29

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging hemorrhagic fever in East Asia, which is caused by a novel bunyavirus-SFTSV. Many studies have reported the clinical characters of SFTS patients, but the reports were not consistent and a systematic summary of clinical manifestations and laboratory parameters are not available. A comprehensive literature research of Web of Science, PubMed, Wan Fang Data, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases was conducted on articles which have described the clinical characters of SFTS patients. Data from selected studies were pooled by using STATA VERSION 12.0 software. Nine articles comprising 844 laboratory-confirmed SFTSV cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled case fatality rate was 16% (95% CI: 0.13-0.19). The major clinical characters of patients with SFTSV infection were fever, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, gastrointestinal symptoms, and central nervous system manifestations. The risk factors for severe disease included bleeding tendency, central nervous system manifestations, elevated serum enzymes, and high viral load. Although there is no specific antiviral therapy for SFTSV infection, symptomatic treatment and supportive therapy including intensive monitoring is the most essential part of case management. The major clinical characters of patients with SFTSV infection were fever, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and gastrointestinal symptoms, and central nervous system manifestations. The risk factors for severity and fatality among SFTS patients included: old age, CNS manifestations, bleeding tendency, elevated serum enzymes, and high vial load.

  16. Assessing Reclamation Levels of Coastal Saline Lands with Integrated Stepwise Discriminant Analysis and Laboratory Hyperspectral Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    At different times over the past 30 years in Zhejiang Province, China, the coastal tidelands have been successively enclosed and reclaimed for agricultural land use. The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether laboratory hyperspectral data might be used to estimate the physicochemical characteristics of these reclaimed saline soils. A coastal region of Shangyu City (Zhejiang Province), which was grouped into four subzones according to reclamation history, was used as the study area, and soil samples were collected in each subzone. Physicochemical analyses showed that the soils were characterized by high electrical conductivity and sand content with low organic matter; the longer the saline lands had been reclaimed, the lower were the electrical conductivity and sand content and the higher the organic matter content.These changing trends of soil chemical and physical properties were found in laboratory reflectance spectra of soil samples and their first-order derivative curves. Stepwise discriminant analysis (SDA) identified six salient spectral bands at 488,530, 670, 880, 1 400, and 1 900 nm. Using derived discriminant functions for saline lands with different historical years of reclamation, classification revealed an overall accuracy from a self-test of 86.6% and from cross-validation of 89.3%.Therefore, as opposed to time-consuming field investigations, this study suggested that remotely sensed hyperspectral data could serve as a promising measure to assess the reclamation levels of coastal saline lands.

  17. Thirty years of capillary electrophoresis in food analysis laboratories: potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, Maria-Ysabel; Bauza, Roberto; Arce, Lourdes

    2011-06-01

    CE has generated considerable interest in the research community since instruments were introduced by different trading companies in the 1990s. Nowadays, CE is popular due to its simplicity, speed, highly efficient separations and minimal solvent and reagent consumption; it can also be included as a useful technique in the nanotechnology field and it covers a wide range of specific applications in different fields (chemical, pharmaceutical, genetic, clinical, food and environmental). CE has been very well evaluated in research laboratories for several years, and different new approaches to improve sensitivity (one of the main drawbacks of CE) and robustness have been proposed. However, this technique is still not well accepted in routine laboratories for food analysis. Researching in data bases, it is easy to find several electrophoretic methods to determine different groups of analytes and sometimes they are compared in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, precision and applicability with other separation techniques. Although these papers frequently prove the potential of this methodology in spiked samples, it is not common to find a discussion of the well-known complexity of the matrices to extract analytes from the sample and/or to study the interferences in the target analytes. Summarizing, the majority of CE scientific papers focus primarily on the effects upon the separation of the analytes while ignoring their behavior if these analytes are presented in real samples. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Efficacy and safety of far infrared radiation in lymphedema treatment: clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ning Fei; Feng, Shao Qing; Tong, Yun; Zhang, Ju Fang; Constantinides, Joannis; Lazzeri, Davide; Grassetti, Luca; Nicoli, Fabio; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-01-26

    Swelling is the most common symptom of extremities lymphedema. Clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis were conducted after far infrared radiation (FIR) treatment on the main four components of lymphedema: fluid, fat, protein, and hyaluronan. Far infrared radiation is a kind of hyperthermia therapy with several and additional benefits as well as promoting microcirculation flow and improving collateral lymph circumfluence. Although FIR therapy has been applied for several years on thousands of lymphedema patients, there are still few studies that have reported the biological effects of FIR on lymphatic tissue. In this research, we investigate the effects of far infrared rays on the major components of lymphatic tissue. Then, we explore the effectiveness and safety of FIR as a promising treatment modality of lymphedema. A total of 32 patients affected by lymphedema in stage II and III were treated between January 2015 and January 2016 at our department. After therapy, a significant decrease of limb circumference measurements was noted and improving of quality of life was registered. Laboratory examination showed the treatment can also decrease the deposition of fluid, fat, hyaluronan, and protein, improving the swelling condition. We believe FIR treatment could be considered as both an alternative monotherapy and a useful adjunctive to the conservative or surgical lymphedema procedures. Furthermore, the real and significant biological effects of FIR represent possible future applications in wide range of the medical field.

  19. Determining the sources of fine-grained sediment using the Sediment Source Assessment Tool (Sed_SAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman Sanisaca, Lillian E.; Gellis, Allen C.; Lorenz, David L.

    2017-07-27

    A sound understanding of sources contributing to instream sediment flux in a watershed is important when developing total maximum daily load (TMDL) management strategies designed to reduce suspended sediment in streams. Sediment fingerprinting and sediment budget approaches are two techniques that, when used jointly, can qualify and quantify the major sources of sediment in a given watershed. The sediment fingerprinting approach uses trace element concentrations from samples in known potential source areas to determine a clear signature of each potential source. A mixing model is then used to determine the relative source contribution to the target suspended sediment samples.The computational steps required to apportion sediment for each target sample are quite involved and time intensive, a problem the Sediment Source Assessment Tool (Sed_SAT) addresses. Sed_SAT is a user-friendly statistical model that guides the user through the necessary steps in order to quantify the relative contributions of sediment sources in a given watershed. The model is written using the statistical software R (R Core Team, 2016b) and utilizes Microsoft Access® as a user interface but requires no prior knowledge of R or Microsoft Access® to successfully run the model successfully. Sed_SAT identifies outliers, corrects for differences in size and organic content in the source samples relative to the target samples, evaluates the conservative behavior of tracers used in fingerprinting by applying a “Bracket Test,” identifies tracers with the highest discriminatory power, and provides robust error analysis through a Monte Carlo simulation following the mixing model. Quantifying sediment source contributions using the sediment fingerprinting approach provides local, State, and Federal land management agencies with important information needed to implement effective strategies to reduce sediment. Sed_SAT is designed to assist these agencies in applying the sediment fingerprinting

  20. Effectiveness of Barcoding for Reducing Patient Specimen and Laboratory Testing Identification Errors: A Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Susan R.; Favoretto, Alessandra M.; Derzon, James H.; Christenson, Robert; Kahn, Stephen; Shaw, Colleen; Baetz, Rich Ann; Mass, Diana; Fantz, Corrine; Raab, Stephen; Tanasijevic, Milenko; Liebow, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of barcoding practices for reducing patient specimen and laboratory testing identification errors. Design and Methods The CDC-funded Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative systematic review methods for quality improvement practices were used. Results A total of 17 observational studies reporting on barcoding systems are included in the body of evidence; 10 for patient specimens and 7 for point-of-care testing. All 17 studies favored barcoding, with meta-analysis mean odds ratios for barcoding systems of 4.39 (95% CI: 3.05 – 6.32) and for point-of-care testing of 5.93 (95% CI: 5.28 – 6.67). Conclusions Barcoding is effective for reducing patient specimen and laboratory testing identification errors in diverse hospital settings and is recommended as an evidence-based “best practice.” The overall strength of evidence rating is high and the effect size rating is substantial. Unpublished studies made an important contribution comprising almost half of the body of evidence. PMID:22750145

  1. The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory for Structured Chemical Product Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti; Kalakul, Sawitree;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present new methods for design of chemicals based formulated products and their implementation in the software, the Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory. The new products are tailor-made blended liquid products and emulsion-based products. The new software...... employs a template approach, where each template follows the same common steps in the workflow for design of formulated products, but has the option to employ different product specific property models, data and calculation routines, when necessary. With the new additions, the software is able to support...... the design and analysis of a wide range of homogeneous formulated products: tailor-made blends, single phase liquid formulations and emulsion-based products. The decision making process is supported by dedicated property models and structured databases, specifically developed for each design problem scenario...

  2. LC-MS/MS analysis of steroids in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevil, Brian G

    2016-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful tool that is changing the way we analyse steroids in the clinical laboratory. It is already opening up the field of steroid analysis in endocrinology and is providing new applications for individual steroids and panels of steroids in different clinical conditions. LC-MS/MS is now well-accepted technology and is increasingly being used to replace problematic immunoassay methods because of greater sensitivity and specificity. Improved sample preparation, modern chromatography methods, and sensitive, faster scanning mass spectrometers have all played a role in improving LC-MS/MS. LC-MS/MS is also playing a key role in improving the quality of assays through the development of reference measurement procedures, characterisation of reference materials and multi-site calibration programmes. There is increasing interest in multiplexing steroid assays into panels of diagnostic tests to aid and improve the diagnosis and monitoring of disease.

  3. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  4. Importance/performance analysis: a tool for service quality control by clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammon, D L; Weiss, R

    1991-01-01

    A study of customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory service is used as the basis for identifying potential improvements in service and more effectively targeting marketing activities to enhance customer satisfaction. Data on customer satisfaction are used to determine the aspects of service most critical to customers, how well the organization is doing in delivery of service, and how consistent service delivery is. Importance-performance analysis is used to highlight areas for future resource reallocation and strategic emphasis. Suggestions include the establishment of performance guidelines for customer contact personnel, the enhancement of timely delivery of reports via electronic transmission (computer and fax), and the development of standardized graphics for request and report forms to facilitate identification of appropriate request forms and guide clients to key items of information on reports.

  5. Adaptive silicon monochromators for high-power wigglers; design, finite-element analysis and laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, J P; Hart, M

    1995-05-01

    Multipole wigglers in storage rings already produce X-ray power in the range up to a few kilowatts and planned devices at third-generation facilities promise up to 30 kW. Although the power density at the monochromator position is an order of magnitude lower than that from undulators, the thermal strain field in the beam footprint can still cause severe loss of performance in X-ray optical systems. For an optimized adaptive design, the results of finite-element analysis are compared with double-crystal rocking curves obtained with a laboratory X-ray source and, in a second paper [Quintana, Hart, Bilderback, Henderson, Richter, Setterson, White, Hausermann, Krumrey & Schulte-Schrepping (1995). J. Synchotron Rad. 2, 1-5], successful tests at wiggler sources at CHESS and ESRF and in an undulator source at HASYLAB are reported.

  6. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzette Payne

    2006-04-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  7. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzette Payne

    2007-08-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  8. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  9. Estimation of the coefficient of variation from laboratory analysis of split specimens for quality control in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, J E; Lee, W W

    1990-02-01

    An explicit statistical model is proposed for the coefficient of variation for laboratory analyses of constituents of blood, serum, saliva, or other specimens. A method for computing the maximum likelihood estimate of the key parameter is described, and compared with two simpler noniterative estimates. Validity of the model is explored by analysis of data from the central laboratory of a large cooperative clinical trial. Simulation studies are employed to compare the accuracy of the three estimators of the coefficient of variation. For most laboratory measurements for which the model is valid, one of the two noniterative estimates is nearly as accurate and unbiased as the maximum likelihood estimate.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Methanogenic Communities in Different Laboratory-Scale Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M.; Ziganshina, Elvira E.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of methanogenic archaea compositions and dynamics in 11 laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with different agricultural materials (chicken manure, cattle manure, maize straw, maize silage, distillers grains, and Jatropha press cake) was carried out by analysis of the methyl coenzyme-M reductase α-subunit (mcrA) gene. Various taxa within Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriaceae, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae, and Methanomassiliicoccales were detected in the biogas reactors but in different proportions depending on the substrate type utilized as well as various process parameters. Improved coverage and higher taxonomic resolution of methanogens were obtained compared to a previous 16S rRNA gene based study of the same reactors. Some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the relative methane content, whereas opposite correlations were found for Methanobacterium. Specific biogas production was found to be significantly correlating with Methanosarcinaceae. Statistical analysis also disclosed that some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the ammonia level, whereas the prevalence of Methanocorpusculum, Methanobacterium, and Methanosaeta was negatively correlated with this parameter. These results suggest that the application of methanogenic archaea adapted to specific feedstock might enhance the anaerobic digestion of such waste materials in full-scale biogas reactors. PMID:28074084

  11. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences after the initiation of failure which includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more details and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM and laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanism and the post-failure mechanism of slope will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Methanogenic Communities in Different Laboratory-Scale Anaerobic Digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrat M. Ziganshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of methanogenic archaea compositions and dynamics in 11 laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with different agricultural materials (chicken manure, cattle manure, maize straw, maize silage, distillers grains, and Jatropha press cake was carried out by analysis of the methyl coenzyme-M reductase α-subunit (mcrA gene. Various taxa within Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriaceae, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae, and Methanomassiliicoccales were detected in the biogas reactors but in different proportions depending on the substrate type utilized as well as various process parameters. Improved coverage and higher taxonomic resolution of methanogens were obtained compared to a previous 16S rRNA gene based study of the same reactors. Some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the relative methane content, whereas opposite correlations were found for Methanobacterium. Specific biogas production was found to be significantly correlating with Methanosarcinaceae. Statistical analysis also disclosed that some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the ammonia level, whereas the prevalence of Methanocorpusculum, Methanobacterium, and Methanosaeta was negatively correlated with this parameter. These results suggest that the application of methanogenic archaea adapted to specific feedstock might enhance the anaerobic digestion of such waste materials in full-scale biogas reactors.

  13. Knowledge on DNA Success Rates to Optimize the DNA Analysis Process: From Crime Scene to Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Anna A; Kloosterman, Ate D; van Marion, Vincent; de Poot, Christianne J

    2016-07-01

    DNA analysis has become an essential intelligence tool in the criminal justice system for the identification of possible offenders. However, it appears that about half of the processed DNA samples contains too little DNA for analysis. This study looks at DNA success rates within 28 different categories of trace exhibits and relates the DNA concentration to the characteristics of the DNA profile. Data from 2260 analyzed crime samples show that cigarettes, bloodstains, and headwear have relatively high success rates. Cartridge cases, crowbars, and tie-wraps are on the other end of the spectrum. These objective data can assist forensics in their selection process.The DNA success probability shows a positive relation with the DNA concentration. This finding enables the laboratory to set an evidence-based threshold value in the DNA analysis process. For instance, 958 DNA extracts had a concentration value of 6 pg/μL or less. Only 46 of the 958 low-level extracts provided meaningful DNA profiling data.

  14. From CryoSat-2 to Sentinel-3 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, R.

    2011-12-01

    CryoSat-2 carried into Earth orbit the first altimeter using SAR principles, although similar techniques had been used on earlier Venusian missions. Furthermore, it carries a second antenna and receive chain, and has been very carefully calibrated, allowing interferometry between these antennas. The results of the SAR mode and of the interferometer have met all expectations, with handsome margins. Even before the launch of CryoSat-2 the further development of this concept was underway with the radar for the oceanography mission Sentinel-3. While this radar, named SRAL (SAR Radar Altimeter) does not have the interferometer capability of CryoSat-2's SIRAL (SAR Interferometric Radar Altimeter), it does have a second frequency, to enable direct measurement of the delay induced by the ionospheric electron content. Sentinel-3 will have a sun-synchronous orbit, like ERS and EnviSat, and will have a similar latitudinal range: about 82° north and south, compared to CryoSat's 88°. Sentinel-3 will operate its radar altimeter in the high-resolution SAR mode over coastal oceans and inland water, and will revert to the more classical pulse-width limited mode over the open oceans. The SAR mode generates data at a high rate, so the major limiting factor is the amount of on-board storage. The power consumption is also higher, imposing less critical constraints. For sizing purposes the coastal oceans are defined as waters within 300 km of the continental shorelines. Sentinel-3 is expected to be launched in 2013 and be followed 18 months later by a second satellite of the same design. The next step in the development of this family of radar altimeters is Jason-CS, which will provide Continuity of Service to the existing Jason series of operational oceanography missions. Jason-CS has a very strong heritage from CryoSat but will fly the traditional Jason orbit, which covers latitudes up to 66° from a high altitude of 1330 km. The new radar is called Poseidon-4, to emphasise the

  15. Understanding System Utilization as a Limitation Associated with Cybersecurity Laboratories--A Literature Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The use of laboratories as part of cybersecurity education is well evidenced in the existing literature. We are informed about the benefits, different types of laboratories and, in addition, underlying learning theories therein. Existing research also demonstrates that the success of employing cybersecurity laboratory exercises relies upon…

  16. Using Phylogenetic Analysis to Detect Market Substitution of Atlantic Salmon for Pacific Salmon: An Introductory Biology Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Erica; Gogarten, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    We describe a laboratory exercise developed for the cell and molecular biology quarter of a year-long majors' undergraduate introductory biology sequence. In an analysis of salmon samples collected by students in their local stores and restaurants, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to detect market substitution of Atlantic salmon…

  17. Extraction and [superscript 1]H NMR Analysis of Fats from Convenience Foods: A Laboratory Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Moore, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and analysis of fats from convenience foods (crackers, cookies, chips, candies) has been developed as an experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. Students gravimetrically determine the fat content per serving and then perform a [superscript 1]H NMR analysis of the recovered fat to determine the…

  18. Extraction and [superscript 1]H NMR Analysis of Fats from Convenience Foods: A Laboratory Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Moore, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and analysis of fats from convenience foods (crackers, cookies, chips, candies) has been developed as an experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. Students gravimetrically determine the fat content per serving and then perform a [superscript 1]H NMR analysis of the recovered fat to determine the…

  19. The decimation process in random k-SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Coja-Oghlan, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Let F be a uniformly distributed random k-SAT formula with n variables and m clauses. Non-rigorous statistical mechanics ideas have inspired a message passing algorithm called Belief Propagation Guided Decimation for finding satisfying assignments of F. This algorithm can be viewed as an attempt at implementing a certain thought experiment that we call the Decimation Process. In this paper we identify a variety of phase transitions in the decimation process and link these phase transitions to the performance of the algorithm.

  20. Multi-sensor Observations of the SpinSat Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    rate, the sphere’s exterior features a reflectance pattern much like that of a beach- ball , a distributed sequence of retro-reflectors, as well as an...been delivered by a SpaceX Dragon supply ship. The launch and deployment of SpinSat were supported by the DoD Space Test program. Figure 1 shows a...reflectance pattern much like that of a beach- ball , a distributed sequence of retro-reflectors, as well as a set of eight light- emitting diodes (LEDs

  1. Band-monitoring Payload for a CubeSat Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vagner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During changing sun activity, the ionosphere is responding accordingly and therefore it is interesting to observe the propagation behavior of shortwave bands. For the above mentioned purpose we have designed a band-monitoring payload for an experimental CubeSat satellite. The payload consists of a receiver, which is able to receive SSB modulated narrowband signals in 28 MHz uplink band, and a transmitter with FM modulation in UHF downlink band. The receiver frequency is selected to be at the center of radio amateur activity with low data rate digital modulations.

  2. A CubeSat deployable solar panel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas; Hirsch, Michael; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    The power usage of CubeSat's onboard systems has increased with the complexity of the systems included. This paper presents a deployment system design which creates a plane of solar panels to collect energy. This allows more panels to be in direct normal sunlight at any given point (in conjunction with the onboard attitude determination and control system), facilitating increased power generation. The deployable system is comprised of a printed circuit board (holding the solar cells) which is attached to an aluminum hinge. The efficacy of this approach for power generation and its simplicity, as compared to other prospective approaches, are assessed herein.

  3. Tunable Microwave Component Technologies for SatCom-Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maune, Holger; Jost, Matthias; Wiens, Alex; Weickhmann, Christian; Reese, Roland; Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Schuster, Christian; Franke, Tobias; Hu, Wenjuan; Nickel, Matthias; Kienemund, Daniel; Prasetiadi, Ananto Eka; Jakoby, Rolf

    2017-03-01

    Modern communication platforms require a huge amount of switched RF component banks especially made of different filters and antennas to cover all operating frequencies and bandwidth for the targeted services and application scenarios. In contrast, reconfigurable devices made of tunable components lead to a considerable reduction in complexity, size, weight, power consumption, and cost. This paper gives an overview of suitable technologies for tunable microwave components especially for SatCom applications. Special attention is given to tunable components based on functional materials such as barium strontium titanate (BST) and liquid crystal (LC).

  4. Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence.

  5. Improvement of the quality of work in a biochemistry laboratory via measurement system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Liao, Chen-Mao; Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Ming

    2016-10-31

    An adequate and continuous monitoring of operational variations can effectively reduce the uncertainty and enhance the quality of laboratory reports. This study applied the evaluation rule of the measurement system analysis (MSA) method to estimate the quality of work conducted in a biochemistry laboratory. Using the gauge repeatability & reproducibility (GR&R) approach, variations in quality control (QC) data among medical technicians in conducting measurements of five biochemical items, namely, serum glucose (GLU), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), uric acid (UA), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl), were evaluated. The measurements of the five biochemical items showed different levels of variance among the different technicians, with the variances in GLU measurements being higher than those for the other four items. The ratios of precision-to-tolerance (P/T) for Na, Cl and GLU were all above 0.5, implying inadequate gauge capability. The product variation contribution of Na was large (75.45% and 31.24% in normal and abnormal QC levels, respectively), which showed that the impact of insufficient usage of reagents could not be excluded. With regard to reproducibility, high contributions (of more than 30%) of variation for the selected items were found. These high operator variation levels implied that the possibility of inadequate gauge capacity could not be excluded. The ANOVA of GR&R showed that the operator variations in GLU measurements were significant (F=5.296, P=0.001 in the normal level and F=3.399, P=0.015 in the abnormal level, respectively). In addition to operator variations, product variations of Na were also significant for both QC levels. The heterogeneity of variance for the five technicians showed significant differences for the Na and Cl measurements in the normal QC level. The accuracy of QC for five technicians was identified for further operational improvement. This study revealed that MSA can be used to evaluate product and personnel errors and to

  6. Laboratory investigation and phylogenetic analysis of an imported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus case in Greece.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Kossyvakis

    Full Text Available Rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis of persons suspected of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV infection is important for timely implementation of infection control practices and disease management. In addition, monitoring molecular changes in the virus can help elucidate chains of transmission and identify mutations that might influence virus transmission efficiency. This was illustrated by a recent laboratory investigation we conducted on an imported MERS-CoV case in Greece. Two oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected on the 1st and 2nd day of patient hospitalization and tested using two real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR assays targeting the UpE and Orf-1a regions of the MERS-CoV genome and RT-PCR and partial sequencing of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid genes. Serum specimens were also collected and serological test were performed. Results from the first swab sample were inconclusive while the second swab was strongly positive for MERS-CoV RNA by rRT-PCR and confirmed positive by RT-PCR and partial gene sequencing. Positive serologic test results further confirmed MERS-CoV infection. Full-length nucleocapsid and spike gene coding sequences were later obtained from the positive swab sample. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus was closely related to recent human-derived MERS-CoV strains obtained in Jeddah and Makkah, Saudi Arabia, in April 2014 and dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. These findings were consistent with the patient's history. We also identified a unique amino acid substitution in the spike receptor binding domain that may have implications for receptor binding efficiency. Our initial inconclusive rRT-PCR results highlight the importance of collecting multiple specimens from suspect MERS-CoV cases and particularly specimens from the lower respiratory tract.

  7. In vitro comparative analysis of resistance to compression of laboratory resin composites and a ceramic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montenegro Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restorative materials must be capable not only of restoring the patient′s masticatory function, but also to rescue the self-esteem of those maculated by a disharmonious smile. Among the esthetic materials available on the market, the choice frequently lies between ceramic or indirect laboratory resin restorations. Aim: This study assessed the resistance to compression of two laboratory resins found on the market, namely Artglass ® and Targis ® , considering Omega 900 ® ceramic from Vita as control. Materials and Methods: With the aid of stainless steel matrices, with internal dimensions of 8.0 mm diameter at the base, 9.0 mm in the top portion and 4.0 mm height, 15 test specimens were made, being 5 of each material to be tested. The test specimens were kept in distilled water for 72 hours and submitted to an axial load by the action of a point with a rounded tip 2 mm in diameter, adapted to an EMIC 500 universal test machine. The compression speed was 0.5 mm/min, with a load cell capacity of 200 Kgf. Results: The means of the results were calculated in kilogram-force (Kgf. The results found were treated by analysis of variance (ANOVA and the differences found among the groups were identified by the Tukey test (5%. Conclusion: It was observed that the material Omega 900 ® offered significantly greater resistance to compression than the other two materials, which did not present statistically significant difference between them.

  8. Quantitative inverse modelling of a cylindrical object in the laboratory using ERT: An error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korteland, Suze-Anne; Heimovaara, Timo

    2015-03-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a geophysical technique that can be used to obtain three-dimensional images of the bulk electrical conductivity of the subsurface. Because the electrical conductivity is strongly related to properties of the subsurface and the flow of water it has become a valuable tool for visualization in many hydrogeological and environmental applications. In recent years, ERT is increasingly being used for quantitative characterization, which requires more detailed prior information than a conventional geophysical inversion for qualitative purposes. In addition, the careful interpretation of measurement and modelling errors is critical if ERT measurements are to be used in a quantitative way. This paper explores the quantitative determination of the electrical conductivity distribution of a cylindrical object placed in a water bath in a laboratory-scale tank. Because of the sharp conductivity contrast between the object and the water, a standard geophysical inversion using a smoothness constraint could not reproduce this target accurately. Better results were obtained by using the ERT measurements to constrain a model describing the geometry of the system. The posterior probability distributions of the parameters describing the geometry were estimated with the Markov chain Monte Carlo method DREAM(ZS). Using the ERT measurements this way, accurate estimates of the parameters could be obtained. The information quality of the measurements was assessed by a detailed analysis of the errors. Even for the uncomplicated laboratory setup used in this paper, errors in the modelling of the shape and position of the electrodes and the shape of the domain could be identified. The results indicate that the ERT measurements have a high information content which can be accessed by the inclusion of prior information and the consideration of measurement and modelling errors.

  9. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Suzette Jackson [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Ryan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Kevin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rodriguez-Marek, Adrian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Falero, Valentina Montaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngs, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures for Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 study and included a Participatory Peer Review Panel (PPRP) to provide the confident technical basis and mean-centered estimates of the ground motions. A new risk-informed methodology for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA was developed as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project. To develop and implement the new methodology, the SRA project elected to perform two SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs. The first was for the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF), which is classified as a Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3 nuclear facility. The second was for the ATR Complex, which has facilities classified as SDC-4. The new methodology requires defensible estimates of ground motion levels (mean and full distribution of uncertainty) for its criteria and evaluation process. The INL SSHAC Level 1 PSHA demonstrates the use of the PPRP, evaluation and integration through utilization of a small team with multiple roles and responsibilities (four team members and one specialty contractor), and the feasibility of a short duration schedule (10 months). Additionally, a SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels for the Spent Fuel Handling Recapitalization Project (SFHP) process facility.

  10. Design and Fabrication of DebriSat - A Representative LEO Satellite for Improvements to Standard Satellite Breakup Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.; Dietrich, A.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Weremeyer, M.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and fabrication of DebriSat, a 50 kg satellite developed to be representative of a modern low Earth orbit satellite in terms of its components, materials used, and fabrication procedures. DebriSat will be the target of a future hypervelocity impact experiment to determine the physical characteristics of debris generated after an on-orbit collision of a modern LEO satellite. The major ground-based satellite impact experiment used by DoD and NASA in their development of satellite breakup models was SOCIT, conducted in 1992. The target used for that experiment was a Navy transit satellite (40 cm, 35 kg) fabricated in the 1960's. Modern satellites are very different in materials and construction techniques than those built 40 years ago. Therefore, there is a need to conduct a similar experiment using a modern target satellite to improve the fidelity of the satellite breakup models. To ensure that DebriSat is truly representative of typical LEO missions, a comprehensive study of historical LEO satellite designs and missions within the past 15 years for satellites ranging from 1 kg to 5000 kg was conducted. This study identified modern trends in hardware, material, and construction practices utilized in recent LEO missions. Although DebriSat is an engineering model, specific attention is placed on the quality, type, and quantity of the materials used in its fabrication to ensure the integrity of the outcome. With the exception of software, all other aspects of the satellite s design, fabrication, and assembly integration and testing will be as rigorous as that of an actual flight vehicle. For example, to simulate survivability of launch loads, DebriSat will be subjected to a vibration test. As well, the satellite will undergo thermal vacuum tests to verify that the components and overall systems meet typical environmental standards. Proper assembly and integration techniques will involve comprehensive joint analysis, including the precise

  11. CryoSat: A mission to determine the fluctuations in Earth’s land and marine ice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingham, D. J.; Francis, C. R.; Baker, S.; Bouzinac, C.; Brockley, D.; Cullen, R.; de Chateau-Thierry, P.; Laxon, S. W.; Mallow, U.; Mavrocordatos, C.; Phalippou, L.; Ratier, G.; Rey, L.; Rostan, F.; Viau, P.; Wallis, D. W.

    This paper describes the CryoSat satellite mission, due for launch in 2005, whose aim is to accurately determine the trends in Earth’s continental and marine ice fields. The paper’s purpose is to provide scientific users of the CryoSat data with a description of the design and operation of the SIRAL radar and the CryoSat platform, the data products, and the expected error budget. The ‘low-resolution mode’ (LRM), ‘synthetic aperture mode’ (SARM) and “synthetic aperture interferometric mode’ (SARInM) of the SIRAL radar are described, together with its system parameters, its antenna gain pattern and interferometer phase difference pattern, and its calibration modes. The orbit is described, together with the platform attitude and altitude control law and control systems, and the expected pointing and altitude knowledge. The geographical masks that are used to determine acquisitions in the three SIRAL modes are described. The SIRAL data products, and the processing applied to produce them, are described. Level 1b, level 2 and higher-level products are described in turn, with a particular emphasis on the new procedures applied to the SARInM and SARM processing over ice surfaces. The beam forming and multi-looking is summarised, and a description is given of the behaviour of the SARM and SARInM echoes over idealised surfaces. These inform descriptions of the elevation retrievals of the level 2 processing, including the SARInM retrieval of interferometric phase. The combination of these data, through cross-over analysis over continental ice sheets, and through averaging over sea-ice, to determine areal averages of ice sheet elevation change or sea-ice thickness, is described. The error budget in these higher-level products is described, together with its breakdown into errors arising from the instrument and errors arising from the retrievals. The importance of the co-variance of these errors in determining the final error is stressed. The description of the

  12. Cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage acquisition and transfer (COLD-SAT) experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.

    1994-01-01

    Subcritical cryogens such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are required for space based transportation propellant, reactant, and life support systems. Future long-duration space missions will require on-orbit systems capable of long-term cryogen storage and efficient fluid transfer capabilities. COLD-SAT, which stands for cryogenic orbiting liquid depot-storage acquisition and transfer, is a free-flying liquid hydrogen management flight experiment. Experiments to determine optimum methods of fluid storage and transfer will be performed on the COLD-SAT mission. The success of the mission is directly related to the type and accuracy of measurements made. The instrumentation and measurement techniques used are therefore critical to the success of the mission. This paper presents the results of the COLD-SAT experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design effort. Candidate transducers capable of fulfilling the COLD-SAT experiment measurement requirements are identified. Signal conditioning techniques, data acquisition requirements, and measurement uncertainty analysis are presented. Electrical harnessing materials and wiring techniques for the instrumentation designed to minimize heat conduction to the cryogenic tanks and provide optimum measurement accuracy are listed.

  13. Validation of cryoSat-2 based lake levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole Baltazar;

    In this study, which is part of the FP7 project Land and Ocean take up from Sentinel-3 (LOTUS), we demonstrate the potential SAR altimetry. We consider lakes at various sizes and evaluate the CryoSat-2 derived lake levels in terms of along-track precision and agreement with in-situ data. As a ref......In this study, which is part of the FP7 project Land and Ocean take up from Sentinel-3 (LOTUS), we demonstrate the potential SAR altimetry. We consider lakes at various sizes and evaluate the CryoSat-2 derived lake levels in terms of along-track precision and agreement with in-situ data....... To derive lake level time series we apply a state-space model with a robust handling of erroneous data. Instead of attempting to identify and remove the polluted observations we use a mixture distribution to describe the observation noise, which prevents the polluted observations from biasing our final...

  14. Řídicí jednotka pro CubeSat

    OpenAIRE

    Horký, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Cílem práce je návrh univerzální řídicí jednotky pro CubeSat založené na obvodu FPGA. Taková jednotka doposud nebyla komerčně dostupná a navržená jednotka má tak dobrý potenciál zaplnit příslušné místo na trhu komponent pro CubeSat. Celá jednotka je navržena z komerčně dostupných komponent. Návrh jednotky je proveden tak, aby umožnil její funkci ve vesmírném prostředí. Stav konfigurace FPGA je pravidelně kontrolován a v případě zjištěné chyby dochází automaticky k rekonfiguraci FPGA a návratu...

  15. Validation of cryoSat-2 based lake levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    In this study, which is part of the FP7 project Land and Ocean take up from Sentinel-3 (LOTUS), we demonstrate the potential SAR altimetry. We consider lakes at various sizes and evaluate the CryoSat-2 derived lake levels in terms of along-track precision and agreement with in-situ data. As a ref......In this study, which is part of the FP7 project Land and Ocean take up from Sentinel-3 (LOTUS), we demonstrate the potential SAR altimetry. We consider lakes at various sizes and evaluate the CryoSat-2 derived lake levels in terms of along-track precision and agreement with in-situ data....... To derive lake level time series we apply a state-space model with a robust handling of erroneous data. Instead of attempting to identify and remove the polluted observations we use a mixture distribution to describe the observation noise, which prevents the polluted observations from biasing our final...

  16. Learn with SAT to Minimize Büchi Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Barth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a minimization procedure for nondeterministic Büchi automata (NBA. For an automaton A another automaton A_min with the minimal number of states is learned with the help of a SAT-solver. This is done by successively computing automata A' that approximate A in the sense that they accept a given finite set of positive examples and reject a given finite set of negative examples. In the course of the procedure these example sets are successively increased. Thus, our method can be seen as an instance of a generic learning algorithm based on a "minimally adequate teacher'' in the sense of Angluin. We use a SAT solver to find an NBA for given sets of positive and negative examples. We use complementation via construction of deterministic parity automata to check candidates computed in this manner for equivalence with A. Failure of equivalence yields new positive or negative examples. Our method proved successful on complete samplings of small automata and of quite some examples of bigger automata. We successfully ran the minimization on over ten thousand automata with mostly up to ten states, including the complements of all possible automata with two states and alphabet size three and discuss results and runtimes; single examples had over 100 states.

  17. WEIGHTS STAGNATION IN DYNAMIC LOCAL SEARCH FOR SAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelraouf Ishtaiwi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1991, tries were made to enhance the stochastic local search techniques (SLS. Some researchers turned their focus on studying the structure of the propositional satisfiability problems (SAT to better understand their complexity in order to come up with better algorithms. Other researchers focused in investigating new ways to develop heuristics that alter the search space based on some information gathered prior to or during the search process. Thus, many heuristics, enhancements and developments were introduced to improve SLS techniques performance during the last three decades. As a result a group of heuristics were introduced namely Dynamic Local Search (DLS that could outperform the systematic search techniques. Interestingly, a common characteristic of DLS heuristics is that they all depend on the use of weights during searching for satisfiable formulas. In our study we experimentally investigated the weights behaviors and movements during searching for satisfiability using DLS techniques, for simplicity, DDFW DLS heuristic is chosen. As a results of our studies we discovered that while solving hard SAT problems such as blocks world and graph coloring problems, weights stagnation occur in many areas within the search space. We conclude that weights stagnation occurrence is highly related to the level of the problem density, complexity and connectivity.

  18. COLD-SAT - An orbital cryogenic hydrogen technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, Joseph P.; Powers, Albert G.

    1989-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and transfer experiments under low-gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 460 km circular orbit by an Atlas I commercial launch vehicle. After deployment, the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10 (-6) to 10(-4) g. These accelerations are an important aspect of some of the experiments, as it is desired to know the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved. The experiment module will contain the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization equipment, and instrumentation. At launch all the hydrogen will be in the largest tank, which has helium-purged MLI and is loaded and topped off by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. The two smaller tanks will be utilized in orbit for performing some of the experiments. The experiments are grouped into two classes on the basis of their priority, and include six regarded as enabling technology and nine regarded as enhancing technology.

  19. COLD-SAT: An orbital cryogenic hydrogen technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, Joseph P.; Powers, Albert G.

    1989-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and transfer experiments under low-gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 460 km circular orbit by an Atlas I commercial launch vehicle. After deployment, the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-4)g. These accelerations are an important aspect of some of the experiments, as it is desired to know the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved. The experiment module will contain the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization equipment, and instrumentation. At launch all the hydrogen will be in the largest tank, which has helium-purged MLI and is loaded and topped off by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. The two smaller tanks will be utilized in orbit for performing some of the experiments. The experiments are grouped into two classes on the basis of their priority, and include six regarded as enabling technology and nine regarded as enhancing technology.

  20. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  1. Short Multi-Prover Quantum Proofs for SAT without Entangled Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jing

    2010-01-01

    BellQMA protocols are a subclass of multi-prover quantum Merlin-Arthur protocols in which the verifier is restricted to perform nonadaptive,unentangled measurements on the quantum states received from each Merlin. In this paper, we prove that m-clause 3-SAT instances have BellQMA proofs of satisfiability with constant soundness gap, in which O(sqrt(m)polylog(m)) Merlins each send O(log m) qubits to Arthur. Our result answers a question of Aaronson et al., who gave a protocol with similar parameters that used entangled measurements; the analysis of our protocol is significantly simpler than that of Aaronson et al. Our result also complements recent work of Brandao, Christandl, and Yard, who showed upper bounds on the power of multiprover quantum proofs with unentangled but adaptive (LOCC) measurements.

  2. Preparing laboratory and real-world EEG data for large-scale analysis: A containerized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima eBigdely-Shamlo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale analysis of EEG and other physiological measures promises new insights into brain processes and more accurate and robust brain-computer interface (BCI models.. However, the absence of standard-ized vocabularies for annotating events in a machine understandable manner, the welter of collection-specific data organizations, the diffi-culty in moving data across processing platforms, and the unavailability of agreed-upon standards for preprocessing have prevented large-scale analyses of EEG. Here we describe a containerized approach and freely available tools we have developed to facilitate the process of an-notating, packaging, and preprocessing EEG data collections to enable data sharing, archiving, large-scale machine learning/data mining and (meta-analysis. The EEG Study Schema (ESS comprises three data Levels, each with its own XML-document schema and file/folder convention, plus a standardized (PREP pipeline to move raw (Data Level 1 data to a basic preprocessed state (Data Level 2 suitable for application of a large class of EEG analysis methods. Researchers can ship a study as a single unit and operate on its data using a standardized interface. ESS does not require a central database and provides all the metadata data necessary to execute a wide variety of EEG processing pipelines. The primary focus of ESS is automated in-depth analysis and meta-analysis EEG studies. However, ESS can also encapsulate meta-information for the other modalities such as eye tracking, that are in-creasingly used in both laboratory and real-world neuroimaging. ESS schema and tools are freely available at eegstudy.org, and a central cata-log of over 850 GB of existing data in ESS format is available at study-catalog.org. These tools and resources are part of a larger effort to ena-ble data sharing at sufficient scale for researchers to engage in truly large-scale EEG analysis and data mining (BigEEG.org.

  3. The Rainbow Project: Enhancing the SAT through Assessments of Analytical, Practical, and Creative Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the formulation and execution of the Rainbow Project, Phase I, funded by the College Board. Past data suggest that the SAT is a good predictor of performance in college. But in terms of the amount of variance explained by the SAT, there is room for improvement, as there would be for virtually any single test battery. Phase I…

  4. Non-"g" Residuals of the SAT and ACT Predict Specific Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Thomas R.; Purcell, Jason M.; Snyder, Anissa C.; Kochunov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This research examined whether non-"g" residuals of the SAT and ACT subtests, obtained after removing g, predicted specific abilities. Non-"g" residuals of the verbal and math subtests of the SAT and ACT were correlated with academic (verbal and math) and non-academic abilities (speed and shop), both based on the Armed Services…

  5. From thin-air to flat-sat in 12 months: the Twentesat student project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langen, van Sven Kevin; Bentum, Mark; Vries, de Rowan; Grootjans, Robert; Grootjans, Roelof; Brethouwer, Martijn F.

    2014-01-01

    TwenteSat aims to build a twin-satellite interferometer in space, a research satellite system in preparation of the OLFAR project. The project will be completely done by students that work on a voluntary basis. The target is to have a flat-sat of at least one of the satellites ready in a short timef

  6. PowerCube: Integrated Power, Propulsion, and Pointing for CubeSats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PowerCube is a 1U CubeSat module that provides integrated propulsion, power, and precision pointing to enable the low-cost CubeSat platform to be used to conduct...

  7. Non-"g" Residuals of the SAT and ACT Predict Specific Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Thomas R.; Purcell, Jason M.; Snyder, Anissa C.; Kochunov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This research examined whether non-"g" residuals of the SAT and ACT subtests, obtained after removing g, predicted specific abilities. Non-"g" residuals of the verbal and math subtests of the SAT and ACT were correlated with academic (verbal and math) and non-academic abilities (speed and shop), both based on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude…

  8. The SAT® and SAT Subject Tests™: Discrepant Scores and Incremental Validity. Research Report 2012-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines student performance on the SAT and SAT Subject Tests in order to identify groups of students who score differently on these two tests, and to determine whether certain demographic groups score higher on one test compared to the other. Discrepancy scores were created to capture individuals' performance differences on the…

  9. The Relationship between SAT Scores and Retention to the Third Year: 2006 Cohort. Statistical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    Results show that SAT performance is related to third year retention rates. Even after controlling for student and institutional characteristics, returners had higher SAT total scores than non-returners, and the performance gap is not due to differences in the demographic makeup of the two groups. Furthermore, while differences in retention can be…

  10. Non-"g" Residuals of the SAT and ACT Predict Specific Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Thomas R.; Purcell, Jason M.; Snyder, Anissa C.; Kochunov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This research examined whether non-"g" residuals of the SAT and ACT subtests, obtained after removing g, predicted specific abilities. Non-"g" residuals of the verbal and math subtests of the SAT and ACT were correlated with academic (verbal and math) and non-academic abilities (speed and shop), both based on the Armed Services…

  11. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Suzette [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Ryan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coppersmith, Kevin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rodriguez-Marek, Adrian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Falero, Valentina Montaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngs, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (Figure 1-1). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures appropriate for a Study Level 1 provided in the guidance advanced by the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) NUREG/CR-6372 and NUREG-2117 (NRC, 1997; 2012a). The SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs for MFC and ATR were conducted as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project (INL Project number 31287) to develop and apply a new-risk informed methodology, respectively. The SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels. The SRA project is developing a new risk-informed methodology that will provide a systematic approach for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA. The new methodology proposes criteria to be employed at specific analysis, decision, or comparison points in its evaluation process. The first four of seven criteria address changes in inputs and results of the PSHA and are given in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard, DOE-STD-1020-2012 (DOE, 2012a) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) 2.29 (ANS, 2008a). The last three criteria address evaluation of quantitative hazard and risk-focused information of an existing nuclear facility. The seven criteria and decision points are applied to Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3, 4, and 5, which are defined in American Society of Civil Engineers/Structural Engineers Institute (ASCE/SEI) 43-05 (ASCE, 2005). The application of the criteria and decision points could lead to an update or could determine that such update is not necessary.

  12. STARE CubeSat Communications Testing, Simulation and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Green) and Debris Ring (Red) from Chinese ASAT Test (December 5, 2007) (From Kelso, 2011) ............................ 4  Figure 4.  Colony I Bus (From...Force Institute of Technology ASAT Anti-Satellite Cal_Poly California Polytechnic State University CGA Common Ground Architecture CIB Carrier...the Chinese Anti-Satellite ( ASAT ) test conducted January 19, 2007 that used a direct ascent SC-19 missile against a Fengyun-IC weather satellite that

  13. WindSAT Data Analysis for Cal/Val

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    the Sea and Atmosphere, 11-16 Jan, 1998, Phoenix AZ. Brown, R.A., 1991; Fluid Mechanics of the Atmosphere, Academic Press, International Geophysics...Evolution of Optimal Ekman Layer Perturbations, J. Fluid Mech., 333, 97-123. Foster, RC 2005: A Why rolls are prevalent in the hurricane boundary...Brown, 1991; Legacy of the Seasat Mission for Studies of the Atmosphere and Air-Sea-Ice Interactions, Bulletin AMS, 72, 7, 967-98 1. Kundu , P, 1976: Ekman

  14. NASAs EDSN Aims to Overcome the Operational Challenges of CubeSat Constellations and Demonstrate an Economical Swarm of 8 CubeSats Useful for Space Science Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harrison Brodsky; Hu, Steven Hung Kee; Cockrell, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Operators of a constellation of CubeSats have to confront a number of daunting challenges that can be cost prohibitive, or operationally prohibitive, to missions that could otherwise be enabled by a satellite constellation. Challenges including operations complexity, intersatellite communication, intersatellite navigation, and time sharing tasks between satellites are all complicated by operating with the usual CubeSat size, power, and budget constraints. EDSN pioneers innovative solutions to these problems as they are presented on the nano-scale satellite platform.

  15. AIRS-AMSU variables-CloudSat cloud mask, radar reflectivities, and cloud classification matchups V3.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is AIRS-CloudSat collocated subset, in NetCDF 4 format. These data contain collocated: AIRS/AMSU retrievals at AMSU footprints, CloudSat radar reflectivities,...

  16. Analysis of the spatiotemporal planform dynamics of braided rivers: a novel laboratory investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redolfi, Marco; Bertoldi, Walter; Tubino, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Braided rivers are highly dynamic, labile environments which experience significant morphological changes even during moderate flow events. Recent remote sensing techniques enable to monitor the river morphology with great detail. However, capturing the rapid morphological changes of a large river with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is still very challenging. As a consequence, quantitative analysis of the braided channel dynamics is often limited to local processes (e.g. a single bifurcation or confluence) and short time periods (e.g. a single flood). This work aims at providing quantitative, statistical description of the channel network dynamics in a braided network at larger spatial and temporal scales, namely the reach scale and the multiple flood scale. This can be achieved using a new technique based on time lapse imagery that we recently developed at the University of Trento. This technique provides high frequency, two dimensional maps of the bed load transport in a large laboratory model, thus allowing to capture the spatiotemporal variability of the transport processes with unprecedented detail. We performed a set of laboratory experiments in a 23 m long, 3 m wide flume, sand bed load flume, where self-formed braided networks can be reproduced. We run several experiments with different discharges and channel widths, lasting for a long time (from 20 to 65 hours) to enable a robust statistical description of the equilibrium morphodynamics. High-resolution pictures were taken at 1 min interval from two SLR cameras, then rectified and merged in order to cover a 7 m long reach. We processed a large number of images to obtain maps of bed load transport, and we developed an algorithm to automatically identifies active (i.e. transporting) channels, bifurcations and confluences. The statistical analysis we performed includes two dimensional correlations, spatial and temporal scales, channel migration rate, avulsion frequency, bank erosion rate. This

  17. Hurricane Wind Speed Estimation Using WindSat 6 and 10 GHz Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The realistic and accurate estimation of hurricane intensity is highly desired in many scientific and operational applications. With the advance of passive microwave polarimetry, an alternative opportunity for retrieving wind speed in hurricanes has become available. A wind speed retrieval algorithm for wind speeds above 20 m/s in hurricanes has been developed by using the 6.8 and 10.7 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures of WindSat. The WindSat measurements for 15 category 4 and category 5 hurricanes from 2003 to 2010 and the corresponding H*wind analysis data are used to develop and validate the retrieval model. In addition, the retrieved wind speeds are also compared to the Remote Sensing Systems (RSS global all-weather product and stepped-frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR measurements. The statistical results show that the mean bias and the overall root-mean-square (RMS difference of the retrieved wind speeds with respect to the H*wind analysis data are 0.04 and 2.75 m/s, respectively, which provides an encouraging result for retrieving hurricane wind speeds over the ocean surface. The retrieved wind speeds show good agreement with the SFMR measurements. Two case studies demonstrate that the mean bias and RMS difference are 0.79 m/s and 1.79 m/s for hurricane Rita-1 and 0.63 m/s and 2.38 m/s for hurricane Rita-2, respectively. In general, the wind speed retrieval accuracy of the new model in hurricanes ranges from 2.0 m/s in light rain to 3.9 m/s in heavy rain.

  18. Reproducibility evaluation of standard procedures for the proximate analysis of coals. [Between and within laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butina, I.V.; Gorelov, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    Four coal samples were analyzed in the laboratories at eight coking plants, for metrological processing to determine the within- and between laboratory reproducibilities of the standard procedures for the basic coal property indices (ash, volatile matter and moisture content). The between-laboratory reproducibility is highest in the ash determination (S/sub b/ up to 0.17%) and the lowest in the volatile matter determination (S/sub b/ up to 0.9%). The within-laboratory reproducibility is up to 0.3% on ash and moisture content and up to 0.5% on volatile matter.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic-based Laboratories on a Chip for Analysis of Biomolecules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A laboratory-on-a-chip design based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) microfluidics and integrated microelectrochemical detection is proposed. The proposed device is...

  20. San Francisco District Laboratory (SAN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program Capabilities Food Analysis SAN-DO Laboratory has an expert in elemental analysis who frequently performs field inspections of materials. A recently acquired...