WorldWideScience

Sample records for saskatchewan

  1. Uranium mining: Saskatchewan status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, V. [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    This paper gives the status of uranium mining by Areva in Saskatchewan. Uranium production now meets 85% of world demand for power generation. 80% of world production of uranium comes from top 5 countries: Kazakhstan, Canada, Australia, Niger and Namibia. Saskatchewan is currently the only Canadian province with active uranium mines and mills and the largest exploration programs. Several mine projects are going through the environmental assessment process. Public opinion is in favour of mining activities in Saskatchewan.

  2. Libraries in Saskatchewan: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/saskatchewan.html Libraries in Saskatchewan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prince Albert PAPHR Library Library, Victoria Hospital 1200 - 24th Street West Prince ...

  3. Regulatory harmonization of the Saskatchewan uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, R. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Moulding, T. [Saskatchewan Environment, Saskatchewan (Canada); Alderman, G. [Saskatchewan Labour, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The uranium mining industry in Saskatchewan produces approximately 30% of the world's production of uranium. The industry is regulated by federal and provincial regulators. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is the principal federal regulator. The principal Saskatchewan provincial regulators are Saskatchewan Environment for provincial environmental regulations and Saskatchewan Labour for occupational health and safety regulations. In the past, mine and mill operators have requested harmonization in areas such as inspections and reporting requirements from the regulators. On February 14, 2003, Saskatchewan Environment, Saskatchewan Labour and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission signed a historical agreement for federal/provincial co-operation called the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - Saskatchewan Administrative Agreement for the Regulation of Health, Safety and the Environment at Saskatchewan Uranium Mines and Mills. This initiative responds to a recommendation made by the Joint Federal-Provincial Panel on Uranium Mining Developments in Northern Saskatchewan in 1997 and lays the groundwork to co-ordinate and harmonize their respective regulatory regimes. The implementation of the Agreement has been very successful. This paper will address the content of the Agreement including the commitments, the deliverables and the expectations for a harmonized compliance program, harmonized reporting, and the review of harmonized assessment and licensing processes as well as possible referencing of Saskatchewan Environment and Saskatchewan Labour regulations in the Nuclear Safety and Control Act. The management and implementation process will also be discussed including the schedule, stakeholder communication, the results to date and the lessons learned. (author)

  4. Northern Manitoba, northern Saskatchewan, and the Saskatchewan River Delta: Waterfowl production survey: 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for northern Manitoba, northern Saskatchewan, and the Saskatchewan River Delta during 1997. The...

  5. Experimental late brood surveys: Southern Saskatchewan: 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the late brood surveys for southern Saskatchewan during 1991. Survey methods, weather and habitat conditions, production indices, and tables...

  6. Southern Saskatchewan Ticagrelor Registry experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani P

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Payam Dehghani,1 Varun Chopra,1 Ali Bell,2 Sheila Kelly,1 Lori Zulyniak,2 Jeff Booker,1 Rodney Zimmermann,1 William Semchuk,2 Asim N Cheema,3 Andrea J Lavoie1 1Prairie Vascular Research Network, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, SK, 2Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region, Regina, SK, 3St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: As ticagrelor enters into clinical use for acute coronary syndrome, it is ­important to understand patient/physician behavior in terms of appropriate use, adherence, and event rates. Methods: The Saskatchewan Registry is a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study that identifies consecutive patients started on ticagrelor. We aimed to evaluate both on- and off-label use, identify characteristics of patients who prematurely stop ticagrelor, and describe patient/physician behavior contributing to inappropriate stoppage of this medication. Results: From April 2012 to September 2013, 227 patients were initiated on ticagrelor, with a mean age of 62.2±12.1 years. The participants were 66% men and had a mean follow up of 157.4±111.7 days. Seventy-four patients (32.4% had off-label indications. Forty-seven patients (20.7% prematurely stopped ticagrelor and were more likely to be older, women, nonwhite, present with shock, and complain of dyspnea. Twenty-six of the 47 patients stopped ticagrelor inappropriately because of patient nonadherence (18 patients and physician advice (eight patients. A composite outcome event of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 8.8% of the entire cohort and was more likely to occur in those older then 65 years, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and those who prematurely stopped ticagrelor. Conclusion: In this real-world registry of patients started on ticagrelor, a third have off-label indications and a fifth prematurely stop the medication. Premature discontinuation was an independent predictor of major

  7. BOREAS SERM Forest Cover Data of Saskatchewan in Vector Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A condensed forest cover type digital map of Saskatchewan and is a product of the Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management, Forestry Branch-Inventory Unit...

  8. Northern Manitoba, northern Saskatchewan, and the Saskatchewan River Delta: Waterfowl breeding pair survey: May 9 - June 9, 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey for northern Manitoba, northern Saskatchewan, and the Saskatchewan River Delta during...

  9. Mining operations of Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slama, J.P.; Michel, B.M.; Laine, R.

    1986-07-01

    Mining of an uranium deposit in the Canadian North raises a certain number of problems even now. Their solution is made still more complex, when the grade of the ore is exceptionally high. Amok, a Canadian company and a joint branch of three large French groups, has faced this situation and has applied solutions which have turned out to be satisfactory. It mines since 1980 a series of deposits situated at Cluff Lake in the North of Saskatchewan. 11 figs.

  10. Building Regional Capacity for Sustainable Development through an ESD Project Inventory in RCE Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peta; Petry, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The Regional Centre of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development in Saskatchewan (RCE Saskatchewan, Canada) is part of the United Nations University RCE Initiative in support of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-14). With funding from the Government of Saskatchewan's Go Green Fund, RCE Saskatchewan carried out…

  11. Implementing Lean Health Reforms in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Marchildon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Saskatchewan has gone further than any other Canadian province in implementing health system process improvements using Lean, a production line discipline that originated with the automobile industry. The goal of the Lean reform is to reduce waste and improve quality and overall health system performance by long-term changes in behaviour. Lean enjoys a privileged position on the provincial government’s agenda because of the policy’s championing by the Deputy Minister of Health and the policy’s fit with the government’s patient-centred care agenda. The implementation of reform depends on a major investment of time in the training and Lean-certification of key leaders and managers in the provincial health system. The Saskatchewan Union of Nurses, the union representing the single largest group of health workers in the province, has agreed to co-operate with the provincial government in implementing Lean-type reforms. Thus far, the government has had limited independent evaluation of Lean while internal evaluations claim some successes.

  12. Understanding the determinants of health: key decision makers in Saskatchewan Health districts and Saskatchewan Health, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, B R; Goodstadt, M S

    1999-01-01

    This research inquiry used qualitative and quantitative methods to examine how key decision makers from Saskatchewan health districts and Saskatchewan Health understand the determinants of health. The inquiry was based on the premise that key decision makers' understanding of the determinants of health, and the consensus regarding these understandings, hinder or facilitate dialogue, choice of effective strategies, and achievement of health promotion goals. Interviews indicated variation in perspective and emphasis regarding how key decision makers understand the determinants of health. A survey of key decision makers found: 1) inconsistencies in respondents' understanding of the determinants of health, particularly between stated beliefs and priorities for actions; and 2) that the degree of consensus among decision makers was higher for stated beliefs and lower for choices of action. Results indicate a need for clarification and consensus-building processes concerning the determinants of health, as well as for clear policies that foster consistency between beliefs and actions and minimize inappropriate or undesirable differences in interpretations.

  13. Gunnar uranium mine environmental remediation - Northern Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldoon, Joe; Yankovich, Tamara; Schramm, Laurier L. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Gunnar Mine and mill site was the largest of some 38 now-abandoned uranium mines that were developed and operated in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada, during the Cold War years. During their operating lifetimes these mines produced large quantities of ore and tailings. The Gunnar mine (open pit and underground) produced over 5 million tonnes of uranium ore and nearly 4.4 million tonnes of mine tailings during its operations from 1955 through 1963. An estimated 2.2 to 2.7 million m{sup 3} of waste rock that was generated during the processing of the ore abuts the shores of Lake Athabasca, the 22. largest lake in the world. After closure in the 1960's, the Gunnar site was abandoned with little to no decommissioning being done. The Saskatchewan Research Council has been contracted to manage the clean-up of these abandoned northern uranium mine and mill sites. The Gunnar Mine, because of the magnitude of tailings and waste rock, is subject to an environmental site assessment process regulated by both provincial and federal governments. This process requires a detailed study of the environmental impacts that have resulted from the mining activities and an analysis of projected impacts from remediation efforts. The environmental assessment process, specific site studies, and public involvement initiatives are all now well underway. Due to the many uncertainties associated with an abandoned site, an adaptive remediation approach, utilizing a decision tree, presented within the environmental assessment documents will be used as part of the site regulatory licensing. A critical early task was dealing with major public safety hazards on the site. The site originally included many buildings that were remnants of a community of approximately 800 people who once occupied the site. These buildings, many of which contained high levels of asbestos, had to be appropriately abated and demolished. Similarly, the original mine head frame and mill site buildings, many of which

  14. Longitudinal Decline in Lung Function Measurements among Saskatchewan Grain Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punam Pahwa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between the long term effects of grain dust and decline in lung function among grain elevator workers in Saskatchewan, studied over a 15-year period.

  15. Status of woodland caribou in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Rettie

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that woodland caribou in Saskatchewan exist as relatively separate populations within a metapopulation. Preliminary analyses show that individuals within all populations are selecting peatland habitat types (i.e., fens and bogs throughout the year. Despite an absence of hunting, populations south of the Precambrian shield appear to be declining slowly, while those on the southern margin of the shield may be declining more rapidly. The apparent population decline is likely due to high rates of predation, especially on neonates. To maintain viable caribou populations in the region, forestry operations must be managed to maintain adequate amounts of preferred habitat types and connections among populations. At a coarse scale, preferred habitat is that which acts as a refuge from predators. Additional information is required to categorize specific peatland types, as data in the existing provincial forest inventory are inadequate for both selection analysis and management purposes. Ongoing research into revisions to the forest inventory and analyses of bog and fen types selected by caribou are needed to focus future management strategies.

  16. Pellet production from sawmill residue : a Saskatchewan perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karwandy, J. [Forintek Canada Corp., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-03-31

    This paper reported on the results of a project that evaluated the viability of producing pellets in Saskatchewan in order to capture some of this rapid market growth. The objective was to define the supply potential for wood pellets. The production process was described along with technical barriers to producing wood pellets in Saskatchewan. It was shown that Saskatchewan's forest sector generates about 1,188,050 oven dried tonnes of residual material annually. However, not all the residuals are preferred by pellet manufacturers. It is unlikely that the entire amount of raw material would be used at one facility since the cost of transporting the raw materials is very prohibitive. It was concluded that the limits on the type and volume of raw material available in Saskatchewan are significant barriers to the commercial scale production of wood pellets. There is not enough sawdust and shavings to support a world class pelleting facility in the province. It was cautioned that although it is feasible to produce pellets in Saskatchewan, the scale of production would be significantly limited by feedstock availability. 24 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs., 2 appendices.

  17. Saskatchewan Forest Fire Control Centre Surface Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Funk, Barry; Strub, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Forest Fire Control Centre (SFFCC) provided surface meteorological data to BOREAS from its archive. This data set contains hourly surface meteorological data from 18 of the Meteorological stations located across Saskatchewan. Included in these data are parameters of date, time, temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation. Temporally, the data cover the period of May through September of 1994 and 1995. The data are provided in comma-delimited ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  18. Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Anne Forbes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cochrane Library is a source of reliable information on the effects of healthcare interventions for health care practitioners and consumers. In July 2004, Saskatchewan became the first province in Canada to provide all residents with access to The Cochrane Library. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of The Cochrane Library. Training sessions were offered to promote the use of The Cochrane Library. Attendees were informed of the evaluation study and invited to participate. Those who consented to participate were telephoned and audio-taped interviews were conducted at three (n=94, six (n=71, nine (n=79, and 12 months (n=72 following the sessions. Usage of The Cochrane Library was also tracked using data available from Wiley-Blackwell. Most participants were librarians (n=31.5%, between 40 to 65 years of age (71.6% and female (92.4%. Data from Wiley-Blackwell revealed that from October 2004 to September 2007, the component of The Cochrane Library most frequently accessed was The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (abstracts=26,016; full texts =15,934. Telephone interviews with participants revealed that the majority (65.2% used The Cochrane Library at the three month interview, however this proportion fell to 27.4% at the twelve month interview even though most (83.6%-88.2% reported that The Cochrane Library was somewhat to very helpful.Most respondents claimed to have learned something from The Cochrane Library; others reported that the knowledge gained helped in their decision-making or confirmed their beliefs. Respondents accessed The Cochrane Library in response to patron requests for information on a variety of health care topics. Information was used to support changes in health care practice and policy and for the preparation of educational papers and presentations. The reported reasons for not using The Cochrane Library were lack of time, limited access to an internet ready computer in the work setting, reliance on

  19. Saskatchewan Court of Appeal: marriage commissioners cannot discriminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Cynthia; Davies, Christine

    2011-04-01

    The Saskatchewan Court of Appeal has ruled that proposed legislation allowing marriage commissioners to refuse to solemnize same-sex marriages based on religious objections would violate the equality rights of gays and lesbians under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Charter). The Court expressed its opinion in a Reference involving proposed amendments to the Marriage Act.

  20. Saskatchewan's Trek School and the Greenall Outdoor School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notenboom, Rob; Moore, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Trek School is an outdoor school program for any Grade 11 students in Regina, Saskatchewan. During the program, students engage in a series of classroom, outdoor, and experiential activities. The various courses are taught through these experiences. The program is designed to help students develop in the areas of independent learning, critical and…

  1. Passive surveillance for ticks on horses in Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartz, Gili; Epp, Tasha; Burgess, Hilary J.; Chilton, Neil B.; Armstrong, James S.; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Passive surveillance of ticks on horses in Saskatchewan revealed that the horses were parasitized by 3 species, Dermacentor albipictus, D. andersoni, and D. variabilis. The nymphs and adults of D. albipictus occurred on horses earlier in the year than did adults of the 2 other species. PMID:25969582

  2. Global Partners : University of Saskatchewan Small Grant Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Global Partners is a University of Saskatchewan program that supports the development of mutually beneficial relationships between the University and institutions of higher education in developing countries. Initial support for ... AUCC-IDRC Partnership Grant 2011-2013: New Models of Partnership for Internationalization.

  3. Habitat fragmentation and the Burrowing Owls (Speotyto cunicularia) in Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Warnock; Paul C. James

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between landscape (125,664 ha circular plots) fragmentation patterns and the spatial distribution of Burrowing Owls (Speotyto cunicularia) was investigated in the heavily fragmented grasslands of Saskatchewan. Data were collected from 152 Burrowing Owl sites and 250 random sites located on 1990 LANDSAT-TM satellite images and 1:250,...

  4. Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Anne Forbes

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence of failure to translate research findings into the health care decision-making process of consumers, practitioners and policy makers (Grimshaw, 2007. Recognizing that The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews contained in The Cochrane Library (the Library are the “gold standard” of systematic reviews, Saskatchewan’s Health Quality Council provided funding for a provincial license and an evaluation study. In July 2004, Saskatchewan became the first province in Canada to provide all residents with access to the Library. The primary aim of the study was to enhance and evaluate the use of the Library over three years. Since September 2004, over 46 training sessions have been conducted on searching the Library online databases. Attendees at the workshops were informed of the evaluation study and invited to participate. Those who consented to participate were telephoned following the workshops and audio-taped interviews were conducted. Usage of the Library was also tracked using data available from Wiley InterScience. Three month (n=94, six month (n=71, nine month (n=79, and 12 month (n=72 telephone interviews were conducted. Most participants were librarians (n=31.5%, followed by nurses (16.3%, therapists (7.6%, library support staff (5.4%, pharmacists (4.3%, physicians (3.3%, and others (30.5. Most were between 40 to 65 years of age (71.6% and female (92.4%. Most respondents had accessed the Library at the three-month (65.2% and six-month (64.2% follow-up interviews. However, this percent fell to 45.2% at the nine-month and 27.4% at the twelve-month interview. MeSH searches were more frequent than standard keyword searches and HTML full text retrievals were more common than PDF versions. It is assumed that HTML versions were scanned for particular information whereas PDF versions were selected when the person wished to save and read the whole review. Librarians, practitioners and consumers are more likely to be

  5. Access to Specialist Care in Rural Saskatchewan: The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandima P. Karunanayake

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of place has emerged as an important factor in determining people’s health experiences. Rural populations experience an excess in mortality and morbidity compared to those in urban settings. One of the factors thought to contribute to this rural-urban health disparity is access to healthcare. The objective of this analysis was to examine access to specialized medical care services and several possible determinants of access to services in a distinctly rural population in Canada. In winter 2010, we conducted a baseline mail survey of 11,982 households located in rural Saskatchewan, Canada. We obtained 4620 completed household surveys. A key informant for each household responded to questions about access to medical specialists and the exact distance traveled to these services. Correlates of interest included the location of the residence within the province and within each household, socioeconomic status, household smoking status, median age of household residents, number of non-respiratory chronic conditions and number of current respiratory conditions. Analyses were conducted using log binomial regression for the outcome of interest. The overall response rate was 52%. Of households who required a visit to a medical specialist in the past 12 months, 23% reported having difficulty accessing specialist care. The magnitude of risk for encountering difficulty accessing medical specialist care services increased with the greatest distance categories. Accessing specialist care professionals by rural residents was particularly difficult for persons with current respiratory conditions.

  6. Dietetic Scope of Practice in Saskatchewan: Dietitian Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Martina; Berenbaum, Shawna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the concept of scope of practice for dietetics in Saskatchewan. Using interpretative description methodology, data were collected through 4 phases. This article reports on phases II and III. In phase II, 92 Saskatchewan Registered Dietitians (RDs) participated in an online survey on scope of practice. In phase III, 8 Saskatchewan RDs participated in a 3-week online focus group. Results from phases II and III indicate that participants saw numerous opportunities in defining, understanding, and working with a scope of practice. Without a scope of practice, participants were interpreting their role from a combination of documents (e.g., ethics, research) and stakeholders (e.g., employers and colleagues). Current confusion amongst employers, other health professions, and RDs themselves regarding the role of dietitians was identified. Most participants believed a scope of practice would provide guidance to employers, other health professions, the public, regulatory bodies, and RDs themselves about the role of a dietitian. Dietetic regulators should continue to provide clear guidelines to their members and employers on safe dietetic practice. Dietitians need to be certain they are safely practicing within provincial policies and their own professional knowledge and skill at all times.

  7. Geological setting of vertebrate microfossil localities across the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Redman, Cory M; Scott, Craig S; Gardner, James D; Braman, Dennis R

    2015-01-01

    The Frenchman and Ravenscrag formations of southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, record an apparently continuous sequence of nonmarine clastic sediments across the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary...

  8. Development and implementation of the Saskatchewan Leadership Program: Leading for healthcare transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutwiri, Betty; Witt, Christine; Denysek, Christina; Halferdahl, Susan; McLeod, Katherine M

    2016-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Leadership Program (SLP) was developed based on the LEADS framework and aligned with Lean management to build leadership renewal and sustainability conducive to transformational change in the Saskatchewan health system. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the SLP, including experiences and lessons learned. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  9. Saskatchewan Highways and Transportation Rural Roads Partnership Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbrandt, R.; Warrener, S. [Saskatchewan Dept. of Highways and Transportation, Regina, SK (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    While the province of Saskatchewan has the most public roads per capita in Canada, most (80 per cent) are low volume roads servicing the agricultural industry and rural municipalities. New agreements have been reached to maximize the level of service on several low volume, thin membrane surface highways and municipal grid roads. The objective is to optimize weight management and user safety while reducing general preservation and maintenance costs. Thin membrane surface highways consist of soft asphalt treated aggregates laid on top of an existing compacted below grade material. They are a cost-effective way to provide dust, mud and stone free roads to rural residents where truck traffic is very low. These roads were not designed for heavily loaded commercial trucks. However, with grain transportation rationalization, economic diversification and value-added initiatives in the province, there will be increased commercial truck traffic is causing accelerated damage to these road networks. Rural municipalities and Saskatchewan Highways and Transportation are looking to collaborate on the preservation of low volume thin membrane surface highways by applying weight restrictions on vulnerable roads and designating haul routes on municipal roads. Several examples were presented to demonstrate the partnership components of the management agreement. The advantages and disadvantages of implement these types of agreements were also described. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Closing rural hospitals in Saskatchewan: on the road to wellness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A M

    1999-10-01

    Rising health care costs at a time of economic stagnation, federal cutbacks to Medicare, and an obsession with budget deficits at all levels of government have contributed to a sense of urgency to reform the Canadian health care system. Accompanying these economic and political motivations for reform, has been a shift in our understanding of health and well-being that lays less emphasis on the institutionalization and medicalization of health care. As part of its wellness approach to health, the Saskatchewan government in 1992 announced the closure and conversion of 52 small rural hospitals to wellness centres as part of a shift from institutional care to community based care. While the health costs and benefits of this shift are contested, the paradox is that closing rural hospitals may have unrealized health and social costs because of the psychological and community importance of hospitals to the meaning of place. This paper begins with a review of the meaning and importance of local institutions for communities. It is clear from this starting point that the debate about the economic and health benefits and costs of rural hospital closures is a limited basis for understanding hospital closures. Finally, the history of Saskatchewan hospitals and a narrative of the recent closures of rural hospitals drawn from a sampling of provincial newspapers and oral discussions highlights the need to understand the hospital closure in terms of its impact on health irrespective of the medical impacts.

  11. Cohort profile: the Saskatchewan Rural Health Study-adult component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Punam; Rana, Masud; Pickett, William; Karunanayake, Chandima P; Amin, Khalid; Rennie, Donna; Lawson, Josh; Kirychuk, Shelley; Janzen, Bonnie; Koehncke, Niels; Dosman, James

    2017-12-11

    Less is known about the respiratory health of general farming and non-framing populations. A longitudinal Saskatchewan Rural Health Study (SRHS) was conducted to explore the association between individual and contextual factors with respiratory health outcomes in these populations. Hence, the objectives are to: (i) describe the updated methodology of longitudinal SRHS-an extension of baseline survey methodology published earlier; (ii) compare baseline characteristics and the prevalences of respiratory health outcomes between drops-outs and completers; and (iii) summarize key findings based on baseline survey data. The SRHS was a prospective cohort study conducted in two phases: baseline survey in 2010 and a follow-up in 2014. Each survey consisted of two components, self-administered questionnaire and clinical assessments. At baseline, 8261 participants (≥ 18 years) (4624 households) and at follow-up, 4867 participants (2797 households) completed the questionnaires. Clinical assessments on lung functions and/or allergies were conducted among a sub-group of participants from both the surveys. To date, we published 15 peer-reviewed manuscripts and 40 abstracts in conference proceedings. Findings from the study will improve the knowledge of respiratory disease etiology and assist in the development and targeting of prevention programs for rural populations in Saskatchewan, Canada.

  12. Extending Mental Health Diagnostic Privileges to Social Workers in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E. Austin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bill 78, An Act to amend The Social Workers Act, was passed in 2013 in Saskatchewan, allowing social workers to diagnose mental health disorders. Social workers previously had diagnostic privileges until the Psychologists Act was passed in 2002. The goal of the reform is to reduce wait times to access mental health services and diagnoses. The reform was introduced following extensive lobbying by the Saskatchewan Association of Social Workers (SASW and during a time of increased recognition of mental health issues both provincially and nationally. The reform will be implemented using regulatory instruments through the SASW and its by-laws, however the by-laws – updated to include provisions for Authorized Practice Endorsement, or in other words diagnosis of mental health disorders – have not, to date, been implemented. Accordingly, an evaluation of the reform has also not yet been conducted. Overall this reform is expected to improve access to mental health services, however concerns remain about availability of government funding and programs for treatment and services following diagnosis.

  13. BOREAS Follow-On DSP-09 Saskatchewan Raster Forest Fire Chronology, 1945-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains a pair of raster images and a spreadsheet chronicling the most recent fire history of Saskatchewan from 1945 to 1996. This data set was...

  14. Partitioning of mercury in the north Saskatchewan River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Mercury levels in fish, water and sediments were determined during 1982 along a 600 km stretch of the North Saskatchewan River (NSR) in the province of Alberta. Migratory fish species such as goldeye, walleye, and sauger in the NSR were found to contain total mercury levels ranging from 0.104 to 1.553 mg/kg (mean greater than or equal to 0 5 mg/kg). Northern pike, white sucker, longnose sucker and northern redhorse sucker had total mercury levels ranging from 0.003 to 1.003 mg/kg. Regression analysis of the data revealed that neither the sex of the fish nor the location of the sampling site contributed significantly to the mercury burden in fish in the entire study section of the river. Sediment analysis showed a low and more or less uniform concentration of mercury in Alberta. The total mercury in NSR water averaged 0.09 ..mu..g/L in upstream Edmonton and was found to elevate in downstream NSR (0.22 ..mu..g/L) near industrial discharge sites and agriculture runoff areas. Calculated partition coefficients seem to group the fish into two categories, (i) goldeye, walleye, and sauger (bioconcentration factor (BCF) = 3-3.7x10/sup 3/) and (ii) northern pike, longnose sucker, white sucker and northern redhorse sucker (BCF=1.2-1.8x10/sup 3/).

  15. Parasitic zoonoses: one health surveillance in northern Saskatchewan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna M Schurer

    Full Text Available We report the results of a joint human-animal health investigation in a Dene community in northern Saskatchewan, where residents harvest wildlife (including moose, bear, elk, and fish, live in close contact with free roaming dogs, and lack access to permanent veterinary services. Fecal analysis of owned and free-roaming dogs over two consecutive years (N = 92, 103 identified several parasites of public health concern, including Toxocara canis, Diphyllobothrium spp., Echinococcus/Taenia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. Administration of pyrantel pamoate to a subset of dogs (N = 122 in the community in the first year was followed by reduced shedding of T. canis and other roundworms in the second year, demonstrating the potential utility of canine de-worming as a public health intervention. Using direct agglutination tests with confirmatory indirect fluorescent antibody test, 21% of 47 dogs were sero-positive for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA sero-prevalence rates in 201 human volunteers were as follows: Toxoplasma gondii (14%, Echinococcus granulosus (48%, Toxocara canis (13% and Trichinella spp. (16%. Overall 65% of participants were sero-positive for at least one parasite. A survey administered to volunteers indicated few associations between widely accepted risk factors for parasite exposure and serological status, emphasizing the importance of environmental transmission of these parasites through soil, food, and waterborne routes.

  16. Hydrogeology of the Judith River Formation in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, David; Lypka, Morgan; Ferguson, Grant

    2017-06-01

    The Judith River Formation forms an important regional aquifer in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada. This aquifer is used for domestic and agricultural purposes in some areas and supports oil and gas production in other areas. As a result, the available data come from a range of sources and integration is required to provide an overview of aquifer characteristics. Here, data from oil and gas databases are combined with data from groundwater resource assessments. Analysis of cores, drill-stem tests and pumping tests provide a good overview of the physical hydrogeology of the Judith River Aquifer. Water chemistry data from oil and gas databases were less helpful in understanding the chemical hydrogeology due contamination of samples and unreliable laboratory analyses. Analytical modeling of past pumping in the aquifer indicates that decreases in hydraulic head exceeding 2 m are possible over distances of 10s of kilometers. Similar decreases in head should be expected for additional large withdrawals of groundwater from the Judith River Aquifer. Long-term groundwater abstraction should be limited by low pumping rates. Higher pumping rates appear to be possible for short-term uses, such as those required by the oil and gas industry.

  17. Activities of the University of Saskatchewan, Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, G. D.; Hirose, A.; Jain, K. K.; Mark, K.; McColl, D.; Mitarai, O.; Ratzdaff, J.; Schott, L.; Skarsgard, H. M.; Xiao, C.

    Detailed summaries of research projects conducted at the University of Saskatchewan's Plasma Physics Laboratory during 1991-92 are presented in the fields of tokamak experiments and reactor studies, basic plasma physics, and theories of instabilities and anomalous transport in tokamaks. The tokamak projects include discharge conditions and plasma diagnostics in the STOR-M tokamak, plasma modes and oscillations, edge density and magnetic fluctuations, diamagnetic measurements, and alternating current tokamak operation. Basic plasma physics projects include studies of radio frequency ion heating, parametric excitation of nonlinear asymmetric sheath oscillations, and dispersion function for a half-Maxwellian velocity distribution. Progress is also reported on developing the compact toroid fueller, intended for accelerating a compact toroid plasmoid to a velocity sufficient for central penetration into the Tokamak de Varennes, and on the compact torus injector project. The injector will be installed on the STOR-M tokamak to study compact torus injection into tokamak discharges. Abstracts of publications during 1991/92 are also included.

  18. Hydrogeology of the Judith River Formation in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, David; Lypka, Morgan; Ferguson, Grant

    2017-11-01

    The Judith River Formation forms an important regional aquifer in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada. This aquifer is used for domestic and agricultural purposes in some areas and supports oil and gas production in other areas. As a result, the available data come from a range of sources and integration is required to provide an overview of aquifer characteristics. Here, data from oil and gas databases are combined with data from groundwater resource assessments. Analysis of cores, drill-stem tests and pumping tests provide a good overview of the physical hydrogeology of the Judith River Aquifer. Water chemistry data from oil and gas databases were less helpful in understanding the chemical hydrogeology due contamination of samples and unreliable laboratory analyses. Analytical modeling of past pumping in the aquifer indicates that decreases in hydraulic head exceeding 2 m are possible over distances of 10s of kilometers. Similar decreases in head should be expected for additional large withdrawals of groundwater from the Judith River Aquifer. Long-term groundwater abstraction should be limited by low pumping rates. Higher pumping rates appear to be possible for short-term uses, such as those required by the oil and gas industry.

  19. Latino Farmworkers in Saskatchewan: Language Barriers and Health and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros-Guzmán, Arcadio; Gertler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As part of a study focused on the experiences of Latino migrant farmworkers in Saskatchewan, Canada, we have attempted to understand how language barriers (LBs) broadly understood may affect farmworkers and their employers, workplace communications, and occupational health and safety (OHS). Drawing on critical ethnography and intercultural communication theory, qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 Latino migrant farmworkers, 11 farmer-employers, two OHS civil servants, and two former Canadian farmworkers. Our findings suggest that LBs interfere with the establishment of effective communications between Latino farmworkers, other farm enterprise personnel, civil servants, and health services providers. LBs impede establishment of the kinds of sustained two-way communications needed for maintaining safe and healthy working environments. All of the stakeholders involved were found to contribute in some manner to the propagation of LBs. The risks for the physical and psychological well-being of migrant farmworkers are substantial, but despite the fact that LBs are generally recognized as a challenge and as a source of risk, they are not widely seen as warranting any systematic response. It is critical that Latino migrant workers learn more English and that their Canadian employers and supervisors learn more Spanish. Beyond that, there is an urgent need for a multistakeholder coalition that moves to address LBs by training certified interpreters and liaison personnel who can facilitate better communications between migrant workers, their employers, and other stakeholders.

  20. Cleaning-up abandoned uranium mines in Saskatchewan's North

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, L.L. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Thirty-six now-abandoned uranium mine and mill sites were developed and operated on or near Lake Athabasca, in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada, from approximately 1957 through 1964. During their operating lifetimes these mines produced large quantities of ore and tailings. After closure in the 1960's, these mine and mill sites were abandoned with little remediation and no reclamation being done. The governments of Canada and Saskatchewan are now funding the cleanup of these abandoned northern uranium mine and mill sites and have contracted the management of the project to the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC). The clean-up activity is underway, with work at many of the smaller sites largely completed, work at the Gunnar site well underway, and a beginning made at the Lorado site. This lecture presents an overview of these operations. (author)

  1. Serological Survey of West Nile Virus in Pet Dogs from Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, M Casey; Waldner, Cheryl; Taylor, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    Serum samples collected from 143 dogs from Saskatchewan, Canada, between 2008 and 2010 were evaluated for seroprevalence of West Nile virus (WNV). WNV antibodies were identified in 40/143 dogs (28%). Dogs that were primarily housed in the yard were 6.2 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6-14.5) more likely to have antibodies than dogs housed in the house or garage. Dogs were more likely to be positive with increasing time spent outside. The results of this study document WNV seroprevalence in dogs from Saskatchewan and suggest that pet dogs might be useful as a sentinel species for WNV surveillance.

  2. Mapping Fugitive Gas Emission Sources and Severity Across Southeastern Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, J.; Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Williams, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada contains a 10,000 km2 region heavily developed by oil and gas activity that has been struggling with air quality issues, arising from hundreds or thousands of oil and gas leak points. The region is also very diverse in terms of oilfield operators, who use extraction techniques including conventional, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and fracking. As regulators and operators need more knowledge about emission patterns locally, we undertook comprehensive mapping and characterization of leak sources at the regional scale using vehicle-based data collection, together with computational techniques. We measured the presence and source of fugitive emissions from infrastructure and oilfield activities in eight 100 km2 survey domains. These included two controls with no oil and gas activity, and otherwise the domains were selected to capture the diversity of development; targeting primarily conventional and EOR activities in the Weyburn-Midale beds, and unconventional activities in the Bakken play. A total of 25 unique operators fell within the survey domains. Each domain was surveyed multiple times for CO2, CH4, and H2S, allowing us to identify persistent leaks and to screen out one-time events. The multiple gas targets also provided opportunities for discriminating one type of fugitive emission from another (i.e. flares from storage tanks) using ratios of excess (above ambient) concentrations, after correcting for natural background variability with a signal-processing routine. Fugitive emissions were commonly observed in all study domains. Most emissions were associated with oil and gas infrastructure, as opposed to drilling and other short-term activities. There were obvious emissions at many well pads, storage tanks, and flares. We also observed high geochemical variability around flares, with some being very effective in combusting toxic gases, and others less so. Almost all observed concentrations fell below regulatory limits, but have a

  3. Leading Professional Learning to Develop Professional Capital: The Saskatchewan Professional Development Unit's Facilitator Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond-Johnson, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on data from a mixed methods study of the Saskatchewan Professional Development Unit's (SPDU) Facilitator Community, this paper highlights the potential of teacher-led professional learning in developing professional capital through engagement in teacher leadership. Analysis of survey, interview, and observational data revealed the…

  4. Information Systems in the University of Saskatchewan Libraries: A Vision for the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon. Libraries.

    This report describes the vision of the Information Systems Advisory Committee (ISAC) of an Information Systems Model for the 1990s. It includes an evaluation of the present automation environment at the university, a vision of library automation at the University of Saskatchewan between 1994 and 1999, and specific recommendations on such issues…

  5. The Intersection of Modernity, Globalization, Indigeneity, and Postcolonialism: Theorizing Contemporary Saskatchewan Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Michael; Preston, Jane P.; Pearce, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Viewing education as a contested site in the intersection of modernity, indigeneity, globalization, and postcolonialism, we explore relations between Aboriginal peoples and public schools in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. Posing a profound challenge to provincial policy underpinned by global educational culture, indigeneity constitutes a…

  6. Research Related to Native Peoples at the University of Saskatchewan, 1912-1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Don C.; Dyer, Aldrich J.

    The volume on University of Saskatchewan graduate theses related to Canadian native peoples (Indian, Inuit, Metis) contains a brief introduction, followed by abstracts of 62 thesis projects (1912-1982), and a final section of statistics, charts, summaries, and discussions related to the abstracted research. Each research abstract consists of three…

  7. Blood Parasite Infection Data from Blue-winged Teal, Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan) and USA (Texas, Louisiana), 2012-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes age, sex, location, and blood parasite infection data from Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) captured in Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan) and the...

  8. Exploring and revitalizing Indigenous food networks in Saskatchewan, Canada, as a way to improve food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Fidji; Hancherow, Anna; Norton, Ashley

    2017-10-01

    The project discussed in this paper was designed to expand research and instigate revitalization of Indigenous food networks in Saskatchewan, Canada, by exploring the current state of local Indigenous food networks, creating a Facebook page, organizing volunteer opportunities and surveying workshop participants regarding their knowledge and interest in Indigenous foods. The survey included Likert scale questions and qualitative questions. Project activities and survey results are discussed using statistical and qualitative analysis of the themes. Results indicate that participants are very interested in learning more about, and having greater access to, traditional foods and suggest that supporting Indigenous food networks may be an appropriate response to food insecurity in communities. Elders and community members are vital players in Indigenous foods exploration and revitalization in Saskatchewan by passing on traditional education. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Geological and geotechnical characteristics of two prospective wind turbine development sites in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, L. [J.D. Mollard and Associates Ltd., Regina, SK (Canada); Adelman, T. [GE Ground Engineering Ltd., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    SaskPower International's Centennial Wind Power Project is located 25 km southeast of Swift Current, Saskatchewan and harnesses 150 megawatts of power from 83 Vestas V80 wind turbines. This paper presented the results of an evaluation of geological and geotechnical site characteristics at two potential wind turbine development sites in southwestern Saskatchewan prior to selecting the final development site. Bearing strength of sediments, variability in stratigraphy and groundwater conditions are important factors affecting the ideal foundation design configuration and design parameters. Potential sites were selected based primarily on wind energy potential and proximity to existing electrical transmission infrastructure. The paper discussed various components of the study including an office airphoto and geological assessment; test hole drilling, sampling and geotechnical testing; piezometer installation and monitoring; and, an assessment of foundation conditions. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Evaluating the potential and opportunities for agroforestry in the Province of Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, K.; Lavoie, A.; Grundberg, B. [KPMG Consulting, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-05-01

    Results of a recent evaluative study of the current agroforestry industry, its potential and market opportunities in Saskatchewan are discussed. Results show that in the absence of incentive programs like those established in Ontario, Quebec, the Atlantic provinces, British Columbia and especially in the United States, the practice of woodlot management in Saskatchewan is on a small scale and on an experimental basis; agroforestry activities have been limited primarily to the establishment of shelter-belts on farmland and grazing cattle in woodlots. Under the current situation, most of the agroforestry scenarios tested in this study appear to be of marginal profitability, although high value crops such as sea buckthorn, incorporated into shelter-belts can provide substantial returns and sustainable grazing practices could be used to produce slight increases in revenues. The main factors responsible for the marginal profitability are the oversupply of public timber in Saskatchewan, and the pricing structures under the current timber tenure system which leave little room for private land owners to compete. In the long run, the key to successful agroforestry industry in Saskatchewan is contingent upon a growing demand for timber, especially hardwood supply, and limited availability of public timber. To encourage the development of the industry it is recommended to review pricing structures of crown timber and create a more favorable pricing structure for private land owners; changing the income tax structure to make it more favorable to agroforestry; improving the economies of scale for woodlot producers by allowing them to integrate woodlots with crown land; providing extension services specialized in agroforestry to support woodlot owners; and establishing alternative funding mechanisms that would encourage landowners to invest in silviculture on their private forest land. 32 refs.

  11. Bilateral cataracts in a coyote (Canis latrans) pup from Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granson, Hilary; Grahn, Bruce; Parker, Dennilyn; Himsworth, Chelsea

    2010-06-01

    A free-ranging coyote (Canis latrans) pup was found in rural Saskatchewan and was subsequently presented to a veterinary teaching hospital by a wildlife rehabilitator. On physical examination, the pup was found to be blind as a result of bilateral, mature cataracts, which were confirmed on postmortem examination. No other significant intraocular or extraocular disease was detected, resulting in a presumptive diagnosis of congenital cataract. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of congenital cataract in any wild canid species.

  12. Countering school bullying: An analysis of policy content in Ontario and Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginette Diane Roberge

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of extreme school violence as a direct consequence of bullying among peers, exacerbated by vast media attention, has caused educational institutions worldwide to put bullying intervention and prevention strategies into operation. This study focused on an overview of two provincewide antibullying incentives in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Saskatchewan, and an analysis of the quality of their respective antibullying policies. An itemized list of beneficial practices for bullying intervention and prevention originated from Smith, Smith, Osborn and Samara (2008’s scoring scheme. The scoring scheme was adapted to the current study by linking research-based program elements that have been found to be effective in reducing school bullying to a content analysis of both provincial frameworks. The final scoring scheme comprised a total of 39 criterions, divided into five categories: Defining Bullying Behaviors, Establishing a Positive School Climate, Disseminating, Monitoring and Reviewing Policy, Reporting and Responding to Bullying, and Involving the Broader Community. Results showed that policies contained a total average of 60% of the criterions in Ontario, and 59% in Saskatchewan. The conclusion of this study observes from policy lenses key essentials of bullying intervention and prevention initiatives in elementary and secondary educational settings. Recommendations are proposed to bridge the gap between areas that have received extensive attention and areas that have received less treatment in bullying intervention and prevention endeavors, using the content of Ontario and Saskatchewan policies as a basis for discussion.

  13. Casting a New Light on a Long Shadow: Saskatchewan Aboriginal High School Students Talk about What Helps and Hinders Their Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Bonnie; Kovach, Margaret; Steeves, Larry

    2017-01-01

    What do teachers do (or not do) that makes you want to go to school? A team of Saskatchewan researchers asked Saskatchewan Aboriginal high school students this question about the aspects of instructional practice that helps and hinders their learning. While responses pointed to several aspects, teacher relational instincts and capacities were the…

  14. W.B. Lewis Lecture: Cleaning-up abandoned uranium mines in Saskatchewan's North

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, L.L. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Thirty-six now-abandoned uranium mine and mill sites were developed and operated on or near Lake Athabasca, in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada, from approximately 1957 through 1964. During their operating lifetimes these mines produced large quantities of ore and tailings. After closure in the 1960's, these mine and mill sites were abandoned with little remediation and no reclamation being done. The governments of Canada and Saskatchewan are now funding the clean-up of these abandoned northern uranium mine and mill sites and have contracted the management of the project to the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC). The clean-up activity is underway, with work at many of the smaller sites largely completed, work at the Gunnar site well underway, and a beginning made at the Lorado site. This lecture presents an overview of these operations. (author)

  15. Strategies to support recruitment and retention of First Nations youth in baccalaureate nursing programs in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anonson, June M; Desjarlais, Joyce; Nixon, Jackie; Whiteman, Lori; Bird, Alteta

    2008-07-01

    Aboriginal youth is one of the fastest growing of all populations in Saskatchewan today. This is a prime group to target for training in the health care professions. The need for strategies to support recruitment and retention in these programs is critical for maintaining our present standard and increasing demands of quality health care. Program initiatives and supports need to be implemented to encourage this population to enroll in and complete health care programs. Although only 5 years old, the University of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, and Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) have created a viable northern nursing program with a retention rate of Aboriginal postsecondary students 13% greater than the provincial norm. They graduated their first class of nursing students from and for the North, May 2006.

  16. The effect on emergency department visits of raised alcohol minimum prices in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherk, Adam; Stockwell, Tim; Callaghan, Russell C

    2018-02-12

    The province of Saskatchewan, Canada introduced minimum prices graded by alcohol strength in April 2010. As previous research found this intervention significantly decreased alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable morbidity, we aim to test the association between the intervention and the rate of emergency department (ED) visits in four alcohol-related injury categories [motor vehicle collisions (MVC), assaults, falls and total alcohol-related injuries]. Data on ED visits in the city of Regina were obtained from the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health. Auto-regressive integrated moving average time series models were used to test the immediate and lagged effects of the pricing intervention on rates of alcohol-related nighttime. ED visits and controlled for daytime rates of ED visits, economic variables, linear and seasonal trends, and auto-regressive and moving average effects. The implementation of an alcohol minimum pricing strategy in Saskatchewan was associated with decreased MVC-related ED visits for women aged 26 and over after a 6 month lag period (-39.4%, P age categories; however, rates of ED visits among young males for MVCs and assaults decreased substantially during this study. The minimum pricing policy change led to a lagged decrease in motor vehicle-collision-related ED visits for women older than 25. Of note, there did not appear to be an instantaneous effect on the rate of alcohol-related injury ED visits immediately after the policy implementation nor lagged effects for other gender-age groups. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  17. Progress, public health, and power: Foucault and the Homemakers' Clubs of Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Scott; Rollwagen, Heather

    2008-08-01

    From 1911 to 1979, the Homemakers' Clubs of Saskatchewan mobilized and monitored extensive study and action in the field of public health. This article explores how these clubs exhorted women to strive for progress, and encouraged women to internalize such striving as fundamental to their own identities. The techniques used included encouraging commitment to shared goals, making such goals personal, structuring action, requiring women to report their thoughts and actions, rewarding certain behaviors, and linking those behaviors with emotionally compelling causes. Rooted in a Foucauldian conceptual framework, this article contributes to the sociological understanding of subject formation and governance.

  18. Health care utilization and costs in Saskatchewan's registered Indian population with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Jeffrey A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes in North American is recognized to be higher in Aboriginal populations. The relative magnitude of health care utilization and expenditures between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations is uncertain, however. Our objective was to compare health care utilization and per capita expenditures according to Registered Indian and diabetes status in the province of Saskatchewan. Methods Administrative databases from Saskatchewan Health were used to identify registered Indians and the general population diabetes cases and two controls for each diabetes case. Health care resource utilization (physician visits, hospitalizations, day surgeries and dialysis and costs for these individuals in the 2001 calendar year were determined. The odds of having used each resource category, adjusted for age and location of residence, was assessed according to Registered Indian and diabetes status. The average number of encounters for each resource category and per capita healthcare expenditures were also determined. Results Registered Indian diabetes cases were younger than general population cases (45.7 ± 14.5 versus 58.4 ± 16.4 years, p Conclusion Relative to individuals without the disease, both registered Indians and the general population with diabetes had substantially higher health care utilization and costs. Excess hospitalization and dialysis suggested that registered Indians with and without diabetes experienced greater morbidity than the general population.

  19. Insect succession and decomposition patterns on shaded and sunlit carrion in Saskatchewan in three different seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharanowski, Barbara J; Walker, Ernest G; Anderson, Gail S

    2008-08-06

    A study was conducted on decomposition and insect succession in the Prairie Ecozone of Saskatchewan in the year 2000. Eighteen domestic pig carcasses (42-79 kg) were employed as human models for applications to future homicide investigations in this region. Two major variables were considered including the effect of season and habitat (sun versus shade). Research was conducted over 25 weeks, spanning three seasons: spring, summer and fall. Ambient temperature, internal carcass temperature, faunistic succession over time, and the rate of decay were all compared for each experimental variable. Results indicated that habitat was only a factor in the decompositional rate of carrion in the spring season. The ambient temperature was the chief factor determining the seasonal variations in decay rate. Maximum internal carcass temperatures always coincided with the presence of 3rd instar larvae. Patterns of insect succession occurred in a predictable sequence that varied across different habitats and seasons and was unique compared to previously published studies. Carcasses placed in spring and fall attracted a more diverse assemblage of insects than summer-placed carrion. Sun-exposed carrion also had greater variation in fauna than shaded carrion in spring and fall. Members of Silphidae were the first coleopteran colonizers in all habitats and seasons. This paper also marks the first record for Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius) in Saskatchewan.

  20. Through the Looking Glass: A Comparative Analysis of the Career Patterns of Rural Female Administrators in Saskatchewan and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Dawn C.

    2005-01-01

    This article stems from research that examined the effect of the rural context on the career patterns of female administrators in rural public school divisions in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, and in the state of Texas, United States. These two studies examined (a) the nature of rural communities and its relationship to women's career…

  1. Souris River Basin Project. Saskatchewan, Canada - North Dakota, U.S.A. General Plan Report and Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    water as it enters the United States. Appendix 9 contains North Dakota water quality standards for the Souris River and an analysis of ambient water...conducted ueadr the amebe tty of the Meritage Nesesrees legislacion of Saskatchewan. 4rcbeolotical work directly associated with the flood control

  2. Blood parasite infection data from Blue-winged teal, Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan) and USA (Texas, Louisiana), 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, John

    2017-01-01

    This data set includes age, sex, location, and blood parasite infection data from Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) captured in Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan) and the USA (Texas, Louisiana) in 2012-2013. Infection data for three different genera of blood parasites are given as are GenBank accession numbers for genetic sequences obtained from positive infections.

  3. Chemical form of selenium in naturally selenium-rich lentils (Lens culinaris L.) from Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Vandenberg, Albert; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2007-09-05

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86-95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5-14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  4. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  5. Retarding field energy analyzer for the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified plasma boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreval, M.; Rohraff, D.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2009-10-01

    The retarding field energy analyzer (RFA) is a simple and reliable diagnostic technique to measure the ion temperature in the scrape-off layer and edge of magnetic fusion devices. Design and operation features of a single-sided (facing the ion flow) RFA for ion temperature measurements in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak are described. Its compact size (21×15×20 mm3) allows RFA measurements without perturbing plasma significantly. Both ion and electron temperature have been measured by RFA in the STOR-M tokamak. A method is proposed to correct the effects of ion flow on the ion temperature using the simultaneously measured Mach number. The measured electron temperature is consistent with the previously reported Langmuir probe data. Abnormal behavior of the RFA has been observed in both ion and electron modes when RFA is inserted deep into the plasma.

  6. Trend analysis of nutrient loadings in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Chun, K. P.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient loadings in river catchments have increased in the past years as a consequence of rapid expansion of agricultural areas, new urban developments and industries, and population growth. Nutrient enrichment of water bodies has intensified eutrophication conditions that degrade water quality and ecosystem health. In large-scale catchments, the assessment of temporal and spatial variability of nutrient loads imply challenges due to climate, land use and geology heterogeneity, and to anthropogenic changes. In this study we carried out a trend analysis of total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads in the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) catchment. This catchment is located in the Canadian Prairie Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The eastern and central areas of the catchment consist mostly of croplands, pasture lands and livestock farms, whereas the western parts are located on the Rocky Mountains that are the source of most of the catchment's streamflows. The trend analysis was performed applying a novel approach to analyse nutrient time series recorded at long-term water quality stations along the main stems of the SSR river network. Since water quality is taken infrequently, in the proposed approach the time series were complemented using regression analysis methods based on streamflow data recorded at the nearest gauge stations. The time series were subsequently pre-whitened in order to remove the autocorrelation, and then subjected to non-parametric statistical test to detect trends. Seasonal analysis of trends at each of the water quality stations were performed in order to determine the relationships between annual flow regimes and nutrient loads in the catchment, in particular, the influence of the high spring runoff on nutrient export. Decadal analysis was also performed to determine the long-tern relationships of nutrients with anthropogenic changes in the catchment. In particular, the capacity of reservoirs to trap nutrients and the effects of the

  7. Improved confinement induced by tangential injection of compact torus into the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.; Sen, S.

    2004-08-01

    Compact torus injection into the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3277 (1992)] tokamak discharges has triggered improved confinement characterized by an increase in the electron density by more than twofold, 30% reduction in the Hα radiation level, significant suppression of floating potential fluctuations and m=2 Mirnov oscillations. In this paper, we present detailed experimental setup and results, as well as an extended theory explaining the mechanism for triggering improved confinement in a tokamak by compact torus injection.

  8. Examining the Potential Role of a Supervised Injection Facility in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, to Avert HIV among People Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Jozaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Research predicting the public health and fiscal impact of Supervised Injection Facilities (SIFs, across different cities in Canada, has reported positive results on the reduction of HIV cases among People Who Inject Drugs (PWID. Most of the existing studies have focused on the outcomes of Insite, located in the Vancouver Downtown Eastside (DTES. Previous attention has not been afforded to other affected areas of Canada. The current study seeks to address this deficiency by assessing the cost-effectiveness of opening a SIF in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Methods We used two different mathematical models commonly used in the literature, including sensitivity analyses, to estimate the number of HIV infections averted due to the establishment of a SIF in the city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Results Based on cumulative cost-effectiveness results, SIF establishment is cost-effective. The benefit to cost ratio was conservatively estimated to be 1.35 for the first two potential facilities. The study relied on 34% and 14% needle sharing rates for sensitivity analyses. The result for both sensitivity analyses and the base line estimates indicated positive prospects for the establishment of a SIF in Saskatoon. Conclusion The opening of a SIF in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan is financially prudent in the reduction of tax payers’ expenses and averting HIV infection rates among PWID.

  9. Use of Principal Components Analysis and Kriging to Predict Groundwater-Sourced Rural Drinking Water Quality in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lianne; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Epp, Tasha; Waldner, Cheryl L

    2017-09-15

    Groundwater drinking water supply surveillance data were accessed to summarize water quality delivered as public and private water supplies in southern Saskatchewan as part of an exposure assessment for epidemiologic analyses of associations between water quality and type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Arsenic in drinking water has been linked to a variety of chronic diseases and previous studies have identified multiple wells with arsenic above the drinking water standard of 0.01 mg/L; therefore, arsenic concentrations were of specific interest. Principal components analysis was applied to obtain principal component (PC) scores to summarize mixtures of correlated parameters identified as health standards and those identified as aesthetic objectives in the Saskatchewan Drinking Water Quality Standards and Objective. Ordinary, universal, and empirical Bayesian kriging were used to interpolate arsenic concentrations and PC scores in southern Saskatchewan, and the results were compared. Empirical Bayesian kriging performed best across all analyses, based on having the greatest number of variables for which the root mean square error was lowest. While all of the kriging methods appeared to underestimate high values of arsenic and PC scores, empirical Bayesian kriging was chosen to summarize large scale geographic trends in groundwater-sourced drinking water quality and assess exposure to mixtures of trace metals and ions.

  10. Introduced and Native Haplotypes of Echinococcus multilocularis in Wildlife in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesy, Karen M; Jenkins, Emily J

    2015-07-01

    Recent detection of a European-type haplotype of the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis in a newly enzootic region in British Columbia prompted efforts to determine if this haplotype was present elsewhere in wildlife in western Canada. In coyote (Canis latrans) definitive hosts in an urban region in central Saskatchewan (SK), we found a single haplotype of E. multilocularis that was most similar to a haplotype currently established in the core of this parasite's distribution in Europe and to the European-type haplotype found in coyotes and a dog (Canis lupus familiaris) in British Columbia. We found six haplotypes of E. multilocularis from deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) intermediate hosts in southwestern SK that were closely related to, and one haplotype indistinguishable from, a haplotype previously reported in the adjacent north-central US. This is a higher level of diversity than has previously been recognized for this parasite, which suggests that the population native to central North America is well established, rather than a recent introduction from the Arctic. These findings, in combination with recent cases of alveolar hydatid cysts in dogs in Canada, raise concerns that European haplotypes of E. multilocularis may be increasing in distribution within wildlife in Canada. European haplotypes may pose greater risks to veterinary and human health than native haplotypes long established in central North America.

  11. Canada's deadly secret : Saskatchewan uranium and the global nuclear system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, J.

    2007-07-01

    Although Canada has a reputation for its support of multilateralism and international peacekeeping, it has provided fuel for American and British nuclear weapons, and continues to provide uranium fuel for nuclear reactors and power plants throughout the world. This book provided a detailed outline of Canada's involvement in uranium mining in Saskatchewan, the largest uranium-producing region in the world. The ways in which Canada has been complicit in the expansion of the global nuclear system were examined. A history of the province's role in the first nuclear arms race between the Soviet Union and the United States was provided, and details of provincial public inquiries conducted to legitimize the expansion of uranium mining were revealed. Issues related to the exploitation of ancestral lands belonging to Aboriginal peoples were discussed along with the impact of uranium mining on communities in the province. It was concluded that the province is now being targeted as a storage site for nuclear waste. refs.

  12. A first report on making Saskatchewan a Canadian leader in energy conservation and renewable energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebble, P. [Government of Saskatchewan, Regina, SK (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    This report proposed policy changes for energy conservation and renewable energy in Saskatchewan related to the electricity and buildings sectors. Recommendations were presented for 4 core areas, notably (1) transition to renewable energy in the electrical sector, (2) incentives to promote conservation and renewable energy, (3) the continuation of conservation and renewable energy programs within the buildings sector, and (4) the creation of new policies to encourage renewable energy use and energy conservation. The report recommended legislation for a renewable energy and conservation portfolio standard for electricity production, as well as increased investment in demand side management programs. The use of large-scale wind power in future electrical generation upgrades was also recommended, as well as net metering and financial incentives for small-scale producers of electricity. Tax credit schemes were presented, as well as various energy efficiency grant programs for homeowners, and the implementation of new energy efficiency building codes, and solar energy legislation. Policy measures to promote conservation and renewable energy development included the expansion of the office of energy conservation, and the establishment of a fund to ensure a stable public funding base for conservation and renewable energy initiatives. refs.

  13. Risk Factors Associated with the Choice to Drink Bottled Water and Tap Water in Rural Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianne McLeod

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study investigated risk factors associated with choices to drink bottled water and tap water in rural Saskatchewan. Of 7,500 anonymous postal questionnaires mailed out, 2,065 responses were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Those who reported a water advisory (p < 0.001 or living in the area for £10 years (p = 0.01 were more likely to choose bottled water. Those who reported tap water was not safe to drink were more likely to choose bottled water, an effect greater for those who had no aesthetic complaints (p ≤ 0.001, while those with aesthetic complaints were more likely to choose bottled water if they believed the water was safe (p < 0.001. Respondents who treated their water and did not use a community supply were more likely to choose bottled water (p < 0.001, while those who did not treat their water were more likely to choose bottled water regardless of whether a community supply was used (p < 0.001. A similar pattern of risk factors was associated with a decreased likelihood of consuming tap water daily; however, the use of a community water supply was not significant. Understanding the factors involved in drinking water choices could inform public health education efforts regarding water management in rural areas.

  14. Educational reform and the public: Two case studies of Poland and Saskatchewan (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaproń, Danuta; Stephan, Werner

    1991-09-01

    The involvement of the public in educational reform processes in modern democratic societies primarily serves the purpose of politically legitimizing the reform agenda. This study examines the rationales implicitly or explicitly submitted to the public to explain why educational reforms in the two countries should be endorsed. Although differences in the political culture caution against a hasty comparison of the two case studies, a number of politico-economic similarities allow for a valid juxtaposition. In Poland the context of socio-political and economic renewal prompted the reformers to emphasize the human-capital model which heightened public awareness and participation in the debate surrounding the reform. Public involvement in Saskatchewan was negatively affected for mainly two reasons. First, the government evidently manipulated public input by various means and thereby appears to have predetermined the outcome. Second, the rationale for the reform, based on a free-market model, tightened the linkage between the needs of the labour market and the mandate of the schools. As a result, public interest and participation was greatly diminished.

  15. Components of population growth rate for White-winged Scoters in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisauskas, R. T.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Breeding range and abundance of White-winged Scoters (Melanitta fusca deglandi have declined in northwestern North America. Hypotheses proposed to account for this trend are that survival and/or recruitment of females had declined. Thus, we used a reverse-time capture-recapture approach to directly estimate survival, seniority and capture probabilities for females of breeding age at Redberry Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada for 1975-1980 and 2000-2003. We also estimated population size of breeding females for 1975-1985 and 2000-2003 using capture-recapture data. Initially, this local population was in serious decline [95%CL(landa75-80 = 0.89 ± 0.09], but has since stabilized and may be slowly increasing [95%CL(landa00-03=1.07±0.11]. This reversal in trajectory apparently resulted from increased recruitment rather than increased apparent survival. Importantly, recent recruitment of adult females appeared to be driven solely by immigration of adult females with no detectable in situ recruitment, suggesting a hypothesis that the local population is being rescued by females produced elsewhere.

  16. Air issues scoping study for the Alberta South Saskatchewan land-use planning region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    This report deals with an air quality study undertaken in the South Saskatchewan Region (SSR). Some of the work is applicable to the local region only but other parts are applicable at the provincial level. The shift to management at the regional level requires a resolution/understanding of the responsibility and authority of the management entity. In this study is stated that the air quality in the province had deteriorated according to Alberta Environment. In order to have an effective and efficient management of air quality in the SSR, the functionalities of both government and non-government organizations should be integrated and harmonized jointly. Once the objectives of air quality management in the SSR have been set, the relevancy of the broad information gaps reported in this study can be reviewed and can either be adopted as is or modified according to updated stakeholder input. Although this assessment only deals with air quality, the overall management of a Land-use Framework region should also take other environmental factors into consideration to ensure a set of harmonized and integrated methods can be applied.

  17. Community Response and Engagement During Extreme Water Events in Saskatchewan, Canada and Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMartin, Dena W.; Sammel, Alison J.; Arbuthnott, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Technology alone cannot address the challenges of how societies, communities, and individuals understand water accessibility, water management, and water consumption, particularly under extreme conditions like floods and droughts. At the community level, people are increasingly aware challenges related to responses to and impacts of extreme water events. This research begins with an assessment of social and political capacities of communities in two Commonwealth jurisdictions, Queensland, Australia and Saskatchewan, Canada, in response to major flooding events. The research further reviews how such capacities impact community engagement to address and mitigate risks associated with extreme water events and provides evidence of key gaps in skills, understanding, and agency for addressing impacts at the community level. Secondary data were collected using template analysis to elucidate challenges associated with education (formal and informal), social and political capacity, community ability to respond appropriately, and formal government responses to extreme water events in these two jurisdictions. The results indicate that enhanced community engagement alongside elements of an empowerment model can provide avenues for identifying and addressing community vulnerability to negative impacts of flood and drought.

  18. Effects of Lakes on Wildfire Activity in the Boreal Forests of Saskatchewan, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E. Nielsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large lakes can act as firebreaks resulting in distinct patterns in the forest mosaic. Although this is well acknowledged, much less is known about how wildfire is affected by different landscape measures of water and their interactions. Here we examine how these factors relate to historic patterns of wildfire over a 35-year period (1980–2014 for the boreal forest of Saskatchewan, Canada. This includes the amount of water in different-sized neighborhoods, the presence of islands, and the direction, distance, and shape of nearest lake of different sizes. All individual factors affected wildfire presence, with lake sizes ≥5000 ha and amount of water within a 1000-ha surrounding area the most supported spatial scales. Overall, wildfires were two-times less likely on islands, more likely further from lakes that were circular in shape, and in areas with less surrounding water. Interactive effects were common, including the effect of direction to lake as a function of distance from lakeshore and amount of surrounding water. Our results point to a strong, but complex, bottom-up control of local wildfire activity based on the configuration of natural firebreaks. In fact, fire rotation periods predicted for one area varied more than 15-fold (<47 to >700 years depending on local patterns in lakes. Old-growth forests within this fire-prone ecosystem are therefore likely to depend on the surrounding configuration of larger lakes.

  19. Ground-Penetrating Radar Evaluation of Moisture and Frost across Typical Saskatchewan Road Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Berthelot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of soil type, moisture content, and the presence of frost on road substructure permittivity. Permittivity sensitivity of typical road soils was characterized in the laboratory to provide baseline dielectric constant values which were compared to field ground penetrating radar (GPR survey results. Both laboratory devices, the complex dielectric network analyzer and the Adek Percometer, as well as the field GPR system were used in this study to measure the dielectric constant of soils. All three systems differentiated between coarse-grained and fine grained soils. In addition, at temperatures below freezing, all three systems identified an increase in water content in soils; however, when frozen, the sensitivity of dielectric constant across soil type and moisture content was significantly reduced. Based on the findings of this study, GPR technology has the ability to characterize in situ substructure soil type and moisture content of typical Saskatchewan road substructure soils. Given the influence of road soil type and moisture content on in-service road performance, this ability could provide road engineers with accurate estimates of in situ structural condition of road structures for preservation and rehabilitation planning and optimization purposes.

  20. Hybrid eolian dunes of William River Dune field, northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, M.A.; MacLean, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    A series of northwest-southeast aligned, large-scale (up to 30 m high) eolian dunes, occurring in a confined (600 km/sup 2/) desert area in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, was examined in the field. Observations were made of dune morphology and internal structure, and patterns of sand movement on the dunes were analyzed in relation to wind events during the summer of 1981. Present cross-sectional profiles exhibit steeper northeast slopes, the lower segment of which are intermittently covered by psammophilous grasses. Dune structure is dominated by northeast-dipping accretion laminae. Three /sup 14/C dates from organic material cropping out on the lower southwest slopes reveal that the dunes have migrated as transverse bed forms at rates of roughly 0.5 m/yr during the last few hundred years. However, a progressive increase in height, bulk, and symmetry along the dune axis from northwest to southeast, suggests an along-dune component of sand transport. This view is supported by (1) field measurements of airflow and along-dune sand transport patterns on 2 dunes, and (2) the present-day wind regime (1963-78). Dominated by north-northeast to northeast winds from January to June and by west-southwest winds from July to December, the resultant potential sand transport vector is toward the southeast, virtually identical to the dune axis.

  1. Farm Exposure and Atopy in Men and Women: The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Donna C; Lawson, Joshua A; Karunanayake, Chandima P; Pahwa, Punam; Chen, Yue; Chu, Luan; Dosman, James A

    2015-01-01

    Associations between farming exposures and atopy can vary by timing of exposure and sex. We examined associations between adult atopy, sex, and farm living in a rural Canadian population. In 2010, we conducted a baseline survey of 11,982 households located in four agricultural regions of Saskatchewan, Canada. Of the 7225 adults aged 18-75, 1658 underwent clinical assessments including skin testing. Of these, 1599 participants underwent skin prick testing to four common allergens. We defined atopy as >3 mm reaction to any of four allergens compared with saline control. Farming exposures were farm living in the first year of life and current farm living. All analyses were stratified by sex. The prevalence of atopy was 17.8% and was higher in men than women (P farm exposure (P = .08) and who were female (P = .03). After adjusting for education, age, and smoking status, both current and early farm exposures were associated with decreased sensitization to cat atopy in women that was stronger with current exposure (P farm exposure and increased atopic sensitization to HDM with a current farm exposure. In this rural population, the protective effect of an early farm exposure for any atopy was weak overall. The impact of farming exposures on atopy was allergen dependent and varied by sex.

  2. Track etch orientation survey in the Cluff Lake area, northern Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, L.S. (Saskatchewan Geological Survey, Regina); Gingrich, J.E.

    1976-05-01

    Track Etch is a recently designed method of uranium exploration that uses small pieces of special plastic film to detect the presence of radon gas emitted by buried uranium deposits. By using a sampling time of at least 25 days, the track etch technique eliminates the problems of sensitivity and fluctuations in background values normally present with other radon detection methods. During the summer of 1974, an orientation survey was carried out over the 'N' zone of Amok (Canada) Limited in the Cluff Lake area of northwestern Saskatchewan. This was the first test of the method in an area of glacial overburden and the results have been encouraging. The 'N' zone consists of several pitchblende-bearing lenses associated with gently dipping fracture zones in paragneisses and granites of Archean or Aphebian age. The mineralized zones have been outlined by drilling and occur at depths ranging from 10 to 100 meters. The mineralized area is covered by sandy till and outwash ranging from a few meters to 20 meters in thickness. Approximately 160 track etch sample cups were placed in shallow holes at the surface at roughly 70-meter centers. Sampling extended well beyond the boundaries of the known ore zone. High track etch values were obtained over the deposit, with a peak anomaly of more than 50 times the background value measured for the surrounding area. (auth)

  3. A modified approach for estimating the aquatic critical load of acid deposition in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Colin J.; Mowat, Aidan C.; Scott, Kenneth A.; Watmough, Shaun A.

    2016-12-01

    Acid-sensitive ecosystems are found in northern Saskatchewan, which lies downwind of major sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions sources associated with the oil sands extraction industry. In order to protect these ecosystems against acidification, tolerance to acid deposition must be quantified. The suitability of the central empirical relationship used in the Steady-State Water Chemistry (SSWC) model to predict historical sulphate (SO4) concentrations was investigated, and an alternate approach for determining aquatic critical loads of acidity (CL(A)) was employed for the study lakes (n = 260). Critical loads of acidity were often low, with median values of 12-16 mmolc m-2 yr-1, with the lower value reflecting a region-specific limit for acid-neutralizing capacity identified in this study. Uncertain levels of atmospheric deposition in the region, however, are problematic for characterizing acidification risk. Accurate S and chloride (Cl) deposition are needed to identify catchment sources (and sinks) of these elements in the new approach for CL(A) calculation. Likewise, accurate depiction of atmospheric deposition levels can prove useful for evaluation of lake runoff estimates on which estimates of CL(A) are contingent. While CL(A) are low and exceedance may occur according to projected increases in S deposition in the near-term, S retention appears to be an important feature in many catchments and risk of acidification may be overstated should long-term S retention be occurring in peatlands.

  4. Chemical characteristics and acid sensitivity of boreal headwater lakes in northwest Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean S. BIRKS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal ecosystems in northwest Saskatchewan may be threatened by acidification as this area is downwind of atmospheric emissions sources from regional oil sands mining operations. To evaluate the status of lakes in this region, a survey of 259 headwater lakes was conducted during 2007–2008 within ~300 km of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Acid sensitivity by ecoregion increased from Mid-Boreal Upland to Churchill River Upland to Athabasca Plain, with 60% of lakes classified as sensitive (50–200 μeq L–1 acid neutralizing capacity (ANC, and 8% as very sensitive (<50 μeq L–1 ANC to acid deposition. Organic anions dominated the acidity balance in most lakes, but non-marine sulphate varied positively with lake elevation and % upland cover (r2 = 0.24. Base cation concentrations (Ca, Mg, K, Na were correlated with % deciduous forest in the catchment area (r2 = 0.33, while dissolved organic carbon (DOC was related most strongly to % bog and lake flushing variables (r2 = 0.53. Variation in runoff coefficients derived by isotope mass balance corresponded with catchment area attributes that proxy controls on evaporation, infiltration and storage, and showed some ecoregional differences. The findings have implications for assignment of runoff values required to calculate critical loads of acidity. Although acidification appears not to be significantly advanced, many dilute oligotrophic lakes with pH 6.0 to pH 6.5 are vulnerable to acid deposition.

  5. Towards a new paradigm of Socio-Hydrology; insights from the Saskatchewan River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.; Gober, P.

    2011-12-01

    , such as when governance systems are incapable of dealing with climate-induced changes in water supply. Socio-hydrology also incorporates research into the processes by translating traditional scientific information into tools for water decision making. These processes are inherently social and value-based. They depend upon the way various water stakeholders (e.g. municipalities, farmers, mining companies, environmental groups, Aboriginal Peoples) define the problem of water security and the values they place on different aspects of it. Socio-hydrology is at the forefront of efforts to establish and study participatory processes for decision making in the water sector. We illustrate these issues by reference to the inter-provincial Saskatchewan River Basin in western Canada. The University of Saskatchewan has established socio-hydrology as a priority research area. Our goal is to integrate hydro-ecological research with social science to study societal responses to water stresses like flooding, drought and nutrient pollution and investigate the potential of existing and new economic and other policy instruments to help communities make sound decisions under uncertainty.

  6. Nitrogen controls on ecosystem carbon sequestration: a model implementation and application to Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Price, D.T.; Chen, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A plant–soil nitrogen (N) cycling model was developed and incorporated into the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS) of Foley et al. [Foley, J.A., Prentice, I.C., Ramankutty, N., Levis, S., Pollard, D., Sitch, S., Haxeltine, A., 1996. An integrated biosphere model of land surface process, terrestrial carbon balance and vegetation dynamics. Global Biogeochem. Cycles 10, 603–628]. In the N-model, soil mineral N regulates ecosystem carbon (C) fluxes and ecosystem C:N ratios. Net primary productivity (NPP) is controlled by feedbacks from both leaf C:N and soil mineral N. Leaf C:N determines the foliar and canopy photosynthesis rates, while soil mineral N determines the N availability for plant growth and the efficiency of biomass construction. Nitrogen controls on the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) are implemented through N immobilization and mineralization separately. The model allows greater SOM mineralization at lower mineral N, and conversely, allows greater N immobilization at higher mineral N. The model's seasonal and inter-annual behaviours are demonstrated. A regional simulation for Saskatchewan, Canada, was performed for the period 1851–2000 at a 10 km × 10 km resolution. Simulated NPP was compared with high-resolution (1 km × 1 km) NPP estimated from remote sensing data using the boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) [Liu, J., Chen, J.M., Cihlar, J., Park, W.M., 1997. A process-based boreal ecosystem productivity simulator using remote sensing inputs. Remote Sens. Environ. 44, 81–87]. The agreement between IBIS and BEPS, particularly in NPP spatial variation, was considerably improved when the N controls were introduced into IBIS.

  7. Decommissioning of a former uranium mine and mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, D.; Pollock, R.; Bennett, P.; Drake, N. [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Cluff Lake Project is a former uranium mine and mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Over 60 million pounds of uranium concentrate were produced in just over twenty years of operation, ending in 2002. The Project is owned and operated by AREVA Resources Canada Inc., part of the AREVA Group, the world leader in nuclear energy development, and increasingly, a provider of other forms of electricity generation systems with low CO{sub 2} emissions. During operation, the facilities at the Cluff Lake Project included open-pit and underground mines, a mill, a tailings management area (TMA) with a two-stage liquid effluent treatment system, a residential camp area and various other support and site infrastructure facilities. Decommissioning when operations have concluded is both an AREVA Group corporate commitment and a regulatory requirement. The purpose is to conduct all necessary activities including the removal or stabilization of all constructed structures and the reclamation of disturbed areas to meet the following objectives: Environment is safe for non-human biota and human use; Long-term adverse effects are minimized; Reclaimed landscape is self-sustaining; and, Restrictions on future land use are minimized. In addition, any restrictions on land use should not prevent traditional land use including casual access for trapping, hunting, and fishing as the primary site activities. The Cluff Lake decommissioning project has four major stages which include planning, physical decommissioning activities, post-decommissioning and follow-up monitoring, and transfer of the site to the Provincial Institutional Control Program (ICP). (author)

  8. Recently surveyed lakes in northern Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada: characteristics and critical loads of acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac WONG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on minimal information, lakes in the western Canadian provinces of Manitoba (MB and Saskatchewan (SK have long been considered unaffected by acid rain. However, emissions of acidifying pollutants from MB smelters and oil sand processing in Alberta (AB may pose a developing threat. Surveys of 347 lakes located on geologically sensitive terrain in northern MB and SK were conducted to assess their acidification sensitivity and status. The survey domain (~193,000 km2 contained 81,494 lakes ≥1 ha in area. Small lakes dominated the inventory in terms of numbers, and large lakes dominated in terms of area. Survey lakes were selected using a stratified-random sampling design in 10 sampling blocks within the overall survey domain. Few lakes had pH <6, and only three (all in SK were acidic, i.e., Gran Alkalinity (Alk <0 μeq L–1. A broad range in lake sensitivity was apparent, and very sensitive lakes (low specific conductance, base cations and Alk were present in all sampling blocks. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC was an important constituent of many lakes. Critical loads (CL of acidity calculated using the Steady-State Water Chemistry model (SSWC revealed extremely low 5th percentile values for every block (range 1.9 to 52.7 eq ha–1 y–1. Block CL exceedances calculated using estimated S and N deposition for 2002 ranged from 54.5 to 909 eq ha–1 y–1. The largest exceedances were for sampling blocks located near smelter sources or downwind of the oil sands. Lake chemistry revealed by our surveys was compared to others conducted both nearby and outside Canada.

  9. 24/7 Registered Nurse Staffing Coverage in Saskatchewan Nursing Homes and Acute Hospital Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Margaret J; Murphy, Janice M; Poss, Jeffrey W; McGrail, Kimberlyn M; Kuramoto, Lisa; Huang, Huei-Chung; Bryan, Stirling

    2015-12-01

    RÉSUMÉ La législation, dans de nombreuses juridictions, nécessite les établissements des soins de longue durée (SLD) d'avoir une infirmière en service 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine. Bien que la recherche considérable existe sur l'intensité SLD de la dotation en personnel infirmier, il n'existe pas de la recherche empirique relative à cette exigence. Notre étude rétrospectif d'observation a comparé des installations en Saskatchewan avec 24/7 RN couverture aux établissements offrant moins de couverture, complétées par divers modèles de dotation des postes de nuit. Les ratios de risque associés à moins de 24/7 couverture RN complété de la dotation infirmière autorisé de nuit, ajusté pour l'intensité de dotation en personnel infirmier et d'autres facteurs de confusion potentiels, étaient de 1,17, IC 95% [0,91, 1,50] et 1.00, IC à 95% [0,72, 1,39], et avec moins de couverture 24/7 RN complété avec soin par aides personnels de nuit, les ratios de risque étaient de 1,46, IC 95% [1,11, 1,91] et 1,11, IC 95% [0,78, 1,58], pour les patients hospitalisés et de visites aux services d'urgence, respectivement. Ces résultats suggèrent que l'utilisation des soins de courte durée peut être influencée négativement par l'absence de la couverture 24/7 RN.

  10. Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2011-05-01

    A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

  11. Increasing the Number of Canadian Indigenous Students in STEM at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jacques, J. M.; McGee, S.; Janze, R.; Longman, M.; Pete, S.; Starblanket, N.

    2016-12-01

    Canadian Indigenous people are an extremely poorly represented group in STEM today due to major barriers in obtaining a high school and then a university education. Approximately 10% of the undergraduate student population out of a total 12,600 students at the University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, is First Nations, Métis or Inuit. The university is located in a catchment region where 30% of the population is First Nations or Métis. Approximately 100 students majoring in the sciences, mathematics and engineering have self-declared themselves to be Indigenous. For the past two years, we have been running a pilot project, the Initiative to Support and Increase the Number of Indigenous Students in the Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering at the Aboriginal Student Centre, with financial support from the Deans of Science and Engineering. We provide student networking lunches, Indigenous scientist and engineer speakers and mentors and supplemental tutoring. Our program is actively supported and guided by Elder Noel Starblanket, former president of the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations). Our students are greatly interested in the health and environmental sciences (particularly water quality), with a sprinkling of physics, mathematics and engineering majors. Our students have gone on to graduate work with prestigious scholarships and a paid internship in engineering. We report here on various lessons learned: the involvement of elders is key, as is the acceptance of non-traditional academic paths, and any STEM support program must respect Indigenous culture. There is great interest in science and engineering on the part of these students, if scientists and engineers are willing to listen and learn to talk with these students on their own terms.

  12. Relationships between Duck and Grassland Bird Relative Abundance and Species Richness in Southern Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P. Skinner

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital map products that integrate long-term duck population and land-use data are currently being used to guide conservation program delivery on the Canadian Prairies. However, understanding the inter-relationships between ducks and other grassland bird species would greatly enhance program planning and delivery. We hypothesized that ducks, and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta in particular, may function as an umbrella guild for the overall breeding habitat quality for other grassland bird species. We compared grassland bird species richness and relative abundance among areas of low, moderate, and high predicted waterfowl breeding densities (i.e., duck density strata in the southern Missouri Coteau, Saskatchewan. We conducted roadside point counts and delineated habitats within a 400 m radius of each point. The duck high-density stratum supported greater avian species richness and abundance than did the duck low-density stratum. Overall, duck and other grassland bird species richness and abundance were moderately correlated, with all r between 0.37 and 0.69 (all P < 0.05. Although the habitat requirements of Northern Pintail may overlap with those of other grassland endemics, priority grassland bird species richness was only moderately correlated with total pintail abundance in both years, and the abundances of pintail and grassland songbirds listed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada were not correlated. No differences in the mean number of priority grassland species were detected among the strata. Adequate critical habitat for several priority species may not be protected if conservation is focused only in areas of moderate to high wetland density because large tracts of contiguous, dry grassland habitat (e.g., pasture occur infrequently in high-quality duck habitat.

  13. The use of alternative therapies in the Saskatchewan stroke rehabilitation population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefromova Ludmilla

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients use alternative therapies. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of stroke rehabilitation patients in Saskatchewan using alternative therapies, whether patients found these therapies effective in alleviating stroke-related symptoms, how often those patients who used alternative therapies discuss this fact with their primary care doctor and the main reason why patients might not do so. Methods Telephone questionnaire surveys were conducted with 117 patients who had suffered a stroke and undergone inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation at Saskatoon City Hospital. Results The study revealed that 26.5% of 117 stroke rehabilitation patients visited alternative practitioners at least once or used some form of unconventional therapy. Only 16.1% of patients found that alternative therapy made them feel much better. Of those who used alternative therapy, 61.3% did not discuss this fact with their primary physician. Many of the respondents (47.3% who did not inform their physician stated that they did not see the necessity of talking about these treatments and 21.1% did not discuss the issue with their physician because they felt that he or she might disapprove of alternative therapies. Conclusion A relatively small percentage of stroke patients found alternative therapies beneficial. Doctors should be aware that a significant number of patients will try alternative treatment without discussion with their primary care physician or specialist. The current study suggests that after completing routine questioning, doctors should also ask their patients about their use of alternative therapies and, when appropriate, review issues of safety and efficacy.

  14. Seroprevalence of West Nile virus in Saskatchewan's Five Hills Health Region, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Tara L; Anderson, Maureen E; Drebot, Michael A; Vooght, Mark T R; Findlater, A Ross; Curry, Phillip S; Campbell, C Alexia; Osei, William D

    2006-01-01

    The Five Hills Health Region of Saskatchewan reported the highest West Nile virus (WNV) case rates in the 2003 outbreak. A serologic and telephone survey was undertaken to assess the seroprevalence of the virus and the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of the residents. Respondents had to be at least 18 years of age, and residents of the Five Hills Health Region between July 1st and September 15th, 2003. Blood samples of respondents were tested at the National Microbiology Laboratory for flavivirus immunoglobulin using a WNV IgG ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization test. Descriptive analyses performed related to respondents' demographics, knowledge, attitudes, behaviours, and seropositivity. WNV infection risk was assessed using odds ratio. There were 619 questionnaire respondents, of whom 501 donated a blood sample. The seroprevalence of WNV in the Five Hills Health Region was 9.98% (95% CI 7.37-12.59%). Seropositivity of rural areas was 16.8% and urban was 3.2%. Most (97%) of participants thought WNV was an important health issue. Forty-eight percent of the participants used insect repellents containing DEET most of the time. There was good knowledge regarding WNV transmission and prevention of the spread of WNV. Rural compared to urban residents were six times more likely to be positive for WNV (OR=6.13, 95% CI 2.82-13.34). This is the highest seroprevalence rate of West Nile virus recorded in North America thus far. Many factors could have influenced this outbreak, such as eco-region, early prolonged hot weather, level of mosquito control programs, urban and rural community differences, and personal protective behaviours.

  15. Petrophysical and geotechnical properties of Lea Park Formation shale from Weyburn, Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, T.K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Environmental Engineering; Hawkes, C.D. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Geological Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The petrophysical and geotechnical properties of the shale rock found within the Leak Park Formation were characterized by testing preserved core samples from a well in a mature oil field in Weyburn Saskatchewan. EnCana Corporation has been using carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection at the well site since 2000 for enhanced oil recovery. The site is also the focus of a major international research project on carbon storage and monitoring. The objective of the testing program was to determine the potential for this formation to act as a barrier to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) leakage, in the event that CO{sub 2} injected into the Midale unit was to leak through the primary caprock that overlies the injection zone. The core samples had water contents of approximately 17 per cent by weight and a porosity of 22 per cent. Plastic and liquid limits were measured to be 22.5 and 94.7 per cent respectively. The shale consists mainly of quartz, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite. Results indicate that the Lea Park Formation is a relatively uniform, ultra low-permeability aquitard that should be effective for mitigating upwards migration of CO{sub 2}. The results of this testing program will also be useful in hydrogeological investigations of field-scale flow patterns in the Weyburn region, the design of drilling programs and drilling fluids for wells that penetrate the Lea Park Formation, and for geotechnical engineering projects that might use the Lea Park Formation as a construction material. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  16. Control of the floating potential fluctuations via limiter biasing in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Xiao, C.; Zhang, L.; Hirose, A.

    1994-11-01

    Limiter biasing experiments have been performed in the STOR-M tokamak (Saskatchewan Torus-Modified) [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3277 (1992)]. It is found that the floating potential fluctuation amplitudes in the scrape-off layer (SOL) depend mainly on the limiter potential and this potential determines the current flowing toward the limiter. The dependence of the fluctuation amplitude on the potential gradient in the SOL is rather weak. For positive limiter bias, a strong suppression of the floating potential fluctuation is observed, while for negative limiter biasing the floating potential fluctuations are significantly enhanced. The observed phenomena are consistent with recent theoretical studies [Phys. Fluids B 5, 3191 (1993)].

  17. Measurement of plasma rotation velocities with electrode biasing in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Jain, K. K.; Zhang, W.; Hirose, A.

    1994-07-01

    In the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3277 (1992)], application of a negative bias results in large negative radial electric field, Er, at the plasma edge, reduced plasma toroidal rotation velocity, and a large poloidal rotation in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. Conversely, a positive bias leads to a relatively small negative Er at the plasma edge, a positive Er in the scrape-off layer, increased toroidal rotation, and an increased poloidal rotation speed in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. Increases in edge plasma density and steepening of its radial profile have also been observed for both polarities.

  18. The Raising of Minimum Alcohol Prices in Saskatchewan, Canada: Impacts on Consumption and Implications for Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinhui; Giesbrecht, Norman; Macdonald, Scott; Thomas, Gerald; Wettlaufer, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We report impacts on alcohol consumption following new and increased minimum alcohol prices in Saskatchewan, Canada. Methods. We conducted autoregressive integrated moving average time series analyses of alcohol sales and price data from the Saskatchewan government alcohol monopoly for 26 periods before and 26 periods after the intervention. Results. A 10% increase in minimum prices significantly reduced consumption of beer by 10.06%, spirits by 5.87%, wine by 4.58%, and all beverages combined by 8.43%. Consumption of coolers decreased significantly by 13.2%, cocktails by 21.3%, and liqueurs by 5.3%. There were larger effects for purely off-premise sales (e.g., liquor stores) than for primarily on-premise sales (e.g., bars, restaurants). Consumption of higher strength beer and wine declined the most. A 10% increase in minimum price was associated with a 22.0% decrease in consumption of higher strength beer (> 6.5% alcohol/volume) versus 8.17% for lower strength beers. The neighboring province of Alberta showed no change in per capita alcohol consumption before and after the intervention. Conclusions. Minimum pricing is a promising strategy for reducing the public health burden associated with hazardous alcohol consumption. Pricing to reflect percentage alcohol content of drinks can shift consumption toward lower alcohol content beverage types. PMID:23078488

  19. The raising of minimum alcohol prices in Saskatchewan, Canada: impacts on consumption and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Tim; Zhao, Jinhui; Giesbrecht, Norman; Macdonald, Scott; Thomas, Gerald; Wettlaufer, Ashley

    2012-12-01

    We report impacts on alcohol consumption following new and increased minimum alcohol prices in Saskatchewan, Canada. We conducted autoregressive integrated moving average time series analyses of alcohol sales and price data from the Saskatchewan government alcohol monopoly for 26 periods before and 26 periods after the intervention. A 10% increase in minimum prices significantly reduced consumption of beer by 10.06%, spirits by 5.87%, wine by 4.58%, and all beverages combined by 8.43%. Consumption of coolers decreased significantly by 13.2%, cocktails by 21.3%, and liqueurs by 5.3%. There were larger effects for purely off-premise sales (e.g., liquor stores) than for primarily on-premise sales (e.g., bars, restaurants). Consumption of higher strength beer and wine declined the most. A 10% increase in minimum price was associated with a 22.0% decrease in consumption of higher strength beer (> 6.5% alcohol/volume) versus 8.17% for lower strength beers. The neighboring province of Alberta showed no change in per capita alcohol consumption before and after the intervention. Minimum pricing is a promising strategy for reducing the public health burden associated with hazardous alcohol consumption. Pricing to reflect percentage alcohol content of drinks can shift consumption toward lower alcohol content beverage types.

  20. "I'm On Home Ground Now. I'm Safe" Saskatchewan Aboriginal Veterans in the Immediate Postwar Years, 1945-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Robert Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In 1945 the Saskatchewan Aboriginal veterans from World War II returned to a rapidly changing world. The economy was improving dramatically as expanding industries encouraged unprecedented consumerism. In addition, new social values reflected an optimism for the elimination of the social inequality epitomized by Nazi Germany. The new social…

  1. Cooperative Development Gap in Québec and Saskatchewan 1980 to 2010: A Tale of Two Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitch Diamantopoulos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses Gramscian hegemony theory and the social movement approach to cooperative development to investigate the cooperative development gap that opened up between the provinces of Québec and Saskatchewan from 1980 to 2010. First, provincial sector growth is compared across several indices to establish this gap’s empirical scope and scale. Second, historical research and fieldwork findings are used to illuminate the gap’s origins and its historical significance. The article concludes that the development gap has been largely driven by bloc formation and dissolution—the historic erosion of Saskatchewan’s traditional, agrarian-cooperative bloc and the renewal and expansion of Québec’s social economy bloc. / Cette étude utilise la théorie de l’hégémonie de Gramsci et la méthode par le mouvement social pour le développement des coopératives afin d’enquêter sur l’écart qui s’est creusé entre les provinces du Québec et de la Saskatchewan de 1980 à 2010 en ce qui a trait au développement des coopératives. Tout d’abord, pour établir la portée et l’échelle empiriques de cet écart, cette étude compare la croissance de ce secteur entre les deux provinces. Ensuite, l’origine de l’écart et sa signification historique sont mis en lumière grâce aux recherches historiques et aux conclusions tirées de l’étude sur le terrain. Finalement, il est conclut dans cet article que l’écart de développement a été majoritairement créé par la formation et la dissolution de blocs – l’érosion par le temps du bloc coopératif agraire traditionnel de la Saskatchewan ainsi que le renouveau et l’expansion du bloc d’économie sociale du Québec.

  2. How early can the seeding dates of spring wheat be under current and future climate in Saskatchewan, Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Wang, Hong; Qian, Budong; McConkey, Brian; DePauw, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Shorter growing season and water stress near wheat maturity are the main factors that presumably limit the yield potential of spring wheat due to late seeding in Saskatchewan, Canada. Advancing seeding dates can be a strategy to help producers mitigate the impact of climate change on spring wheat. It is unknown, however, how early farmers can seed while minimizing the risk of spring frost damage and the soil and machinery constraints. This paper explores early seeding dates of spring wheat on the Canadian Prairies under current and projected future climate. To achieve this, (i) weather records from 1961 to 1990 were gathered at three sites with different soil and climate conditions in Saskatchewan, Canada; (ii) four climate databases that included a baseline (treated as historic weather climate during the period of 1961-1990) and three climate change scenarios (2040-2069) developed by the Canadian global climate model (GCM) with the forcing of three greenhouse gas (GHG) emission scenarios (A2, A1B and B1); (iii) seeding dates of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under baseline and projected future climate were predicted. Compared with the historical record of seeding dates, the predicted seeding dates were advanced under baseline climate for all sites using our seeding date model. Driven by the predicted temperature increase of the scenarios compared with baseline climate, all climate change scenarios projected significantly earlier seeding dates than those currently used. Compared to the baseline conditions, there is no reduction in grain yield because precipitation increases during sensitive growth stages of wheat, suggesting that there is potential to shift seeding to an earlier date. The average advancement of seeding dates varied among sites and chosen scenarios. The Swift Current (south-west) site has the highest potential for earlier seeding (7 to 11 days) whereas such advancement was small in the Melfort (north-east, 2 to 4 days) region. The extent of

  3. The Saskatchewan River Basin - a large scale observatory for transdisciplinary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.

    2012-12-01

    Water resources are under pressure world-wide and face unprecedented challenges - from population growth, economic development, pollution and environmental change. Further, effective water management is becoming increasingly complex, requiring deep understanding of aquatic and terrestrial environments, their vulnerabilities to environmental change, and water management and protection challenges. Important science challenges arise in understanding and managing environmental change. However, with increasing pressures on the environment, it is necessary to recognise the effects of human interventions; flows in many major rivers are strongly affected by operational water management, and large-scale agricultural land management change can affect hydrology, land-atmosphere feedbacks, water quality and habitats. There is a need to represent effects on river flows and groundwater of management decisions, and more generally to understand impacts of policy, governance and societal values on water futures. This research agenda poses important challenges to the science community. Observational data are necessary, across multiple scales, to understand environmental change. This requires focussed research at intensively monitored sites and small watersheds to improve process understanding and fine-scale models. To understand large-scale effects on river flows and quality, land-atmosphere feedbacks, and regional climate, integrated monitoring, modelling and analysis is needed at large basin scale. And to support water management, new tools are needed for operational management and scenario-based planning that can be implemented across multiple scales and multiple jurisdictions. The 340,000 km2 Saskatchewan River Basin (SRB) is being developed as a large scale observatory to support a new level of integration of interdisciplinary science. In one of the most extreme and variable climates in the world, we are developing state-of-the-art hydro-ecological experimental sites in the

  4. Integrating strategic environmental assessment with industry planning: a case study of the Pasquai-Porcupine forest management plan, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Bram F

    2004-03-01

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) is gaining widespread recognition as a tool for integrating environmental considerations in policy, plan, and program development and decision-making. Notwithstanding the potential of SEA to improve higher-order decision processes, there has been very little attention given to integrating SEA with industry planning practices. As a result, the benefits of SEA have yet to be fully realized among industrial proponents. That said, SEA practice is ongoing, albeit informally and often under a different label, and is proving to be a valuable tool for industry planning and decision-making. Based on a case study of the Pasquai-Porcupine forest management plan in Saskatchewan, Canada, this paper illustrates how an integrated approach to SEA can contribute to industry environmental decision-making and can enhance the quality and deliverability of industry plans.

  5. Historypin for Library Image Collections: New Modes of Access for Unique Materials at the University of Saskatchewan Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Harkema

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A combination of user needs and an evolving information landscape make it imperative for libraries to plan for and initiate digital projects with interface in mind. To meet the needs of a wide range of digital library users, supplementary interfaces should be considered from the beginning of a project rather than simply adding an out-of-the-box interface with basic search functionality. This paper discusses the theoretical and practical considerations of selecting or implementing interfaces for the exploration of library content. It uses the University Library, University of Saskatchewan as a case study, drawing on, in particular, the use of Historypin as a way to geolocate and interact with the Library's Postcard Collection.

  6. University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC): an assessment of its utility for teaching diagnostic imaging in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil; Malin, Greg; Trinder, Krista; Pinelle, David

    2015-01-01

    We have found it very challenging to integrate images from our radiology digital imaging repository into the curriculum of our local medical school. Thus, it has been difficult to convey important knowledge related to viewing and interpreting diagnostic radiology images. We sought to determine if we could create a solution for this problem and evaluate whether students exposed to this solution were able to learn imaging concepts pertinent to medical practice. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a novel interactive web application that enables preclinical medical students to acquire image interpretation skills fundamental to clinical practice. This web application reformats content stored in Medical Imaging Resource Center teaching cases for BlackBoard Learn™, a popular learning management system. We have deployed this solution for 2 successive years in a 1st-year basic sciences medical school course at the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. The "courseware" content covers both normal anatomy and common clinical pathologies in five distinct modules. We created two cohorts of learners consisting of an intervention cohort of students who had used USRC for their 1st academic year, whereas the nonintervention cohort was students who had not been exposed to this learning opportunity. To assess the learning experience of the users we designed an online questionnaire and image review quiz delivered to both of the student groups. Comparisons between the groups revealed statistically significant differences in both confidence with image interpretation and the ability to answer knowledge-based questions. Students were satisfied with the overall usability, functions, and capabilities of USRC. USRC is an innovative technology that provides integration between Medical Imaging Resource Center, a teaching solution used in radiology, and a Learning Management System.

  7. Derivation of no-effect and reference-level sediment quality values for application at Saskatchewan uranium operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett-Seidel, Charlene; Liber, Karsten

    2013-11-01

    To date, the majority of empirical approaches used to derive sediment quality values (SQVs) have focused on metal concentrations in sediment associated with adverse effects on benthic invertebrate communities. Here, we propose the no-effect (NE) approach. This SQV derivation methodology uses metal concentrations in sediment associated with unaffected benthic communities (i.e., from reference sites and lightly contaminated no-effect sites) and accounts for local benthic invertebrate tolerance and potential chemical interactions at no-effect exposure sites. This NE approach was used to propose alternative regional SQVs for uranium operations in northern Saskatchewan. Three different sets of NE values were derived using different combinations of benthic invertebrate community effects criteria (abundance, richness, evenness, Bray-Curtis index). Additionally, reference values were derived based solely on sediment metal concentrations from reference sites. In general, NE values derived using abundance, richness, and evenness (NE1 and NE2 values) were found to be higher than the NE values derived using all four metrics (NE3 values). Derived NE values for Cr, Cu, Pb, and V did not change with the incorporation of additional effects criteria due to a lack of influence from the uranium operations on the concentrations of these metals in sediment. However, a gradient of exposure concentrations was apparent for As, Mo, Ni, Se, and U in sediment which allowed for tolerable exposure levels of these metals in sediment to be defined. The findings from this assessment have suggested a range of new, alternate metal SQVs for use at uranium operations in northern Saskatchewan.

  8. The role of farm operational and rural environments as potential risk factors for pediatric asthma in rural Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Rebecca J; Pickett, William; Rennie, Donna C; Dosman, James A; Pahwa, Punam; Hagel, Louise; Karunanayake, Chandima; Lawson, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    Researchers have historically reported that farm children have a lower prevalence of asthma compared to more urban children. Potential explanations include theories surrounding differences in personal factors, access to health care, engagement in health risk behaviors, and differences in the environment. The aims of this study were to: (1) confirm whether the prevalence of asthma varies between farm and small town status among children living in Saskatchewan; (2) identify risk and protective factors for asthma, and use this information to infer which of the above theories is most explanatory for any observed geographic variations in pediatric asthma. Rural students (N = 2383, 42% participation rate) from the province of Saskatchewan participated in a 2011 cross-sectional study. Parents completed a survey that included questions about location of residence, respiratory symptoms, potential risk factors for respiratory disease, and exposures to farm activities. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine relations between respiratory outcomes (asthma, wheeze) with farm type and farm activities, while accounting for factors that may underlie such relations. Asthma and wheeze prevalence did not differ by residential status. Living on a grain farm (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.43-0.96), cleaning or playing in pens (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.46-1.02), filling grain bins (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.32-0.96), and riding horses (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.40-1.05) were protective factors for ever diagnosis with asthma. We identified a number of risk and protective factors for asthma and associated wheeze. This suggests the need to focus on specific environmental explanations to better understand previously observed associations between farm residential status and asthma. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Socio-hydrology and the science-policy interface: a case study of the Saskatchewan River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gober, P.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-04-01

    While there is a popular perception that Canada is a water-rich country, the Saskatchewan River basin (SRB) in Western Canada exemplifies the multiple threats to water security seen worldwide. It is Canada's major food-producing region and home to globally significant natural resource development. The SRB faces current water challenges stemming from (1) a series of extreme events, including major flood and drought events since the turn of the 21st century, (2) full allocation of existing water resources in parts of the basin, (3) rapid population growth and economic development, (4) increasing pollution, and (5) fragmented and overlapping governance that includes the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, various Federal and First Nations responsibilities, and international boundaries. The interplay of these factors has increased competition for water across economic sectors and among provinces, between upstream and downstream users, between environmental flows and human needs, and among people who hold different values about the meaning, ownership, and use of water. These current challenges are set in a context of significant environmental and societal change, including widespread land modification, rapid urbanization, resource exploitation, climate warming, and deep uncertainties about future water supplies. We use Sivapalan et al.'s (2012) framework of socio-hydrology to argue that the SRB's water security challenges are symptoms of dynamic and complex water systems approaching critical thresholds and tipping points. To Sivapalan et al.'s (2012) emphasis on water cycle dynamics, we add the need for governance mechanisms to manage emergent systems and translational science to link science and policy to the socio-hydrology agenda.

  10. Anthropometric indices of First Nations children and youth on first entry to Manitoba/Saskatchewan residential schools—1919 to 1953

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Paul Hackett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: First Nations people are experiencing increasing rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes but no anthropometric information exists from before the 1950s to provide context to these epidemics. Objective: To compare anthropometric indices of First Nations children and youth on first entering residential schools with historical and contemporary reference groups. Methods: This observational cross-sectional study used archival records from the Department of Indian Affairs to calculate body mass index (BMI, height for age (HA and weight for age (WA of all known children and youth undergoing physical examinations on first entering residential schools in Saskatchewan and Manitoba from 1919 to 1953. Proportions of children and youth in each BMI category were determined by age, sex, time period and residential school. Z-scores for HA and WA were determined by age group and sex. Finally, median heights and weights were compared with a non-Indigenous cohort from the 1953 Canadian survey. Results: On admission to residential schools, 1,767 First Nations children and youth (847 boys, 920 girls were more likely to have normal BMIs (79.8% than Canadian children and youth today (66.5%, but lower rates of overweight/obesity (10.9% vs. 32.0% and higher rates of underweight (9.3% vs. −2, age-specific median heights tended to be higher than Canadian children and youth in 1953. Under 3% of children and youth had WA Z-scores of >−2. Conclusions: A large majority of First Nations children and youth exhibited normal anthropometric indices on first entering residential schools in Manitoba and Saskatchewan from 1919 to 1953. These historical findings provide an important context to the current epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes and suggest that the nutritional conditions in these First Nations children's communities were satisfactory during the residential school era.

  11. A 5-year study of the incidence and economic impact of variant infectious bursal disease viruses on broiler production in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachar, Tara; Popowich, Shelly; Goodhope, Bob; Knezacek, Tennille; Ojkic, Davor; Willson, Philip; Ahmed, Khawaja Ashfaque; Gomis, Susantha

    2016-01-01

    While the prevalence of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) on chicken farms in some provinces of Canada has been documented, the economic impact of variant IBDV infection on the broiler chicken industry in Saskatchewan has not. The objectives of this study were to identify the variant strains of IBDV circulating on Saskatchewan chicken farms and evaluate their economic impact on broiler production. Infection due to IBDV was detected in 43% of Saskatchewan chicken farms, with variant strains detected in infected birds closely related predominantly to NC171, 586, and Delaware-E. Infected flocks showed an IBDV antibody titer of 4236 geometric mean (GM), whereas an antibody titer of 157 GM was measured in uninfected flocks. Infected flocks had very low (0.06) bursa-to-body-weight (BBW) ratio (an indicator of immunity) compared to high BBW ratio (0.17) in uninfected flocks, which suggests a significant immunosuppression in the former. Flocks positive for IBDV had mean mortality of 8.6% and mean condemnation of 1.5%. In contrast, mean mortality in uninfected flocks was 6.1% and mean condemnation was 1.1%. The live market weight per grow area at 37 d of age was 29.3 kg/m2 in infected flocks and 34.0 kg/m2 in flocks without IBDV infection. Flock mortality and condemnation rate were positively correlated with IBDV infection, whereas low BBW ratio was inversely correlated, as expected. Overall, IBDV-infected flocks had higher mortality, bursal atrophy, poorer feed conversion ratio (FCR), and decreased meat production. Our data suggest that the broiler chicken industry in Saskatchewan loses 3.9 million kilograms of meat production per year due to variant IBDV strains. PMID:27733779

  12. A 5-year study of the incidence and economic impact of variant infectious bursal disease viruses on broiler production in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachar, Tara; Popowich, Shelly; Goodhope, Bob; Knezacek, Tennille; Ojkic, Davor; Willson, Philip; Ahmed, Khawaja Ashfaque; Gomis, Susantha

    2016-10-01

    While the prevalence of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) on chicken farms in some provinces of Canada has been documented, the economic impact of variant IBDV infection on the broiler chicken industry in Saskatchewan has not. The objectives of this study were to identify the variant strains of IBDV circulating on Saskatchewan chicken farms and evaluate their economic impact on broiler production. Infection due to IBDV was detected in 43% of Saskatchewan chicken farms, with variant strains detected in infected birds closely related predominantly to NC171, 586, and Delaware-E. Infected flocks showed an IBDV antibody titer of 4236 geometric mean (GM), whereas an antibody titer of 157 GM was measured in uninfected flocks. Infected flocks had very low (0.06) bursa-to-body-weight (BBW) ratio (an indicator of immunity) compared to high BBW ratio (0.17) in uninfected flocks, which suggests a significant immunosuppression in the former. Flocks positive for IBDV had mean mortality of 8.6% and mean condemnation of 1.5%. In contrast, mean mortality in uninfected flocks was 6.1% and mean condemnation was 1.1%. The live market weight per grow area at 37 d of age was 29.3 kg/m 2 in infected flocks and 34.0 kg/m 2 in flocks without IBDV infection. Flock mortality and condemnation rate were positively correlated with IBDV infection, whereas low BBW ratio was inversely correlated, as expected. Overall, IBDV-infected flocks had higher mortality, bursal atrophy, poorer feed conversion ratio (FCR), and decreased meat production. Our data suggest that the broiler chicken industry in Saskatchewan loses 3.9 million kilograms of meat production per year due to variant IBDV strains.

  13. Impacts of climate and land use changes on regional nutrient export in the South Saskatchewan River catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Marin, L. A.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Climate and land use changes modify the physical functioning of river catchments and, in particular, influence the transport of nutrients from land to water. In large-scale catchments, where a variety of climates, topographies, soil types and land uses co-exist to form a highly heterogeneous environment, a more complex nutrient dynamic is imposed by climate and land use changes. This is the case of the South Saskatchewan River (SSR) that, along with the North Saskatchewan River, forms the largest river system in western Canada. In the past years changes in the land use and new industrial developments in the SSR area have heightened serious concerns about the future of water quality in the catchment and downstream waters. Agricultural activities have increased the supply of manure and fertilizer for cropping. Oil and gas exploitation has also increased the risk of surface water and groundwater contamination. The rapid population growth not only leads to increments in water consumption and wastewater, but in the construction of roads, railways and the expansion of new urban developments that impose hydraulic controls on the catchment hydrology and therefore the sediment and nutrient transport. Consequences of the actual anthropogenic changes have been notorious in reservoirs where algal blooms and signs of eutrophication have become common during certain times of the year. Although environmental agencies are constantly improving the mechanisms to reduce nutrient export into the river and ensure safe water quality standards, further research is needed in order to identify major nutrient sources and quantify nutrient export and also, to assess how nutrients are going to vary as a result of future climate and land use change scenarios. The SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) model is therefore implemented to assess water quality regionally, in order to describe spatial and temporal patterns to identify those factors and processes that affect water

  14. Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms and depression after exposure to the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show disaster: prevalence and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Carleton, R Nicholas; Brundin, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute distress-that is, clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depression-and to identify predictors of each in a sample of people who witnessed a fatal aircraft collision at the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show. Air Show attendees (N = 157) were recruited by advertisements in the local media and completed an Internet-administered battery of questionnaires. Based on previously established cut-offs, 22 percent respondents had clinically significant PTSS and 24 percent had clinically significant depressive symptoms. Clinically significant symptoms were associated with posttrauma impairment in social and occupational functioning. Acute distress was associated with several variables, including aspects of Air Show trauma exposure, severity of prior trauma exposure, low posttrauma social support (ie, negative responses by others), indices of poor coping (eg, intolerance of uncertainty, rumination about the trauma), and elevated scores on anxiety sensitivity, the personality trait of absorption, and dissociative tendencies. Results suggest that clinically significant acute distress is common in the aftermath of witnessed trauma. The statistical predictors (correlates) of acute distress were generally consistent with the results of studies of other forms of trauma. People with elevated scores on theoretical vulnerability factors (eg, elevated anxiety sensitivity) were particularly likely to develop acute distress.

  15. Bioassays with caged hyalella azteca to determine in situ toxicity downstream of two Saskatchewan, Canada, uranium operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Erin L; Liber, Karsten

    2007-11-01

    The main objectives of this in situ study were to evaluate the usefulness of an in situ bioassay to determine if downstream water bodies at the Key Lake and Rabbit Lake uranium operations (Saskatchewan, Canada) were toxic to Hyalella azteca and, if toxicity was observed, to differentiate between the contribution of surface water and sediment contamination to in situ toxicity. These objectives were achieved by performing 4-d in situ bioassays with laboratory-reared H. azteca confined in specially designed, paired, surface water and sediment exposure chambers. Results from the in situ bioassays revealed significant mortality, relative to the respective reference site, at the exposure sites at both Key Lake (p azteca at both operations, although this relationship was stronger at Key Lake. At Key Lake, the primary cause of aquatic toxicity to H. azteca did not appear to be correlated with the variables measured in this study, but most likely with a pulse of organic mill-process chemicals released during the time of the in situ study-a transient event that was caused by a problem with the mill's solvent extraction process. The suspected cause of in situ toxicity to H. azteca at Rabbit Lake was high levels of uranium in surface water, sediment, and pore water.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Saskatchewan, Canada: utility of NG-MAST in predicting antimicrobial susceptibility regionally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sidharath D; Levett, Paul N; Horsman, Gregory B; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology of isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Saskatchewan, Canada, using Neisseria gonorrhoeae multi antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), and to assess associations between antimicrobial susceptibility (AMS) and specific strain types (STs). 320 consecutive gonococcal isolates, collected between 2003 and 2008, were typed by NG-MAST. STs were grouped if one of their alleles was common and the other differed by ≤1% in DNA sequence. AMS was determined by agar dilution (CLSI) to seven antibiotics. N gonorrhoeae isolates were resolved into 82 individual NG-MAST STs and 18 NG-MAST ST groups with groups 25, 3655, 921, 3654, 3657 and 3656 comprising 53.4% (171/320) of the isolates. N gonorrhoeae isolates susceptible to all the tested antimicrobials were significantly (pgonorrhoeae AMS and NG-MAST STs were identified and may be useful in predicting AMS regionally. Because STs in different countries vary considerably, the use of NG-MAST for the prediction of AMS globally requires further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Tracking Dietary Patterns over 20 Years from Childhood through Adolescence into Young Adulthood: The Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movassagh, Elham Z; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Kontulainen, Saija; Whiting, Susan J; Vatanparast, Hassanali

    2017-09-08

    Dietary patterns established during adolescence might play a role in adulthood disease. We examined the stability of dietary patterns (DPs) from childhood through adolescence and into young adulthood (from age 8 to 34 years). Data from 130 participants (53 females) of Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (aged 8-15 years, at baseline) were included. Multiple 24-h recalls were collected annually from 1991 to 1997, 2002 to 2005, and 2010 and 2011. Using principal component analysis, "Vegetarian-style", "Western-like", "High-fat, high-protein", "Mixed", and "Snack" DPs were derived at baseline. Applied DP scores for all annual measurements were calculated using factor loading of baseline DPs and energy-adjusted food group intakes. We analyzed data using generalized estimating equations. The tracking coefficient represents correlation between baseline dietary pattern scores and all other follow-up dietary pattern scores. We found a moderate tracking for the "Vegetarian-style" (β = 0.44, p adulthood showed an increasing trend in adherence to "Vegetarian-style" DP and decreasing trend in adherence to "High-fat, high-protein" DP by age in both sexes (p adulthood.

  18. Relationship between water quality parameters and bacterial indicators in a large prairie reservoir: Lake Diefenbaker, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R L; Khan, N H; Ahsan, M; Prestie, C; Korber, D R; Lawrence, J R; Hudson, J J

    2014-04-01

    Lake Diefenbaker (LD) is a large reservoir on the South Saskatchewan River used for agricultural irrigation, drinking water, and recreation. Our objectives were to determine the distribution and abundance of bacterial indicators in embayments and the main channel of LD and to relate these to environmental factors. Total coliforms (TCs), fecal coliforms (FCs), and fecal indicator bacteria (i.e., Escherichia coli) were measured concurrently with water quality parameters. Although TCs, FCs, and E. coli were present in LD, they rarely exceeded the TC and FC Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) water quality standards for agricultural use (1000 colony-forming units (CFU) per 100 mL and 100 CFU per 100 mL, respectively). The correlation between the bacterial indicators in the sediments and the water column indicates that higher embayment abundances may be related to sediment loading and (or) resuspension events in these frequently mixed embayments. With higher water temperatures and water levels, as well as higher microbial activity, CCME bacterial limits may be exceeded. The greatest contributor to bacterial indicator abundance was water temperature. We predict that water quality standards will be exceeded more frequently with climate warming.

  19. Evaluation of sediment quality guidelines derived using the screening-level concentration approach for application at uranium operations in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett-Seidel, Charlene; Liber, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) can be derived using different approaches and are commonly used in environmental management, reclamation, and risk assessment. The screening-level concentration (SLC) approach has been used in Ontario, Canada, to derive lowest effect levels (LELs) and severe effect levels for use as SQGs. This approach was adopted by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to set guidelines for metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni, Se, U, and V) and radionuclides (Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210) in sediment at northern Saskatchewan uranium mining and milling operations. The SLC approach is based on total metal and radionuclide concentrations in sediment, and corresponding benthic community composition data for a specific sampling site. In this study, sediment chemistry (total metals and radionuclides) and benthic community data from northern Saskatchewan uranium operations were compiled and examined. Results indicate that the CNSC-derived SQGs had limited relationships to observed effects, or lack thereof, on benthic invertebrate communities near uranium operations in Saskatchewan. The LELs were found to correctly align with effects at 95% of the sites that had effects, on a general basis, but on an element-specific basis many of the elements had concentrations at effect sites below their LELs. Furthermore, concentrations of the evaluated elements exceeded at least one LEL at 60% of the no-effect sites. The high number of exceedences of LELs at reference and no-effect sites (false-positives) calls to question the appropriateness of the CNSC-derived SQGs. It is suggested that alternatives to the SLC approach be explored.

  20. Association of increased rate of condemnation of broiler carcasses due to hepatic abnormalities with immunosuppressive diseases in the broiler chicken industry in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Keyvan; Zachar, Tara; Popowich, Shelly; Knezacek, Tennille; Goodhope, Bob; Willson, Philip; Gomis, Susantha

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the causative agents of hepatitis observed in broiler chickens at processing. Livers of chickens from 16 broiler farms in Saskatchewan with gross lesions of hepatitis were collected at processing. In addition to routine bacterial isolation and histopathological examination, serologic studies for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) and Chicken anaemia virus (CAV), calculation of the ratio of the weight of the bursa of Fabricius (BF) to body weight (BBW), and histopathological examination of the BF were done. Of the 264 livers with gross lesions, 83% had multifocal to coalescing necrotizing hepatitis, 16% had perihepatitis, and 1% had hemorrhages. No definitive causative microorganisms were isolated from the hepatic lesions; however, no significant bacterial isolations were made. Bursal atrophy, low BBW ratio, and high titer of antibody against IBDV each correlated with the rate of total condemnations (P = 0.0188, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0073, respectively). Nucleotide sequencing of IBDV isolated from the BF identified the variant strains Delaware-E and 586. Condemnation because of hepatic lesions was correlated with titer of antibody against IBDV and BBW (P = 0.016 and P = 0.027). The results of this study demonstrate that hepatic lesions in Saskatchewan chickens are not currently caused by a primary bacterial pathogen but are associated with indicators of immunosuppression that is likely due to variant IBDV.

  1. Magnetotelluric and Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Pre-Injection Study of Aquistore CO2 Sequestration Site, Near Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, J.; McLeod, J.; Ferguson, I. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Aquistore project is a large-scale CO2 sequestration operation at Estevan, southeast Saskatchewan, Canada. CO2 is being captured from the Boundary Dam power station, and injected to the base of the Phanerozoic Williston Basin, to be stored in a saline aquifer at 3.4 km depth. In this study, magnetotelluric (MT) and surface controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods are tested in a pre-injection setting at Aquistore for their applicability to sequestration monitoring goals. The MT and CSEM methods are complimentary in their ability to resolve structures at different scales using different current systems. Pre-injection MT soundings were conducted in 2013, 2014 and 2015 over a 2.5 km × 8.5 km area surrounding the Aquistore injection well. The Phanerozoic MT response is spatially uniform across the survey area. The resistivity structure of the Phanerozoic is one-dimensional from 0.001 to 10 s: the apparent resistivity decreases from 8 Ωm to 2 Ωm in this period range. Spectral and polarization analyses indicate that broadband noise in period bands of 0.05 to 1 s and 0.0077 to 0.0125 s recorded in 2014 is associated with a CO2 pipeline. At frequencies outside these bands, the MT responses define small differences between surveys (response from these datasets and constraints from a resistivity well-log, a representative 18-layer 1D resistivity model for the Williston Basin sedimentary sequence has been recovered. CSEM surveys in 2013 and 2015 used a 1 km, 30 A electric horizontal dipole source. Recordings of the radial electric field component were made along an inline receiver profile from 3.5 to 9.5 km offsets. Preliminary characterization of these recordings indicates that the transmitted signals are observable at each of the profile locations. Fréchet derivatives of the CSEM response indicate that response sensitivity to changes in the Williston Basin electrical properties is attainable at the level of the reservoir. Low induction number soundings

  2. Prevalence, risk factors and co-morbidities of diabetes among adults in rural Saskatchewan: the influence of farm residence and agriculture-related exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyck Roland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although rural Canadians are reported to have higher rates of diabetes than others, little is known about the relative influence of known versus agriculture-related risk factors. The purpose of this research was to carry out a comprehensive study of prevalence, risk factors and co-morbidities of diabetes among adults in rural Saskatchewan and to determine possible differences between those living on and off farms. Methods In 2010, we conducted a baseline mail-out survey (Saskatchewan Rural Health Study of 11,982 households located in the province′s four agricultural quadrants. In addition to self-reported physician-diagnosed diabetes, the questionnaire collected information from farm and small town cohorts on possible diabetes determinants including lifestyle, family history, early life factors and environmental/agricultural-related exposures. Clustering effect within households was adjusted using Generalized Estimating Equations approach. Results Responses were obtained from 4624 (42% households comprising 8208 males and females aged 18 years or older and 7847 self-described Caucasian participants (7708 with complete information. The overall age-standardized diabetes prevalence for the latter was 6.35% but people whose primary residence was on farms had significantly lower diabetes prevalence than those living in non-farm locations (5.11% versus 7.33% respectively; p′ 1.63, 4.04 compared to those aged 18–45. Other known independent risk factors included family history of diabetes (OR 2.50 [CI′s 1.94, 3.23] if father; OR 3.11 [CI′s 2.44, 3.98] if mother, obesity (OR 2.66; CI′s 1.86, 3.78, as well as lower socioeconomic status, minimal/no alcohol intake and smoking. The most original finding was that exposure to insecticides conferred an increased risk for diabetes among males (OR 1.83; CI′s 1.15, 2.91. Finally, the co-morbidities with the strongest independent association with diabetes were heart disease and

  3. Hydrometric, Chemical, and Multi-Isotope Approaches to Assess the Water Balance and the Sources and Fate of Nitrate and Sulfate in the South Saskatchewan River Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, B.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Ferguson, P. R.; Rock, L.; McCallum, J. E.; Veizer, J.

    2006-12-01

    River water, seasonally sampled at 25 stations along the South Saskatchewan River and its tributaries between the headwaters in Alberta and mouth near Prince Albert (Saskatchewan), was analyzed for its chemical and isotopic composition (δ2H, δ18O, δ13CDIC, δ15Nnitrate, δ18Onitrate, δ34Ssulfate, δ18Osulfate). Using a water-isotope mass balance approach we estimated that circa 7% (35 mm) of the annual precipitation (490 mm) in the watershed is subject to evaporation, while circa 51% (247 mm) is returned to the atmosphere via transpiration. In order to identify the sources and the fate of sulfate and nitrate along the river, riverine sulfate and nitrate fluxes were calculated by combining hydrometric data with concentration measurements. Sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen isotope measurements were used to determine the causes of marked changes in sulfate and nitrate fluxes with increasing flow distance. Geologic (evaporite) sulfate was the predominant sulfate source in the headwaters, while sulfate from anthropogenic sources in urban areas and from pyrite oxidation in the tills of agricultural regions caused markedly elevated sulfate fluxes with increasing distance. Nitrate fluxes in the headwater section were low and N and O stable isotope data indicated that the nitrate was mainly derived from nitrification in forest soils. With increasing flow distance, there was clear evidence of nitrate loading from municipal waste water sources. Downstream of major urban centers, nitrate flux data indicated active nitrogen assimilation particularly during the summer months. There was also evidence for influx of manure-derived nitrate with agricultural return flows in some areas of the South Saskatchewan River basin. Additional tracer techniques (e.g. B isotopes) would have been desirable to better differentiate nitrate loading from urban and agricultural sources. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that stable isotope techniques are an effective tool for constraining water

  4. Acid Deposition Simulations for Alberta, Saskatchewan, and the Canadian Oil Sands, using the Global Environmental Multiscale - Modelling Air-quality and CHemistry (GEM-MACH) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Paul; Akingunola, Ayodeji; Moran, Michael; Wong, Isaac; Aherne, Julian; Hayden, Katherine; Li, Shao-Meng; Zhang, Junhua; Baratzedah, Pegha; Pabla, Balbir; Cheung, Philip; Cole, Amanda; Kirk, Jane; Scott, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The Global Environmental Multiscale - Modelling Air-quality and CHemistry (GEM-MACH) system (version 2) was used to carry out simulations of acid deposition for the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. These model predictions include the hourly deposition of four sulphur and eleven nitrogen containing species (SO2(g), HSO3(-)(aq) , SO4(2-)(aq), particulate sulphate, and NH3(g), NO2(g), HNO3(g), NH4(+)(aq), NO3(-)(aq), HONO(g), PAN(g), HNO4(g), particulate nitrate, particulate ammonium, and gaseous organic nitrate, respectively). A two-bin aerosol size distribution configuration of GEM-MACH was used to estimate the annual deposition of these chemicals, for the period August 1, 2013 through July 31, 2014, at two resolutions—a 10km resolution North American domain and a 2.5km resolution Alberta and Saskatchewan domain. The model estimates of acid deposition from both resolutions (version 2), were used to determine the relative contributions of the different species towards total sulphur and nitrogen deposition, and to evaluate the effect of model resolution on estimates of acid deposition. The potential ecosystem impacts of acid deposition were examined via comparison of model-predicted total deposition to different sources of sulphur and nitrogen critical load data, for forest and lake ecosystems in northern Alberta and Saskatchewan. The deposition estimates were compared to observations of snowpack sulphur and nitrogen ions, collected during the winter of 2013. The processes underlying acidifying deposition in the vicinity of the Canadian oil sands were examined in more detail using the 12-bin aerosol size distribution configuration of GEM-MACH (version 2), for a period from mid-August to mid-September 2013. This time period corresponds to an aircraft measurement intensive campaign designed to examine emissions, transportation, and deposition associated with air pollution sources in the Canadian oil sands. Multiple model simulation scenarios were

  5. Rural and remote dementia care challenges and needs: perspectives of formal and informal care providers residing in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina P M; Cammer, Allison; Morgan, Debra; Stewart, Norma; Kosteniuk, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Rural and remote settings pose particular healthcare and service delivery challenges. Providing appropriate care and support for individuals with dementia and their families living in these communities is especially difficult, and can only be accomplished when the needs of care providers and the context and complexity of care provision are understood. This paper describes formal and informal caregivers' perceptions of the challenges and needs in providing care and support for individuals with dementia living in rural and remote areas of Saskatchewan, Canada. A mixed-methods exploratory approach was used to examine caregivers' needs. This research was a component of a broader process evaluation designed to inform the initial and ongoing development of a community-based participatory research program in rural dementia care, which included the development of the Rural and Remote Memory Clinic (RRMC). Four approaches were used for data collection and analyses: (1) thematic analysis of consultation meetings with rural healthcare providers: documented discussions from consultation meetings that occurred in 2003-2004 with rural physicians and healthcare providers regarding plans for a new RRMC were analysed thematically; (2) telephone and mail questionnaires: consultation meeting participants completed a subsequent telephone or mail questionnaire (2003-2004) that was analysed descriptively; (3) thematic analysis of referral letters to the Rural and Remote Memory Clinic: physician referral letters over a five-year period (2003-2008) were analysed descriptively and thematically; and (4) examination of family caregiver satisfaction: four specific baseline questionnaire questions completed by family caregivers (2007-2010) were analysed descriptively and thematically. Both physician and non-physician healthcare providers identified increased facilities and care programs as needs. Physicians were much more likely than other providers to report available support services for

  6. Sturdy fungi : researchers at the University of Saskatchewan say inoculating plants with spores prior to reclamation planting will give them a more efficient future in tailings areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentein, J.

    2010-09-15

    A cost-effective method of reclaiming oil sands mining sites may also hold the potential for growing crops on dry soils without the need for fertilizers or irrigation. The method is currently being researched by a University of Saskatchewan professor who initially noted species that had taken root at an oil sands tailings site. The professor has collected and analyzed dandelions and other plants from areas in the Arctic archipelago to study the characteristics that enable them to live in harsh conditions. The fungi colonizing the roots of plants taken from 3 oil sands tailings sites have been analyzed to determine their role in increasing the survival rates of plants at the disturbed sites. Planting of the primary successors with the appropriate fungi will help to establish an environment where diverse ecological successors can survive. The approach may also be used to grow plants in arid and unusable lands. 2 figs.

  7. Trends in prevalence, incidence and pharmacologic management of diabetes mellitus among seniors newly admitted to long-term care facilities in Saskatchewan between 2003 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsabbagh, Mhd Wasem; Mansell, Kerry; Lix, Lisa M; Teare, Gary; Shevchuk, Yvonne; Lu, Xinya; Champagne, Anne; Blackburn, David F

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to describe trends in the prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus and also report the overall use of diabetes medications among patients newly admitted to a long-term care facility (LTCF). A retrospective cohort study was done using health administrative databases in Saskatchewan. Eligible patients were newly admitted to LTCF in Saskatchewan between 2003 and 2011 and maintained LTCF residency for at least 6 months. Prevalence of diabetes was defined with physician or hospital claims in the 2 years preceding admission. Antihyperglycemic medication use was estimated from prescription claims data during the first 6 months after LTCF admission. All data were descriptively analyzed. The validated case definition for diabetes (≥2 diagnostic claims) in the 2 years before or 6 months after admission was met by 16.9% of patients (2471 of 14,624). An additional 965 patients (6.6%) had a single diabetes diagnostic claim or antihyperglycemic prescriptions only. Among patients receiving antihyperglycemic therapies, 64.9% (1518 of 2338) were exclusively managed with oral medications, and metformin was the most commonly used medication. Glyburide was commonly withdrawn after LTCF admission. Insulin use was observed in 23.9% of diabetes patients, with a mean daily average consumption of 54.7 units per day. Use of diabetes medications appear to generally align with Canadian practice recommendations as evidenced by declining use of glyburide and frequent use of metformin. Future studies should examine clinical benefits and safety of hypoglycemic agent use in LTCFs. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tree-ring-based estimates of long-term seasonal precipitation in the Souris River Region of Saskatchewan, North Dakota and Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Vecchia, Skip V.; Akyüz, F. Adnan; Lin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Historically unprecedented flooding occurred in the Souris River Basin of Saskatchewan, North Dakota and Manitoba in 2011, during a longer term period of wet conditions in the basin. In order to develop a model of future flows, there is a need to evaluate effects of past multidecadal climate variability and/or possible climate change on precipitation. In this study, tree-ring chronologies and historical precipitation data in a four-degree buffer around the Souris River Basin were analyzed to develop regression models that can be used for predicting long-term variations of precipitation. To focus on longer term variability, 12-year moving average precipitation was modeled in five subregions (determined through cluster analysis of measures of precipitation) of the study area over three seasons (November–February, March–June and July–October). The models used multiresolution decomposition (an additive decomposition based on powers of two using a discrete wavelet transform) of tree-ring chronologies from Canada and the US and seasonal 12-year moving average precipitation based on Adjusted and Homogenized Canadian Climate Data and US Historical Climatology Network data. Results show that precipitation varies on long-term (multidecadal) time scales of 16, 32 and 64 years. Past extended pluvial and drought events, which can vary greatly with season and subregion, were highlighted by the models. Results suggest that the recent wet period may be a part of natural variability on a very long time scale.

  9. An economic analysis of a system wide Lean approach: cost estimations for the implementation of Lean in the Saskatchewan healthcare system for 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Nazmi; Rotter, Thomas; Goodridge, Donna; Harrison, Liz; Kinsman, Leigh

    2017-08-03

    The costs of investing in health care reform initiatives to improve quality and safety have been underreported and are often underestimated. This paper reports direct and indirect cost estimates for the initial phase of the province-wide implementation of Lean activities in Saskatchewan, Canada. In order to obtain detailed information about each type of Lean event, as well as the total number of corresponding Lean events, we used the Provincial Kaizen Promotion Office (PKPO) Kaizen database. While the indirect cost of Lean implementation has been estimated using the corresponding wage rate for the event participants, the direct cost has been estimated using the fees paid to the consultant and other relevant expenses. The total cost for implementation of Lean over two years (2012-2014), including consultants and new hires, ranged from $44 million CAD to $49.6 million CAD, depending upon the assumptions used. Consultant costs accounted for close to 50% of the total. The estimated cost of Lean events alone ranged from $16 million CAD to $19.5 million CAD, with Rapid Process Improvement Workshops requiring the highest input of resources. Recognizing the substantial financial and human investments required to undertake reforms designed to improve quality and contain cost, policy makers must carefully consider whether and how these efforts result in the desired transformations. Evaluation of the outcomes of these investments must be part of the accountability framework, even prior to implementation.

  10. Lightning-produced NO2 observed by two ground-based UV-visible spectrometers at Vanscoy, Saskatchewan in August 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fraser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant columns by the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and UT-GBS (University of Toronto Ground-Based Spectrometer instruments during the MANTRA 2004 field campaign are presented herein. During the afternoon of 28 August, a thunderstorm passed over the instruments, which were installed at Vanscoy, Saskatchewan (52° N, 107° W. Enhanced differential slant columns of ozone and NO2 were observed by both instruments during the storm, with maximum values of two and 25 times the expected clear sky columns, respectively. The enhanced ozone differential slant columns are primarily due to the longer path traversed by the solar radiation caused by multiple scattering inside the thick cloud layer associated with the thunderstorm. The enhanced NO2 columns are partly attributed to NOx production by lightning. Two new methods are used to separate the NO2 enhancements into contributions from the longer path length and production by lightning. Combining the observed excess NO2 with lightning flash data from the Canadian Lightning Detection Network and Environment Canada Doppler radar measurements, the production of NO2 molecules per lightning flash is determined. Using these two methods, the best estimate of the production rate is found to be (7.88±2.52×1026 molecules NO2/flash from the UT-GBS and (6.81±2.17×1026 molecules NO2/flash from SAOZ. These results are consistent with the range of previous estimates reported in the literature.

  11. The influence of lead content in drinking water, household dust, soil, and paint on blood lead levels of children in Flin Flon, Manitoba and Creighton, Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safruk, Adam M; McGregor, Erin; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Cheung, Paul H; Pinsent, Celine; Jackson, Blair J; Hair, Alan T; Lee, Murray; Sigal, Elliot A

    2017-09-01

    Lead exposure continues to be an important health issue despite the general removal of lead sources in commercial and industrial applications. Low levels of lead exposure have been found to produce adverse neurodevelopmental effects in children with no evidence that a threshold exists for this critical endpoint. Blood lead levels (BLLs) were measured in children (n=118) under the age of 7years in the northern Canadian smelter community of Flin Flon, Manitoba and Creighton, Saskatchewan. An environmental sampling component was included to examine the relationship between lead content in outdoor soil, household dust, tap water, and paint within a given household and the corresponding BLLs in participating children. The geometric mean (GM) BLL for study participants was 1.41μg/dL. Blood lead levels varied slightly by age category with the lowest levels found among the children under age 2 (GM=1.11μg/dL) and the highest levels found among children between 2 and 3years of age (GM=1.98μg/dL). Results from the multivariate modeling indicated that BLLs had a significant positive association with the age of housing (ppaint were found to be significantly correlated (ppaint, respectively). Lead concentrations in flushed (GM=0.89μg/L) and stagnant (GM=2.07μg/L and 1.18μg/L) tap water samples were not significantly correlated (p>0.05) to BLLs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influences of vegetation structure and elevation on CO{sub 2} uptake in a mature jack pine forest in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasmer, L.; McCaughey, H.; Treitz, P. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Kljun, N. [Swansea Univ., Swansea (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geography; Barr, A. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Climate Research Branch; Black, A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Land and Food Systems; Hopkinson, C. [Applied Geomatics Research Group, Lawrencetown, NS (Canada)

    2008-11-15

    Eddy covariance (EC) is often used to measure the movement and direction of energy and trace gas concentrations in ecosystems. Data from EC networks are often combined with remote sensing data and ecosystem models in order to assess the spatial and temporal variability of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) exchanges within specific areas of interest. This study presented a new method of determining changes in the structural characteristics of biomass and elevation. Lidar was used within the contours of half-hourly flux footprint areas to characterize vegetation structure and elevation. The influences of vegetation structure and elevation on CO{sub 2} concentrations were measured by EC and Lidar measurements for 3 mature growing periods at a mature jack pine site in Saskatchewan. Mensuration data were collected over 2 periods. Meteorological, CO{sub 2}, and H2O flux measurements were collected for 30 minute periods each day. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine the influence of meteorological variables on vegetation structure. Footprint contour lines were then layered onto the canopy height models derived by the lidar data. Multiple regression equations were used to determine net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) using meteorological variables, canopy fractional cover; and elevation, as well as the results obtained from a Landsberg equation. The study showed that differences in NEP variability were influenced by differences in canopy and ground surface characteristics within the site. EC measurements underestimated gross CO{sub 2} fluxes by 5 per cent as the biomass was lower within the immediate vicinity of the EC network. It was concluded that canopy structures and elevation are important factors for determining annual carbon balances. 36 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs.

  13. Community-based educational intervention to limit the dissemination of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golding George R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveillance examining the incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA was conducted over 8 years beginning in 2001 in three health regions covering the northern half of Saskatchewan. The annual rate of individuals reported with CA-MRSA infection in these regions dramatically increased from 8.2 per 10,000 population in 2001 (range to 4.4-10.1 per 10,000 to 168.1 per 10,000 in 2006 (range 43.4-230.9 per 10,000. To address this issue, a team of community members, healthcare professionals, educators and research scientists formed a team called "the Northern Antibiotic Resistance Partnership" (NARP to develop physician, patient, community, and school based educational materials in an attempt to limit the spread of CA-MRSA. Methods Posters, radio broadcasts, community slide presentations, physician treatment algorithms, patient pamphlets, and school educational programs Do Bugs Need Drugs http://www.dobugsneeddrugs.org and Germs Away http://www.germsaway.ca were provided to targeted northern communities experiencing high rates of infections. Results Following implementation of this program, the rates of MRSA infections in the targeted communities have decreased nearly two-fold (242.8 to 129.3 infections/10,000 population from 2006 to 2008. Through pre-and post-educational intervention surveys, this decrease in MRSA infections coincided with an increase in knowledge related to appropriate antimicrobial usage and hand washing in these communities. Conclusion These educational materials are all freely available http://www.narp.ca and will hopefully aid in increasing awareness of the importance of proper antimicrobial usage and hygiene in diminishing the spread of S. aureus and other infectious diseases in other communities.

  14. Variations in Sense of Place Across Immigrant Status and Gender in Hamilton, Ontario; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Melissa; Williams, Allison

    Past research in Hamilton, Ontario has found that age and longevity of residence are positively associated with evaluations of sense of place (SoP); further, evaluations of SoP between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals have shown no clear pattern (Williams et al. 2010; Williams and Kitchen 2012). This paper builds on this work by further examining evaluations of SoP among both immigrants and Canadian-born residents and across gender in Hamilton, while expanding the study to two other small-to-medium sized cities: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. This paper has two objectives: (1) to establish measures of SoP across immigrant status and gender in Hamilton, Saskatoon, and Charlottetown; and, (2) to determine how SoP varies according to immigrant status, length of residence in Canada, age, income, and neighbourhood length of residence across the three city sites. Telephone survey data (n = 1,132) was used to compare evaluations of SoP across various groups and to construct an ordered logistic regression model for SoP. Results suggest that immigrants tended to rate their SoP lower than their Canadian-born counterparts. Hamilton residents were found to rate their SoP lowest, followed by Saskatoon residents and, finally, Charlottetown residents. Younger individuals, those with lower income levels, and those with shorter neighbourhood residency in the cities concerned were more likely to have lower evaluations of SoP. This research suggests that greater attention is needed to nurture immigrants' connection with their new home.

  15. Perspectives on past and present waste disposal practices: a community-based participatory research project in three Saskatchewan first nations communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagozewski, Rebecca; Judd-Henrey, Ian; Nilson, Suzie; Bharadwaj, Lalita

    2011-04-28

    The impact of current and historical waste disposal practices on the environment and human health of Indigenous people in First Nations communities has yet to be adequately addressed. Solid waste disposal has been identified as a major environmental threat to First Nations Communities. A community-based participatory research project (CBPR) was initiated by the Saskatoon Tribal Council Health and Family Services Incorporated to investigate concerns related to waste disposal in three Saskatchewan First Nations Communities. Utilizing a qualitative approach, we aimed to gain an understanding of past and present waste disposal practices and to identify any human and environmental health concerns related to these practices. One to one interviews and sharing circles were conducted with Elders. Elders were asked to share their perspectives on past and present waste disposal practices and to comment on the possible impacts these practices may have on the environment and community health. Historically waste disposal practices were similar among communities. The homeowner generated small volumes of waste, was exclusively responsible for disposal and utilized a backyard pit. Overtime waste disposal evolved to weekly pick-up of un-segregated garbage with waste disposal and open trash burning in a community dump site. Dump site locations and open trash burning were identified as significant health issues related to waste disposal practices in these communities. This research raises issues of inequity in the management of waste in First Nations Communities. It highlights the need for long-term sustainable funding to support community-based waste disposal and management strategies and the development of First Nations centered and delivered educational programs to encourage the adoption and implementation of waste reduction, reutilization and recycling activities in these communities.

  16. Perspectives on Past and Present Waste Disposal Practices: A Community-Based Participatory Research Project in Three Saskatchewan First Nations Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagozewski, Rebecca; Judd-Henrey, Ian; Nilson, Suzie; Bharadwaj, Lalita

    2011-01-01

    The impact of current and historical waste disposal practices on the environment and human health of Indigenous people in First Nations communities has yet to be adequately addressed. Solid waste disposal has been identified as a major environmental threat to First Nations Communities. A community-based participatory research project (CBPR) was initiated by the Saskatoon Tribal Council Health and Family Services Incorporated to investigate concerns related to waste disposal in three Saskatchewan First Nations Communities. Utilizing a qualitative approach, we aimed to gain an understanding of past and present waste disposal practices and to identify any human and environmental health concerns related to these practices. One to one interviews and sharing circles were conducted with Elders. Elders were asked to share their perspectives on past and present waste disposal practices and to comment on the possible impacts these practices may have on the environment and community health. Historically waste disposal practices were similar among communities. The homeowner generated small volumes of waste, was exclusively responsible for disposal and utilized a backyard pit. Overtime waste disposal evolved to weekly pick-up of un-segregated garbage with waste disposal and open trash burning in a community dump site. Dump site locations and open trash burning were identified as significant health issues related to waste disposal practices in these communities. This research raises issues of inequity in the management of waste in First Nations Communities. It highlights the need for long-term sustainable funding to support community-based waste disposal and management strategies and the development of First Nations centered and delivered educational programs to encourage the adoption and implementation of waste reduction, reutilization and recycling activities in these communities. PMID:21573032

  17. Dietary analysis of randomly selected meals from the Child Hunger and Education Program School Nutrition Program in Saskatchewan, Canada, suggests that nutrient target levels are being provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, Laura A R; Henry, Carol J; Ramdath, Dan; Whiting, Susan J

    2011-03-01

    In Canada, school meals are regarded as important for social, educational, and nutritional reasons and have been provided for several years because of concerns about the health and welfare of children, especially those from low-income households. They are generally offered as local community organization and individual schools, are not regulated by law, and have no set national nutrition standards. The Canadian scientific literature lacks quantitative information on the nutritional adequacy of school meals. Better and more evaluation of such programs would encourage and guide administrators to assess other local programs in a similar fashion. Here, we describe the dietary assessment process of 1 school meal program in Canada and the nutritional adequacy of the meals. Throughout 10 years (1997-2007), the contents of 159 lunches and 90 breakfasts were collected mainly from elementary schools participating in the Child Hunger and Education Program Good Food, Inc's school nutrition program initiative in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. We collected, weighed, and analyzed food samples from meals served to children at participating schools. We then compared their nutrient content against standards based on the Dietary Recommended Intakes for children aged 4 to 8 and 9 to 13 years using one third of the recommendations as the standard for lunches and one fourth for breakfasts. Overall, both meals had a good nutrient profile and met the standards for most analyzed macronutrients and micronutrients throughout the years. Although energy was persistently low, vitamin and mineral contents were often above the standards, reflecting a tendency to offer nutrient-dense foods in lieu of energy-dense foods. The rigorous methodology described in this manuscript can be followed to assess other small local programs. Furthermore, the dietary assessment presented can encourage not only the implementation of school meal programs in other locations but also the assessment of already

  18. Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Colleen Anne; Duncan, Charles Randy; DesRoches, Andrea; Bendig, Melissa; Steeves, Megan; Turner, Holly; Quaife, Terra; McCann, Chuck; Enns, Brett

    2013-10-22

    Despite endorsement by the Saskatchewan government to apply empirically-based approaches to youth drug prevention services in the province, programs are sometimes delivered prior to the establishment of evidence-informed goals and objectives. This paper shares the 'preptory' outcomes of our team's program evaluation of the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services' Outreach Worker Service (OWS) in eight rural, community schools three years following its implementation. Before our independent evaluation team could assess whether expectations of the OWS were being met, we had to assist with establishing its overarching program goals and objectives and 'at-risk' student population, alongside its alliance with an empirically-informed theoretical framework. A mixed-methods approach was applied, beginning with in-depth focus groups with the OWS staff to identify the program's goals and objectives and targeted student population. These were supplemented with OWS and school administrator interviews and focus groups with school staff. Alignment with a theoretical focus was determined though a review of the OWS's work to date and explored in focus groups between our evaluation team and the OWS staff and validated with the school staff and OWS and school administration. With improved understanding of the OWS's goals and objectives, our evaluation team and the OWS staff aligned the program with the Positive Youth Development theoretical evidence-base, emphasizing the program's universality, systems focus, strength base, and promotion of assets. Together we also gained clarity about the OWS's definition of and engagement with its 'at-risk' student population. It is important to draw on expert knowledge to develop youth drug prevention programming, but attention must also be paid to aligning professional health care services with a theoretically informed evidence-base for evaluation purposes. If time does not permit for the establishment of

  19. The effects of household income distribution on stroke prevalence and its risk factors of high blood pressure and smoking: a cross-sectional study in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Yelena; Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is a major chronic disease and a common cause of adult disability and mortality. Although there are many known risk factors for stroke, lower income is not one that is often discussed. To determine the unadjusted and adjusted association of income distribution on the prevalence of stroke in Saskatchewan, Canada. Information was collected from the Canadian Community Health Survey conducted by Statistics Canada for 2000-2008. In total, 178 variables were analysed for their association with stroke. Prior to statistical adjustment, stroke was seven times more common for lower income residents than higher income residents. After statistical adjustment, only four covariates were independently associated with stroke prevalence, including having high blood pressure (odds ratio (OR) = 2.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.12-3.24), having a household income below CAD$30,000 per year (OR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.88-3.29), being a daily smoker (OR = 1.36; 95% CI = 1.16-1.58) and being physically inactive (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.13-1.43). After statistical adjustment, there were five covariates independently associated with high blood pressure prevalence, including having a household income below CAD$30,000 per year (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.41-1.63). After statistical adjustment, there were five covariates independently associated with daily smoking prevalence, including having a household income below CAD$30,000 per year (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.25-1.33). Knowledge of disparities in the prevalence, severity, disability and mortality of stroke is critically important to medical and public health professionals. Our study found that income distribution was strongly associated with stroke, its main disease intermediary - high blood pressure - and its main risk factor - smoking. As such, income is an important variable worthy of public debate as a modifiable risk factor for stroke.

  20. The Incidence of Hip Fractures in Long-Term Care Homes in Saskatchewan from 2008 to 2012: an Analysis of Provincial Administrative Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Lilian U; Whiting, Susan J; Li, Wenbin; Dust, William; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Teare, Gary

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures (HFs) represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality among adults in long-term care (LTC), but lack of detailed epidemiological data poses challenges to intervention planning. We aimed to determine the incidence of HFs among permanent LTC residents in Saskatchewan between 2008 and 2012, using linked, provincial administrative health databases, exploring associations between outcomes and basic individual and institutional characteristics. We utilized the Ministry of Health databases to select HF cases based on ICD 10 diagnoses fracture of head and neck of femur, pertrochanteric fracture and subtrochanteric fracture of femur. HF incidence rates in LTC were compared to older adults in the general population. LTC residents were more likely to be female overall (65.5%), although this varied by age, with only 46.6% female in those under 65, but 77% female among those 90 years and older. Mean age of residents was highest in rural centres (85.2 yrs) and lowest in medium-large centres (81.0 yrs). Of 6,230 cases of HFs in the province during the study period, 2,743 (44%) were in the LTC cohort. Incidence rates per 1,000 person years increased with age and were higher in the LTC group (F = 68.6, M = 49.8) than the overall population (F = 1.62, M = 0.73). Rates of HFs in the province and in LTC were higher in females than males in all age groups, except for the youngest (< 65 years), where males had higher rates, and the oldest category (90+) where rates were similar. Women 90+ years in larger LTC had significantly higher (p = .035) HF rates than those in smaller LTC, and also had significantly (p = .001) higher rates in medium-large compared to smaller population centres. However, after age standardization to the overall SK population, it was apparent that the larger LTC facilities and the medium-large population centres had overall lower HF rates than the small and medium LTC facilities and the small urban and rural PCs, respectively. One health region

  1. Some in Saskatchewan Find The Cochrane Library Useful after Promotion, Access and Training Efforts. A review of: Forbes, Dorothy, Christine Neilson, Janet Bangma, Jennifer Forbes, Daniel Fuller, and Shari Furniss. “Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library.” Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research 2.2 (2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandra Protzko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To evaluate the use of The Cochrane Library by librarians, health care providers and consumers in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Design – Volunteer telephone interviews and surveys of training participants at multiple time points; usage statistics.Setting – Saskatchewan.Subjects – Ninety-four volunteers participated in the study. Participants were self-selected from approximately 300 health practitioners and 100 public library staff attending training sessions, located primarily in rural areas. The majority of public library staff who attended training sessions were not professional librarians, although 31.5% of the study participants were librarians. Nurses made up the next largest group (16.3%, followed by therapists (7.6%, library support staff (5.4%,pharmacists (4.3%, physicians (3.3%, other health care providers (20.7%, and other (9.8%. Most were 40-65 years of age (71.6%and female (92.4%.Methods – Forty-six training sessions were provided upon request between October 2004 and December 2006. Attendees wereinvited to participate in the study. Telephone interviews were conducted at three, six, nine, and twelve months following training sessions. Demographic information and data on the use of andsatisfaction with The Cochrane Library were collected. Additionally, monthly statistics were tracked by Wiley-Blackwell for user sessions, number of searches, and the number of full-text articles and abstracts visited.Main Results – Telephone interviews revealed that 65.2% of participants had accessed The Cochrane Library at three months; 64.2% had at six months. At nine months access dropped to 45.2%. At twelve months only 27.4% of participants reported using the resource. Of those who used The Cochrane Library, 16.4% reported at the three month interview that it was not helpful. This number decreased at six months (11.6%, nine months (7.7% and twelve months (11.8%. 57.5% of respondents claimed to have learned something

  2. One size does not fit all: a qualitative content analysis of the importance of existing quality improvement capacity in the implementation of Releasing Time to Care: the Productive Ward™ in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jessica; Verrall, Tanya; Maben, Jill; Griffiths, Peter; Avis, Kyla; Baker, G Ross; Teare, Gary

    2014-12-19

    Releasing Time to Care: The Productive Ward™ (RTC) is a method for conducting continuous quality improvement (QI). The Saskatchewan Ministry of Health mandated its implementation in Saskatchewan, Canada between 2008 and 2012. Subsequently, a research team was developed to evaluate its impact on the nursing unit environment. We sought to explore the influence of the unit's existing QI capacity on their ability to engage with RTC as a program for continuous QI. We conducted interviews with staff from 8 nursing units and asked them to speak about their experience doing RTC. Using qualitative content analysis, and guided by the Organizing for Quality framework, we describe the existing QI capacity and impact of RTC on the unit environment. The results focus on 2 units chosen to highlight extreme variation in existing QI capacity. Unit B was characterized by a strong existing environment. RTC was implemented in an environment with a motivated manager and collaborative culture. Aided by the structural support provided by the organization, the QI capacity on this unit was strengthened through RTC. Staff recognized the potential of using the RTC processes to support QI work. Staff on unit E did not have the same experience with RTC. Like unit B, they had similar structural supports provided by their organization but they did not have the same existing cultural or political environment to facilitate the implementation of RTC. They did not have internal motivation and felt they were only doing RTC because they had to. Though they had some success with RTC activities, the staff did not have the same understanding of the methods that RTC could provide for continuous QI work. RTC has the potential to be a strong tool for engaging units to do QI. This occurs best when RTC is implemented in a supporting environment. One size does not fit all and administrative bodies must consider the unique context of each environment prior to implementing large-scale QI projects. Use of an

  3. Third-world realities in a first-world setting: A study of the HIV/AIDS-related conditions and risk behaviors of sex trade workers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Yelena; Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2016-12-01

    The transmission and prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among those employed as sex trade workers (STW) is a major public health concern. The present study describes the self-reported responses of 340 STW, at-risk for contracting HIV. The participants were recruited by selective targeting between 2009 and 2010 from within the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR), Saskatchewan, Canada. As of 2012, the SHR has the highest incidence rate of positive test reports for HIV in Canada, at more than three times the national average (17.0 vs. 5.9 per 100,000 people). Additionally, the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in the SHR is different from that seen elsewhere in Canada (still mostly men having sex with men and Caucasians), with its new HIV cases predominantly associated with injection drug use and Aboriginal cultural status. The purpose of this study was to (a) describe the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the STW in the SHR, (b) identify their significant life events, self-reported problems, knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, self-efficacy, and barriers regarding HIV, and (c) determine the significant independent risk indicators for STW self-reporting a chance of greater than 50% of becoming infected with HIV/AIDS. The majority of the study participants were females, who were never married, of Aboriginal descent, without a high school diploma, and had an annual income of less than $10,000. Using multivariate regression analysis, four significant independent risk indicators were associated with STW reporting a greater that 50% chance of acquiring HIV/AIDS, including experiencing sexual assault as a child, injecting drugs in the past four weeks, being homeless, and a previous Chlamydia diagnosis. These findings provide important evidence of the essential sexual and drug-related vulnerabilities associated with the risk of HIV infection among STW and offer insight into the design and implementation of effective and culturally sensitive public health

  4. The Saskatchewan/New Brunswick Healthy Start-Départ Santé intervention: implementation cost estimates of a physical activity and healthy eating intervention in early learning centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Nazmi; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Froehlich Chow, Amanda

    2017-01-19

    Participation in daily physical activity and consuming a balanced diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods are behaviours associated with positive health outcomes during all stages of life. Previous literature suggests that the earlier these behaviours are established the greater the health benefits. As such, early learning settings have been shown to provide an effective avenue for exploring and influencing the physical activity and healthy eating behaviours of children before school entry. However, in addition to improving individual level health of children, such interventions may also result in a number of social benefits for the society. In fact, research among adult populations has shown that sufficient participation in physical activity can significantly lower hospital stays and physician visits, in turn leading to positive economic outcomes. To our knowledge there is very limited literature about economic evaluations of interventions implemented in early learning centers to increase physical activity and healthy eating behaviours among children. The primary purpose of this paper is to identify inputs and costs needed to implement a physical activity and healthy eating intervention (Healthy Start-Départ Santé (HS-DS)) in early learning centres throughout Saskatchewan and New Brunswick over the course of three years. In doing so, implementation cost is estimated to complete the first phase of a social return on investment analysis of this intervention. In order to carry out this evaluation the first step was to identify the inputs and costs needed to implement the intervention, along with the corresponding outputs. With stakeholder interviews and using existing database, we estimated the implementation cost by measuring, valuing and monetizing each individual input. Our results show that the total annual cost of implementing HS-DS was $378,753 in the first year, this total cost decreased slightly in the second year ($356,861) and again

  5. Third-world realities in a first-world setting: A study of the HIV/AIDS-related conditions and risk behaviors of sex trade workers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Bird

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission and prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV among those employed as sex trade workers (STW is a major public health concern. The present study describes the self-reported responses of 340 STW, at-risk for contracting HIV. The participants were recruited by selective targeting between 2009 and 2010 from within the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR, Saskatchewan, Canada. As of 2012, the SHR has the highest incidence rate of positive test reports for HIV in Canada, at more than three times the national average (17.0 vs. 5.9 per 100,000 people. Additionally, the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in the SHR is different from that seen elsewhere in Canada (still mostly men having sex with men and Caucasians, with its new HIV cases predominantly associated with injection drug use and Aboriginal cultural status. The purpose of this study was to (a describe the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the STW in the SHR, (b identify their significant life events, self-reported problems, knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, self-efficacy, and barriers regarding HIV, and (c determine the significant independent risk indicators for STW self-reporting a chance of greater than 50% of becoming infected with HIV/AIDS. The majority of the study participants were females, who were never married, of Aboriginal descent, without a high school diploma, and had an annual income of less than $10,000. Using multivariate regression analysis, four significant independent risk indicators were associated with STW reporting a greater that 50% chance of acquiring HIV/AIDS, including experiencing sexual assault as a child, injecting drugs in the past four weeks, being homeless, and a previous Chlamydia diagnosis. These findings provide important evidence of the essential sexual and drug-related vulnerabilities associated with the risk of HIV infection among STW and offer insight into the design and implementation of effective and culturally sensitive public

  6. Access to Specialist Care in Rural Saskatchewan: The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Karunanayake, Chandima; Rennie, Donna; Hagel, Louise; Lawson, Joshua; Janzen, Bonnie; Pickett, William; Dosman, James; Pahwa, Punam; Group, The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study

    2015-01-01

    The role of place has emerged as an important factor in determining people’s health experiences. Rural populations experience an excess in mortality and morbidity compared to those in urban settings. One of the factors thought to contribute to this rural-urban health disparity is access to healthcare. The objective of this analysis was to examine access to specialized medical care services and several possible determinants of access to services in a distinctly rural population in Canada. In w...

  7. Sensitive, Sensible Practicum Supervision: A Contextual Application in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Edwin G.

    1993-01-01

    In contextual supervision (CS) (an adaptation of situational leadership), the student teacher's (supervisee's) level of confidence and competence determines level of supervisory support and task orientation. CS also encourages a global view of all contextual variables. Observation of 49 untrained pairs of practicum students and cooperating…

  8. The Cost of Health Care for AIDS Patients in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Browne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical records of 19 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (aids were reviewed in an attempt to estimate their health care costs. The patients were all male, members of high risk groups and diagnosed between April 1985 and February 1988. Twelve of the patients died; they lived a mean of 240 days (range 0 to 580 after diagnosis, were admitted three times (range one to six to hospital for 65 total days (range one to 148 for a cost per patient of $33,721 (range $2,768 to $64,981 for inpatient care. They made five (range zero to 25 office visits per patient costing $196 per patient (range $0 to $4,999 for outpatient care. The seven survivors (one was lost to follow-up have lived 375 days (range 186 to 551 since diagnosis, have been admitted to hospital two times (range zero to seven for 30 total days (range zero to 86 for a total cost per patient of $14,223 (range $0 to $39,410 for inpatient care. They have made 11 office/emergency room visits (range zero to 46 costing in total $4322 (range $0 to $13,605 for outpatient care. The total expenditure was $546,332 ($28,754 per patient, of which total fees to physicians were $37,210 (6.8%, and estimated costs of laboratory tests $117,917 (21.6%, drugs $36,930 (6.7%, and medical imaging $20,794 (3.8%. Patients now deceased cost $416,445 (mean $34,704 per patient, accounting for 76.2% of overall expenditures. The average medical/surgical and drug costs per patient day in hospital were greater for aids patients than for the average medical/surgical patient in the authors’ institution.

  9. People, pets, and parasites: one health surveillance in southeastern Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Janna M; Ndao, Momar; Quewezance, Helen; Elmore, Stacey A; Jenkins, Emily J

    2014-06-01

    Residents of remote and Indigenous communities might experience higher exposure to some zoonotic parasites than the general North American population. Human sero-surveillance conducted in two Saulteaux communities found 113 volunteers exposed as follows: Trichinella (2.7%), Toxocara canis (4.4%), Echinococcus (4.4%), and Toxoplasma gondii (1.8%). In dogs, 41% of 51 fecal samples were positive for at least one intestinal parasite, 3% of 77 were sero-positive for Borrelia burgdorferi, and 21% of 78 for T. gondii. Echinococcus exposure was more likely to occur in non-dog owners (odds ratio [OR]: 11.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-107, P = 0.03); while T. canis was more likely to occur in children (ages 4-17) (OR: 49, 95% CI: 3.9-624; P = 0.003), and those with a history of dog bites (OR: 13.5, 95% CI: 1.02-179; P = 0.048). Our results emphasize the use of dogs as sentinels for emerging pathogens such as Lyme disease, and the need for targeted surveillance and intervention programs tailored for parasite species, cultural groups, and communities. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, 280 Slater Street, Ottawa ON K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  11. Giving Voice to the Trans Community on GID Reform in the "DSM-5": A Saskatchewan Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jai T.

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of the diagnosis of gender identity disorder (GID) within the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") is a contentious issue. A summary of the arguments for retention, removal, or reform of the diagnosis in the "DSM-5" is presented. A qualitative study with 7 individuals from…

  12. Indoor mold levels and current asthma among school-aged children in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, O; Kirychuk, S P; Lawson, J A; Karunanayake, C; Cockcroft, D W; Willson, P J; Senthilselvan, A; Rennie, D C

    2017-03-01

    Current knowledge regarding the association between indoor mold exposures and asthma is still limited. The objective of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between objectively measured indoor mold levels and current asthma among school-aged children. Parents completed a questionnaire survey of health history and home environmental conditions. Asthma cases had a history of doctor-diagnosed asthma or current wheeze without a cold in the past 12 months. Controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Vacuumed dust samples were collected from the child's indoor play area and mattress. Samples were assessed for mold levels and quantified in colony-forming units (CFU). Sensitization to mold allergens was also determined by skin testing. Being a case was associated with family history of asthma, pet ownership, and mold allergy. Mold levels (CFU/m2 ) in the dust samples of children's mattress and play area floors were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; P mold levels (≥30 000 CFU/m2 ) in dust samples from play [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.03-6.43] and mattress (aOR) = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.11-8.00) areas were significantly associated with current asthma. In this study high levels of mold are a risk factor for asthma in children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effective work plan for conditioning of Saskatchewan pipeline data to enabled industry standard mapping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B. [Geomatics Data Management Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Operators in the oil and gas industry need to access pipeline information to support their business. Several Industry Standard mapping systems are in use today, including AccuMap, geoscout and internal GIS software. This presentation discussed the issue of data accuracy and presented methods, sources and processes to condition and improve data. It emphasized the value of a custom database that integrates field data for effective information management. Accurate data leads to better decision making through consistent information and preservation of knowledge. The process is sustainable and companies become more proactive in regulatory compliance, operations, maintenance and production accounting. tabs., figs.

  14. Energy and economic impact of conservation tillage systems in the Saskatchewan parkland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, A.M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Melfort, SK (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the impact that conservation tillage production systems for cereals, oilseeds and pulse crops have on the energy use and economics of individual farm operations. Thirty-six farmers were surveyed to gather information on the advantages and disadvantages of conservation tillage. Inputs associated with the production of spring wheat, canola and field peas for both conservation and conventional tillage systems were used to calculate energy consumed and variable costs for each crop and seeding system. Average fuel consumption of seeding, fertilizing and spraying of crops was reported at 9.5 litres per hectare, 45 per cent of reported conventional fuel consumption. Other benefits of conservation tilling included reduced farm labour and improved soil moisture conservation. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Engaging Undergraduates in Social Science Research: The Taking the Pulse of Saskatchewan Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, Loleen

    2014-01-01

    Although student involvement in research and inquiry can advance undergraduate learning, there are limited opportunities for undergraduate students to be directly involved in social science research. Social science faculty members typically work outside of laboratory settings, with the limited research assistance work being completed by graduate…

  16. Preliminary Soil and Groundwater Characterization Study at the CFAD Dundurn Explosives Facility (Saskatchewan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    circulation and transformation in groundwater we propose also to install two succion lysimeters in the vadose zone in the main burning area. The...aquifer classification should also be better known. More wells and a few succion Iysimeters must be installed to better understand the behavior of

  17. Assessing the Consumer Food Environment in Restaurants by Neighbourhood Distress Level across Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Engler-Stringer, Rachel; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2016-03-01

    To assess the consumer food environment in restaurants in Saskatoon, using the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey for Restaurants (NEMS-R), to examine differences by neighbourhood distress level and to reflect on the need for further refinement of the assessment of restaurant consumer food environments. Neighbourhoods were classified as low, middle, or high distress level based on the socioeconomic indicators (income, employment, and education) in the Material Deprivation Index. Differences in restaurant consumer food environments, indicated by mean NEMS-R total and sub-scores, were examined by various restaurant categories and by varying neighbourhood distress levels. Chain coffee shops and pita and sandwich restaurants had higher NEMS-R totals and "Healthy Entrées" sub-scores; however, burger and chicken restaurants and pizza restaurants had more barriers to healthful eating. Although restaurants in lower distress level neighbourhoods generally rated healthier (higher NEMS-R scores), only a few measures (such as "Facilitators" and "Barriers") significantly differed by neighbourhood distress level. The findings highlight the importance of developing interventions to improve restaurant consumer food environments, especially in neighbourhoods with higher distress levels. The results suggest that reliable measures of the consumer food environment could be developed beginning with what can be measured by NEMS-R.

  18. Assessment of the Research Learning Needs of University of Saskatchewan Librarians: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Alvin M.; Shiri, Ali; Williamson, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    As academic librarians with faculty status increasingly embrace research engagement as a core value and requirement, one of the little-studied questions is the extent to which they possess the requisite knowledge and skills to conduct high-quality research and scholarship and what further learning needs they might have within the organizational…

  19. First Report of Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum (Echinostomatidae) in a Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) from Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a new host record for Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum. These small trematode parasites were found in a debilitated, immature, male sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) during Autumn migration from the Canadian prairies. Necropsy examination identified fibrinonecrotizing and ulcerative jejuni...

  20. Application of Lacustrine Biomarkers to Reconstruct Late Holocene Temperature Change in the Saskatchewan Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzin, B.; Toney, J. L.; Pearson, E. J.; Schouten, S.; Leavitt, P.; Haig, H.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme hydrological events such as prolonged droughts are among Canada's costliest natural calamities resulting in disastrous impacts on agriculture, forestry, industry, and ecosystems. Investigations into climate variations prior to significant anthropogenic modification are essential to build effective projection models and adaptation strategies needed to reduce economic, social and environmental vulnerability within the prairies eco-region. In this study we use organic geochemical analysis of lipids produced by bacteria, archaea and algae in lake and catchment sediments. These organic compounds are highly resistant to degradation and accumulate in the sediments as geochemical fossils or biomarkers. In particular we focus on Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers (GDGT) biomarkers which are ubiquitous in soils and lacustrine environments and can be applied as quantitative temperature proxies in regions of the world where other proxies cannot be used. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between GDGT distribution and temperature and assess the potential for establishing a GDGT-based paleothermometer for the Canadian prairies lakes. Our training set includes GDGT data from core-top sediments from 105 lakes across spanning a 5° latitudinal gradient and spring surface water temperature gradient of about 9°C. We identified 30 known bacterial and archaeal GDGTs, including the novel archaeal tetraether lipids with a cyclohexyl ring. These compounds are present in varying proportions in all the lakes investigated, suggesting a broad range of GDGT inputs and also potential in-situ production. We analysed the relationships between individual GDGT compounds against temperature, pH, conductivity, water depth and other environmental variables. We also examined previously published GDGT-environment indices in order to test the applicability of previously developed GDGT-based paleotemperature calibrations to the prairies lakes and assess whether a new calibration is needed specifically for this region.

  1. Determination of radon flux rates in a uranium mine, Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan. Report No. INFO-0347

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    In 1986, the Atomic Energy Control Board completed a project in which a computer model (VENTRAD) was developed to model underground mine ventilation systems. The accuracy of the radon/radon daughter concentration predictions by the computer model depend on the input parameters describing the radon source term. At present, there is a lack of reliable data on radon sources in general and in uranium mines in particular. This study determined the flux of radon emitted per unit surface area in selected locations of Amok Ltd.'s underground Cluff Lake uranium mine; measured parameters that can have an influence on radon flux; tested the VENTRAD computer program using the input parameters measured in the mine; and determined the total flux of radon per unit surface area from the total amount of radon exhausted from the mine and the total surface area of the mine openings.

  2. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B; Carr, Anthony P; Gaunt, M Casey

    2016-09-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea.

  3. The opaque minerals and economic geology of the nemeiben ultramafic complex, saskatchewan, canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, N. D.; Mossman, D. J.

    1981-10-01

    The main rock types of the Nemeiben ultramafic complex form grossly concentric layers of clinopyroxenite, websterite, wehrlite and dunite. These rocks were partially amphibolitized late in the Hudsonian orogeny; consequently numerous relict primary textural and mineralogical features are preserved. Disseminated primary magmatic nickeliferous pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, magnetite and chromite occur throughout this complex and local concentrations of sulfides occur. Textures, mineralogy and chemistry of these phases are indicative of a high temperature magmatic origin. Unmixing phenomena in pyrrhotite are attributable to post crystallization dissociation of a high temperature Fe-Ni-Cu-Co monosulfide solid solution. A secondary assemblage of fine-grained iron oxides, sulfides and native metals developed in altered ultramafic rocks. Magnetite and hematite, bravoite, violarite and millerite are among the minerals formed during serpentinization. Trace amounts of nickeliferous copper, native gold and silver occur in hematite veinlets and at the center of hematized former sulfide grains. Supergene alteration has affected most of the sulfides. Thus the most plausible explanation of the opaque minerals is that they represent a metamorphosed primary magmatic assemblage modified by supergene alteration.

  4. Influência da temperatura no diâmetro e na estabilidade de agregados em Chernossolo, Saskatchewan, Canadá Temperature effect on aggregate diameter and stability in a Chernozem from Saskatchewan, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Lopes Thomaz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O papel do fogo nos processos ambientais é amplamente reportado nos diversos ecossistemas da Terra. O fogo influencia diversos processos ambientais no solo (e.g. infiltração, erodibilidade, dinâmica de matéria orgânica etc.. Os objetivos deste ensaio realizado em laboratório foram: 1 verificar o efeito da temperatura na estabilidade de agregados em Chernossolo de ambiente temperado; 2 avaliar dois procedimentos para se detectar tal efeito nos agregados do solo (i.e. peneiramento seco e peneiramento submerso em água; 3 aplicar diferentes índices para mensurar possíveis mudanças na distribuição e na estabilidade de agregados (diâmetro médio, diâmetro médio geométrico e estabilidade de agregados em porcentagem. As amostras foram aquecidas em Forno Mufla, sendo submetidas aos seguintes tratamentos: controle (temperatura ambiente, 200 oC e 300 oC por 20 minutos e 580 oC durante 10 minutos. O solo foi afetado pelas diferentes temperaturas aplicadas. Na temperatura de 200 oC, verificou-se diminuição no diâmetro médio, no diâmetro médio geométrico e na estabilidade de agregados do solo. Os agregados de 2,8 mm foram os mais influenciados por esta temperatura. De modo contrário, a temperatura de 580 oC causou aumento nos referidos índices. A temperatura de 300 oC causou resposta intermediária em comparação as demais temperaturas. O peneiramento submerso em água foi a técnica mais eficiente na detecção do efeito da temperatura no solo.The role of fire on environmental processes is widely reported in several Earth ecosystems. Fire affects environmental processes (e.g. infiltration, erodibility, organic matter dynamic etc.. The objectives of this laboratory study were: 1 to establish the effect of temperature on aggregate stability in a Chernozem soil from a temperate environment; 2 to evaluate two procedures to detect such effects on soil aggregates (i.e. dry and wet sieving; 3 to use different indexes to measure possible changes in aggregate distribution and stability (mean weight diameter, geometric mean diameter and aggregate stability. The samples were heated in a muffle furnace, and subjected to the following treatments: control (room temperature, 200 oC and 300 oC for 20 minutes and 580 oC for 10 minutes. The Chernozem soil was affected by the different temperatures. At 200 ºC, there was a decrease in the geometric mean diameter, mean weight diameter and the soil aggregate stability. Aggregates of 2.8 mm were most influenced by this temperature. On the other hand, the 580 °C temperature caused an increase in these indexes. The 300 °C temperature caused intermediate response compared to other temperatures. The wet sieving was the most efficient technique to detect the temperature effects on soil.

  5. Analysis of the Mo speciation in the JEB tailings management facility at McClean Lake, Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R; Grosvenor, Andrew P; Rowson, John; Hughes, Kebbi; Frey, Ryan A; Reid, Joel

    2014-04-15

    The JEB Tailings Management Facility (TMF) is central to reducing the environmental impact of the uranium ore processing operation located at the McClean Lake facility and operated by AREVA Resources Canada (AREVA). The geochemical controls of this facility are largely designed around the idea that elements of concern, such as Mo, will be controlled in the very long term through equilibrium with supporting minerals. However, these systems are far from equilibrium when the tailings are first placed in the TMF, and it can take years, decades, or centuries to reach equilibrium. Therefore, it is necessary to understand how these reactions evolve toward an equilibrium state to understand the very long-term behavior of the TMF and to ensure that the elements of concern will be adequately contained. To this end, the Mo speciation in a series of samples taken from the JEB TMF during the 2008 sampling campaign has been analyzed. This analysis was performed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). These results show that only XANES was effective in speciating Mo in the tailings samples, because it was both element-specific and sensitive enough to detect the low concentrations of Mo present. These results show that the predominant Mo-bearing phases present in the TMF are powellite, ferrimolybdite, and molybdate adsorbed on ferrihydrite.

  6. A qualitative study of factors influencing different generations of Newfoundland and Saskatchewan trained physicians to leave a work location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Maria; Seguin, Maureen; Chowdhury, Nurun; Card, Robert T

    2012-07-25

    Some studies have suggested that young physicians may have different expectations and practice behaviours than their older generational counterparts, including their reasons for wanting to remain or leave a community. This study examined the factors associated with a physician's decision to leave a work location. We compared different generations of physicians to assess whether these factors have changed over generations. We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 physicians who graduated from two Canadian medical schools. We asked each physician about the number and nature of work location changes and the factors related to their decisions to leave each location. Interview transcripts and notes were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Dissatisfaction with the working environment was the most frequently cited reason for leaving a location for physicians of all generations. Elements which contributed to the quality of the work environment included the collaborative nature of the practice, the relationship with administrators, and access to resources and personnel. For younger physicians, the work environment had to meet their personal expectations for work-life balance. While remuneration level was given by some physicians as the key reason for leaving a location, for others it was the "last straw" if the work environment was poor. A small number of older generation physicians moved in response to political events and/or policies We documented generational differences in physicians' reasons for choosing a work location. We found that a poor work environment was universally the most important reason why a physician chose to leave a location. A few physicians who were unsatisfied with their work location identified level of remuneration as an additional reason for leaving. Some older generation physicians cited political climate as a reason for leaving a work location. While economic factors have largely been the focus of recruitment and retention initiatives, our findings highlight the importance of the work environment and organizational culture on the retention of physicians of all generations.

  7. A qualitative study of factors influencing different generations of Newfoundland and Saskatchewan trained physicians to leave a work location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies have suggested that young physicians may have different expectations and practice behaviours than their older generational counterparts, including their reasons for wanting to remain or leave a community. This study examined the factors associated with a physician’s decision to leave a work location. We compared different generations of physicians to assess whether these factors have changed over generations. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 physicians who graduated from two Canadian medical schools. We asked each physician about the number and nature of work location changes and the factors related to their decisions to leave each location. Interview transcripts and notes were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Dissatisfaction with the working environment was the most frequently cited reason for leaving a location for physicians of all generations. Elements which contributed to the quality of the work environment included the collaborative nature of the practice, the relationship with administrators, and access to resources and personnel. For younger physicians, the work environment had to meet their personal expectations for work-life balance. While remuneration level was given by some physicians as the key reason for leaving a location, for others it was the “last straw” if the work environment was poor. A small number of older generation physicians moved in response to political events and/or policies Conclusions We documented generational differences in physicians’ reasons for choosing a work location. We found that a poor work environment was universally the most important reason why a physician chose to leave a location. A few physicians who were unsatisfied with their work location identified level of remuneration as an additional reason for leaving. Some older generation physicians cited political climate as a reason for leaving a work location. While economic factors have largely been the focus of recruitment and retention initiatives, our findings highlight the importance of the work environment and organizational culture on the retention of physicians of all generations.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the Colour Subject between Canada Saskatchewan State and Visual Arts Education Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabancal, Meral Per

    2015-01-01

    A deeper analysis of the art education curriculums applied in developed countries and treating specific subjects within these curriculums holds vital importance in allowing the production of alternative solution methods by providing the educators multiple perspectives in the face of problems concerning art education. In present paper colour…

  9. The immigration experience of Iranian Baha'is in Saskatchewan: the reconstruction of their existence, faith, and religious experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Miki; Desjardins, Michel

    2012-06-01

    For approximately 150 years, Baha'is in Iran have been persecuted on the basis of their religion. Limitations to aspects of their lives have compelled them to face "civic death" or migrate to other countries. This qualitative pilot study explored the experience of forced migration and how religion attenuates the disruption to the lives of Iranian Baha'is. Adaptive strategies that four participants utilised to re-establish continuity were examined. Participants who were satisfied with their lives developed a way to allow parallel cultural traditions (Iranian and Canadian) to co-exist; those who could not integrate found it difficult to maintain a balance between these traditions.

  10. Geomorphology, facies architecture, and high-resolution, non-marine sequence stratigraphy in avulsion deposits, Cumberland Marshes, Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper demonstrates field relationships between landforms, facies, and high-resolution sequences in avulsion deposits. It defines the building blocks of a prograding avulsion sequence from a high-resolution sequence stratigraphy perspective, proposes concepts in non-marine sequence stratigraphy and flood basin evolution, and defines the continental equivalent to a parasequence. The geomorphic features investigated include a distributary channel and its levee, the Stage I crevasse splay of Smith et al. (Sedimentology, vol. 36 (1989) 1), and the local backswamp. Levees and splays have been poorly studied in the past, and three-dimensional (3D) studies are rare. In this study, stratigraphy is defined from the finest scale upward and facies are mapped in 3D. Genetically related successions are identified by defining a hierarchy of bounding surfaces. The genesis, architecture, geometry, and connectivity of facies are explored in 3D. The approach used here reveals that avulsion deposits are comparable in process, landform, facies, bounding surfaces, and scale to interdistributary bayfill, i.e. delta lobe deposits. Even a simple Stage I splay is a complex landform, composed of several geomorphic components, several facies and many depositional events. As in bayfill, an alluvial ridge forms as the feeder crevasse and its levees advance basinward through their own distributary mouth bar deposits to form a Stage I splay. This produces a shoestring-shaped concentration of disconnected sandbodies that is flanked by wings of heterolithic strata, that join beneath the terminal mouth bar. The proposed results challenge current paradigms. Defining a crevasse splay as a discrete sandbody potentially ignores 70% of the landform's volume. An individual sandbody is likely only a small part of a crevasse splay complex. The thickest sandbody is a terminal, channel associated feature, not a sheet that thins in the direction of propagation. The three stage model of splay evolution proposed by Smith et al. (Sedimentology, vol. 36 (1989) 1) is revised to include facies and geometries consistent with a bayfill model. By analogy with delta lobes, the avulsion sequence is a parasequence, provided that its definition is modified to be independent from sea level. In non-marine settings, facies contacts at the tops of regional peats, coals, and paleosols are analogous to marine flooding surfaces. A parasequence is redefined here as a relatively conformable succession of genetically related strata or landforms that is bounded by regional flooding surfaces or their correlative surfaces. This broader definition incorporates the concept of landscape evolution between regional flooding surfaces in a variety of depositional settings. With respect to landscape evolution, accommodation space has three spatial dimensions - vertical (x), lateral (y), and down-the-basin (z). A flood basin fills in as landforms vertically (x) and laterally accrete (y), and prograde down-the-basin (z). Vertical aggradation is limited by the elevation of maximum flood stage (local base level). Differential tectonism and geomorphology control the slope of the flood basin floor and the direction of landscape evolution. These processes produce parasequences that include inclined stratal surfaces and oriented, stacked macroforms (clinoforms) that show the magnitude and direction of landscape evolution. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nutritional Impacts of Saskatchewan Grown Lentils (Lens culinaris L) Feeding on Samples of Healthy and Clinical Children in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian grown Lentil is a rich source of micronutrients. It has high levels of selenium (Se), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), folic acid and carotenes (Thavarajah, et al., 2007; 2008, 2009, Wilmot et al., 2009). In addition, our latest finding shows that Canadian lentil has naturally low levels of antinutri...

  12. The effects of predator exclusion and food supplementation on Burrowing Owl (Speotyto cunicularia) population change in Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy I. Wellicome; Geoffrey L. Holroyd; Karyn Scalise; Earl R. Wiltse

    1997-01-01

    If low reproductive output plays an important role in the population decline of the Burrowing Owl (Speotyto cunicularia,) in Canada, we predicted the decline would slow or stop in our study population after consecutive years of productivity enhancement via food supplementation and predator exclusion. In the portion of our study site for which...

  13. Plus C'est La Meme Chose? Questioning Crop Diversification as a Response to Agricultural Deregulation in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Ben

    2004-01-01

    In the context of declining government subsidization of agriculture, many analysts have predicted reversals in certain characteristic trends of post-1945 Western agriculture with positive implications for agroecosystem well-being. One example, investigated herein, is the suggestion that, in the absence of government safety nets, farmers will seek…

  14. Dog Days on the Plains : A Preliminary aDNA Analysis of Canid Bones from Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholdy, B.P.; Murchie, T.J.; Hacking, K.; Verwoerd, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs were an important component of lifeways on the Northern Plains until the reintroduction of the horse following European contact. There has been little investigation into the variability of domesticcanids on the Prairies and the potential of that variability as a proxy for identifying

  15. A study of the HIV/AIDS-related conditions and risk behaviors of sex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-11

    Sep 11, 2016 ... bDrPH, PhD, is an Adjunct Professor at the School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan, Canada. cBA, MPA, is a Researcher at the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan, Canada. dMD, PhD, MPH, is an Associate Professor at the School of Public Health, ...

  16. The Indigenous Red Ribbon Storytelling Study: What does it mean for Indigenous peoples living with HIV and a substance use disorder to access antiretroviral therapy in Saskatchewan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowgesic, Earl; Meili, Ryan; Stack, Sandra; Myers, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous peoples living with HIV are less likely than non-Indigenous peoples living with HIV to access antiretroviral therapy; however, there is not enough contextual information surrounding this issue. The Indigenous Red Ribbon Storytelling Study was conducted in part to examine how Indigenous peoples living with HIV construct and understand their experiences accessing antiretroviral therapy. Our study design was critical Indigenous qualitative research, using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and community-based participatory research approaches. The study was conducted in partnership with Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations. Study participants were adults from two Canadian cities. The study methods included 20 individual and two Indigenous sharing circle interviews, six participant observation sessions, a short survey and thematic analysis. Accessing antiretroviral therapy within the context of living with a substance use disorder was an overarching theme. Indigenous peoples living with HIV felt they had to choose between living with their active substance use disorder and accessing antiretroviral therapy. They felt misunderstood as a person living with a substance use disorder and often felt coerced into using antiretroviral therapy. Despite these challenges, they persevered as Indigenous peoples living with HIV and a substance use disorder. Further research on antiretroviral therapy access among Indigenous peoples living with HIV and a substance use disorder, particularly from the perspective of health service providers, is needed. PMID:27867444

  17. Conductivity gradients as inferred by electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings within a salt-affected wetland in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirck, Jaconette; Schroeder, William

    2018-01-01

    The change from deep-rooted grass and shrub vegetation to annual-cropping dryland farming has contributed to serious soil salinization challenges on the semi-arid North American Great Plains. In some cases, cultivation of the Great Plains has increased the availability of water, causing dominant sulfate salts to travel from the uphill areas to depressions where it will surface when water evaporates at the soil surface. A potential solution could include the replanting of the native deep-rooted vegetation, which requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil salinity. This study tested the soil factors influencing electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings of soil salinity distribution around wetlands. The objectives were to: (1) predict growth and survival of Salix dasyclados Wimm. (cv. `India') along a salinity gradient in a small wetland, and (2) investigate whether newly established willows affected water-table fluctuations, which would indicate their phreatophytic nature or their ability to obtain their water supply from the zone of saturation. Results indicated significantly lower salinity values for sampling points with EM38 readings above 175 and 250 mS m-1 for height and survival, respectively. In addition, diurnal fluxes of the water table in areas of good willow growth and lower salinity indicated that cultivar `India' was phreatophytic in these areas and therefore has great potential for being used to combat saline seeps.

  18. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. PMID:23710367

  19. Depositional environments of the Hart coal zone (Paleocene), Willow Bunch Coalfield, southern Saskatchewan, Canada from petrographic, palynological, paleobotanical, mineral and trace element studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, J.; Beaton, A.P.; McDougall, W.J.; Nambudiri, E.M.V.; Vigrass, L.W. (University of Regina, SK (Canada). Energy Research Unit)

    1991-12-01

    Coal petrology, palynology, paleobotany and mineralogy of the Hart coal indicate deposition under wet, warm-temperate to subtropical climatic conditions in low-lying backswamps with fluvial channels and locally ponded areas. The coal is dominated by mixed xylitic/attrital lithotypes and by huminite macerals with secondary inertinite macerals and minor liptinite macerals. Good correlation exists between lithotypes and maceral composition. Local and vertical variations in proportions of huminites and inertinites reflect frequent fluctuations in water levels, periodic flooding, desiccation and burning of the peat. Swamps were dominated by {ital Glyptostrobus-Taxodium} forest with {ital Betula-Myrica-Alnus} communities and, locally {ital Laevigatosporites}, which are the dominant contributors to the xylite-rich lithotypes. Attrital lithotypes with abundant {ital Pandanus}, {ital Typha} and {ital Azolla} are consistent with wetter areas of a fluvial environment, including ponds and channels. Trace elements Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Si, Ti, U, Se, V, W, K and Th, typically associated with syngenetic minerals kaolinite, calcite and quartz, may have a volcanic source. High concentrations of Na, Ba and Ca found in organic complexes are of secondary origin and probably originate in deep source brines rather than marine surface waters. 55 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Practical examples of the use of statistics in horizontal well prospect analysis in the Frobisher-Alida, Saskatchewan and Suffield Upper Mannville, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kende, L.F.; Outtrim, C.P.; Christie, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    A practical method for statistically analyzing historic production data from horizontal wells was demonstrated. To date, more than 3,500 horizontal wells have been drilled in Western Canada with an estimated 900 more to be drilled in each of the next few years. The Statistical Technique to Analyze Production History (STAPH) is a new tool with which the petroleum industry can formulate strategy from a production or development engineering point of view. The technique was used to derive a set of production profiles with associated probabilities for producing horizontal wells grouped by lithology, or by lithology and geographic location. The production profile curves can be applied directly to production forecasting and budgeting for recently completed horizontal producers. 8 refs., 13 figs.

  1. Plasma current start-up by the outer ohmic heating coils in the Saskatchewan TORus Modified (STOR-M) iron core tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, O.; Xiao, C.; McColl, D.; Dreval, M.; Hirose, A.; Peng, M.

    2015-03-01

    A plasma current up to 15 kA has been driven with outer ohmic heating (OH) coils in the STOR-M iron core tokamak. Even when the inner OH coil is disconnected, the outer OH coils alone can induce the plasma current as primary windings and initial breakdown are even easier in this coil layout. This result suggests a possibility to use an iron core in a spherical tokamak to start up the plasma current without a central solenoid. The effect of the iron core saturation on the extension of the discharge pulse length has been estimated for further experiments in the STOR-M tokamak.

  2. Synchronous egress and ingress fluid flow related to compressional reactivation of basement faults: the Phoenix and Gryphon uranium deposits, southeastern Athabasca Basin, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zenghua; Chi, Guoxiang; Bethune, Kathryn M.; Eldursi, Khalifa; Thomas, David; Quirt, David; Ledru, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies on unconformity-related uranium deposits in the Athabasca Basin (Canada) suggest that egress flow and ingress flow can develop along single fault systems at different stages of compressional deformation. This research aims to examine whether or not both ingress and egress flow can develop at the same time within an area under a common compressional stress field, as suggested by the reverse displacement of the unconformity surface by the basement faults. The study considers the Phoenix and Gryphon uranium deposits in the Wheeler River area in the southeastern part of the Athabasca Basin. Two-dimensional numerical modeling of fluid flow, coupled with compressional deformation and thermal effects, was carried out to examine the fluid flow pattern. The results show that local variations in the basement geology under a common compressional stress field can result in both egress and ingress flow at the same time. The fault zone at Phoenix underwent a relatively low degree of deformation, as reflected by minor reverse displacement of the unconformity, and egress flow developed, whereas the fault zone at Gryphon experienced a relatively high degree of deformation, as demonstrated by significant reverse displacement of the unconformity, and ingress flow was dominant. The correlation between strain development and location of uranium mineralization, as exemplified by Gryphon and Phoenix uranium deposits, suggests that the localization of dilation predicted by numerical modeling may represent favourable sites for uranium mineralization in the Athabasca Basin.

  3. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1994 Annual Meeting (Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, June 3-7, 1994).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers from the 1994 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; (4) ad hoc groups; and (5) reports on ICMI (International Committee on Mathematical Instruction) studies. Papers include: (1)…

  4. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary; Khanlou, Nazilla

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

  5. An economic analysis of a system wide Lean approach: cost estimations for the implementation of Lean in the Saskatchewan healthcare system for 2012-2014

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nazmi Sari; Thomas Rotter; Donna Goodridge; Liz Harrison; Leigh Kinsman

    2017-01-01

    ... over 50 years ago as the Toyota Production System, a method to improve production by eliminating waste [8]. In the field of operations management, the most frequently cited definition of Lean is offered by Shah and Ward, who define Lean as a complex intervention in the form of ‘an integrated socio-technical system to eliminate waste by concurrently red...

  6. Back to the basics: identifying positive youth development as the theoretical framework for a youth drug prevention program in rural Saskatchewan, Canada amidst a program evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dell, Colleen Anne; Duncan, Charles Randy; DesRoches, Andrea; Bendig, Melissa; Steeves, Megan; Turner, Holly; Quaife, Terra; McCann, Chuck; Enns, Brett

    2013-01-01

    ... of evidence-informed goals and objectives. This paper shares the 'preptory' outcomes of our team's program evaluation of the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services' Outreach Worker Service (OWS...

  7. Why Teaching? Motivations Influencing Beginning Teachers' Choice of Profession and Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Laurie-Ann M.; Prytula, Michelle P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores why beginning teachers in Saskatchewan chose to enter the profession and the importance of these motivations in their first year as teachers. More specifically, using survey and interview methodologies, the purpose of this study was to: (1) investigate the entry motivations of Saskatchewan beginning teachers; (2) determine if…

  8. Toward a Program That Makes a Difference: A Consultation with Prospective Clients of the Gabriel Dumont Institute Community Training Directorate. Aboriginal Peoples Collection. Corrections Branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Elizabeth Osbaldeston; Kelly, Patrice

    The Gabriel Dumont Community Training Residence (CTR) in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada) seeks to facilitate the transition of female offenders back into society. The residence will be the first of its type in Saskatchewan. The majority of women eligible for the program are Native Americans; thus the program will address the specific needs of…

  9. NuCoal CTL wood mountain project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    The province of Saskatchewan experienced significant growth between 2005 and 2008. The growing economy included an abundance of different commodities and made Saskatchewan the newest hub for the latest technologies and investment. This report outlined the various opportunities in Saskatchewan for a coal to liquids plant and its technologies. The coal from southern Saskatchewan is generally lignite, which is found in the Ravenscrag Formation near the Big Muddy Badlands. The report discussed the Ravenscrag Formation as well as mining activity that was largely concentrated near Estevan and Bienfait in southeastern Saskatchewan, where Sherritt International operated two surface mines. The Coronach Poplar River Power Station, located 10 kilometres north of the Canada-United States border in southern Saskatchewan was also discussed. Population density, labour, land use, First Nations, and proximity to major centres were factors that were discussed. The programs that were identified included the Saskatchewan immigrant nominee program, an alternative program to the Canadian federal immigration program for those who want to come to Saskatchewan as a permanent resident of Canada; the Weyburn-Midale carbon dioxide project, the world's first carbon dioxide measuring, monitoring and verification initiative; and the Federated Co-op in Regina, a 100,000 barrel/day refinery located close to the Coronach area in Saskatchewan. Political climate, access to the electrical grid, access to water, access to major pipelines, access to rail lines, and access to highways were other topics that were presented. It was concluded that southern Saskatchewan had a broad range of opportunities for a coal to liquids plant. The area has numerous advantages including access to rail and pipelines. refs., tabs., figs., appendices.

  10. BOREAS CanSIS Regional Soils Data in Vector Format, V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains soils data from the Canada Soil Information System (CanSIS) in ESRI Shapefile format for the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. They are...

  11. Publications | Page 147 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The University of Saskatchewan hosted the Linking Agriculture, Nutrition and Health Conference where representatives from research, industry and ... on Tobacco Control (FCTC) interventions, such as alternative livelihoods for tobacco farmers, product regulation, education and curbing illicit trade in tobacco products.

  12. Teacher Training in Arts Education: Regina's Unique Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakel, Norman; Caron, Ruth

    1984-01-01

    The new arts education program at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, which stresses aesthetic education is described. Music, dance, drama, and the visual and literary arts are all included in the undergraduate program. (RM)

  13. Collected Data from The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study, NASA, CD-ROM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) project information and data collected at selected sites in the boreal forest of Saskatchewan and...

  14. Diagnostic nutrient mass balance on J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The Souris River, an international river originating in Canada’s Saskatchewan Province, flows south into the State of North Dakota and then back north into Canada’s...

  15. Waterfowl Studies on the Lower Souris Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is one of a continuing study, the purposes and technique of which have already been set forth. It had its origin in Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1934; it was...

  16. Väetiserinne tõotab hoogsaid ülevõtmisi / Romet Kreek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreek, Romet, 1972-

    2010-01-01

    Maailma suurim väetisetootja Potash Corp. Of Saskatchewan lükkas tagasi maailma suurima kaevanduskompanii BHP Billitoni 39 mld. dollari suuruse ülevõtmispakkumise. Liituda võivad Venemaa potasetootjad Silvinit ja Uralkal

  17. Examining vertebrobasilar artery stroke in two Canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre; Grier, Alexander R; Cassidy, J David

    2009-02-01

    Ecological study. To determine the annual incidence of hospitalized vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and chiropractic utilization in Saskatchewan and Ontario between 1993 and 2004. To determine whether at an ecological level, the incidence of VBA stroke parallels the incidence of chiropractic utilization. Little is known about the incidence and time trends of VBA stroke diagnoses in the population. Chiropractic manipulation to the neck is believed to be a risk factor for VBA stroke. No study has yet found an association between chiropractic utilization and VBA diagnoses at the population level. All hospitalizations with discharge diagnoses of VBA stroke were extracted from administrative databases for Saskatchewan and Ontario. We included incident cases that were diagnosed between January 1993 and December 2004 for Saskatchewan and from April 1993 to March 2002 for Ontario. VBA cases that had previously been hospitalized for any stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) were excluded. Chiropractic utilization was measured using billing data from Saskatchewan Health and Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Denominators were derived from Statistics Canada's annual population estimates. The incidence rate of VBA stroke was 0.855 per 100,000 person-years for Saskatchewan and 0.750 per 100,000 person-years for Ontario. The annual incidence rate spiked dramatically with a 360% increase for Saskatchewan in 2000. There was a 38% increase for the 2000 incidence rate in Ontario. The rate of chiropractic utilization did not increase significantly during the study period. In Saskatchewan, we observed a dramatic increase in the incidence rate in 2000 and there was a corresponding relatively small increase in chiropractic utilization. In Ontario, there was a small increase in the incidence rate; however, chiropractic utilization decreased. At the ecological level, the increase in VBA stroke does not seem to be associated with an increase in the rate of chiropractic utilization.

  18. Examining vertebrobasilar artery stroke in two Canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre; Grier, Alexander R; Cassidy, J David

    2008-02-15

    Ecological study. To determine the annual incidence of hospitalized vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and chiropractic utilization in Saskatchewan and Ontario between 1993 and 2004. To determine whether at an ecological level, the incidence of VBA stroke parallels the incidence of chiropractic utilization. Little is known about the incidence and time trends of VBA stroke diagnoses in the population. Chiropractic manipulation to the neck is believed to be a risk factor for VBA stroke. No study has yet found an association between chiropractic utilization and VBA diagnoses at the population level. All hospitalizations with discharge diagnoses of VBA stroke were extracted from administrative databases for Saskatchewan and Ontario. We included incident cases that were diagnosed between January 1993 and December 2004 for Saskatchewan and from April 1993 to March 2002 for Ontario. VBA cases that had previously been hospitalized for any stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) were excluded. Chiropractic utilization was measured using billing data from Saskatchewan Health and Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Denominators were derived from Statistics Canada's annual population estimates. The incidence rate of VBA stroke was 0.855 per 100,000 person-years for Saskatchewan and 0.750 per 100,000 person-years for Ontario. The annual incidence rate spiked dramatically with a 360% increase for Saskatchewan in 2000. There was a 38% increase for the 2000 incidence rate in Ontario. The rate of chiropractic utilization did not increase significantly during the study period. In Saskatchewan, we observed a dramatic increase in the incidence rate in 2000 and there was a corresponding relatively small increase in chiropractic utilization. In Ontario, there was a small increase in the incidence rate; however, chiropractic utilization decreased. At the ecological level, the increase in VBA stroke does not seem to be associated with an increase in the rate of chiropractic utilization.

  19. Humboldt SK pilot biodigester receives funding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-09-30

    The Canada-Saskatchewan Western Economic Partnership Agreement (WEPA) will provide funding for Canada's first pilot-scale biodigester to be built in Humboldt, Saskatchewan. The $208,138 pilot facility will use household garbage as well as agricultural waste such as manure and livestock operations, abattoirs and food processing to create heat or power and fertilizer. Support for this bio-energy facility, which could also reduce greenhouse gases, will come from the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute which has received $186,138 from Canada and Saskatchewan in the form of cost-shared federal-provincial funding. The pilot plant will test different combinations of waste material feedstocks and the characteristics of the resulting gas end products. The pilot facility will also provide design information for full-scale biodigester manufacturers in Canada. It is expected that 25 full-scale biodigesters will be constructed in Canada in the near future.

  20. High herd-level prevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Western Canadian dairy farms, based on environmental sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R; Barkema, H W; De Buck, J; Slomp, M; Flaig, J; Haupstein, D; Pickel, C; Orsel, K

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes chronic progressive enteritis in ruminants. The pathogen is present in most countries with modern dairy production, causing substantial economic losses for the industry. The objectives of this study were to estimate dairy herd prevalence of MAP in the Western Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, and to determine whether herd size and housing system (tie-stall versus freestall or loose housing) affected the risk of a herd testing positive for MAP. Six environmental samples were collected on 360 Alberta farms (60% of registered producers) and on 166 Saskatchewan dairy farms (99%). In total, 47% of the sampled farms in Alberta and 53% of the sampled farms in Saskatchewan had at least one environmental sample that was MAP culture positive and were, therefore, defined as infected. Sensitivity of environmental sampling was estimated using 3 subsequent annual tests performed on 82 farms. Because laboratory protocols were continuously improved throughout the project, the sensitivity increased over time. Therefore, a mean of the sensitivity estimates weighted on sampling year was constructed; this resulted in sensitivities of 68 and 69% for Alberta and Saskatchewan, respectively. Implementing those estimates in an approximate Bayesian computation model resulted in a true herd prevalence of 68% (95% probability interval: 60-80%) for Alberta and 76% (95% probability interval: 70-85%) for Saskatchewan. Herds with >200 cows had 3.54 times higher odds of being environmental sample positive and had more positive samples than herds with <50 cows (neither province nor housing system affected those results). In conclusion, the majority of Alberta and Saskatchewan dairy farms were infected with MAP and larger herds were more often MAP positive than smaller herds. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Canada: expanding nuclear fuel exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paehlke, R.

    1978-01-01

    Uranium is soon to be a very big business in Canada and most of the expansion is bound for export markets. The expansions that are planned are both in uranium mining and in fuel processing. Almost all environmental problems associated with the nuclear fuel cycle thus far in Canada have been associated with these two phases of the cycle: mining and processing. The water in Elliot Lake has been found to have high concentrations of radium and the drinking water of Serpent River, Ontario--downwater from Elliot Lake--has been found to be contaminated by excess radioactivity. Buildings in both Port Hope, Ontario, and Uranium City, Saskatchewan (near Eldorado's Saskatchewan minesite), have excess radiation counts attributable to radon and radon daughter gases. Several aspects of the expansion are currently undergoing environmental impact assessment. Far and away the most careful and balanced inquiry is the Saskatchewan government-appointed inquiry under Mr. Justice E. D. Bayda of the Saskatchewan Appeals Court. This inquiry is, in the first instance, examining a proposal by Amok Ltee., a consortium of a French multinational and the French government, to develop a $135 million uranium mine and mill at Cluff Lake in the northern portion of Saskatchewan. But the inquiry is considering all aspects and implications of the full nuclear fuel cycle. The second stage of the uranium boom in Canada centers on processing. Here two major new plants are proposed by Eldorado Nuclear: one at Port Granby, Ontario; the second at Varman, Saskatchewan. Several massive nuclear power stations are planned east of Toronto, but nuclear opposition is growing in Canada. (MCW)

  2. Governance and decision making in complex socio-hydrological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshorbagy, Amin; Wheater, Howard; Gober, Patricia; Hassanzadeh, Elmira

    2017-04-01

    The transboundary Saskatchewan River, originating in the Canadian Rockies in Alberta, flows through Saskatchewan and Manitoba and discharges its water into Lake Winnipeg. It supports irrigated agriculture, hydropower generation, flood protection, municipal water supplies, mining, recreation, and environmental services across a large area and in multiple administrative jurisdictions. Managing the region's water-based economic activities and environmental services, requires decisions at a variety of scales to incorporate competing values and priorities about water use. Current inter-provincial allocations are based on the 1969 Master Agreement of Water Apportionment whereby upstream Alberta must release one-half of the annual natural flows of the Saskatchewan River to Saskatchewan, which in turn must pass one-half of the residual natural flow to the Province of Manitoba. This analysis uses a hydro-economic simulation model, SWAMP, to examine risk-based tradeoffs in Saskatchewan for various types of water use including, agriculture, energy, and flood protection under various scenarios of water availability. The eco-hydrological effects of the scenarios on the largest inland delta in North America - the Saskatchewan River Delta - are also shown. Results enable decision makers to weigh the costs and benefits of implementing particular sector-based future development strategies. Assuming net provincial benefit as a single monetary indicator of economic value, the effects of various scenarios of environmental and policy changes are quantified Results show that improving irrigation technology and expanding irrigated lands in Alberta will positively affect the province's economic development and have compound effects downstream on hydropower generation, environmental flows and the economies of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The implementation of similar policies in Saskatchewan will have different downstream impacts because of the large hydro-power capacity downstream in

  3. Does Targeted Training Improve Residents' Teaching Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polreis, Sean; D'Eon, Marcel F.; Premkumar, Kalyani; Trinder, Krista; Bonnycastle, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Resident doctors have an important and integral responsibility of teaching a number of individuals. The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the University of Saskatchewan's resident-as-teacher training course--Teaching Improvement Project Systems (TIPS). Residents who attended the TIPS course from January, 2010 through June,…

  4. 75 FR 67086 - Proposed Subsequent Arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... uranium, from Areva Resources Canada, Inc. (Areva Resources) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, to Eurodif Production in Pierrelatte, France. The material, which is currently located at Areva Resources... programs in the United States and France. The material was originally obtained by Areva Resources from the...

  5. 75 FR 67087 - Proposed Subsequent Arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... uranium, from Areva Resources Canada, Inc. (Areva Resources) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, to URENCO in Gronau, Germany. The material, which is currently located at Areva Resources, will be transferred... States and France. The material was originally obtained by Areva Resources from the Feed Component...

  6. Les agriculteurs de l'Afrique de l'Ouest augmentent les rendements ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Agent(e) responsable du CRDI. crmadm CRM. Financement total. CAD$ 5,000,000. Pays. Bénin, Nigéria. Chargé(e) de projet. Prof. Derek Peak. Institution. University of Saskatchewan. Pays d' institution. Canada. Site internet. http://www.usask.ca. Chargé(e) de projet. Prof. Rotimi Emmanuel Aluko. Institution. The University ...

  7. CASE REPORT CASE CASE R Infantile Sandhoff's disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-17

    Aug 17, 2009 ... Sandhoff's disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of sphin- golipid metabolism that results from ... Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon,. Saskatchewan, Canada. E Lemire ... cerebral atrophy is yet to be elucidated.15 Animal models have sug-. 67. SA JOURNAL OF ...

  8. Examen des facteurs de réussite d'un développement rural durable ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    associera au Centre for the Study of Co-operatives de l'Université de la Saskatchewan, au Moshi University College of Co-operative and Business Studies (de la Tanzanie) et au Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness de ...

  9. Undergraduate Peer Mentors as Teacher Leaders: Successful Starts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Dawn; DeLathouwer, Erin; Adilman, Jordan; Hoffart, Jessie; Prior-Hildebrandt, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a qualitative study that examined the professional growth of undergraduate peer mentors as teacher leaders during an innovative Learning Community initiative designed for a teacher education program at the University of Saskatchewan. The paper describes the extent to which peer mentors exhibited characteristics…

  10. Cameco Corporation - the Key Lake uranium mill: current status and vision for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, B., E-mail: Biman_bharadwaj@cameco.com [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Moldovan, B. [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Yesnik, L.; Grant, S.; Piche, J. [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Key Lake mill located approximately 570 km north of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada and is currently the world's largest primary producer of uranium producing 8.5 million kg U{sub 3}O{sub 8} /y. The feed to the Key Lake mill currently originates from the McArthur River mine, an underground mine located approximately 80 kilometres north of the Key Lake mill. The McArthur River mine, located within the Athabasca Basin, is the world's largest high-grade uranium deposit with proven and probable reserve, as of December 31, 2009 of 152 million kg U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Approximately 1,300 people are employed at Key Lake and McArthur River of which 51% of the workforce are residents of Saskatchewan's north. The mine site and mill are remote and employees commute via air travel to and from the sites from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan as well as communities throughout northern Saskatchewan. Employees work a 7-day in/7-day out work rotation and reside in permanent camps during the work week at the mine and mill. (author)

  11. What words and where? Applying usability testing techniques to name a new live reference service

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Vicky; Fichter, Darlene M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: A user-focused design approach was taken to develop a new “live reference” service at the Health Sciences Library, University of Saskatchewan. The name of the service, the placement of the links, and the design of a graphical button were seen as key elements in creating service awareness and its subsequent use.

  12. Digital Storytelling for Historical Understanding: Treaty Education for Reconciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Katia; Lewis, Patrick; Kreuger, Claire; Naytowhow, Joseph; Tupper, Jennifer; Couros, Alec; Montgomery, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project that sought to interrogate the possibilities of digital storytelling as a pathway towards a more complete understanding of treaties and the treaty relationship in western Canada. This research is situated in the province of Saskatchewan, where treaty education (that is, education about the…

  13. West Nile virus and hemoparasites in captive snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus)--management strategies to optimize survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, Carol A

    2008-11-01

    In August 2005, 2 members of a group of 6 captive snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus) in central Saskatchewan died of West Nile virus infection. One of these owls and 3 of the remaining owls had significant numbers of circulating hemoparasites. Management strategies are suggested to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  14. West Nile virus and hemoparasites in captive snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus) — management strategies to optimize survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    In August 2005, 2 members of a group of 6 captive snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus) in central Saskatchewan died of West Nile virus infection. One of these owls and 3 of the remaining owls had significant numbers of circulating hemoparasites. Management strategies are suggested to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:19183740

  15. First report of Pineus strobi (Hartig) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pine bark adelgid, Pineus strobi (Hartig, 1839) (Hempitera: Adelgidae), is native to eastern North America. Its main host species is eastern white pine, Pinus strobus L. Pineus strobi is reported here for the first time from Washington, Colorado, Saskatchewan and tentatively Oregon by identifica...

  16. Sud du Sahara | Page 6 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    élevage contribuent à la sécurité alimentaire d'un ménage dépend des ... Hawassa University has become a center of excellence on nutrition in Ethiopia — the University of Saskatchewan has contributed to this achievement as a key partner in ...

  17. South of Sahara | Page 6 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    élevage contribuent à la sécurité alimentaire d'un ménage dépend des ... Hawassa University has become a center of excellence on nutrition in Ethiopia — the University of Saskatchewan has contributed to this achievement as a key partner in ...

  18. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; economic uses fact sheet 06: selection criteria analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Confidence in decisionmaking can often come from knowing if others in similar circumstances would choose the same management strategy. Researchers at the USDA FS Pacific Northwest Research Station and the University of Saskatchewan have developed a Selection Criteria Analysis for answering this very question. This fact sheet discusses factors affecting the choice of...

  19. Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, David; Avery, Brent P.; Parmley, E. Jane; Deckert, Anne; Carson, Carolee A.; Dutil, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    During 2005–2010, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance identified increased prevalence of ciprofloxacin (a fluororquinolone) resistance among Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken in British Columbia (4%–17%) and Saskatchewan (6%–11%), Canada. Fluoroquinolones are critically important to human medicine and are not labeled for use in poultry in Canada. PMID:23764141

  20. Passive seismic reflection interferometry : A case study from the aquistore CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheraghi, Saeid; White, Donald J.; Draganov, D.S.; Bellefleur, Gilles; Craven, James A.; Roberts, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Seismic reflection interferometry has recently been tested in a few resource-exploration applications. We have evaluated passive seismic interferometry results for data from the Aquistore CO2 storage site, Saskatchewan, Canada, with the objective of testing the method's ability to

  1. West Nile virus and hemoparasites in captive snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus) — management strategies to optimize survival

    OpenAIRE

    Harasym, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    In August 2005, 2 members of a group of 6 captive snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus) in central Saskatchewan died of West Nile virus infection. One of these owls and 3 of the remaining owls had significant numbers of circulating hemoparasites. Management strategies are suggested to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  2. Rural to Urban Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Jane A.

    Personal interviews with 100 former farm operators living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, were conducted in an attempt to understand the nature of the adjustment process caused by migration from rural to urban surroundings. Requirements for inclusion in the study were that respondents had owned or operated a farm for at least 3 years, had left their…

  3. Authentic Inclusion in Two Secondary Schools: "It's the Full Meal Deal. It's Not Just in the Class. It's Everywhere."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. Anthony; Timmons, Vianne

    2017-01-01

    Inclusive educational practices vary across Canada, and perhaps most especially in secondary schools. Researchers use the term authentic inclusion to describe exemplary inclusive educational institutions. Using an appreciative inquiry framework, two such high schools were identified and profiled within the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.…

  4. Culture and Community in Canada's Isolated Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John; Anderson, Kirk; Jamal, Samina

    This paper presents highlights from surveys of some of Canada's most isolated schools, located in northern Labrador, Nunavut, northern Saskatchewan, and northern and interior British Columbia. Most served Inuit or other First Nations communities. Although all schools had contact by phone and most had e-mail, few were accessible by road. Five Inuit…

  5. Northern forests, Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.H. Pardo; C.L. Goodale; E.A. Lilleskov; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The Northern Forests ecological region spans much of Canada, from Saskatchewan to Newfoundland; its southern portion extends into the northern United States (CEC 1997). The U.S. component includes the northern hardwood and spruce-fir forest types and encompasses parts of the Northeast (mountainous regions in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut,...

  6. School Autonomy and 21st Century Learning: The Canadian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul; da Costa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the policy and practice contexts for school autonomy and twenty-first century learning in Canadian provinces. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on an analysis of policies in Canadian provinces (particularly the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan). The authors review policies…

  7. South of Sahara | Page 6 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improved food processing and preparation methods, coupled with education programs, have contributed to improved nutrition, with mothers learning to incorporate chickpeas into complementary foods. Hawassa University has become a center of excellence on nutrition in Ethiopia — the University of Saskatchewan has ...

  8. Advancing biological control of the wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus) – new strategies in a 100 year struggle to manage a costly pest in the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus, Norton), has become a destructive pest of cereal crops in the Northern Great Plains, including: Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba. Wheat stem sawflies (WSS) typically infest wheat (Triticum sp.), but they also d...

  9. Report of the International Ice Patrol in the North Atlantic. 1989 Season Bulletin Number 75

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    LIBERIA 1 SAMUEL H ARMACOST BAHAMAS 5 5 SAN LORENZO UNITED KINGDOM 4 i SARAH LIBERIA 1 SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER CANADA 4 ESCHWANENTOR UNKNOWN I...BADAK LIBERIA 1 BAFFIN CANADA 4 BAFFIN RESOLUTEBAY ANTIGUA - BARBUBA 3 BALSA 8 PHILLIPINES 1 BALTASAR ALVARES POLAND 13 BALTIC SUN NETHERLANDS 2

  10. Effective Programmatic Tutor Training for Interprofessional Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eon, Marcel; Proctor, Peggy; Bassendowski, Sandra; Dobson, Roy; Udahl, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    A provincial initiative to encourage interprofessional education and research resulted in the implementation of three interprofessional PBL (iPBL) modules at the University of Saskatchewan. The ambitious target of 1200 student iPBL experiences over three years presented a substantial teaching development challenge. Training incorporated many of…

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 277 of 277 ... O Ntshebe, JMN Pitso, AK Segobye. Vol 13, No 1 (2016), Third-world realities in a first-world setting: A study of the HIV/AIDS-related conditions and risk behaviors of sex trade workers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, Abstract PDF. Yelena Bird, Mark Lemstra, Marla Rogers, John Moraros.

  12. SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS - Vol 13, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Third-world realities in a first-world setting: A study of the HIV/AIDS-related conditions and risk behaviors of sex trade workers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Yelena Bird, Mark Lemstra, Marla Rogers, John ...

  13. Neighborhood Poverty Impacts Children's Physical Health and Well-Being over Time: Evidence from the Early Development Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushon, Jennifer A.; Vu, Lan T. H.; Janzen, Bonnie L.; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to investigate how neighborhoods and neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage impact school readiness over time. School readiness was measured using the Early Development Instrument (EDI) for 3 populations of kindergartners in 2001, 2003, and 2005 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. EDI results…

  14. Sylvatic plague in a Canadian black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonation, Kym S; Shury, Todd K; Bollinger, Trent K; Olson, Adam; Mabon, Philip; Van Domselaar, Gary; Corbett, Cindi R

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) was found dead in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada. Postmortem gross and histologic findings indicated bacterial septicemia, likely due to Yersinia pestis, which was confirmed by molecular analysis. This is the first report of Y. pestis in the prairie dog population within Canada.

  15. Knowledge Translation Strategies in a Community-University Partnership: Examining Local Quality of Life (QoL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison; Holden, Bill; Krebs, Peter; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Waygood, Kate; Randall, James; Spence, Cara

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing interest in quality of life as an integrated approach to addressing key social, environmental and economic determinants of health. The University of Saskatchewan's Community-University Institute for Social Research, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (grant #410-2004-0669) has examined the process and…

  16. Computer-Mediated Communication: Faculty and Student Conversations during the Field Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzuba, Ethelwyn June

    This thesis describes computer-mediated communication between 15 health and physical education preservice teachers at the University of Regina (Saskatchewan, Canada) and a faculty contact person during the field experience. Discourse using an interactive computer network system called UNIBASE was analyzed to examine communication patterns on the…

  17. Mobile Devices and Their Use in Library Professional Practice: The Health Librarian and the Ipad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Vicky; Kumaran, Maha; Lê, Mê-Linh; Murphy, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices are being extensively adopted by health sciences faculty, students, and practitioners, but there is little evidence of how this technology is being used by health librarians in their own professional practice. In 2011, health sciences librarians at the University of Saskatchewan undertook a project to familiarize themselves with…

  18. UJAS 8.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Coffee Leaf Rust and Coffee Berry Disease are the most devastating diseases of Arabica coffee in. Africa. The importance of coffee in ...... Malhi, S.S. and Kutcher, HR. 2004. Effect of topography, N fertilization and fungicide application on leaf spot diseases, yield and seed quality of wheat in. North-Central. Saskatchewan.

  19. The Group as Support in a Native Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, H. R.; Scarfe, D. R.

    This study examines a specific Indian/Metis teacher education program which uses the group as a support system--the Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP) at Regina. SUNTEP is a part of the Elementary Teacher Education Program of the Univesity of Regina. This paper: (1) discusses the support services and systems provided as a…

  20. Queer Eye on Straight Youth: Homoerotics and Racial Violence in the Narrative Discourse of White Settler Masculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNinch, James

    2008-01-01

    In September 2001, three white men from Tisdale Saskatchewan sexually assaulted a 12-year-old Saulteaux girl from the Yellow Quill First Nations. At the time, this Reserve was known for having what was called "the worst water in Canada," while nearby Tisdale still advertises itself as the land of "sparkling waters" and the land…

  1. Planning Phase - Strengthening Community to Health Facility Care ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The UK medical journal, Lancet, noted that the province also has lower usage of health facility delivery and postnatal care services compared to the rest of the country. Research partnership for health. The Universidade Lurio will collaborate with the University of Saskatchewan to design research to address these ...

  2. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An aluminium(Al) characterisation study was conducted at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant (BPWTP) in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada) to understand better the effect of alum coagulant on various Al fractions. The raw water source for BPWTP is Buffalo Pound Lake water. The Al ...

  3. Soil bacteria help Ethiopian farmers grow more nutritious and higher ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The opportunity: Locally enhanced pulse seeds. A Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) project led by scientists at the University of Saskatchewan in. Canada and Hawassa University in Ethiopia has found a way to feed the depleted soil and add protein to people's diets. Their efforts are critical to ...

  4. Milne "en Masse": A Case Study in Digitizing Large Image Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkema, Craig; Avery, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    In December 2012, the University of Saskatchewan Library's University Archives and Special Collections acquired the complete image collection of Courtney Milne, a professional photographer whose worked encompassed documentary, abstract and fine art photographs. From acquisition to digital curation, the authors identify, outline, and discuss the…

  5. Moral Education Polices in Five Canadian Provinces: Seeking Clarity, Consistency and Coherency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, K.; Donlevy, J. K.; Gereluk, D.; Patterson, P.; Brar, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper asks the question, "What is the current status of provincial moral education polices in the five Canadian provinces which have mandated or optional moral education programs: Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, and Alberta?" It then offers a response through an analysis of the relevant policies in those provinces…

  6. Toward Instructional Leadership: Principals' Perceptions of Large-Scale Assessment in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytula, Michelle; Noonan, Brian; Hellsten, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the perceptions that Saskatchewan school principals have regarding large-scale assessment reform and their perceptions of how assessment reform has affected their roles as principals. The findings revealed that large-scale assessments, especially provincial assessments, have affected the principal in Saskatchewan…

  7. Epilepsy and homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  8. B cells contribute to MS pathogenesis through antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson HL

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heather L Wilson1,21Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaAbstract: For many years, central dogma defined multiple sclerosis (MS as a T cell-driven autoimmune disorder; however, over the past decade there has been a burgeoning recognition that B cells contribute to the pathogenesis of certain MS disease subtypes. B cells may contribute to MS pathogenesis through production of autoantibodies (or antibodies directed at foreign bodies, which unfortunately cross-react with self-antigens, through promotion of T cell activation via antigen presentation, or through production of cytokines. This review highlights evidence for antibody-dependent and antibody-independent B cell involvement in MS pathogenesis.Keywords: autoantibodies, antibody targets, clinically isolated MS, primary progressive MS, secondary progressive MS, relapsing and remitting MS, T cells, T regulatory cells

  9. A financial dog no more

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, M.

    1996-07-29

    A $1.7 billion heavy oil processing plant just inside Saskatchewan along the Alberta border, was discussed. The Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader processes local heavy crudes into synthetic oils. It is now equally owned by the Saskatchewan government and Husky Oil. In 1994, the Alberta government sold its 24.2% stake in the processor for $32 million; the federal government also bailed out. Husky has recently announced that the upgrader is finally in the black after months of painstaking reassessment of every aspect of the operation from feedstock to labour, and making constant improvements. Daily output is 57,000 barrels. Where in the past Husky Oil needed a spread of US$6 per barrel to make money, it can now stay afloat and be profitable with only about US$3.30 per barrel.

  10. The First Smallpox Epidemic on the Canadian Plains: In the Fur-traders' Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Stuart Houston

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available William Tomison, in charge of the Hudson's Bay Company's Cumberland House on the Saskatchewan River, described the devastating smallpox epidemic of 1781 and 1782. He understood contagion, practised isolation and disinfection, and provided mortality statistics during a 'virgin soil' epidemic. Above all, he showed remarkable compassion. He and his men took dying Indians into their already crowded quarters, and provided them with food, shelter and 24 h care. This article describes the epidemic and its aftermath.

  11. Breast and pelvic examinations: easing women's discomfort.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, R.; Opdahl, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether women prefer male or female physicians for gynecologic examinations, whether they want a third person present during examinations, and what behaviour physicians and third persons should exhibit. We also sought to determine whether women had experienced any unprofessional behaviour from doctors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, 17-item questionnaire. SETTING: Two Saskatchewan family practices: one rural (Melfort), one urban (Saskatoon). PARTICIPANTS: All women 18 years...

  12. Extensive forest leaf area survey aiming at detection of vegetation change in subarctic-boreal zone

    OpenAIRE

    Kusakabe,Tomoko; Tsuzuki,Hayato; Hughes,Gary; Sweda,Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    The warming resulting from increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses is expected to be most prominent in the subarctic-boreal region of the Northern Hemisphere. With the objective of setting up a baseline to monitor possible vegetation change in this region, a continuous vegetation profile extending 600km from Edmonton, Alberta to Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada was measured using an airborne infrared laser altimeter mounted on a helicopter. Then the distribution of...

  13. Career and parenting satisfaction among medical students, residents and physician teachers at a Canadian medical school

    OpenAIRE

    Cujec, B; Oancia, T; Bohm, C; Johnson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of career and parenting satisfaction have focused separately on medical students, residents and practising physicians. The objective of this study was to compare satisfaction across a spectrum of stages of medical career. METHODS: A survey of incoming medical students, current medical students, residents and physician teachers at the University of Saskatchewan was conducted in the spring of 1997. Response rates were 77% (43/56), 81% (177/218), 65% (134/206) and 39% (215/55...

  14. Unearthing new energy potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, M.

    2011-04-15

    An interview with Stan Szary, CEO, Saturn Minerals, about this company's mining developments in Saskatchewan, western Canada, and their growing importance as a provider of energy now and in the future. Company activity in the past decade has revealed the two potential for coals within the Cretaceous Mannville Group and has identified the style of deposition that had complicated the region's coal geology. 2 photos.

  15. Delegation lobbies Ottawa to simplify funding of large national research facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, M

    2003-01-01

    "Two respected proponents of a strong national innovation system led a delegation to Ottawa last week for five days of meetings to push for dramatic change in how Ottawa funds Canada's national research facilities. The Saskatchewan delegation met with key ministers, secretaries of state, DMs and opposition parties to argue for a consolidation of funding sources so that they flow to national facilities through one institution" (1 page).

  16. Cultural Resources Survey for the Lake Darling-Souris River Project, North Dakota (1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-13

    finishings on pottery , the Saskatchewan Basin sequence known from the Morkin Site, and the Cluny Complex, a proto- historic manifestation identified at...the Cluny Site in Alberta. Pottery found on the Souris River may be related to the Late Woodland ceramic-making cultures of seuthern Canada (see... Pottery and Projectile Points (site lead) Schweigert, 1978 " (SW SE ) 32RV435 Servold Homestead House Schweigert, 1978 Sec. 17 (SW NWh) McCarroll Ranch

  17. An examination of internet and land-based gambling among adolescents in three Canadian provinces: results from the youth gambling survey (YGS)

    OpenAIRE

    Tara Elton-Marshall; Leatherdale, Scott T.; Turner, Nigel E

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background With the rapid proliferation of new gambling technology and online gambling opportunities, there is a concern that online gambling could have a significant impact on public health, particularly for adolescents. The aim of this study is to examine online and land-based gambling behaviour among adolescents in 3 Canadian provinces (Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan) prior to the implementation of legalized online gambling. Methods Data are from 10,035 students ...

  18. Connecting Music and Place: Exploring Library Collection Data Using Geo-visualizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Doi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives – This project had two stated objectives: 1 to compare the location and concentration of Saskatchewan-based large ensembles (bands, orchestras, choirs within the province, with the intention to draw conclusions about the history of community-based musical activity within the province; and 2 to enable location-based browsing of Saskatchewan music materials through an interactive search interface. Methods – Data was harvested from MARC metadata found in the library catalogue for a special collection of Saskatchewan music at the University of Saskatchewan. Microsoft Excel and OpenRefine were used to screen, clean, and enhance the dataset. Data was imported into ArcGIS software, where it was plotted using a geo-visualization showing location and concentrations of musical activity by large ensembles within the province. The geo-visualization also allows users to filter results based on the ensemble type (band, orchestra, or choir. Results – The geo-visualization shows that albums from large community ensembles appear across the province, in cities and towns of all sizes. The ensembles are concentrated in the southern portion of the province and there is a correlation between population density and ensemble location. Choral ensembles are more prevalent than bands and orchestras, and appear more widely across the province, whereas bands and orchestras are concentrated around larger centres. Conclusions – Library catalogue data contains unique information for research based on special collections, though additional cleaning is needed. Using geospatial visualizations to navigate collections allows for more intuitive searching by location, and allow users to compare facets. While not appropriate for all kinds of searching, maps are useful for browsing and for location-based searches. Information is displayed in a visual way that allows users to explore and connect with other platforms for more information.

  19. Pulmonary effects of active smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among adolescent students in Juárez, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Bird Y; Staines-Orozco H

    2016-01-01

    Yelena Bird,1 Hugo Staines-Orozco2 1School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Anillo Envolvente del PRONAF y Calle Estocolmo, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico Background: Youth smoking trends among Latin American countries, including Mexico, are on the rise. Notably, although the high prevalence of smoking in teens has been well documented in the liter...

  20. South of Sahara | Page 149 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Hawassa University has become a center of excellence on nutrition in Ethiopia — the University of Saskatchewan has contributed to this achievement as a key ... Bien que les migrants qui se trouvent dans les villes de l'Afrique australe ou qui en proviennent jouent un rôle déterminant au sein du secteur non structuré, les ...

  1. Integration versus assimilation within minority groups in North America: multidimensional acculturation measurement for francophone communities in the Canadian prairies

    OpenAIRE

    López Ruiz, Baltasar

    2014-01-01

    The Francophone communities within the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan constitute the target group of the present study focused on acculturation processes. A survey aiming at measuring acculturation has been conducted, including a total of 223 participants. The data hereby displayed are the result of the statistical treatment of the responses extracted from a 24-question questionnaire, an adapted version of the Vancouver Index of Acculturation model. A multidimensiona...

  2. A Survey of Mining Associated Rockbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-02

    1st International Congress on Rockbursts and Seismicity in Mines, Johannesburg, 1982, SAIMM. Johannesburg, 1984. 28. Herget, G., Mackintosh , A.D. (1987...presented at Fred Leighton Memorial Workshop on Mining Induced Seismicity, 29-30 August 1987, Montreal, Quebec. 30 Monitoring: Various digital arrays. Dates...Johannesburg, 1982, SAIMM, Johannesburg, 1984. 54 References 28. Hlerget, G.. Mackintosh , A.D. (1987) Mining Induced Stresses in Saskatchewan Potash Mines

  3. L'enrichissement des sols et des semences permet d'améliorer la ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    6 juin 2016 ... L'Université d'Awassa est maintenant un centre d'excellence en nutrition en Éthiopie, réalisation à laquelle l'Université de la Saskatchewan a contribué à titre de partenaire clé. L'enrichissement des sols et des semences permet d'améliorer la nutrition (PDF, 517 Ko). Il s'agit de l'une des neuf fiches de la ...

  4. Des solutions novatrices pour accroître la sécurité alimentaire de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    cuisine domestique et les entreprises commerciales et lorsqu'on aura mobilisé les acteurs du secteur. Principaux partenaires de recherche : l'Université de la Saskatchewan (Canada) et l'Université d'Awassa (Éthiopie). Des solutions novatrices pour accroître la sécurité alimentaire de vastes populations dans les pays en ...

  5. Hybrid poplar growth in bioenergy production systems: Biomass prediction with a simple process-based model (3PG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amichev, Beyhan Y.; Van Rees, Ken C.J. [Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Johnston, Mark [Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Saskatchewan Research Council, Environment and Forestry Division, 125 - 15 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 2X8 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    Establishing short-rotation tree plantations for bioenergy and fiber production on agricultural land (abandoned farmland) would provide significant environmental and economic benefits for rural communities and society as a whole. Walker hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x P. nigra) is one of the most commonly used varieties cultivated in Saskatchewan, Canada; however, there are no existing hybrid poplar growth models in the literature. The aim of this work was to parameterize and evaluate the 3PG model (Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth) to predict Walker tree growth in the climate and soils of Saskatchewan. We used annual data from Walker poplar trials (4- to 11-yr old stands) established at three spacing levels (2.4, 3.0, and 3.7 m) at three sites located in central Saskatchewan, Hnr, BH, and ML sites. The data were split into two sets - the modeling set from the Hnr site was used to parameterize 3PG, and the testing sets from the BH and ML sites were used to evaluate Walker growth predictions made by 3PG. The bias, sum(predicted minus observed) divided by number of observations, for tree height predictions ranged from -1.76 to 1.45 m, and bias for diameter at breast height (DBH) ranged from -2.61 to 0.66 cm. Regression R-square values of 3PG-predicted versus observed height and DBH ranged from 0.75 to 0.98. Our results indicated that, once parameterized, 3PG could predict Walker hybrid poplar growth with desirable accuracy by only utilizing commonly available soils and climate data for marginal or more productive agricultural land across Saskatchewan. (author)

  6. BOREAS RSS-11 Ground Network of Sunphotometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Schafer, Joel; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-11 team operated a network of five automated (Cimel) and two hand-held (Miami) solar radiometers from 1994 to 1996 during the BOREAS field campaigns. The data provide aerosol optical depth measurements, size distribution, phase function, and column water vapor amounts over points in northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada. The data are useful for the correction of remotely sensed aircraft and satellite images. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  7. Prioritizing health leadership capabilities in Canada: Testing LEADS in a Caring Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchildon, Gregory P; Fletcher, Amber J

    2016-01-01

    This article is the first major empirical test of LEADS in a Caring Environment, the principal leadership capability framework in Canada. The results rank the perceived salience of leadership attributes, given time and budget constraints, while implementing a major organization reform in the Saskatchewan health system. The results also indicate important differences between self-assessed leadership behaviours versus observed behaviours in other leaders that may reflect participants' expectations of managers with designated authority. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  8. Les premiers succès obtenus en matière de lutte contre la faim en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    8 nov. 2013 ... Des spécialistes du sol et des phytologues de l'Université d'Awassa, en Éthiopie, et de l'Université de la Saskatchewan, au Canada, ont collaboré avec des agriculteurs pour mettre à l'essai la culture en rotation de céréales et de légumineuses à graines comme le haricot, la lentille et le pois chiche.

  9. Integrated population models reveal local weather conditions are the key drivers of population dynamics in an aerial insectivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegman, Mitch D; Arnold, Todd W; Dawson, Russell D; Winkler, David W; Clark, Robert G

    2017-09-01

    Changes to weather patterns under a warming climate are complex: while warmer temperatures are expected virtually worldwide, decreased mean precipitation is expected at mid-latitudes. Migratory birds depend on broad-scale weather patterns to inform timing of movements, but may be more susceptible to local weather patterns during sedentary periods. We constructed Bayesian integrated population models (IPMs) to assess whether continental or local weather effects best explained population dynamics in an environmentally sensitive aerial insectivorous bird, the tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), along a transcontinental gradient from British Columbia to Saskatchewan to New York, and tested whether population dynamics were synchronous among sites. Little consistency existed among sites in the demographic rates most affecting population growth rate or in correlations among rates. Juvenile apparent survival at all sites was stable over time and greatest in New York, whereas adult apparent survival was more variable among years and sites, and greatest in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Fledging success was greatest in Saskatchewan. Local weather conditions explained significant variation in adult survival in Saskatchewan and fledging success in New York, corroborating the hypothesis that local more than continental weather drives the population dynamics of this species and, therefore, demographic synchrony measured at three sites was limited. Nonetheless, multi-population IPMs can be a powerful tool for identifying correlated population trajectories caused by synchronous demographic rates, and can pinpoint the scale at which environmental drivers are responsible for changes. We caution against applying uniform conservation actions for populations where synchrony does not occur or is not fully understood.

  10. Studying abroad: Exploring factors influencing nursing students' decisions to apply for clinical placements in international settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent-Wilkinson, Arlene; Dietrich Leurer, Marie; Luimes, Janet; Ferguson, Linda; Murray, Lee

    2015-08-01

    For over 15 years the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan has facilitated study abroad clinical placements in a number of countries to enhance student learning. Nursing students often find their study abroad experience to be a defining moment in their educational program, and in their personal and professional growth. The main objective of this research was to explore factors influencing nursing students' decisions to study abroad. A descriptive longitudinal design study was conducted using an online survey. The Study Abroad Survey was distributed to all undergraduate and graduate nursing students, in all years of all programs, at all sites of the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan in Saskatchewan, Canada. A total of 1058 nursing students registered in the 2013-2014 academic year were surveyed. The data were collected using an online survey administered by Campus Labs™ (2014). Students indicated that their interest in study abroad international experiences was high (84%), with many perceived benefits, but barriers to participation were also high for these students. Financial barriers topped the list (71%), followed by family responsibilities (30%) and job obligations (23%). The research highlights the factors behind student decision making related to international placements, and provides the basis for improvements to the College of Nursing's International Study Abroad Program (ISAP). Previous travel and international service learning, resulting in increased perceived value of a study abroad experience may prove to be the more significant factor influencing decision making, rather than financial barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Celebrating Co-operation among Saskatchewan’s Libraries: The Multitype Library Board, 1996-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Shires

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Saskatchewan’s Multitype Library Board (MLB celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2016. It was established under the passage of the provincial government’s The Libraries Co- operation Act in 1996 to facilitate the co-operative development of the multitype library system in Saskatchewan. This legislation is unique in Canada. The MLB is a Minister of Education Advisory Board and it provides a forum to promote and facilitate co-operation among over 320 public libraries in 10 provincial systems, 25 post-secondary libraries, 755 school libraries, several special libraries, and other information providers. Major milestones of the MLB include helping to eliminate the Provincial Sales Tax on library subscriptions, establishing a provincial digitization plan, and creating a cross-sector database licensing program that has resulted in a projected value of 14.8 million dollars to Saskatchewan users in 2014. The development of the MLB and the impact of the programs it has initiated will be discussed, and recommendations for developing a collaborative initiative will be provided. Le Multitype Library Board (MLB de Saskatchewan fête son 20e anniversaire en 2016. Il était établi sous l’Acte The Libraries Co-operation du parti Libéral en 1996 pour faciliter le développement coopératif du système de bibliothèque Multitype en Saskatchewan. Cette législation est unique au Canada. Le MLB est un comité consultatif du ministère de l’Éducation et il fournit un forum pour promouvoir et faciliter la coopération entre plus de 320 bibliothèques publiques dans dix systèmes provinciaux, 25 bibliothèques postsecondaires, 755 bibliothèques scolaires, plusieurs bibliothèques spéciales, et d’autres fournisseurs d’informations. Les étapes importantes du MLB comprennent, à aider à éliminer les taxes de vente provinciale sur les abonnements aux bibliothèques, à établir un plan provincial de numérisation, et à créer un programme de licence

  12. Scenario-based Water Resources Management Using the Water Value Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Elshorbagy, Amin; Wheater, Howard

    2013-04-01

    The Saskatchewan River is the key water resource for the 3 prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Western Canada, and thus it is necessary to pursue long-term regional and watershed-based planning for the river basin. The water resources system is complex because it includes multiple components, representing various demand sectors, including the environment, which impose conflicting objectives, and multiple jurisdictions. The biophysical complexity is exacerbated by the socioeconomic dimensions associated for example with impacts of land and water management, value systems including environmental flows, and policy and governance dimensions.. We focus on the South Saskatchewan River Basin (SSRB) in Alberta and Saskatchewan, which is already fully allocated in southern Alberta and is subject to increasing demand due to rapid economic development and a growing population. Multiple sectors and water uses include agricultural, municipal, industrial, mining, hydropower, and environmental flow requirements. The significant spatial variability in the level of development and future needs for water places different values on water across the basin. Water resources planning and decision making must take these complexities into consideration, yet also deal with a new dimension—climate change and its possible future impacts on water resources systems. There is a pressing need to deal with water in terms of its value, rather than a mere commodity subject to traditional quantitative optimization. In this research, a value-based water resources system (VWRS) model is proposed to couple the hydrological and the societal aspects of water resources in one integrated modeling tool for the SSRB. The objective of this work is to develop the VWRS model as a negotiation, planning, and management tool that allows for the assessment of the availability, as well as the allocation scenarios, of water resources for competing users under varying conditions. The proposed

  13. Use of low-value radiotherapy practices in Canada: an analysis of provincial cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, K; Rahal, R; Brundage, M; Fung, S; Louzado, C; Milosevic, M; Xu, J; Bryant, H

    2016-10-01

    As part of Choosing Wisely Canada (a national campaign to encourage patient-provider conversations about unnecessary medical tests, treatments, and procedures), a list of ten oncology practices that could be low-value in some instances was developed. Of those practices, two were specific to radiation therapy (rt): conventional fractionation as part of breast-conserving therapy (bct) for women with early-stage breast cancer, and multifraction radiation for palliation of uncomplicated painful bone metastases. Here, we report baseline findings for the current utilization rates of those two rt practices in Canada. The use of conventional fractionation as part of bct varied substantially from province to province. Of women 50 years of age and older, between 8.8% (Alberta) and 36.5% (Saskatchewan) received radiation in 25 fractions (excluding boost irradiation) as part of bct. The use of hypofractionated rt (that is, 16 fractions excluding boost irradiation)-a preferred approach for many patients-was more common in all 6 reporting provinces, ranging from 43.2% in Saskatchewan to 94.7% in Prince Edward Island. The use of multifraction rt for palliation of bone metastases also varied from province to province, ranging from 40.3% in British Columbia to 69.0% in Saskatchewan. The most common number of fractions delivered to bone metastases was 1, at 50.2%; the second most common numbers were 2-5 fractions, at 41.7%. Understanding variation in the use of potentially low-value rt practices can help to inform future strategies to promote higher-value care, which balances high-quality care with the efficient use of limited system resources. Further work is needed to understand the factors contributing to the interprovincial variation observed and to develop benchmarks for the appropriate rate of use of these rt practices.

  14. Drinking Water Management: Health Risk Perceptions and Choices in First Nations and Non-First Nations Communities in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Diane; Waldner, Cheryl; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Plummer, Ryan; Carter, Blair; Cave, Kate; Zagozewski, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between tap water and health has been a topic of public concern and calls for better management in Canada since well-publicized contamination events in two provinces (Ontario and Saskatchewan) in 2000–2001. This study reports the perspectives on health risks from tap water and corresponding use of, and spending on, bottled water in a number of different communities in Canada. In 2009–2010, four First Nations communities (three from Ontario and one from Saskatchewan) and a geographically diverse sample of non-First Nations Canadians were surveyed about their beliefs concerning health risks from tap water and their spending practices for bottled water as a substitute. Responses to five identical questions were examined, revealing that survey respondents from Ontario First Nations communities were more likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe bottled water is safer than tap water (OR 1.6); more likely to report someone became ill from tap water (OR 3.6); more likely to express water and health concerns related to tap water consumption (OR 2.4); and more likely to spend more on bottled water (OR 4.9). On the other hand, participants from one Saskatchewan First Nations community were less likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe that someone had become ill from drinking tap water (OR 3.8), less likely to believe bottled water is safer than tap (OR 2.0), and less likely to have health concerns with tap water (OR 1.5). These differences, however, did not translate into differences in the likelihood of high bottled water expenditures or being a 100% bottled water consumer. The paper discusses how the differences observed may be related to water supply and regulation, trust, perceived control, cultural background, location, and past experience. PMID:24886757

  15. The effects of patient education programs on medication use among asthma and COPD patients: a propensity score matching with a difference-in-difference regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Nazmi; Osman, Meric

    2015-08-17

    Adherence to medication is one of the critical determinants of successful management of chronic diseases including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Given that poor adherence with self-management medication is very common among asthma and COPD patients, interventions that improve the use of chronic disease management medications for this patient group have potential to generate positive health outcomes. In an effort to improve asthma and COPD care, the Lung Association of Saskatchewan has implemented an intervention by providing access to effective and high quality asthma and COPD education for both patients and health care professionals along with increasing access to spirometry. By evaluating the impacts of this intervention, our purpose in this paper is to examine the effectiveness of spirometry use, and asthma and COPD education in primary care setting on medication use among asthma and COPD patients. At the time of the intervention, the Lung Association of Saskatchewan has not assigned a control group. Therefore we used a propensity score matching to create a control group using administrative health databases spanning 6 years prior to the intervention. Using Saskatchewan administrative health databases, the impacts of the intervention on use of asthma and COPD medications were estimated for one to four years after the intervention using a difference in difference regression approach. The paper shows that overall medication use for the intervention group is higher than that of the control group. On average, intervention group uses more asthma and COPD drugs. Within the asthma and COPD drugs, this intervention creates a persistent effect over time in the form of higher utilization of chronic management drugs equivalent to $157 and $195 in a given year during four years after the intervention. The study suggests that effective patient education and increasing access to spirometry increases the utilization of chronic disease management

  16. Settlement in backfill pipelines: its causes and a novel online detection method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goosen, P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available is applicable only for d+ < 5 For coarser slurries to which this method cannot be applied, many other alternative methods for predicting deposition velocity are available, for example the method of Gillies and co-workers (2000) at the Saskatchewan Research... vision-based target tracking for a gun turret utilizing low-performance components. Unpublished MSc thesis, University of Johannesburg. GILLIES, R.G., SHAAN, J., SUMNER, R.J., MCKIBBEN, M.J. and SHOOK, C.A., 2000. Deposition velocities for Newtonian...

  17. Lake Diefenbaker: Water Quality Assessment and Modeling for Management under Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, J.; Wheater, H. S.; Hudson, J.; Doig, L.; Liber, K.; Jones, P.; Giesy, J.; Bharadwaj, L.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary results are presented for a comprehensive inter-disciplinary study on Lake Diefenbaker initiated by the Global Institute for Water Security to understand the physical and biogeochemical processes affecting water quality under climate change and their policy implications. Lake Diefenbaker is a large reservoir (surface area ~500km2 and Zmean ~33m) located in Southern Saskatchewan, Canada and is a critically-important water resource for Saskatchewan. It receives nearly all of its flow from the South Saskatchewan River, which flows through some of the most urbanized and intense agricultural lands of southern Alberta. As a result these waters contain high levels of nutrients [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] along with a variety of chemical contaminants characteristic of anthropogenic activity. In addition, riparian and in-lake activities provide local sources of nutrients, from domestic sewage, agriculture and fish farming. The South Saskatchewan River has been identified by the World Wildlife Fund (2009) as Canada's most threatened river in terms of environmental flow. Lake Diefenbaker has numerous large deep embayments (depth >20m) and an annual water level fluctuation of ~6m. A deep thermocline (~25m) forms infrequently. Stratification does not occur throughout the lake. Anecdotal information suggests that the frequency and severity of algal blooms are increasing; although blooms have been sporadic and localized. This localized eutrophication may be related to local stratification patterns, point source nutrient loading, and/or internal lake processes (i.e., internal nutrient loading). A paleolimnological reconstruction has begun to assess historical nutrient and contaminant loading to Lake Diefenbaker and hence the trajectory of water quality in the lake. Major point sources and diffuse sources of N and P are also under investigation. In addition, the type (N versus P) and degree of nutrient limitation of bacteria and algae are being assessed (spatially

  18. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, A; Bernath, P. F.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; D. Fu; Goutail, F.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; McElroy, C. T.; C. Midwinter; Olson, J. R.; Strong, K.; Walker, K. A.; Wunch, D.; Young, I. J.

    2007-01-01

    The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment) 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W) from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of seve...

  19. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, K.; Walker, K. A.; Olson, J. R.; McElroy, C. T.; C. Midwinter; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; D. Fu; Goutail, F.; Fogal, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Bernath, P. F.; Fraser, A; Wunch, D.; Young, I. J.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment) 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W) from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based meas...

  20. Impacts of sulphur and nitrogen deposition in western Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. SHAW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of transportation sectors (road vehicles and marine vessels, industry (e.g., oil and gas and urban centres in western Canada has triggered a growth in research, monitoring and modelling activities investigating the impacts of sulphur and nitrogen deposition on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This special issue presents an overview of related research in British Columbia (Georgia Basin, Alberta (Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The research provides a valuable benchmark for future studies across the region and points the way forward for 'acid rain' policies in western Canada.

  1. Land Covering Classifications of Boreas Modeling Grid Using AIRSAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Rignot, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Mapping forest types in the boreal ecosystem in an integrated part of any modeling excercise of biogeophysical processes characterizing the interaction of forest with the atmosphere. In this paper, we report the results of the land cover classification of the SAR data acquired during the BOREAS (BOReal Ecosystem Atmospheric Study) intensive field campaigns over the modeling sub-grid of the southern study area in Saskatchewan , Canada. A Bayesian-maximum-a-posteriori classifier has been applied on the NASA/JPL AIRSAR images covering the region during the peak of the growing season in July, 1994.

  2. Diamagnetic measurements in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, Dallas

    2008-11-01

    Diamagnetic measurements of poloidal beta have been successfully performed on the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) using a compensated coil system mounted exterior to the vacuum chamber wall. A significant challenge in performing these measurements on STOR-M is the presence of a decaying toroidal magnetic field over the duration of the discharge. A simple method for compensating these measurements based on independently measuring the vacuum field signal and correcting during post-processing is presented. Measurements of poloidal beta using the diamagnetic coil arrangement are compared to calculations of poloidal beta based on the Spitzer conductivity corrected for trapped electrons.

  3. New office building uses 40% less gas, electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, F.

    1984-05-16

    A new Saskatchewan office building with energy conservation features included in the design stage uses between 40 and 80% less energy than buildings of comparable size. Attention to conservation also lowered building costs 7 to 14%. Pre-planning enabled the designers to reduce the scale of building systems and to use proven technology. Among the building's features are the recovery of condenser waste heat, economizers connecting fan rooms with outside air with a system of modulating dampers, a hard-wired energy managemet system, and a building envelope.

  4. Clarification of some api characteristics in relation to caribou (Rangifer tarandus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William O. Pruitt, Jr.

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2177 comparisons of api hardness vs. density in northern Saskatchewan, southeastern Manitoba and northeastern Finland revealed no consistent correlation (r varied from +.70 to -.17. A total of 1395 comparisons of horizontal hardness of the top layer of api to vertical hardness of the same layer of api in southeastern Manitoba, northeastern Finland and far eastern middle Finland revealed no consistent correlation (r varied from +.99 to -.20. Therefore one cannot substitute density for hardness nor horizontal hardness of the top layer for vertical hardness of the top layer in the terms of the Värriö Snow Index.

  5. BOREAS AES MARSII Surface Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected several data sets related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from six MARSII meteorology stations in the BOREAS region in Canada. Parameters include site, time, temperature, dewpoint, visibility, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, two cloud groups, precipitation, and station pressure. Temporally, the data cover the period of May to September 1994. Geo-graphically, the stations are spread across the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  6. BOREAS AES READAC Surface Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected and processed data related to surface atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from one READAC meteorology station in Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan. Parameters include day, time, type of report, sky condition, visibility, mean sea level pressure, temperature, dewpoint, wind, altimeter, opacity, minimum and maximum visibility, station pressure, minimum and maximum air temperature, a wind group, precipitation, and precipitation in the last hour. The data were collected non-continuously from 24-May-1994 to 20-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  7. Quality of healthcare in Canada: potential for a pan-Canadian measurement standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florizone, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Saskatchewan has embarked on a journey to transform the quality of its healthcare. Through our experiences, we have learned many lessons that could be useful to the development of a pan-Canadian system of measurement aimed at bettering care. However, measurement in isolation is insufficient to achieve improved healthcare. The system needs to be linked to a common improvement agenda. Creating a systematic approach to improvement is only possible through developing the capacities of leaders and front-line staff, by alignment through a common purpose, by focusing on value from the perspective of the customer and by creating measures backed by best practice that are transparent and accountable.

  8. Origin and composition of mineralizing fluids in the Athabasca Basin, Canada; Origine et composition des fluides mineralisateurs dans le Bassin de l'Athabasca, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, A.; Cathelineau, M.; Boiron, M.Ch.; Cuney, M.; Mercadier, J. [G2R, Nancy-Universite, CNRS, CREGU, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Milesi, J.P. [AREVA, BU Mines, Tour Areva, 92 - Paris La Defense (France)

    2009-07-01

    The authors report studies aimed at understanding mechanisms of concentration of uranium in the geological environment of the Athabasca Basin (Saskatchewan, Canada). They describe how two brines, a sodic one and a calcic one, circulated and mixed together while carrying uranium with exceptional and very heterogeneous concentrations. They show that these brines have a common origin and are formed by sea water evaporation, that the calcic brine formed itself by interaction between the sodic brine and platform rocks, and that the interactions of brines with platform rocks and minerals, water radiolysis, and bitumen synthesis have controlled the isotopic content in oxygen, hydrogen and carbon of these brines

  9. Brine migrations in the Athabasca Basin platform, alteration and associated fluid-rock exchanges; Migrations de saumures dans le socle du bassin de l'Athabasca, alteration et echanges fluide-roche associes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercadier, J.; Cathelineau, M.; Richard, A.; Boiron, M.Ch.; Cuney, M. [G2R, Nancy-Universite, CNRS, CREGU, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Milesi, J.P. [AREVA, BU Mines, Tour Areva, 92 - Paris La Defense (France)

    2009-07-01

    Uranium deposits of Athabasca Basin (Saskatchewan, Canada) are considered as the richest in the world. They result from massive percolation of basin brines in the underlying platform. The authors describe the brine movements and how structures and micro-fractures promoted this percolation until very important depths (hundreds of meters under the discordance), and their chemical modifications as they interacted with platform rocks, thus promoting the transformation of an initially sodic brine into a uranium-enriched calcic brine which is essential to the formation of discordance-type deposit

  10. COLLABORATIVE POLICY-MAKING, LAW STUDENTS, AND ACCESS TO JUSTICE: THE REWARDS OF DESTABILIZING INSTITUTIONAL PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brea Lowenberger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heightened concerns and dialogue about access to justice have infused the law school setting in Saskatchewan and, to varying degrees, across the country. If there ever were a time to approach social justice reform differently – to upset traditional parameters around decision making and step around older hierarchies for input and design – it would be now. This article describes the Dean’s Forum on Dispute Resolution and Access to Justice (colloquially known as the Dean’s Forum as a platform for genuine student engagement in the development of public policy in this important area. We offer our combined reflections, gathered inside our “teaching team,” about the unique pedagogical features of our experiment and its challenges. As we continue to grow with the project, we offer this Saskatchewan story as one example of institutional collaboration in a quickly evolving educational and social policy landscape.   L’accès à la justice est une préoccupation croissante et un thème de plus en plus récurrent dans les facultés de droit de la Saskatchewan et, à différents degrés, de l’ensemble du pays. Le temps est venu, semble-t-il, d’aborder la réforme de la justice sociale différemment, de bouleverser les paramètres traditionnels gravitant autour de la prise de décisions et de contourner les hiérarchies plus anciennes en ce qui concerne les données et les concepts. Cet article porte sur le forum du doyen concernant le règlement des conflits et l’accès à la justice (familièrement appelé le Dean’s Forum (forum du doyen comme plateforme pour la participation des étudiants à l’élaboration des politiques publiques dans cet important domaine. Nous présentons l’ensemble des réflexions de notre équipe d’enseignants au sujet des éléments pédagogiques uniques de notre expérience et des difficultés connexes. Nous continuons à grandir avec notre projet, mais nous souhaitions décrire dès maintenant cette

  11. Application of laser-wakefield-based x-ray source to global food security issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, J. C.; Fourmaux, S.; Hallin, E.; Arnison, P.; Brereton, N.; Pitre, F.; Dixon, M.; Tran, N.

    2017-05-01

    We present the development of a high throughput phase contrast screening system based on LWFA Xray sources for plant imaging. We upgraded the INRS laser-betatron beam line and we illustrate its imaging potential through the innovative development of new tools for addressing issues relevant to global food security. This initiative, led by the Global Institute of Food Security (GIFS) at the U of Saskatchewan, aims to elucidate that part of the function that maps environmental inputs onto specific plant phenotypes. The prospect of correlating phenotypic expression with adaptation to environmental stresses will provide researchers with a new tool to assess breeding programs for crops meant to thrive under the climate extremes.

  12. Small modular reactors (SMRs) - the way forward for the nuclear industry in Canada?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam-Aggrey, H. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are being touted as safer, more cost effective and more flexible than traditional nuclear power plants (NPPs). Consequently, it has been argued that SMR technology is pivotal to the revitalization of the nuclear industry at the national and global levels. Drawing mainly on previously published literature, this paper explores the suitability of SMRs for various niche market applications in Canada. The paper examines the potential role of SMRs in providing an opportunity for remote mines and communities in northern Canada to reduce their vulnerability and dependence on costly, high-carbon diesel fuel. Other niche market applications of SMRs explored include: SMRs deployment in Saskatchewan for grid augmentation and as replacement options for Saskatchewan's ageing coal plants; the use of SMRs for bitumen extraction in the Oil Sands, and the potential use of SMRs in Canadian-owned foreign based mines. The socio-economic benefits of SMR deployments are also discussed. Building an SMR industry in Canada could complement the country's extensive expertise in uranium mining, reactor technology, plant operation, nuclear research, and environmental and safety standards, thereby enhancing Canada's ability to offer services throughout the entire nuclear life cycle. The paper also outlines some of the technical, economic and social barriers that could impede the successful introduction of SMRs in Canada. (author)

  13. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Tellez-Zenteno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available José F. Tellez-Zenteno1, Cesar Serrano-Almeida2, Farzad Moien-Afshari11Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.Keywords: epilepsy, gelastic seizures, epilepsy surgery, hypothalamic hamartoma, intractable epilepsy

  14. High potential for selenium biofortification of lentils ( Lens culinaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Ruszkowski, Jamie; Vandenberg, Albert

    2008-11-26

    Beneficial forms of selenium (Se) and their impact on human health are a global topic of interest in public health. We are studying the genetic potential for Se biofortification of pulse crops to improve human nutrition. Lentils ( Lens culinaris L.) are an important protein and carbohydrate food and are a valuable source of essential dietary components and trace elements. We analyzed the total Se concentration of 19 lentil genotypes grown at eight locations for two years in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observed significant genotypic and environmental variation in total Se concentration in lentils and that total Se concentration in lentils ranged between 425 and 673 microg kg(-1), providing 77-122% of the recommended daily intake in 100 g of dry lentils. Over 70% of the Se was present as selenomethionine (SeMet) with a smaller fraction (lentils were grown were rich in Se (37-301 microg kg(-1)) and that lentils grown in Saskatchewan have the potential to provide an excellent natural source of this essential element. Our analyses gave us a preliminary understanding of the genetic basis of Se uptake in lentil and indicated that any potential strategy for micronutrient biofortification in lentil will require choice of field locations that minimize the spatial variability of soil Se content.

  15. Low phytic acid lentils (Lens culinaris L.): a potential solution for increased micronutrient bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Thavarajah, Dil; Vandenberg, Albert

    2009-10-14

    Phytic acid is an antinutrient present mainly in seeds of grain crops such as legumes and cereals. It has the potential to bind mineral micronutrients in food and reduce their bioavailability. This study analyzed the phytic acid concentration in seeds of 19 lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) genotypes grown at two locations for two years in Saskatchewan, Canada. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the levels of phytic acid in commercial lentil genotypes and (2) the impact of postharvest processing and (3) the effect of boiling on the stability of phytic aid in selected lentil genotypes. The phytic acid was analyzed by high-performance anion exchange separation followed by conductivity detection. The Saskatchewan-grown lentils were naturally low in phytic acid (phytic acid = 2.5-4.4 mg g(-1); phytic acid phosphorus = 0.7-1.2 mg g(-1)), with concentrations lower than those reported for low phytic acid mutants of corn, wheat, common bean, and soybean. Decortication prior to cooking further reduced total phytic acid by >50%. As lowering phytic acid intake can lead to increased mineral bioavailability, dietary inclusion of Canadian lentils may have significant benefits in regions with widespread micronutrient malnutrition.

  16. A critical cost benefit analysis of oilseed biodiesel in Canada : a BIOCAP research integration program synthesis paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaney, M.J.T.; Hartley Furtan, W. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada); Loutas, P. [Northstar Engineering, Chico, CA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    This paper investigated resources in Canada with the potential for conversion to biodiesel and analyzed strategies for the development of a biodiesel economy in Saskatchewan. Costs and benefits of biodiesel production were investigated. Producer margins for growing biodiesel crops were examined. Grain transportation and storage methods for various feed materials were discussed, as well as oil extraction and refining strategies that influence non-oil co-products. Biodiesel production technologies were also evaluated, and various distribution methods were discussed. The study determined that the costs and benefits of a biodiesel economy would accrue to many different sectors and sub-sectors, including seed production; farming; agricultural chemicals; fertilizers; grain storage and transportation; biodiesel manufacture and distribution; and petroleum manufacture and distribution. Outlines of impacts on each sector were examined under various scenarios. Results of the study demonstrated that the quantity of low-priced canola that is available in a given year has a significant impact on the profitability of a biodiesel industry in Saskatchewan. 16 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Retail food environments, shopping experiences, First Nations and the provincial Norths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Kristin; Skinner, Kelly; Hay, Travis; LeBlanc, Joseph; Chambers, Lori

    2017-10-01

    This paper looks at the market food environments of First Nations communities located in the provincial Norths by examining the potential retail competition faced by the North West Company (NWC) and by reporting on the grocery shopping experiences of people living in northern Canada. We employed two methodological approaches to assess northern retail food environments. First, we mapped food retailers in the North to examine the breadth of retail competition in the provincial Norths, focussing specifically on those communities without year-round road access. Second, we surveyed people living in communities in northern Canada about their retail and shopping experiences. Fifty-four percent of communities in the provincial Norths and Far North without year-round road access did not have a grocery store that competed with the NWC. The provinces with the highest percentage of northern communities without retail competition were Ontario (87%), Saskatchewan (83%) and Manitoba (72%). Respondents to the survey (n = 92) expressed concern about their shopping experiences in three main areas: the cost of food, food quality and freshness, and availability of specific foods. There is limited retail competition in the provincial Norths. In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario, the NWC has no store competition in at least 70% of northern communities. Consumers living in northern Canada find it difficult to afford nutritious foods and would like access to a wider selection of perishable foods in good condition.

  18. Evaluation of two quantitative PCR assays using Bacteroidales and mitochondrial DNA markers for tracking dog fecal contamination in waterbodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Boa, Tyler; Liljebjelke, Karen; Yost, Christopher K

    2012-12-01

    This study describes a comparative performance evaluation of two qPCR assays targeting a dog-associated Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genetic marker (CanBac-UCD) and a dog mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker. The same fecal and environmental samples were assayed for the two markers thereby allowing direct comparison. A wide range of non-target species including, human, pig, horse, deer, mountain goat, bison, caribou, and moose were tested. Marker persistence was also monitored in freshwater microcosms. Both markers were prevalent in the canine samples collected in Regina, Saskatchewan and Calgary, Alberta, Canada (91% and 98% sensitivity, respectively). The mtDNA marker was detected exclusively in the target species while the CanBac-UCD marker was detected in all the non-target species (31% specificity). The CanBac-UCD marker exhibited faster decay in freshwater microcosms. The markers were rarely detected in the water samples collected from dog parks in Calgary and in Regina as well as from waterbodies and sewage influents in Saskatchewan, indicating possibly low to negligible levels of dog fecal contamination in the sampling areas. Altogether, the results of this study support the utility of the dog mtDNA assay in detecting dog fecal contamination in waterbodies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The communicative power of nurse practitioners in multidisciplinary primary healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Robertson, Susan

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) in facilitating knowledge exchange within multidisciplinary primary healthcare teams. The rationale for the study is that most knowledge transfer and exchange literature is from a single profession perspective; yet, an increasing number of healthcare practitioners work in the context of multidisciplinary teams. There is little research examining the mechanisms by which knowledge crosses professional and disciplinary boundaries. The study's data source is a survey administered to NPs in urban, rural, and remote primary healthcare teams in Saskatchewan. The mapping techniques of social network analysis are applied to the survey data. The study's conclusions concern the structure of the intrateam knowledge-exchange behaviors and, in particular, the role of the NP as knowledge boundary spanner. The study hypothesizes that the hallmark of well-functioning multidisciplinary teams is the effective intrateam knowledge exchange and that Saskatchewan's new NPs bring a "boundary-spanning" capacity to the knowledge exchange of the province's multidisciplinary primary healthcare teams. The study fills this gap in the conceptual and empirical research within the evolving context of the reorganization of primary health care. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. The Roots of North America's First Comprehensive Public Health Insurance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostry, Aleck

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian province of Saskatchewan in 1944 it inherited a long tradition of "socialized" medicine in many rural regions. However, urban medicine was based on fee-for-service payment of physicians and no private health insurance. In crafting North America's first public health insurance system, the government built on the rural medical infrastructure already in place by expanding a rural salaried system of physician payment and successfully promoted a regional comprehensive insurance system piloted in a southern region of the province. However, major demographic shifts from countryside to city during the 1950s, burgeoning physician supply, increased immigration of physicians into the provinces' cities, and aggressive expansion of urban-based private insurance for physician services into rural regions, shifted the balance of medical power away from rural towards urban centers in the province. The increasing resistance, by the medical profession, to health-care reform in Saskatchewan in the 1950s must be considered within a geographic framework as rural regions of the province became the major battleground between government and insurance third party payers. While historical comparisons should not be overstated, re-visiting this struggle may be useful in the current era in which the pressure for privatization of the medical system in Canada appear to be growing.

  1. Optimization of first order decay gas generation model parameters for landfills located in cold semi-arid climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hoang Lan; Ng, Kelvin Tsun Wai; Richter, Amy

    2017-11-01

    Canada has one of the highest waste generation rates in the world. Because of high land availability, land disposal rates in the province of Saskatchewan are high compared to the rest of the country. In this study, landfill gas data was collected at semi-arid landfills in Regina and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and curve fitting was carried out to find optimal k and Lo or DOC values using LandGEM, Afvalzorg Simple, and IPCC first order decay models. Model parameters at each landfill were estimated and compared using default k and Lo or DOC values. Methane generation rates were substantially overestimated using default values (with percentage errors from 55 to 135%). The mean percentage errors for the optimized k and Lo or DOC values ranged from 11.60% to 19.93% at the Regina landfill, and 1.65% to 10.83% at the Saskatoon landfill. Finally, the effect of different iterative methods on the curve fitting process was examined. The residual sum of squares for each model and iterative approaches were similar, with the exception of iterative method 1 for the IPCC model. The default values in these models fail to represent landfills located in cold semi-arid climates. The use of site specific data, provided enough information is available regarding waste mass and composition, can greatly help to improve the accuracy of these first order decay models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reasons for reoperation after epilepsy surgery: a review based on a complex clinical case with three operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F Téllez-Zenteno

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available José F Téllez-Zenteno1, Farzad Moien-Afshari1, Lizbeth Hernández-Ronquillo1, Robert Griebel2, Venkat Sadanand21Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, CanadaAbstract: The results of surgical treatment of epileptic seizures have gradually improved in the past decade, approaching 60% to 90% seizure-free outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy and 45% to 66% in extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Unfortunately some patients continue with seizures after epilepsy surgery and the studies have shown that approximately the 3% to 15% of patients with a previous failed surgical procedure are reoperated. Selected patients may be candidates for further surgery, potentially leading to a significant decrease in the frequency and severity of seizures. In patients with intractable partial epilepsy there are many possible factors, alone or in combination, that could be related to the failure of resection. Some of the factors could be genetic or acquired predisposition to epileptogenicity. In this article we report a case with intractable epilepsy that required three interventions to render seizure free. We analyzed our specific case in the light of previous reports on reoperation and enumerate the potential reasons or reoperation that could apply to all patients with failure of an initial procedure.Keywords: intractable epilepsy, reoperation, epilepsy surgery, surgical failure

  3. Is neck pain associated with worse health-related quality of life 6 months later? A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolet, P. S.; Cote, P.; Kristman, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Current evidence suggests that neck pain is negatively associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, these studies are cross-sectional and do not inform the association between neck pain and future HRQoL. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate...... of future poor physical HRQoL in the population. Raising awareness of the possible future impact of neck pain on physical HRQoL is important for health-care providers and policy makers with respect to the management of neck pain in populations....... Saskatchewan adults were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures were the mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) of the Short-Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire. METHODS: We formed a cohort of 1,100 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults in September 1995. We used the Chronic Pain...... Questionnaire to measure neck pain and its related disability. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to measure physical and mental HRQoL 6 months later. Multivariable linear regression was used to measure the association between graded neck pain and HRQoL while controlling for confounding. Analysis of variance...

  4. Retail food environments, shopping experiences, First Nations and the provincial Norths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Burnett

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper looks at the market food environments of First Nations communities located in the provincial Norths by examining the potential retail competition faced by the North West Company (NWC and by reporting on the grocery shopping experiences of people living in northern Canada. Methods: We employed two methodological approaches to assess northern retail food environments. First, we mapped food retailers in the North to examine the breadth of retail competition in the provincial Norths, focussing specifically on those communities without year-round road access. Second, we surveyed people living in communities in northern Canada about their retail and shopping experiences. Results: Fifty-four percent of communities in the provincial Norths and Far North without year-round road access did not have a grocery store that competed with the NWC. The provinces with the highest percentage of northern communities without retail competition were Ontario (87%, Saskatchewan (83% and Manitoba (72%. Respondents to the survey (n = 92 expressed concern about their shopping experiences in three main areas: the cost of food, food quality and freshness, and availability of specific foods. Conclusion: There is limited retail competition in the provincial Norths. In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario, the NWC has no store competition in at least 70% of northern communities. Consumers living in northern Canada find it difficult to afford nutritious foods and would like access to a wider selection of perishable foods in good condition.

  5. Decreasing Rates of Neomycin Sensitization in Western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John F; Abbas, Mariam; Hull, Peter; de Gannes, Gillian; Toussi, Reza; Milani, Azita

    2016-09-01

    Neomycin contact sensitization rates in North America range from 7% to 13%, whereas in Europe they average approximately 1.9%. Given that topical neomycin products are no longer readily available in Canada, the aim of this study was to examine what influence this may have had on neomycin sensitization rates in the 3 western provinces. On the basis of an observation originally communicated by L. M. Parsons and C. Zhang of the University of Calgary, which suggested significantly reduced rates of neomycin sensitization in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, a multicenter study of patch test results from 5690 patient charts was undertaken. Data from 3 other western Canadian Universities (the University of Saskatchewan, the University of Alberta, and the University of British Colombia) were analyzed. Data were available from 2001 to 2013 for the University of Saskatchewan (except 2006), whereas the University of Alberta and the University of British Columbia had data from 2009 to 2013. Descriptive statistics, trend analysis, and risk estimates were determined using SPSS version 20. Sensitization rates for neomycin have decreased in western Canada and are now similar to those of Europe. This trend is likely influenced by the reduced availability of over-the-counter and prescription neomycin products in Canada. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Miscible displacement in the Weyburn reservoir: A laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S.S (Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)); Dyer, S.B. (PanCanadian Petorleum Ltd., AB (Canada))

    1993-09-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of various solvents (including the potential source of carbon dioxide extracted from flue gas) for the recovery of oil from a southeast Saskatchewan reservoir, the Weyburn. The physical, chemical, and phase behavior (PVT) properties of the dead oil, reservoir fluid, and reservoir fluid with carbon dioxide, were determined. Slim tube tests were conducted for the Weyburn reservoir fluid with pure carbon dioxide, with wellhead gas from the Steelman gas plant, and with two impure carbon dioxide gases (one containing 9.9 mol % CH[sub 4] and the other containing 5.1 mol % N[sub 2] and 5.1 mol % CH[sub 4]), at various pressures and the reservoir temperature of 59[degree]C. Tests were also carried out to determine the maximum amount of impurities that can be tolerated for the miscible process. The minimum miscibility pressures (MMP) determined for the systems demonstrated that miscible displacement using pure CO[sub 2] or impure gas containing up to 9.9 mol % CH[sub 4] as a solvent is a promising enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technique for southest Saskatchewan reservoirs. The MMPs are below the estimated reservoir fracture pressure. The wellhead gas from the Steelman gas plant is not a suitable EOR agent for the Weyburn reservoir. MMPs determined by the rising bubble method were in good agreement with slim tube test results, and this method is considered superior. 20 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Allergic rhinitis and genetic components: focus on Toll-like receptors (TLRs gene polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Gao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Zhiwei Gao1, Donna C Rennie2, Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan11Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2College of Nursing and Canadian Centre for Health and Agricultural Safety, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaAbstract: Allergic rhinitis represents a global health issue affecting 10% to 25% of the population worldwide. Over the years, studies have found that allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, are associated with immunological responses to antigens driven by a Th2-mediated immune response. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses to a broad variety of antigens, the association between polymorphisms of TLRs and allergic diseases has been the focus in many animal and human studies. Although the etiology of allergic rhinitis is still unknown, extensive research over the years has confirmed that the underlying causes of allergic diseases are due to many genetic and environmental factors, along with the interactions among them, which include gene–environment, gene–gene, and environment–environment interactions. Currently, there is great inconsistency among studies mainly due to differences in genetic background and unique gene–environment interactions. This paper reviews studies focusing on the association between TLR polymorphisms and allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, which would help researchers better understand the role of TLR polymorphisms in the development of allergic rhinitis, and ultimately lead to more efficient therapeutic interventions being developed.Keywords: allergic rhinitis, allergic diseases, Toll-like receptors

  8. Medial release and lateral imbrication for intractable anterior knee pain: diagnostic process, technique, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum AR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Meldrum,1 Jeremy R Reed,2 Megan D Dash3 1Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Regina, SK, Canada; 3Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, SK, Canada Purpose: To present two cases of intractable patellofemoral pain syndrome treated with a novel procedure, arthroscopic medial release, and lateral imbrication of the patellar retinaculum. Patients and methods: This case series presents the treatment of three knees in two patients (one bilateral in whom an all-inside arthroscopic medial release and lateral imbrication of the patellar retinaculum was performed. Subjective measurement of pain was the primary outcome measurement, and subjective patellofemoral instability was the secondary outcome measurement. Results: Subjectively the two patients had full resolution of their pain, without any patellofemoral instability. Conclusion: Medial release and lateral imbrication of the patellar retinaculum is a new surgical procedure that has been used in the treatment of intractable patellofemoral pain syndrome. This is the first report of its kind in the literature. While outcome measurements were less than ideal, the patients had positive outcomes, both functionally and in terms of pain. Keywords: anterior knee pain syndrome, chondromalacia patellae, runners knee, patellar chondropathy, patellofemoral dysfunction, patellofemoral tracking disorder

  9. Association between labetalol use for hypertension in pregnancy and adverse infant outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ri-hua; Guo, Yanfang; Krewski, Daniel; Mattison, Donald; Walker, Mark C; Nerenberg, Kara; Wen, Shi Wu

    2014-04-01

    Labetalol and methyldopa are the two antihypertensive drugs most frequently used to control blood pressure for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to assess if labetalol is associated with poor infant outcomes. Retrospective population-based cohort study using the linked maternal/infant databases in the Province of Saskatchewan. Women with a diagnosis of a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy who delivered a singleton in Saskatchewan from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2005 and who were dispensed only labetalol or only methyldopa were included in the study. Occurrences of small for gestational age (SGA)labetalol only and 923 received methyldopa only during pregnancy. For women with chronic hypertension, the rate of hospitalization for RDS, sepsis, and seizure during infancy was significantly higher for infants born to mothers who were dispensed labetalol only as compared with infants born to mothers who were dispensed methyldopa only (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-2.22). Compared with methyldopa, the use of labetalol for chronic hypertension of pregnancy may be associated with increased rate of hospitalization during infancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Decommissioning costs and financial assurances for uranium mines and mills in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, R. [AREVA/COGEMA Resources Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' The Athabasca Basin region of northern Saskatchewan is now the location of all uranium production in Canada. About one-third of world primary production originates from the region with seven projects, as follows, currently licensed by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and by Saskatchewan Environment (SE): Rabbit Lake - underground and (formerly) open pit mining, mill, tailings management facilities - operating. Cluff Lake - underground and open pit mining, mill, tailings management facility - decommissioning (operations ceased in 2002). Key Lake - (formerly) open pit mining, mill, tailings management facilities - operating (ore from McArthur River). McClean Lake - open pit mining, mill, tailings management facility - operating. McArthur River - underground mine (ore to Key Lake) - operating. Cigar lake - underground mine - construction - Midwest - future mine development - site preparation licence. Preliminary decommissioning plans, and financial guarantees for future decommissioning, are a requirement of each licence. The Elliot Lake area of Canada has also had extensive uranium mining and milling activities, with the last operating mine closing in 1996. Decommissioning has been completed by the licensees, however monitoring, care and maintenance of the sites is ongoing. This leads to a reduced, but ongoing, requirement for financial guarantees. Decommissioning objectives for a uranium mine and mill site must consider that the waste rock and tailings resulting from the operation, as well as the majority of the waste materials resulting from removing the physical facilities, will be managed on site for the long term. This is a fundamental difference from many other types of nuclear facilities, where all of the physical facilities, and the wastes which have been produced during operations, are removed and disposed elsewhere. Other factors which differ from many other nuclear facilities are the remote location, and the need for an

  11. Genetic status and conservation of Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Glacier National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; D'Angelo, Vincent S.; Downs, Christopher C.; Powell, John D.; Amish, Stephen J.; Luikart, Gordon; Kovach, Ryan; Boyer, Matthew; Kalinowski, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive hybridization is one of the greatest threats to the persistence of Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi. Large protected areas, where nonhybridized populations are interconnected and express historical life history and genetic diversity, provide some of the last ecological and evolutionary strongholds for conserving this species. Here, we describe the genetic status and distribution of Westslope Cutthroat Trout throughout Glacier National Park, Montana. Admixture between Westslope Cutthroat Trout and introduced Rainbow Trout O. mykiss and Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout O. clarkii bouvieri was estimated by genotyping 1,622 fish collected at 115 sites distributed throughout the Columbia, Missouri, and South Saskatchewan River drainages. Currently, Westslope Cutthroat Trout occupy an estimated 1,465 km of stream habitat and 45 lakes (9,218 ha) in Glacier National Park. There was no evidence of introgression in samples from 32 sites along 587 km of stream length (40% of the stream kilometers currently occupied) and 17 lakes (2,555 ha; 46% of the lake area currently occupied). However, nearly all (97%) of the streams and lakes that were occupied by nonhybridized populations occurred in the Columbia River basin. Based on genetic status (nonnative genetic admixture ≤ 10%), 36 Westslope Cutthroat Trout populations occupying 821 km of stream and 5,482 ha of lakes were identified as “conservation populations.” Most of the conservation populations (N = 27; 736 km of stream habitat) occurred in the Columbia River basin, whereas only a few geographically restricted populations were found in the South Saskatchewan River (N = 7; 55 km) and Missouri River (N = 2; 30 km) basins. Westslope Cutthroat Trout appear to be at imminent risk of genomic extinction in the South Saskatchewan and Missouri River basins, whereas populations in the Columbia River basin are widely distributed and conservation efforts are actively addressing threats from

  12. The liberal party and the achievement of national Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, P E

    2009-01-01

    The process that led to the implementation of a full national health insurance system in Canada was as complicated and contested as the battles that were fought over Medicare in Saskatchewan. The federal Liberal party had to first adopt health insurance as a serious component of its electoral platform, devise a strategy for dealing with provinces which had constitutional jurisdiction over health, and finally wrestle with those within the party--and within the cabinet--who continued to question whether Canada was financially prepared to administer such a costly program. The strategies were devised and the battles were fought privately, but had an important effect on the timing and shape of a national health insurance system.

  13. Concentrations and health effects of potash dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, J W; Tan, L K

    1981-09-01

    In an investigation of the relationship between atmospheric dust levels and worker health, the respiratory dust exposures of employees at two Saskatchewan potash mines were examined following atmospheric measurements. Some, notably those of the mining crew and the screening operators, were above the Threshold Limit Value 8-hour Time Weighted Average (TLV-TWA) for total nuisance particulates specified by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Respiratory symptoms were recorded and forced expiratory lung function tests were done among 850 volunteers drawn from an eligible work force of 931. The results were compared between low and higher exposure groups after allowing for personal factors such as age and smoking habits. Symptoms of Grade I chronic phlegm production and mild shortness of breath and chronic cough were more common in the higher exposure groups, but episodes of chest illness were not. Severe respiratory symptoms were rare. There were no statistically significant differences in the proportions performing lung function tests below predicted values.

  14. A Preventive Approach to Impetigo of Treaty Indians Using Staphylococcus Polyvalent Somatic Antigen Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenberg, H.; Waldron, M. P. D.

    1963-01-01

    In a controlled study, Greenberg's staphylococcal polyvalent somatic antigen vaccine was administered to 190 Indian volunteers of a reserve in Saskatchewan in an attempt to reduce the incidence of impetigo. An intradermal skin test dose of 0.1 ml. was given initially. Reactors were forthwith placed in a separate category, otherwise this test injection was followed by intramuscular injection of 0.25 ml. of the vaccine, repeated a second time after six weeks. One hundred and sixty-nine controls received “placebo vaccine”. Four months later the number of cases of impetigo in the vaccinated group had been reduced from 55 to 16. There was no reduction in the control group. The preventive effect waned after five months. The results of this field trial are considered encouraging. PMID:14052980

  15. Piikani wind power project : sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Big Bull, W. [Piikuni Utilities Corp., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation reviewed the potential environmental impacts that a wind turbine array may have on the sacred way of life of the Piikuni Nation, an Aboriginal community living in Blackfoot Territory in Alberta and Saskatchewan. A map depicting the traditional land use area as delineated in an 1877 Treaty was presented. Companies that require access to the land must be aware of historic sites and utilize protocol to approach First Nations communities. The community consultation process is driven by a desire to embark in partnerships to ensure that best practice methods are used throughout the duration of the project. The Weather Dancer 1 is a 100 MW wind power joint venture project between the Piikani Utilities Corporation and EPCOR. Electricity is presently being sold to the city of Edmonton. figs.

  16. The Interplay of Content and Community in Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication: Virtual Communication in a Graduate Seminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Schwier

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A group of graduate students and an instructor at the University of Saskatchewan experimented with the use of synchronous communication (chat and asynchronous communication (bulletin board in a theory course in Educational Communications and Technology for an eight-month period. Synchronous communication contributed dramatically to the continuity and convenience of the class, and promoted a strong sense of community. At the same time, it was viewed as less effective than asynchronous communication for dealing with content and issues deeply, and it introduced a number of pedagogical and intellectual limitations. We concluded that synchronous and asynchronous strategies were suitable for different types of learning, and what we experienced was a balancing act between content and community in our group. A combination of synchronous and asynchronous experiences seems to be necessary to promote the kind of engagement and depth required in a graduate seminar.

  17. Spatiotemporal trends in Canadian domestic wild boar production and habitat predict wild pig distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Nicole; Laforge, Michel; van Beest, Floris

    2017-01-01

    eradication of wild pigs is rarely feasible after establishment over large areas, effective management will depend on strengthening regulations and enforcement of containment practices for Canadian domestic wild boar farms. Initiation of coordinated provincial and federal efforts to implement population...... wild boar and test the propagule pressure hypothesis to improve predictive ability of an existing habitat-based model of wild pigs. We reviewed spatiotemporal patterns in domestic wild boar production across ten Canadian provinces during 1991–2011 and evaluated the ability of wild boar farm...... distribution to improve predictive models of wild pig occurrence using a resource selection probability function for wild pigs in Saskatchewan. Domestic wild boar production in Canada increased from 1991 to 2001 followed by sharp declines in all provinces. The distribution of domestic wild boar farms in 2006...

  18. A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The stilt is identified by its distinct head pattern of black and white, its very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. The stilt's habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  19. Beaverlodge mine closure current challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, M.; Alonso, J.; Jarrell, J., E-mail: jean_alonso@cameco.com [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Beaverlodge mine and mill facilities operated from 1952 until 1982. Site decommissioning was completed in 1985 and a transition monitoring/maintenance phase followed. As described in this paper, although some properties have recently been transferred into Saskatchewan's newly established institutional control program, most properties remain in transition phase, originally envisioned to last 10 years. Reclamation/decommissioning expectations were initially established, but over time societal and regulatory expectations and regulatory processes have changed. Cameco recently established a management framework to guide potential remedial activities which has been accepted by regulatory agencies. The framework seeks to balance current decommissioning expectations with the presence of legacy issues and past close-out agreements, ultimately relying on benefit-cost evaluation to determine final acceptance criteria for sites. (author)

  20. Effects of oil sands sediments on fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, J.; Colavecchia, M.; Hewitt, L.; Sherry, J.; Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Turcotte, D.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a collaborative project organized by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Panel of Energy Research and Development (PERD) with researchers from Environment Canada and the University of Saskatchewan. The 4-year study was conducted to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments and river waters, and reclamation ponds and sediments on laboratory-raised fish. Three sediments from rivers were evaluated for their potential to cause adverse impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larvae for a period of 18 days. The study monitored hatching, larval survival, development, and growth. Naphthenic acids (NA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were measured in the sediments to determine if the compounds can be correlated with observed toxicity. The study will also assess walleye eggs exposed to sediments, and in situ fish exposures. Toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) studies will be conducted to isolate the fractions that may affect fish development and growth.

  1. Disseminated visceral coccidiosis in sandhill cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.N.; Fayer, R.; Iverson, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC) caused by Eimeria spp was first recognized as a disease entity in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Because cranes produced at the Center are reintroduced to the wild to augment wild populations, studies involving both experimentally induced and natural infections were initiated to determine the potential or actual occurrence of DVC in wild Gruidae. Nine sandhill cranes dosed orally with eimerian oocysts of wild origin developed lesions characteristic of DVC. Extraintestinal granulomas associated with developing schizonts were found in 6 birds. Similar lesions were observed in wild sandhill cranes throughout parts of midwestern United States, Alaska, and Saskatchewan. These studies revealed the wide geographic distribution and the high frequency of occurrence of DVC in wild cranes.

  2. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  3. Integrated use of NMR, petrel and modflow in the modeling of SAGD produced water re-injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K. [Miswaco(CANADA); Phair, C [Mneme Corp, CALGARY (Canada); Alloisio, S [SWS, Vancouver (CANADA); Novotny, M [SWS, Denver, (United States); Raven, S [Oilsands Quest Inc., Calgary (CANADA)

    2011-07-01

    In the oil industry, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a method used to enhance oil recovery in which production water disposal is a challenge. During this process, production water is re-injected into the reservoir and operators have to verify that it will not affect the quality of the surrounding fresh groundwater. This research aimed at determining the flow path and the time that produced water would take to reach an adjacent aquifer. This study was carried out on a horizontal well pair at the Axe Lake Area in northwestern Saskatchewan, using existing site data in Petrel to create a static hydrogeological model which was then exported to Modflow to simulate injection scenarios. This innovative method provided flow path of the re-injected water and time to reach the fresh with advantages over conventional hydrogeological modeling. The innovative workflow presented herein successfully provided useful information to assess the feasibility of the SAGD project and could be used for other projects.

  4. Low-frequency electric and magnetic fields evaluation of power lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenke, B.; Catania, P.J. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Brown, D. [Government of Saskatchewan, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    This article reports the outcome of a study commissioned by the Radiation Safety Unit, Government of Saskatchewan, which addressed the public concern on exposure to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) surrounding power lines. Measurements of EMF are reported for 14.4 to 230 kV power lines utilizing a model HI-3600-02 extreme low frequency (ELF) power frequency EMF survey meter. Field intensities were within the Canadian standards, with the recorded value for a 230 kV/230 kV line voltage yielding a maximum electric field of 1,790 V/m at 15 feet from the center and a maximum magnetic field intensity of 2,376 mA/m at 25 feet from the center. Continued research and analysis are required in determining the mechanism of interaction between EMFs and the human body and to determine if there exists a correlation between EMF exposure and health.

  5. Adaptive relaying for ground fault protection of a distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachdev, M.S.; Sidhu, T.S.; Talukdar, B.K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Adaptive protection was used for designing a protection system for the City of Saskatoon`s distribution network. The software and hardware were developed and the protection system was implemented in the laboratory at the University of Saskatchewan. In the first phase of the project, phase overcurrent relays were coordinated on the basis of three-phase faults. Most faults in distribution networks were single-phase to ground faults. Ground fault currents varied due to different grounding practices, changes in operating conditions and system topology. In the second phase of the project, adaptive capabilities for ground overcurrent and directional ground overcurrent protection were added. Software modules developed for achieving adaptive ground fault protection were described. Results from system studies carried out using the City of Saskatoon`s distribution network were also analyzed. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study. AECL research No. AECL-10851

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, J.J.; Smellie, J.A.T. (eds.)

    1994-07-15

    AECL has conducted natural analog studies on the Cigar Lake uranium deposit in northern Saskatchewan since 1984 as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This report provides background information and summarizes the results of the study, emphasizing the analog aspects and the implications of modelling activities related to the performance assessment of disposal concepts for nuclear fuel wastes developed in both Canada and Sweden. The study was undertaken to obtain an understanding of the process involved in, and the effects of, steady-state water-rock interaction and trace-element migration in and around the deposit, including paleo-migration processes since the deposit was formed. To achieve these objectives, databases and models were produced to evaluate the equilibrium thermodynamic codes and databases; the role of colloids, organics, and microbes in transport processes for radionuclides; and the stability of UO2 and the influence of radiolysis on UO2 dissolution and radionuclide migration.

  7. Unconventional Oil Reserves Development in the Viking Play (Western Canada Using Horizontal Wells and Hydraulic Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.B. Baishev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil production from the Viking play in Saskatchewan province started in the 1950s and continues since that time. Horizontal drilling and multistage fracturing have caused resurgence in development of this play. Based on the production data from several fields, the comparative results of the Viking play development using vertical and horizontal wells are presented. Horizontal wells drilling made it possible to increase oil production in those formation zones that were previously considered predominantly gas-saturated, as well as in the zones affected by water injection using vertical wells in order to maintain reservoir pressure. Infill drilling combined with longer lateral completion length also positively affected the development of oil reserves from the Viking play.

  8. Are Prevalent Self-reported Cardiovascular Disorders Associated with Delayed Recovery From Whiplash-associated Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmlöf, Lina; Côté, Pierre; Holm, Lena W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: The aim of this cohort study was to investigate the association between self-reported cardiovascular disorders (CVD) and recovery from whiplash associated disorder (WAD) after a traffic collision. METHODS:: This study was based on the Saskatchewan Government Insurance cohort, including...... includes a subcohort of 6011 participants who reported WAD (defined as answering "yes" to the question "Did the accident cause neck or shoulder pain") at baseline. The outcome, self-perceived recovery, was measured at all follow-up interviews. The presence of cardiovascular disorder and its effect...... on health was classified into three exposure categories; (1) CVD absent, (2) CVD present with no or mild effect on health and (3) CVD present with moderate or severe effect on health. The association between CVD and recovery from WAD was assessed with Cox regression, and adjusted for potential confounders...

  9. Development of the native legume glycyrrhiza lepidota as a potential soil reclamation and forage crop: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, A.

    1989-01-01

    Study of wild licorice, a deep-rooted perennial herbaceous legume sometimes occurring in stands of salt-tolerant native grasses. The green leafy tops of the plant are eaten by wild herbivores and domestic livestock while the protein-rich seeds are winter food for wildlife. Mature field-ripened seeds were collected from 14 different areas in southern Saskatchewan, five of which represented two crop years. To ascertain salt tolerance, seeds were germinated in sodium chloride or sodium sulfate solutions of increasing strength. Growth response to continuous salinity stress under a controlled light and temperature regime was monitored. Selected seed sources were also tested in a sulfate-rich soil extract and in saline soil mixtures.

  10. Drumlins, subglacial meltwater floods, and ocean responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John

    1989-09-01

    Drumlins and erosional marks in bedrock give evidence for broad, subglacial meltwater floods that have discharge-rate estimates of about 106 m3/s. Similar discharge rates are obtained for other late glacial catastrophic floods. The total volume of meltwater that is thought to have formed the Livingstone Lake, Saskatchewan, drumlin field is estimated at 8.4 x 104 km3. This volume is equivalent to a eustatic rise of 0.23 m in global sea level. Meltwater release and roughly contemporaneous formation of drumlin fields in North America and Europe could have involved several metres of sea-level rise in a few years. The implications of such floods for the generation of myths and the interpretation of the oxygen isotopic record of the oceans are discussed. High meltwater discharges are of potential importance to the generation of a lid of cold, fresh water over the North Atlantic and its effects on late glacial climate.

  11. Bench test and preliminary results of vertical compact torus injection experiments on the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Xiao, C.; Singh, A. K.; Hirose, A.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Saskatchewan compact torus injector has been modified to allow vertical injection of the compact torus (CT) into the STOR-M tokamak. The injector stayed at the horizontal position and the CT trajectory was bent by 90° using a curved conducting drift tube. The curved drift tube did not significantly slow the CT velocity down or change the CT magnetic field topology. Preliminary vertical CT injection experiments have revealed a prompt increase in the line averaged electron density and in the soft x-ray radiation level in the tokamak discharge immediately following vertical CT injection. Suppression of the m = 2 Mirnov oscillation amplitude has also been observed after CT injection.

  12. Modification of plasma rotation with resonant magnetic perturbations in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgriw, S.; Liu, Y.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2016-04-01

    The toroidal plasma flow velocity of impurity ions has been significantly modified in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak by means of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). It has been found that the toroidal flow velocities of OV and CVI impurity ions change towards the co-current direction after the application of a current through a set of (l  =  2, n  =  1) RMP field coils. It has been observed that the reduction of the toroidal flow velocity is closely correlated to the reduction of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuation frequency measured by Mirnov coils. Modulation of the flow velocity has been achieved by switching the RMP current pulses. Non-resonant magnetic perturbations have also induced a much smaller change in the toroidal plasma flow. A theoretical model has been adopted to assess the contributions of different drift mechanisms to magnetic islands rotation in STOR-M.

  13. Modification of toroidal flow velocity through momentum Injection by compact torus injection into the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohollahi, A.; Elgriw, S.; Basu, D.; Wolfe, S.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2017-05-01

    In the Saskatchewan torus-modified (STOR-M) tokamak, tangential compact torus injection (CTI) experiments have been performed with normal (counter-clockwise, CCW, top view) and reversed (clockwise, CW, top view) plasma current directions while the compact torus (CT) injection direction remains in the CCW direction. The intrinsic toroidal flow direction reverses when the discharge current is reversed. However, the change in the toroidal flow direction is always toward the CTI direction (CCW). It has been determined that the momentum in high density and high velocity CT is more than ten times larger than the intrinsic toroidal rotation momentum in the typical STOR-M plasma. Therefore, the modification of the plasma toroidal rotation velocity is attributed to momentum transfer from CT to the tokamak discharge.

  14. Measurement of Plasma Rotation Velocities in the STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Jordan; Xiao, Chijin; McColl, David; Hirose, Akira; Mitarai, Osamu

    2000-10-01

    Measurements of the plasma rotation velocities in the edge region of the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak during one full cycle of alternating current operation and CT injection will be presented. In these experiments, a four sided Mach probe is used to measure the radial profile of the plasma poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities in the edge region. It has long been suspected that changes in the plasma edge region of both the velocity structure, and the radial electric field and its gradient are responsible for the transition to the ohmic high-confinement mode (H-mode). Furthermore, the results will help to check a recent theoretical model in which the confinement improvement is based on the toroidal velocity CURVATURE, consistent with the expectation that the tangential CT injection speeds up the toroidal flow.

  15. Measured versus simulated transients of temperature logs—a test of borehole climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorowicz, Jacek; Safanda, Jan

    2005-12-01

    We report the results of repeated temperature, T, measurements with depth (z) for two borehole sites located in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, in central Alberta and south central Saskatchewan. These were logged at three different times within the time period of 1986 AD to 2004 AD. Subsurface temperature transient changes of 0.1 to 0.4 °C observed between the repeated temperature logs over the last two decades agree only partially with the changes derived from the synthetic profiles in which surface temperature time series were used as forcing signals. The surface temperature forcing is responsible for the majority of the observed deviation of temperature with depth. In some cases, differences higher than the error of measurement are observed between the model and measurements. This can be an indication that factors other than the surface temperature change also influence the subsurface thermal regime.

  16. Perceived causes of stress among a group of western Canadian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alyssa; Hoover, Jay N; Karunanayake, Chandima P; Uswak, Gerald S

    2017-12-08

    The demanding nature of dental education, both academically and clinically, results in higher levels of perceived stress among its students. The aim of this study was to determine how dental students at the College of Dentistry, University of Saskatchewan perceived stress. During the 2013-2014 academic year, all students were asked to complete a modified dental environmental survey (DES). Of the 111 students enrolled at the College that year 92 completed the survey (response rate = 83%). In general, female students reported higher stress levels than males. Higher stress levels were associated with living away from home, concerns about manual dexterity and the transition from pre-clinical to clinical studies. Additionally, students who enter dental school with higher debt loads (> 100,000) report high stress levels relating to finances. This study found that financial and clinical workloads result in high stress levels among dental students.

  17. The potential arsenic retention role of Ca-Fe(III)-AsO{sub 4} compounds in lime neutralized co-precipitation tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becze, L.; Gomez, M.A. [McGill Univ., Dept. of Mining and Materials Engineering, Montreal, QC (Canada); Petkov, V. [Central Michigan Univ., Dept. of Physics, Mount Pleasant, Michigan (United States); Cutler, J.N. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Demopoulos, G.P., E-mail: george.demopoulos@mcgill.ca [MCGill Univ., Dept. of Mining and Materials Engineering, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Arsenic is a major contaminant in a number of high grade uranium ores mined in Northern Saskatchewan. Upon processing of these ores by hydrometallurgical processes, arsenic reports to aqueous waste solutions from which arsenic(V) is removed by co-precipitation with iron(III). This process results in the generation of a mixture of poorly crystalline arsenate-bearing phases and gypsum. Based on laboratory investigations there exists the potential upon reaction of the disposed iron(III)-arsenate phases and gypsum to lead to Ca-Fe(III)-AsO{sub 4} association resembling the mineral yukonite. In this paper the laboratory synthesis, characterization and solubility investigation of yukonite is reviewed and the implications of its formation in U-mill tailings as an arsenic control phase are discussed. (author)

  18. Identification of poorly crystalline scorodite in uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, R.; Rowson, J.; Hughes, K.; Rinas, C., E-mail: ryan.frey@areva.ca [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Warner, J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The McClean Lake mill, located in northern Saskatchewan, processes a variety of uranium ore bodies to produce yellowcake. A by-product of this process is an acidic waste solution enriched in arsenic, referred to as raffinate. The raffinate waste stream is treated in the tailings preparation circuit, where arsenic is precipitated as a poorly crystalline scorodite phase. Raffinate neutralization studies have successfully identified poorly crystalline scorodite using XRD, SEM, EM, XANES and EXAFS methods, but to date, scorodite has not been successfully identified within the whole tailing solids. During the summer of 2008, a drilling program sampled the in situ tailings within the McClean Lake tailings management facility. Samples from this drilling campaign were sent to the Canadian Light Source Inc. for EXAFS analysis. The sample spectra positively identify a poorly crystalline scorodite phase within the McClean tailings management facility. (author)

  19. Geochemical characterisation of arsenic in uranium tailings pore fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldovan, B.; Hendry, M.J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Landine, P. [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Geochemical characterisation of uranium tailings porewater and solids is required to determine the long-term source contaminant potential of arsenic in the tailings. The Rabbit Lake In-pit Tailings Management Facility in Northern Saskatchewan was investigated with the objective of obtaining representative tailings porewater samples from a detailed depth profile. Methods of extracting porewater, including centrifugation and hydraulic squeezing were compared to drive-point piezometer data. Field measurements of Eh, pH and temperature were taken as the core samples were recovered. Pore fluid samples were analysed for arsenic speciation. Analytical results were compared to the previous sampling event in the same location. Tailings produced from several ore bodies were also compared in terms of pore fluid contaminant concentrations. (author)

  20. Spectral characteristics of spring arctic mesosphere dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The spring of 1997 has represented a stable period of operation for the joint University of Tromsø / University of Saskatchewan MF radar, being between refurbishment and upgrades. We examine the horizontal winds from the February to June inclusive and also include estimates of energy dissipation rates derived from signal fading times and presented as upper limits on the turbulent energy dissipation rate, ε. Here we address the periodicity in the dynamics of the upper mesosphere for time scales from hours to one month. Thus, we are able to examine the changes in the spectral signature of the mesospheric dynamics during the transition from winter to summer states.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; waves and tides.

  1. Population-based, inception cohort study of the incidence, course, and prognosis of mild traumatic brain injury after motor vehicle collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, John David; Boyle, Eleanor; Carroll, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    days (95% CI, 97-103), and about 23% reported not having recovered by 1 year. Factors associated with delayed recovery included being older than 50 years, having less than a high school education, having poor expectations for recovery, having depressive symptoms, having arm numbness, having hearing......, but 23% have still not recovered by 1 year. A mix of biopsychosocial factors is associated with recovery, including a strong effect of poor expectations for recovery........ PARTICIPANTS: All adults (N=1716) incurring an MTBI in a motor vehicle collision between November 1997 and December 1999 in Saskatchewan. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age- and sex-stratified incidence rates, time to self-reported recovery, and prognostic factors over a 1-year follow...

  2. Farm Activities and Agricultural Injuries in Youth and Young Adult Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWit, Yvonne; Pickett, William; Lawson, Joshua; Dosman, James

    2015-01-01

    Youth and young adults who work in the agricultural sector experience high rates of injury. This study aimed to investigate relations between high-risk farm activities and the occurrence of agricultural injuries in these vulnerable groups. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using written questionnaire data from 1135 youth and young adults from the Saskatchewan Farm Injury Cohort. The prevalence of agricultural injury was estimated at 4.9%/year (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.7, 6.2). After adjustment for important covariates, duration of farm work was strongly associated with the occurrence of injury (risk ratio [RR] = 8.0 [95% CI: 1.7, 36.7] for 10-34 vs. agricultural injury. Risks for agricultural injury among youth and young adults on farms relate directly to the amounts and types of farm work exposures that young people engage in.

  3. Arsenic removal by manganese greensand filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phommavong, T. [Saskatchewan Environment, Regina (Canada); Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Some of the small communities in Saskatchewan are expected to have difficulty complying with the new maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 25 {micro}g/L for arsenic. A test column was set up in the laboratory to study the removal of arsenic from the potable water using oxidation with KMnO{sub 4}, followed by manganese greensand filtration. Tests were run using water from the tap having a background arsenic concentration of <0.5 {micro}g/L and iron concentration in the range of 0.02 to 0.77 mg/L. The test water was spiked with arsenic and iron. Results showed that 61 % to 98% of arsenic can be removed from the potable water by oxidation with KMnO{sub 4} followed by manganese greensand filtration.

  4. Freehold title issues of significance to the industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherman, B.J. [Balfour Moss, Regina, SK (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Thousands of top leases still survive in Saskatchewan, and are complicating access to oil and gas resources. This paper examined recent developments in Saskatchewan law applicable to freehold title, with particular reference to a judicial decision relating to top leases and the introduction of an electronic land titles system. The validity of top leases was discussed as well as issues concerning contraventions of the rule against perpetuities. Conversion to the new Land Titles Act of 2000 has involved the creation of an electronic ownership registry for each surface parcel and each granted mineral commodity associated with a mineral parcel, and allowed for multiple titles created within the ownership registry for each surface parcel or mineral commodity within a mineral parcel due to tenants in common or fractional ownerships. An audit report with a 95 per cent degree of confidence found the error rate resulting from the land titles conversion was 3 per cent and the error rate in the Writ Registry conversion was 3.5 per cent. Due to an amendment, mineral certification is no longer mandatory when registering a transfer of an uncertified mineral title in a producing area. However, there is no assurance of title or access to assurance fund compensation if transfers are made without certification. The conversion process will perpetuate many of the existing errors regarding minerals. Transfers of uncertified mineral titles or registration of interests against uncertified mineral titles can occur, but there is no statutory assurance that this will result in a valid and effective title until certification of the underlying mineral occurs. Recommendations included searching original grants to ensure that there are not 2 or more grants for the same mineral rights; searching the last paper title prior to conversion; and, searching back from the current mineral title to the certification by the registrar.

  5. Balancing risk: site remediation outside the environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankovich, T.L.; Klyashtorin, A.; Guo, Z.; Muldoon, J.; Lysohirka, S.; Petelina, E.; Gergely, E. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Jacklin, T.; Heffron, T. [AECOM, Calgary, AB (Canada); Smith, R. [R.S. Management Services Inc., Prince Albert, SK (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In Canada, an environmental assessment (EA) is typically required for physical works or physical activities that are to be undertaken at a given site, such as those that would be required when performing environmental remediation at an abandoned mine site. In general, the type of EA required under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) tends to be commensurate with risk, whereby a comprehensive study is required for projects with the potential to cause significant adverse environmental effects. Remediation of the Gunnar Mine Site, an abandoned uranium mine/mill in Northern Saskatchewan, is currently undergoing a comprehensive EA to develop plans for the sustainable remediation of the Gunnar pit, two waste rock piles, three areas of unconfined tailings and the mine site itself. The site was abandoned in 1964, with little to no remediation. As a result, buildings and structures present on the site deteriorated over time due to scavenging of building materials that had taken place and exposure to the harsh northern conditions. To address the risks associated with buildings and structures in a timely manner, on July 23, 2010, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issued an Order to address those that have failed a structural safety assessment to be taken down by no later than October 31, 2011 (prior to approval of the Gunnar EA). To accomplish this, it was necessary for the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) to plan the work in a safe and cost-effective manner, with consideration of both the short-term mitigative measures required under the Order and the long-term end-state of the Gunnar Mine Site following remediation. Work is proceeding on budget and ahead of schedule on the abatement and demolition of buildings and structures at Gunnar. An overview of the considerations taken, the project accomplishments and the lessons learned will be provided. (author)

  6. Lean interventions in healthcare: do they actually work? A systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraros, John; Lemstra, Mark; Nwankwo, Chijioke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lean is a widely used quality improvement methodology initially developed and used in the automotive and manufacturing industries but recently expanded to the healthcare sector. This systematic literature review seeks to independently assess the effect of Lean or Lean interventions on worker and patient satisfaction, health and process outcomes, and financial costs. Data sources We conducted a systematic literature review of Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, ABI/Inform, ERIC, EMBASE and SCOPUS. Study selection Peer reviewed articles were included if they examined a Lean intervention and included quantitative data. Methodological quality was assessed using validated critical appraisal checklists. Publically available data collected by the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council and the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses were also analysed and reported separately. Data extraction Data on design, methods, interventions and key outcomes were extracted and collated. Results of data synthesis Our electronic search identified 22 articles that passed methodological quality review. Among the accepted studies, 4 were exclusively concerned with health outcomes, 3 included both health and process outcomes and 15 included process outcomes. Our study found that Lean interventions have: (i) no statistically significant association with patient satisfaction and health outcomes; (ii) a negative association with financial costs and worker satisfaction and (iii) potential, yet inconsistent, benefits on process outcomes like patient flow and safety. Conclusion While some may strongly believe that Lean interventions lead to quality improvements in healthcare, the evidence to date simply does not support this claim. More rigorous, higher quality and better conducted scientific research is required to definitively ascertain the impact and effectiveness of Lean in healthcare settings. PMID:26811118

  7. Identifying and mitigating risks for agricultural injury associated with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan King

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In some occupational contexts overweight and obesity have been identified as risk factors for injury. The purpose of this study was to examine this hypothesis within farm work environments and then to identify specific opportunities for environmental modification as a preventive strategy. Data on farm-related injuries, height and weight used to calculate body mass index (BMI, and demographic characteristics were from the Phase 2 baseline survey of the Saskatchewan Farm Injury Cohort; a large cross-sectional mail-based survey conducted in Saskatchewan, Canada from January through May 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between BMI and injury. Injury narratives were explored qualitatively. Findings were inconsistent and differed according to gender. Among women (n = 927, having overweight (adjusted OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.29 to 6.70 but not obesity (1.10; 95% CI: 0.35 to 3.43 was associated with an increased odds of incurring a farm-related injury. No strong or statistically significant effects were observed for men (n = 1406 with overweight or obesity. While injury-related challenges associated with obesity have been addressed in other occupational settings via modification of the worksite, such strategies are challenging to implement in farm settings because of the diversity of work tasks and associated hazards. We conclude that the acute effects of overweight in terms of injury do require consideration in agricultural populations, but these should also be viewed with a differentiation based on gender.

  8. Thoughts of Quitting General Surgery Residency: Factors in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, David Nathan; Dattani, Sheev; Miller, Sarah; Hayes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Attrition rates in general surgery training are higher than other surgical disciplines. We sought to determine the prevalence with which Canadian general surgery residents consider leaving their training and the contributing factors. An anonymous survey was administered to all general surgery residents in Canada. Responses from residents who considered leaving their training were assessed for importance of contributing factors. The study was conducted at the Royal University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, a tertiary academic center. The response rate was approximately 34.0%. A minority (32.0%) reported very seriously or somewhat seriously considering leaving their training, whereas 35.2% casually considered doing so. Poor work-life balance in residency (38.9%) was the single-most important factor, whereas concern about future unemployment (16.7%) and poor future quality of life (15.7%) were next. Enjoyment of work (41.7%) was the most frequent mitigating factor. Harassment and intimidation were reported factors in 16.7%. On analysis, only intention to practice in a nonacademic setting approached significant association with thoughts of leaving (odds ratio = 1.92, CI = 0.99-3.74, p = 0.052). There was no association with sex, program, postgraduate year, relationship status, or subspecialty interest. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more thoughts of leaving with older age. Canadian general surgery residents appear less likely to seriously consider quitting than their American counterparts. Poor work-life balance in residency, fear of future unemployment, and anticipated poor future quality of life are significant contributors to thoughts of quitting. Efforts to educate prospective residents about the reality of the surgical lifestyle, and to assist residents in securing employment, may improve completion rates. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An examination of internet and land-based gambling among adolescents in three Canadian provinces: results from the youth gambling survey (YGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton-Marshall, Tara; Leatherdale, Scott T; Turner, Nigel E

    2016-03-18

    With the rapid proliferation of new gambling technology and online gambling opportunities, there is a concern that online gambling could have a significant impact on public health, particularly for adolescents. The aim of this study is to examine online and land-based gambling behaviour among adolescents in 3 Canadian provinces (Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan) prior to the implementation of legalized online gambling. Data are from 10,035 students in grades 9 to 12 who responded to the 2012-2013 Youth Gambling Survey (YGS) supplement, a questionnaire administered as part of the Canadian Youth Smoking Survey (YSS, 2012) in 3 provinces: Newfoundland and Labrador (n = 2,588), Ontario (n = 3,892), and Saskatchewan (n = 3,555). Overall, 41.6% of adolescents (35.9% of females and 47.4% of males) had gambled in the past 3 months. 9.4% of adolescents had gambled online in the past 3 months alone (3.7% of females and 15.3% of males). The most popular form of online gambling was online sports betting. Adolescents also engaged in online simulated gambling including internet poker (9.1%) and simulated gambling on Facebook (9.0%). Few adolescents participated in online gambling exclusively and online gamblers were more likely than land-based gamblers to engage in multiple forms of gambling. A higher proportion of adolescent online gamblers scored "high" or "low to moderate" in problem gambling severity compared to land-based only gamblers. Despite restrictions on online gambling at the time of the study, adolescents were engaging in online gambling at a significantly higher rate than has been previously found. Adolescents were also using technology such as video games to gamble and free online gambling simulations.

  10. An examination of internet and land-based gambling among adolescents in three Canadian provinces: results from the youth gambling survey (YGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Elton-Marshall

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid proliferation of new gambling technology and online gambling opportunities, there is a concern that online gambling could have a significant impact on public health, particularly for adolescents. The aim of this study is to examine online and land-based gambling behaviour among adolescents in 3 Canadian provinces (Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan prior to the implementation of legalized online gambling. Methods Data are from 10,035 students in grades 9 to 12 who responded to the 2012–2013 Youth Gambling Survey (YGS supplement, a questionnaire administered as part of the Canadian Youth Smoking Survey (YSS, 2012 in 3 provinces: Newfoundland and Labrador (n = 2,588, Ontario (n = 3,892, and Saskatchewan (n = 3,555. Results Overall, 41.6 % of adolescents (35.9 % of females and 47.4 % of males had gambled in the past 3 months. 9.4 % of adolescents had gambled online in the past 3 months alone (3.7 % of females and 15.3 % of males. The most popular form of online gambling was online sports betting. Adolescents also engaged in online simulated gambling including internet poker (9.1 % and simulated gambling on Facebook (9.0 %. Few adolescents participated in online gambling exclusively and online gamblers were more likely than land-based gamblers to engage in multiple forms of gambling. A higher proportion of adolescent online gamblers scored “high” or “low to moderate” in problem gambling severity compared to land-based only gamblers. Conclusions Despite restrictions on online gambling at the time of the study, adolescents were engaging in online gambling at a significantly higher rate than has been previously found. Adolescents were also using technology such as video games to gamble and free online gambling simulations.

  11. Assessment of nutrient loadings of a large multipurpose prairie reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Marín, L. A.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2017-07-01

    The relatively low water flow velocities in reservoirs cause them to have high capacities for retaining sediments and pollutants, which can lead to a reduction in downstream nutrient loading. Hence, nutrients can progressively accumulate in reservoirs, resulting in the deterioration of aquatic ecosystems and water quality. Lake Diefenbaker (LD) is a large multipurpose reservoir, located on the South Saskatchewan River (SSR), that serves as a major source of freshwater in Saskatchewan, Canada. Over the past several years, changes in land use (e.g. expansion of urban areas and industrial developments) in the reservoir's catchment have heightened concerns about future water quality in the catchment and in the reservoir. Intensification of agricultural activities has led to an increase in augmented the application of manure and fertilizer for crops and pasture. Although previous research has attempted to quantify nutrient retention in LD, there is a knowledge gap related to the identification of major nutrient sources and quantification of nutrient export from the catchment at different spatial scales. Using the SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) model, this gap has been addressed by assessing water quality regionally, and identifying spatial patterns of factors and processes that affect water quality in the LD catchment. Model results indicate that LD retains about 70% of the inflowing total nitrogen (TN) and 90% of the inflowing total phosphorus (TP) loads, of which fertilizer and manure applied to agricultural fields contribute the greatest proportion. The SPARROW model will be useful as a tool to guide the optimal implementation of nutrient management plans to reduce nutrient inputs to LD.

  12. Lived experience of economic and political trends related to globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushon, Jennifer A; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Labonte, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    A multi-method case study examined how the economic and political processes of globalization have influenced the determinants of health among low-income children in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. This paper presents the results from the qualitative interview component of the case study. The purpose of the interviews was to uncover the lived experience of low-income families and their children in Saskatoon with regards to political and economic trends related to globalization, an important addition to the usual globalization and health research that relies primarily on cross-country regressions in which the personal impacts remain hidden. In-depth phenomenological interviews with 26 low-income parents of young children (aged zero to five) who were residents of Saskatoon. A combination of volunteer and criterion sampling was used. Interview questions were open-ended and based upon an analytical framework. Analysis proceeded through immersion in the data, a process of open coding, and finally through a process of selective coding. The larger case study and interviews indicate that globalization has largely not been benefiting low-income parents with young children. Low-income families with young children were struggling to survive, despite the tremendous economic growth occurring in Saskatchewan and Saskatoon at the time of the interviews. This often led to participants expressing a sense of helplessness, despair, isolation, and/or anger. Respondents' experiences suggest that globalization-related changes in social conditions and public policies and programs have great potential to negatively affect family health through either psychosocial effects in individuals and/or decreased levels of social cohesion in the community.

  13. Vitamin D Insufficiency and Bone Mineral Status in a Population of Newcomer Children in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Gushulak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low levels of circulating vitamin D are more likely to be found in those with darker skin pigmentation, who live in areas of high latitude, and who wear more clothing. We examined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and inadequacy in newcomer immigrant and refugee children. Methods: We evaluated circulating vitamin D status of immigrant children at the national level. Subsequently, we investigated vitamin D intake, circulating vitamin D status, and total body bone mineral content (TBBMC in newcomer children living in Saskatchewan. Results: In the sample of newcomer children in Saskatchewan, the prevalence of inadequacy in calcium and vitamin D intakes was 76% and 89.4%, respectively. Vitamin D intake from food/supplement was significantly higher in immigrants compared to refugees, which accords with the significant difference in serum status. Circulating vitamin D status indicated that 29% of participants were deficient and another 44% had inadequate levels of serum 25(OHD for bone health. Dietary vitamin D intake, sex, region of origin, and length of stay in Canada were significant predictors of serum vitamin D status. Results for TBBMC revealed that 38.6% were found to have low TBBMC compared to estimated values for age, sex, and ethnicity. In the regression model, after controlling for possible confounders, children who were taller and had greater circulating vitamin D also had greater TBBMC. Nationally, immigrant children, particularly girls, have significantly lower plasma 25(OHD than non-immigrant children. Interpretation: Newcomer immigrant and refugee children are at a high risk of vitamin D deficiency and inadequacy, which may have serious negative consequences for their health.

  14. Trends in high-dose opioid prescribing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tara; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Paterson, J Michael; Dhalla, Irfan A; Juurlink, David N

    2014-09-01

    To describe trends in rates of prescribing of high-dose opioid formulations and variations in opioid product selection across Canada. Population-based, cross-sectional study. Canada. Retail pharmacies dispensing opioids between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Opioid dispensing rates, reported as the number of units dispensed per 1000 population, stratified by province and opioid type. The rate of dispensing high-dose opioid formulations increased 23.0%, from 781 units per 1000 population in 2006 to 961 units per 1000 population in 2011. Although these rates remained relatively stable in Alberta (6.3% increase) and British Columbia (8.4% increase), rates in Newfoundland and Labrador (84.7% increase) and Saskatchewan (54.0% increase) rose substantially. Ontario exhibited the highest annual rate of high-dose oxycodone and fentanyl dispensing (756 tablets and 112 patches per 1000 population, respectively), while Alberta's rate of high-dose morphine dispensing was the highest in Canada (347 units per 1000 population). Two of the highest rates of high-dose hydromorphone dispensing were found in Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia (258 and 369 units per 1000 population, respectively). Conversely, Quebec had the lowest rate of high-dose oxycodone and morphine dispensing (98 and 53 units per 1000 population, respectively). We found marked interprovincial variation in the dispensing of high-dose opioid formulations in Canada, emphasizing the need to understand the reasons for these differences, and to consider developing a national strategy to address opioid prescribing. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. Mineralogical characterization of arsenic, iron, and nickel in uranium mine tailings using XAS and EMPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essilfie-Dughan, J.; Hendry, M.J., E-mail: joe377@mail.usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Warner, J. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Kotzer, T. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    In northern Saskatchewan, Canada, high-grade uranium ores and the resulting tailings can contain high levels of arsenic (As), iron (Fe), and nickel (Ni). An environmental concern in the uranium mining industry is the long-term stabilization of these elements of concern (EOCs) within tailings management facilities thereby mitigating their transfer to the surrounding groundwater. Characterization of these As-, Fe- and Ni-bearing minerals and complexes must be carried out to evaluate their solubility and long-term stability within the tailings mass. Synchrotron-based bulk x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the speciation of these EOCs in mine tailing samples obtained from the Deilmann Tailings Management Facility (DTMF) at Key Lake, Saskatchewan. Electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and synchrotron-based micro-focussing x-ray fluorescence mapping and absorption spectroscopy (μXRF; μXAS ) have also been employed to study spatial distribution and speciation at the micron scale. Comparisons of K-edge absorption spectra of tailings samples and reference compounds indicate the dominant oxidation states of As, Fe, and Ni in the mine tailings samples are +5, +3, and +2, respectively, largely reflecting their deposition in an oxidized environment and complexation within stable oxic phases. Backscattered electron (BSE) images of the tailings from the electron microprobe indicate the presence of gypsum/lime nodules surrounded by metallic rims mainly consisting of As, Fe, and Ni. μXRF elemental mapping confirms these EPMA results. μXAS collected within the metal-bearing rims indicates As and Fe is present mainly in the +5 and +3 oxidation state, respectively. (author)

  16. Historical changes in caribou distribution and land cover in and around Prince Albert National Park: land management implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Arlt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In central Saskatchewan, boreal woodland caribou population declines have been documented in the 1940s and again in the 1980s. Although both declines led to a ban in sport hunting, a recovery was only seen in the 1950s and was attributed to wolf control and hunting closure. Recent studies suggest that this time, the population may not be increasing. In order to contribute to the conservation efforts, historical changes in caribou distribution and land cover types in the Prince Albert Greater Ecosystem (PAGE, Saskatchewan, were documented for the period of 1960s to the present. To examine changes in caribou distribution, survey observations, incidental sightings and telemetry data were collated. To quantify landscape changes, land cover maps were created for 1966 and 2006 using current and historic forest resources inventories, fire, logging, and roads data. Results indicate that woodland caribou are still found throughout the study area although their distribution has changed and their use of the National Park is greatly limited. Results of transition prob¬abilities and landscape composition analyses on the 1966 and 2006 land cover maps revealed an aging landscape for both the National Park and provincial crown land portions of the PAGE. In addition, increased logging and the development of extensive road and trail networks on provincial crown land produced significant landscape fragmentation for woodland caribou and reduced functional attributes of habitat patches. Understanding historical landscape changes will assist with ongoing provincial and federal recovery efforts for boreal caribou, forest management planning activities, and landscape restoration efforts within and beyond the Park boundaries.

  17. Sediment plume model-a comparison between use of measured turbidity data and satellite images for model calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Amir; Hudson, Jeff; Wheater, Howard; Lindenschmidt, Karl-Erich

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we built a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Lake Diefenbaker, Saskatchewan, Canada. It was calibrated by using measured turbidity data from stations along the reservoir and satellite images based on a flood event in 2013. In June 2013, there was heavy rainfall for two consecutive days on the frozen and snow-covered ground in the higher elevations of western Alberta, Canada. The runoff from the rainfall and the melted snow caused one of the largest recorded inflows to the headwaters of the South Saskatchewan River and Lake Diefenbaker downstream. An estimated discharge peak of over 5200 m3/s arrived at the reservoir inlet with a thick sediment front within a few days. The sediment plume moved quickly through the entire reservoir and remained visible from satellite images for over 2 weeks along most of the reservoir, leading to concerns regarding water quality. The aims of this study are to compare, quantitatively and qualitatively, the efficacy of using turbidity data and satellite images for sediment transport model calibration and to determine how accurately a sediment transport model can simulate sediment transport based on each of them. Both turbidity data and satellite images were very useful for calibrating the sediment transport model quantitatively and qualitatively. Model predictions and turbidity measurements show that the flood water and suspended sediments entered upstream fairly well mixed and moved downstream as overflow with a sharp gradient at the plume front. The model results suggest that the settling and resuspension rates of sediment are directly proportional to flow characteristics and that the use of constant coefficients leads to model underestimation or overestimation unless more data on sediment formation become available. Hence, this study reiterates the significance of the availability of data on sediment distribution and characteristics for building a robust and reliable sediment transport model.

  18. Hudson Bay wood gasifier: Final technical report on a Renewables-Conservation Demonstration Program Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    With electricity generation in mind, the 0.25 MW British Columbia Research fluidized bed wood gasifier was scaled up into a 1.2 MW pilot plant at the Saskatchewan Forest Products plywood mill in Hudson Ray, Saskatchewan, with the commissioning of the unit being completed in 1979. Following the installation of a new airlock, grate and ash scraper and a program of preliminary runs, a 60-day period was completed, during which the suitability of the Hudson Bay wood gasification system for continous operation was evaluated. It was concluded that serious deficiencies exist in the available scale-up procedures and expertise. Areas requiring major changes include the feed system, to alleviate the back-leakage of product gases, and to prevent overheating in the combustion zone, the grate/ash removal system, and the mode of operation (fixed or fluidized bed). Because the gasifier was designed to run in the fluidized mode, and in fact operates as a fixed moving bed, problems have arisen with ash removal and overheating. The stack gas and the waste water effluents were found to pose no serious threat to the environment, and can be safely disposed of without producing pollution problems. The scrubber operated very well, producing a cool, clean gas which burned well in the diesel and in the Maxon burner. A comparison of wood gasification to diesel oil generation of electricity revealed that, over the next 15 years, wood gas will produce cheaper electricity than well diesel, when a free source of waste wood is available, such as the situation in which the plant is listed at the source of the waste wood, and is operated by the waste wood producer. 4 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Resilience of farm women working the third shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Valerie; Hagel, Louise; Dosman, James A; Rana, Masud; Lawson, Josh; Marlenga, Barbara; Trask, Catherine; Pickett, William

    2017-09-26

    We examined physical health and work experiences in a Saskatchewan population of farm women, and determined how participation in the "third shift" (a phenomenon where women engage in off-farm employment, farm labor, and as homemakers) relates to their demographic, physical health, and work experiences. This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study. Reports from 980 women who lived or worked on Saskatchewan farms were analyzed to describe their health status, comorbidities, use of medications, and exposures to farm work. Regression models were used to explore determinants of participation in the third shift. 216 women [22.0%] engaged in the "third shift", and these women consistently reported significantly longer mechanized and non-mechanized farm work hours. Compared to women not involved in the third shift, participants in the third shift were more likely to be: 41-50 years of age [ORAdj 2.06 (1.12, 3.77)], and involved in beef cattle production [ORAdj 1.62 (1.05-2.49)], large animal chores [ORAdj 1.66 (1.04-2.66)], use of shovels/pitchforks [ORAdj 1.67 (1.08-2.57)], combine operation [ORAdj 1.72 (1.08-2.74)], and have higher levels of education [e.g. ORAdj 0.46 (0.29-0.72) for high school or less]. Descriptively, reduced engagement in the third shift was associated with "fair or poor" health status [ORCrude 0.32 (0.14-0.76)] and more co-morbidities [e.g., ORCrude 0.50 (0.33, 0.75) for 2 or more versus none reported]. This study found that farm women often report high levels of work, including engagement in the third shift. Women engaged in the third shift are also generally healthier than non-engaged women, consistent with a healthy worker effect.

  20. International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Weyburn-Midale CO₂ Monitoring and Storage Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacuta, Norm [Petroleum Technology Research Centre Incorporated, Saskatchewan (Canada); Young, Aleana [Petroleum Technology Research Centre Incorporated, Saskatchewan (Canada); Worth, Kyle [Petroleum Technology Research Centre Incorporated, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2015-12-22

    The IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO₂ Monitoring and Storage Project (WMP) began in 2000 with the first four years of research that confirmed the suitability of the containment complex of the Weyburn oil field in southeastern Saskatchewan as a storage location for CO₂ injected as part of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. The first half of this report covers research conducted from 2010 to 2012, under the funding of the United States Department of Energy (contract DEFE0002697), the Government of Canada, and various other governmental and industry sponsors. The work includes more in-depth analysis of various components of a measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) program through investigation of data on site characterization and geological integrity, wellbore integrity, storage monitoring (geophysical and geochemical), and performance/risk assessment. These results then led to the development of a Best Practices Manual (BPM) providing oilfield and project operators with guidance on CO₂ storage and CO₂-EOR. In 2013, the USDOE and Government of Saskatchewan exercised an optional phase of the same project to further develop and deploy applied research tools, technologies, and methodologies to the data and research at Weyburn with the aim of assisting regulators and operators in transitioning CO₂-EOR operations into permanent storage. This work, detailed in the second half of this report, involves seven targeted research projects – evaluating the minimum dataset for confirming secure storage; additional overburden monitoring; passive seismic monitoring; history-matched modelling; developing proper wellbore design; casing corrosion evaluation; and assessment of post CO₂-injected core samples. The results from the final and optional phases of the Weyburn-Midale Project confirm the suitability of CO₂-EOR fields for the injection of CO₂, and further, highlight the necessary MMV and follow-up monitoring required for these operations to be considered

  1. Exercise prescription for hospitalized people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidities: a synthesis of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid WD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available W Darlene Reid,1,2 Cristiane Yamabayashi,1 Donna Goodridge,3 Frank Chung,4 Michael A Hunt,1 Darcy D Marciniuk,5 Dina Brooks,6 Yi-Wen Chen,1 Alison Hoens,1,7 Pat Camp1,21Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 2Institute of Heart and Lung Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 3College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 4Physiotherapy, Burnaby Hospital, Fraser Health, British Columbia, 5Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 6Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 7Providence Health Care, Vancouver, BC, CanadaIntroduction: The prescription of physical activity for hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD can be complicated by the presence of comorbidities. The current research aimed to synthesize the relevant literature on the benefits of exercise for people with multimorbidities who experience an AECOPD, and ask: What are the parameters and outcomes of exercise in AECOPD and in conditions that are common comorbidities as reported by systematic reviews (SRs?Methods: An SR was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. Nine electronic databases were searched up to July 2011. Articles were included if they (1 described participants with AECOPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, or one of eleven common comorbidities, (2 were an SR, (3 examined aerobic training (AT, resistance training (RT, balance training (BT, or a combination thereof, (4 included at least one outcome of fitness, and (5 compared exercise training versus control/sham.Results: This synthesis examined 58 SRs of exercise training in people with AECOPD, COPD, or eleven chronic conditions commonly associated with COPD. Meta-analyses of endurance (aerobic or exercise capacity, 6-minute walk distance – 6MWD were shown to significantly improve in most conditions

  2. A risk-based framework to assess long-term effects of policy and water supply changes on water resources systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Elshorbagy, Amin; Wheater, Howard; Gober, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Climate uncertainty can affect water resources availability and management decisions. Sustainable water resources management therefore requires evaluation of policy and management decisions under a wide range of possible future water supply conditions. This study proposes a risk-based framework to integrate water supply uncertainty into a forward-looking decision making context. To apply this framework, a stochastic reconstruction scheme is used to generate a large ensemble of flow series. For the Rocky Mountain basins considered here, two key characteristics of the annual hydrograph are its annual flow volume and the timing of the seasonal flood peak. These are perturbed to represent natural randomness and potential changes due to future climate. 30-year series of perturbed flows are used as input to the SWAMP model - an integrated water resources model that simulates regional water supply-demand system and estimates economic productivity of water and other sustainability indicators, including system vulnerability and resilience. The simulation results are used to construct 2D-maps of net revenue of a particular water sector; e.g., hydropower, or for all sectors combined. Each map cell represents a risk scenario of net revenue based on a particular annual flow volume, timing of the peak flow, and 200 stochastic realizations of flow series. This framework is demonstrated for a water resources system in the Saskatchewan River Basin (SaskRB) in Saskatchewan, Canada. Critical historical drought sequences, derived from tree-ring reconstructions of several hundred years of annual river flows, are used to evaluate the system's performance (net revenue risk) under extremely low flow conditions and also to locate them on the previously produced 2D risk maps. This simulation and analysis framework is repeated under various reservoir operation strategies (e.g., maximizing flood protection or maximizing water supply security); development proposals, such as irrigation

  3. On-site co-generation: cost savings in view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granson, E.

    2004-03-31

    The technical and economic aspects of cogeneration are explained with examples from Alberta and British Columbia. One of the examples is the cogeneration of steam and electricity at the ATCO/EPCOR/NOVA power plant in Joffre, Alberta, which generates enough electricity, steam and heat to supply the whole ethylene and polyethylene plant; it also boosts the provincial grid by four per cent. Another good example cited is TransCanada Pipelines' Carseland, Alberta, operation, which generates 80 MW of electricity, along with about 120 tonnes/hr of steam for Agrium's adjacent Carseland Nitrogen Operation. The electricity is generated by two GE LM6000 PD combustion turbines using natural gas as fuel. Each turbine is equipped with a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG), which captures the gas turbine exhaust heat to raise steam. The high pressure, superheated steam is sent to the Agrium facility for use by the company's nitrogen operation. Dow Chemical Canada Inc also has a power and utilities combined-cycle cogeneration plant at its Fort Saskatchewan site. By utilizing a steam turbine down the line, Dow Chemicals' Fort Saskatchewan operations are able to achieve at least an 80 per cent thermal efficiency rating for the overall process, or about a 10 to 20 per cent gain on alternate designs. The Dow Canada plant operates three GE gas turbines and two steam turbines for a total rated capacity of 300 MW of power. Cogeneration is not limited to turbines fuelled by natural gas; pulp and paper mills throughout Western Canada use wood residue as fuel to produce steam and the hot water required by the mills. Methane gas is another source of fuel being put to use in the Vancouver Landfill Cogeneration Facility at Delta, BC, which, using three Caterpillar 3532 engines, generates 5.6 MW of electricity and 6.7 MW of thermal energy. The electricity is sold to BC Hydro, while the thermal energy is used by the CanAgro greenhouses. In addition to the substantial

  4. Do physiological measures predict selected CrossFit® benchmark performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher SJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scotty J Butcher,1,2 Tyler J Neyedly,3 Karla J Horvey,1 Chad R Benko2,41Physical Therapy, University of Saskatchewan, 2BOSS Strength Institute, 3Physiology, University of Saskatchewan, 4Synergy Strength and Conditioning, Saskatoon, SK, CanadaPurpose: CrossFit® is a new but extremely popular method of exercise training and competition that involves constantly varied functional movements performed at high intensity. Despite the popularity of this training method, the physiological determinants of CrossFit performance have not yet been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physiological and/or muscle strength measures could predict performance on three common CrossFit "Workouts of the Day" (WODs.Materials and methods: Fourteen CrossFit Open or Regional athletes completed, on separate days, the WODs "Grace" (30 clean and jerks for time, "Fran" (three rounds of thrusters and pull-ups for 21, 15, and nine repetitions, and "Cindy" (20 minutes of rounds of five pull-ups, ten push-ups, and 15 bodyweight squats, as well as the "CrossFit Total" (1 repetition max [1RM] back squat, overhead press, and deadlift, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, and Wingate anaerobic power/capacity testing.Results: Performance of Grace and Fran was related to whole-body strength (CrossFit Total (r=-0.88 and -0.65, respectively and anaerobic threshold (r=-0.61 and -0.53, respectively; however, whole-body strength was the only variable to survive the prediction regression for both of these WODs (R2=0.77 and 0.42, respectively. There were no significant associations or predictors for Cindy.Conclusion: CrossFit benchmark WOD performance cannot be predicted by VO2max, Wingate power/capacity, or either respiratory compensation or anaerobic thresholds. Of the data measured, only whole-body strength can partially explain performance on Grace and Fran, although anaerobic threshold also exhibited association with performance. Along with their typical training

  5. Persistence to disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis in a Canadian cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melesse DY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dessalegn Y Melesse,1,2 Ruth Ann Marrie,2,3 James F Blanchard,1 Bo Nancy Yu,1,4 Charity Evans5 1Centre for Global Public Health, 2Department of Community Health Sciences, 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, 4Public Health, Manitoba Health Seniors and Active Living, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 5College of Pharmacy & Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Purpose: To examine the long-term persistence to the first-line injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs for multiple sclerosis (MS and to identify the factors associated with nonpersistence. Patients and methods: We used population-based administrative data from Manitoba, Canada. All adult subjects who were diagnosed with MS and dispensed a first-line injectable DMT (beta-interferon-1b, beta-interferon-1a, and glatiramer acetate between 1996 and 2011 and had a minimum of 1 year of follow-up were included. The primary outcome was the median time to discontinuation of any DMT. The associations between potential predictors and persistence were estimated using multivariable Cox-proportional hazard models. Results: Overall, 721 subjects were followed for a median of 7.8 years (interquartile range 6.1. The median time to discontinuation of all first-line DMTs was 4.2 years (25th and 75th percentile: 1.7, 10.6 years. Of the 451 (62.6% subjects who discontinued their DMT during the study period, 259 (57.4% eventually resumed or restarted a DMT. Subjects who were younger when starting a DMT, had prior MS-related hospitalizations, were more recently diagnosed with MS, or had a greater lag time between their MS diagnosis and DMT initiation were more likely to discontinue therapy. Conclusion: Over half of the individuals receiving a DMT for MS in Manitoba remained on therapy for at least 4 years. DMT discontinuation occurred in 60% of the cohort, but most restarted a DMT within 1 year. While not all of the factors identified with discontinuing DMT are

  6. Qu'Appelle River Dam, dam break analysis using advanced GIS tools for rapid modelling and inundation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, D. [Hatch Energy, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Campbell, C. [Saskatchewan Watershed Authority, Moose Jaw, SK (Canada); Groeneveld, J. [Hatch Energy, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The South Saskatchewan River Project (SSRP) comprises a multi-purpose reservoir that provides water for conservation and irrigation, flood control, power generation, recreation, and municipal and industrial water supply. In addition to the 64 m high Gardiner Dam, the 27 m high Qu'Appelle River Dam and the 22 km long Lake Diefenbaker Reservoir, the SSRP also includes ancillary works. The Qu'Appelle River valley extends for 458 km before connecting to the Assiniboine River. The valley is incised up to 90 m in depth and is a popular cottaging and recreational area with several major communities located in the flood plain. In the event of a breach of the Qu'Appelle Dam, the discharge will increase from a normal maximum discharge of under 60 m{sup 3} per second to over 50,000 m{sup 3} per second. The Saskatchewan Watershed Authority (SWA) is responsible for ensuring safe development of the Province's water resources, without affecting reservoir or lake operations, and preventing damage from flooding, erosion or land slides. It is in the process of developing Hazard Assessments and emergency preparedness plans for each of their dams in accordance with the Canadian Dam Safety Guidelines. Studies using GIS technology and the hydrodynamic routing model HEC-RAS have been completed to evaluate the potential inundation that may result in the event of failure of the Qu'Appelle River Dam. These studies involved the development of a breach parameter model using a breach data set revised to better reflect the Qu'Appelle River Dam; the development of a dam break model for the Qu'Appelle River Dam and downstream river and flood plain; and, the use of this model to simulate two potential dam failure scenarios for the Qu'Appelle River Dam, notably failure during passage of the PMF and failure during fair weather conditions. Inundation maps have been prepared for the downstream Qu'Appelle River valley for each of the above events. 3 refs., 4

  7. Environnement alimentaire de la vente au détail et expériences de magasinage dans les collectivités des Premières nations du nord des provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Burnett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Cet article porte sur l'environnement de la vente d’aliments dans les collectivités des Premières nations du nord des provinces, en particulier sur la concurrence éventuelle dans la vente au détail de la North West Company (NWC ainsi que sur les expériences d'achats alimentaires de la population vivant dans le Nord canadien. Méthodologie : Nous avons utilisé deux méthodologies pour évaluer l’environnement alimentaire de la vente au détail dans le Nord. D’abord, nous avons cartographié les détaillants en alimentation du Nord afin d’examiner le degré de concurrence au détail dans les régions nordiques, en prêtant une attention particulière aux collectivités qui ne sont pas accessibles à l’année par la route. Ensuite, nous avons enquêté auprès des personnes vivant dans les collectivités du Nord canadien à propos de leurs expériences d’achat au détail et de magasinage. Résultats : Cinquante‑quatre pour cent des collectivités du nord des provinces et du Grand Nord n’avaient aucune épicerie en concurrence avec la NWC. Les provinces comptant les plus fortes proportions de collectivités nordiques sans concurrence dans la vente au détail étaient l’Ontario (87 %, la Saskatchewan (83 % et le Manitoba (72 %. Les participants au sondage (n = 92 ont fait état de leurs préoccupations quant à leurs expériences d'achat dans trois grands secteurs : le coût des aliments, la qualité et la fraîcheur des aliments et la disponibilité de certains aliments. Conclusion : La concurrence dans la vente au détail est limitée dans le nord des provinces. Au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Ontario, la NWC ne fait face à aucune concurrence dans au moins 70 % des collectivités nordiques. Les consommateurs du Nord canadien considèrent que les aliments nutritifs sont peu abordables, et ils souhaitent avoir accès à un plus grand choix d’aliments périssables en bon état.

  8. Is a history of work-related low back injury associated with prevalent low back pain and depression in the general population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy J David

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the role of prior occupational low back injury in future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population. We conducted a study to determine if a lifetime history of work-related low back injury is associated with prevalent severity-graded low back pain, depressive symptoms, or both, in the general population. Methods We used data from the Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey – a population-based cross-sectional survey mailed to a random, stratified sample of 2,184 Saskatchewan adults 20 to 69 years of age in 1995. Information on the main independent variable was gathered by asking respondents whether they had ever injured their low back at work. Our outcomes, the 6-month period prevalence of severity-graded low back pain and depressive symptoms during the past week, were measured with valid and reliable questionnaires. The associations between prior work-related low back injury and our outcomes were estimated through multinomial and binary multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, and other important covariates. Results Fifty-five percent of the eligible population participated. Of the 1,086 participants who responded to the question about the main independent variable, 38.0% reported a history of work-related low back injury. A history of work-related low back injury was positively associated with low intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 3.66; 95%CI, 2.48–5.42, with high intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 4.03; 95%CI, 2.41–6.76, and with high disability low back pain (OR, 6.76; 95%CI, 3.80–12.01. No association was found between a history of work-related low back injury and depression (OR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.55–1.30. Conclusion Our analysis shows an association between past occupational low back injury and increasing severity of prevalent low back pain, but not depression. These results suggest that past work-related low back injury

  9. Patient Feedback on Pharmacist Prescribing for Minor Ailments in a Canadian Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff G Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists have been given authority in many Canadian provinces to go beyond simply recommending over-the-counter medicines to patients with minor ailments. In Saskatchewan, they can prescribe medicines normally under the sole control of physicians for 17 conditions. An evaluation program is underway to assess the value of the program. Methods: Adults were recruited over a one-year period and were eligible for inclusion if prescribed an agent for an applicable condition. Pharmacists from 40 pharmacies participated in identifying people who received the service. Of patients agreeing to participate, a link to an online survey was provided. The survey included items on clinical improvement, care options, and patient confidence in knowing when to seek a physician for a minor ailment. Results: Forty-eight people were involved in prescribing encounters, with the majority seeking help for themselves. All but one saw their symptoms improve subsequent to pharmacist assistance, most often to a significant extent. Satisfaction with the service was high. Convenience and trust in pharmacists were primary reasons for choosing the service over medical care (rather than an issue potentially more worrisome such as not having a family physician. Had this service not been in place, 30.6% of those asking for help would have gone to a medical clinic or emergency room. Seventy-five percent were (at least very confident in knowing when to seek a physician (rather than a pharmacist for such conditions. Conclusion: Information on the clinical outcomes of pharmacist-led minor ailment care is starting to accrue in Saskatchewan. While the numbers are extremely low to date, what has become available suggests the service is of value to the citizens of the province, it is chosen for appropriate reasons, and is of an acceptable standard of care. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their

  10. Effect of creatine supplementation during resistance training on lean tissue mass and muscular strength in older adults: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilibeck PD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Chilibeck,1 Mojtaba Kaviani,2 Darren G Candow,3 Gordon A Zello4 1College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, 2School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS, 3Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, 4College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada Abstract: The loss of muscle mass and strength with aging results in significant functional impairment. Creatine supplementation has been used in combination with resistance training as a strategy for increasing lean tissue mass and muscle strength in older adults, but results across studies are equivocal. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of creatine supplementation during resistance training in older adults with lean tissue mass, chest press strength, and leg press strength as outcomes by searching PubMed and SPORTDiscus databases. Twenty-two studies were included in our meta-analysis with 721 participants (both men and women; with a mean age of 57–70 years across studies randomized to creatine supplementation or placebo during resistance training 2–3 days/week for 7–52 weeks. Creatine supplementation resulted in greater increases in lean tissue mass (mean difference =1.37 kg [95% CI =0.97–1.76]; p<0.00001, chest press strength (standardized mean difference [SMD] =0.35 [0.16–0.53]; p=0.0002, and leg press strength (SMD =0.24 [0.05–0.43]; p=0.01. A number of mechanisms exist by which creatine may increase lean tissue mass and muscular strength. These are included in a narrative review in the discussion section of this article. In summary, creatine supplementation increases lean tissue mass and upper and lower body muscular strength during resistance training of older adults, but potential mechanisms by which creatine exerts these positive effects have yet to be evaluated extensively. Keywords: muscle, age, sarcopenia

  11. Long-term cost effectiveness of early and sustained dual oral antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel given for up to one year after percutaneous coronary intervention results: from the Clopidogrel for the Reduction of Events During Observation (CREDO) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinart, Sean C; Kolm, Paul; Veledar, Emir; Zhang, Zefeng; Mahoney, Elizabeth M; Bouin, Olivier; Gabriel, Sylvie; Jackson, Joseph; Chen, Roland; Caro, Jaime; Steinhubl, Steven; Topol, Eric; Weintraub, William S

    2005-09-06

    This study sought to evaluate the long-term cost effectiveness of a clopidogrel loading strategy before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) followed by continued treatment for one year. The Clopidogrel for the Reduction of Events During Observation (CREDO) trial, a randomized trial of 2,116 patients, showed the effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel 300 mg before PCI and 75 mg daily for one year afterward compared with placebo load and placebo days 29 to 365 in reducing the combined risk of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke. All patients received clopidogrel on days 1 to 28 and aspirin on days 1 to 365. All hospitalizations were assigned a diagnosis-related group. Associated costs were estimated three ways (including professional costs): 1) Medicare costs, 2) MEDSTAT costs, and 3) blend with Medicare for those age > or = 65 years and MEDSTAT for those age <65 years. Clopidogrel 75 mg cost 3.22 dollars. Life expectancy in trial survivors was estimated using external data. Confidence intervals were assessed by bootstrap. The primary composite end point occurred in 89 (8.45%) clopidogrel patients and in 122 (11.48%) placebo patients (relative risk reduction [RRR] 26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9% to 44.4%). The number of life-years gained (LYG) with clopidogrel was 0.1526 (95% CI 0.0263 to 0.2838) using Framingham data and 0.1920 (95% CI 0.054 to 0.337) using Saskatchewan data. Average total costs were 664 dollars higher for the clopidogrel arm (95% CI -461 dollars to 1,784 dollars). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) based on Framingham data ranged from 3,685 dollars/LYG to 4,353 dollars/LYG, with over 97% of bootstrap-derived ICER estimates below 50,000 dollars/LYG. The ICERs based on Saskatchewan data were 2,929 dollars/LYG to 3,460 dollars/LYG, with over 98% of estimates below 50,000 dollars/LYG. Platelet inhibition with clopidogrel loading before PCI followed by therapy for one year is highly cost effective.

  12. Space-use, movement and dispersal of sub-adult cougars in a geographically isolated population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl D. Morrison

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cougar (Puma concolor observations have increased in Midwest North America, with breeding populations re-establishing in several regions east of their contemporary range. The Cypress Hills Uplands, located in southwest Saskatchewan and southeast Alberta, was recently re-colonized by cougars and now supports the easternmost confirmed breeding population of cougars in Canada. A number of factors contribute to this cougar range expansion, but it is dispersal that provides the mechanism for re-colonization of historic range. We used GPS-collar data to examine space-use and movement behavior of sub-adult cougars, the age class associated with dispersal, in the Cypress Hills. Conditional logistic regression and a two-stage modeling approach were used to estimate resource selection functions (RSF of sub-adult cougars during two distinct ranging behaviors: transient movements (i.e., dispersal and exploratory forays and localizing movements (i.e., temporary home ranges. Linear regression was used to model movement rates, measured as the distance between consecutive 3-h GPS-relocations, of sub-adult cougars relative to different habitats, times of day and between transient and localizing behavior. All individual sub-adult cougars displayed bouts of transient and localizing behavior. All male cougars dispersed from their natal ranges and travelled considerably farther distances than female cougars. One male dispersed over 750 km eastward through the agricultural belt of northern Montana and southern Saskatchewan. Males occupied temporary home ranges in more open habitats on the fringes of the insular Cypress Hills, while females appeared to be recruited into the adult population, occupying treed habitat that provided more suitable cover. During both ranging behaviors, sub-adult cougars selected for rugged terrain and proximity to hydrological features (likely supporting riparian habitats and avoided open cover types. Differences in habitat selection

  13. Income and heart disease: Neglected risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2015-08-01

    To determine the unadjusted and adjusted effects of income on heart disease; its main disease intermediary, high blood pressure; and its main behavioural risk factors, smoking and physical inactivity. Random-digit dialing telephone survey collected through the Canadian Community Health Survey by Statistics Canada. Saskatchewan. A total of 27 090 residents aged 20 years and older; each health region in Saskatchewan was represented. Overall, 178 variables related to demographic characteristics, socioeconomic factors, behaviour, life stress, disease intermediaries, health outcomes, and access to health care were analyzed to determine their unadjusted and adjusted effects on heart disease. The mean age of the sample was 52.6 years. Women represented 55.9% of the sample. Most respondents were married (52.3%) and had some postsecondary or graduate education (52.5%). The mean personal income was $23 931 and the mean household income was $37 533. All models statistically controlled for age. Five covariates independently associated with heart disease included high blood pressure, household income of $29 999 or less per year, being a daily smoker, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with high blood pressure included being overweight or obese, being a daily smoker, household income of $29 999 or less per year, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with daily smoking included being a visible minority, household income of $29 999 or less per year, not being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, and male sex. Six covariates independently associated with physical inactivity included being a visible minority, being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, male sex, household income of $29 999 or less per year, and being a daily smoker. Household income was strongly and independently associated with heart disease; its main disease

  14. A Continent-Wide Migratory Divide in North American Breeding Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A Hobson

    Full Text Available Populations of most North American aerial insectivores have undergone steep population declines over the past 40 years but the relative importance of factors operating on breeding, wintering, or stopover sites remains unknown. We used archival light-level geolocators to track the phenology, movements and winter locations of barn swallows (Hirdundo rustica; n = 27 from populations across North America to determine their migratory connectivity. We identified an east-west continental migratory divide for barn swallows with birds from western regions (Washington State, USA (n = 8 and Saskatchewan, Canada (n = 5 traveling shorter distances to wintering areas ranging from Oregon to northern Colombia than eastern populations (Ontario (n = 3 and New Brunswick (n = 10, Canada which wintered in South America south of the Amazon basin. A single swallow from a stable population in Alabama shared a similar migration route to eastern barn swallows but wintered farther north in northeast Brazil indicating a potential leap frog pattern migratory among eastern birds. Six of 9 (67% birds from the two eastern populations and Alabama underwent a loop migration west of fall migration routes including around the Gulf of Mexico travelling a mean of 2,224 km and 722 km longer on spring migration, respectively. Longer migration distances, including the requirement to cross the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico and subsequent shorter sedentary wintering periods, may exacerbate declines for populations breeding in northeastern North America.

  15. USRC: a new strategy for adding digital images to the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelle, David; Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil

    2012-10-01

    Many medical schools use learning management systems (LMSs) to give students access to online lecture notes, assignments, quizzes, and other learning resources. LMSs can also be used to provide access to digital radiology images, potentially improving preclinical teaching in anatomy, physiology, and pathology while also allowing students to develop interpretation skills that are important in clinical practice. However, it is unclear how radiology images can best be stored, imported, and displayed in an LMS. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a new web application that allows course designers to import images into pages linked to BlackBoard Learn, a popular LMS. Page content, including images, annotations, captions, and supporting text, are stored as teaching cases on a MIRC (Medical Imaging Resource Center) server. Course designers create cases in MIRC, and then create a corresponding page in BlackBoard by modifying an HTML template so that it holds the URL of a MIRC case. When a user visits the page in BlackBoard, the page requests content from the MIRC case, reformats the text for display in BlackBoard, and loads an image viewer plug-in that allows students to view and interact with the images stored in the case. The USRC technology can be used to reformat MIRC cases for presentation in any website or in any learning management system that supports custom pages written in HTML with embedded JavaScript.

  16. Strategic Environmental Assessment Framework for Landscape-Based, Temporal Analysis of Wetland Change in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizo, Anton; Noble, Bram F.; Bell, Scott

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a spatial framework for the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in the context of change analysis for urban wetland environments. The proposed framework is focused on two key stages of the SEA process: scoping and environmental baseline assessment. These stages are arguably the most information-intense phases of SEA and have a significant effect on the quality of the SEA results. The study aims to meet the needs for proactive frameworks to assess and protect wetland habitat and services more efficiently, toward the goal of advancing more intelligent urban planning and development design. The proposed framework, adopting geographic information system and remote sensing tools and applications, supports the temporal evaluation of wetland change and sustainability assessment based on landscape indicator analysis. The framework was applied to a rapidly developing urban environment in the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, analyzing wetland change and land-use pressures from 1985 to 2011. The SEA spatial scale was rescaled from administrative urban planning units to an ecologically meaningful area. Landscape change assessed was based on a suite of indicators that were subsequently rolled up into a single, multi-dimensional, and easy to understand and communicate index to examine the implications of land-use change for wetland sustainability. The results show that despite the recent extremely wet period in the Canadian prairie region, land-use change contributed to increasing threats to wetland sustainability.

  17. Adolescent Trajectories of Aerobic Fitness and Adiposity as Markers of Cardiometabolic Risk in Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Jackowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adolescent growth trajectories of aerobic fitness and adiposity were associated with mid-adulthood cardiometabolic risk (CMR. Methods. Participants were drawn from the Saskatchewan Growth and Development Study (1963–1973. Adolescent growth trajectories for maximal aerobic capacity (absolute VO2 (AbsVO2, skinfolds (SF, representing total body (Sum6SF and central adiposity (TrunkSF, and body mass index (BMI were determined from 7 to 17 years of age. In mid-adulthood (40 to 50 years of age, 61 individuals (23 females returned for follow-ups. A CMR score was calculated to group participants as displaying either high or a low CMR. Multilevel hierarchical models were constructed, comparing the adolescent growth trajectories of AbsVO2, Sum6SF, TrunkSF, and BMI between CMR groupings. Results. There were no significant differences in the adolescent development of AbsVO2, Sum6SF, TrunkSF, and BMI between adult CMR groupings (p>0.05. Individuals with high CMR accrued 62% greater adjusted total body fat percentage from adolescence to adulthood (p=0.03. Conclusions. Growth trajectories of adolescent aerobic fitness and adiposity do not appear to be associated with mid-adulthood CMR. Individuals should be encouraged to participate in behaviours that promote healthy aerobic fitness and adiposity levels throughout life to reduce lifelong CMR.

  18. Fertility in Alberta in a Context of Rapid Economic Growth, 1997-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Trovato

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, birth rates in Alberta have followed closely the trajectory of change experienced by the other Canadian provinces. Its total fertility rate fell during the low point of the 1930s; it increased during the post-War baby boom in the 1950s and sixties, and thereafter fell to subreplacement levels beginning in the mid 1970s. In recent years, especially since the early 2000s, the birth rate in Alberta has unexpectedly increased, such that by 2007, it had reached 1.90 children per woman - not far from the 2.1 level needed for generational replacement in the long term. During this same period both national and provincial fertility rates fluctuated at levels below those of Alberta (except Saskatchewan and Manitoba, whose rates have been higher. In this study, I examine the historical pattern of fertility change in Alberta, noting similarities and differences with the other provinces. I then look at the association of selected macro level factors (marriage, unemployment, wages, female labour force participation with change in total and parity-specific birth rates between 1997 and 2007, a period of unprecedented economic growth in Alberta. The statistical results show that although marriage is not significantly correlated with change in fertility rates, male and female wages and female labour force participation all show associations consistent with a procyclical interpretation of fertility change - that is, periods of economic growth are conducive to fertility increase whereas bad economic times are associated with reduced fertility.

  19. Detection by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of coronavirus antibodies in bovine serum and lacteal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L; Babiuk, L A; Acres, S D

    1982-07-01

    The sensitivity of a radioimmunoassay (RIA), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a serum neutralization assay (SN) for detecting antibodies to bovine coronavirus in serum and colostrum were compared. Although there proved to be a good correlation among all three assays (r = 0.915 and 0.964 for RIA with SN and ELISA, respectively), RIA and ELISA proved to be at least 10 times more sensitive than neutralization tests. By using these techniques, it was possible to detect a time-dependent decrease in antibody levels in bovine colostrum after parturition. Using ELISA, we demonstrated that 12 of 12 herds in Saskatchewan, and 109 of 110 animals tested, and antibody to bovine coronavirus. There was no elevated antibody response in serum or lacteal secretions of cows vaccinated once or twice with a commercially available modified live rota-coronavirus vaccine. In addition to being more sensitive than SN, ELISA and RIA proved to have other advantages for measuring antibody levels to bovine coronavirus and therefore warrant wider use as tools in diagnostic virology.

  20. Quantifying Spatial Changes in the Structure of Water Quality Constituents in a Large Prairie River within Two Frameworks of a Water Quality Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Hosseini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A global sensitivity analysis was carried out on a water quality model to quantify the spatial changes in parameter sensitivity of a model of a large prairie river, the South Saskatchewan River (SSR. The method is used to assess the relative impacts of major nutrient loading sources and a reservoir on the river’s water quality. The river completely freezes over during winter; hence, the sensitivity analysis was carried out seasonally, for winter and summer, to account for the influence of ice-covered conditions on nutrient transformations. Furthermore, the integrity of the river’s aquatic ecosystem was examined through the inter-relationship between variables and comparing hierarchy index values and water quality indices at four locations along the river. Sensitivities of model parameters varied slightly at different locations along the river, with the phytoplankton growth rate being the most influential parameter. Nitrogen and phosphorus transformation processes were more sensitive in winter, while chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen parameters showed higher sensitivity in summer. A more complicated correlation between variables was observed downstream of the junction of the Red Deer River. Our results reveal that the lower correlation between variables may suggest a more balanced and healthier system, although further analysis is needed to support this statement.

  1. Site-specific estimates of water yield applied in regional acid sensitivity surveys across western Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. SHAW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Runoff or water yield is an important input to the Steady-State Water Chemistry (SSWC model for estimating critical loads of acidity. Herein, we present site-specific water yield estimates for a large number of lakes (779 across three provinces of western Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia using an isotope mass balance (IMB approach. We explore the impact of applying site-specific hydrology as compared to use of regional runoff estimates derived from gridded datasets in assessing critical loads of acidity to these lakes. In general, the average water yield derived from IMB is similar to the long-term average runoff; however, IMB results suggest a much larger range in hydrological settings of the lakes, attributed to spatial heterogeneity in watershed characteristics and landcover. The comparison of critical loads estimates from the two methods suggests that use of average regional runoff data in the SSWC model may overestimate critical loads for the majority of lakes due to systematic skewness in the actual runoff distributions. Implications for use of site-specific hydrology in regional critical loads assessments across western Canada are discussed.

  2. Residential energy efficiency: Progress since 1973 and future potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    1985-11-01

    Today's 85 million U.S. homes use 100 billion of fuel and electricity (1150/home). If their energy intensity (resource energy/ft2) were still frozen at 1973 levels, they would use 18% more. With well-insulated houses, need for space heat is vanishing. Superinsulated Saskatchewan homes spend annually only 270 for space heat, 150 for water heat, and 400 for appliances, yet they cost only 2000±1000 more than conventional new homes. The concept of Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE) is used to rank conservation technologies for existing and new homes and appliances, and to develop supply curves of conserved energy and a least cost scenario. Calculations are calibrated with the BECA and other data bases. By limiting investments in efficiency to those whose CCE is less than current fuel and electricity prices, the potential residential plus commercial energy use in 2000 AD drops to half of that estimated by DOE, and the number of power plants needed drops by 200. For the whole buildings sector, potential savings by 2000 are 8 Mbod (worth 50B/year), at an average CCE of 10/barrel.

  3. Foothills model forest grizzly bear study : project update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    This report updates a five year study launched in 1999 to ensure the continued healthy existence of grizzly bears in west-central Alberta by integrating their needs into land management decisions. The objective was to gather better information and to develop computer-based maps and models regarding grizzly bear migration, habitat use and response to human activities. The study area covers 9,700 square km in west-central Alberta where 66 to 147 grizzly bears exist. During the first 3 field seasons, researchers captured and radio collared 60 bears. Researchers at the University of Calgary used remote sensing tools and satellite images to develop grizzly bear habitat maps. Collaborators at the University of Washington used trained dogs to find bear scat which was analyzed for DNA, stress levels and reproductive hormones. Resource Selection Function models are being developed by researchers at the University of Alberta to identify bear locations and to see how habitat is influenced by vegetation cover and oil, gas, forestry and mining activities. The health of the bears is being studied by researchers at the University of Saskatchewan and the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre. The study has already advanced the scientific knowledge of grizzly bear behaviour. Preliminary results indicate that grizzlies continue to find mates, reproduce and gain weight and establish dens. These are all good indicators of a healthy population. Most bear deaths have been related to poaching. The study will continue for another two years. 1 fig.

  4. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  5. Mining the Cultural Evidence: Situating Planning and Leadership within the Academic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Shepstone

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study investigated organizational culture in two academic librariesin order to propose culturally responsive strategies for developing planning andleadership initiatives. A case study conducted at the University of SaskatchewanLibrary (Shepstone & Currie, 2008 was replicated at two other Canadian academiclibraries to generate some comparative data on organizational culture in Canadianacademic libraries.Methods – The Competing Values Framework (Cameron & Quinn, 1999, 2006provided the theoretical framework and the methodology for diagnosing andunderstanding organizational culture. The Organizational Culture AssessmentInstrument (OCAI was administered by questionnaire to all library staff at MountRoyal University and Carleton University libraries.Results – Scores on the OCAI were used to graphically plot and describe the currentand preferred culture profiles for each library. We compared the cultures at the threelibraries and proposed strategies for initiating planning and developing leadershipthat were appropriate for the preferred cultures.Conclusions – This research demonstrates that academic library culture can be diagnosed, understood, and changed in order to enhance organizational performance. Examining organizational culture provides evidence to guide strategy development, priority setting and planning, and the development of key leadership abilities and skills. Creating culturally appropriate support mechanisms, opportunities for learning and growth, and a clear plan of action for change and improvement are critical.

  6. Improvement in obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and management wait times: A retrospective analysis of home management pathway for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Samuel Alan; Skomro, Robert; Reid, John; Penz, Erika; Fenton, Mark; Gjevre, John; Cotton, David

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition within the Canadian population. The current gold standard for diagnosis and management of patients is in-laboratory (in-lab) polysomnography; however, the limited availability of testing options for patients has led to long wait times and increased disease burden within the population. The Sleep Research Laboratory in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan) implemented a home management program to run in parallel with the in-lab system several years ago in an effort to increase their capacity and reduce wait times. The present study was a retrospective analysis of all patients referred to the program between 2009 and 2012. The home management system has improved wait times by diagnosing and managing up to one-half of the referred patient population, reducing the wait for in-lab treatment from a median of 152 days in 2009 to 92 days in 2012 (Pmanagement can provide a viable alternative to in-lab testing for patients who meet strict entry criteria, reducing the in-lab workload and, ultimately, reducing wait times.

  7. (BOREAS) BOREAS TE-7 Sap Flow Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Hogg, E. H.; Hurdle, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-7 team collected data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the sap flow of boreal vegetation. The heat pulse method was used to monitor sap flow and to estimate rates of transpiration from aspen, black spruce, and mixed wood forests at the SSAOA, MIX, SSA-OBS. and Batoche sites in Saskatchewan, Canada. Measurements were made at the various sites from May to October 1994, May to October 1995, and April to October 1996. A scaling procedure was used to estimate canopy transpiration rates from the sap flow measurements. The data were stored in tabular ASCII files. Analyses to date show a tendency for sap flow in aspen to remain remarkably constant over a wide range of environmental conditions VPD from 1.0 to 4.8 kPa and solar radiation less than 400 W/sq m). For forests with high aerodynamic conductance, the results would indicate an inverse relationship between stomatal conductance and VPD, for VPD greater than 1 kPa. A possible interpretation is that stomata are operating to maintain leaf water potentials above a critical minimum value, which in turn places a maximum value on the rate of sap flow that can be sustained by the tree. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Measurement of Forest Leaf Area over an Extensive Transect with Airborne Laser Altimetry for Global Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, T.; Tsuzuki, H.; Abraham, E. R.; Sweda, T.

    2001-12-01

    The climate warming resulting from increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses is expected to be most prominent in the subarctic-boreal region of the Northern Hemisphere. With an objective of setting up a baseline to monitor possible vegetation change in terms of change in leaf area index in this region, a continuous vegetation profile extending 600 km from Edmonton, Alberta to Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada was measured using an airborne infrared laser altimeter mounted on a helicopter. The ground truth survey at some 30 plots located directly under the airborne laser profiling track revealed that leaf area index correlated well with standing stock, which further in turn correlated well with the area of vegetation profile. Thus, using regression of leaf area index and standing stock respectively upon stand stock and vegetation profile, a continuous distribution of leaf area index over the same 600 km laser profiling track was estimated. The distribution of leaf area index not only corresponded well with biome type, but also showed characteristic change in accordance with environmental gradient within a given biome, thus confirming that airborne laser altimetry is a powerful tool for measuring and monitoring such important vegetation characteristics as standing volume, leaf area index, etc. over an extensive area.

  9. Fostering Cultures of Sustainability through Community-Engaged Museums: The History and Re-Emergence of Ecomuseums in Canada and the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn C. Sutter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, communities around the world have been reacting to the forces of globalization by re-focusing on the local, leading to the democratization of culture, heritage, and related concepts. By attempting to reconnect locals with their own sense of belonging, to reinvigorate a pride of place, and to foster wellbeing, communities have increasingly and successfully turned to features that make their local history, heritage, and environment unique or distinctive. In turn, democratization processes have led to sustainable forms of economic and community development through ecomuseums and other examples of community-engaged museums. This paper aims to deepen our understanding of relevant community-based culture and heritage initiatives by reflecting on the development of ecomuseums in Canada and the USA. As part of the larger museum community, ecomuseums tend to be accessible entities that are not affiliated with political or other convictions or viewpoints. This makes them uniquely positioned to foster creative change and adaptation aimed at sustainability, yet their evolution in North America has not been examined from this perspective. To address this gap, this paper will highlight the Haute-Beauce Ecomuseum in Québec and the Ak-Chin Him Dak Ecomuseum in Arizona, which have long histories as North American ecomuseums and represent two very different cultural and geographic contexts. We also reflect on the history of ecomuseums in Canada, and their recent emergence in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.

  10. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  11. Temporal variation in the prevalence and species richness of Campylobacter spp. in a prairie watershed impacted by urban and agricultural mixed inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Boa, Tyler; Aryal, Bijaya; Yost, Christopher K

    2016-05-01

    Campylobacter spp. are a substantial cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Human infection can result from ingestion of contaminated food or water from a variety of sources, including the consumption of fresh produce that is contaminated with the pathogen via the use of contaminated irrigation water. Using molecular methods, we investigated the occurrence of Campylobacter in the Qu'Appelle River watershed, an important source of irrigation water for vegetable producers in southern Saskatchewan, Canada. Water samples were collected from 7 sampling sites from April to September 2009 (145 samples), and from 5 sampling sites from May to October 2013 (116 samples). Campylobacter was detected in 57% and 16% of the samples collected in 2009 and 2013, respectively. Campylobacter detection was highest in May and June for both sampling years. In 2009, the predominant species were Campylobacter lari and Campylobacter jejuni, with prevalences of 84% and 41%, respectively. Other Campylobacter spp. were detected less frequently. Only C. lari was detected in 2013. The results in 2009 demonstrate the species richness of Campylobacter in water sources within the watershed. The occurrence of Campylobacter in the study area also underscores the importance of monitoring irrigation water used to irrigate fresh produce from a public health prospective.

  12. Selenium uptake and speciation in wild and caged fish downstream of a metal mining and milling discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phibbs, James; Wiramanaden, Cheryl I E; Hauck, Dominic; Pickering, Ingrid J; Liber, Karsten; Janz, David M

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the dominance of the feeding pathway with respect to selenium (Se) uptake and speciation in fish inhabiting the receiving waters downstream of a uranium processing mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The experimental design included analysis of Se in the predominant fish species located in the study area, a caging validation study using wild, naïve (i.e., collected from a reference lake) lake chub (Couesius plumbeus) and spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius), and a 21-day feeding cage study using wild naïve lake chub. Three exposure lakes located downstream of the uranium mill and one reference lake situated in an adjacent watershed were studied to investigate a gradient of Se exposure. Lake chub were identified as more suitable candidates for caging due to higher survival and condition factor at the completion of the 21-day trial. Analytical results indicated that lake chub caged in the exposure lakes had significantly greater whole-body Se concentrations after 21 days compared to fish caged in the reference lake. Selenium speciation results (obtained using X-ray absorption spectroscopy) from wild and caged lake chub indicated that organic Se modeled as selenomethionine was the dominant form of Se found in both wild and caged lake chub from the exposure lakes, and that selenomethionine (R-Se-R) acts as a marker of bioavailable Se exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus canadensis in wolves from western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Janna M; Gesy, Karen M; Elkin, Brett T; Jenkins, Emily J

    2014-02-01

    Echinococcus species are important parasites of wildlife, domestic animals and people worldwide; however, little is known about the prevalence, intensity and genetic diversity of Echinococcus tapeworms in Canadian wildlife. Echinococcus tapeworms were harvested from the intestines of 42% of 93 wolves (Canis lupus) from five sampling regions in the Northwest Territories, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and visually identified to genus level by microscopic examination. Genetic characterization was successful for tapeworms from 30 wolves, and identified both Echinococcus canadensis and Echinococcus multilocularis in all sampling locations. Mixed infections of E. canadensis/E. multilocularis, as well as the G8/G10 genotypes of E. canadensis were observed. These findings suggest that wolves may be an important definitive host for both parasite species in western Canada. This represents the first report of wolves naturally infected with E. multilocularis in North America, and of wolves harbouring mixed infections with multiple species and genotypes of Echinococcus. These observations provide important information regarding the distribution and diversity of zoonotic species of Echinococcus in western North America, and may be of interest from public health and wildlife conservation perspectives.

  14. Tree rings provide early warning signals of jack pine mortality across a moisture gradient in the southern boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamet, S. D.; Chun, K. P.; Metsaranta, J. M.; Barr, A. G.; Johnstone, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    Recent declines in productivity and tree survival have been widely observed in boreal forests. We used early warning signals (EWS) in tree ring data to anticipate premature mortality in jack pine (Pinus banksiana)—an extensive and dominant species occurring across the moisture-limited southern boreal forest in North America. We sampled tree rings from 113 living and 84 dead trees in three soil moisture regimes (subxeric, submesic, subhygric) in central Saskatchewan, Canada. We reconstructed annual increments of tree basal area to investigate (1) whether we could detect EWS related to mortality of individual trees, and (2) how water availability and tree growth history may explain the mortality warning signs. EWS were evident as punctuated changes in growth patterns prior to transition to an alternative state of reduced growth before dying. This transition was likely triggered by a combination of severe drought and insect outbreak. Higher moisture availability associated with a soil moisture gradient did not appear to reduce tree sensitivity to stress-induced mortality. Our results suggest tree rings offer considerable potential for detecting critical transitions in tree growth, which are linked to premature mortality.

  15. Understanding academic clinicians' intent to treat pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankfurter, Claudia; Cunningham, Charles; Morrison, Katherine M; Rimas, Heather; Bailey, Karen

    2017-02-08

    To examine the extent to which the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicts academic clinicians' intent to treat pediatric obesity. A multi-disciplinary panel iteratively devised a Likert scale survey based on the constructs of the TPB applied to a set of pediatric obesity themes. A cross-sectional electronic survey was then administered to academic clinicians at tertiary care centers across Canada from January to April 2012. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic and item agreement data. A hierarchical linear regression analysis controlling for demographic variables was conducted to examine the extent to which the TPB subscales predicted intent to treat pediatric obesity. A total of 198 physicians, surgeons, and allied health professionals across Canada (British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec) completed the survey. On step 1, demographic factors accounted for 7.4% of the variance in intent scores. Together in step 2, demographic variables and TPB subscales predicted 56.9% of the variance in a measure of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Perceived behavioral control, that is, confidence in one's ability to manage pediatric obesity, and subjective norms, congruent with one's context of practice, were the most significant predictors of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Attitudes and barriers did not predict the intent to treat pediatric obesity in this context. Enhancing self-confidence in the ability to treat pediatric obesity and the existence of supportive treatment environments are important to increase clinician's intent to treat pediatric obesity.

  16. Constitutionality of CEPA challenged

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaran, A.

    1997-02-24

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) was challenged by Hydro-Quebec in the Supreme Court of Canada. Hydro-Quebec argued that in the absence of any explicit jurisdiction, federal environmental law must be rooted in either the Constitution`s criminal law power, or in its power to legislate for the peace, order and good government of Canada. When accused under CEPA of dumping PCBs into the the St. Maurice River in 1990, Hydro-Quebec, joined in its case by the Attorney Generals of Quebec and Saskatchewan, and IPSCO Inc., argued that the law failed to meet these criteria, and is, therefore unconstitutional and invalid. The Supreme Court case focused primarily on the validity of the Federal Government`s right to declare substances toxic in its pursuit of protecting the environment from immediate or long-term harm, in as much as the criminal law power is understood to protect human life and health, but heretofore, not the environment. Although the Justices were anxious to circumscribe the limits of federal environmental jurisdiction, they also appeared disinclined to explode all of Canada`s toxic waste laws. The most likely outcome is that the CEPA will be allowed to stand, but will be severed of the environmental protection purpose, while preserving the Federal Government`s jurisdiction over toxic substances under the protection of human life and health provisions of the Constitution.

  17. Lentils (Lens culinaris Medikus Subspecies culinaris): a whole food for increased iron and zinc intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Sarker, Ashutosh; Vandenberg, Albert

    2009-06-24

    Micronutrient malnutrition, the hidden hunger, affects more than 40% of the world's population, and a majority of them are in South and South East Asia and Africa. This study was carried out to determine the potential for iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) biofortification of lentils ( Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris ) to improve human nutrition. Lentils are a common and quick-cooking nutritious staple pulse in many developing countries. We analyzed the total Fe and Zn concentrations of 19 lentil genotypes grown at eight locations for 2 years in Saskatchewan, Canada. It was observed that some genetic variation exists for Fe and Zn concentrations among the lentil lines tested. The total Fe and Zn concentrations ranged from 73 to 90 mg of Fe kg(-1) and from 44 to 54 mg of Zn kg(-1). The calculated percentages of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for Fe and Zn were within the RDA ranges from a 100 g serving of dry lentils. Broad-sense heritability estimates for Fe and Zn concentrations in lentil seed were 64 and 68%, respectively. It was concluded that lentils have great potential as a whole food source of Fe and Zn for people affected by these nutrient deficiencies. This is the first report on the genetic basis for Fe and Zn micronutrient content in lentils. These results provide some understanding of the genetic basis of Fe and Zn concentrations and will allow for the development of potential strategies for genetic biofortification.

  18. Detection of common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) in Lentil (Lens culinaris L.) using unique chemical fingerprint markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Thavarajah, Dil; Premakumara, G A S; Vandenberg, Albert

    2012-12-15

    Detection of adulteration of split red lentil (Lens culinaris L.) seeds with low level addition of split common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) is hampered by a lack of reliable detection methods. An analytical method was developed using high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) based on two unique chemical markers found in common vetch: ß-cyanoalanine (BCA) and γ-glutamyl-ß-cyanoalanine (GCA). These two markers were present in samples of common vetch seed grown in Canada and Serbia. Authentic lentil samples grown in Canada, Australia, USA, Turkey, Syria, and Morocco had no detectable levels of these chemical markers. Commercial lentil samples for export from lentil processing plants in Saskatchewan, Canada, also had no detectable levels of GCA and BCA. The presence of vetch in intentionally adulterated lentil samples could be determined via chemical markers with a detection limit of 5% (w/w). The proposed method is a simple sample extraction and rapid HPLC analysis that could be widely used to detect intentional adulteration of lentils with common vetch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Perceived Benefits and Barriers Surrounding Lentil Consumption in Families with Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Theodosia; Zello, Gordon A; Chilibeck, Phil D; Vandenberg, Albert

    2015-03-01

    Plant-based diets are advocated for prevention of chronic diseases. Lentils are an inexpensive plant-based meat alternative. This study determined perceived benefits and barriers to lentil consumption and how they relate to the demographics and nutritional knowledge of caregivers and consumption habits in families with children 3-11 years of age. A self-administered questionnaire measuring nutritional knowledge and perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of lentils was completed by 401 caregivers in a school setting in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The majority of respondents were 26-45 years of age (83%) and female (76%). Respondents associated lentils with health benefits (91%). The most frequently reported barrier associated with consumption pertained to family acceptance: "if my child liked lentils I would make them more" (76% agreement). More than half (58%) of respondents stated they "never or rarely" consumed lentils (low-consumers). Of low-consumers, top barriers included lack of knowledge on how to cook lentils and a belief that family members would not accept lentils. Future promotion strategies should address the top barriers to lentil consumption. An understanding of the perceived benefits and barriers surrounding lentil consumption will help formulate approaches to increase consumption of lentils as well as pulses.

  20. Marker-Trait Association Analysis of Iron and Zinc Concentration in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Hamid; Podder, Rajib; Caron, Carolyn T; Kundu, Shudhangshu S; Diapari, Marwan; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E

    2017-07-01

    Lentil ( Medik.) seeds are relatively rich in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), making lentil a potential crop to aid in the global battle against human micronutrient deficiency. Understanding the genetic basis for uptake of seed Fe and Zn is required to increase sustainable concentrations of these minerals in seeds. The objectives of this study were to characterize genetic variation in seed Fe and Zn concentration and to identify molecular markers associated with these traits across diverse lentil accessions. A set of 138 cultivated lentil accessions from 34 countries were evaluated in four environments (2 sites × 2 yr) in Saskatchewan, Canada. The collection was genotyped using 1150 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that are distributed across the lentil genome. The germplasm tested exhibited a wide range of variation for seed Fe and Zn concentration. The marker-trait association analysis detected two SNP markers tightly linked to seed Fe and one linked to seed Zn concentration (-log10 ≥ 4.36). Additional markers were detected at -log10 ≥ 3.06. A number of putative candidate genes underlying detected loci encode Fe- and Zn-related functions. This study provides insight into the genetics of seed Fe and Zn concentration of lentil and opportunities for marker-assisted selection to improve micronutrient concentration as part of micronutrient biofortification programs. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  1. Ecology of the River Darter in Canadian Waters: Distribution, Relative Abundance, Life-History Traits, Diet, and Habitat Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Pratt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The River Darter (Percina shumardi is a native, rarely sampled fish that has been detected in relatively small numbers since the 1930s. It has a wide North American distribution, but little is known about the species biology and distribution across the Canadian portion of its range. We revisited many historic sampling locations and sampled additional areas to (i confirm and update the distribution of River Darters in Canadian waters; (ii assess relative abundance; (iii update life history characteristics; (iv collect diet information; and (v identify characteristics of River Darter habitat. Since 1990, a total of 1032 River Darters were recorded from 29 waterbodies across three ecoregions. River Darters were observed in relatively high abundances in both the Saskatchewan-Nelson River and Southern Hudson Bay-James Bay ecoregions. While still extant in the Great Lakes-Upper St. Lawrence ecoregion, River Darters persist at low abundance. Life history analyses indicate similar maximum age (age 4 and growth (10 mm/year to conspecific populations in the United States, while sex ratios are generally skewed towards female dominance. River Darter populations had high flexibility in habitat use and diet, using a range of flows and depths and a variety of seasonally available prey types.

  2. Observations of convection vortices in the afternoon sector using the SuperDARN HF radars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristow, W.A.; Greenwald, R.A.; Sibeck, D.G. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Observations of convection vortices using the new SuperDARN HF radars are presented. The velocity field derived from the overlapping fields of view of the new HF radars at Kapuskasing, Ontario, and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, often image the portion of the convection pattern near the convection reversal boundary. Observations from near the convection reversal boundary in the afternoon sector of October 22, 1993, showed two convection vortices evolving within the field of view of both radars. The first vortex appeared at about 2120 UT and the second at about 2145 UT: 1446 MLT and 1512 MLT, respectively. The vortices were roughly 900 km in diameter and moved tailward with a velocity of about 600 m/s. At the times the vortices were observed by the radars, ground-based magnetometers of the CANOPUS and MACCS chains show transient deflections of near 100 nT, and the GOES 6 and GOES 7 satellite magnetometers showed significant decreases in the magnetospheric magnetic field strength. Data from the Geotail satellite magnetometer lagged by an appropriate time interval indicated that there were southward turnings of the interplanetary magnetic field that coincided with the decreases of magnetospheric magnetic field strength. The observations differ in many respects from previously published vortex observations. It is theorized that the vortices were caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the inner edge of the low-latitude boundary layer. 48 refs.

  3. The boreal ecosystem research and monitoring sites (BERMS) initiative : scientific accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaughey, J.H. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada); Barr, A. [National Hydrology Research Centre, Meteorological Service of Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Black, T.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Goodison, B. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Downsview, ON (Canada); Hogg, E.H.; Amiro, B.; Price, D.T. [Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Stewart, R.B. [Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Stolle, N. [Parks and Heritage Canada, Prince Albert National Park, Waskesiu Lake, SK (Canada); Chen, J. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada); Gower, S.T. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Carbon, water and energy cycling in the Canadian boreal forest ecosystems is currently being studied in the Canadian research initiative called the Boreal Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Sites (BERMS) project. BERMS provides long-term, continuous climatological and flux data from target ecosystems in Canada. The data is used to determine the impact of certain parameters on carbon and energy exchange in a multi-year perspective. The role of inter-annual climate variation and site disturbance on forest-atmosphere interactions such as water and energy is also addressed along with carbon sequestration on a seasonal and annual basis. The BERMS database offers a test bed for developing and testing Land Surface Parameterization (LSP) schemes, particularly the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS). Three tower fluxes located in south-central Saskatchewan were part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) program which monitored climate variables and fluxes for complete annual cycles within pure, mature forest stands of old aspen, old black spruce, and old jack pine. The data is used develop and validate process models of the carbon and water cycles. The objective is to better understand the sequestration of carbon by the boreal forest in relation to vegetation type and climate. 6 figs.

  4. Improvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Management Wait Times: A Retrospective Analysis of a Home Management Pathway for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Alan Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition within the Canadian population. The current gold standard for diagnosis and management of patients is in-laboratory (in-lab polysomnography; however, the limited availability of testing options for patients has led to long wait times and increased disease burden within the population. The Sleep Research Laboratory in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan implemented a home management program to run in parallel with the in-lab system several years ago in an effort to increase their capacity and reduce wait times. The present study was a retrospective analysis of all patients referred to the program between 2009 and 2012. The home management system has improved wait times by diagnosing and managing up to one-half of the referred patient population, reducing the wait for in-lab treatment from a median of 152 days in 2009 to 92 days in 2012 (P<0.0001. Moving forward, home management can provide a viable alternative to in-lab testing for patients who meet strict entry criteria, reducing the in-lab workload and, ultimately, reducing wait times.

  5. Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1993-11-01

    Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

  6. Intrapopulation variation in gray wolf isotope (delta(15)N and delta(13)C) profiles: implications for the ecology of individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urton, Erin J M; Hobson, Keith A

    2005-09-01

    Trophic relationships among organisms in terrestrial boreal ecosystems define ecological communities and are important in determining dynamics of energy flow and ecosystem function. We examined trophic relationships between the gray wolf (Canis lupus) and 18 mammalian species from the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada, using delta(13)C and delta(15)N stable isotope values measured in guard hair samples. Variance in isotope values for wolves and other carnivores was investigated as a proxy for variation in diet among individuals. Isosource, an isotopic source partitioning model, quantified the relative range in proportions of five most-likely prey items in the diets of wolves. The distribution of feasible contributions from each source was dominated by elk (Cervus elaphus; mean: 48%, range:11-75%), followed by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; mean: 21%, range: 0-54%), moose (Alces alces; mean:14%, range: 0-41%), beaver (Castor canadensis; mean: 8%, range:0-25%) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus; mean: 8%, range: 0-24%). Despite social foraging, our results indicate highly variable diets among individuals and we discuss this in terms of individual versus group ecology of boreal wolves.

  7. Landowner perspectives on afforestation for carbon sequestration in Canada's prairie provinces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.A.; McFarlane, B.L.; Parkins, J.R.; Pohrebniuk, P.A.M.

    2005-07-01

    This study examined landowner attitudes towards participating in an afforestation program for the purpose of carbon sequestration and the elements necessary for the success of such a program. Data was collected by means of focus groups and a literature review. Private landowners met for discussion in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta in 2003. Potential benefits of the program were identified and included the following: ecosystem benefits; potential income; and intergenerational benefits. Drawbacks and barriers were also identified, including: unknown opportunity cost; time involved in establishing and growing trees; lack of technical knowledge; ownership and financial issues. Flexible incentive packages were recommended that included: opportunity cost; tax incentives; risk-sharing agreements; long-term commitment by government and landowners; and, the need for infrastructure and support. Regional differentiation was recommended to account for microclimate and ecosystem differences as well as distances from delivery centres, markets, and support infrastructure. Contingent aspects include the role of carbon credit accounting; cooperative development for acreage and infrastructure development; and uncertainty of timber markets in the future. A need for the development of mechanisms for parallel research, program delivery and monitoring was emphasized. It was concluded that the mechanisms are necessary for increased and appropriate afforestation-related research, models and monitoring techniques. Appendices of sample templates for focus groups and detailed focus group results were also included. 29 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Field-scale water balance closure in seasonally frozen conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological water balance closure is a simple concept, yet in practice it is uncommon to measure every significant term independently in the field. Here we demonstrate the degree to which the field-scale water balance can be closed using only routine field observations in a seasonally frozen prairie pasture field site in Saskatchewan, Canada. Arrays of snow and soil moisture measurements were combined with a precipitation gauge and flux tower evapotranspiration estimates. We consider three hydrologically distinct periods: the snow accumulation period over the winter, the snowmelt period in spring, and the summer growing season. In each period, we attempt to quantify the residual between net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation and the change in field-scale storage (snow and soil moisture, while accounting for measurement uncertainties. When the residual is negligible, a simple 1-D water balance with no net drainage is adequate. When the residual is non-negligible, we must find additional processes to explain the result. We identify the hydrological fluxes which confound the 1-D water balance assumptions during different periods of the year, notably blowing snow and frozen soil moisture redistribution during the snow accumulation period, and snowmelt runoff and soil drainage during the melt period. Challenges associated with quantifying these processes, as well as uncertainties in the measurable quantities, caution against the common use of water balance residuals to estimate fluxes and constrain models in such a complex environment.

  9. The Latent Curriculum: Breaking Conceptual Barriers to Information Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Boden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In online instruction there is a physical and temporal distance between students and instructors that is not present in face-to-face instruction, which has implications for developing online curricula. This paper examines information literacy components of Introduction to Systematic Reviews, an online graduate-level course offered at the University of Saskatchewan. Course evaluation suggested that, although the screencast tutorials were well accepted by the students as a method of learning, there was need to enhance their content. Through grading of assignments, consultations with the students, and evaluation of the final search strategies, the authors identified common aspects of search strategy development with which the students struggled throughout the course. There was a need to unpack the curriculum to more clearly identify specific areas that needed to be expanded or improved. Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy was utilized as the construct to identify information literacy learning objectives at a relatively granular level. Comparison of learning objectives and the content of the screencast tutorials revealed disparities between desired outcomes and the curriculum (particularly for high-level thinking – the latent curriculum. Analyzing curricula using a tool like Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy will help information literacy librarians recognize hidden or latent learning objectives.

  10. Working alone safely : CPPI western region guidance document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    This practical guide describes general best practices recognized and followed by businesses with effective programs in place to make workplaces safe. It is intended for employers who must comply with provincial regulations to minimize risks for employees of the oil industry's Retail and Bulk Plant Operations who work or drive alone. The three broad categories of working alone included employees who handle cash, employees who travel away from a base office to meet clients, and employees who do hazardous work but have no routine interaction with customers and coworkers. In particular, the guide is intended for members of the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute regarding the specific requirements of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The guide outlines employers' responsibilities and describes how employers can meet provincial regulatory requirements. Provincial health and safety regulations require that the employer conduct a hazard assessment, eliminate or reduce risks, establish an effective means of communication and ensure that employees are trained and educated. 11 refs., 18 figs., 4 appendices.

  11. Investigation under the National Energy Board Act into the death of Mr. Henri St. Pierre at the Enbridge Pipelines Inc. Kerrobert pump station on 24 March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-02-15

    This paper discussed an investigation conducted by the National Energy Board (NEB) into the death of an electrician who died while carrying out electrical work at Enbridge's Kerrobert pipeline pump station in Saskatchewan. Emergency response procedures were activated immediately after the incident. The final autopsy report showed that contact with high voltage electricity resulted in instantaneous cardiac arrest. The investigation showed that prior to the incident, the employees working at the site did not have any pre-job safety meetings and that safety hazard assessments were not conducted, nor were any electrical equipment isolation and clearance forms completed. The employee was not wearing the required personal protective equipment. Other employees involved in the incident did not test high voltage probes or sweep inside the cell. The investigation determined that the hazard-risk category assigned to the power factor capacitor cell corresponded to a lower level of personal protective equipment than was required to protect personnel from being injured by arc flashes. 6 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Development of a bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments to pike (Esox lucius)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pike (Esox lucius) are a commercially sought fish species that inhabit the Athabasca River, which flows through the Athabasca oil sands. The fish are exposed to natural sources of bitumen from the McMurray formation. This study was conducted to design and implement a daily-renewal bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands to this fish species and to obtain information regarding the development of pike exposed to bitumen. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild pike captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish, approximately 15 days post-hatch. For the rest of the experiment, brine shrimp were fed to the walleye embryos every day after hatching. The developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length. The research findings indicated that pike is less sensitive than walleye and fathead minnow to the toxicity of oil sands sediments.

  13. Development of a bioassay using walleye (Sander vitreus) to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effects of sediments from the Athabasca oil sands area on fish development and survival. Walleye (Sander vitreus) which inhabit the Athabasca River are exposed to natural sources of bitumen eroding from the McMurray formation. This study described the design and implementation of a daily-renewal bioassay to evaluate the potential effects of toxicants on walleye development. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild walleye captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish. The walleye embryos were fed brine shrimp daily after hatching and the developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length between treatments. Organics concentrations in fish tissues and water were measured when possible. Fathead minnows and northern pikes will also be exposed to the same sediments in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the three species.

  14. A generic system dynamics model for simulating and evaluating the hydrological performance of reconstructed watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Keshta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A generic system dynamics watershed (GSDW model is developed and applied to five reconstructed watersheds located in the Athabasca mining basin, Alberta, Canada, and one natural watershed (boreal forest located in Saskatchewan, Canada, to simulate various hydrological processes in reconstructed and natural watersheds. This paper uses the root mean square error (RMSE, the mean absolute relative error (MARE, and the correlation coefficient (R as the main performance indicators, in addition to the visual comparison. For the South Bison Hills (SBH, South West Sand Storage (SWSS and Old Aspen (OA simulated soil moisture, the RMSE values ranges between 2.5–4.8 mm, and the MARE ranges from 7% to 18%, except for the D2-cover it was 26% for the validation year. The R statistics ranges from 0.3 to 0.77 during the validation period. The error between the measured and simulated cumulative actual evapotranspiration (AET flux for the SWSS, SBH, and the OA sites were 2%, 5%, and 8%, respectively. The developed GSDW model enables the investigation of the utility of different soil cover designs and evaluation of their performance. The model is capable of capturing the dynamics of water balance components, and may used to conduct short- and long- term predictions under different climate scenarios.

  15. Effects of herbicides on two submersed aquatic macrophytes, Potamogeton pectinatus L. and Myriophyllum sibiricum Komarov, in a prairie wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D J; Martin, P A; Shaw, G G

    1997-01-01

    Clopyralid, picloram, 2,4-D and a mixture of 2,4-D plus picloram, (Tordon 202C) were added to the water of 1 m square enclosures in a prairie wetland in Saskatchewan, Canada to produce concentrations of 0.01 and 0.1 mg active ingredient litre(-1). Effects on the submersed macrophytes, Potamogeton pectinatus and Myriophyllum sibiricum, were monitored by taking repeated measurements of plant weight, flower and tuber production and inspecting for injuries at 30 and 60 days after application. Clopyralid did not inhibit weight gain (growth) in either species, but stimulated growth and flowering by M. sibiricum at 0.01 mg litre(-1) and tuber production by P. pectinatus at both rates. The low rate of 2,4-D stimulated flowering by M. sibiricum and tuber production by P. pectinatus, whereas the high rate inhibited growth of M. sibiricum and injured both species. Picloram did not affect growth of either species, but injured M. sibiricum at both concentrations and inhibited flowering at 0.1 mg litre(-1). Tordon 202C at 0.1 mg litre(-1) caused reduced growth and flowering in M. sibiricum and injured both species; 0.01 mg litre(-1) also injured M. sibiricum. Mortality resulted only from Tordon 202C and 2,4-D. Field data are lacking to assess the extent to which submerged macrophytes in prairie ponds are exposed to harmful concentrations of herbicide from aerial spraying, drift from ground application, runoff or wind erosion of soil.

  16. A Re-Evaluation of the Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid Genus Chasmosaurus (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation of Western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A; Ryan, Michael J; Holmes, Robert B; Schröder-Adams, Claudia J

    2016-01-01

    The chasmosaurine ceratopsid Chasmosaurus is known from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation of southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Two valid species, Chasmosaurus belli and C. russelli, have been diagnosed by differences in cranial ornamentation. Their validity has been supported, in part, by the reported stratigraphic segregation of chasmosaurines in the Dinosaur Park Formation, with C. belli and C. russelli occurring in discrete, successive zones within the formation. An analysis of every potentially taxonomically informative chasmosaurine specimen from the Dinosaur Park Formation indicates that C. belli and C. russelli have indistinguishable ontogenetic histories and overlapping stratigraphic intervals. Neither taxon exhibits autapomorphies, nor a unique set of apomorphies, but they can be separated and diagnosed by a single phylogenetically informative character-the embayment angle formed by the posterior parietal bars relative to the parietal midline. Although relatively deeply embayed specimens (C. russelli) generally have relatively longer postorbital horncores than specimens with more shallow embayments (C. belli), neither this horncore character nor epiparietal morphology can be used to consistently distinguish every specimen of C. belli from C. russelli. Kosmoceratops is purportedly represented in the Dinosaur Park Formation by a specimen previously referred to Chasmosaurus. The reassignment of this specimen to Kosmoceratops is unsupported here, as it is based on features that are either influenced by taphonomy or within the realm of individual variation for Chasmosaurus. Therefore, we conclude that Kosmoceratops is not present in the Dinosaur Park Formation, but is instead restricted to southern Laramidia, as originally posited.

  17. The incidence of fracture of the proximal femur in two million Canadians from 1972 to 1984. Projections for Canada in the year 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A D; Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Bernhardson, S; Wajda, A; Roos, L L

    1991-05-01

    Reported increases in the number of fractures of the proximal femur in Europe are greater than can be explained by demographic changes alone. This trend was assessed in Canada by examining hospital discharge records from the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba from 1972 to 1984. The annual number of first fractures of the proximal femur in persons older than 50 years of age increased 59.7% in women and 42.2% in men during this time period. In most of the five-year age groups the percentage of increase in the number of fractures exceeded the percentage of increase in population of that age group. Annual age-specific incidences (by five-year age groups) increased exponentially with age, doubling every six years, and reached a maximum value of 4% in women older than 90 years of age. Annual age-adjusted incidences increased significantly over the study period in men and women. For the whole of Canada in 1987, it is estimated that there were 13,193 first fractures of the proximal femur in women and 4610 in men, and that in the year 2006 these will rise to 22,922 and 7846, respectively. The actual increase will be considerably greater if the age-specific incidences continue to increase as they have from 1972 to 1984. The gradual decline in physical activity, which contributes to bone loss, may be one etiological factor of this trend during the last half century.

  18. Building capacity through urban agriculture: report on the askîy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Wanda; Vold, Lindsey

    2018-01-01

    Many North American cities have a built environment that provides access to energy-dense food and little opportunity for active living. Urban agriculture contributes to a positive environment involving food plant cultivation that includes processing, storing, distributing and composting. It is a means to increase local food production and thereby improve community health. The purpose of this study was to understand how participating in urban agriculture can help to empower young adults and build capacity for growing food in the city. This was a qualitative study of seven participants (five Indigenous and two non-Indigenous) between the ages of 19 and 29 years, engaged as interns in an urban agriculture project known as "askîy" in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada in 2015. We used a case-study design and qualitative analysis to describe the participants' experience based on the sustainable livelihoods framework. A collaborative approach had a great effect on the interns' experiences, notably the connections formed as they planned, planted, tended, harvested and sold the produce. Some of the interns changed their grocery shopping habits and began purchasing more vegetables and questioning where and how the vegetables were produced. All interns were eager to continue gardening next season, and some were planning to take their knowledge and skills back to their home reserves. Urban agriculture programs build capacity by providing skills beyond growing food. Such programs can increase local food production and improve food literacy skills, social relationships, physical activity and pride in community settings.

  19. Educational Selectivity of Out-migration in Canada: 1976-1981 to 1996-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Ram

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The major objective of this paper is to show that migrants are positively selected whether they are driven by economic factors or by non-economic factors, and whether they are motivated by pull factors or push factors. Using “five-year migration data” from the 1981 to 2001 censuses of Canada, we find that the education gradient of out-migration is apparent in every region, with the highly educated being more mobile than the less educated. However, the pattern is most pronounced in the Atlantic region, Quebec, and Manitoba/Saskatchewan, the regions experiencing poorer economic conditions and persistent net losses through migration. The three high-income provinces, Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia not only experience lower overall net losses, but are also less likely to lose their better educated persons—even during bad economic times. Quebec emerges as a special case where economic as well as linguistic-political factors play an important role in governing the out-migration patterns of the better educated, particularly those belonging to the non-Francophone group.

  20. Strategic Environmental Assessment Framework for Landscape-Based, Temporal Analysis of Wetland Change in Urban Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizo, Anton; Noble, Bram F; Bell, Scott

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a spatial framework for the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in the context of change analysis for urban wetland environments. The proposed framework is focused on two key stages of the SEA process: scoping and environmental baseline assessment. These stages are arguably the most information-intense phases of SEA and have a significant effect on the quality of the SEA results. The study aims to meet the needs for proactive frameworks to assess and protect wetland habitat and services more efficiently, toward the goal of advancing more intelligent urban planning and development design. The proposed framework, adopting geographic information system and remote sensing tools and applications, supports the temporal evaluation of wetland change and sustainability assessment based on landscape indicator analysis. The framework was applied to a rapidly developing urban environment in the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, analyzing wetland change and land-use pressures from 1985 to 2011. The SEA spatial scale was rescaled from administrative urban planning units to an ecologically meaningful area. Landscape change assessed was based on a suite of indicators that were subsequently rolled up into a single, multi-dimensional, and easy to understand and communicate index to examine the implications of land-use change for wetland sustainability. The results show that despite the recent extremely wet period in the Canadian prairie region, land-use change contributed to increasing threats to wetland sustainability.

  1. Nine Hundred Years of Weekly Streamflows: Stochastic Downscaling of Ensemble Tree-Ring Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauchyn, David; Ilich, Nesa

    2017-11-01

    We combined the methods and advantages of stochastic hydrology and paleohydrology to estimate 900 years of weekly flows for the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers at Edmonton and Medicine Hat, Alberta, respectively. Regression models of water-year streamflow were constructed using historical naturalized flow data and a pool of 196 tree-ring (earlywood, latewood, and annual) ring-width chronologies from 76 sites. The tree-ring models accounted for up to 80% of the interannual variability in historical naturalized flows. We developed a new algorithm for generating stochastic time series of weekly flows constrained by the statistical properties of both the historical record and proxy streamflow data, and by the necessary condition that weekly flows correlate between the end of a year and the start of the next. A second innovation, enabled by the density of our tree-ring network, is to derive the paleohydrology from an ensemble of 100 statistically significant reconstructions at each gauge. Using paleoclimatic data to generate long series of weekly flow estimates augments the short historical record with an expanded range of hydrologic variability, including sequences of wet and dry years of greater length and severity. This unique hydrometric time series will enable evaluation of the reliability of current water supply and management systems given the range of hydroclimatic variability and extremes contained in the stochastic paleohydrology. It also could inform evaluation of the uncertainty in climate model projections, given that internal hydroclimatic variability is the dominant source of uncertainty.

  2. Management of malignant pleural effusion: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penz E

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Erika Penz,1 Kristina N Watt,1 Christopher A Hergott,2 Najib M Rahman,3 Ioannis Psallidas3 1Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, 2Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Oxford Centre for Respiratory Medicine, Respiratory Trials Unit, Oxford University, Oxford, UK Abstract: Malignant pleural effusion (MPE is a sign of advanced cancer and is associated with significant symptom burden and mortality. To date, management has been palliative in nature with a focus on draining the pleural space, with therapies aimed at preventing recurrence or providing intermittent drainage through indwelling catheters. Given that patients with MPEs are heterogeneous with respect to their cancer type and response to systemic therapy, functional status, and pleural milieu, response to MPE therapy is also heterogeneous and difficult to predict. Furthermore, the impact of therapies on important patient outcomes has only recently been evaluated consistently in clinical trials and cohort studies. In this review, we examine patient outcomes that have been studied to date, address the question of which are most important for managing patients, and review the literature related to the expected value for money (cost-effectiveness of indwelling pleural catheters relative to traditionally recommended approaches. Keywords: malignant pleural effusion, therapeutics, cost-effectiveness, quality of life 

  3. Library Learning: Undergraduate Students’ Informal, Self-directed, and Information Sharing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Ann Murphy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A focus group study of fourteen University of Saskatchewan second to fourth year humanities and social science undergraduate students was conducted in the fall of 2011. The purpose of the research was to determine how students learn about library resources and services. Findings indicate that the participants often use a variety of informal, self-directed and information sharing strategies. Seeking help from professors, peers, friends, and family members is a common practice. Convenience, familiarity, and perceived knowledge are key factors that determine who and how these students learn about the library. Formal instruction and seeking assistance from librarians did not resonate for participants as a typical approach for learning about the library. The author suggests that undergraduate students engage in informal learning and information sharing as many ‘adult learners’ do, similar to an employment setting. The library, within the formal educational structure, lends itself to a more informal learning context. The study concludes that libraries must continue to develop resources, services, and innovative programs that support students’ informal learning styles, while also providing formal instruction as part of the undergraduate curriculum ensuring students are exposed early on to core foundational skills that contribute to their success as informal and self-directed learners.

  4. Modeling of the carbon dioxide capture process system using machine intelligence approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Wu, Y.X.; Chan, C.W.; Tontiwachwuthikul, P. [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    The objective of this paper is to study the relationships among the significant parameters impacting CO{sub 2} production. An enhanced understanding of the intricate relationships among the process parameters supports prediction and optimization, thereby improving efficiency of the CO{sub 2} capture process. Our modeling study used the 3-year operational data collected from the amine-based post combustion CO{sub 2} capture process system at the International Test Centre (ITC) of CO{sub 2} Capture located in Regina, Saskatchewan of Canada. This paper describes the data modeling process using the approaches of (1) neural network modeling combined with sensitivity analysis and (2) neuro-fuzzy modeling technique. The results from the two modeling processes were compared from the perspectives of predictive accuracy, inclusion of parameters, and support for explication of problem space. We conclude from the study that the neuro-fuzzy modeling technique was able to achieve higher accuracy in predicting the CO{sub 2} production rate than the combined approach of neural network modeling and sensitivity analysis.

  5. Morphology, affinities and phytogeographic history of Porosia Hickey in the Cretaceous and Paleocene of North America and Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchester Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphology and anatomy of the extinct angiosperm fruit, Porosia verrucosa (Lesqueruex Hickey, are documented in detail based on various modes of preservation including molds, casts, and permineralizations from more than seventy localities in the late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The fruits are schizocarpic with paired unilocular, single-seeded mericarps seated on a prominent gynophore with an hypogynous perianth borne on a long pedicel. The most distinctive feature of these fruits is the regularly spaced cylindrical intrusions over the surface of the endocarp. These are interpreted to represent oil cavities similar to those common in the fruits of extant Rutaceae. The oldest known occurrences of P. verrucosa are from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian to Maastrichtian of western North America, but the genus traversed Beringia and became widespread in the Paleocene both in Asia (Kazakhstan, Amur Region, and Koryak Highlands, and North America (Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Oregon, Washington, Alberta, Saskatchewan. It extended to the late Paleocene in the Rocky Mountain and Great Plains region, and appears to have become extinct near the Paleocene-Eocene boundary.

  6. Using a Geospatial Model to Relate Fluvial Geomorphology to Macroinvertebrate Habitat in a Prairie River—Part 1: Genus-Level Relationships with Geomorphic Typologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. N. Meissner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern river ecosystems undergo constant stress from disturbances such as bank stabilization, channelization, dams, and municipal, agricultural, and industrial water use. As these anthropogenic water requirements persist, more efficient methods of characterizing river reaches are essential. Benthic macroinvertebrates are helpful when evaluating fluvial health, because they are often the first group to react to contaminants that can then be transferred through them to other trophic levels. Hence, the purpose of this research is to use a geospatial model to differentiate instream macroinvertebrate habitats, and determine if the model is a viable method for stream evaluation. Through the use of ArcGIS and digital elevation models, the fluvial geomorphology of the Qu’Appelle River in Saskatchewan (SK was assessed. Four geomorphological characteristics of the river were isolated (sinuosity, slope, fractal dimension, and stream width and clustered through Principle Component Analysis (PCA, yielding sets of river reaches with similar geomorphological characteristics, called typologies. These typologies were mapped to form a geospatial model of the river. Macroinvertebrate data were aligned to the locations of the typologies, revealing several relationships with the fluvial geomorphology. A Kruskal-Wallis analysis and post hoc pairwise multiple comparisons were completed with the macroinvertebrate data to pinpoint significant genera, as related to the geospatial model.

  7. Water balance modelling of a uranium mill effluent management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagnes, Valérie; Schmid, Brad; Mitchell, Brett; Judd-Henrey, Ian

    2017-06-01

    A water balance model was developed to forecast the management strategy of a uranium mill effluent system, located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Mining and milling operations, such as pit dewatering or treated effluent release, can potentially influence the hydrology and the water quality downstream of the operations. This study presents the methodology used to predict water volumes and water quality discharging downstream in surface water bodies. A compartment model representing the three subsequent lakes included in the management system was set up using the software GoldSim®. The water balance allows predicting lake volumes at the daily time step. A mass balance model developed for conservative elements was also developed and allows validating the proportions of inputs and outputs issued from the water balance model. This model was then used as predictive tool to evaluate the impact of different scenarios of effluents management on volumes and chemistry of surface water for short and longer time periods. An additional significant benefit of this model is that it can be used as an input for geochemical modelling to predict the concentrations of all constituents of concern in the receiving surface water.

  8. Improved Confinement Induced by CT Injection in the STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.; Zawalski, W.; Jin, T.; Ding, W.; White, D.; Raman, R.; Decoste, R.; Gregory, B. C.; Martin, F.

    1997-11-01

    Compact torus (CT) injection as a means to centrally fuel a large tokamak is an attractive alternative. The University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector (USCTI) is designed to study the interaction between the compact torus and tokamak plasmas. USCTI has been modified to include chromium coated copper outer electrodes and to allow baking at higher temperatures up to 100 ^circC. As a result of the modification and parameter optimization, CTs can be formed at a lower gas injection throughput (80% lower than before). The CT velocity has also been increased from 120 km/sec to 180 km/sec. Disruption-free tangential CT injection has been achieved. CT injection triggers Ohmic H-mode which lasts for 4 msec. The H-mode triggered by CT injection is characterized by an increase in the line averaged density, sudden drop in H_α emission, sudden increase in floating potential at the edge and SOL, decrease in floating potential and m=2 MHD fluctuations, and steepening of edge density profile. In the next experimental campaign, possibility of momentum transfer from energetic CT to tokamak discharge will be investigated.

  9. Control of magnetic islands in the STOR-M tokamak using resonant helical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgriw, S.; Liu, D.; Asai, T.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2011-11-01

    The resonant interaction between magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability modes and the externally applied helical magnetic field is demonstrated in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak. The study is conducted both numerically and experimentally using a 2D MHD equilibrium code in the former and an (l = 2, n = 1) helical coil carrying a short current pulse in the latter. It is shown numerically that the resonant helical current can efficiently suppress the magnetic islands resonating on the (m = 2, n = 1) magnetic surface when the value of the safety factor at the plasma edge is relatively low (STOR-M during low-q ohmic discharges with high MHD activities. The amplitude and frequency of (2, 1) Mirnov fluctuations are significantly reduced after the activation of the resonant field. Lesser suppression in sideband islands is also observed. Moreover, a phase of improved plasma confinement, characterized by a reduction in Hα emission level, a reduction in loop voltage and an increase in the soft x-ray emission, is induced after application of the resonant field.

  10. Fuelling and plasma flow change by compact torus injection into the STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; Liu, Yelu; Dreval, Mykola; McColl, David; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Asai, Tomohiko; Wolfe, Sean

    2012-10-01

    The Saskatchewan TORus Modified (STOR-M) tokamak is equipped with a Compact Torus (CT) injector for tangential (toroidal) injection of a high density plasmoid at a velocity of 150 km/s. The objectives of CT injection (CTI) are to fuel the core region of tokamak and optimize the bootstrap current in future reactors by control of the plasma pressure gradient. After CTI, the line averaged density along central chord increases from ne˜x 10^12 to 1.5 x 10^13 [cm-3]. Measurement of soft X-ray bremsstrahlung emission profile indicates a steeper density gradient is generated after the asymmetric density profile is formed and the profile become symmetry again in STOR-M. Intrinsic impurity ion flows have been measured with ion Doppler spectroscopy. Significant radial velocity shear from center to edge region is observed even in Ohmic discharges. The toroidal flow direction is found to depend on the plasma current direction. CTI also modifies toroidal plasma flow. The edge plasma flow increases by 5 km/s 1millisecond after CTI. During these milliseconds of time, toroidal flow shear is also increased from 214.3 to 285.7 [10^3 x1/s]. A few milliseconds later than that time, plasma flow slows down, but plasma confinement is improved. Hα emission decreases by 50%.

  11. Plasma flow measurements in improved modes on STOR-M and CASTOR tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, G. S.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2010-02-01

    A Gundestrup probe, a Mach probe array, is used to measure both the parallel and perpendicular flow velocities in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak during several discharge conditions. It is observed that during ohmic discharges there is no velocity shear and the direction of the parallel flow is independent of the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. During H-mode induced by a turbulent heating current pulse, a region of strong velocity shear develops in the plasma edge and an edge transport barrier develops. This results in a short period of improved particle and energy confinement with reduced fluctuation amplitudes. During electrode biasing experiments, a stainless steel biasing electrode is inserted into the plasma up to r=82 mm and biased to+500 V relative to the vacuum chamber. It is observed that the particle confinement improves during the biasing phase while the energy confinement is degraded. A region of weak shear in the poloidal flow is observed in the plasma scrape-off layer (SOL). The results from STOR-M are compared with results from data taken in the Czech Academy of Sciences Torus (CASTOR) tokamak during both ohmic discharges and discharges with electrode biasing.

  12. Physical Design and Transport Simulation of the STOR-U Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dazhi; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    The Saskatchewan TORus Upgraded (STOR-U) tokamak is a new spherical tokamak (ST) with tight aspect ratio = 1.7, plasma major/minor radius = 55/32 cm, plasma current 2 MA and 1.5 T toroidal field. The research scope of the STOR-U project covers ST engineering, high β plasma confinement and transport, advanced plasma fueling by compact torus injection, helicity injection for plasma start-up and development of advanced plasma diagnostics. In this presentation, design and numerical studies on STOR-U toroidal/poloidal field systems are described. Various plasma equilibria have been obtained to meet the discharge requirements through variation in elongation, (k STOR-U plasma transport simulations have been carried out using the ASTRA code. The results reveal that, compared with purely ohmic heating, 3MW NBI heating significantly increases both Ti and Te by 46% and 15%, achieving 2.4 and 2.2 keV (at center), respectively. Bootstrap current ratio, fbs, is larger than 50%. Results of simulation with different transport models are also presented.

  13. Magnetic Effects in a Moderate-Temperature, High-Beta, Toroidal Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, W. F.; Singh, A. K.; Held, E. D.

    2011-10-01

    A small toroidal machine (STOR-1M; minor radius 4.5 cm), on loan from the University of Saskatchewan, has been modified to operate at hydrogen ionization levels ~0.1%, beta values between 0.1 and 1, electron number density ~5x1016/m3, temperature ~5 eV, and applied toroidal magnetic field ~20 gauss. Plasma is generated using magnetron-produced microwaves. Langmuir and Hall probes determine radial profiles of electron number density, temperature, and magnetic field. For most values of the externally-applied magnetic field, the internal field is the same with or without plasma, however, in a narrow window of B, diamagnetism and other effects are present. The effect is observed with no externally induced current; plasma currents are self generated through some sort of relaxation process. Beta and radius conditions correlate well with similar magnetic structures in the laboratory (eg., plasma focus, Z pinch) and in space (eg., Venus flux ropes, solar coronal loops).

  14. Compact Torus Fueling of the STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.; Zawalski, W.; White, D.; Raman, R.; Decoste, R.; Gregory, B. C.; Martin, F.

    1996-11-01

    Tangential injection of accelerated compact torus (CT) has been performed on the STOR-M tokamak (R/a=46/12 cm, B_t<1 T, I_p<= 50 kA, barn_e=(0.5 - 1)×10^13 cm-3) using the University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector (USCTI). The CT parameters are: m~=1 μg, v=120 km/sec, B=0.1 T and n=(2 - 4)×10^15 cm-3. After CT injection, the electron density in tokamak doubles and the poloidal β-value increases. Indications of reduction in the loop voltage and H_α emission level have also been observed. Currently, following efforts are being made: (a) to coat chromium on the electrode surface, (b) to increase the on-line baking temperature, and (c) to reduce the neutral gas load which follows the CT plasma. In addition, numerical calculation of CT motion in a tokamak magnetic field has been carried out. For horizontal injection, the initial CT magnetic dipole direction should be aligned with the CT velocity for deeper penetration. In the case of vertical injection, the CT trajectory is independent of the initial magnetic dipole direction and central penetration is facilitated by off-axis injection.

  15. Density profile control using compact toroid injection in STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; Liu, Dazhi; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Asai, Tomohiko; Wolfe, Sean

    2011-10-01

    The Saskatchewan TORus Modified (STOR-M) tokamak has a Compact Torus (CT) injector which allows tangential injection of high density plasmoid. The objectives of CT injection (CTI) into the core of plasma are to fuel tokamaks and also optimize the bootstrap current in the future reactors by control of the plasma pressure gradient. Measurement of soft X-ray bremsstrahlung emission profile have verified that CT particles are deposited in the core region from outside and steeper density gradient is generated via a balancing process after the asymmetric density profile is formed in STOR-M. The major radius of the core plasma is shifted outward and stays in equilibrium until the end of discharge. H alpha line-emission considerably decreases in the core region and the high emitting area with low temperature plasma exists in the edge region. A few milliseconds seconds after these altered profiles of the density and the emission by CTI are generated, stronger edge radial electric field as well as H-mode appears and the average electron density peaks. This work has been sponsored by the CRC program and NSERC of Canada.

  16. Plasma autobiasing during Ohmic H-mode in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    1993-11-01

    Application of a short current pulse on a nominal Ohmic discharge in the STOR-M tokamak (Saskatchewan Torus-Modified) [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3277 (1992)] triggers the Ohmic H-mode characterized by reduced Hα radiation, increased electron density, and reduced edge density/magnetic fluctuations. Measurements of plasma floating potential at the plasma edge and in the scrape-off layer indicate that the Ohmic H-mode is accompanied by negative plasma autobiasing, which leads to a steeper radial electric field profile at the edge. Since the duration of the current pulse (≤20 kA, 100 μsec) is shorter than the resistive skin time (≂1 msec), preferential edge heating is expected, which is believed to be responsible for changes in the edge discharge condition favorable for inducing the Ohmic H-mode. The electron density profile becomes steeper at the edge during the H-mode, and clear formation of a density pedestal has been seen. The evolution of the density profile suggests the presence of particle pinch. An improved confinement phase (ICP) is induced by external negative electrode biasing. The ICP reveals some similarities as compared to the current pulse induced H-mode. It is found that the electrostatic modes are dominant in the scrape-off layer while electromagnetic modes dominate in the plasma edge during the normal Ohmic discharges.

  17. Plasma Properties of Microwave Produced Plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Edwards, W. F.; Held, Eric

    2011-10-01

    We have modified a small tokamak, STOR-1M, on loan from University of Saskatchewan, to operate as a low-temperature (~5 eV) toroidal plasma machine with externally induced toroidal magnetic fields ranging from zero to ~50 G. The plasma is produced using microwave discharges at relatively high pressures. Microwaves are produced by a kitchen microwave-oven magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz in continuous operating mode, resulting in pulses ~0.5 s in duration. Initial measurements of plasma formation in this device with and without applied magnetic fields are presented. Plasma density and temperature profiles have been measured using Langmuir probes and the magnetic field profile inside the plasma has been obtained using Hall probes. When the discharge is created with no applied toroidal magnetic field, the plasma does not fill the entire torus due to high background pressure. However, when a toroidal magnetic field is applied, the plasma flows along the applied field, filling the torus. Increasing the applied magnetic field seems to aid plasma formation - the peak density increases and the density gradient becomes steeper. Above a threshold magnetic field, the plasma develops low-frequency density oscillations due to probable excitation of flute modes in the plasma.

  18. NUG reliability implications in a composite generation and transmission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billinton, R.; Adzanu, S. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The cost implications of non-utility generation (NUG) on composite generation and transmission system reliability was discussed and customer interruption costs in two test systems was reviewed. Reliability analysis based on generation, transmission and distribution with hierarchical levels (HL) was described. The Roy Billinton test system (RBTS) and the IEEE-Reliability test system were used for testing in conjunction with COMREL (COMposite system RELiability evaluation) software developed at the University of Saskatchewan. A description of COMREL, and best case results were presented for the RBTS. Assessment of energy costs for unserved energy accounted for the composite customer damage function (CCDF), interrupted energy assessment rate (IEAR), and expected energy not supplied (EENS) index. The utilization of reliability worth concepts was summarized, and was used to indicate different impacts on both load point and overall power system customer costs of unserved energy. It was concluded that quantitative reliability assessments can be performed in systems with NUGs, and that they can be extended to include reliability worth evaluations. 17 refs., 15 figs.

  19. Luke May of Seattle--"America's Sherlock Holmes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a brief biography of Luke S. May (1886-1965), whose pioneering work in forensic science in the United States has not received full recognition. May began as a private detective in Salt Lake City, Utah, shortly after the turn of the century and later established his own agency, the Revelare International Secret Service, which he moved to Seattle, Washington, in 1919. Although basically self-taught in scientific matters, May built a solid reputation among police agencies and attorneys in the Pacific Northwest and Western Canada as a serious and effective scientific investigator in the era before public crime laboratories. This reputation as "America's Sherlock Holmes" also led to his being consulted on the establishment of the first American crime laboratory at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois, and on a laboratory for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police at Regina, in Saskatchewan, Canada. He contributed to a landmark case of court acceptance of toolmark identification, invented specialized instruments, and founded an institute to teach scientific criminal investigation to police officers. His earliest associates were John L. Harris and J. Clark Sellers, both of whom became recognized document examiners on the West Coast and were followed by a second and a third generation of practitioners.

  20. A new U.S.-Canada Collaboration to build SWOT Calibration/Validation and Science Capacity for Northern Rivers and Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.; Gleason, C. J.; Pietroniro, A.; Fiset, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA/CNES/CSA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission holds strong promise to be a transformational mission for land surface hydrology in much the same way that conventional radar altimetry transformed physical oceanography following the launch of Seasat in 1978. However, to achieve this potential key pre-launch tasks remain, including 1) establishing benchmark monitoring sites, standardized measurement protocols, and international partnerships for quality calibration/validation of SWOT hydrology products; 2) demonstration that SWOT inundation area mapping for rivers, lakes, and wetlands is feasible; 3) demonstration that quality SWOT discharge retrievals for large rivers are feasible; and 4) demonstration of exciting new science from SWOT-like measurements. To these ends we present a new U.S.-Canada partnership to establish new SWOT calibration/validation sites, collect unique "SWOT-like" field and remote sensing datasets, conduct phenomenology studies of potentially important impacts (vegetation, sedimentary deposits, ice, and wind) on SWOT backscatter and water surface elevation (WSE) retrievals; and to gain scientific knowledge of the impact of permafrost on the form, hydraulics, and water surface elevations of northern rivers and lakes. This U.S-Canada partnership will establish scientifically interesting calibration/validation sites along three to four major Canadian rivers (current candidates: Saskatchewan, Athabasca, Arctic Red, Slave/Peace, or Ottawa Rivers). Field sites will be selected optimize scientific impact, logistics, and location inside the nominal planned orbits of the SWOT Fast Sampling Phase.

  1. Applications of the BIOPHYS Algorithm for Physically-Based Retrieval of Biophysical, Structural and Forest Disturbance Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle, Derek R.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Hall, Forrest G.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Soenen, Scott A.; Jackson, Chris D.

    2011-01-01

    Canopy reflectance model inversion using look-up table approaches provides powerful and flexible options for deriving improved forest biophysical structural information (BSI) compared with traditional statistical empirical methods. The BIOPHYS algorithm is an improved, physically-based inversion approach for deriving BSI for independent use and validation and for monitoring, inventory and quantifying forest disturbance as well as input to ecosystem, climate and carbon models. Based on the multiple-forward mode (MFM) inversion approach, BIOPHYS results were summarized from different studies (Minnesota/NASA COVER; Virginia/LEDAPS; Saskatchewan/BOREAS), sensors (airborne MMR; Landsat; MODIS) and models (GeoSail; GOMS). Applications output included forest density, height, crown dimension, branch and green leaf area, canopy cover, disturbance estimates based on multi-temporal chronosequences, and structural change following recovery from forest fires over the last century. Good correspondences with validation field data were obtained. Integrated analyses of multiple solar and view angle imagery further improved retrievals compared with single pass data. Quantifying ecosystem dynamics such as the area and percent of forest disturbance, early regrowth and succession provide essential inputs to process-driven models of carbon flux. BIOPHYS is well suited for large-area, multi-temporal applications involving multiple image sets and mosaics for assessing vegetation disturbance and quantifying biophysical structural dynamics and change. It is also suitable for integration with forest inventory, monitoring, updating, and other programs.

  2. Use of health technology assessment in decision making: coresponsibility of users and producers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivon, Myriam; Lehoux, Pascale; Denis, Jean-Louis; Tailliez, Stéphanie

    2005-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a policy-oriented form of research designed to inform decision-makers on the introduction, use, and dissemination of health technology. Whereas research on knowledge transfer has focused on knowledge producers, little attention has been given to the user's perspective. This study examines how health-care provider, administrator, and patient associations across Canada use HTA reports and the limitations they encounter when accessing and using scientific knowledge. This study draws from semistructured interviews (n=42) conducted with three types of user, located in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Quebec. Applying well-established conceptual categories in knowledge utilization research, our qualitative analyses sought to define more precisely how HTA is used by interviewees as well as the most significant barriers they encounter. The vast majority of users recognize the usefulness and credibility of HTA reports. Of interest, the way they use HTA takes different forms. Although administrators and health-care providers are in a better position than patient associations to act directly on HTA messages--making an instrumental use of HTA--we also found conceptual and symbolic uses across all groups. Our results also indicate that significant organizational, scientific, and material limitations hinder the use of scientific evidence. Overcoming such barriers requires a greater commitment from both HTA producers and users. This study argues that, to ensure better uptake of HTA, it should become a shared responsibility between HTA producers and various types of user.

  3. Ear Infection and Its Associated Risk Factors in First Nations and Rural School-Aged Canadian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandima P. Karunanayake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ear infections in children are a major health problem and may be associated with hearing impairment and delayed language development. Objective. To determine the prevalence and the associated risk factors of ear infections in children 6–17 years old residing on two reserves and rural areas in the province of Saskatchewan. Methodology. Data were provided from two rural cross-sectional children studies. Outcome variable of interest was presence/absence of an ear infection. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between ear infection and the other covariates. Results. The prevalence of ear infection was 57.8% for rural Caucasian children and 43.6% for First Nations children living on-reserve. First Nations children had a lower risk of ear infection. Ear infection prevalence was positively associated with younger age; first born in the family; self-reported physician-diagnosed tonsillitis; self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma; and any respiratory related allergy. Protective effect of breastfeeding longer than three months was observed on the prevalence of ear infection. Conclusions. While ear infection is a prevalent condition of childhood, First Nations children were less likely to have a history of ear infections when compared to their rural Caucasian counterparts.

  4. CAEP position statement on cellphone use while driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dayan; Kapur, Atul K; Ling, Patrick; Purssell, Roy; Henneberry, Ryan J; Champagne, Chantelle R; Lee, Victoria K; Francescutti, Louis H

    2010-07-01

    Distracted driving caused by cellphone use is a significant source of needless injuries. These injuries place unnecessary financial burden, emotional stress and health care resource misuse on society. This paper states the Canadian Association of Emergency Physician's (CAEP's) position on cellphone use while driving. In recent years, numerous studies were conducted on the danger of cellphone use while driving. Research has shown that cellphone use while driving negatively impacts cognitive functions, visual fields, reaction time and overall driving performances. Some studies found that cellphone use is as dangerous as driving under the influence of alcohol. Moreover, vehicle crash rates were shown to be significantly higher when drivers used cellphones. Countermeasures have been implemented in recent years. Over 50 countries worldwide have laws limiting the use of cellphones while driving. Six Canadian provinces, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, British Columbia and Saskatchewan, currently have legislation prohibiting cellphone use. Other provinces are considering implementing similar bans. As emergency physicians, we must advocate for injury prevention. Cell phone related road traumas are avoidable. CAEP supports all measures to ban cellphone use while driving.

  5. The NATO Advanced Study Institute on New Vistas in Electro-Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Caplan, H S; Dressler, E T; The NATO Advanced Study Institute on New Vistas in Electro-Nuclear Physics

    1986-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute "New Vistas in Electro-Nuclear Physics" was held in Banff, Alberta, Canada from August 22 to September 4, 1985. This volume con­ tains the lecture notes from that Institute. The idea to organize this Institute coincided with the award of funding for a pulse stretcher ring at the University of Saskatchewan's Linear Accelerator Laboratory. This together with the high level of interest in electron accelerators worldwide convinced us that it was an appropriate time to discuss the physics to be learned with such machines. In particular that physics which requires high energy and/or high duty cycle accelerators for its extraction was intended to be the focus of the Institute. Thus the scope of the lec­ tures was wide, with topics ranging from the structure of the trinucleons to quark models of nucleons, QCD, and QHD. The theme however was that we are just trying to under­ stand the nucleus and that the electromagnetic probe can serve as a powerful tool in such a quest.

  6. Canadian leadership in energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Canada's energy is complex and an important resource as it fuels and funds the economy. The unique character of Canada's energy production and consumption provides strength to the country. The purpose of this booklet was to highlight Canada's energy production and consumption and to demonstrate Canada's rank globally with other major global energy players. The document also presented information on the value of Canada's energy exports, Canada's relationship with the United States, and Canada's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Specifically, the document discussed Canada's energy in a global context; the value of Canada's energy exports; domestic value of energy; Canada's unique energy mix; Canada's electricity mix; Canada's carbon dioxide emissions; energy strategies; and the importance of energy to Canadians. It was concluded that there are 14 federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions managing their respective energy resources. All of these regions, with the exception of Saskatchewan have produced an energy strategy document or a climate change action plan focusing on 8 areas of action, notably awareness; benefit; efficiency; development; diversification; electricity; and emissions. refs., tabs., figs.

  7. Molybdenum and selenium speciation in uranium mine tailings using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essilfie-Dughan, J.; Hendry, M.J.; Pickering, I.; George, G., E-mail: joe377@mail.usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Kotzer, T. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Mined uranium (U) ore often contains relatively high concentrations of elements (other than uranium) that may be deleterious to the environment. These include molybdenum (Mo) and selenium (Se), which are liberated from uranium oxides and associated sulphide minerals during milling processing. A critical environmental concern in the U mining industry is the possibility of long-term mobilization of elements such as Mo and Se from tailings deposited in in-pit tailings facilities to regional groundwater systems. In this study, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to study the molecular speciation of these elements of concern (EOC) in samples from the Deilmann Tailings Management Facility (DTMF) at Key Lake in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. An understanding of Mo and Se speciation will help to characterize their long-term stability and evolution in the mine tailings. Results indicate Mo exists mainly as molybdate (+6 oxidation state) and Se exists mainly as selenite (+4 oxidation state). Linear combination fitting (LCF) analysis of the Mo K-edge XANES spectra on tailings samples using standard reference compounds suggests various proportions of NiMoO{sub 4} and CaMoO{sub 4} complexes as well as molybdate adsorbed onto ferrihydrite. (author)

  8. Two Machine Learning Approaches for Short-Term Wind Speed Time-Series Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Ronay; Fink, Olga; Zio, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The increasing liberalization of European electricity markets, the growing proportion of intermittent renewable energy being fed into the energy grids, and also new challenges in the patterns of energy consumption (such as electric mobility) require flexible and intelligent power grids capable of providing efficient, reliable, economical, and sustainable energy production and distribution. From the supplier side, particularly, the integration of renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) into the grid imposes an engineering and economic challenge because of the limited ability to control and dispatch these energy sources due to their intermittent characteristics. Time-series prediction of wind speed for wind power production is a particularly important and challenging task, wherein prediction intervals (PIs) are preferable results of the prediction, rather than point estimates, because they provide information on the confidence in the prediction. In this paper, two different machine learning approaches to assess PIs of time-series predictions are considered and compared: 1) multilayer perceptron neural networks trained with a multiobjective genetic algorithm and 2) extreme learning machines combined with the nearest neighbors approach. The proposed approaches are applied for short-term wind speed prediction from a real data set of hourly wind speed measurements for the region of Regina in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both approaches demonstrate good prediction precision and provide complementary advantages with respect to different evaluation criteria.

  9. Large Scale Observatories for Changing Cold Regions - Recent Progress and Future Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Carey, S. K.; DeBeer, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Observatories are at the core of hydrological science and a critical resource for the detection and analysis of environmental change. The combination of multiple pressures on the water environment and new scientific opportunities provides a context where a broader vision is urgently needed. Human activities are increasingly affecting land and water management at multiple scales, so our observatories now need to more fully include the human dimensions of water, including their integration across jurisdictional boundaries and at large basin scales. And large scales are also needed to diagnose and predict impacts of climate change at regional and continental scales, and to address land-water-atmosphere interactions and feedbacks. We argue the need to build on the notable past successes of the World Climate Research Programme and move forward to a new era of globally-distributed large scale observatories. This paper introduces 2 such observatories in rapidly warming western Canada - the 405,000 km2 Saskatchewan and the 1.8 million km2 Mackenzie river basins. We review progress in these multi-scale observatories, including the use of point and small basin-scale observatory sites to observe and diagnose complex regional patterns of hydrological change. And building on new opportunities for observational systems and data assimilation, we present a vision for a pan-Canadian observing system to support the science needed for the management of future societal risk from extreme events and environmental change.

  10. Enhanced Identification of hydrologic models using streamflow and satellite water storage data: a multi-objective calibration approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, F. A.; Razavi, S.; Sapriza, G.; Wheater, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional procedure for parameter identification of hydrological processes through conditioning only to streamflow data is challenging in physically based distributed hydrologic modelling. The challenge increases for modeling the landscapes where vertical processes dominate horizontal processes, leading to high uncertainties in modelled state variables, vertical fluxes and hence parameter estimates. Such behavior is common in modeling the prairie region of the Saskatchewan River Basin (SaskRB, our case study), Canada, where hydrologic connectivity and vertical fluxes are mainly controlled by surface and sub-surface water storage. To address this challenge, we developed a novel multi-criteria framework that utilizes total column water storage derived from the GRACE satellite, in addition to streamflows. We used a multi-objective optimization algorithm (Borg) and a recently-developed global sensitivity analysis approach (VARS) to effectively identify the model parameters and characterize their significance in model performance. We applied this framework in the calibration of a Land Surface Scheme-Hydrology model, MESH (Modélisation Environmentale Communautaire - Surface and Hydrology) to a sub-watershed of SaskRB. Results showed that the developed framework is superior to the conventional approach of calibration to streamflows. The new framework allowed us to find optimal solutions that effectively constrain the posterior parameter space and are representative of storage and streamflow performance criteria, yielding more credible prediction with reduced uncertainty of modeled storage and evaporation.

  11. Deterioration in the health-related quality of life of persons with multiple sclerosis: the possible warning signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, K V L; Carroll, L J; Cassidy, J D; Hader, W J

    2007-09-01

    Baseline data from a population-based study examining the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of MS patients about to begin disease modifying therapy was used to determine the factors associated with the HRQL of Saskatchewan adults with relapsing-remitting MS. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire regarding demographic and socioeconomic status, fatigue, comorbid medical conditions, disability level (EDSS), number of attacks in past 6 months, illness intrusiveness (Illness Intrusiveness Ratings Scale), depression (Beck Depression Inventory), and HRQL (SF-36 Health Status Survey). Multiple linear regression models were used to identify the factors associated with the physical and mental health summary scores of the SF-36. We found poorer physical HRQL in those who are female; older; not working; have musculoskeletal or respiratory problems; greater fatigue, higher disability scores, and more MS attacks. High illness intrusiveness; digestive system problems; genitourinary problems; and headaches were associated with poorer mental HRQL. Interestingly, we found an interaction between sex and age in mental HRQL, with worse mental health in older men but better mental health in older women. These findings may assist health care providers in identifying patients who may be at risk for decline in their HRQL, permitting appropriate and timely interventions.

  12. Water security in the Canadian Prairies: science and management challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, Howard; Gober, Patricia

    2013-11-13

    In this paper, we discuss the multiple dimensions of water security and define a set of thematic challenges for science, policy and governance, based around cross-scale dynamics, complexity and uncertainty. A case study of the Saskatchewan River basin (SRB) in western Canada is presented, which encompasses many of the water-security challenges faced worldwide. A science agenda is defined based on the development of the SRB as a large-scale observatory to develop the underpinning science and social science needed to improve our understanding of water futures under societal and environmental change. We argue that non-stationarity poses profound challenges for existing science and that new integration of the natural sciences, engineering and social sciences is needed to address decision making under deep uncertainty. We suggest that vulnerability analysis can be combined with scenario-based modelling to address issues of water security and that knowledge translation should be coupled with place-based modelling, adaptive governance and social learning to address the complexity uncertainty and scale dynamics of contemporary water problems.

  13. Energy prices, equalization and Canadian federalism : comparing Canada's energy price shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courchene, T.J. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). School of Policy Studies; Institute for Research on Public Policy, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2006-04-01

    Revenues from natural resources during periods of high energy prices can create problems with the way the Canadian federal government distributes wealth through equalization. This paper traced the history of equalization in comparison with energy prices from the years 1973 to 2003. It was noted that the National Energy Program, section 92A of the Constitution, and the 5-province standard were all federal responses to initial energy price increases. It was suggested that current increases in energy prices demand a different response. The author examined a method of using the national average standard to calculate equalization payments as a means of eliminating the inequities created by the current 5-province standard, which excludes both Alberta and the Atlantic provinces. It was argued that the exclusion of Alberta's energy resources creates a false impression that other provinces such as British Columbia and Saskatchewan are rich in resources. It was suggested that fiscal imbalance between provinces is a significant challenge to the current Canadian government. New approaches to cash transfers to the provinces were discussed. A 2-tier equalization scheme was proposed that separated natural resource revenues from other revenues. It was concluded that the government's previous response to high energy prices will not be appropriate for addressing the current price shock. A 2-tier equalization scheme will mean that resource-rich provinces have an opportunity to participate more fully in federal decision-making. 53 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Uranium association with iron-bearing phases in mill tailings from Gunnar, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmane, Guillaume; Allard, Thierry; Morin, Guillaume; Sélo, Madeleine; Brest, Jessica; Llorens, Isabelle; Chen, Ning; Bargar, John R; Fayek, Mostafa; Calas, Georges

    2013-11-19

    The speciation of uranium was studied in the mill tailings of the Gunnar uranium mine (Saskatchewan, Canada), which operated in the 1950s and 1960s. The nature, quantification, and spatial distribution of uranium-bearing phases were investigated by chemical and mineralogical analyses, fission track mapping, electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies at the U LIII-edge and Fe K-edge. In addition to uranium-containing phases from the ore, uranium is mostly associated with iron-bearing minerals in all tailing sites. XANES and EXAFS data and transmission electron microscopy analyses of the samples with the highest uranium concentrations (∼400-700 mg kg(-1) of U) demonstrate that uranium primarily occurs as monomeric uranyl ions (UO2(2+)), forming inner-sphere surface complexes bound to ferrihydrite (50-70% of the total U) and to a lesser extent to chlorite (30-40% of the total U). Thus, the stability and mobility of uranium at the Gunnar site are mainly influenced by sorption/desorption processes. In this context, acidic pH or alkaline pH with the presence of UO2(2+)- and/or Fe(3+)-complexing agents (e.g., carbonate) could potentially solubilize U in the tailings pore waters.

  15. A closure relation to molecular theory of solvation for macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobryn, Alexander E.

    We propose a closure to the integral equations of molecular theory of solvation, particularly suitable for polar and charged macromolecules in electrolyte solution. This includes such systems as oligomeric polyelectrolytes at a finite concentration in aqueous and various non-aqueous solutions, as well as drug-like compounds in solution. The new closure (KGK closure) imposes the mean spherical approximation (MSA) almost everywhere in the solvation shell but levels out the density distribution function to zero inside the repulsive core and in the spatial regions of strong density depletion emerging due to molecular associative interactions. We test the performance of the KGK closure coupled to the reference interaction site model (RISM) on the examples of LJ liquids, polar and nonpolar molecular solvents, including water, and aqueous solutions of simple ions, and use the KGK closure to obtain the solvation structure and thermodynamics of oligomeric polyelectrolytes and drug-like compounds at a finite concentration in electrolyte solution, for which no convergence is obtained with other closures. We further test the 3D-version of the KGK closure with 3D-RISM for molecular mixtures as well as oligomeric polyelectrolytes and drug-like molecules in electrolyte solutions. 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2M9, Canada.

  16. Using a Geospatial Model to Relate Fluvial Geomorphology to Macroinvertebrate Habitat in a Prairie River—Part 2: Matching Family-Level Indices to Geomorphological Response Units (GRUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grace Nostbakken Meissner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many rivers are intensely managed due to anthropogenic influences such as dams, channelization, and water provision for municipalities, agriculture, and industry. With this growing pressure on fluvial systems comes a greater need to evaluate the state of their ecosystems. The purpose of this research is to use a geospatial model of the Qu’Appelle River in Saskatchewan to distinguish instream macroinvertebrate habitats at the family level. River geomorphology was assessed through the use of ArcGIS and digital elevation models; with these tools, the sinuosity, slope, fractal dimension, and stream width of the river were processed. Subsequently, Principal Component Analysis, a clustering technique, revealed areas with similar sets of geomorphological characteristics. These similar typology sequences were then grouped into geomorphological response units (GRUs, designated a color, and mapped into a geospatial model. Macroinvertebrate data was then incorporated to reveal several relationships to the model. For instance, certain GRUs contained more highly sensitive species and healthier diversity levels than others. Future possibilities for expanding on this project include incorporating stable isotope data to evaluate the food-web structure within the river basin. Although GRUs have been very successful in identifying fish habitats in other studies, the macroinvertebrates may be too sessile and their habitat too localized to be identified by such large river units. Units may need to be much shorter (250 m to better identify macroinvertebrate habitat.

  17. Reduction in Fatalities, Ambulance Calls, and Hospital Admissions for Road Trauma After Implementation of New Traffic Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Herbert; Brasher, Penelope; Erdelyi, Shannon; Desapriya, Edi; Asbridge, Mark; Purssell, Roy; Macdonald, Scott; Schuurman, Nadine; Pike, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the public health benefits of traffic laws targeting speeding and drunk drivers (British Columbia, Canada, September 2010). Methods. We studied fatal crashes and ambulance dispatches and hospital admissions for road trauma, using interrupted time series with multiple nonequivalent comparison series. We determined estimates of effect using linear regression models incorporating an autoregressive integrated moving average error term. We used neighboring jurisdictions (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Washington State) as external controls. Results. In the 2 years after implementation of the new laws, significant decreases occurred in fatal crashes (21.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 15.3, 26.4) and in hospital admissions (8.0%; 95% CI = 0.6, 14.9) and ambulance calls (7.2%; 95% CI = 1.1, 13.0) for road trauma. We found a very large reduction in alcohol-related fatal crashes (52.0%; 95% CI = 34.5, 69.5), and the benefits of the new laws are likely primarily the result of a reduction in drinking and driving. Conclusions. These findings suggest that laws calling for immediate sanctions for dangerous drivers can reduce road trauma and should be supported. PMID:25121822

  18. Effects of long-term 2,4-D and MCPA field applications on soil residues and their rates of breakdown. [Triticum aestivum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.E.; Abuin, A.J. (Agriculture Canada, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)); Biederbeck, V.O. (Agriculture Canada, Swift Current, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    A 3-yr rotation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), wheat, and summerfallow in field plots on a clay soil at the Indian Head Experimental Farm, Saskatchewan, has been receiving annual applications of ester and amine formulations of 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) since 1947, and MCPA (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid) since 1953. In the fall of 1987, after 40 successive applications of 2,4-D and 34 annual treatments of MCPA, soil samples were taken from the 0- to 15-cm and 15- to 30-cm depths of replicate treatments. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed that residual amounts of 2,4-D and MCPA were less than 0.02 mg kg{sup {minus}1}, indicating that there had been complete degradation of the herbicides. Under laboratory conditions, the breakdown of 2.0 mg kg{sup {minus}1} ({sup 14}C) 2,4-D and ({sup 14}C)MCPA was slightly faster in soils that had received continuous applications with the appropriate herbicide, than in soil from the untreated control plots, suggesting some soil microbial adaptation in response to long-term use of these herbicides.

  19. Effects of water addition on soil arthropods and soil characteristics in a precipitation-limited environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikoski, Jennifer M.; Ferguson, Steven H.; Meyer, Lense

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the effect of water addition and season on soil arthropod abundance and soil characteristics (%C, %N, C:N, moisture, pH). The experimental design consisted of 24 groups of five boxes distributed within a small aspen stand in Saskatchewan, Canada. The boxes depressed the soil to create a habitat with suitable microclimate for soil arthropods, and by overturning boxes we counted soil arthropods during weekly surveys from April to September 1999. Soil samples were collected at two-month intervals and water was added once per week to half of the plots. Of the eleven recognizable taxonomic units identified, only mites (Acari) and springtails (Collembola) responded to water addition by increasing abundance, whereas ants decreased in abundance with water addition. During summer, springtail numbers increased with water addition, whereas pH was a stronger determinant of mite abundance. In autumn, springtails were positively correlated with water and negatively correlated with mites, whereas mite abundance was negatively correlated with increasing C:N ratio, positively correlated to water addition, and negatively correlated with springtail abundance. Although both mite and springtail numbers decreased in autumn with a decrease in soil moisture, mites became more abundant than springtails suggesting a predator-prey (mite-springtail) relationship. Water had a significant effect on both springtails and mites in summer and autumn supporting the assertion that prairie soil communities are water limited.

  20. Study of various herbicides effect on two Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense L. varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    eskandar zand

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of two varieties of Canada thistle (Horridum, and Integrifolium to 14 herbicides was examined under controlled environment conditions in 2000, at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Each herbicide constituted a separate experiment. Each experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with four replications (one pot per replicate. Each herbicide was applied at 0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 times the recommended rate (in g a.i. ha-1: metsulfuron, 4.44; 2,4-D, 876; 2,4-DB, 1400; clopyralid, 152; dicamba, 128; MCPA, 876; MCPB, 1700; MCPB+MCPA (15:1, respectively, by volume, 1700; mecoprop, 926; hexazinone, 1008; bentazon, 840; bromoxynil, 336; glyphosate, 880; glufosinate, 500. Twenty-one days after treatment, shoots were cut at soil level, and dry matter was determined. For statistical analysis of the dose-response data were fitted to a log-logistic model. Shoot dry matter responses of the Canada thistle varieties to the herbicides were described well by log-logistsic model. Results indicated that bromoxynil, and hexazinone had maximum effect, and metsulfuron minimum effect on Canada thistle (based on control effect index. Varieties horridum and integrifolium responsed differently to increasing rates of hexazinone only. Variety integrifolium was 40% less sensitive to the herbicide than variety horridum. If can not attribute the lack of control to soil properties or environment, it should ascertain the varietal type.

  1. A comprehensive revisit of the ρ meson with improved Monte-Carlo based QCD sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-Nan; Zhang, Zhu-Feng; Steele, T. G.; Jin, Hong-Ying; Huang, Zhuo-Ran

    2017-07-01

    We improve the Monte-Carlo based QCD sum rules by introducing the rigorous Hölder-inequality-determined sum rule window and a Breit-Wigner type parametrization for the phenomenological spectral function. In this improved sum rule analysis methodology, the sum rule analysis window can be determined without any assumptions on OPE convergence or the QCD continuum. Therefore, an unbiased prediction can be obtained for the phenomenological parameters (the hadronic mass and width etc.). We test the new approach in the ρ meson channel with re-examination and inclusion of α s corrections to dimension-4 condensates in the OPE. We obtain results highly consistent with experimental values. We also discuss the possible extension of this method to some other channels. Supported by NSFC (11175153, 11205093, 11347020), Open Foundation of the Most Important Subjects of Zhejiang Province, and K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, TGS is Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Z. F. Zhang and Z. R. Huang are Grateful to the University of Saskatchewan for its Warm Hospitality

  2. Quality councils as health system performance and accountability mechanisms: the Cancer Quality Council of Ontario experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrow, Mark; Langer, Bernard; Angus, Helen; Sullivan, Terrence

    2006-01-01

    Recent national and provincial reviews on the status of healthcare in Canada have recommended the establishment of quality councils to guide quality improvement efforts. The emergence of quality councils, such as the Health Quality Council of Alberta, the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council, the Cancer Quality Council of Ontario and the Health Council of Canada, reflect new but largely unscrutinized models for improving quality of care. We discuss the varying mandates of these new quality councils, their fit with evolving governance and accountability structures and the credibility and legitimacy of their role as perceived by other health system organizations. To further illustrate these issues, we present insiders' perspectives on the Cancer Quality Council of Ontario's activities over its first three years, including the initial agenda, critical success factors and the nature of evolving relationships with other organizations in Ontario's healthcare system. While current Canadian quality councils represent an eclectic mix of methods for achieving improvements in quality of care, it is not entirely clear how quality councils will stimulate sustained and significant improvements in quality of care where other models have failed. However, these new Canadian quality councils represent natural experiments in motion from which much needs to be learned.

  3. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  4. West Nile Virus Surveillance and Diagnostic: A Canadian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Drebot

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A surveillance program has been in place since 2000 to detect the presence of West Nile virus (WNV in Canada. Serological assays are most appropriate when monitoring for human disease and undertaking case investigations. Genomic amplification procedures are more commonly used for testing animal and mosquito specimens collected as part of ongoing surveillance efforts. The incursion of WNV into this country was documented for the first time in 2001 when WNV was demonstrated in 12 Ontario health units during the late summer and fall. In 2002 WNV activity was documented by avian surveillance in Ontario by mid-May with subsequent expansion of the virus throughout Ontario and into Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia. Human cases were recorded in both Ontario and Quebec in 2002 with approximately 800 to 1000 probable, confirmed and suspect cases detected. The possible recurrence and further spread of WNV to other parts of Canada in 2003 must be anticipated with potential risk to public health. The continued surveillance and monitoring for WNV-associated human illness is necessary and appropriate disease prevention measures need to be in place in 2003.

  5. Field-scale water balance closure in seasonally frozen conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xicai; Helgason, Warren; Ireson, Andrew; Wheater, Howard

    2017-11-01

    Hydrological water balance closure is a simple concept, yet in practice it is uncommon to measure every significant term independently in the field. Here we demonstrate the degree to which the field-scale water balance can be closed using only routine field observations in a seasonally frozen prairie pasture field site in Saskatchewan, Canada. Arrays of snow and soil moisture measurements were combined with a precipitation gauge and flux tower evapotranspiration estimates. We consider three hydrologically distinct periods: the snow accumulation period over the winter, the snowmelt period in spring, and the summer growing season. In each period, we attempt to quantify the residual between net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation) and the change in field-scale storage (snow and soil moisture), while accounting for measurement uncertainties. When the residual is negligible, a simple 1-D water balance with no net drainage is adequate. When the residual is non-negligible, we must find additional processes to explain the result. We identify the hydrological fluxes which confound the 1-D water balance assumptions during different periods of the year, notably blowing snow and frozen soil moisture redistribution during the snow accumulation period, and snowmelt runoff and soil drainage during the melt period. Challenges associated with quantifying these processes, as well as uncertainties in the measurable quantities, caution against the common use of water balance residuals to estimate fluxes and constrain models in such a complex environment.

  6. Knowledge Co-production Strategies for Water Resources Modeling and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gober, P.

    2016-12-01

    The limited impact of scientific information on policy making and climate adaptation in North America has raised awareness of the need for new modeling strategies and knowledge transfer processes. This paper outlines the rationale for a new paradigm in water resources modeling and management, using examples from the USA and Canada. Principles include anticipatory modeling, complex system dynamics, decision making under uncertainty, visualization, capacity to represent and manipulate critical trade-offs, stakeholder engagement, local knowledge, context-specific activities, social learning, vulnerability analysis, iterative and collaborative modeling, and the concept of a boundary organization. In this framework, scientists and stakeholders are partners in the production and dissemination of knowledge for decision making, and local knowledge is fused with scientific observation and methodology. Discussion draws from experience in building long-term collaborative boundary organizations in Phoenix, Arizona in the USA and the Saskatchewan River Basin (SRB) in Canada. Examples of boundary spanning activities include the use of visualization, the concept of a decision theater, infrastructure to support social learning, social networks, and reciprocity, simulation modeling to explore "what if" scenarios of the future, surveys to elicit how water problems are framed by scientists and stakeholders, and humanistic activities (theatrical performances, art exhibitions, etc.) to draw attention to local water issues. The social processes surrounding model development and dissemination are at least as important as modeling assumptions, procedures, and results in determining whether scientific knowledge will be used effectively for water resources decision making.

  7. BOREAS RSS-18 Level-1B AVIRIS Imagery: At-Sensor Radiance in BIL Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Green, Robert O.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    These data were collected and processed by the BOREAS RSS-18 team at NASA JPL. Data were acquired for BOREAS with NASA's AVIRIS. This optical sensor measures images that consist of spectra from 400 to 2500 nm at 10-nm sampling. These spectra are acquired as images with 20-meter spatial resolution, 11-km swath width and up to 800-km length. The measurements are spectrally, radiometrically, and geometrically calibrated. Spatially, the data are focused on the BOREAS NSA and SSA near Thompson, Manitoba, and Candle Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada, respectively. AVIRIS data were collected in 1994 during the Thaw campaign at the NSA and SSA, at the SSA in IFC-1, and at the NSA and SSA in both IFC-2 and IFC-3. In 1996, AVIRIS was deployed in the winter and summer campaigns in the SSA only. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. BOREAS RSS-19 1996 CASI At-Sensor Radiance and Reflectance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Freemantle, Jim; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-19 team collected CASI images from the Chieftain Navaho aircraft in order to observe the seasonal change in the radiometric reflectance properties of the boreal forest landscape. CASI was deployed as a site-specific optical sensor as part of BOREAS. The overall objective of the CASI deployment was to observe the seasonal change in the radiometric reflectance properties of the boreal forest landscape. In 1996, image data were collected with CASI on 15 days during a field campaign between 18-July and 01 -August, primarily at flux tower sites located at study sites near Thompson, Manitoba, and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. A variety of CASI data collection strategies were used to meet the following scientific objectives: 1) canopy bidirectional reflectance, 2) canopy biochemistry, 3) spatial variability, and 4) estimates of up and downwelling PAR spectral albedo, as well as changes along transects across lakes at the southern site and transects between the NSA and SSA. The images are stored as binary image files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Variations in the Life Cycle of Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae in Wild Populations of Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kricsfalusy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a study of a perennial herb Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae in a variety of natural habitats in Saskatchewan, Canada, eight life stages (seed, seedling, juvenile, immature, vegetative, generative, subsenile, and senile are distinguished and characterized in detail. The species ontogenetic growth patterns are investigated. A. patens has a long life cycle that may last for several decades which leads to the formation of compact clumps. The distribution and age of clumps vary substantially in different environments with different levels of disturbance. The plant ontogeny includes the regular cycle with reproduction occurring through seeds. There is an optional subsenile vegetative disintegration at the end of the life span. The following variations in the life cycle of A. patens are identified: with slower development in young age, with an accelerated development, with omission of the generative stage, with retrogression to previous life stages in mature age, and with vegetative dormancy. The range of variations in the life cycle of A. patens may play an important role in maintaining population stability in different environmental conditions and management regimes.

  10. Effect of Wells’ Connectivity Enhancement on the Performance of Vapor Extraction (VAPEX Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadpoor Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drawbacks of the thermal recovery techniques such as excessive heat loss to the surrounding formations and carbon dioxide emissions during these processes have directed the interests of researchers towards more viable alternatives such as solvent-based recovery techniques (e.g. VAPEX. One of the key parameters to implement a successful VAPEX process is to control the profiles of vapour chamber and consequently improve the areal sweep efficiency. In this regard, an optimum well configuration and well connectivity establishment between the injection and production wells are desirable. The main focus of this research is to extensively conduct series of experiments to investigate the effect of injection/production wells connectivity on the performance of VAPEX process. For this purpose, two large-scale physical models were employed. Propane and propane/carbon dioxide mixtures were selected as the injection solvents in the visual sand-packed physical models saturated with heavy oil sample from Saskatchewan (Canada heavy oil. Various injection/production scenarios were followed and it was found that the initial connection path between the injector and producer had a significant impact on the vapour chamber profiles and consequently on the ultimate recovery performance of the VAPEX process.

  11. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfide oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.

  12. Interannual water-level fluctuations and the vegetation of prairie potholes: Potential impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, Arnold; Mushet, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Mean water depth and range of interannual water-level fluctuations over wet-dry cycles in precipitation are major drivers of vegetation zone formation in North American prairie potholes. We used harmonic hydrological models, which require only mean interannual water depth and amplitude of water-level fluctuations over a wet–dry cycle, to examine how the vegetation zones in a pothole would respond to small changes in water depth and/or amplitude of water-level fluctuations. Field data from wetlands in Saskatchewan, North Dakota, and South Dakota were used to parameterize harmonic models for four pothole classes. Six scenarios in which small negative or positive changes in either mean water depth, amplitude of interannual fluctuations, or both, were modeled to predict if they would affect the number of zones in each wetland class. The results indicated that, in some cases, even small changes in mean water depth when coupled with a small change in amplitude of water-level fluctuations can shift a prairie pothole wetland from one class to another. Our results suggest that climate change could alter the relative proportion of different wetland classes in the prairie pothole region.

  13. The geography of conflict between elk and agricultural values in the Cypress Hills, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Troy M; Gates, C Cormack; Eslinger, Dale

    2009-01-01

    Complex ecological issues like depredation and its management are determined by multiple factors acting at more than one scale and are interlinked with complex human social and economic behaviour. Depredation by wild herbivores can be a major obstacle to agricultural community support for wildlife conservation. For three decades, crop and fence damage, competition with livestock for native rangeland and tame pasture, and depredation of stored feed by elk (Cervus elaphus canadensis) have been the cause of conflict with agricultural producers in the Cypress Hills, Alberta and Saskatchewan. Tolerance of elk presence on private lands is low because few benefits accrue to private landowners; rather they largely perceive elk as a public resource produced at their expense. Government management actions have focused on abatement inputs (e.g., population reduction; fencing) and compensation, but incentives to alter land use patterns (crop choice and location) in response to damages have not been considered. Nor has there been information on spatial structure of the elk population that would allow targeted management actions instead of attempting to manage the entire population. In this study we analysed the spatial structure of the Cypress Hills elk population, the distribution of the elk harvest in relation to agricultural conflicts, developed models of the spatial patterns of conflict fields, and evaluated compensation patterns for damage by wild herbivores. We propose modifications to current abatement and compensation programs and discuss alternative approaches involving changes to agricultural land use patterns that may reduce the intensity of conflicts with elk, and increase the acceptance capacity of landowners.

  14. The impact of price-cap regulations on market entry by generic pharmaceutical firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Huiying; Guh, Daphne; Anis, Aslam H

    2017-04-01

    In 1998, the province of Ontario, Canada implemented price-cap '70/90' regulations: the first generic must be priced at ≤70% of the associated brand-name price and subsequent generics must be priced at ≤90% of the first generics' price. The price-cap was further lowered to 50% in 2006 and 25% in 2010 for all generic drugs regardless of the first or subsequent generic entrants. This study assessed the impact of such price-cap regulations on market entry by generic firms using the formulary database from 9 provinces (January 2004-March 2013). A logistic regression was estimated to compare the probability of entry during the three policy periods in Ontario ('70/90', '25', versus '50'). Since different price-caps were subsequently introduced in other provinces, Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan, difference-in-differences was used to compare market entry. In Ontario, compared with the period '50', generic firms were 76% and 63% less likely to enter markets in the periods '25' and '70/90', respectively. The difference-in-differences showed that the entry probability decreased the most in Ontario during the '25' period from the '50' period. Lowering the price-cap level to 25% leads to a significantly lower probability of market entry by generic firms.

  15. LIFAC flue gas desulfurization process an alternative SO{sub 2} control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, J.G. [Tampella Power Corp., Atlanta, GA (United States); Vilala, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the results from two recently completed LIFAC flue gas desulfurization plants - 300 MW Shand lignite powered station owned by Saskatchewan Power Corporation and 60 MW Whitewater Valley high sulfur coal fired station owned by Richmond Powerand Light. LIFACis a dry FGD process in which limestone is injected into the upper regions of the boiler furnace and an activation reactor is used to humidify the unreacted limestone to achieve additional sulfur capture. The performance in both plants indicates that 70 to 80% sulfur is removed at a Ca/S ratio of 2. Cost performance data from these plants has shown that LI FAC both on construction cost and $/ton SO{sub 2} removed basis is very cost competitive compared to other SO{sub 2} control technologies. The Richmond plant has been realized under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program. The Shand plant is the first commercial installation in North America. The paper also discusses highlights of operating and maintenance experience, availability and handling of the solid waste product.

  16. Potential water resource impacts of hydraulic fracturing from unconventional oil production in the Bakken shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Namita; Chilkoor, Govinda; Wilder, Joseph; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana; Stone, James J

    2017-01-01

    Modern drilling techniques, notably horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, have enabled unconventional oil production (UOP) from the previously inaccessible Bakken Shale Formation located throughout Montana, North Dakota (ND) and the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The majority of UOP from the Bakken shale occurs in ND, strengthening its oil industry and businesses, job market, and its gross domestic product. However, similar to UOP from other low-permeability shales, UOP from the Bakken shale can result in environmental and human health effects. For example, UOP from the ND Bakken shale generates a voluminous amount of saline wastewater including produced and flowback water that are characterized by unusual levels of total dissolved solids (350 g/L) and elevated levels of toxic and radioactive substances. Currently, 95% of the saline wastewater is piped or trucked onsite prior to disposal into Class II injection wells. Oil and gas wastewater (OGW) spills that occur during transport to injection sites can potentially result in drinking water resource contamination. This study presents a critical review of potential water resource impacts due to deterministic (freshwater withdrawals and produced water management) and probabilistic events (spills due to leaking pipelines and truck accidents) related to UOP from the Bakken shale in ND. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Infectious Disease and Grouping Patterns in Mule Deer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Mejía Salazar

    Full Text Available Infectious disease dynamics are determined, to a great extent, by the social structure of the host. We evaluated sociality, or the tendency to form groups, in Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus from a chronic wasting disease (CWD endemic area in Saskatchewan, Canada, to better understand factors that may affect disease transmission. Using group size data collected on 365 radio-collared mule deer (2008-2013, we built a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM to evaluate whether factors such as CWD status, season, habitat and time of day, predicted group occurrence. Then, we built another GLMM to determine factors associated with group size. Finally, we used 3 measures of group size (typical, mean and median group sizes to quantify levels of sociality. We found that mule deer showing clinical signs of CWD were less likely to be reported in groups than clinically healthy deer after accounting for time of day, habitat, and month of observation. Mule deer groups were much more likely to occur in February and March than in July. Mixed-sex groups in early gestation were larger than any other group type in any season. Groups were largest and most likely to occur at dawn and dusk, and in open habitats, such as cropland. We discuss the implication of these results with respect to sociobiology and CWD transmission dynamics.

  18. A comparison of CO{sub 2} minimum miscibility pressure determinations for Weyburn crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, M.; Huang, S. [Saskatchewan Research Council, 6 Research Drive, S4S 7J7 Regina, SK (Canada); Dyer, S.B. [PanCanadian Petroleum Limited, 150-9th Avenue S.W., T2P 2S5 Calgary, AB (Canada); Mourits, F.M. [Natural Resources Canada, 580 Booth Street, 10th Floor, K1A 0E4 Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-10-01

    Minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) is often used as a key criterion for screening and selecting suitable solvents for enhanced oil recovery projects. This paper compares the pure and impure CO{sub 2} MMP values determined for a medium oil from Weyburn reservoir located in southeast Saskatchewan, Canada. Three different methods were employed for determining MMP, namely, slim tube experiments, rising bubble apparatus (RBA) tests, and correlations. The contaminants in the impure CO{sub 2} streams considered were nitrogen (from flue gas) and methane (from recycled CO{sub 2}). Results of the study indicated that the MMP values measured by the RBA technique agreed well with those measured using the slim tube tests and those predicted using a published correlation. For the Weyburn oil-CO{sub 2} system, a distinct bubble behaviour-tail formation-was observed when the pressure reached or was higher than MMP. These results provide additional experimental experience of using the RBA as an efficient tool of determining the MMP for some solvent gas-medium oil systems. This study also demonstrated that, for the Weyburn reservoir, promising EOR agents (having an MMP below 80% of the reservoir fracture pressure) are pure CO{sub 2} and blended CO{sub 2} containing up to about 12 mol% CH{sub 4} or 5 mol% N{sub 2}.

  19. Using burst collars in a liner string for multi-zone completions in horizontal wellbores : case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeld, J. [WestFire Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Kostenuk, N.; Jorgensen, M.; Sherman, S. [Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Improvements in multi-zone completion technology (MZCT) for stimulating horizontal wells has resulted in an increased number of horizontal wells drilled in recent years. With MZCT, multi-stage fractures can be done along the horizontal section and stimulated either open hole; cased using external casing packers; or cemented into place. This paper described the use of the MZCT process in the Canadian Viking Formation, in Alberta's Redwater field and Saskatchewan's Plato field. Burst collars were used in the liner string of the horizontal section of the wellbore. The casing liner with specialized collars was cemented into place and coiled tubing was used to isolate each burst collar to stimulate each interval one at a time. There were no restrictions on the number of collars that could be run, nor the spacing between them. The study showed that there are similarities and advantages to using burst collars for MZCT, including cost savings and a full-bore diameter liner casing that is available for re-entry. The time requirement for fracture treatments using burst collars was found to be similar to that of an open hole packer system. Production results from wells completed with burst collars were found to be competitive with those treated with an open hole packer system or a pre-perforated cemented liner. 1 tab., 4 figs.

  20. Sedimentation and erosion in Lake Diefenbaker, Canada: solutions for shoreline retreat monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Amir; de Boer, Dirk; Lindenschmidt, Karl-Erich

    2017-09-15

    This study looks into sedimentation and erosion rates in Lake Diefenbaker, a prairie reservoir, in Saskatchewan, Canada, which has been in operation since 1968. First, we looked at the historical data in all different formats over the last 70 years, which includes data from more than 20 years before the formation of the lake. The field observations indicate high rates of shoreline erosion, especially in the upstream portion as a potential region for shoreline retreat. Because of the great importance of this waterbody to the province, monitoring sedimentation and erosion rates is necessary for maintaining the quality of water especially after severe floods which are more common due to climate change effects. Second, we used Google Maps Elevation API, a new tool from Google that provides elevation data for cross sections drawn between two points, by drawing 24 cross sections in the upstream area extending 250 m from each bank. This feature from Google can be used as an easy and fast monitoring tool, is free of charge, and provides excellent control capabilities for monitoring changes in cross-sectional profiles.

  1. Health and well-being of farm women: contradictory roles in the contemporary economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, W; Moore, R J

    2005-05-01

    To document the roles of farm women in the contemporary farm economy, their physical health and psychological well-being, and their interaction with and evaluation of the health care system, a multi-stage study employing both quantitative and qualitative research strategies was implemented. A total of 717 Canadian farm women in 20 rural Saskatchewan municipalities returned a 20-page objective questionnaire that focused on: (1) health care, (2) health status, (3) social support, (4) well-being, (5) lifestyle and activities, (6) stress, (7) work, (8) male and female roles, (9) demographics, and (10) farm issues. Subsequently, 20 qualitative interviews were conducted to explore in-depth the findings of the survey. Results document long hours of work, on and off the farm, that often went unacknowledged; pressure to assume the role of a "traditional farm wife," expectations they often felt they had difficulty living up to; and high levels of stress in response to economic and family pressures. Although rating the availability and quality of health care as "fair to good," the farm women commented on the lack of access to medical and counseling services, and a perceived lack of understanding by policymakers and professionals. Integrated health and educational service centers, increased use of nurse practitioners, and establishment of mobile health services are recommended policy initiatives.

  2. Infrared Measurements of Atmospheric Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, Frank J.

    1998-01-01

    This research program studies atmospheric trace gas concentrations and altitude distributions, particularly for those gases that are important in stratospheric chemistry and radiative balance. Measurements are made with infrared remote sensing instruments, either ground based or balloon-borne. Most of the ground based instruments are part of the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), including a very high spectral resolution solar absorption spectrometer at Mauna Loa Observatory and similar system at McMurdo Station, Antarctica (operated in collaboration with the New Zealand NIWA). Additionally, we are deriving stratospheric constituent data from the spectra obtained at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program's site in north-central Oklahoma. We have an atmospheric emission spectrometer system at the South Pole (with additional support from NSF), and an identical NSF support instrument at Eureka, NWT, Canada. Our balloon-borne instruments include a very high resolution solar absorption spectrometer system, a smaller, slightly lower resolution solar spectrometer system, a high resolution atmospheric emission spectrometer, and several medium resolution emission spectrometers (CAESRs) that are usually flown piggyback. During the past year, we participated in the MANTRA balloon flight from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with the high resolution solar spectrometer system. Several of our instruments were extensively compared to (UARS) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite observations, and so provide a data set with known connections to UARS. In the longer term, the data can be used to relate UARS data to (EOS) Earth Observing System and (ADEOS) Advanced Airborne Earth Observing System.

  3. Telematics for rural health care practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Robert H.; Kardaun, Jan W. P. F.

    1990-06-01

    The " crisis" in rural health care i. e. the decreasing number of practitioners is partially caused by the increasing use of technology in health care. Health care practitioners in rural Canada are progressively finding their practice more difficult because of their isolation from the population centers housing many of the services and supplies needed in the modern practice of medicine. The centralization of these supplies and services results from the increasing use of technology in medicine. It is uneconomical to place expensive equipment highly trained technicians and consultants and well-stocked and current information sources in rural locations where they are underutilized. Thus over the years the increasing use of technology makes rural practice more difficult and less attractive in comparison to an urban practice that can easily and cheaply employ the benefits of technology and expert consultation. The Saskatchewan situation is examined using data collected by the authors and compared to other rural areas reported in the literature. The ways that computer communications can help alleviate this situation are explained and illustrated through a review of North American telematics activities. Telematic services for physicians are developing in North America. This is in synergy with the increasing ownership of computers by physicians. We contrast the Canadian scene with the American. Telematics is a technological approach that can be employed to reduce the isolation of rural health care practitioners. It can provide

  4. The 2002 voluntary climate change action plan update of Shell Canada : performance to the end of 2001 and projections to 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    In this eighth annual report in support of the Voluntary Challenge and Registry Program, Shell Canada Ltd. has continued to improve on its overall environmental performance. The construction of the Athabasca Oil Sands Project, including the Muskeg River mine located north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, as well as and upgrader adjacent to Shell's Scotford refinery near Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, continued in 2001. In September 2001, Shell's climate change strategy was approved. It led to the development of several management practices to provide leadership for greenhouse gas management and emission control. The target of successfully have all major facilities registered to the international environmental management system standard (ISO) 14001 was achieved. Also registered were the corporate health, safety and sustainable development (HSSD) and Resources business unit HSSD management systems. Adjustments were made to the 1990 baseline, due to the divestment of businesses in the 1990s. In 2001, the emissions of greenhouse gases were 76,000 tonnes lower than those recorded for the year 2002. The Resources business unit reduced its energy consumption by 2 per cent in 2001, as planned. Other initiatives concerning energy consumption are currently being implemented, notably at the Peace River complex and the Waterton gas complex. 6 figs.

  5. Fertility in Alberta in a Context of Rapid Economic Growth, 1997-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Trovato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, birth rates in Alberta have followed closely the trajectory of change experienced by the other Canadian provinces. Its total fertility rate fell during the low point of the 1930s; it increased during the post-War baby boom in the 1950s and sixties, and thereafter fell to sub-replacement levels beginning in the mid 1970s. In recent years, especially since the early 2000s, the birth rate in Alberta has unexpectedly increased, such that by 2007, it had reached 1.90 children per woman---not far from the 2.1 level needed for generational replacement in the long term. During this same period both national and provincial fertility rates fluctuated at levels below those of Alberta (except Saskatchewan and Manitoba, whose rates have been higher. In this study, I examine the historical pattern of fertility change in Alberta, noting similarities and differences with the other provinces. I then look at the association of selected macro level factors (marriage, unemployment, wages, female labour force participation with change in total and parity-specific birth rates between 1997 and 2007, a period of unprecedented economic growth in Alberta. The statistical results show that although marriage is not significantly correlated with change in fertility rates, male and female wages and female labour force participation all show associations consistent with a procyclical interpretation of fertility change --- that is, periods of economic growth are conducive to fertility increase whereas bad economic times lead to reduced fertility.

  6. Oil sector expansion hits small road bump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2002-04-01

    Indications are that the upward production trend in Saskatchewan's oil industry, evident in recent years, will be reversed in 2002. Predictions are that the drop in production will be a modest one, reflecting the slower economy and the lag time between drilling activity and produced barrels of oil. Also a contributing factor is the fact that the year 2001 marked a decline of 20 per cent in oil well drilling from the previous year, down from 2,401 wells drilled to 1,931 wells. Expansions of last year such as PanCanadian's carbon dioxide project, Husky Energy's heavy oil project at Pike's Peak, northeast of Lloydminster, PanCanadian's SAGD project, Conoco's project at the Kerrobert Pool and Apache Canada's Midale area project southeast of Regina, are all likely to see more modest development during 2002. Similar retrenchment is expected at Nexen's (Wascana) Williston Basin area operations, due in part to the increased drilling cost resulting from the intense activity during 2001, and a 5 to 10 per cent rise in operating costs.

  7. Getting and keeping good people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soucy, R.

    2002-07-01

    This presentation deals with the many challenges the natural gas industry faces in getting and retaining qualified employees. The author notes that during the period 1998-2001, Canada suffered a 26 per cent decline in the number of farm workers, while that number reached 36 per cent in Alberta and Saskatchewan over the same period. The industry must face demographic realities, such as the baby boom generation that it now reaching retirement age. The author discusses three important issues: occupational competencies, virtual career fairs, and Human Resource Sector Councils. In the case of occupational competencies, the following sectors are mentioned: pumping services, well testing, oil field transport, wireline, snubbing, and wellsite. The topic of provincial equivalency is also discussed along with the National Red Seal. Virtual career fairs offer Web sites targeted to junior and senior high schools, with video clips, day-in-the-life vignettes, and information on sector. Human Resource Sector Councils touch oil and gas producers, drilling contractors, geophysical contractors, service companies, and pipeline companies. 1 tab.

  8. Modelling carbon dioxide emissions from agricultural soils in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Wang, Junye

    2017-11-01

    Agricultural soils are a leading source of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are major contributors to global climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up 20% of the total GHG emitted from agricultural soil. Therefore, an evaluation of CO2 emissions from agricultural soil is necessary in order to make mitigation strategies for environmental efficiency and economic planning possible. However, quantification of CO2 emissions through experimental methods is constrained due to the large time and labour requirements for analysis. Therefore, a modelling approach is needed to achieve this objective. In this paper, the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC), a process-based model, was modified to predict CO2 emissions for Canada from regional conditions. The modified DNDC model was applied at three experimental sites in the province of Saskatchewan. The results indicate that the simulations of the modified DNDC model are in good agreement with observations. The agricultural management of fertilization and irrigation were evaluated using scenario analysis. The simulated total annual CO2 flux changed on average by ±13% and ±1% following a ±50% variance of the total amount of N applied by fertilising and the total amount of water through irrigation applications, respectively. Therefore, careful management of irrigation and applications of fertiliser can help to reduce CO2 emissions from the agricultural sector. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Path dependency and collective action in common pool governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Heinmiller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Collective action among resource users has long been identified as a basic element of successful common pool governance, and one of the main concerns of common pool research is the identification of factors that affect collective action. Among the most commonly identified factors are trust, social capital, common preferences, shared knowledge, collaborative experiences, focusing events and expectations of future interactions. Thus far, however, relatively little attention has been paid to the historical-institutional context of collective action and the constraining effects of path dependency. Path dependency suggests that investments and adaptations in early resource management institutions can make it difficult for actors to abandon these institutions, thereby influencing and shaping subsequent collective action efforts. This article examines the impact that path dependency can have on collective action in common pools, by examining transboundary water management in the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia, the Colorado Basin of the US and the Saskatchewan-Nelson Basin of Canada. In all three cases, early transboundary water apportionment institutions have proven strongly path dependent, significantly shaping subsequent collective action efforts at transboundary water conservation.

  10. Direct conversion of fission energy into electricity in liquid gallium contact potential cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, T., E-mail: tes211@mail.usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Sohtech R& D Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear fission of uranium releases about 93% of its energy in the form of highly charged (up to 20+) and highly energetic fission fragment (83.5MeV average) and other ionizing radiations, including beta and gamma radiations. Liquid gallium is a semimetal that had been previously explored as a self recovering ionization media for alphavoltiac contact potential cell (CPC), and had been evaluated as a suitable replacement coolant for the next generation of fast reactor. By improving the neutronic aspect of a Liquid Gallium CPC (LGaCPC) with low neutron absorption construction materials, and by using a heterogeneous mixture of CANDU fuel grade uranium oxide powder (provided by CAMECO Inc.) and liquid gallium as its junction material, the direct conversion of fission energy to electricity has been observed when irradiated by the thermal neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE-II Research Reactor at the Saskatchewan Research Council. To further explore the effect of temperature on the operation of the LGaCPC, a High Temperature LGaCPC (HTLGaCPC), and a 6 meter high monolithic Large Volume Submersible Neutron Irradiation Chamber (LVSNIC) have been designed and constructed, which allow high temperature fission experiment up to 623K with a thermal neutron flux of 1.18 x 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}/s and the result is presented here, along with discussions on the operating principle of the LGaCPC, and on the construction and measurement techniques used in this study. (author)

  11. Cannibalism of nestling American kestrels by their parents and siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Gary R.; Wiebe, Karen L.; Iko, William M.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the frequency of cannibalism of nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) in north-central Saskatchewan. We investigated human disturbance and food shortages as possible causes of it. Cannibalism of nestlings by their parents and siblings was confirmed by observation and by the presence of partially eaten carcasses, or inferred from the sudden disappearance of a nestling between frequent nest checks. Cannibalism occurred at 8% of 48 nests in 1988, and 18% of 92 nests in 1989. Not all nestlings that died were cannibalized. Where nestling mortality occurred, carcasses were eaten in at least 20% of nests in 1988, and 63% of nests in 1989. The chicks that were cannibalized died at a significantly younger age than those that died but were not cannibalized. The mass and age of the parent and the laying date were not associated with the occurrence of cannibalism. We found no strong evidence of a causal link between human disturbance and nestling mortality or cannibalism; however, the abundance of small mammal prey was inversely related to the frequency of cannibalism between years, and there were fewer prey and lower prey delivery rates in territories where cannibalism occurred than in territories where nestling mortality did not occur. The fact that some nestlings died but were not eaten suggests that such mortality was unrelated to food shortages. The food advantage of cannibalism may not outweigh potential disadvantages such as disease transmission.

  12. Allometry of Sapwood Depth in Five Boreal Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rebeca Quiñonez-Piñón

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes sapwood variability and allometry within individuals of Populus tremuloides, Pinus contorta, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, and Picea glauca. Outside bark diameter at breast height (DBH and sapwood depth (sd in four cardinal directions were measured in individuals in stands in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada. The microscopical analysis of wood anatomy was used to measure sd, and the error associated with the measures was observed. Sapwood allometry analyses examined the influence of DBH on sd and on sapwood area (SA. All species were observed to have varying sapwood depths around the trunk with statistical analyses showing that Pinus banksiana has a well defined preference to grow thicker in the North-East side. The largest sd values were observed for the Populus tremuloides set. Unlike Populus tremuloides and Picea glauca, for the species Pinus contorta, Pinus banksiana, and Picea mariana, incremental growth in DBH does not directly drive sapwood growth in any direction. For these three species, SA increases only because of increases in DBH as sd remains nearly constant. These results show that sapwood depth and sapwood area seem to behave differently in each studied species and are not always proportional to the tree size as is normally assumed.

  13. Geology of the Cluff Lake uranium deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, C.T.

    1978-12-01

    The uranium deposits discovered by Amok (Canada) Ltd. in the Cluff Lake area of northwestern Saskatchewan occur at or near the southern edge of the uplifted basement core of the Carswell circular structure. Two types of mineralization, distinguishable by their geological and structural setting and mineral paragenesis, have been recognized. The N-Claude type is characterized by a relatively simple mineral assemblage, consisting of uraninite or pitchblende with coffinite, and is accompanied by variable amounts of graphite and organic matter, and Fe, Cu, Pb and Mo sulphides. Both N and Claude orebodies occur within quartzofeldspathic gneisses of the basement core. On the other hand, the D-type ore has a complex mineral assemblage consisting of: uraninite, pitchblende, thucholite and coffinite, along with native gold and selenium; gold tellurides, and selenides of Pb, Bi, Ni and Co; sulphides of Fe, Cu and Pb; and organic matter. The D orebody occurs within carbonaceous shales at the base of the Athabasca Formation as well as in fault zones in regolithic quartzofeldspathic gneisses above the inverted unconformity. An age of 1050 m.y., which is consistent with a period (circa to 1200 to 1000 m.y.) of widespread hydrothermal activity and uranium mineralization or reworking within and adjacent to the Athabasca Basin, has been obtained from uranium mineralization from the D orebody. Later reworking (circa 470 m.y.) of the mineralization occurred at the intersection of older mineralized shear zones with radial faults produced during meteorite impact.

  14. Geology and recognition criteria for veinlike uranium deposits of the lower to middle Proterozoic unconformity and strata-related types. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlkamp, F.J.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of the Rabbit Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, in 1968 and the East Alligator Rivers district, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970 established the Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike-type deposits as one of the major types of uranium deposits. The term veinlike is used in order to distinguish it from the classical magmatic-hydrothermal vein or veintype deposits. The veinlike deposits account for between a quarter and a third of the Western World's proven uranium reserves. Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike deposits, as discussed in this report include several subtypes of deposits, which have some significantly different geologic characteristics. These various subtypes appear to have formed from various combinations of geologic processes ranging from synsedimentary uranium precipitation through some combination of diagenesis, metamorphism, metasomatism, weathering, and deep burial diagenesis. Some of the deposit subtypes are based on only one or two incompletely described examples; hence, even the classification presented in this report may be expected to change. Geologic characteristics of the deposits differ significantly between most districts and in some cases even between deposits within districts. Emphasis in this report is placed on deposit descriptions and the interpretations of the observers.

  15. Mining practices for the extraction of uranium ore with examples from producing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janoschka, K. (Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke A.G., Koeln (Germany, F.R.))

    1980-10-01

    In the introduction the author goes briefly into the historical development of the utilization of uranium, the personal strain on miners in the work place and the particulars of safety measures to protect the health of personnel engaged in the recovery of uranium. Several characteristic examples of uranium ore producing facilities are then presented. They were chosen for open pit mine operations as well as for underground mines. The extraction of uranium in the open pit mines of the Cluff Lake deposits of Amok Ltd. in Saskatchewan, the uranium surface mine Roessing in Namibia, recovery in the underground workings of the uranium mine of Dennison Mines Ltd. at Elliot Lake, Ontario, and the uranium ore mine La Fraisse in France are all described. In addition, the unconventional recovery of uranium from phosphates by in-situ leaching and the recovery of uranium as a by-product of the extraction of gold in South Africa are gone into in detail. The ore miner has learned to master all the given conditions of nature. The limits are his ability to make concentrations of mineral ores useful, constrained by the price consumers are ready to pay, which is to say the competitive situation of the world raw material market.

  16. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Pham

    Full Text Available Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  17. Is low back pain associated with worse health-related quality of life 6 months later?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolet, P. S.; Kristman, V. L.; Cote, P.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of low back pain (LBP) on future health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Current evidence suggests that individuals with LBP have poorer HRQoL than those without LBP. However, most of the evidence comes from cross-sectional studies where LBP...... control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 1,110 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults in September 1995. LBP at baseline was measured with the chronic pain questionnaire. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to measure physical and mental HRQoL at 6 months follow-up. Multivariable linear regression...... was used to estimate the association between graded LBP at baseline and HRQoL at 6 months while controlling for the effects of confounding. The 6-month follow-up rate was 70.7 % (785/1,110). LBP had a dose-response relationship with worsening physical HRQoL at 6 months, after controlling for age, income...

  18. Educational Selectivity of Out-migration in Canada:1976-1981 to 1996-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram, Bali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThe major objective of this paper is to show that migrants are positively selected whether they are driven by economic factors or by non-economic factors, and whether they are motivated by pull factors or push factors. Using "five-year migration data" from the 1981 to 2001 censuses of Canada, we find that the education gradient of out-migration is apparent in every region, with the highly educated being more mobile than the less educated. However, the pattern is most pronounced in the Atlantic region, Quebec, and Manitoba/Saskatchewan, the regions experiencing poorer economic conditions and persistent net losses through migration. The three high-income provinces, Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia not only experience lower overall net losses, but are also less likely to lose their better educated persons -- even during bad economic times.Quebec emerges as a special case where economic as well as linguistic-political factors play an important role in governing the out-migration patterns of the better educated, particularly those belonging to the non-Francophone group.FrenchL’objectif principal du présent document est de montrer que les migrants font l’objet d’une sélection positive, qu’ils soient motivés par des facteurs économiques ou non économiques, ou par des facteurs d’attirance oud’incitation. En utilisant les données quinquennales sur la migration tirées des recensements du Canada de 1981 à 2001, nous constatons que le gradient descolarité lié à l’émigration interne est apparent dans chaque région, les personnes très instruites étant plus mobiles que celles qui sont moins instruites.Toutefois, la tendance est plus prononcée dans la région de l’Atlantique, auQuébec et au Manitoba/Saskatchewan, soit les régions qui connaissent une conjoncture économique moins favorable et des pertes nettes persistantesrésultant de la migration. Les trois provinces prospères, l’Ontario, l’Alberta et la

  19. Generational differences in factors influencing physicians to choose a work location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, M; Seguin, M; Chowdhury, N; Card, R T

    2012-01-01

    Canadian medical schools have increased enrolment and recruited more rural students in an effort to address general and rural physician shortages. The success of this approach depends on the recruitment of these newly trained physicians to under-serviced areas. Studies from North America suggest that the career expectations and practice patterns of younger, more recently graduated physicians differ from those of their older counterparts. This study explored the factors that influenced the work location choices of physicians of differing generations, who trained at universities in Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador, two Canadian provinces with large rural populations and no community larger than 235 000 population. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with physicians who graduated from either the Memorial University of Newfoundland or the University of Saskatchewan. Generation definitions were based on the graduation year. Early-career physicians graduated between 1995 and 1999; mid-career physician graduated between 1985 and 1989; late-career physicians graduated between 1975 and 1979; and end-career physicians graduated between 1965 and 1969. Each physician was asked questions about the number and nature of work location changes over the course of their careers and the factors related to their decision to choose each location. Interview transcripts and notes were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Although the study focus was on generational differences, similarities and differences between universities, sexes and specialties (family physicians/GPs vs specialists) were also examined. Recruitment to the provinces was focused on as a whole, because the largest communities in the provinces are small compared with most urban communities. Forty-eight physicians were interviewed, five to nine physicians who graduated in each decade and from each university. The desire to be near family and friends was cited as the primary

  20. Updated ultrasound criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome: reliable thresholds for elevated follicle population and ovarian volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Marla E; Jarrett, Brittany Y; Brooks, Eric D; Reines, Jonathan K; Peppin, Andrew K; Muhn, Narry; Haider, Ehsan; Pierson, Roger A; Chizen, Donna R

    2013-05-01

    Do the ultrasonographic criteria for polycystic ovaries supported by the 2003 Rotterdam consensus adequately discriminate between the normal and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) condition in light of recent advancements in imaging technology and reliable methods for estimating follicle populations in PCOS? Using newer ultrasound technology and a reliable grid system approach to count follicles, we concluded that a substantially higher threshold of follicle counts throughout the entire ovary (FNPO)-26 versus 12 follicles-is required to distinguish among women with PCOS and healthy women from the general population. The Rotterdam consensus defined the polycystic ovary as having 12 or more follicles, measuring between 2 and 9 mm (FNPO), and/or an ovarian volume (OV) >10 cm(3). Since their initial proposal in 2003, a heightened prevalence of polycystic ovaries has been described in healthy women with regular menstrual cycles, which has questioned the accuracy of these criteria and marginalized the specificity of polycystic ovaries as a diagnostic criterion for PCOS. A diagnostic test study was performed using cross-sectional data, collected from 2006 to 2011, from 168 women prospectively evaluated by transvaginal ultrasonography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to determine the appropriate diagnostic thresholds for: (i) FNPO, (ii) follicle counts in a single cross section (FNPS) and (iii) OV. The levels of intra- and inter-observer reliability when five observers used the proposed criteria on 100 ultrasound cases were also determined. Ninety-eight women diagnosed with PCOS by the National Institutes of Health criteria as having both oligo-amenorrhea and hyperandrogenism and 70 healthy female volunteers recruited from the general population. Participants were evaluated by transvaginal ultrasonography at the Royal University Hospital within the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Saskatchewan