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Sample records for sars nucleocapsid measured

  1. Mesodynamics in the SARS nucleocapsid measured by NMR field cycling

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    Clarkson, Michael W.; Lei Ming; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Labeikovsky, Wladimir [MS009 Brandeis University, Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Redfield, Alfred [MS009 Brandeis University, Department of Biochemistry (United States)], E-mail: redfield@brandeis.edu; Kern, Dorothee [MS009 Brandeis University, Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States)], E-mail: dkern@brandeis.edu

    2009-09-15

    Protein motions on all timescales faster than molecular tumbling are encoded in the spectral density. The dissection of complex protein dynamics is typically performed using relaxation rates determined at high and ultra-high field. Here we expand this range of the spectral density to low fields through field cycling using the nucleocapsid protein of the SARS coronavirus as a model system. The field-cycling approach enables site-specific measurements of R{sub 1} at low fields with the sensitivity and resolution of a high-field magnet. These data, together with high-field relaxation and heteronuclear NOE, provide evidence for correlated rigid-body motions of the entire {beta}-hairpin, and corresponding motions of adjacent loops with a time constant of 0.8 ns (mesodynamics). MD simulations substantiate these findings and provide direct verification of the time scale and collective nature of these motions.

  2. The SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein--forms and functions.

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    Chang, Chung-ke; Hou, Ming-Hon; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Tai-huang

    2014-03-01

    The nucleocapsid phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV N protein) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid (RNP) and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. It is a protein with multifarious activities. In this article we will review our current understanding of the N protein structure and its interaction with nucleic acid. Highlights of the progresses include uncovering the modular organization, determining the structures of the structural domains, realizing the roles of protein disorder in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and visualizing the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structure inside the virions. It was also demonstrated that N-protein binds to nucleic acid at multiple sites with a coupled-allostery manner. We propose a SARS-CoV RNP model that conforms to existing data and bears resemblance to the existing RNP structures of RNA viruses. The model highlights the critical role of modular organization and intrinsic disorder of the N protein in the formation and functions of the dynamic RNP capsid in RNA viruses. This paper forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A combined nucleocapsid vaccine induces vigorous SARS-CD8+ T-cell immune responses

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    Azizi, Ali; Aucoin, Susan; Tadesse, Helina; Frost, Rita; Ghorbani, Masoud; Soare, Catalina; Naas, Turaya; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cell-mediated immune responses play a crucial role in controlling viral replication. As such, a candidate SARS vaccine should elicit broad CD8+ T-cell immune responses. Several groups of mice were immunized alone or in combination with SARS-nucleocapsid immunogen. A high level of specific SARS-CD8+ T-cell response was demonstrated in mice that received DNA encoding the SARS-nucleocapsid, protein and XIAP as an adjuvant. We also observed that co-administration of a plasmid expressing nucleocapsid, recombinant protein and montanide/CpG induces high antibody titers in immunized mice. Moreover, this vaccine approach merits further investigation as a potential candidate vaccine against SARS. PMID:16115319

  4. High-resolution structure of HLA-A*1101 in complex with SARS nucleocapsid peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Thomas; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Buus, Søren

    2005-01-01

    The structure of the human MHC-I molecule HLA-A*1101 in complex with a nonameric peptide (KTFPPTEPK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.45 A resolution. The peptide is derived from the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein positions 362-370 (SNP362-370). It is conserved in all known isolates...... of SARS-CoV and has been verified by in vitro peptide-binding studies to be a good to intermediate binder to HLA-A*0301 and HLA-A*1101, with IC50 values of 70 and 186 nM, respectively [Sylvester-Hvid et al. (2004), Tissue Antigens, 63, 395-400]. In terms of the residues lining the peptide-binding groove...

  5. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

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    Grasso Felicia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells.

  6. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

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    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  7. Sea surface slicks measured by SAR

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    Trivero, P. [Alessandria Univ. del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandri (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Avanzate; Fiscella, B. [Turin Univ., Turin (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Generale; Pavese, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Cosmogeofisica, Turin (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system capability to detect and characterize marine surface slicks was tested during the SAR-580 experiment in the northern Adriatic Sea, offshore the Venice coast, in October 1990. Two small artificial slicks of oleyl alcohol were produced in an area around the oceanographic platform of the Italian National Research Council (CNR). The oleyl alcohol produces a damping of the sea centimetric waves, which has been measured by an airborne two band (C and X) SAR, by a tower based 3 band (L, S and C) scatterometer and by a wave gauge, installed on board the platform, which measures the instantaneous sea surface elevation in the range form gravity up to capillary waves. The good agreement among measures proves that multi-frequency SAR is able to detect and characterized sea surface films. Slicks in SAR images taken during SIR-C/X-SAR mission in 1994 have been analysed on the basis of these results and L-band measurements of spatial attenuation near the borders of the slicks have been done, in order to test the slicks detectability using single-band SAR images.

  8. Which preventive measures might protect health care workers from SARS?

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    Huang Jian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the use of a series of preventive measures, a high incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS was observed among health care workers (HCWs during the SARS epidemic. This study aimed to determine which preventive measures may have been effective in protecting HCWs from infection, and which were not effective. Methods A retrospective study was performed among 758 'frontline' health care workers who cared for SARS patients at the Second Affiliated Hospital and the Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. The HCWs with IgG against SARS and those without IgG against SARS were respectively defined as the "case group" and the "control group", and logistic regression was conducted to explore the risk factors for SARS infection in HCWs. Results After adjusting for age, gender, marital status, educational level, professional title, and the department in which an individual worked, the results of a multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that incidence of SARS among HCWs was significantly and positively associated with: performing tracheal intubations for SARS patients, methods used for air ventilation in wards, avoiding face-to-face interaction with SARS patients, the number of pairs of gloves worn by HCWs, and caring for serious SARS cases. Conclusion Some measures, particularly good air ventilation in SARS wards, may be effective in minimizing or preventing SARS transmission among HCWs in hospitals.

  9. Use of surface plasmon resonance for the measurement of low affinity binding interactions between HSP72 and measles virus nucleocapsid protein

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    Zhang Xinsheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 is a molecular chaperone that binds native protein with low affinity. These interactions can alter function of the substrate, a property known as HSP-mediated activity control. In the present work, BIAcore instrumentation was used to monitor binding reactions between HSP72 and naturally occurring sequence variants of the measles virus (MV nucleocapsid protein (N, a structural protein regulating transcription/replication of the viral genome. Binding reactions employed synthetic peptides mimicking a putative HSP72 binding motif of N. Sequences were identified that bound HSP72 with affinities comparable to well-characterized activity control reactions. These sequences, but not those binding with lesser affinity, supported HSP72 activity control of MV transcription/replication. BIAcore instrumentation thus provides an effective way to measure biologically relevant low affinity interactions with structural variants of viral proteins.

  10. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation

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    Jiang-ping Long

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given.

  11. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation.

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    Ding, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Feng, Guang-Cai; Long, Jiang-Ping

    2008-09-03

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given.

  12. High resolution PolInSAR with the ground-based SAR (GB-SAR) System: measurement and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, K; Williams, M L

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based work is necessary for a comprehensive assessment of the operational potential and limitations of PolInSAR in airborne and satellite SAR applications. A study is made of the performance and usefulness of the UK’s Ground-Based SAR (GB-SAR) Outdoor System in high-resolution PolInSAR studies of vegetation using modeling results. The facility provides fully-polarimetric L- through X-band imagery down to a resolution of several wavelengths. However, the measurem...

  13. The Ecosystems SAR (EcoSAR) an Airborne P-band Polarimetric InSAR for the Measurement of Vegetation Structure, Biomass and Permafrost

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    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Ranson, K. Jon; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Perrine, Martin L.; Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Bonds, Quenton; Beck, Jaclyn; hide

    2014-01-01

    EcoSAR is a new synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument being developed at the NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the polarimetric and interferometric measurements of ecosystem structure and biomass. The instrument uses a phased-array beamforming architecture and supports full polarimetric measurements and single pass interferometry. This Instrument development is part of NASA's Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program (ESTO IIP).

  14. The Pixel-similarity Measurement in SAR Image Despeckling

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    Li Guang-ting

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pixel Relativity (PR measurement of SAR image, which is the key of the despeckling techniques based on weighted average, is researched in three aspects. Firstly, the rationality of ratio PR model is expounded, and two new ratio PR models, which are the LOG-domain Gaussian model and the pixel similarity probability model, are proposed. Meanwhile, the Probability Density Function (PDF of SAR image and the PDF of the ratio between pixels are transformed into ratio PR models. Then, in order to evaluate the four ratio PR models, the weighted maximum likelihood filters are designed using the PR. Finally, a novel method, performed by calibrating the maximum location of the PR model, is introduced to improve the radiation preservation of those models whose maximum do not locate at 1. The effectiveness of the two proposed PR models and the approach to calibrate the maximum location of the PR model, are indicated by the theoretical analysis and experimental comparison.

  15. Application of postured human model for SAR measurements

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    Vuchkovikj, M.; Munteanu, I.; Weiland, T.

    2013-07-01

    In the last two decades, the increasing number of electronic devices used in day-to-day life led to a growing interest in the study of the electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissues. The design of medical devices and wireless communication devices such as mobile phones benefits a lot from the bio-electromagnetic simulations in which digital human models are used. The digital human models currently available have an upright position which limits the research activities in realistic scenarios, where postured human bodies must be considered. For this reason, a software application called "BodyFlex for CST STUDIO SUITE" was developed. In its current version, this application can deform the voxel-based human model named HUGO (Dipp GmbH, 2010) to allow the generation of common postures that people use in normal life, ensuring the continuity of tissues and conserving the mass to an acceptable level. This paper describes the enhancement of the "BodyFlex" application, which is related to the movements of the forearm and the wrist of a digital human model. One of the electromagnetic applications in which the forearm and the wrist movement of a voxel based human model has a significant meaning is the measurement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) when a model is exposed to a radio frequency electromagnetic field produced by a mobile phone. Current SAR measurements of the exposure from mobile phones are performed with the SAM (Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin) phantom which is filled with a dispersive but homogeneous material. We are interested what happens with the SAR values if a realistic inhomogeneous human model is used. To this aim, two human models, a homogeneous and an inhomogeneous one, in two simulation scenarios are used, in order to examine and observe the differences in the results for the SAR values.

  16. Measurement of Sinkhole Formation and Progression with InSAR

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    Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayou Corne Sinkhole initially formed in August 2012 from sidewall collapse of a brine cavern within the Napoleonville Salt Dome in southeastern Louisiana. The sinkhole, initially ~1 hectare in size, has expanded to ~10 hectare surface coverage by July 2013, as material continued to fill the subterranean void. Here we show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) could have reliably forecast the formation and location of the Bayou Corne Sinkhole at least a month in advance from the large precursory surface deformation that occurred in the area where the sinkhole later formed. The Mississippi delta region has been imaged since 2009 using the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), and radar data over the Napoleonville Salt Dome had been acquired on 2 July 2012, only a month before the sinkhole developed. Using radar interferometry, we show significant surface deformation of up to 250 mm occurred between 23 June 2011, and 2 July 2012, in an extended area encompassing the sinkhole site. The InSAR results show no measurable deformation prior to 23 June 2011. The measured precursory deformation pattern is consistent with compressive loading at the surface due to removal of support caused by a vertically oriented subsurface fracture. The measured strains relate directly to subsurface geology, salt rock properties, and internal stresses caused by the salt dome sidewall collapse. Measurements made with UAVSAR since the sinkhole formation, between August 2012 and July 2013, show progression of the surface deformation well beyond the limited extent of the sinkhole itself, with growth of the sinkhole following the direction of maximum surface deformation. These results show that even in radar-challenging environments such as the swamplands of Bayou Corne, L-band InSAR can be used to study the underlying geophysics of sinkhole formation and, furthermore, that InSAR data collected operationally for hazard monitoring could

  17. Theory and measure of certain image norms in SAR

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    Raney, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The principal properties of synthetic aperture radar SAR imagery of point and distributed objects are summarized. Against this background, the response of a SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) to the moving surface of the sea is considered. Certain conclusions are drawn as to the mechanism of interaction between microwaves and the sea surface. Focus and speckle spectral tests may be used on selected SAR imagery for areas of the ocean. The fine structure of the sea imagery is sensitive to processor focus and adjustment. The ocean reflectivity mechanism must include point like scatterers of sufficient radar cross section to dominate the return from certain individual resolution elements. Both specular and diffuse scattering mechanisms are observed together, to varying degree. The effect is sea state dependent. Several experiments are proposed based on imaging theory that could assist in the investigation of reflectivity mechanisms.

  18. SU-F-I-27: Measurement of SAR and Temperature Elevation During MRI Scans

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    Seo, Y [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The poor reliability and repeatability of the manufacturer-reported SAR values on clinical MRI systems have been acknowledged. The purpose of this study is to not only measure SAR values, but also RF-induced temperature elevation at 1.5 and 3T MRI systems. Methods: SAR measurement experiment was performed at 1.5 and 3T. Three MRI RF sequences (T1w TSE, T1w inversion recovery, and T2w TSE) with imaging parameters were selected. A hydroxyl-ethylcelluose (HEC) gelled saline phantom mimicking human body tissue was made. Human torso phantom were constructed, based on Korean adult standard anthropometric reference data (Fig.1). FDTD method was utilized to calculate the SAR distribution using Sim4Life software. Based on the results of the simulation, 4 electrical field (E-field) sensors were located inside the phantom. 55 Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensors (27 sensors in upper and lower cover lids, and one sensor located in the center as a reference) were located inside the phantom to measure temperature change during MRI scan (Fig.2). Results: Simulation shows that SAR value is 0.4 W/kg in the periphery and 0.001 W/kg in the center (Fig.2). One 1.5T and one of two 3T MRI systems represent that the measured SAR values were lower than MRI scanner-reported SAR values. However, the other 3T MRI scanner shows that the averaged SAR values measured by probe 2, 3, and 4 are 6.83, 7.59, and 6.01 W/kg, compared to MRI scanner-reported whole body SAR value (<1.5 W/kg) for T2w TSE (Table 1). The temperature elevation measured by FBG sensors is 5.2°C in the lateral shoulder, 5.1°C in the underarm, 4.7°C in the anterior axilla, 4.8°C in the posterior axilla, and 4.8°C in the lateral waist for T2w TSE (Fig.3). Conclusion: It is essential to assess the safety of MRI system for patient by measuring accurate SAR deposited in the body during clinical MRI.

  19. The contribution of satellite SAR-derived displacement measurements in landslide risk management practices

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    Raspini, Federico; Bardi, Federica; Bianchini, Silvia; Ciampalini, Andrea; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Farina, Paolo; Ferrigno, Federica; Solari, Lorenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Landslides are common phenomena that occur worldwide and are a main cause of loss of life and damage to property. The hazards associated with landslides are a challenging concern in many countries, including Italy. With 13% of the territory prone to landslides, Italy is one of the European countries with the highest landslide hazard, and on a worldwide scale, it is second only to Japan among the technologically advanced countries. Over the last 15 years, an increasing number of applications have aimed to demonstrate the applicability of images captured by space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors in slope instability investigations. InSAR (SAR Interferometry) is currently one of the most exploited techniques for the assessment of ground displacements, and it is becoming a consolidated tool for Civil Protection institutions in addressing landslide risk. We present a subset of the results obtained in Italy within the framework of SAR-based programmes and applications intended to test the potential application of C- and X-band satellite interferometry during different Civil Protection activities (namely, prevention, prevision, emergency response and post-emergency phases) performed to manage landslide risk. In all phases, different benefits can be derived from the use of SAR-based measurements, which were demonstrated to be effective in the field of landslide analysis. Analysis of satellite-SAR data is demonstrated to play a major role in the investigation of landslide-related events at different stages, including detection, mapping, monitoring, characterization and prediction. Interferometric approaches are widely consolidated for analysis of slow-moving slope deformations in a variety of environments, and exploitation of the amplitude data in SAR images is a somewhat natural complement for rapid-moving landslides. In addition, we discuss the limitations that still exist and must be overcome in the coming years to manage the transition of satellite SAR

  20. Quantification of Tropical Forest Biomass and its Changes through Using InSAR Phase Measurements

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    Treuhaft, R. N.; Lei, Y.; Neumann, M.; Keller, M. M.; Goncalves, F. G.; Santos, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The status of aboveground biomass (AGB) in tropical forests and its changes are essential in monitoring the carbon budget, and the consequent climate change. The remote sensing community has endeavored to measure AGB, forest height, as well as other forest biophysical parameters by utilizing various types of sensors. Among them, Interferometric Sythetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and/or Polarimetric InSAR (PolInSAR) techniques have proven capable of measuring the forest height to few-meter accuracy. In a recent study, the InSAR phase measurements instead of the widely-used complex InSAR correlation measurements, are examined and utilized to reveal a new estimate of forest-height temporal change, with a height estimation accuracy comparable to or even better than the existing InSAR/PolInSAR methods (few-meter accuracy). Through this method, one is able to detect sub-meter AGB change resulting from forest disturbance and regrowth. This method will be demonstrated with data from the German Aerospace Center (DLR)'s TanDEM-X data over ground validation sites in Brazil (where selective logging is known to occur for some stands) by utilizing an automated Python program that is able to process a time series of TanDEM-X observations as well as to generate the stand-wise forest change information. Due to the reasonable computational cost, this approach along with the automatic program could serve as an important tool for monitoring the global forest change, and thus to better explain the global carbon source versus sink, an essential descriptor of climate change.

  1. High-speed railway bridge dynamic measurement based on GB-InSAR technology

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    Liu, Miao; Ding, Ke-liang; Liu, Xianglei; Song, Zichao

    2015-12-01

    It is an important task to evaluate the safety during the life of bridges using the corresponding vibration parameters. With the advantages of non-contact and high accuracy, the new remote measurement technology of GB-InSAR is suitable to make dynamic measurement for bridges to acquire the vibration parameters. Three key technologies, including stepped frequency-continuous wave technique, synthetic aperture radar and interferometric measurement technique, are introduced in this paper. The GB-InSAR is applied for a high-speed railway bridge to measure of dynamic characteristics with the train passing which can be used to analyze the safety of the monitored bridge. The test results shown that it is an reliable non-contact technique for GB-InSAR to acquire the dynamic vibration parameter for the high-speed railway bridges.

  2. Using Airborne SAR Interferometry to Measure the Elevation of a Greenland Ice Cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Keller, K.; Madsen, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) of an ice cap in Greenland has been generated from airborne SAR interferometry data, calibrated with a new algorithm, and compared with airborne laser altimetry profiles and carrier-phase differential GPS measurements of radar reflectors deployed on the ice cap...

  3. Estimation of Soil Moisture for Vegetated Surfaces Using Multi-Temporal L-Band SAR Measurements

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    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Sun, G.; Hsu, A.; Wang, J.; ONeill, P.; Ranson, J.; Engman, E. T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the technique to estimate ground surface and vegetation scattering components, based on the backscattering model and the radar decomposition theory, under configuration of multi-temporal L-band polarimetric SAR measurement. This technique can be used to estimate soil moisture of vegetated surface.

  4. An L-band SAR for repeat pass deformation measurements on a UAV platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kevin; Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling

    2004-01-01

    We are proposing to develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for repeatpass differential interferometric measurements of deformation for rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes that is to be flown on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV or minimally piloted vehicle (MPV).

  5. Improving peak local SAR prediction in parallel transmit using in situ S-matrix measurements.

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    Restivo, Matthew; Raaijmakers, Alexander; van den Berg, Cornelis; Luijten, Peter; Hoogduin, Hans

    2017-05-01

    Peak local specific absorption rate (pSAR10g) is an important parameter used to determine patient safety during radiofrequency transmission. pSAR10g predictions for parallel transmit MRI are affected by the level of coupling exhibited by a modeled array in the simulation environment. However, simulated array coupling is rarely equal to the physical array coupling. Accurately simulating the physical array coupling may improve the accuracy of predicted SAR levels. The scattering parameter matrix (S-matrix) of a prototype 4-channel array was measured in situ using directional couplers installed on a 7T scanner. Agreement between the simulated and measured S-matrix was achieved by using network co-simulation with a modified cost function. B1+ maps acquired in a phantom were compared to B1+ distributions determined from simulations. The modified co-simulation technique forces the simulations to have S-matrices similar to the measured values. A comparison of realistically versus ideally simulated coupling conditions shows that ideally simulated coupling can result in large ( > 40%) error in pSAR10g predictions, even when the array is reasonably tuned. The simulated B1+ distributions match the measured B1+ distributions better when the coupling is accurately simulated. Considering the measured array coupling matrix in numerical simulations eliminates a potential confound in pSAR10g prediction. Magn Reson Med 77:2040-2047, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Joint Offshore Wind Field Monitoring with Spaceborne SAR and Platform-Based Doppler LIDAR Measurements

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    Jacobsen, S.; Lehner, S.; Hieronimus, J.; Schneemann, J.; Kuhn, M.

    2015-04-01

    The increasing demand for renewable energy resources has promoted the construction of offshore wind farms e.g. in the North Sea. While the wind farm layout consists of an array of large turbines, the interrelation of wind turbine wakes with the remaining array is of substantial interest. The downstream spatial evolution of turbulent wind turbine wakes is very complex and depends on manifold parameters such as wind speed, wind direction and ambient atmospheric stability conditions. To complement and validate existing numerical models, corresponding observations are needed. While in-situ measurements with e.g. anemometers provide a time-series at the given location, the merits of ground-based and space- or airborne remote sensing techniques are indisputable in terms of spatial coverage. Active microwave devices, such as Scatterometer and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), have proven their capabilities of providing sea surface wind measurements and particularly SAR images reveal wind variations at a high spatial resolution while retaining the large coverage area. Platform-based Doppler LiDAR can resolve wind fields with a high spatial coverage and repetition rates of seconds to minutes. In order to study the capabilities of both methods for the investigation of small scale wind field structures, we present a direct comparison of observations obtained by high resolution TerraSAR-X (TS-X) X-band SAR data and platform-based LiDAR devices at the North Sea wind farm alpha ventus. We furthermore compare the results with meteorological data from the COSMO-DE model run by the German Weather Service DWD. Our study indicates that the overall agreement between SAR and LiDAR wind fields is good and that under appropriate conditions small scale wind field variations compare significantly well.

  7. Measurement and validation of GHz-band whole-body average SAR in a human volunteer using reverberation chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqing; Suzuki, Tokio; Fujiwara, Osamu; Harima, Hiroki

    2012-12-07

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendation on the need for further research for radio-frequency dosimetry has promoted studies on the whole-body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) in various kinds of anatomical-based numerical models. For experimental validation of GHz-band WBA-SARs in a real human, however, there have not so far been any published papers, despite the fact that, in 1982, Hill measured WBA-SARs at frequencies less than 40 MHz in human volunteers using a TEM-cell exposure system. In this study, we provide a measurement technique with a reverberation chamber for validating numerical dosimetry results on GHz-band WBA-SARs in living humans. We measured WBA-SARs at 1, 1.5 and 2 GHz for a 22 year old male volunteer, with a height of 173 cm and a weight of 73 kg, in the reverberation chamber, and compared the results with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The reverberation chamber was excited by using a signal generator through an amplifier with an output power of 30-40 mW, which produced inside the chamber with the volunteer an average electric field strength of 5 V m(-1) equivalent to an average power spectral density of 6.6 μW cm(-2). The WBA-SARs were obtained from the measured S(11) and S(21) together with the power density. On the other hand, the WBA-SARs have been calculated using the FDTD method for an adult male model with almost the same physique as that of the volunteer exposed to the electromagnetic field in the reverberation chamber. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated WBA-SARs, we could confirm that the measured GHz-band WBA-SARs approximately agree with the FDTD calculated results.

  8. Improved SAR Amplitude Image Offset Measurements for Deriving Three-Dimensional Coseismic Displacements

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Teng

    2015-02-03

    Offsets of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images have played an important role in deriving complete three-dimensional (3-D) surface displacement fields in geoscientific applications. However, offset maps often suffer from multiple outliers and patch-like artifacts, because the standard offset-measurement method is a regular moving-window operation that does not consider the scattering characteristics of the ground. Here, we show that by focusing the offset measurements on predetected strong reflectors, the reliability and accuracy of SAR offsets can be significantly improved. Application to the 2011 Van (Turkey) earthquake reveals a clear deformation signal from an otherwise decorrelated interferogram, making derivation of the 3-D coseismic displacement field possible. Our proposed method can improve mapping of coseismic deformation and other ground displacements, such as glacier flow and landslide movement when strong reflectors exist.

  9. Measurement of Surface Deformation due to the 2016 Nuclear Test of North Korea Using SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, M. J.; Kim, S. W.; Won, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Underground nuclear test was performed on January 6 (01:30 UTC), 2016, at Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site (129.049°E, 41.308°N) in North Korea. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported that seismic signals of a 5.1 magnitude were recorded from the location. We observed the surface deformation caused by the nuclear test using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique. InSAR is a powerful method for the quantitative measurement of surface deformation, and has been widely used for inferring vital clues pertaining the source or mechanism in geologic studies. In this study, we demonstrate the surface deformation induced by the 4th nuclear test of the North Korea using high resolution L-band ALOS PALSAR data. Coseismic InSAR pairs acquired from descending and ascending orbits were used for the investigation. By the analysis of the descending pair, we obtained the deformation signals away from the satellite. The maximum displacement measured by descending data was about 13cm along the satellite's line of sight (LOS) direction. On the other hand, surface deformation measured from the ascending data enabled us to detect the movements to the opposite direction compared to the descending data. Also, we were able to decompose the horizontal and vertical displacements by integrating interferograms from both ascending and descending orbits. As a result, we confirmed that most of the surface deformation induced by the nuclear test was horizontal movements, particularly to the westward direction. It was anticipated that most of the horizontal displacements were happened by landslides as a secondary effect of the nuclear test. Weak vertical movements of about 4-5cm to the subsiding direction were also estimated, and the geometry and volumetric changes of the deformation source can be determined from these vertical signals. In conclusion, InSAR measurements will be helpful to the characterization and the better understanding about the nuclear test.

  10. Topography and Penetration of the Greenland Ice Sheet Measured with Airborne SAR Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Madsen, Søren Nørvang; Keller, K.

    2001-01-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) of the Geikie ice sap in East Greenland has been generated from interferometric C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired with the airborne EMISAR system. GPS surveyed radar reflectors and an airborne laser altimeter supplemented the experiment. The accur......A digital elevation model (DEM) of the Geikie ice sap in East Greenland has been generated from interferometric C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired with the airborne EMISAR system. GPS surveyed radar reflectors and an airborne laser altimeter supplemented the experiment......, while the transparency of the firn in the percolation zone makes volume scattering dominate at the higher elevations. For the first time, the effective penetration has been measured directly as the difference between the interferometric heights and reference heights obtained with GPS and laser altimetry....

  11. Development of soil moisture retrieval algorithm for L-band SAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiancheng; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Soares, Joao V.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1992-01-01

    A study of algorithm development and testing for soil moisture retrieval for bare fields using L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery is reported. First-order surface scattering models predict that the copolarization ratio is sensitive to soil moisture but not to surface roughness. All possible ratios of the co-polarization signals and their linear combinations are evaluated. The best sensitivity to soil moisture is achieved from measurements as predicted by the first-order surface scattering model. The effects of system noise and volume scattering of soil are evaluated. To minimize the effect of the volume scattering, an algorithm which includes both the surface and volume scattering has been developed and tested using Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (JPL AIRSAR) data. The results show that the estimation of soil moisture can be improved after removing the system noise and including the volume scattering effect at large incidence angles.

  12. Seasonal and multi-year surface displacements measured by DInSAR in a High Arctic permafrost environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; Short, Naomi; Brisco, Brian

    2018-02-01

    Arctic landscapes undergo seasonal and long-term changes as the active layer thaws and freezes, which can result in localized or irregular subsidence leading to the formation of thermokarst terrain. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) is a technique capable of measuring ground surface displacements resulting from thawing permafrost at centimetre precision and is quickly gaining acceptance as a means of measuring ground displacement in permafrost regions. Using RADARSAT-2 stacked DInSAR data from 2013 and 2015 we determined the magnitude and patterns of land surface change in a continuous permafrost environment. At our study site situated in the Canadian High Arctic, DInSAR seasonal ground displacement patterns were consistent with field observations of permafrost degradation. As expected, many DInSAR values are close to the detection threshold (i.e., 1 cm) and therefore do not indicate significant change; however, DInSAR seasonal ground displacement patterns aligned well with climatological and soil conditions and offer geomorphological insight into subsurface processes in permafrost environments. While our dataset is limited to two years of data representing a three-year time period, the displacements derived from DInSAR provide insight into permafrost change in a High Arctic environment and demonstrate that DInSAR is an applicable tool for understanding environmental change in remote permafrost regions.

  13. The Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Is a Multifunctional Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ruth; van Zyl, Marjorie; Fielding, Burtram C.

    2014-01-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) is a structural protein that forms complexes with genomic RNA, interacts with the viral membrane protein during virion assembly and plays a critical role in enhancing the efficiency of virus transcription and assembly. Recent studies have confirmed that N is a multifunctional protein. The aim of this review is to highlight the properties and functions of the N protein, with specific reference to (i) the topology; (ii) the intracellular localization and (iii) the functions of the protein. PMID:25105276

  14. Improved oceanographic measurements with cryosat sar altimetry: Application to the coastal zone and arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotton, P. D.; Garcia, P. N.; Cancet, M.

    -situ measurements, in particular tide gauges. Although much has been achieved in recent years through the Coastal Altimetry community, (http://www.coastalt.eu/community) there is a limit to the capabilities of pulse-limited altimetry which often leaves an un-measured “white strip” right at the coastline. Firstly...... mode data to enable the retrieval of valid oceanographic measurements in coastal areas with complex topography. Thanks to further development of the algorithms, a new approach was achieved that can also be applied to SAR and conventional altimetry data (e.g., Sentinel-3, Jason series, Envi...

  15. Deformation in the Bataan Volcanic Arc Complex measured with PSInSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco, Rodrigo; Bonus-Ybanez, Audrei; Lagmay, Mahar

    2017-04-01

    Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PSInSAR) studies on the Bataan Volcanic Arc Complex, Philippines, reveal tectonic deformation of Natib Volcano associated with movement of the Lubao Fault. Differential movement of blocks alongside the north-northeast trending Lubao Fault, measured in terms of line-of-sight (LOS) change in the radar signal, is as much 31.9 mm/year. The Lubao fault, based on PSInSAR time-series analysis of ascending and descending images over a 5-year period, shows oblique-slip right-lateral movement with the eastern block moving downward. Coupled with morphological interpretation of high-resolution digital elevation models, the results of the PSInSAR study highlights earthquake hazards associated with a poorly understood fault that straddles a populated region in Central Luzon. The advancement on the understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of the Lubao Fault is an important step in preparedness efforts against the potential hazard impacts it may create.

  16. Induction of neutralising antibodies and cellular immune responses against SARS coronavirus by recombinant measles viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liniger, Matthias; Zuniga, Armando; Tamin, Azaibi; Azzouz-Morin, Teldja N; Knuchel, Marlyse; Marty, Rene R; Wiegand, Marian; Weibel, Sara; Kelvin, David; Rota, Paul A; Naim, Hussein Y

    2008-04-16

    Live attenuated recombinant measles viruses (rMV) expressing a codon-optimised spike glycoprotein (S) or nucleocapsid protein (N) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) were generated (rMV-S and rMV-N). Both recombinant viruses stably expressed the corresponding SARS-CoV proteins, grew to similar end titres as the parental strain and induced high antibody titres against MV and the vectored SARS-CoV antigens (S and N) in transgenic mice susceptible to measles infection. The antibodies induced by rMV-S had a high neutralising effect on SARS-CoV as well as on MV. Moreover, significant N-specific cellular immune responses were measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays. The pre-existence of anti-MV antibodies induced by the initial immunisation dose did not inhibit boost of anti-S and anti-N antibodies. Immunisations comprising a mixture of rMV-S and rMV-N induced immune responses similar in magnitude to that of vaccine components administered separately. These data support the suitability of MV as a bivalent candidate vaccine vector against MV and emerging viruses such as SARS-CoV.

  17. Combating SARS and H1N1: insights and lessons from Singapore's public health control measures

    OpenAIRE

    Allen Yu-Hung Lai; Teck Boon Tan

    2012-01-01

    "Combating the outbreak of infectious diseases is a major public health imperative for the small island-state of Singapore. In this paper we discuss and assess the public health measures taken by the Singaporean government to combat the outbreak of SARS in 2003 and H1N1 in 2009. Most notably, the state introduced a clear line of command and control to monitor the effectiveness and efficacy of public health control measures as well as to oversee their implementation. Meanwhile, it has also emp...

  18. A Hierarchical Multi-Temporal InSAR Method for Increasing the Spatial Density of Deformation Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Point-like targets are useful in providing surface deformation with the time series of synthetic aperture radar (SAR images using the multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (MTInSAR methodology. However, the spatial density of point-like targets is low, especially in non-urban areas. In this paper, a hierarchical MTInSAR method is proposed to increase the spatial density of deformation measurements by tracking both the point-like targets and the distributed targets with the temporal steadiness of radar backscattering. To efficiently reduce error propagation, the deformation rates on point-like targets with lower amplitude dispersion index values are first estimated using a least squared estimator and a region growing method. Afterwards, the distributed targets are identified using the amplitude dispersion index and a Pearson correlation coefficient through a multi-level processing strategy. Meanwhile, the deformation rates on distributed targets are estimated during the multi-level processing. The proposed MTInSAR method has been tested for subsidence detection over a suburban area located in Tianjin, China using 40 high-resolution TerraSAR-X images acquired between 2009 and 2010, and validated using the ground-based leveling measurements. The experiment results indicate that the spatial density of deformation measurements can be increased by about 250% and that subsidence accuracy can reach to the millimeter level by using the hierarchical MTInSAR method.

  19. InSAR Measurement of Precursor and Post-Collapse Sinkhole Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Rachel; McCormack, Harry; Larkin, Hayley; Wooster, Michael; Thomas, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Sinkholes occur across the world, often posing an obvious hazard to communities, infrastructure and the environment. Regions prone to sinkhole formation can often be identified; however prediction of exact sinkhole locations and occurrences is exceedingly difficult. This case study from Wink, in the Permian Basin of Texas, demonstrates how InSAR can measure both precursor and post-collapse deformation associated with sinkholes. ERS, ALOS PALSAR and Sentinel-1A datasets are used to show precursor signals at least nine years before sinkhole formation, and post-collapse effects continuing over several decades. The rate of deformation is variable, but reaches many tens of centimetres per year during some periods.

  20. Integrating interferometric SAR data with levelling measurements of land subsidence using geostatistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.; Stein, A.; Molenaar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometric (D-InSAR) data of ground surface deformation are affected by several error sources associated with image acquisitions and data processing. In this paper, we study the use of D-InSAR for quantifying land subsidence due to groundwater

  1. Ice velocity measurements at Jakobshavn Isbrae using 2011 ERS-2 SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundal, A. V.; Shepherd, A.; Park, J.

    2011-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbrae is Greenland's largest outlet glacier, draining about 6.5 per cent of the total ice-sheet area. Large variability of the velocity over time has been detected, including a slowing down from 6,700 m/y in 1985 to 5,700 m/y in 1992, and a subsequent speeding up to 12,600 m/y in 2003 (Joughin et al., 2004; Luckman and Murray, 2005). These changes are consistent with evidence for thickening of the glacier in the early 1990s and rapid thinning thereafter (Thomas et al., 2003). In March 2011, the ERS-2 satellite was moved from a 35-day to a 3-day repeat cycle allowing more frequent SAR data acquisitions suitable for ice velocity analysis. The 3-day repeat campaign lasted until the beginning of July 2011. Here we apply InSAR and offset tracking techniques to available 2011 ERS-2 SAR data to measure ice velocities at Jakobshavn Isbrae and the land-terminating sector immediately south of this glacier. We detect surface ice velocities near the Jakobshavn glacier front of ~13,000 m/y which are similar to those observed in 2003 (Joughin et al., 2004). The velocity time-series from the 3-day repeat campaign will be analysed to search for potential short term ice velocity fluctuations in the Jakobshavn region. References Joughin, I., Abdalati, W. and Fahnestock, M. (2004): Large fluctuations in speed on Greenland's Jakobshavn Isbræ glacier. Nature, 432, 608-610. Luckman, A., and Murray, T. (2005): Seasonal variation in velocity before retreat of Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland, Geophysical Research Letters, 32, L08501. Thomas, R., Abdalati, W., Frederick, E., Krabill, W., Manizade, S., Steffen, K. (2003): Investigation of surface melting and dynamic thinning on Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland. Journal of Glaciology 49, 231-239.

  2. Bridging the gap between cyclone wind and wave by C-band SAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weizeng; Li, Xiaofeng; Hwang, Paul; Zhang, Biao; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    Active microwave remote sensing of hurricane-strength wind is a challenging task due to the saturation of col-polarization backscattering signal under such condition. Here we take advantage of the fact that wind sea wave growth does not saturate at high wind and the intrinsic relationship among wind-wave triplets (sea surface wind speed, significant wave height, and peak wave period) within a tropical storm to derive the wind speed. Three Sentinel-1 (S-1) and nine RADARSAT-2 (R-2) C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired between 20 and 40 m/s winds are collected in this study. The S-1 and R-2 SAR-derived winds are compared with those measured by coincident National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and simulated by Symmetric Hurricane Estimates for Wind (SHEW) model. Validations against SFMR winds for S-1 show Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of 1.7 m/s with a 0.2 m/s bias at the left side of cyclone centers and RMSE of 2.9 m/s RMSE with a 0.56 bias at the backside of cyclone centers. R-2 SAR-derived winds against SHEW model results show a RMSE of 2.4 m/s with a 0.3 m/s bias and 2.6 m/s with a 0.35 m/s bias at the right side and the left side of cyclone centers, while the RMSE is 3.9 m/s with a 0.1 m/s bias at the backside of cyclone centers. The wave-information-based wind retrieval method works well at the left side and right side, but less accurately at the backside of a tropical storm when wind wave and swell are mixed.

  3. Ice Velocity Measurement from SAR: Comparison of Sentinel-1A and RADARSAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Anders; Dall, Jørgen

    Mapping the velocity fields of the continental ice sheets and their outlet glaciers is important in order to monitor and model the response of the cryosphere to global climate change. Since the mid 1990s, space-based SAR data have enabled measurement of ice velocities on a continental scale. Comp...... that observed differences lies in the data products/sensors rather than being due to different processing techniques. [1] T.Nagler et. al, ” The Sentinel-1 Mission: New Opportunities for IceSheet Observations”, Journal of Remote Sensing, 2015, 7, 9371-9389......Mapping the velocity fields of the continental ice sheets and their outlet glaciers is important in order to monitor and model the response of the cryosphere to global climate change. Since the mid 1990s, space-based SAR data have enabled measurement of ice velocities on a continental scale....... Compared to interferometry, Offset Tracking techniques excel in terms of robustness and ease of automation. With the launch of Sentinel-1A in 2014 and Sentinel-1B in 2016, the potential coverage and revisit frequency have greatly improved, allowing monitoring of temporal changes in the ices sheet velocity...

  4. Rapid SAR and GPS Measurements and Models for Hazard Science and Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. E.; Yun, S. H.; Hua, H.; Agram, P. S.; Liu, Z.; Moore, A. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Linick, J.; Fielding, E. J.; Lundgren, P.; Sacco, G. F.; Polet, J.; Manipon, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) project for Natural Hazards is focused on rapidly generating higher level geodetic imaging products and placing them in the hands of the solid earth science and local, national, and international natural hazard communities by providing science product generation, exploration, and delivery capabilities at an operational level. Space-based geodetic measurement techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), SAR-based change detection, and image pixel tracking have recently become critical additions to our toolset for understanding and mapping the damage caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and floods. Analyses of these data sets are still largely handcrafted following each event and are not generated rapidly and reliably enough for response to natural disasters or for timely analysis of large data sets. The ARIA project, a joint venture co-sponsored by California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and by NASA through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), has been capturing the knowledge applied to these responses and building it into an automated infrastructure to generate imaging products in near real-time that can improve situational awareness for disaster response. In addition, the ARIA project is developing the capabilities to provide automated imaging and analysis capabilities necessary to keep up with the imminent increase in raw data from geodetic imaging missions planned for launch by NASA, as well as international space agencies. We will present the progress we have made on automating the analysis of SAR data for hazard monitoring and response using data from Sentinel 1a/b as well as continuous GPS stations. Since the beginning of our project, our team has imaged events and generated response products for events around the world. These response products have enabled many conversations with those in the disaster response community

  5. Covariance estimation for dInSAR surface deformation measurements in the presence of anisotropic atmospheric noise

    KAUST Repository

    Knospe, Steffen H G

    2010-04-01

    We study anisotropic spatial autocorrelation in differential synthetic aperture radar interferometric (dInSAR) measurements and its impact on geophysical parameter estimations. The dInSAR phase acquired by the satellite sensor is a superposition of different contributions, and when studying geophysical processes, we are usually only interested in the surface deformation part of the signal. Therefore, to obtain high-quality results, we would like to characterize and/or remove other phase components. A stochastic model has been found to be appropriate to describe atmospheric phase delay in dInSAR images. However, these phase delays are usually modeled as being isotropic, which is a simplification, because InSAR images often show directional atmospheric anomalies. Here, we analyze anisotropic structures and show validation results using both real and simulated data. We calculate experimental semivariograms of the dInSAR phase in several European Remote Sensing satellite-1/2 tandem interferograms. Based on the theory of random functions (RFs), we then fit anisotropic variogram models in the spatial domain, employing Matérn-and Bessel-family correlation functions in nested models to represent complex dInSAR covariance structures. The presented covariance function types, in the statistical framework of stationary RFs, are consistent with tropospheric delay models. We find that by using anisotropic data covariance information to weight dInSAR measurements, we can significantly improve both the precision and accuracy of geophysical parameter estimations. Furthermore, the improvement is dependent on how similar the deformation pattern is to the dominant structure of the anisotropic atmospheric signals. © 2009 IEEE.

  6. Measurement and Mitigation of the Ionosphere in L-Band Interferometric SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Satellite-based repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) provides a synoptic high spatial resolution perspective of Earth's changing surface, permitting one to view large areas quickly and efficiently. By measuring relative phase change from one observation to the next on a pixel-by-pixel basis, maps of deformation and change can be derived. Variability of the atmosphere and the ionosphere leads to phase/time delays that are present in the data that can mask many of the subtle deformation signatures of interest, so methods for mitigation of these effects are important. Many of these effects have been observed in existing ALOS PALSAR data, and studies are underway to characterize and mitigate the ionosphere using these data. Since the ionosphere is a dispersive medium, it is possible in principle distinguish the ionospheric signatures from the non-dispersive effects of deformation and the atmosphere. In this paper, we describe a method for mapping the ionosphere in InSAR data based on a multi-frequency split-spectrum processing technique.

  7. Interactive Web Based Visualization of PS-InSAR and TomoSAR Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Wei, Lianhuan; Balz, Timo; Liao, Mingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Interactive web based visualization has become an important trend for displaying information dynamically. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data can be used to measure height and deformation information using interferometric SAR (InSAR) and differential InSAR (D-InSAR). Precise deformation information can be acquired in urban areas using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PS-InSAR) and differential SAR tomography (D-TomoSAR). PS-InSAR and TomoSAR results are usually represented as point clouds. In order to visualize this data dynamically, we developed an interactive web-based visualization system.

  8. Interactive Web-Based Visualization of PS-InSAR and TomoSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Wei, Lianhuan; Balz, Timo; Liao, Mingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Interactive web based visualization has become an important trend for displaying information dynamically. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data can be used to measure height and deformation information using interferometric SAR (InSAR) and differential InSAR (D-InSAR). Precise deformation information can be acquired in urban areas using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PS-InSAR) and differential SAR tomography (D-TomoSAR). PS-InSAR and TomoSAR results are usually represented as point clouds. In order to visualize this data dynamically, we developed an interactive web-based visualization system

  9. Measurement of pressure ridges in SAR images of sea ice - Preliminary results on scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Smith, M. P.; Daida, J. M.; Samadani, R.; Camiso, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Sea ice ridges and keels (hummocks and bummocks) are important in sea ice research for both scientific and practical reasons. A long-term objective is to make quantitative measurements of sea ice ridges using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The preliminary results of a scattering model for sea ice ridge are reported. The approach is through the ridge height variance spectrum Psi(K), where K is the spatial wavenumber, and the two-scale scattering model. The height spectrum model is constructed to mimic height statistics observed with an airborne optical laser. The spectrum model is used to drive a two-scale scattering model. Model results for ridges observed at C- and X-band yield normalized radar cross sections that are 10 to 15 dB larger than the observed cross sections of multiyear ice over the range of angles of incidence from 10 to 70 deg.

  10. Constraining ice mass loss from Jakobshavn Isbræ (Greenland) using InSAR-measured crustal uplift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lin; Wahr, John; Howat, Ian

    2012-01-01

    . Overall, our results suggest that despite the inherent difficulties of working with a signal that has significant large-scale components, InSAR-measured crustal deformation can be used to study the ice mass loss of a rapidly thinning glacier and its surrounding catchment, providing both a constraint...

  11. Estimating the 2008 Quetame (Colombia) earthquake source parameters from seismic data and InSAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicelis, Gabriel; Assumpção, Marcelo; Kellogg, James; Pedraza, Patricia; Dias, Fábio

    2016-12-01

    Seismic waveforms and geodetic measurements (InSAR) were used to determine the location, focal mechanism and coseismic surface displacements of the Mw 5.9 earthquake which struck the center of Colombia on May 24, 2008. We determined the focal mechanism of the main event using teleseismic P wave arrivals and regional waveform inversion for the moment tensor. We relocated the best set of aftershocks (30 events) with magnitudes larger than 2.0 recorded from May to June 2008 by a temporary local network as well as by stations of the Colombia national network. We successfully estimated coseismic deformation using SAR interferometry, despite distortion in some areas of the interferogram by atmospheric noise. The deformation was compared to synthetic data for rectangular dislocations in an elastic half-space. Nine source parameters (strike, dip, length, width, strike-slip deformation, dip-slip deformation, latitude shift, longitude shift, and minimum depth) were inverted to fit the observed changes in line-of-sight (LOS) toward the satellite four derived parameters were also estimated (rake, average slip, maximum depth and seismic moment). The aftershock relocation, the focal mechanism and the coseismic dislocation model agree with a right-lateral strike-slip fault with nodal planes oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. We use the results of the waveform inversion, radar interferometry and aftershock relocations to identify the high-angle NE-SW nodal plane as the primary fault. The inferred subsurface rupture length is roughly 11 km, which is consistent with the 12 km long distribution of aftershocks. This coseismic model can provide insights on earthquake mechanisms and seismic hazard assessments for the area, including the 8 million residents of Colombia's nearby capital city Bogota. The 2008 Quetame earthquake appears to be associated with the northeastward "escape" of the North Andean block, and it may help to illuminate how margin-parallel shear slip is partitioned in the

  12. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  13. Non-interferometric GB-SAR measurement: application to the Vallcebre landslide (eastern Pyrenees, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Monserrat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, ground-based interferometry has proven to be a powerful technique for continuous deformation monitoring of landslides, glaciers, volcanoes, or manmade structures, among others. However, several limitations need to be addressed in order to improve the performances of the technique, especially for long-term monitoring. These limitations include the reduction of measurable points with an increase in the period of observation, the ambiguous nature of the phase measurements, and the influence of the atmospheric phase component. In this paper, a new procedure to process the amplitude component of ground-based synthetic aperture radar (GB-SAR data acquired in discontinuous mode is compared and validated. The use of geometric features of the amplitude images combined with a matching technique will allow the estimation of the displacements over specific targets. Experimental results obtained during 19 months, in eight different campaigns carried out in the active landslide of Vallcebre (eastern Pyrenees, Spain, were analysed. During the observed period, from February 2010 to September 2011, displacements up to 80 cm were measured. The comparison with other surveying technique shows that the precision of the method is below 1 cm.

  14. PolinSAR coherence optimisation for deformation measurement in an agricultural region

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, Jeanine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available of the scattering processes implied that different phase centres were present in interferograms which introduced a spatially heterogeneous topographic phase contribution. Consequently, the polInSAR techniques are considered to be unsuccessful in enhancing...

  15. Three-Dimensional Human Bronchial-Tracheal Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLAs) as Hosts for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suderman, M. T.; McCarthy, M.; Mossell, E.; Watts, D. M.; Peters, C. J.; Shope, R.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-like assembly (TLA) of human bronchial-tracheal mesenchymal (HBTC) cells with an overlay of human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells was constructed using a NASA Bioreactor to survey the infectivity of SARS-CoV. This TLA was inoculated with a low passage number Urbani strain of SARS-CoV. At selected intervals over a 10-day period, media and cell aliquots of the 3-D TLA were harvested for viral titer assay and for light and electron microscopy examination. All viral titer assays were negative in both BEAS-2B two-dimensional monolayer and TLA. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry demonstrated antigen-antibody reactivity with anti-SARS-CoV polyclonal antibody to spike and nuclear proteins on cell membranes and cytoplasm. Coronavirus Group 2 cross-reactivity was demonstrated by positive reaction to anti-FIPV 1 and anti-FIPV 1 and 2 antibodies. TLA examination by transmission electron microscopy indicated increasing cytoplasmic vacuolation with numerous electron-dense bodies measuring 45 to 270 nm from days 4 through 10. There was no evidence of membrane blebbing, membrane duplication, or fragmentation of organelles in the TLAs. However, progressive disruption of endoplasmic reticulum was observed throughout the cells. Antibody response to SARS-CoV specific spike and nucleocapsid glycoproteins, cross-reactivity with FIPV antibodies, and the cytoplasmic pathology suggests this HBTE TLA model is permissive to SARS-CoV infection.

  16. Status of a UAV SAR Designed for Repeat Pass Interferometry for Deformation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Hoffman, Jim; Miller, Tim; Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ron; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Rosen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Under the NASA ESTO sponsored Instrument Incubator Program we have designed a lightweight, reconfigurable polarimetric L-band SAR designed for repeat pass deformation measurements of rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes. This radar will be installed on an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) or a lightweight, high-altitude, and long endurance platform such as the Proteus. After a study of suitable available platforms we selected the Proteus for initial development and testing of the system. We want to control the repeat track capability of the aircraft to be within a 10 m tube to support the repeat deformation capability. We conducted tests with the Proteus using real-time GPS with sub-meter accuracy to see if pilots could fly the aircraft within the desired tube. Our results show that pilots are unable to fly the aircraft with the desired accuracy and therefore an augmented autopilot will be required to meet these objectives. Based on the Proteus flying altitude of 13.7 km (45,000 ft), we are designing a fully polarimetric L-band radar with 80 MHz bandwidth and 16 km range swath. This radar will have an active electronic beam steering antenna to achieve Doppler centroid stability that is necessary for repeat-pass interferometry (RPI). This paper will present are design criteria, current design and expected science applications.

  17. Validation and operational measurements with SUSIE – A sar ice motion processing chain developed within promice (Programme for monitoring of Greenland ice-sheet)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Dall, Jørgen; Ahlstrøm, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of an ice-motion processing chain developed for the PROMICE project – a long-term program funded by the Danish ministry of Climate and Energy to monitor the mass budget of the Greenland ice-sheet. The processor, named SUSIE, (Scripts and Utilities for SAR Ice......-motion Estimation) uses a combination of differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) and offset-tracking techniques to measure the horizontal velocity components, providing also an estimate of the corresponding measurement error standard deviations. In this performance of SUSIE’s offset-tracking chain is compared...

  18. Sea ice local surface topography from single-pass satellite InSAR measurements: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dierking

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative parameters characterizing the sea ice surface topography are needed in geophysical investigations such as studies on atmosphere–ice interactions or sea ice mechanics. Recently, the use of space-borne single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR for retrieving the ice surface topography has attracted notice among geophysicists. In this paper the potential of InSAR measurements is examined for several satellite configurations and radar frequencies, considering statistics of heights and widths of ice ridges as well as possible magnitudes of ice drift. It is shown that, theoretically, surface height variations can be retrieved with relative errors  ≤  0.5 m. In practice, however, the sea ice drift and open water leads may contribute significantly to the measured interferometric phase. Another essential factor is the dependence of the achievable interferometric baseline on the satellite orbit configurations. Possibilities to assess the influence of different factors on the measurement accuracy are demonstrated: signal-to-noise ratio, presence of a snow layer, and the penetration depth into the ice. Practical examples of sea surface height retrievals from bistatic SAR images collected during the TanDEM-X Science Phase are presented.

  19. Sea ice local surface topography from single-pass satellite InSAR measurements: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Wolfgang; Lang, Oliver; Busche, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative parameters characterizing the sea ice surface topography are needed in geophysical investigations such as studies on atmosphere-ice interactions or sea ice mechanics. Recently, the use of space-borne single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for retrieving the ice surface topography has attracted notice among geophysicists. In this paper the potential of InSAR measurements is examined for several satellite configurations and radar frequencies, considering statistics of heights and widths of ice ridges as well as possible magnitudes of ice drift. It is shown that, theoretically, surface height variations can be retrieved with relative errors ≤ 0.5 m. In practice, however, the sea ice drift and open water leads may contribute significantly to the measured interferometric phase. Another essential factor is the dependence of the achievable interferometric baseline on the satellite orbit configurations. Possibilities to assess the influence of different factors on the measurement accuracy are demonstrated: signal-to-noise ratio, presence of a snow layer, and the penetration depth into the ice. Practical examples of sea surface height retrievals from bistatic SAR images collected during the TanDEM-X Science Phase are presented.

  20. Analyses of Coronavirus Assembly Interactions with Interspecies Membrane and Nucleocapsid Protein Chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Lili; Hurst-Hess, Kelley R; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-05-01

    The coronavirus membrane (M) protein is the central actor in virion morphogenesis. M organizes the components of the viral membrane, and interactions of M with itself and with the nucleocapsid (N) protein drive virus assembly and budding. In order to further define M-M and M-N interactions, we constructed mutants of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) in which all or part of the M protein was replaced by its phylogenetically divergent counterpart from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We were able to obtain viable chimeras containing the entire SARS-CoV M protein as well as mutants with intramolecular substitutions that partitioned M protein at the boundaries between the ectodomain, transmembrane domains, or endodomain. Our results show that the carboxy-terminal domain of N protein, N3, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with M protein. However, despite some previous genetic and biochemical evidence that mapped interactions with N to the carboxy terminus of M, it was not possible to define a short linear region of M protein sufficient for assembly with N. Thus, interactions with N protein likely involve multiple linearly discontiguous regions of the M endodomain. The SARS-CoV M chimera exhibited a conditional growth defect that was partially suppressed by mutations in the envelope (E) protein. Moreover, virions of the M chimera were markedly deficient in spike (S) protein incorporation. These findings suggest that the interactions of M protein with both E and S protein are more complex than previously thought. The assembly of coronavirus virions entails concerted interactions among the viral structural proteins and the RNA genome. One strategy to study this process is through construction of interspecies chimeras that preserve or disrupt particular inter- or intramolecular associations. In this work, we replaced the membrane (M) protein of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus with its counterpart from a

  1. Quantitative evaluation of 2x2 arrays of Lucite cone applicators in flat layered phantoms using Gaussian-beam-predicted and thermographically measured SAR distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietveld, P.J.M.; Lumori, M.L.D.; Zee, J. van der; Rhoon, G.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Subdivision of Hyperthermia, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lumori, M.L.D. [Vesalius College and Department of Electrical Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    1998-08-01

    SAR distributions from four different E-field-orientated 2x2 arrays of incoherently driven Lucite cone applicators (LCAs) were investigated. The LCAs operated at 433 MHz with an aperture of 10.5cmx10.5cm each. Two techniques were used to obtain SAR distributions in flat layered phantoms: Gaussian beam (GB) predictions and thermographical (TG) imaging. The GB predictions showed that the effective field size of the different array configurations varied by up to 3%. The TG-measured SAR distribution showed significant deviations from the GB-predicted SAR distributions (maximum 34.6%). The difference between GB-predicted and TG-measured SAR levels (averaged per 10% GB-predicted SAR intervals) equalled less than 11.3% for the parallel E-field orientated array and respectively 15.1% for the clockwise-orientated array. When antennae in the clockwise-orientated array were more widely spread (array aperture 23cmx23cm) in order to diminish their mutual interactions, these differences decreased to 12.4%. However, the overall difference within the 50% SAR or higher range decreased from 14% to 9%. The results lead us to conclude that LCAs can be used clinically and their antenna interactions are not considered to be a problem under clinical conditions. (author)

  2. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of the Oh, Dubois and IEM Backscatter Models Using a Large Dataset of SAR Data and Experimental Soil Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Choker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate the most used radar backscattering models (Integral Equation Model “IEM”, Oh, Dubois, and Advanced Integral Equation Model “AIEM” using a wide dataset of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar data and experimental soil measurements. These forward models reproduce the radar backscattering coefficients ( σ 0 from soil surface characteristics (dielectric constant, roughness and SAR sensor parameters (radar wavelength, incidence angle, polarization. The analysis dataset is composed of AIRSAR, SIR-C, JERS-1, PALSAR-1, ESAR, ERS, RADARSAT, ASAR and TerraSAR-X data and in situ measurements (soil moisture and surface roughness. Results show that Oh model version developed in 1992 gives the best fitting of the backscattering coefficients in HH and VV polarizations with RMSE values of 2.6 dB and 2.4 dB, respectively. Simulations performed with the Dubois model show a poor correlation between real data and model simulations in HH polarization (RMSE = 4.0 dB and better correlation with real data in VV polarization (RMSE = 2.9 dB. The IEM and the AIEM simulate the backscattering coefficient with high RMSE when using a Gaussian correlation function. However, better simulations are performed with IEM and AIEM by using an exponential correlation function (slightly better fitting with AIEM than IEM. Good agreement was found between the radar data and the simulations using the calibrated version of the IEM modified by Baghdadi (IEM_B with bias less than 1.0 dB and RMSE less than 2.0 dB. These results confirm that, up to date, the IEM modified by Baghdadi (IEM_B is the most adequate to estimate soil moisture and roughness from SAR data.

  4. Sexuality Attitudes Reassessment (SAR): Historical and New Considerations for Measuring Its Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitron, Justin A.; Dyson, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, leading scholars in the field of sexology have been calling for more professionals who are primarily sexologists rather than professionals in other fields who specialize in sexuality. Such professionals require specialized training that meets their specific needs. The Sexuality Attitude Reassessment (SAR) has been established as a…

  5. Oligomerization of Uukuniemi virus nucleocapsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Anna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uukuniemi virus (UUKV belongs to the Phlebovirus genus in the family Bunyaviridae. As a non-pathogenic virus for humans UUKV has served as a safe model bunyavirus in a number of studies addressing fundamental questions such as organization and regulation of viral genes, genome replication, structure and assembly. The present study is focused on the oligomerization of the UUKV nucleocapsid (N protein, which plays an important role in several steps of virus replication. The aim was to locate the domains involved in the N protein oligomerization and study the process in detail. Results A set of experiments concentrating on the N- and C-termini of the protein was performed, first by completely or partially deleting putative N-N-interaction domains and then by introducing point mutations of amino acid residues. Mutagenesis strategy was based on the computer modeling of secondary and tertiary structure of the N protein. The N protein mutants were studied in chemical cross-linking, immunofluorescence, mammalian two-hybrid, minigenome, and virus-like particle-forming assays. The data showed that the oligomerization ability of UUKV-N protein depends on the presence of intact α-helices on both termini of the N protein molecule and that a specific structure in the N-terminal region plays a crucial role in the N-N interaction(s. This structure is formed by two α-helices, rich in amino acid residues with aromatic (W7, F10, W19, F27, F31 or long aliphatic (I14, I24 side chains. Furthermore, some of the N-terminal mutations (e.g. I14A, I24A, F31A affected the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays. Conclusions UUKV-N protein has ability to form oligomers in chemical cross-linking and mammalian two-hybrid assays. In mutational analysis, some of the introduced single-point mutations abolished the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays, suggesting that especially the N

  6. Coronavirus nucleocapsid proteins assemble constitutively in high molecular oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, Yingying; Kriegenburg, Franziska; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2017-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoV) are enveloped viruses and rely on their nucleocapsid N protein to incorporate the positive-stranded genomic RNA into the virions. CoV N proteins form oligomers but the mechanism and relevance underlying their multimerization remain to be fully understood. Using in vitro pull-down

  7. InSAR measurements for the 2014 Mw 6.0 Jinggu, Yunnan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajun; Feng, Wanpeng; Sergey, Samsonov; Mahdi, Motagh; Li, Zhenhong; Clarke, Peter

    2016-04-01

    An earthquake occurred in the southwest of Yunnan, China on 7 October 2014 at 21:49 local time, measured as Mw 6.0 by the United States Geological Survey and Mw 6.1 by the European Alert System. Strong earthquakes are common in this region because of the continental collision between the India and Eurasia plates with a relative convergence rate of 40-50 mm/yr. A detailed study of this earthquake will therefore allow better understanding of regional fault properties. For the first time, Radarsat-2 (RS2) data was employed to investigate co-seismic surface movements of this event. Two ascending RS2 images acquired on 2 October 2014 and 19 November 2014 were used to generate an interferogram, revealing line-of-sight (LOS) displacements with a maximum value of 0.13 m (towards the satellite) in the NW sector. We use PSOKINV to determine fault geometric parameters and slip distribution. First, fault parameters are determined using improved particle swarm optimization. Second, slip distribution over the fault plane is retrieved using an iterative strategy for estimating optimal dip angle and smoothing factors [Feng et al., 2013]. The comparison between the modelled LOS changes and the measured ones shows a good fit, with residuals smaller than 0.02 m. The best-fitting model suggests that the rupture occurred on a left-lateral strike-slip fault with a strike of 323°. The total released moment is equivalent to Mw 6.1 and the main slip zone is confined between depths of 2-8 km. A maximum slip of 1.1 m appears at a depth of 4.3 km, with a rupture length of about 10km. Reference: Feng, W., Z. Li, J. R. Elliott, Y. Fukushima, T. Hoey, A. Singleton, R. Cook, and Z. Xu (2013), The 2011 MW 6.8 Burma earthquake: fault constraints provided by multiple SAR techniques, Geophysical Journal International, doi:10.1093/gji/ggt254.

  8. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of slow-moving along-track displacement from an efficient multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Min-Jeong; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Won, Joong-Sun; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta; Lu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) has demonstrated outstanding measurement accuracy of along-track displacement when compared to pixel-offset-tracking methods; however, measuring slow-moving (cm/year) surface displacement remains a challenge. Stacking of multi-temporal observations is a potential approach to reducing noise and increasing measurement accuracy, but it is difficult to achieve a significant improvement by applying traditional stacking methods to multi-temporal MAI interferograms. This paper proposes an efficient MAI stacking method, where multi-temporal forward- and backward-looking residual interferograms are individually stacked before the MAI interferogram is generated. We tested the performance of this method using ENVISAT data from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, where displacement on the order of several centimeters per year is common. By comparing results from the proposed stacking methods with displacements from GPS data, we documented measurement accuracies of about 1.03 and 1.07 cm/year for the descending and ascending tracks, respectively—an improvement of about a factor of two when compared with that from the conventional stacking approach. Three-dimensional surface-displacement maps can be constructed by combining stacked InSAR and MAI observations, which will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of geological phenomena.

  10. The Mw 6.0 2016 Amatrice (Italy) Earthquake: Source Geometry Inferred from DInSAR Measurements and Geological Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, F.; Lavecchia, G.; Castaldo, R.; De Nardis, R.; De Novellis, V.; Ferrarini, F.; Pepe, S.; Brozzetti, F.; Solaro, G.; Cirillo, D.; Bonano, M.; Boncio, P.; de Luca, C.; Lanari, R.; Manunta, M.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, A.; Zinno, I.; Tizzani, P.

    2016-12-01

    On 24 August 2016, at 01:36 UTÇ the intra-Apennine extensional fault system of Central Italy released a destructive earthquake (MW 6.0). It produced widespread damage and fatalities, killing about 300 people and severely destroying the town of Amatrice and surrounding villages. After few hours, the Amatrice earthquake was followed by a significant aftershock (MW 5.5), which nucleated 15 km NW-ward. The epicentral area of the seismic sequence extends in the NNW-SSE direction, for a length of about 25-30 km. It is located at the hanging-wall of the WSW-dipping Vettore-Gorzano active extensional fault system. During the days following the main shock, a significant number of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data have been acquired from different passes and angles by the L-band ALOS-2, C-band Sentinel-1 and X-band COSMO-SkyMed satellites. This allowed us to map in a very short time the co-seismic ground displacements through the Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) technique, and also to evaluate their Vertical and East-West components with high details. The generated interferometric pattern is characterized by a double-eyed co-seismic shape that spans 20 km along the NNW-SSE direction and that well coincides with the epicentral areas. We modeled the seismic source that well fit the Mw 6.2 event. In particular, for this analysis, we separately applied an analytical Okada approach as well as a 3D Finite Element (FE) numerical modeling, the latter jointly exploiting DInSAR measurements and structural-geological data. The model obtained via the FE approach suggests that the Amatrice 2016 earthquake nucleated at 8 km deep along the intersection line between the Vettoretto-Redentore and the Northern Gorzano faults, and instantly geminated in two rupture patches that radiated with an approximate bilateral symmetry on the two fault planes. The two rupture patches covered differently shaped slip area, with aspect ratio that well recalls the shape of the interferometric lobes

  11. Measuring Variable Scales of Surface Deformation in and around the Yellowstone Caldera with TerraSAR-X Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, C. W., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing three years of TerraSAR-X (TSX) Stripmap data covering the Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming, we identify several examples showing the benefits of the high spatial and temporal resolution TSX data. Although the Stripmap footprints are small, compared to those of past SAR satellites, we are nonetheless able to track subsidence/uplift cycles of the ~50 x 80 km Yellowstone caldera using multiple strips. The Stripmap data are also useful for measuring deformation associated with the area of the North Rim anomaly, an area of repeated uplift and subsidence, ~30 km in diameter near the intersection of the north caldera rim, north-trending Mammoth-Norris Corridor, and west-northwest trending seismic belt east of Hebgen Lake. We measured ~45 mm of uplift associated with an episode that occurred mostly during the winter of 2013-2014 (as verified by GPS), and ~15 mm of subsequent subsidence in the early summer of 2014. The TSX Stripmap data have also proven effective at measuring small-scale deformation features. Because of the high-resolution of the TSX Stripmap data, we have also been able to measure many small-scale deforming features in Yellowstone National Park that are associated with apparent aquifer discharge/recharge cycles, unstable slope movement, geyser basin deformation, and deformation related to other hydrothermal features. We present an example of ~3 cm of seasonal deformation likely resulting from water movement in and out of an aquifer along the southwest caldera rim. We also document subsidence of ~1 cm/yr in a circular area nearly 0.5 km across near the vent from the Pitchstone Plateau, a thick rhyolite flow that erupted nearly 70 ka. TSX data are instrumental in identifying the seasonal variation found in some of these features, and in measuring the small spatial areas of deformation associated with other features.

  12. mRNA display design of fibronectin-based intrabodies that detect and inhibit severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiang-I; Olson, C Anders; Hwang, Seungmin; Deng, Hongyu; Wong, Elaine; Baric, Ralph S; Roberts, Richard W; Sun, Ren

    2009-06-26

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus plays important roles in both viral replication and modulation of host cell processes. New ligands that target the N protein may thus provide tools to track the protein inside cells, detect interaction hot spots on the protein surface, and discover sites that could be used to develop new anti-SARS therapies. Using mRNA display selection and directed evolution, we designed novel antibody-like protein affinity reagents that target SARS N protein with high affinity and selectivity. Our libraries were based on an 88-residue variant of the 10th fibronectin type III domain from human fibronectin (10Fn3). This selection resulted in eight independent 10Fn3 intrabodies, two that require the N-terminal domain for binding and six that recognize the C terminus, one with Kd=1.7 nM. 10Fn3 intrabodies are well expressed in mammalian cells and are relocalized by N in SARS-infected cells. Seven of the selected intrabodies tested do not perturb cellular function when expressed singly in vivo and inhibit virus replication from 11- to 5900-fold when expressed in cells prior to infection. Targeting two sites on SARS-N simultaneously using two distinct 10Fn3s results in synergistic inhibition of virus replication.

  13. mRNA Display Design of Fibronectin-based Intrabodies That Detect and Inhibit Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiang-I.; Olson, C. Anders; Hwang, Seungmin; Deng, Hongyu; Wong, Elaine; Baric, Ralph S.; Roberts, Richard W.; Sun, Ren

    2009-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus plays important roles in both viral replication and modulation of host cell processes. New ligands that target the N protein may thus provide tools to track the protein inside cells, detect interaction hot spots on the protein surface, and discover sites that could be used to develop new anti-SARS therapies. Using mRNA display selection and directed evolution, we designed novel antibody-like protein affinity reagents that target SARS N protein with high affinity and selectivity. Our libraries were based on an 88-residue variant of the 10th fibronectin type III domain from human fibronectin (10Fn3). This selection resulted in eight independent 10Fn3 intrabodies, two that require the N-terminal domain for binding and six that recognize the C terminus, one with Kd = 1.7 nm. 10Fn3 intrabodies are well expressed in mammalian cells and are relocalized by N in SARS-infected cells. Seven of the selected intrabodies tested do not perturb cellular function when expressed singly in vivo and inhibit virus replication from 11- to 5900-fold when expressed in cells prior to infection. Targeting two sites on SARS-N simultaneously using two distinct 10Fn3s results in synergistic inhibition of virus replication. PMID:19364769

  14. Measuring Deformation in Jakarta through Long Term Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustan; Sulaiman, Albertus; Ito, Takeo

    2016-11-01

    Jakarta as a home for more than 10 millions habitant facing complex environmental problems due to physical development that cause physical deformation. Physical deformation issues such as decreasing environmental carrying capacity, land cover changes and land subsidence have occurred. Recent studies shows that the long of shoreline changes in a span of 13 years from 2002 to 2015 around 14 km due to land reclamation in Jakarta bay. Previous studies also concluded that Jakarta suffer a sinking phenomena due to its rapid subsidence rate, approximately 260 mm/year in northern part of Jakarta. During the 2007 to 2011, the land subsidence phenomena in Jakarta was observed by InSAR based on ALOS-PALSAR data and found that the subsided areas only occurred in certain areas, mainly in Pluit and Cengkareng regions, with a subsidence of approximately 70 cm for 4 years. Land subsidence is generally related to geological subsidence i.e. sediment consolidation due to its own weight and tectonic movements; or related to human activities such as withdrawal of ground water and geothermal fluid, oil and gas extraction from underground reservoirs, and collapse of underground mines. The amount of subsidence or uplift can be estimated from the number of concentric fringes that appear in the interferogram. This research utilizes Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data observed from ALOS-2 (L-band) and Sentinel-1 (C-band) satellites. By interfering two single look complex (SLC) images from different observation epoch, it is found that the subsided area that has been identified before continues to subside. This occurs especially in Pluit region and has been revealed by interfering ALOS-2 data up to year 2016. The deformation in this area is approximately 12 cm from November 2015 to September 2016. The process of land reclamation also clearly identified by Sentinel-1 image by series data processing in Sentinels Application Platform (SNAP) software.

  15. Subsidence in the Central Valley, California 2007 - present measured by InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Jones, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence caused by groundwater pumping in the rich agricultural area of California's Central Valley has been a problem for decades. Over the last few years, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations from satellite and aircraft platforms have been used to produce maps of subsidence with ~cm accuracy. For this study, we have obtained and analyzed Japanese PALSAR data for 2006 - 2011, Canadian Radarsat-1 data for 2011 - 2013, Radarsat-2 data for 2012 - 2015, and ESA's Sentinel-1A for 2015 and produced maps of subsidence for those periods. High resolution InSAR data were also acquired along the California Aqueduct by the NASA UAVSAR from 2013 - 2015. Using multiple scenes acquired by these systems, we were able to produce the time histories of subsidence at selected locations and transects showing how subsidence varies both spatially and temporally. The maps show that subsidence is continuing in areas with a history of subsidence and that the rates and areas affected have increased due to increased groundwater extraction during the extended western US drought. The high resolution maps from UAVSAR were used to identify and quantify new, highly localized areas of accelerated subsidence along the California Aqueduct that occurred in 2014. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) funded this work to provide the background and an update on subsidence in the Central Valley to support future policy. Geographic Information System (GIS) files are being furnished to DWR for further analysis of the 4 dimensional subsidence time-series maps. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  16. Retrospective dosimetry: Preliminary use of the single aliquot regeneration (SAR) protocol for the measurement of quartz dose in young house bricks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, D.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    In retrospective dosimetry, the total dose absorbed by some pre-existing dosemeters, such as house bricks or tiles, is used to derive the dose to the population arising from a nuclear accident. This paper uses the newly developed SAR protocol to determine the total dose in young house bricks from...... the vicinity of the Chernobyl reactor site and from Roskilde, Denmark. For these samples, it is shown that high precision (similar to 1%) on the mean estimates of total dose can be achieved with similar to 20 independent measurements. The SAR total dose estimates of two Danish house bricks agree...

  17. The management of scarce water resources using GNSS, InSAR and in-situ micro gravity measurements as monitoring tools

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wonnacott, R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available can be extracted either through pumping or using artesian pressure. This paper describes the application of GNSS, InSAR and In-Situ Micro Gravity measurements for the monitoring of an artesian wellfield in the Oudtshoorn District in the Western Cape...

  18. Detecting and Measuring Land Subsidence in Houston-Galveston, Texas using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System Data, 2012-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A.; Baker, S.

    2016-12-01

    Several cities in the Houston-Galveston (HG) region in Texas have subsided up to 13 feet over several decades due to natural and anthropogenic processes [Yu et al. 2014]. Land subsidence, a gradual sinking of the Earth's surface, is an often human-induced hazard and a major environmental problem expedited by activities such as mining, oil and gas extraction, urbanization and excessive groundwater pumping. We are able to detect and measure subsidence in HG using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and global positioning systems (GPS). Qu et al. [2015] used ERS, Envisat, and ALOS-1 to characterize subsidence in HG from 1995 to 2011, but a five-year gap in InSAR measurements exists due to a lack of freely available SAR data. We build upon the previous study by comparing subsidence patterns detected by Sentinel-1 data starting in July 2015. We used GMT5SAR to generate a stack of interferograms with perpendicular baselines less than 100 meters and temporal baselines less than 100 days to minimize temporal and spatial decorrelation. We applied the short baseline subset (SBAS) time series processing using GIAnT and compared our results with GPS measurements. The implications of this work will strengthen land subsidence monitoring systems in HG and broadly aid in the development of effective water resource management policies and strategies.

  19. Combating SARS and H1N1: Insights and Lessons From Singapore’s Public Health Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Yu-Hung Lai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combating the outbreak of infectious diseases is a major public health imperative for the small island-state of Singapore. In this paper we discuss and assess the public health measures taken by the Singaporean government to combat the outbreak of SARS in 2003 and H1N1 in 2009. Most notably, the state introduced a clear line of command and control to monitor the effectiveness and efficacy of public health control measures as well as to oversee their implementation. Meanwhile, it has also employed moral suasion to ensure compliance with draconian health control measures by the population. At the same time, the Singapore government also established a close partnership with the population to ensure the acquiescence of the general public to these measures. Finally, this paper draws on the insights and lessons learned from the two outbreaks to develop a conceptual model for pandemic management. ----- Die Bekämpfung des Ausbruchs ansteckender Krankheiten ist ein zentrales Gesundheitsgebot für den Inselstaat Singapur. Im vorliegenden Artikel erörtern und bewerten wir die Maßnahmen, welche die Regierung Singapurs im Bereich der öffentlichen Gesundheitsversorgung traf, um den Ausbruch von SARS im Jahr 2003 und von H1N1 im Jahr 2009 zu bekämpfen. Besonders bemerkenswert ist in diesem Zusammenhang die Einführung einer klaren Weisungs- und Kontrollstrategie, um die Wirksamkeit und Wirkungen der Maßnahmen zu überprüfen sowie ihre Implementierung beaufsichtigen zu können. Zudem wurden moralische Appelle angewendet, um die Einhaltung von drakonischen Maßnahmen zur Gesundheitskontrolle durch die Bevölkerung zu gewährleisten. Gleichzeitig etablierte die singapurische Regierung eine enge Partnerschaft mit der Bevölkerung, die das Einverständnis der Öffentlichkeit zu diesen Maßnahmen sicherstellte. Zum Schluss wird im vorliegenden Aufsatz ein konzeptionelles Modell, das auf Einsichten und Lehren aus den beiden Ausbrüchen beruft, ausgearbeitet.

  20. Elucidating the Interacting Domains of Chandipura Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N protein of Chandipura virus (CHPV plays a crucial role in viral life cycle, besides being an important structural component of the virion through proper organization of its interactions with other viral proteins. In a recent study, the authors had mapped the associations among CHPV proteins and shown that N protein interacts with four of the viral proteins: N, phosphoprotein (P, matrix protein (M, and glycoprotein (G. The present study aimed to distinguish the regions of CHPV N protein responsible for its interactions with other viral proteins. In this direction, we have generated the structure of CHPV N protein by homology modeling using SWISS-MODEL workspace and Accelrys Discovery Studio client 2.55 and mapped the domains of N protein using PiSQRD. The interactions of N protein fragments with other proteins were determined by ZDOCK rigid-body docking method and validated by yeast two-hybrid and ELISA. The study revealed a unique binding site, comprising of amino acids 1–30 at the N terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (N1 that is instrumental in its interactions with N, P, M, and G proteins. It was also observed that N2 associates with N and G proteins while N3 interacts with N, P, and M proteins.

  1. Measurement of Subsidence Across the Sacramento Delta: Applying InSAR to a Coherence-challenged Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. E.; Sharma, P.

    2014-12-01

    InSAR-based measurement of ground subsidence rates are notoriously challenging in agricultural areas because of rapid temporal decorrelation introduced by physical disturbance of the ground and water content changes. This can be mitigated by the use of longer wavelength instruments and time series techniques, but measurement remains a challenge particularly in areas where the deformation rates are low. Here we discuss techniques developed to work with low coherence data in a project to measure sub-island scale subsidence rates across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using SBAS processing of L-band UAVSAR data collected between July 2009 and February 2014. Determination of rates in this area is particularly valuable because of the Delta's critical importance as a water resource for the State of California and as an enormously productive estuarine ecosystem. Subsidence across the region has left most of the man-made islands below mean sea level and the levees maintaining their integrity are subject to a wide range of threats, including failure during earthquakes on the nearby Hayward and San Andreas fault. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease-Mediated Nucleocapsid Processing: Possible Link to Viral Cell Culture Adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2017-01-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes severe diarrhea and high mortality rates in newborn piglets, leading to massive losses to the swine industry worldwide during recent epidemics. Intense research efforts are now focusing on defining viral characteristics that confer a growth advantage, pathogenicity, or cell adaptability in order to better understand the PEDV life cycle and identify suitable targets for antiviral or vaccine development. Here, we report a unique phenomenon of PEDV nucleocapsid (N) cleavage by the PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease (3Cpro) during infection. The identification of the 3Cpro cleavage site at the C terminus of N supported previous observations that PEDV 3Cpro showed a substrate requirement slightly different from that of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3Cpro and revealed a greater flexibility in its substrate recognition site. This cleavage motif is present in the majority of cell culture-adapted PEDV strains but is missing in emerging field isolates. Remarkably, reverse-genetics-derived cell culture-adapted PEDVAVCT12 harboring uncleavable N displayed growth retardation in Vero E6-APN cells compared to the wild-type virus. These observations altogether shed new light on the investigation and characterization of the PEDV nucleocapsid protein and its possible link to cell culture adaptation. Recurrent PEDV outbreaks have resulted in enormous economic losses to swine industries worldwide. To gain the upper hand in combating this disease, it is necessary to understand how this virus replicates and evades host immunity. Characterization of viral proteins provides important clues to mechanisms by which viruses survive and spread. Here, we characterized an intriguing phenomenon in which the nucleocapsids of some PEDV strains are proteolytically processed by the virally encoded main protease. Growth retardation in recombinant PEDV carrying uncleavable N suggests a replication advantage provided by the cleavage

  3. Geodetic model of the 2016 Central Italy earthquake sequence inferred from InSAR and GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheloni, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    On 24th August 2016, a Mw 6.0 earthquake struck a sector of the Apennines in Central Italy, causing extensive damage to the town of Amatrice and several surroundings villages, and killing about 300 inhabitants. The seismic sequence which followed was characterized by numerous aftershocks southeast and northwest of the main event, which decreased in frequency and magnitude until the end of October, when an event of magnitude Mw 5.9 occurred on 26th October about 25 km to the NW of the 24th August event, close to Visso village. In addition, few days later, on 30th October a third great shock of magnitude Mw 6.5, nucleated below the town of Norcia, hit an area encompassing the two previous main events. In order to infer the ground displacement field and to determine the source parameters of the causative faults associated with the three main events of the seismic sequence we exploit the InSAR and GPS coseismic measurements. In particular, we use SAR data acquired by the ALOS-2 (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency), Sentinel-1 (European Space Agency) and COSMO-SkyMed (Italian Space Agency) satellites, from both ascending and descending orbits, and data from continuous and survey-mode GPS stations operating during the earthquake sequence. We show that our preferred model is consistent with the activation of at least four main coseismic asperities during the entire sequence, belonging to a SW-dipping normal fault system, the surface expression of which could be associated with the Mt. Gorzano-Mt. Vettore-Mt. Bove alignment. To better simulate the complex deformation pattern associated with the greatest event of the sequence (the 30th October Mw 6.5 Norcia earthquake), additional slip is required by secondary anti- and synthetic faults in the hanging-wall of the main fault, and by a further SW-dipping low-angle fault plane. Finally, we compare the latter retrieved geodetic source with the known geological structures of the Central Apennines; this result may suggest a

  4. An Improved Source Model for the Mw 7.1, October 23, 2011 Van (Turkey) Earthquake: New Insights from SAR Pixel Offsets and Coastal Uplift Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, Ahmet M.; Jónsson, Sigurjón; Çakır, Ziyadin; Ergintav, Semih; Uǧur, Doǧan; Wang, Teng; Osmanoǧlu, Batuhan; Feng, Guangcai; Zabcı, Cengiz; Emre, Ömer

    2013-04-01

    The October 23rd, 2011, Mw 7.1, Van earthquake is the largest instrumentally recorded thrust faulting event in Turkey. The absence of a clear prominent surface rupture also marks this earthquake as the most recent case of blind faulting in the country. The Van earthquake has already been extensively studied by many researchers, with many of them relying only on the available InSAR data. However, due to limited coherence and data coverage and also due to the fact that the available coseismic data came only from descending satellite orbits, it proved difficult to constrain the parameters of the causative fault. Pixel offsets calculated in the flight (azimuth) and range directions are byproducts of SAR imaging and can provide a secondary perspective of the surface displacements when accurate. With the introduction of high resolution X-band SAR satellites it became possible to benefit more from the pixel offset information due to the increase in accuracy. We use offset information from a raw Cosmo-SkyMed SAR image pair, where the slave image was acquired only 4 hours after the October, 23rd, 2011 Van (Turkey) earthquake, which enables us to extend the coverage and to minimize the contribution of postseismic motion after the event. The pixel offsets are calculated using a novel technique that only considers reliable point-like scatterers for the offset measurements to increase their accuracy. The introduction of this new dataset helped us to minimize unwrapping errors due to loss of coherence around the surface projection of the causative fault, which the amplitude information is independent of. In addition to SAR pixel offsets, we also incorporate a new set of measurements of the uplift along the Lake Van coast due to the earthquake using dead algae levels as biological markers. Although sparse, these measurements were crucial to improve our final source model of the earthquake since the InSAR measurements only provide the relative displacement between two points on

  5. Integrating InSAR and GPS data to measure crustal deformation: Insights on resolution from sensitivity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C. P.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    A crustal deformation map across the complex fault systems of Southern California may lead to an improved understanding of the regional state of stress, tectonic motion throughout the seismic cycle, and seismic hazard near densely-populated regions. The dense spatial resolution and sensitivity to vertical deformation of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) datasets may increase the accuracy of inferred motion relative to results based solely on Global Position System (GPS) data. However, some critical issues must be addressed before these complementary datasets can be combined into a single map. The different spatial and temporal sampling rates inherent to InSAR and GPS data types require a careful consideration of how the two data sets are weighted and combined. In anticipation of assimilating InSAR and GPS data into a single deformation map, we explore how differences in sampling of the true deformation field and noise sources contribute to errors in the inferred motion. The choice of weighting and the contribution from noise may impact not only the inferred 3D velocity vector but also potential conclusions drawn from the map (e.g. fault locking depth and slip rate). We build a series of synthetic models aimed at emulating interseismic and seasonal signals, as well as sources of white and spatially coherent noise present in InSAR and GPS datasets. We evaluate the potential resolution gained from the inclusion of InSAR data and identify problems that may arise if signals are sampled by a single data type. We apply thresholds on resolution and noise detection inferred from the sensitivity tests to characterize signals in real InSAR and GPS data in the Los Angeles basin. Our conclusions, which may help characterize the resolution of deformation maps built from both InSAR and GPS data will be critical to choices made by researchers constructing future velocity maps or incorporating the results of such maps into other research initiatives.

  6. The expression and antigenicity of a truncated spike-nucleocapsid fusion protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Yan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of effective drugs, controlling SARS relies on the rapid identification of cases and appropriate management of the close contacts, or effective vaccines for SARS. Therefore, developing specific and sensitive laboratory tests for SARS as well as effective vaccines are necessary for national authorities. Results Genes encoding truncated nucleocapsid (N and spike (S proteins of SARSCoV were cloned into the expression vector pQE30 and fusionally expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The fusion protein was analyzed for reactivity with SARS patients' sera and with anti-sera against the two human coronaviruses HCoV 229E and HCoV OC43 by ELISA, IFA and immunoblot assays. Furthermore, to evaluate the antigen-specific humoral antibody and T-cell responses in mice, the fusion protein was injected into 6-week-old BALB/c mice and a neutralization test as well as a T-cell analysis was performed. To evaluate the antiviral efficacy of immunization, BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with SARSCoV at day 33 post injection and viral loads were determined by fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR. Serological results showed that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the truncated S-N fusion protein derived the SARS virus were > 99% (457/460 and 100.00% (650/650, respectively. Furthermore there was no cross-reactivity with other two human coronaviruses. High titers of antibodies to SRASCoV appeared in the immunized mice and the neutralization test showed that antibodies to the fusion protein could inhibit SARSCoV. The T cell proliferation showed that the fusion protein could induce an antigen-specific T-cell response. Fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR showed that BALB/c mice challenged intranasally with SARSCoV at day 33 post injection were completely protected from virus replication. Conclusion The truncated S-N fusion protein is a suitable immunodiagnostic antigen and vaccine candidate.

  7. Longwall mining and surface deformation – lessons learned from dInSAR measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, Jeanine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available of deformation basins over time can be monitored. In contrast, field-based measurements using GPS or spirit-levelling provide only point-based measurements. Therefore, the full extent of deformation basins and their evolution over time is frequently not well...

  8. Post-Eruption Deformation Processes Measured Using ALOS-1 and UAVSAR InSAR at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren N. Schaefer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacaya volcano is a persistently active basaltic cone complex located in the Central American Volcanic Arc in Guatemala. In May of 2010, violent Volcanic Explosivity Index-3 (VEI-3 eruptions caused significant topographic changes to the edifice, including a linear collapse feature 600 m long originating from the summit, the dispersion of ~20 cm of tephra and ash on the cone, the emplacement of a 5.4 km long lava flow, and ~3 m of co-eruptive movement of the southwest flank. For this study, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR images (interferograms processed from both spaceborne Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1 (ALOS-1 and aerial Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR data acquired between 31 May 2010 and 10 April 2014 were used to measure post-eruptive deformation events. Interferograms suggest three distinct deformation processes after the May 2010 eruptions, including: (1 subsidence of the area involved in the co-eruptive slope movement; (2 localized deformation near the summit; and (3 emplacement and subsequent subsidence of about a 5.4 km lava flow. The detection of several different geophysical signals emphasizes the utility of measuring volcanic deformation using remote sensing techniques with broad spatial coverage. Additionally, the high spatial resolution of UAVSAR has proven to be an excellent compliment to satellite data, particularly for constraining motion components. Measuring the rapid initiation and cessation of flank instability, followed by stabilization and subsequent influence on eruptive features, provides a rare glimpse into volcanic slope stability processes. Observing these and other deformation events contributes both to hazard assessment at Pacaya and to the study of the stability of stratovolcanoes.

  9. MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Ice Velocity Maps of Central Antarctica: 1997 and 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, consists of two high-resolution digital mosaics...

  10. MEaSUREs Greenland Ice Sheet Velocity Map from InSAR Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides annual ice-sheet-wide velocity maps...

  11. MEaSUREs Greenland Annual Ice Sheet Velocity Mosaics from SAR and Landsat, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, contains annual ice velocity mosaics for the...

  12. MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Antarctica Ice Velocity Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides the first comprehensive,...

  13. MEaSUREs Greenland Ice Velocity: Selected Glacier Site Velocity Maps from InSAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program. This data set provides maps of glacier outlet...

  14. MEaSUREs Greenland Ice Sheet Velocity Map from InSAR Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides annual ice-sheet-wide velocity maps...

  15. MEaSUREs Greenland Ice Sheet Velocity Map from InSAR Data V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, contains seasonal (winter) ice-sheet-wide...

  16. Antibody-dependent SARS coronavirus infection is mediated by antibodies against spike proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tsao, Ching-Han; Shen, Chun-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Liu, Wu-Tse; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Huang, Jason C

    2014-08-22

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) still carries the potential for reemergence, therefore efforts are being made to create a vaccine as a prophylactic strategy for control and prevention. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is a mechanism through which dengue viruses, feline coronaviruses, and HIV viruses take advantage of anti-viral humoral immune responses to infect host target cells. Here we describe our observations of SARS-CoV using ADE to enhance the infectivity of a HL-CZ human promonocyte cell line. Quantitative-PCR and immunofluorescence staining results indicate that SARS-CoV is capable of replication in HL-CZ cells, and of displaying virus-induced cytopathic effects and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-6 two days post-infection. According to flow cytometry data, the HL-CZ cells also expressed angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2, a SARS-CoV receptor) and higher levels of the FcγRII receptor. We found that higher concentrations of anti-sera against SARS-CoV neutralized SARS-CoV infection, while highly diluted anti-sera significantly increased SARS-CoV infection and induced higher levels of apoptosis. Results from infectivity assays indicate that SARS-CoV ADE is primarily mediated by diluted antibodies against envelope spike proteins rather than nucleocapsid proteins. We also generated monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins and observed that most of them promoted SARS-CoV infection. Combined, our results suggest that antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins may trigger ADE effects. The data raise new questions regarding a potential SARS-CoV vaccine, while shedding light on mechanisms involved in SARS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features ... SARS virus · SARS – Koch´Postulates proved. SARS – virus jumps species · How infectious is SARS virus · SARS – Global Distribution- 10th July 2003.

  18. Improved oceanographic measurements fom SAR altimetry: Results and scientific roadmap from ESA cryosat plus for oceans project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotton, P. D.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars

    The ESA CryoSat mission is the first space mission to carry a radar altimeter that can operate in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode. It thus provides the first opportunity to test and evaluate, using real data, the significant potential benefits of SAR altimetry for ocean applications...... results and outlines a proposed roadmap for the further development and exploitation of these results in operational and scientific applications, with particular focus on their relevance for Sentinel-3. The “CryoSat Plus for Oceans” (CP4O) project has been supported by ESA (Support To Science Element...

  19. Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric S. Kasischke; Laura L. Bourgeau-Chavez; Allison R. Rober; Kevin H. Wyatt; James M. Waddington; Merritt R. Turetsky

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary investigation of the response of ERS C-band SAR backscatter to variations in soil moisture and surface inundation in wetlands of interior Alaska. Data were collected from 5 wetlands over a three-week period in 2007. Results showed a positive correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in sites dominated by herbaceous vegetation cover (r...

  20. Geodetic SAR Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Montazeri, Sina; Gisinger, Christoph; Hanssen, R.F.; Bamler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework referred to as 'geodetic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) tomography' that fuses the SAR imaging geodesy and tomographic SAR inversion (TomoSAR) approaches to obtain absolute 3-D positions of a large amount of natural scatterers. The methodology is applied on

  1. Circular SAR GMTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven

    2014-06-01

    We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target SAR responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel SAR chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).

  2. Probing Mercaptobenzamides as HIV Inactivators via Nucleocapsid Protein 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mrinmoy; Scerba, Michael T; Shank, Nathaniel I; Hartman, Tracy L; Buchholz, Caitlin A; Buckheit, Robert W; Durell, Stewart R; Appella, Daniel H

    2017-05-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein 7 (NCp7), a zinc finger protein, plays critical roles in viral replication and maturation and is an attractive target for drug development. However, the development of drug-like molecules that inhibit NCp7 has been a significant challenge. In this study, a series of novel 2-mercaptobenzamide prodrugs were investigated for anti-HIV activity in the context of NCp7 inactivation. The molecules were synthesized from the corresponding thiosalicylic acids, and they are all crystalline solids and stable at room temperature. Derivatives with a range of amide side chains and aromatic substituents were synthesized and screened for anti-HIV activity. Wide ranges of antiviral activity were observed, with IC 50 values ranging from 1 to 100 μm depending on subtle changes to the substituents on the aromatic ring and side chain. Results from these structure-activity relationships were fit to a probable mode of intracellular activation and interaction with NCp7 to explain variations in antiviral activity. Our strategy to make a series of mercaptobenzamide prodrugs represents a general new direction to make libraries that can be screened for anti-HIV activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Surface Deformation Due to the May 27, 1995 Sakhalin Earthquake and Related Events Measured by JERS-1 SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Hensley, S.; Rosen, P. A.; Tobita, Mikio; Shimada, Masanobu

    1996-01-01

    A large (M&subw;=7.0) earthquake on May 27, 1995 completely destroyed the town of Neftegorsk in the northern part of Sakhalin Island and caused more than 2000 human deaths. The shallow, right-lateral, strick-slip earthquake resulted in extensive surface ruptures and up to 7 m of horizontal displacement as reported by field workers. The sourthern part of the mainshock epicenter zone was imaged by the JERS-1 SAR (synthetic aperature radar) one month (April 28) before and two weeks after (June 11) the mainshock. Despite drastically changed surface conditions in the 44 days between the two images, due primarily to spring thaw, we obtained reasonably good interferometric correlation with the L-band (24 cm) SAR pair. The interoferogram records the distribution of deformation reflecting displacement during both the mainshock and aftershocks. The ability to map the deformation pattern can aid the assessment and mitigation of damage.

  4. Precision Rectification of Airborne SAR Image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Liao, M.; Zhang, Zhe

    1997-01-01

    A simple and direct procedure for the rectification of a certain class of airborne SAR data is presented. The relief displacements of SAR data are effectively removed by means of a digital elevation model and the image is transformed to the ground coordinate system. SAR data from the Danish EMISAR......([7]) is used. The EMISAR produces data with a geometrical resolution of 2.0 meters. The corrected image is tested against photogrammetric control measurements and an accuracy better than 0.5 pixel corresponding to 0.75 meters is obtained. The results indicate promising possibilities...... for the application of SAR data in the difficult process of map revision and updating....

  5. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: The Case of SARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Olivia C; Massa, Silvia; Illiano, Elena; De Martinis, Domenico; Chan, Paul K S; Di Bonito, Paola; Franconi, Rosella

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the membrane protein (M) using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks.

  6. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 μg mL(-1), (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.

  7. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: The Case of SARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Olivia C.; Massa, Silvia; Illiano, Elena; De Martinis, Domenico; Chan, Paul K. S.; Di Bonito, Paola; Franconi, Rosella

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the membrane protein (M) using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks. PMID:26904039

  8. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: the Case of SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C eDemurtas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV, crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N and the membrane protein (M using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks.

  9. The metastable state of nucleocapsids of enveloped viruses as probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, L P; Terezan, A F; Pinheiro, A S; Foguel, D; Rebello, M A; Silva, J L

    2001-03-09

    Enveloped viruses fuse their membranes with cellular membranes to transfer their genomes into cells at the beginning of infection. What is not clear, however, is the role of the envelope (lipid bilayer and glycoproteins) in the stability of the viral particle. To address this question, we compared the stability between enveloped and nucleocapsid particles of the alphavirus Mayaro using hydrostatic pressure and urea. The effects were monitored by intrinsic fluorescence, light scattering, and binding of fluorescent dyes, including bis(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) and ethidium bromide. Pressure caused a drastic dissociation of the nucleocapsids as determined by tryptophan fluorescence, light scattering, and gel filtration chromatography. Pressure-induced dissociation of the nucleocapsids was poorly reversible. In contrast, when the envelope was present, pressure effects were much less marked and were highly reversible. Binding of ethidium bromide occurred when nucleocapsids were dissociated under pressure, indicating exposure of the nucleic acid, whereas enveloped particles underwent no changes. Overall, our results demonstrate that removal of the envelope with the glycoproteins leads the particle to a metastable state and, during infection, may serve as the trigger for disassembly and delivery of the genome. The envelope acts as a "Trojan horse," gaining entry into the host cell to allow release of a metastable nucleocapsid prone to disassembly.

  10. Recent Changes in Ground Deformation at the East Mesa Geothermal Field, California as Measured by InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H.; Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The East Mesa Geothermal Field in East Mesa, Imperial County, California is a series of 6 geothermal power plants with a 57MW capacity that has been in operation since 1987. Previous InSAR studies using ERS-1 and ERS-2 data (1992-2001) have observed ongoing subsidence at rates between -32 to -43 mm/yr. The observed subsidence at this site was thought to be caused by reservoir compaction since there was a negative net production of water during that time period. However, even though net production remained negative, more recent Envisat data reveal a shift in the subsidence signal towards the north and onset of relative uplift in the south portion of the geothermal field starting in 2006. We examine three datasets over East Mesa, including 57 descending ERS-1 and ERS-2 SAR images as well as 35 ascending and 48 descending Envisat SAR acquisitions, to create more than 900 interferograms over the 18 year time period (1992-2010). This dense temporal coverage is valuable for evaluating variations in deformation patterns and minimizing the contribution from the atmosphere. A modified version of the small baseline subset (SBAS) method is used to generate time series of ground displacements and average velocities. ERS data are consistent with previous studies showing rates between -30 and -40 mm/year in the line-of-sight while the Envisat time series' show line-of-sight rates of -20 mm/yr and 12 mm/yr for maximum subsidence and uplift. Net production at the East Mesa Geothermal Field is calculated using production and injection data provided by the California Department of Conservation. The average net production is estimated as -383,000 metric tons per month over the time span of Envisat data and remained negative even during the onset of relative uplift.

  11. Derivation of 3-D surface deformation from an integration of InSAR and GNSS measurements based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haipeng; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ting; Xu, Caijun; Wen, Yangmao

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method to derive 3-D surface deformation from an integration of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC), considering relationship between deformations of neighbouring locations. This method avoids interpolated errors by excluding the interpolation of GNSS into the same spatial resolution as InSAR images and harnesses the data sets and the prior smooth constraints of surface deformation objectively and simultaneously by using ABIC, which were inherently unresolved in previous studies. In particular, we define surface roughness measuring smoothing degree to evaluate the performance of the prior constraints and deduce the formula of the covariance for the estimation errors to estimate the uncertainty of modelled solution. We validate this method using synthetic tests and the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. We find that the optimal weights associated with ABIC minimum are generally at trade-off locations that balance contributions from InSAR, GNSS data sets and the prior constraints. We use this method to evaluate the influence of the interpolated errors from the Ordinary Kriging algorithm on the derivation of surface deformation. Tests show that the interpolated errors may contribute to biasing very large weights imposed on Kriged GNSS data, suggesting that fixing the relative weights is required in this case. We also make a comparison with SISTEM method, indicating that our method allows obtaining better estimations even with sparse GNSS observations. In addition, this method can be generalized to provide a solution for situations where some types of data sets are lacking and can be exploited further to account for data sets such as the integration of displacements along radar lines and offsets along satellite tracks.

  12. Land Subsidence Monitoring Using PS-InSAR Technique for L-Band SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S.; Chatterjee, R. S.; Singh, K. B.; Kumar, D.

    2016-10-01

    Differential SAR-Interferometry (D-InSAR) is one of the potential source to measure land surface motion induced due to underground coal mining. However, this technique has many limitation such as atmospheric in homogeneities, spatial de-correlation, and temporal decorrelation. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry synthetic aperture radar (PS-InSAR) belongs to a family of time series InSAR technique, which utilizes the properties of some of the stable natural and anthropogenic targets which remain coherent over long time period. In this study PS-InSAR technique has been used to monitor land subsidence over selected location of Jharia Coal field which has been correlated with the ground levelling measurement. This time series deformation observed using PS InSAR helped us to understand the nature of the ground surface deformation due to underground mining activity.

  13. Transport of Ebolavirus Nucleocapsids Is Dependent on Actin Polymerization: Live-Cell Imaging Analysis of Ebolavirus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudt, Gordian; Dolnik, Olga; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Herwig, Astrid; Becker, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Transport of ebolavirus (EBOV) nucleocapsids from perinuclear viral inclusions, where they are formed, to the site of budding at the plasma membrane represents an obligatory step of virus assembly. Until now, no live-cell studies on EBOV nucleocapsid transport have been performed, and participation of host cellular factors in this process, as well as the trajectories and speed of nucleocapsid transport, remain unknown. Live-cell imaging of EBOV-infected cells treated with different inhibitors of cellular cytoskeleton was used for the identification of cellular proteins involved in the nucleocapsid transport. EBOV nucleocapsids were visualized by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled nucleocapsid viral protein 30 (VP30) in EBOV-infected cells. Incorporation of the fusion protein VP30-GFP into EBOV nucleocapsids was confirmed by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence analyses. Importantly, VP30-GFP fluorescence was readily detectable in the densely packed nucleocapsids inside perinuclear viral inclusions and in the dispersed rod-like nucleocapsids located outside of viral inclusions. Live-cell imaging of EBOV-infected cells revealed exit of single nucleocapsids from the viral inclusions and their intricate transport within the cytoplasm before budding at the plasma membrane. Nucleocapsid transport was arrested upon depolymerization of actin filaments (F-actin) and inhibition of the actin-nucleating Arp2/3 complex, and it was not altered upon depolymerization of microtubules or inhibition of N-WASP. Actin comet tails were often detected at the rear end of nucleocapsids. Marginally located nucleocapsids entered filopodia, moved inside, and budded from the tip of these thin cellular protrusions. Live-cell imaging of EBOV-infected cells revealed actin-dependent long-distance transport of EBOV nucleocapsids before budding at the cell surface. These findings provide useful insights into EBOV assembly and have potential application in the development

  14. Evolution of unrest at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from InSAR and GPS measurements, 2003 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; Córdova, Loreto; DeMets, Charles; Lundgren, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in the southern volcanic zone of the Chilean Andes exhibits a large volume of rhyolitic material erupted during postglacial times (20-2 ka). Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation. Analysis of new GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveals uplift rates greater than 190 mm/yr between January 2013 and November 2014. The geodetic data are modeled as an inflating sill at depth. The results are used to calculate the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2010. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation. Modeling historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates.

  15. Some physico-chemical properties of the rigid form of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repanovici, R; Hristova, M; Popa, L M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of some dissociation agents (SDS, beta-mercaptoethanol, urea, EDTA) on the rigid form of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid was studied. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of lytic mixture (1% SDS, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 5 M urea, for 2 min at 100 degrees C) revealed two types of polypeptide subunits (mol. wts. 46,000 and 14,000), as well as the dissociation in the presence of 0.1% SDS only. The EDTA treatment leads to a disorganization of the protein part (10(-2) M) or of the nucleocapsid structure (5 x 10(-2) M).

  16. SAR Simulations & Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Thomas M; Ladd, Mark E; Bitz, Andreas K

    2017-03-20

    At ultra-high fields, the assessment of radiofrequency (RF) safety presents several new challenges compared to low-field systems. Multi-channel RF transmit coils in combination with parallel transmit techniques produce time-dependent and spatially varying power loss densities in the tissue. Further, in ultra-high-field systems, localized field effects can be more pronounced due to a transition from the quasi stationary to the electromagnetic field regime. Consequently, local information on the RF field is required for reliable RF safety assessment as well as for monitoring of RF exposure during MR examinations. Numerical RF and thermal simulations for realistic exposure scenarios with anatomical body models are currently the only practical way to obtain the requisite local information on magnetic and electric field distributions as well as tissue temperature. In this article, safety regulations and the fundamental characteristics of RF field distributions in ultra-high-field systems are reviewed. Numerical methods for computation of RF fields as well as typical requirements for the analysis of realistic multi-channel RF exposure scenarios including anatomical body models are highlighted. In recent years, computation of the local tissue temperature has become of increasing interest, since a more accurate safety assessment is expected because temperature is directly related to tissue damage. Regarding thermal simulation, bio-heat transfer models and approaches for taking into account the physiological response of the human body to RF exposure are discussed. In addition, suitable methods are presented to validate calculated RF and thermal results with measurements. Finally, the concept of generalized simulation-based specific absorption rate (SAR) matrix models is discussed. These models can be incorporated into local SAR monitoring in multi-channel MR systems and allow the design of RF pulses under constraints for local SAR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. LOCALIZATION OF A T-CELL EPITOPE WITHIN THE NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN OF AVIAN CORONAVIRUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; KUSTERS, JG; VANNOORT, JM; ZWAAGSTRA, KA; RIJKE, E; VANDERZEIJST, BAM; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    In a previous study, two murine T-cell hybridomas generated after immunization with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) were shown to be responsive to the internally localized viral nucleocapsid protein. In the present study, the antigenic determinants were mapped using recombinant expression products

  18. Genetic engineering of Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus as an improved pesticide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Sun, X.; Hu, Z.; Li, M.; O'Reilly, D.R.; Zuidema, D.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) has been registered and is commercially produced in China as a biopesticide to control the bollworm in cotton. However, the virus has a relatively slow speed of action. To improve its efficacy, recombinant HearNPVs were

  19. Horizontal and vertical transmission of wild-type and recombinant Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.C.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.H.; Werf, van der W.

    2005-01-01

    Transmission plays a central role in the ecology of baculoviruses and the population dynamics of their hosts. Here, we report on the horizontal and vertical transmission dynamics of wild-type Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV-WT) and a genetically modified variant

  20. Mutational analysis of Rift Valley fever phlebovirus nucleocapsid protein indicates novel conserved, functional amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, Timothy J; Li, Ping; Dietrich, Isabelle; Shi, Xiaohong; Brennan, Benjamin; Varjak, Margus; Kohl, Alain

    2017-12-21

    Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV; Phenuiviridae, Phlebovirus) is an important mosquito-borne pathogen of both humans and ruminants. The RVFV genome is composed of tripartite, single stranded, negative or ambisense RNAs. The small (S) segment encodes both the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the non-structural protein (NSs). The N protein is responsible for the formation of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, which are essential in the virus life cycle and for the transcription and replication of the viral genome. There is currently limited knowledge surrounding the roles of the RVFV nucleocapsid protein in viral infection other than its key functions: N protein multimerisation, encapsidation of the RNA genome and interactions with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, L. By bioinformatic comparison of the N sequences of fourteen phleboviruses, mutational analysis, minigenome assays and packaging assays, we have further characterised the RVFV N protein. Amino acids P11 and F149 in RVFV N play an essential role in the function of RNPs and are neither associated with N protein multimerisation nor known nucleocapsid protein functions and may have additional roles in the virus life cycle. Amino acid Y30 exhibited increased minigenome activity despite reduced RNA binding capacity. Additionally, we have determined that the N-terminal arm of N protein is not involved in N-L interactions. Elucidating the fundamental processes that involve the nucleocapsid protein will add to our understanding of this important viral protein and may influence future studies in the development of novel antiviral strategies.

  1. Sinking Coastlines: Land Subsidence at Aquaculture Facilities in the Yellow River Delta, China, measured with Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Tanaka, A.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Land subsidence in river deltas is a global problem. It heightens storm surges, salinates groundwater, intensifies river flooding, destabilizes infrastructure and accelerates shoreline retreat. Measurements of delta subsidence typically rely on point measures such as GPS devices, tide gauges or extensometers, but spatial coverage is needed to fully assess risk across river deltas. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can provide maps of ground deformation with mm to cm-scale vertical resolution. We apply D-InSAR to the coast of the Yellow River Delta in China, which is dominated by aquaculture facilities and has experienced severe coastal erosion in the last twenty years. We extract deformation patterns from dry land adjacent to aquaculture facilities along the coast, allowing the first measurements of subsidence at a non-urban delta shoreline. Results show classic cones-of-depression surrounding aquaculture facilities, likely due to groundwater pumping. Subsidence rates are as high as 250 mm/y at the largest facility on the delta. These rates exceed local and global average sea level rise by nearly two orders of magnitude. If these rates continue, large aquaculture facilities in the area could induce more than a meter of relative sea level rise every five years. Given the global explosion in fish farming in recent years, these results also suggest that similar subsidence and associated relative sea level rise may present a significant hazard for other Asian megadeltas. False-color MODIS image of the Yellow River delta in September 2012. Water appears dark blue, highlighting the abundance of aquaculture facilities along the coast. Green land is primarily agricultural; brown is urban. Red boxes indicate locations of aquaculture facilities examined in this study. Figure from Higgins, S., Overeem, I., Tanaka, A., & Syvitski, J.P.M., (2013), Land Subsidence at Aquaculture Facilities in the Yellow River

  2. Ground Motion Measurement in the Lake Mead Area (Nevada, USA), by DinSAR Time Series Analysis : Probing of the Lithosphere Rheological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doin, M.; Cavalié, O.; Laserre, C.; Briole, P.

    2006-12-01

    SAR interferometry has proven to be a reliable method for detecting small displacements due to ground subsidence. In this study, we measure ground motion around the lake Mead (Nevada, USA) using InSAR. This artificial lake has been filled with water in 1935. An earlier study, based on leveling measurements, has shown that the load associated with lake impoundement induced a subsidence of 17 centimeters. This relaxation process has been argued as analogous to the postglacial rebound, but at a smaller spatial scale and with a much lower viscous relaxation scale. To quantify the deformation and thus constrain the crust and mantle rheological parameters in the lake area, we analyze multiple interferograms (241) based on 43 ERS images acquired between 1992 and 2001. With baselines smaller than 300 m, all interferograms have a very good coherence due to the desert region. Most of interferograms show strong atmospheric artefacts that are partly due to the variation of water vapor vertical stratification between two satellite passes. This tropospheric delay is computed for each interferogram and then inverted for each date of SAR images before interferogram correction. These corrections are validated using data from global atmospheric models (ERA40). Corrected interferograms are then inverted to solve for the time series of ground motion in the lake Mead area. The linear inversion treats each pixel independently from its neighbours and uses the data redundancy to reduce errors such as local decorrelations. Additionnal constraints such as temporal smoothing allow to reduce the local atmospheric artefacts. We obtain a time series of the deformation in the lake Mead area with a millimetric accuracy. The deformation is non linear in time and spreads over a large spatial scale. In particular, we observe a subsidence of up to 16 mm between 1995 and 1998 due to a 10 meters water level increase, followed by an uplift due to the drop of the water level after 2000. The deformation

  3. Mapping of a Hydrological Ice Sheet Drainage Basin on the West Greenland Ice Sheet Margin from ERS-1/2 SAR Interferometry, Ice-Radar Measurement, and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Bøggild, C.E.; Stenseng, L.

    2002-01-01

    importance of the potential of the ice overburden pressure compared to the bedrock topography. The meltwater run-off for the basin delineations was modelled with an energy-balance model calibrated with observed ice-sheet ablation and compared to a 25 year time series of measured basin run-off. The standard......The hydrological ice-sheet basin draining into the Tasersiaq lake, West Greenland (66°13'N, 50°30'W), was delineated, First using standard digital elevation models (DEMs) for ice-sheet surface and bedrock, and subsequently using a new high-resolution dataset, with a surface DEM derived from repeat......-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and a bedrock topography derived from an airborne 60 MHz ice-penetrating radar. The extent of the delineation was calculated from a water-pressure potential as a function of the ice-sheet surface and bedrock elevations and a hydraulic factor κ describing the relative...

  4. The Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ac83 Gene Contains a cis-Acting Element That Is Essential for Nucleocapsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihong; Pan, Mengjia; Zhu, Silei; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Wenbi; Yuan, Meijin; Yang, Kai

    2017-03-01

    Baculoviridae is a family of insect-specific viruses that have a circular double-stranded DNA genome packaged within a rod-shaped capsid. The mechanism of baculovirus nucleocapsid assembly remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that deletion of the ac83 gene of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) blocks viral nucleocapsid assembly. Interestingly, the ac83-encoded protein Ac83 is not a component of the nucleocapsid, implying a particular role for ac83 in nucleocapsid assembly that may be independent of its protein product. To examine this possibility, Ac83 synthesis was disrupted by insertion of a chloramphenicol resistance gene into its coding sequence or by deleting its promoter and translation start codon. Both mutants produced progeny viruses normally, indicating that the Ac83 protein is not required for nucleocapsid assembly. Subsequently, complementation assays showed that the production of progeny viruses required the presence of ac83 in the AcMNPV genome instead of its presence in trans Therefore, we reasoned that ac83 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly via an internal cis-acting element, which we named the nucleocapsid assembly-essential element (NAE). The NAE was identified to lie within nucleotides 1651 to 1850 of ac83 and had 8 conserved A/T-rich regions. Sequences homologous to the NAE were found only in alphabaculoviruses and have a conserved positional relationship with another essential cis-acting element that was recently identified. The identification of the NAE may help to connect the data of viral cis-acting elements and related proteins in the baculovirus nucleocapsid assembly, which is important for elucidating DNA-protein interaction events during this process.IMPORTANCE Virus nucleocapsid assembly usually requires specific cis-acting elements in the viral genome for various processes, such as the selection of the viral genome from the cellular nucleic acids, the cleavage of concatemeric viral genome

  5. Data Assimilation of InSAR Surface Deformation Measurements for the Estimation of Reservoir Geomechanical Parameters in the Upper Adriatic Sedimentary Basin, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, D. A.; Alzraiee, A.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Teatini, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades, extensive work has been conducted to estimate land subsidence due the development of deep gas reservoirs situated in the Upper Adriatic sedimentary basin, Italy. These modeling efforts have stemmed from the development finite-element (FE) coupled reservoir-geomechanical models that can simulate the deformation due to the change in pore pressure induced by hydrocarbon production from the geological formations. However, the application of these numerical models has often been limited by the uncertainty in the hydrogeological and poro-mechanical input parameters that are necessary to simulate the impact on ground surface levels of past and/or future gas-field development scenarios. Resolving these uncertainties is of paramount importance, particularly the Northern Adriatic region, given the low elevation above the mean sea level observed along most of the coastline and in the areas surrounding the Venice Lagoon. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art data assimilation (DA) framework to incorporate measurements of displacement of the land surface obtained using Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques into the response of geomechanical simulation models. In Northern Italy, InSAR measurement campaigns have been carried out over a depleted gas reservoir, referred to as "Lombardia", located at a depth of about 1200 m in the sedimentary basin of the Po River plain. In the last years, this reservoir has been used for underground gas storage and recovery (GSR). Because of the pore pressure periodical alternation produced by GSR, reservoir formations have undergone loading/unloading cycles, experiencing effective stress changes that have induced periodical variation of ground surface levels. Over the Lombardia reservoir, the pattern, magnitude and timing of time-laps land displacements both in the vertical and in the East-West directions have been acquired from 2003 until 2008. The availability of these data opens new

  6. Study on crustal deformation of the Ms6. 6 Damxung earthquake in 2008 by InSAR measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Qiao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three Envisat images from ESA were used to derive the pre – and co-seismic deformation interfereograms caused by the Damxung Ms6. 6 earthquake of Oct. 6, 2008, by using InSAR. The result shows no significant crustal motion more than 4 months before the earthquake, but a maximum co-seismic displacement of about 0.3 m in an epicentral area of 20 km × 20 km. The deformation field was symmetrically distributed about a NS axis, where the west side subsided and the east side uplifted. We used a linear elastic dislocation model in half space and a nonlinear constraint optimized algorithm to estimate the slip distribution along the fault. The results indicates that the epicenter is located at 90.374°E, 29.745°N with a moment magnitude of Mw6. 35. The earthquake is dominated by normal faulting with a maximum slip of 3 m on a 12 km × 11 km fault plane striking S189°W, dipping 60° to NW at a depth of 9.5 km, and is located at a sub-fault of the southeastern Piedmont of the Nyainqentanglha mountains. The relatively shallow depth of earthquake is related to relatively high heat flow in the area.

  7. Kinematic fault slip model from joint inversion of teleseismic, GPS, InSAR and subpixel-correlation measurements of the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake and postseismic deformation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Wei, S.; Leprince, S.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Avouac, J.; Briggs, R. W.; Hudnut, K. W.; Helmberger, D. V.; Hensley, S.; Hauksson, E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Herring, T.; Akciz, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    We use interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images (InSAR) and pixel tracking by subpixel correlation of SAR and optical images to map the fault ruptures and surface deformation of the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (Mw 7.2) in Baja California, Mexico. We then combine sampled InSAR and subpixel correlation results with GPS offsets at PBO stations and teleseismic waveforms in a joint inversion to produce a kinematic fault slip model. Pixel-tracking measurements from SPOT 2.5 m panchromatic images and from Envisat ASAR and ALOS PALSAR images measure large ground displacements close to fault ruptures, with a strong discontinuity where the rupture reached the surface. Optical image subpixel correlation measures horizontal displacements in both the east-west and north-south directions and shows the earthquake ruptured the Pescadores Fault in the southern Sierra Cucapah and the Borrego Fault in the central and northern edge of the mountain range. At the south end of the Sierra Cucapah, the fault ruptures fork into two subparallel strands with substantial slip on both visible. SAR image subpixel correlation measures horizontal deformation in the along-track direction of the satellite (approximately north or south) and in the radar line-of-sight direction. SAR along-track offsets, especially on ALOS images, show that there is a large amount of right-lateral slip (1-3 m) on a previously unmapped system of faults extending about 60 km to the southeast of the epicenter beneath the Colorado River Delta named the Indiviso Fault system. Aftershocks also extend approximately the same distance to the southeast. InSAR analyses of Envisat, ALOS and UAVSAR images, measure the surface displacements in the same radar line-of-sight as the range pixel tracking, but with much greater precision. Combination of SAR images from different directions allows the separation of the vertical and east components of the deformation, revealing the large normal fault

  8. SAR ATR Based on Convolutional Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhuangzhuang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new method of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image target recognition based on a convolutional neural network. First, we introduce a class separability measure into the cost function to improve this network’s ability to distinguish between categories. Then, we extract SAR image features using the improved convolutional neural network and classify these features using a support vector machine. Experimental results using moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition SAR datasets prove the validity of this method.

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  10. The 3a Protein of SARS-coronavirus Induces Apoptosis in Vero E6 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Waye, Mary; W Law, Patrick; Wong, Chi-Hang; C Au, Thomas; Chuck, Chi-Pang; Kong, Siu-Kai; S Chan, Paul; To, Ka-Fai; I Lo, Anthony; W Chan, Judy; Suen, Yick-Keung; Edwin Chan, H Y; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Y Sung, Joseph; Lo, Y M; W Tsui, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in China and the first case emerged in mid November 2002. The etiologic agent of this disease was found to be a previously unknown coronavirus, SARS-CoV. The detailed pathology of SARS-CoV infection and the host response to the viral infection are still not known. The 3a gene encodes a non-structural viral protein which is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. In this study, we showed that the 3a protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in 3a-transfected monkey kidney Vero E6 cells. In vitro experiments of chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation suggest that the 3a protein may trigger apoptosis. Our data show that over-expression of a single SARS-CoV protein can induce apoptosis in vitro. Thus GFP-3a fusion protein could also be used as a biosensor for monitoring the cytopathic features of SARS infection, e.g. lymphopenia, in animal model systems, similar to nucleocapsid and 7a proteins.

  11. Cloning of biologically active genomes from a Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus isolate by using a bacterial artifical chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Deng, F.; Pijlman, G.P.; Chen Xinwen,; Sun, X.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Purification of genotypes from baculovirus isolates provides understanding of the diversity of baculoviruses and may lead to the development of better pesticides. Here, we report the cloning of different genotypes from an isolate of Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus

  12. Measurement of long-term land subsidence by combination of InSAR and time series analysis - Application study to Kanto Plains of Japan -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, T.; Rokugawa, S.; Matsushima, J.

    2009-04-01

    InSAR is an application technique of synthetic aperture radars and is now drawing attention as a methodology capable of measuring subtle surface deformation over a wide area with a high spatial resolution. In this study, the authors applied the method of measuring long-term land subsidence by combining InSAR and time series analysis to Kanto Plains of Japan using 28 images of ENVISAT/ASAR data. In this measuring method, the value of land deformation is set as an unknown parameter and the optimal solution to the land deformation amount is derived by applying a smoothness-constrained inversion algorithm. The vicinity of the Kanto Plain started to subside in the 1910s, and became exposed to extreme land subsidence supposedly in accordance with the reconstruction efforts after the Second World War and the economic development activities. The main causes of the land subsidence include the intake of underground water for the use in industries, agriculture, waterworks, and other fields. In the Kujukuri area, the exploitation of soluble natural gas also counts. The Ministry of Environment reported in its documents created in fiscal 2006 that a total of 214 km2 in Tokyo and the six prefectures around the Plain had undergone a subsidence of 1 cm or more per a year. As a result of long-term land subsidence over approximately five and a half years from 13th January, 2003, to 30th June, 2008, unambiguous land deformation was detected in six areas: (i) Haneda Airport, (ii) Urayasu City, (iii) Kasukabe-Koshigaya, (iv) Southern Kanagawa, (v) Toride-Ryugasaki, and (vi) Kujukuri in Chiba Prefecture. In particular, the results for the Kujukuri area were compared with the leveling data taken around the same area to verify the measuring accuracy. The comparative study revealed that the regression formula between the results obtained by time series analysis and those by the leveling can be expressed as a straight line with a gradient of approximately 1, though including a bias of about

  13. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  14. SARS Pathogenesis: Host Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhile it is hypothesized that Sever Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans is caused by a disproportional immune response illustrated by inappropriate induction of inflammatory cytokines, the exact nature of the host response to SARS coronavirus (CoV) infection causing severe

  15. Low-SAR metamaterial-inspired printed monopole antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-SAR metamaterial-embedded planar monopole antenna is introduced for a wireless communication system. A printed monopole antenna is designed for modern mobile, which operates in GSM, UMTS, LTE, WLAN, and Bluetooth frequency bands. A metamaterial structure is designed to use in the mobile handset with a multi-band printed monopole antenna. The finite integration technique of the CST microwave studio is used in this study. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber, and the SAR values are measured using COMOSAR system. The results indicate that metamaterial structure leads to reduce SAR without affecting antenna performance significantly. According to the measured results, the metamaterial attachment leads to reduce 87.7% peak SAR, 68.2% 1-g SAR, and 46.78% 10-g SAR compared to antenna without metamaterial.

  16. Resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus infection in transgenic tobacco expressing the viral nucleocapsid gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, D J; Ellis, P J

    1992-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing the entire tomato spotted with virus (TSWV) nucleocapsid gene, with the exception of nucleotide encoding three N-terminal amino acids, was isolated by screening a complementary DNA library, prepared against random primed viral RNA, using a specific monoclonal antibody. The insert contained in plasmid pTSW1 was repaired and amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the complete nucleocapsid protein gene was introduced into Nicotiana tabacum 'Samsun' by leaf disk transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgenic plants expressing the viral nucleocapsid protein were resistant to subsequent infection following mechanical inoculation with TSWV as indicated by a lack of systemic symptoms and little or no systemic accumulation of virus as determined by double antibody sandwich enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. These results further extend the applicability of coat protein-mediated resistance, as previously demonstrated for a number of simple plant viruses composed of a positive-sense RNA genome encapsidated with a single species of coat protein, to a membrane-encapsidated, multi-component, negative-sense RNA virus.

  17. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus PK-1 is essential for nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Changyong, E-mail: cyliang@yzu.edu.cn [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Li, Min; Dai, Xuejuan; Zhao, Shuling; Hou, Yanling; Zhang, Yongli; Lan, Dandan [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-09-01

    PK-1 (Ac10) is a baculovirus-encoded serine/threonine kinase and its function is unclear. Our results showed that a pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny, while the pk-1 repair virus could rescue this defect. qPCR analysis demonstrated that pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Analysis of the repaired recombinants with truncated pk-1 mutants demonstrated that the catalytic domain of protein kinases of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. Moreover, those PK-1 mutants that could rescue the infectious BV production defect exhibited kinase activity in vitro. Therefore, it is suggested that the kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. Electron microscopy revealed that pk-1 deletion affected the formation of normal nucleocapsids. Masses of electron-lucent tubular structures were present in cell transfected with pk-1 knockout bacmid. Therefore, PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral or cellular proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly. - Highlights: • A pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny. • The pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. • The catalytic domain of protein kinases (PKc) of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. • The kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. • PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly.

  18. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  19. SARS-CoV envelope protein palmitoylation or nucleocapid association is not required for promoting virus-like particle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ying-Tzu; Wang, Shiu-Mei; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2014-04-27

    Coronavirus membrane (M) proteins are capable of interacting with nucleocapsid (N) and envelope (E) proteins. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) M co-expression with either N or E is sufficient for producing virus-like particles (VLPs), although at a lower level compared to M, N and E co-expression. Whether E can release from cells or E/N interaction exists so as to contribute to enhanced VLP production is unknown. It also remains to be determined whether E palmitoylation or disulfide bond formation plays a role in SARS-CoV virus assembly. SARS-CoV N is released from cells through an association with E protein-containing vesicles. Further analysis suggests that domains involved in E/N interaction are largely located in both carboxyl-terminal regions. Changing all three E cysteine residues to alanines did not exert negative effects on E release, E association with N, or E enhancement of VLP production, suggesting that E palmitoylation modification or disulfide bond formation is not required for SARS-CoV virus assembly. We found that removal of the last E carboxyl-terminal residue markedly affected E release, N association, and VLP incorporation, but did not significantly compromise the contribution of E to efficient VLP production. The independence of the SARS-CoV E enhancement effect on VLP production from its viral packaging capacity suggests a distinct SARS-CoV E role in virus assembly.

  20. Simultaneous measurements from the Millstone Hill radar and the Active satellite during the SAID/SAR arc event of the March 1990 CEDAR storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Förster

    Full Text Available During a nearby passage of the Active satellite above the Millstone Hill radar on 21 March 1990 at local sunset, the satellite and the radar performed simultaneous measurements of upper ionospheric parameters in nearly the same spatial volume. For this purpose the radar carried out a special azimuth-elevation scan to track the satellite. Direct comparisons of radar data and in situ satellite measurements have been carried out quite rarely. In this case, the coincidence of co-ordinated measurements and active ionospheric-magnetospheric processes during an extended storm recovery phase presents a unique occasion resulting in a very valuable data set. The measurements show generally good agreement both during quiet prestorm and storm conditions and the combination of radar and satellite observations gives a more comprehensive picture of the physical processes involved. We find a close relationship between the rapid westward ion drift peak at subauroral latitudes (SAID event and the occurrence of a stable auroral red (SAR arc observed after sunset by an all-sky imager and reported in an earlier study of this event. The SAID electric field is caused by the penetration of energetic ions with energies between about 1 keV and 100 keV into the outer plasmasphere to a latitude equatorward of the extent of the plasmasheet electrons. Charge separation results in the observed polarisation field and the SAID. Unusually high molecular ion densities measured by the satellite at altitudes of 700-870 km at subauroral and auroral latitudes point on strong upward-directed ion acceleration processes and an intense neutral gas upwelling. These structures are collocated with a narrow trough in electron density and an electron temperature peak as observed simultaneously by the radar and the satellite probes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density; Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere.

  1. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  2. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-12-20

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated.

  3. SARS Requests for Information

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rob Hare

    2016-01-01

      It is an increasingly common scenario: the South African Revenue Service (SARS) sends a taxpayer a request for information and, if it does not receive a response, proceeds to issue tax assessments against that taxpayer...

  4. MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Ice Velocity of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program, provides high-resolution, digital mosaics of...

  5. MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Ice Velocity of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, Antarctica V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program, provides high-resolution, digital mosaics of...

  6. The Role of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-Coronavirus Accessory Proteins in Virus Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ruth; Fielding, Burtram C.

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, termed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was first reported in China in late 2002. The subsequent efficient human-to-human transmission of this virus eventually affected more than 30 countries worldwide, resulting in a mortality rate of ~10% of infected individuals. The spread of the virus was ultimately controlled by isolation of infected individuals and there has been no infections reported since April 2004. However, the natural reservoir of the virus was never identified and it is not known if this virus will re-emerge and, therefore, research on this virus continues. The SARS-CoV genome is about 30 kb in length and is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). The genome encodes for proteins that are homologous to known coronavirus proteins, such as the replicase proteins (ORFs 1a and 1b) and the four major structural proteins: nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), membrane (M) and envelope (E). SARS-CoV also encodes for eight unique proteins, called accessory proteins, with no known homologues. This review will summarize the current knowledge on SARS-CoV accessory proteins and will include: (i) expression and processing; (ii) the effects on cellular processes; and (iii) functional studies. PMID:23202509

  7. Evaluation of the Wishart test statistics for polarimetric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut

    2003-01-01

    A test statistic for equality of two covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution has previously been used in new algorithms for change detection, edge detection and segmentation in polarimetric SAR images. Previously, the results for change detection and edge detection have been...... quantitatively evaluated. This paper deals with the evaluation of segmentation. A segmentation performance measure originally developed for single-channel SAR images has been extended to polarimetric SAR images, and used to evaluate segmentation for a merge-using-moment algorithm for polarimetric SAR data....

  8. Crop identification of SAR data using digital textural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuesch, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    After preprocessing SEASAT SAR data which included slant to ground range transformation, registration to LANDSAT MSS data and appropriate filtering of the raw SAR data to minimize coherent speckle, textural features were developed based upon the spatial gray level dependence method (SGLDM) to compute entropy and inertia as textural measures. It is indicated that the consideration of texture features are very important in SAR data analysis. The SEASAT SAR data are useful for the improvement of field boundary definitions and for an earlier season estimate of corn and soybean area location than is supported by LANDSAT alone.

  9. Measurement of SAR-induced temperature increase in a phantom and in vivo with comparison to numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sukhoon; Ryu, Yeun-Chul; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Sica, Christopher T; Collins, Christopher M

    2014-05-01

    To compare numerically simulated and experimentally measured temperature increase due to specific energy absorption rate from radiofrequency fields. Temperature increase induced in both a phantom and in the human forearm when driving an adjacent circular surface coil was mapped using the proton resonance frequency shift technique of magnetic resonance thermography. The phantom and forearm were also modeled from magnetic resonance image data, and both specific energy absorption rate and temperature change as induced by the same coil were simulated numerically. The simulated and measured temperature increase distributions were generally in good agreement for the phantom. The relative distributions for the human forearm were very similar, with the simulations giving maximum temperature increase about 25% higher than measured. Although a number of parameters and uncertainties are involved, it should be possible to use numerical simulations to produce reasonably accurate and conservative estimates of temperature distribution to ensure safety in magnetic resonance imaging. R01 EB006563 Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Ionospheric effects on repeat-pass SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian; Zhen, Weimin; Wu, Zhensen

    2017-10-01

    InSAR measurements can be significantly affected by the atmosphere when the radar signal propagates through the atmosphere since it varies with space and time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the tropospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating these effects. By using the basic principles of InSAR, the quantitative analysis of ionospheric delay effects on topography and surface deformation have been introduced for the first time. The measurement errors can be related to the vertical ionospheric total electron content (vTEC). By using the ionospheric observations, the effects of temporal ionospheric variations on InSAR have been analyzed. The results indicate that the ionospheric variations with time, season, solar cycle and geomagnetic activities can compromise the effectiveness of InSAR for both the measurement of topography and surface determination. The repeat-pass SAR interferometry errors induced by ionosphere should be corrected by actual measurements.

  11. Landslide kinematics and their potential controls from hourly to decadal timescales: Insights from integrating ground-based InSAR measurements with structural maps and long-term monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ricci, Pier P.; Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Shurtleff, Brett L.; Panosky, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of kinematics is rudimentary for understanding landslide controls and is increasingly valuable with greater spatiotemporal coverage. However, characterizing landslide-wide kinematics is rare, especially at broadly ranging timescales. We used highly detailed kinematic data obtained using photogrammetry and field mapping during the 1980s and 1990s and our 4.3-day ground-based InSAR survey during 2010 to study kinematics of the large, persistently moving Slumgullion landslide. The landslide was segregated into 11 kinematic elements using the 1980s-1990s data and the InSAR survey revealed most of these elements within a few hours. Averages of InSAR-derived displacement point measures within each element agreed well with higher quality in situ observations; averaging was deemed necessary because adverse look angles for the radar coupled with tree cover on the landslide introduced error in the InSAR results. We found that the landslide moved during 2010 at about half its 1985-1990 speed, but slowing was most pronounced at the landslide head. Gradually decreased precipitation and increased temperature between the periods likely resulted in lower groundwater levels and consequent slowing of the landslide. We used GPS survey results and limit-equilibrium modeling to analyze changing stability of the landslide head from observed thinning and found that its stability increased between the two periods, which would result in its slowing, and the consequent slowing of the entire landslide. Additionally, InSAR results suggested movement of kinematic element boundaries in the head region and our field mapping verified that they moved and changed character, likely because of the long-term increasing head stability. On an hourly basis, InSAR results were near error bounds but suggested landslide acceleration in response to seemingly negligible rainfall. Pore-pressure diffusion modeling suggested that rainfall infiltration affected frictional strength only to shallow depths

  12. Landslide kinematics and their potential controls from hourly to decadal timescales: Insights from integrating ground-based InSAR measurements with structural maps and long-term monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, William; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ricci, P.P; Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Shurtleff, Brett L; Panosky, J

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of kinematics is rudimentary for understanding landslide controls and is increasingly valuable with greater spatiotemporal coverage. However, characterizing landslide-wide kinematics is rare, especially at broadly ranging timescales. We used highly detailed kinematic data obtained using photogrammetry and field mapping during the 1980s and 1990s and our 4.3-day ground-based InSAR survey during 2010 to study kinematics of the large, persistently moving Slumgullion landslide. The landslide was segregated into 11 kinematic elements using the 1980s–1990s data and the InSAR survey revealed most of these elements within a few hours. Averages of InSAR-derived displacement point measures within each element agreed well with higher quality in situ observations; averaging was deemed necessary because adverse look angles for the radar coupled with tree cover on the landslide introduced error in the InSAR results. We found that the landslide moved during 2010 at about half its 1985–1990 speed, but slowing was most pronounced at the landslide head. Gradually decreased precipitation and increased temperature between the periods likely resulted in lower groundwater levels and consequent slowing of the landslide. We used GPS survey results and limit-equilibrium modeling to analyze changing stability of the landslide head from observed thinning and found that its stability increased between the two periods, which would result in its slowing, and the consequent slowing of the entire landslide. Additionally, InSAR results suggested movement of kinematic element boundaries in the head region and our field mapping verified that they moved and changed character, likely because of the long-term increasing head stability. On an hourly basis, InSAR results were near error bounds but suggested landslide acceleration in response to seemingly negligible rainfall. Pore-pressure diffusion modeling suggested that rainfall infiltration affected frictional strength only to shallow

  13. Sub-nucleocapsid nanoparticles: a nasal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Roux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in infants less than two years old is a growing public health concern worldwide, and there is currently no safe and effective vaccine. A major component of RSV nucleocapsid, the nucleoprotein (N, has been so far poorly explored as a potential vaccine antigen, even though it is a target of protective anti-viral T cell responses and is remarkably conserved between human RSV A and B serotypes. We recently reported a method to produce recombinant N assembling in homogenous rings composed of 10-11 N subunits enclosing a bacterial RNA. These nanoparticles were named sub-nucleocapsid ring structure (N SRS. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine potential of N SRS was evaluated in a well-characterized and widely acknowledged mouse model of RSV infection. BALB/c adult mice were immunized intranasally with N SRS adjuvanted with the detoxified E. coli enterotoxin LT(R192G. Upon RSV challenge, vaccinated mice were largely protected against virus replication in the lungs, with a mild inflammatory lymphocytic and neutrophilic reaction in their airways. Mucosal immunization with N SRS elicited strong local and systemic immunity characterized by high titers of IgG1, IgG2a and IgA anti-N antibodies, antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of using nanoparticles formed by the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as an efficient and safe intra-nasal vaccine against RSV.

  14. Measurement and interpretation of subtle deformation signals at Unimak Island from 2003 to 2010 using weather model-assisted time series InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.; Lee, C.-W.; Lu, Z.; Freymueller, J.

    2015-02-01

    A 7 year time series of satellite radar images over Unimak Island, Alaska—site of Westdahl Volcano, Fisher Caldera, and Shishaldin Volcano—was processed using a model-free Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique assisted by numerical weather prediction model. The deformation-only signals were optimally extracted from atmosphere-contaminated phase records. The reconstructed deformation time series maps are compared with campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements as well as Small Baseline Subset interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) results for quality assessment and geophysical interpretation. We observed subtle surface inflation at Westdahl Volcano that can be fit by a Mogi source located at approximately 3.6 km north of Westdahl peak and at depth of about 6.9 km that is consistent with the GPS-estimated depth for the 1998 to 2001 time period. The magma chamber volume change decays during the period of 2003 to 2010. The deformation field over Fisher Caldera is steadily subsiding over time. Its best fit analytical model is a sill source that is about 7.9 km in length, 0.54 km in width, and located at about 5.5 km below sea level underneath the center of Fisher Caldera with strike angle of N52°E. Very little deformation was detected near Shishaldin peak; however, a region approximately 15 km east of Shishaldin, as well as an area at the Tugamak range at about 30 km northwest of Shishaldin, shows evidence for movement toward the satellite, with a temporal signature correlated with the 2004 Shishaldin eruption. The cause of these movements is unknown.

  15. Agricultural Performance Monitoring with Polarimetric SAR and Optical Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, T.; Gray, D.; Menges, C.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results from an experiment measuring yield using TerraSAR-X dual-polarimetric mode and precision agriculture machinery which records harvested amounts every few meters. The experimental field setup and data collection using TerraSAR-X are discussed and some preliminary results are shown.

  16. SAR image registration in absolute coordinates using GPS carrier phase position and velocity information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, S.; Meindl, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aided Navigation and Remote Sensing Systems

    1994-09-01

    It is useful in a variety of military and commercial application to accurately register the position of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery in absolute coordinates. The two basic SAR measurements, range and doppler, can be used to solve for the position of the SAR image. Imprecise knowledge of the SAR collection platform`s position and velocity vectors introduce errors in the range and doppler measurements and can cause the apparent location of the SAR image on the ground to be in error by tens of meters. Recent advances in carrier phase GPS techniques can provide an accurate description of the collection vehicle`s trajectory during the image formation process. In this paper, highly accurate carrier phase GPS trajectory information is used in conjunction with SAR imagery to demonstrate a technique for accurate registration of SAR images in WGS-84 coordinates. Flight test data will be presented that demonstrates SAR image registration errors of less than 4 meters.

  17. Quantum-SAR Extension of the Spectral-SAR Algorithm. Application to Polyphenolic Anticancer Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Chiriac

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR “wave” and “conversion factor” in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization of molecular (concentration effects while indicating the structural (quantum based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein.

  18. Mapping groundwater level and aquifer storage variations from InSAR measurements in the Madrid aquifer, Central Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjar-Pizarro, Marta; Ezquerro, Pablo; Herrera, Gerardo; Tomás, Roberto; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Ruiz Hernández, José M.; Fernández Merodo, José A.; Marchamalo, Miguel; Martínez, Rubén

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater resources are under stress in many regions of the world and the future water supply for many populations, particularly in the driest places on Earth, is threatened. Future climatic conditions and population growth are expected to intensify the problem. Understanding the factors that control groundwater storage variation is crucial to mitigate its adverse consequences. In this work, we apply satellite-based measurements of ground deformation over the Tertiary detritic aquifer of Madrid (TDAM), Central Spain, to infer the spatio-temporal evolution of water levels and estimate groundwater storage variations. Specifically, we use Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) data during the period 1992-2010 and piezometric time series on 19 well sites covering the period 1997-2010 to build groundwater level maps and quantify groundwater storage variations. Our results reveal that groundwater storage loss occurred in two different periods, 1992-1999 and 2005-2010 and was mainly concentrated in a region of ∼200 km2. The presence of more compressible materials in that region combined with a long continuous water extraction can explain this volumetric deficit. This study illustrates how the combination of PSI and piezometric data can be used to detect small aquifers affected by groundwater storage loss helping to improve their sustainable management.

  19. Combined observations of Arctic sea ice with near-coincident colocated X-band, C-band, and L-band SAR satellite remote sensing and helicopter-borne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A. M.; King, J. A.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Gerland, S.; Singha, S.; Spreen, G.; Busche, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we compare colocated near-coincident X-, C-, and L-band fully polarimetry SAR satellite images with helicopter-borne ice thickness measurements acquired during the Norwegian Young sea ICE 2015 (N-ICE2015) expedition in the region of the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard in April 2015. The air-borne surveys provide near-coincident snow plus ice thickness, surface roughness data, and photographs. This unique data set allows us to investigate how the different frequencies can complement one another for sea ice studies, but also to raise awareness of limitations. X-band and L-band satellite scenes were shown to be a useful complement to the standard SAR frequency for sea ice monitoring (C-band) for lead ice and newly formed sea ice identification. This may be in part be due to the frequency but also the high spatial resolution of these sensors. We found a relatively low correlation between snow plus ice thickness and surface roughness. Therefore, in our dataset ice thickness cannot directly be observed by SAR which has important implications for operational ice charting based on automatic segmentation.

  20. MULTI-TEMPORAL SAR INTERFEROMETRY FOR LANDSLIDE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dwivedi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, SAR Interferometry specially InSAR and D-InSAR were extensively used for deformation monitoring related applications. Due to temporal and spatial decorrelation in dense vegetated areas, effectiveness of InSAR and D-InSAR observations were always under scrutiny. Multi-temporal InSAR methods are developed in recent times to retrieve the deformation signal from pixels with different scattering characteristics. Presently, two classes of multi-temporal InSAR algorithms are available- Persistent Scatterer (PS and Small Baseline (SB methods. This paper discusses the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterer (StaMPS based PS-InSAR and the Small Baselines Subset (SBAS techniques to estimate the surface deformation in Tehri dam reservoir region in Uttarkhand, India. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS approaches used sixteen ENVISAT ASAR C-Band images for generating single master and multiple master interferograms stack respectively and their StaMPS processing resulted in time series 1D-Line of Sight (LOS mean velocity maps which are indicative of deformation in terms of movement towards and away from the satellites. From 1D LOS velocity maps, localization of landslide is evident along the reservoir rim area which was also investigated in the previous studies. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS effectively extract measurement pixels in the study region, and the general results provided by both approaches show a similar deformation pattern along the Tehri reservoir region. Further, we conclude that StaMPS based PS-InSAR method performs better in terms of extracting more number of measurement pixels and in the estimation of mean Line of Sight (LOS velocity as compared to SBAS method. It is also proposed to take up a few major landslides area in Uttarakhand for slope stability assessment.

  1. Nucleocapsid gene analysis from an imported case of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor-Aziyah Mat-Rahim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the complete nucleocapsid (N gene region of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV from imported case in Malaysia and the relations with human- and camel-derived MERS-CoV. Methods: Combination of throat and nasal swab specimens was subjected to viral RNA extraction. For screening, the extracted RNA was subjected to real-time RT-PCR targeting upstream of E gene, open reading frame 1b and open reading frame 1a. For confirmation, the RNA was subjected to RT-PCR targeting partial part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid, followed by amplification of complete N gene region. Nucleotide sequencing of the first Malaysian case of MERS-CoV was performed following the confirmation with real-time RT-PCR detection. Results: Initial analysis of partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and N gene revealed that the nucleotides had high similarity to Jeddah_1_2013 strain. Analysis of complete N gene region (1 242 nucleotides from the case showed high similarity and yet distinct to the nucleotide sequences of camel-derived MERS-CoV. Conclusions: From the finding, there are possibilities that the patient acquired the infection from zoonotic transmission from dromedary camels.

  2. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, Jerome; Lucas, Bruno; DInardo, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage of ERS-2 and Envisat, and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the two Sentinels is expected to be launched in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as netCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth

  3. Mechanisms for SAR imaging of ocean surface phenomena: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding the SAR response to surface wave is a central issue in the analysis of SAR ocean images. The imaging mechanism for gravity waves and the practical question of just which characteristics of the ocean wave field can be measured remotely using SAR were examined. Assessments of wave imaging theory are based primarily on comparisons of the directional wave height variance spectrum psi (K) measured by in situ buoys with estimates from SAR images. Other criteria are also recommended, e.g., the effects of focus adjustments. It is assumed that fluctuations in SAR image intensity are proportional to fluctuations in ocean surface height. If this were true, the Fourier power spectrum of a SAR image and corresponding surface measurements of psi would coincide. Differences between SAR estimates based on this hypothesis and buoy measurements of psi are then used to begin the assessment of rival wave imaging theories.

  4. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  5. Crop Classification by Polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Svendsen, Morten Thougaard; Nielsen, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    Polarimetric SAR-data of agricultural fields have been acquired by the Danish polarimetric L- and C-band SAR (EMISAR) during a number of missions at the Danish agricultural test site Foulum during 1995. The data are used to study the classification potential of polarimetric SAR data using...... the Wishart distributed covariance matrix. In general, the improvement of using polarimetric SAR data compared to multipolarization SAR data is larger at L-band compared to C-band. On the other hand, the variability due to natural variation and different incidence angles is larger at L-band compared to C-band...

  6. The nucleocapsid proteins of mouse hepatitis virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus share the same IFN-β antagonizing mechanism: attenuation of PACT-mediated RIG-I/ MDA5 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhen; Fang, Liurong; Yuan, Shuangling; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Xunlei; Long, Siwen; Wang, Mohan; Wang, Dang; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-07-25

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a huge threat to both humans and animals and have evolved elaborate mechanisms to antagonize interferons (IFNs). Nucleocapsid (N) protein is the most abundant viral protein in CoV-infected cells, and has been identified as an innate immunity antagonist in several CoVs, including mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unclear. In this study, we found that MHV N protein inhibited Sendai virus and poly(I:C)-induced IFN-β production by targeting a molecule upstream of retinoic acid-induced gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation gene 5 (MDA5). Further studies showed that both MHV and SARS-CoV N proteins directly interacted with protein activator of protein kinase R (PACT), a cellular dsRNA-binding protein that can bind to RIG-I and MDA5 to activate IFN production. The N-PACT interaction sequestered the association of PACT and RIG-I/MDA5, which in turn inhibited IFN-β production. However, the N proteins from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which are also classified in the order Nidovirales, did not interact and counteract with PACT. Taken together, our present study confirms that both MHV and SARS-CoV N proteins can perturb the function of cellular PACT to circumvent the innate antiviral response. However, this strategy does not appear to be used by all CoVs N proteins.

  7. Bats and SARS

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-08

    Bats are a natural reservoir for emerging viruses, among them henipaviruses and rabies virus variants. Dr. Nina Marano, Chief, Geographic Medicine and Health Promotion Branch, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, CDC, explains connection between horseshoe bats and SARS coronavirus transmission.  Created: 11/8/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/17/2006.

  8. Data Analytics for SAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Calef, Matthew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-02

    We assess the ability of variants of anomalous change detection (ACD) to identify human activity associated with large outdoor music festivals as they are seen from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery collected by the Sentinel-1 satellite constellation. We found that, with appropriate feature vectors, ACD using random-forest machine learning was most effective at identifying changes associated with the human activity.

  9. The use of fluorescence microscopy to visualise homotypic interactions of tomato spotted wilt virus nucleocapsid protein in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.; Borst, J.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) were employed to study homotypic protein¿protein interactions in living cells. To this end, the nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was expressed as a fusion protein with either

  10. Bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of antibodies against the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid and Gn glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der F.J.; Achterberg, R.P.; Boer, de S.M.; Boshra, H.; Brun, A.; Maassen, C.B.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    A multiplex bead-based suspension array was developed that can be used for the simultaneous detection of antibodies against the surface glycoprotein Gn and the nucleocapsid protein N of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in various animal species. The N protein and the purified ectodomain of the Gn

  11. SAR-sensing of vegetation wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JJM; Klaassen, W

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study is to measure rain induced forest canopy wetness. The approach used is ERS tandem mission C-band SAR backscatter change detection between successive dry and rainy days. The observed backscatter change is positively related with modelled canopy wetness change. It is therefore

  12. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  13. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  14. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development. PMID:26038429

  15. Molecular characterisation of the nucleocapsid protein gene, glycoprotein gene and gene junctions of rhabdovirus 903/87, a novel fish pathogenic rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Nylund, S.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    The sequences of the nucleocapsid and glycoprotein genes and the gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus 903/87 were determined from cDNA and PCR clones. The mRNA of the nucleocapsid is most likely 1492 nucleotides long and encodes a protein of 426 amino acids, whereas the m......RNA of the glycoprotein is likely to be 1682 nucleotides long and the protein 517 amino acids. When the nucleocapsid and glycoprotein genes of virus 903/87 were compared at amino acid level with other rhabdoviruses they showed the hi hest homology with the Vesiculovirus genus. By sequencing the junctions between the N, P...

  16. Bistatic sAR data processing algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Xiaolan; Hu, Donghui

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is critical for remote sensing. It works day and night, in good weather or bad. Bistatic SAR is a new kind of SAR system, where the transmitter and receiver are placed on two separate platforms. Bistatic SAR is one of the most important trends in SAR development, as the technology renders SAR more flexible and safer when used in military environments. Imaging is one of the most difficult and important aspects of bistatic SAR data processing. Although traditional SAR signal processing is fully developed, bistatic SAR has a more complex system structure, so sign

  17. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang, E-mail: jiyou@catholic.ac.kr

    2016-05-15

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  18. Geocoding of AIRSAR/TOPSAR SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecz, Francesco; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated and recognized that radar interferometry is a promising method for the determination of digital elevation information and terrain slope from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. An important application of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) data in areas with topographic variations is that the derived elevation and slope can be directly used for the absolute radiometric calibration of the amplitude SAR data as well as for scattering mechanisms analysis. On the other hand polarimetric SAR data has long been recognized as permitting a more complete inference of natural surfaces than a single channel radar system. In fact, imaging polarimetry provides the measurement of the amplitude and relative phase of all transmit and receive polarizations. On board the NASA DC-8 aircraft, NASA/JPL operates the multifrequency (P, L and C bands) multipolarimetric radar AIRSAR. The TOPSAR, a special mode of the AIRSAR system, is able to collect single-pass interferometric C- and/or L-band VV polarized data. A possible configuration of the AIRSAR/TOPSAR system is to acquire single-pass interferometric data at C-band VV polarization and polarimetric radar data at the two other lower frequencies. The advantage of this system configuration is to get digital topography information at the same time the radar data is collected. The digital elevation information can therefore be used to correctly calibrate the SAR data. This step is directly included in the new AIRSAR Integrated Processor. This processor uses a modification of the full motion compensation algorithm described by Madsen et al. (1993). However, the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with the additional products such as local incidence angle map, and the SAR data are in a geometry which is not convenient, since especially DEMs must be referred to a specific cartographic reference system. Furthermore, geocoding of SAR data is important for multisensor and/or multitemporal purposes. In this paper, a procedure to

  19. Antigenic structure of the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, S K; Nelson, E A; Yoo, D

    1998-11-01

    A collection of 12 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus was used to study the antigenic structure of the virus nucleocapsid protein (N). The full-length N gene, encoded by open reading frame 7, was cloned from the Canadian PRRS virus, PA-8. Deletions were introduced into the N gene to produce a series of nine overlapping protein fragments ranging in length from 25 to 112 amino acids. The individual truncated genes were cloned as glutathione S-transferase fusions into a eukaryotic expression vector downstream of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter. HeLa cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing T7 RNA polymerase were transfected with plasmid DNA encoding the N protein fragments, and the antigenicity of the synthesized proteins was analyzed by immunoprecipitation. Based on the immunoreactivities of the N protein deletion mutants with the panel of N-specific MAbs, five domains of antigenic importance were identified. MAbs SDOW17, SR30, and 5H2.3B12.1C9 each identified independent domains defined by amino acids 30 to 52, 69 to 123, and 37 to 52, respectively. Seven of the MAbs tested specifically recognized the local protein conformation formed in part by the amino acid residues 52 to 69. Furthermore, deletion of 11 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the nucleocapsid protein disrupted the epitope configuration recognized by all of the conformation-dependent MAbs, suggesting that the carboxy-terminal region plays an important role in maintaining local protein conformation.

  20. Characterization of a single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of Thysanoplusia orichalcea L. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X W; Carner, G R

    2000-05-01

    A single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) isolated from Thysanoplusia orichalcea L. (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) (ThorNPV) in Indonesia has tetrahedral occlusion bodies (OBs) with a width of 1. 22 microm (range = 0.803-1.931 microm). The length of the virion with an envelope averaged 0.29 and 0.23 microm without an envelope. ThorNPV was propagated in Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) and its authenticity was confirmed by sequence analysis of the polyhedrin gene of the ThorNPV produced in T. orichalcea and P. includens. Polyhedrin amino acid sequence analysis revealed that ThorNPV belongs to Group II of baculoviruses and is closely related to Trichoplusia ni single nucleocapsid NPV, sharing 97.6% sequence identity. Infectivity of ThorNPV against third instar P. includens was low, with a LD(50) value of 65,636 OBs/larva. Electron microscopy of infected tissues showed many polyhedra without virions embedded, which might explain the low virulence against P. includens. Differences in virion occlusion rates between individual cells in the same tissue suggested that the inoculum consisted of at least two variants that differed in the gene(s) controlling virion occlusion. In a host range test using the LD(50) value to P. includens against Spodoptera exigua, S. frugiperda, S. eridania, Anticarsia gemmatalis, Helicoverpa zea, Trichoplusia ni, and P. includens, P. includens was the only species infected. The virus infected primarily the fat body, tracheal epithelium, and hypodermis. The genomic size of the ThorNPV is 135 kb. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Rupture geometry and slip distribution of the 2016 January 21st Ms6.4 Menyuan, China earthquake inferred from Sentinel-1A InSAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    On 21 January 2016, an Ms6.4 earthquake stroke Menyuan country, Qinghai Province, China. The epicenter of the main shock and locations of its aftershocks indicate that the Menyuan earthquake occurred near the left-lateral Lenglongling fault. However, the focal mechanism suggests that the earthquake should take place on a thrust fault. In addition, field investigation indicates that the earthquake did not rupture the ground surface. Therefore, the rupture geometry is unclear as well as coseismic slip distribution. We processed two pairs of InSAR images acquired by the ESA Sentinel-1A satellite with the ISCE software, and both ascending and descending orbits were included. After subsampling the coseismic InSAR images into about 800 pixels, coseismic displacement data along LOS direction are inverted for earthquake source parameters. We employ an improved mixed linear-nonlinear Bayesian inversion method to infer fault geometric parameters, slip distribution, and the Laplacian smoothing factor simultaneously. This method incorporates a hybrid differential evolution algorithm, which is an efficient global optimization algorithm. The inversion results show that the Menyuan earthquake ruptured a blind thrust fault with a strike of 124°and a dip angle of 41°. This blind fault was never investigated before and intersects with the left-lateral Lenglongling fault, but the strikes of them are nearly parallel. The slip sense is almost pure thrusting, and there is no significant slip within 4km depth. The max slip value is up to 0.3m, and the estimated moment magnitude is Mw5.93, in agreement with the seismic inversion result. The standard error of residuals between InSAR data and model prediction is as small as 0.5cm, verifying the correctness of the inversion results.

  2. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  3. SAR++: A Multi-Channel Scalable and Reconfigurable SAR System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Flemming; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    2002-01-01

    SAR++ is a technology program aiming at developing know-how and technology needed to design the next generation civilian SAR systems. Technology has reached a state, which allows major parts of the digital subsystem to be built using custom-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A design goal...... is to design a modular, scalable and reconfigurable SAR system using such components, in order to ensure maximum flexibility for the users of the actual system and for future system updates. Having these aspects in mind the SAR++ system is presented with focus on the digital subsystem architecture...

  4. Interaction with Tsg101 is necessary for the efficient transport and release of nucleocapsids in marburg virus-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dolnik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery supports the efficient budding of Marburg virus (MARV and many other enveloped viruses. Interaction between components of the ESCRT machinery and viral proteins is predominantly mediated by short tetrapeptide motifs, known as late domains. MARV contains late domain motifs in the matrix protein VP40 and in the genome-encapsidating nucleoprotein (NP. The PSAP late domain motif of NP recruits the ESCRT-I protein tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. Here, we generated a recombinant MARV encoding NP with a mutated PSAP late domain (rMARV(PSAPmut. rMARV(PSAPmut was attenuated by up to one log compared with recombinant wild-type MARV (rMARV(wt, formed smaller plaques and exhibited delayed virus release. Nucleocapsids in rMARV(PSAPmut-infected cells were more densely packed inside viral inclusions and more abundant in the cytoplasm than in rMARV(wt-infected cells. A similar phenotype was detected when MARV-infected cells were depleted of Tsg101. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that Tsg101 accumulated in inclusions of rMARV(wt-infected cells and was co-transported together with nucleocapsids. In contrast, rMARV(PSAPmut nucleocapsids did not display co-localization with Tsg101, had significantly shorter transport trajectories, and migration close to the plasma membrane was severely impaired, resulting in reduced recruitment into filopodia, the major budding sites of MARV. We further show that the Tsg101 interacting protein IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeleton regulator, was recruited into inclusions and to individual nucleocapsids together with Tsg101. Moreover, IQGAP1 was detected in a contrail-like structure at the rear end of migrating nucleocapsids. Down regulation of IQGAP1 impaired release of MARV. These results indicate that the PSAP motif in NP, which enables binding to Tsg101, is important for the efficient actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids to the sites of budding. Thus

  5. Wetland InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  6. Analysis of Dual- and Full-Circular Polarimetric SAR Modes for Rice Phenology Monitoring: An Experimental Investigation through Ground-Based Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Izumi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Circularly polarized synthetic aperture radar (CP-SAR is known to be insensitive to polarization mismatch losses caused by the Faraday rotation effect and antenna misalignment. Additionally, the dual-circular polarimetric (DCP mode has proven to have more polarimetric information than that of the corresponding mode of linear polarization, i.e., the dual-linear polarimetric (DLP mode. Owing to these benefits, this paper investigates the feasibility of CP-SAR for rice monitoring. A ground-based CP-radar system was exploited, and C-band anechoic chamber data of a self-cultivated Japanese rice paddy were acquired from germination to ripening stages. Temporal variations of polarimetric observables derived from full-circular polarimetric (FCP and DCP as well as synthetically generated DLP data are analyzed and assessed with regard to their effectiveness in phenology retrieval. Among different observations, the H / α ¯ plane and triangle plots obtained by three scattering components (surface, double-bounce, and volume scattering for both the FCP and DCP modes are confirmed to have reasonable capability in discriminating the relevant intervals of rice growth.

  7. The flight test of Pi-SAR(L) for the repeat-pass interferometric SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masanobu; Miyawaki, Masanori

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the experiment of the repeat pass interferometric SAR using Pi-SAR(L). The air-borne repeat-pass interferometric SAR is expected as an effective method to detect landslide or predict a volcano eruption. To obtain a high-quality interferometric image, it is necessary to make two flights on the same flight pass. In addition, since the antenna of the Pi-SAR(L) is secured to the aircraft, it is necessary to fly at the same drift angle to keep the observation direction same. We built a flight control system using an auto pilot which has been installed in the airplane. This navigation system measures position and altitude precisely with using a differential GPS, and the PC Navigator outputs a difference from the desired course to the auto pilot. Since the air density is thinner and the speed is higher than the landing situation, the gain of the control system is required to be adjusted during the repeat pass flight. The observation direction could be controlled to some extent by adjusting a drift angle with using a flight speed control. The repeat-pass flight was conducted in Japan for three days in late November. The flight was stable and the deviation was within a few meters for both horizontal and vertical direction even in the gusty condition. The SAR data were processed in time domain based on range Doppler algorism to make the complete motion compensation. Thus, the interferometric image processed after precise phase compensation is shown.

  8. Novel Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Algorithms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polarimetric SAR interferometry (PolInSAR) is a recently developed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode that combines the capabilities of radar polarimetry...

  9. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac75 is required for egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus and formation of de novo intranuclear membrane microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Jun Guo

    Full Text Available In this study, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac75 was functionally characterized. Ac75 has homologs in all sequenced genomes of alphabaculoviruses, betabaculoviruses, and gammabaculoviruses. It was determined to encode a protein that is associated with the nucleocapsid of budded virus and with both envelope and nucleocapsids of occlusion-derived virus. Sf9 cells transfected by an ac75-knockout bacmid resulted in the infection being restricted to single cells. No budded virus were detected although viral DNA replication and late gene expression were unaffected. Electron microscopy revealed that the virogenic stroma, nucleocapsids and occlusion bodies appeared normal in the cells transfected by an ac75-knockout bacmid. However, the nucleocapsids were unenveloped, the occlusion bodies did not contain any virions or nucleocapsids, and no nucleocapsids were found outside the nucleus or spanning the nuclear membrane. In addition, de novo intranuclear membrane microvesicles that are the precursor of occlusion-derived virus envelopes were absent in the nuclei of transfected cells. Confocal microscopy showed that AC75 protein appeared in the cytoplasm as early as 6 hours post infection. It localized to the ring zone at the periphery of the nucleus from 15 to 24 hours post infection and demonstrated light blocky cloud-like distribution in the center of the nucleus. AC75 was found to co-immunoprecipitate with BV and ODV associated envelope protein ODV-E25. The data from this study suggest that ac75 is essential for induction of the intranuclear membrane microvesicles, it appears to be required for the intranuclear envelopment of nucleocapsids, and is also essential for egress of nucleocapsids from the nuclei, in infected cells.

  10. Vaccine efficacy in senescent mice challenged with recombinant SARS-CoV bearing epidemic and zoonotic spike variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Deming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV was identified as the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome, a disease characterized by severe pneumonia that sometimes results in death. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that crossed the species barrier, most likely originating from bats or from other species including civets, raccoon dogs, domestic cats, swine, and rodents. A SARS-CoV vaccine should confer long-term protection, especially in vulnerable senescent populations, against both the 2003 epidemic strains and zoonotic strains that may yet emerge from animal reservoirs. We report the comprehensive investigation of SARS vaccine efficacy in young and senescent mice following homologous and heterologous challenge.Using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP expressing the 2003 epidemic Urbani SARS-CoV strain spike (S glycoprotein (VRP-S or the nucleocapsid (N protein from the same strain (VRP-N, we demonstrate that VRP-S, but not VRP-N vaccines provide complete short- and long-term protection against homologous strain challenge in young and senescent mice. To test VRP vaccine efficacy against a heterologous SARS-CoV, we used phylogenetic analyses, synthetic biology, and reverse genetics to construct a chimeric virus (icGDO3-S encoding a synthetic S glycoprotein gene of the most genetically divergent human strain, GDO3, which clusters among the zoonotic SARS-CoV. icGD03-S replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cells and in the lungs of young and senescent mice, and was highly resistant to neutralization with antisera directed against the Urbani strain. Although VRP-S vaccines provided complete short-term protection against heterologous icGD03-S challenge in young mice, only limited protection was seen in vaccinated senescent animals. VRP-N vaccines not only failed to protect from homologous or heterologous challenge, but resulted in enhanced immunopathology with eosinophilic

  11. RESEARCH ON AIRBORNE SAR IMAGING BASED ON ESC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. T. Dong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ability of flexible, accurate, and fast obtaining abundant information, airborne SAR is significant in the field of Earth Observation and many other applications. Optimally the flight paths are straight lines, but in reality it is not the case since some portion of deviation from the ideal path is impossible to avoid. A small disturbance from the ideal line will have a major effect on the signal phase, dramatically deteriorating the quality of SAR images and data. Therefore, to get accurate echo information and radar images, it is essential to measure and compensate for nonlinear motion of antenna trajectories. By means of compensating each flying trajectory to its reference track, MOCO method corrects linear phase error and quadratic phase error caused by nonlinear antenna trajectories. Position and Orientation System (POS data is applied to acquiring accuracy motion attitudes and spatial positions of antenna phase centre (APC. In this paper, extend chirp scaling algorithm (ECS is used to deal with echo data of airborne SAR. An experiment is done using VV-Polarization raw data of C-band airborne SAR. The quality evaluations of compensated SAR images and uncompensated SAR images are done in the experiment. The former always performs better than the latter. After MOCO processing, azimuth ambiguity is declined, peak side lobe ratio (PSLR effectively improves and the resolution of images is improved obviously. The result shows the validity and operability of the imaging process for airborne SAR.

  12. Research on Airborne SAR Imaging Based on Esc Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X. T.; Yue, X. J.; Zhao, Y. H.; Han, C. M.

    2017-09-01

    Due to the ability of flexible, accurate, and fast obtaining abundant information, airborne SAR is significant in the field of Earth Observation and many other applications. Optimally the flight paths are straight lines, but in reality it is not the case since some portion of deviation from the ideal path is impossible to avoid. A small disturbance from the ideal line will have a major effect on the signal phase, dramatically deteriorating the quality of SAR images and data. Therefore, to get accurate echo information and radar images, it is essential to measure and compensate for nonlinear motion of antenna trajectories. By means of compensating each flying trajectory to its reference track, MOCO method corrects linear phase error and quadratic phase error caused by nonlinear antenna trajectories. Position and Orientation System (POS) data is applied to acquiring accuracy motion attitudes and spatial positions of antenna phase centre (APC). In this paper, extend chirp scaling algorithm (ECS) is used to deal with echo data of airborne SAR. An experiment is done using VV-Polarization raw data of C-band airborne SAR. The quality evaluations of compensated SAR images and uncompensated SAR images are done in the experiment. The former always performs better than the latter. After MOCO processing, azimuth ambiguity is declined, peak side lobe ratio (PSLR) effectively improves and the resolution of images is improved obviously. The result shows the validity and operability of the imaging process for airborne SAR.

  13. Reverse Genetics of SARS-Related Coronavirus Using Vaccinia Virus-Based Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevenhoven, Jessika C.; Weber, Friedemann; Züst, Roland; Kuri, Thomas; Dijkman, Ronald; Chang, Guohui; Siddell, Stuart G.; Snijder, Eric J.; Thiel, Volker; Davidson, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that emerged in 2002 to become a global health concern. Although the original outbreak was controlled by classical public health measures, there is a real risk that another SARS-CoV could re-emerge from its natural reservoir, either in its original form or as a more virulent or pathogenic strain; in which case, the virus would be difficult to control in the absence of any effective antiviral drugs or vaccines. Using the well-studied SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849, we developed a vaccinia virus-based SARS-CoV reverse genetic system that is both robust and biosafe. The SARS-CoV genome was cloned in separate vaccinia virus vectors, (vSARS-CoV-5prime and vSARS-CoV-3prime) as two cDNAs that were subsequently ligated to create a genome-length SARS-CoV cDNA template for in vitro transcription of SARS-CoV infectious RNA transcripts. Transfection of the RNA transcripts into permissive cells led to the recovery of infectious virus (recSARS-CoV). Characterization of the plaques produced by recSARS-CoV showed that they were similar in size to the parental SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849 but smaller than the SARS-CoV isolate Frankfurt-1. Comparative analysis of replication kinetics showed that the kinetics of recSARS-CoV replication are similar to those of SARS-CoV Frankfurt-1, although the titers of virus released into the culture supernatant are approximately 10-fold less. The reverse genetic system was finally used to generate a recSARS-CoV reporter virus expressing Renilla luciferase in order to facilitate the analysis of SARS-CoV gene expression in human dendritic cells (hDCs). In parallel, a Renilla luciferase gene was also inserted into the genome of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Using this approach, we demonstrate that, in contrast to HCoV-229E, SARS-CoV is not able to mediate efficient heterologous gene expression in hDCs. PMID:22412934

  14. Reverse genetics of SARS-related coronavirus using vaccinia virus-based recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd H E van den Worm

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV that emerged in 2002 to become a global health concern. Although the original outbreak was controlled by classical public health measures, there is a real risk that another SARS-CoV could re-emerge from its natural reservoir, either in its original form or as a more virulent or pathogenic strain; in which case, the virus would be difficult to control in the absence of any effective antiviral drugs or vaccines. Using the well-studied SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849, we developed a vaccinia virus-based SARS-CoV reverse genetic system that is both robust and biosafe. The SARS-CoV genome was cloned in separate vaccinia virus vectors, (vSARS-CoV-5prime and vSARS-CoV-3prime as two cDNAs that were subsequently ligated to create a genome-length SARS-CoV cDNA template for in vitro transcription of SARS-CoV infectious RNA transcripts. Transfection of the RNA transcripts into permissive cells led to the recovery of infectious virus (recSARS-CoV. Characterization of the plaques produced by recSARS-CoV showed that they were similar in size to the parental SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849 but smaller than the SARS-CoV isolate Frankfurt-1. Comparative analysis of replication kinetics showed that the kinetics of recSARS-CoV replication are similar to those of SARS-CoV Frankfurt-1, although the titers of virus released into the culture supernatant are approximately 10-fold less. The reverse genetic system was finally used to generate a recSARS-CoV reporter virus expressing Renilla luciferase in order to facilitate the analysis of SARS-CoV gene expression in human dendritic cells (hDCs. In parallel, a Renilla luciferase gene was also inserted into the genome of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E. Using this approach, we demonstrate that, in contrast to HCoV-229E, SARS-CoV is not able to mediate efficient heterologous gene expression in hDCs.

  15. Exploratory Data Analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Measurements to Distinguish the Sea Surface Expressions of Naturally-Occurring Oil Seeps from Human-Related Oil Spills in Campeche Bay (Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo de Araújo Carvalho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA aims to use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR measurements for discriminating between two oil slick types observed on the sea surface: naturally-occurring oil seeps versus human-related oil spills—the use of satellite sensors for this task is poorly documented in scientific literature. A long-term RADARSAT dataset (2008–2012 is exploited to investigate oil slicks in Campeche Bay (Gulf of Mexico. Simple Classification Algorithms to distinguish the oil slick type are designed based on standard multivariate data analysis techniques. Various attributes of geometry, shape, and dimension that describe the oil slick Size Information are combined with SAR-derived backscatter coefficients—sigma-(σo, beta-(βo, and gamma-(γo naught. The combination of several of these characteristics is capable of distinguishing the oil slick type with ~70% of overall accuracy, however, the sole and simple use of two specific oil slick’s Size Information (i.e., area and perimeter is equally capable of distinguishing seeps from spills. The data mining exercise of our EDA promotes a novel idea bridging petroleum pollution and remote sensing research, thus paving the way to further investigate the satellite synoptic view to express geophysical differences between seeped and spilled oil observed on the sea surface for systematic use.

  16. Deformation Monitoring of Urban Infrastructure by Tomographic SAR Using Multi-View TerraSAR-X Data Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Sina; Zhu, Xiaoxiang; Eineder, Michael; Hanssen, Ramon F.; Bamler, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography (TomoSAR) coupled with data from modern SAR sensors, such as the German TerraSAR-X (TS-X) produces the most detailed three-dimensional (3D) maps by distinguishing among multiple scatterers within a resolution cell. Furthermore, multi-temporal TomoSAR allows for recording the underlying deformation phenomenon of each individual scatterer. One of the limitations of using InSAR techniques, including TomoSAR, is that they only measure deformation along the radar Line-of-Sight (LOS). In order to enhance the understanding of deformation, a decomposition of the observed LOS displacement into the 3D deformation vector in the local coordinate system is desired. In this paper we propose a method, based on L1 norm minimization within local spatial cubes, to reconstruct 3D deformation vectors from TomoSAR point clouds available from, at least, three different viewing geometries. The methodology is applied on two pair of cross-heading TS-X spotlight image stacks over the city of Berlin. The linear deformation rate and amplitude of seasonal deformation are decomposed and the results from two individual test sites with remarkable deformation patterns are discussed in details.

  17. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  18. MEASURING THE COSEISMIC DISPLACEMENTS OF 2010 Ms7.1 Yushu EARTHQUAKE BY USING SAR AND HIGH RESOLUTION OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available After the 2010, Mw7.1, Yushu earthquake, many researchers have conducted detail investigations of the surface rupture zone by optical image interpretation, field surveying and inversion of seismic waves. However, how larger of the crustal deformation area caused by the earthquake and the quantitative co-seismic displacements are still not available. In this paper, we first take advantage of D-InSAR, MAI, and optical image matching methods to determine the whole co-seismic displacement fields. Two PALSAR images and two SPOT5 images before and after the earthquake are processed and the co-seismic displacements at the surface rupture zone and far field are obtained. The results are consistent with the field investigations, which illustrates the rationality of the application of optical image matching technology in the earthquake.

  19. Measuring the Coseismic Displacements of 2010 Ms7.1 Yushu Earthquake by Using SAR and High Resolution Optical Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Wu, J.; Shi, F.

    2017-09-01

    After the 2010, Mw7.1, Yushu earthquake, many researchers have conducted detail investigations of the surface rupture zone by optical image interpretation, field surveying and inversion of seismic waves. However, how larger of the crustal deformation area caused by the earthquake and the quantitative co-seismic displacements are still not available. In this paper, we first take advantage of D-InSAR, MAI, and optical image matching methods to determine the whole co-seismic displacement fields. Two PALSAR images and two SPOT5 images before and after the earthquake are processed and the co-seismic displacements at the surface rupture zone and far field are obtained. The results are consistent with the field investigations, which illustrates the rationality of the application of optical image matching technology in the earthquake.

  20. Generation of Recombinant Schmallenberg Virus Nucleocapsid Protein in Yeast and Development of Virus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justas Lazutka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schmallenberg virus (SBV, discovered in continental Europe in late 2011, causes mild clinical signs in adult ruminants, including diarrhoea and reduced milk yield. However, fetal infection can lead to severe malformation in newborn offspring. To develop improved reagents for SBV serology, a high-level yeast expression system was employed to produce recombinant SBV nucleocapsid (N protein. Recombinant SBV N protein was investigated as an antigen in SBV-specific IgG enzyme immunoassay and used for generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. Yeast-expressed SBV N protein was reactive with anti-SBV IgG-positive cow serum specimens collected from different farms of Lithuania. After immunization of mice with recombinant SBV N protein, four MAbs were generated. The MAbs raised against recombinant SBV N protein reacted with native viral nucleocapsids in SBV-infected BHK cells by immunofluorescence assay. The reactivity of recombinant N protein with SBV-positive cow serum specimens and the ability of the MAbs to recognize virus-infected cells confirm the antigenic similarity between yeast-expressed SBV N protein and native viral nucleocapsids. Our study demonstrates that yeast expression system is suitable for high-level production of recombinant SBV N protein and provides the first evidence on the presence of SBV-specific antibodies in cow serum specimens collected in Lithuania.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-03

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  3. Ambiguities analysis in SAR tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziwei; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yixian; Zhang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture radar tomography (TomoSAR) is typically used to retrieve elevation, deformation, and other key information by separating scatters of the same slant range in multiple baseline SAR images. In this paper, we investigate two kinds of ambiguities for TomoSAR. Rank-1 ambiguity, as the first one we concerned, is due to the baseline distribution of the SAR image dataset which makes the steering matrix out of full rank. It will result in false alarms appearing in a permanent distance. However, an example using the TomoSAR imaging parameters shows this ambiguity makes no sense in most cases. The second ambiguity refers to the coherence of scatters contained in one pixel. In simulation experiment, the coherence will enhance the side lobes of the spectrum, even make the real peaks fused.

  4. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  5. Using airborne and satellite SAR for wake mapping offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Merete B.; Hasager, Charlotte B.

    2006-09-01

    Offshore wind energy is progressing rapidly around Europe. One of the latest initiatives is the installation of multiple wind farms in clusters to share cables and maintenance costs and to fully exploit premium wind resource sites. For siting of multiple nearby wind farms, the wind turbine wake effect must be considered. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an imaging remote sensing technique which offers a unique opportunity to describe spatial variations of wind speed offshore. For the first time an airborne SAR instrument was used for data acquisition over a large offshore wind farm. The aim was to identify the turbine wake effect from SAR-derived wind speed maps as a downstream region of reduced wind speed. The aircraft SAR campaign was conducted on 12 October 2003 over the wind farm at Horns Rev in the North Sea. Nearly simultaneous measurements were acquired over the area by the SAR on board the ERS-2 satellite. In addition, meteorological data were collected. Both aircraft and satellite SAR-derived wind speed maps showed significant velocity deficits downstream of the wind farm. Wind speed maps retrieved from aircraft SAR suggested deficits of up to 20% downstream of the last turbine, whereas satellite SAR-derived maps showed deficits of the order of 10%. The difference originated partly from the two different reference methods used for normalization of measured wind speeds. The detected region of reduced wind speed had the same width as the wind turbine array, indicating a low degree of horizontal wake dispersion. The downstream wake extent was approximately 10 km, which corresponds well with results from previous studies and with wake model predictions. Copyright

  6. A spatio-temporal analysis of matrix protein and nucleocapsid trafficking during vesicular stomatitis virus uncoating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To study VSV entry and the fate of incoming matrix (M protein during virus uncoating we used recombinant viruses encoding M proteins with a C-terminal tetracysteine tag that could be fluorescently labeled using biarsenical (Lumio compounds. We found that uncoating occurs early in the endocytic pathway and is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative (DN Rab5, but is not inhibited by DN-Rab7 or DN-Rab11. Uncoating, as defined by the separation of nucleocapsids from M protein, occurred between 15 and 20 minutes post-entry and did not require microtubules or an intact actin cytoskeleton. Unexpectedly, the bulk of M protein remained associated with endosomal membranes after uncoating and was eventually trafficked to recycling endosomes. Another small, but significant fraction of M distributed to nuclear pore complexes, which was also not dependent on microtubules or polymerized actin. Quantification of fluorescence from high-resolution confocal micrographs indicated that after membrane fusion, M protein diffuses across the endosomal membrane with a concomitant increase in fluorescence from the Lumio label which occurred soon after the release of RNPs into the cytoplasm. These data support a new model for VSV uncoating in which RNPs are released from M which remains bound to the endosomal membrane rather than the dissociation of M protein from RNPs after release of the complex into the cytoplasm following membrane fusion.

  7. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  8. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  9. Identification of novel 2-benzoxazolinone derivatives with specific inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Elia; Mori, Mattia; Kovalenko, Lesia; Giannini, Alessia; Sosic, Alice; Saladini, Francesco; Fabris, Dan; Mély, Yves; Gatto, Barbara; Botta, Maurizio

    2018-02-10

    In this report, we present a new benzoxazole derivative endowed with inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC). NC is a 55-residue basic protein with nucleic acid chaperone properties, which has emerged as a novel and potential pharmacological target against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel NC-inhibitor chemotypes, we performed virtual screening and in vitro biological evaluation of a large library of chemical entities. We found that compounds sharing a benzoxazolinone moiety displayed putative inhibitory properties, which we further investigated by considering a series of chemical analogues. This approach provided valuable information on the structure-activity relationships of these compounds and, in the process, demonstrated that their anti-NC activity could be finely tuned by the addition of specific substituents to the initial benzoxazolinone scaffold. This study represents the starting point for the possible development of a new class of antiretroviral agents targeting the HIV-1 NC protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Component tree analysis of cystovirus φ6 nucleocapsid Cryo-EM single particle reconstructions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas M Oliveira

    Full Text Available The 3-dimensional structure of the nucleocapsid (NC of bacteriophage φ6 is described utilizing component tree analysis, a topological and geometric image descriptor. The component trees are derived from density maps of cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstructions. Analysis determines position and occupancy of structure elements responsible for RNA packaging and transcription. Occupancy of the hexameric nucleotide triphosphorylase (P4 and RNA polymerase (P2 are found to be essentially complete in the NC. The P8 protein lattice likely fixes P4 and P2 in place during maturation. We propose that the viral procapsid (PC is a dynamic structural intermediate where the P4 and P2 can attach and detach until held in place in mature NCs. During packaging, the PC expands to accommodate the RNA, and P2 translates from its original site near the inner 3-fold axis (20 sites to the inner 5-fold axis (12 sites with excess P2 positioned inside the central region of the NC.

  11. Solubility, immunogenicity and physical properties of the nucleocapsid protein of Nipah virus produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen Siang; Ong, Swee Tin; Eshaghi, Majid; Foo, Sze-Shir; Yusoff, Khatijah

    2004-05-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of Nipah virus (NiV) can be produced in three Escherichia coli strains [TOP10, BL21(DE3) and SG935] under the control of trc promoter. However, most of the product existed in the form of insoluble inclusion bodies. There was no improvement in the solubility of the product when this protein was placed under the control of T7 promoter. However, the solubility of the N protein was significantly improved by lowering the growth temperature of E. coli BL21(DE3) cell cultures. Solubility analysis of N- and C-terminally deleted mutants revealed that the full-length N protein has the highest solubility. The soluble N protein could be purified efficiently by sucrose gradient centrifugation and nickel affinity chromatography. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified product revealed that the N protein assembled into herringbone-like particles of different lengths. The C-terminal end of the N protein contains the major antigenic region when probed with antisera from humans and pigs infected naturally. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography's Performance Analysis in Forest 3-D Structure Mapping with long term ALOS L band repeat pass InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Q.; Zebker, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Acquiring accurate measurement of three-dimensional structure of forest globally , is key to improve quantitative understanding of the state and dynamics of ecosystems, particularly global carbon cycle. Moreover, forest contains a large portion of Earth's renewable natural resources. All these require an accurate, timely and cost-effective global forest vertical structure mapping. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) remote sensing is widely acknowledged as a powerful tool to accomplish this task. Within the last decade, a number of experimental demonstrations of 3-D InSAR techniques have suggested the possibility of remotely sensing global 3-D vegetation structure. Among all the 3-D InSAR techniques, Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography( MB Tomo-SAR) is a very promising one. Multiple baseline SAR tomography exploits InSAR images acquired from different baselines and form a synthetic aperture in the vertical direction in order to retrieval vertical structure. Though theoretical predictions and several laboratory experiments show great reconstruction results, applying the method in real world condition still face a lot of challenges, including low acquisition number, irregular sample distribution, atmospheric phase noise and time decorrelation effect. In this article, we use L band ALOS spaceborne SAR data in Hawaii area to test the performance of MB TomoSAR . In the process, advanced Fourier beamforming method, atmospheric phase screen removal algorithm and time decorrelation effect are all applied. In addition, we also utilize the Landsat vegetation index and the result with other 3-D reconstruction methods as comparison to validate its performance.

  13. Quality evaluation of DInSAR results from the phase statistical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Centolanza, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The Earth is continuously monitored by sensors capable of providing diversified information about several phenomena. In particular Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is able to observe the Earth in all-day and all-weather conditions. Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) regards a set of techniques able to measure displacement of the terrain. In the last decades these techniques have become very powerful geodetic tools for land deformation monitoring and have gained a prominent role in several...

  14. Linear Features’ Detection in SAR Images Using Fuzzy Edge Detector (FED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    together with dissimilarity measure D4 constitute two promising edge detection • ,jI tools for SAR images, as they incorporate despeckling properties...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO10840 TITLE: Linear Features’ Detection in SAR Images Using Fuzzy Edge...report: ADPO10816 thru ADPO10842 UNCLASSIFIED 49-1 Linear features’ detection in SAR images using Fuzzy Edge Detector (FED) Alexandros Dimoun’ 2

  15. High Resolution Processing with an Active Phased Array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenboer, F.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Dutch PHARUS system is a polarimetric active phased array SAR capable of performing advanced SAR modes. Advanced SAR modes that are being investigated are: spotlight SAR, sliding spotlight SAR, stepped frequency SAR and interferometric SAR. The flight experiments and automatic beam steering

  16. Feature-Based Nonlocal Polarimetric SAR Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Xing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR images are inherently contaminated by multiplicative speckle noise, which complicates the image interpretation and image analyses. To reduce the speckle effect, several adaptive speckle filters have been developed based on the weighted average of the similarity measures commonly depending on the model or probability distribution, which are often affected by the distribution parameters and modeling texture components. In this paper, a novel filtering method introduces the coefficient of variance ( CV and Pauli basis (PB to measure the similarity, and the two features are combined with the framework of the nonlocal mean filtering. The CV is used to describe the complexity of various scenes and distinguish the scene heterogeneity; moreover, the Pauli basis is able to express the polarimetric information in PolSAR image processing. This proposed filtering combines the CV and Pauli basis to improve the estimation accuracy of the similarity weights. Then, the similarity of the features is deduced according to the test statistic. Subsequently, the filtering is proceeded by using the nonlocal weighted estimation. The performance of the proposed filter is tested with the simulated images and real PolSAR images, which are acquired by AIRSAR system and ESAR system. The qualitative and quantitative experiments indicate the validity of the proposed method by comparing with the widely-used despeckling methods.

  17. VideoSAR collections to image underground chemical explosion surface phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocky, David A.; Calloway, Terry M.; Wahl, Daniel E.

    2017-05-01

    Fully-polarimetric X-band (9.6 GHz center frequency) VideoSAR with 0.125-meter ground resolution flew collections before, during, and after the fifth Source Physics Experiment (SPE-5) underground chemical explosion. We generate and exploit synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) and VideoSAR products to characterize surface effects caused by the underground explosion. To our knowledge, this has never been done. Exploited VideoSAR products are "movies" of coherence maps, phase-difference maps, and magnitude imagery. These movies show two-dimensional, time-varying surface movement. However, objects located on the SPE pad created unwanted, vibrating signatures during the event which made registration and coherent processing more difficult. Nevertheless, there is evidence that dynamic changes are captured by VideoSAR during the event. VideoSAR provides a unique, coherent, time-varying measure of surface expression of an underground chemical explosion.

  18. SAR calculation using FDTD simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, Francisco Nabais; Pinto, Guilherme Taveira; Pinho, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The main intend of this work, is to determinate the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) on human head tissues exposed to radiation caused by sources of 900 and 1800MHz, since those are the typical frequencies for mobile communications systems nowadays. In order to determinate the SAR, has been used the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain), which is a numeric method in time domain, obtained from the Maxwell equations in differential mode. In order to do this, a computational model from the human he...

  19. Recent decadal glacier mass balances over the Western Nyainqentanglha Mountains and the increase in their melting contribution to Nam Co Lake measured by differential bistatic SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lin, Hui

    2017-02-01

    The Western Nyainqentanglha Mountains locates in the southeastern center of the Inner Tibetan Plateau (ITP). Glaciers in this region are influenced by both the continental climate of Central Asia and the Indian Monsoon system. Their melting on the western slopes feeds the Nam Co Lake, which is the second largest endorheic lake in the ITP. The elevation of Nam Co Lake increased at a rate of 0.25 ± 0.12 m year- 1 from 2003 to 2009. In this study, aimed at quantifying the decadal glacier mass balance in the Western Nyainqentanglha Mountains and their increasing melting contribution to Nam Co Lake; we applied the differential Bistatic SAR interferometry method to five pairs of TanDEM CoSSC datasets observed between 2013 and 2014 and SRTM acquired in 2000. The mean annual mass loss rate was - 0.235 ± 0.127 m w.e. year- 1 for the entire range. The mass loss rate for the northwestern slope (inside the Nam Co Lake drainage basin) and the southeastern slope (outside the Nam Co Lake drainage basin) were - 0.268 ± 0.129 m w.e. year- 1 and ¬ 0.219 ± 0.126 m w.e. year- 1, respectively. Our results agree well with previous fieldwork at the Zhadang and Gurenhekou glaciers located on the northwestern and southeastern slopes. Debris-cover suppressed glacier downwasting to some extent. By presuming that all of the melted ice flows into the lake, the glaciers' melting contribution to Nam Co Lake's increasing water volume was approximately 10.50 ± 9.00% during the period between 2003 and 2009.

  20. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, M. R. I.; Hossain, M. I.; Misran, N.; Singh, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances. PMID:26599584

  1. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, M R I; Hossain, M I; Misran, N; Singh, M; Islam, M T

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances.

  2. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R I Faruque

    Full Text Available A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances.

  3. Nucleocapsid Protein: A Desirable Target for Future Therapies Against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mattia; Kovalenko, Lesia; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Antaki, Danny; Torbett, Bruce E; Botta, Maurizio; Mirambeau, Gilles; Mély, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The currently available anti-HIV-1 therapeutics is highly beneficial to infected patients. However, clinical failures occur as a result of the ability of HIV-1 to rapidly mutate. One approach to overcome drug resistance is to target HIV-1 proteins that are highly conserved among phylogenetically distant viral strains and currently not targeted by available therapies. In this respect, the nucleocapsid (NC) protein, a zinc finger protein, is particularly attractive, as it is highly conserved and plays a central role in virus replication, mainly by interacting with nucleic acids. The compelling rationale for considering NC as a viable drug target is illustrated by the fact that point mutants of this protein lead to noninfectious viruses and by the inability to select viruses resistant to a first generation of anti-NC drugs. In our review, we discuss the most relevant properties and functions of NC, as well as recent developments of small molecules targeting NC. Zinc ejectors show strong antiviral activity, but are endowed with a low therapeutic index due to their lack of specificity, which has resulted in toxicity. Currently, they are mainly being investigated for use as topical microbicides. Greater specificity may be achieved by using non-covalent NC inhibitors (NCIs) targeting the hydrophobic platform at the top of the zinc fingers or key nucleic acid partners of NC. Within the last few years, innovative methodologies have been developed to identify NCIs. Though the antiviral activity of the identified NCIs needs still to be improved, these compounds strongly support the druggability of NC and pave the way for future structure-based design and optimization of efficient NCIs.

  4. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualley, Dominic F., E-mail: dqualley@berry.edu; Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  5. Nonsegmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses-Structural Data Bring New Insights Into Nucleocapsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, M; Yabukarski, F

    2017-01-01

    Viruses with a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA genome (NNVs) include important human pathogens as well as life-threatening zoonotic viruses. These viruses share a common RNA replication complex, including the genomic RNA and three proteins, the nucleoprotein (N), the phosphoprotein (P), and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L). During genome replication, the RNA polymerase complex first synthesizes positive-sense antigenomes, which in turn serve as template for the production of negative-sense progeny genomes. These newly synthesized antigenomic and genomic RNAs must be encapsidated by N, and the source of soluble, RNA-free N, competent for the encapsidation is a complex between N and P, named the N0-P complex. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in the structural characterization of the different components of this peculiar RNA polymerase machinery. We discuss common features and replication strategies and highlight idiosyncrasies encountered in different viruses, along with the key role of the dual ordered/disordered architecture of protein components and the dynamics of the viral polymerase machinery. In particular, we focus on the N0-P complex and its role in the nucleocapsid assembly process. These new results provide evidence that the mechanism of NC assembly is conserved between the different families and thus support a divergent evolution from a common ancestor. In addition, the successful inhibition of infection due to different NNVs by peptides derived from P suggests that the mechanism of NC assembly is a potential target for antiviral development. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enrichment of measles virus-like RNA in the nucleocapsid fraction isolated from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedows, E.; Payne, F.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA). School of Public Health); Kohne, D.E. (Center for Neurologic Study, San Diego, CA, USA); Tourtellotte, W.W. (Neurology Service, V.A. Wadsworth Hospital Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA)

    1982-02-01

    A procedure has been developed which facilitates the detection of measles virus RNA sequences in human brains. The procedure involves isolating subviral components (nucleocapsids) from brain tissues prior to RNA purification, followed by hybridization of these RNAs to cDNA synthesized from measles virus 50 S RNA template. Using these techniques we were able to obtain an RNA fraction which was manyfold enriched in measles virus-specific RNA, relative to unfractionated subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) brain RNAs. 70-100% of the measles virus-specific RNA present in these SSPE brain samples were recovered in this enriched fraction.

  7. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors, Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    cytoplas- mic inclusions. Immunocytochemical studies confirmed that MV and RSV nucleocapsid anti- genswere expressed in osteoclasts formed invitro in...multiple cloning site immediately upstream of the rabbit β-glo- bin sequences. The TRAP-p62P392L transgene was excised by XhoI digestion from the... digestion . The resulting DNA fragment (430 bp) encoding the com- plete coding sequence of OIP-1 was sub-cloned into the pKCR3R1-mTRAP gene promoter

  8. UAVSAR and TerraSAR-X Based InSAR Detection of Localized Subsidence in the New Orleans Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, R. G.; An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Latini, D.

    2014-12-01

    Vulnerability of the US Gulf coast to inundation has received increased attention since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Compounding effects of sea level rise, wetland loss, and regional and local subsidence makes flood protection a difficult challenge, and particularly for the New Orleans area. Key to flood protection is precise knowledge of elevations and elevation changes. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements show surprising complexity, including locations subsiding more rapidly than considered during planning of hurricane protection and coastal restoration projects. Combining traditional, precise geodetic data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations can provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. The Gulf Coast environment is challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. We use two InSAR capable systems, the L- band (24 cm wavelength) airborne JPL/NASA UAVSAR, and the DLR/EADS Astrium spaceborne TerraSAR X-band (3 cm wavelength), and compare results. First, we are applying pair-wise InSAR to the longer wavelength UAVSAR data to detect localized elevation changes potentially impacting flood protection infrastructure from 2009 - 2014. We focus on areas on and near flood protection infrastructure to identify changes indicative of subsidence, structural deformation, and/or seepage. The Spaceborne TerraSAR X-band SAR system has relatively frequent observations, and dense persistent scatterers in urban areas, enabling measurement of very small displacements. We compare L-band UAVSAR results with permanent scatterer (PS-InSAR) and Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) interferometric analyses of a stack composed by 28 TerraSAR X-band images acquired over the same period. Thus we can evaluate results from the different radar frequencies and analyses techniques. Preliminary results indicate subsidence features potentially of a variety of causes, including ground water

  9. On the use of distributed targets for the calibration imagery from the European SAR-580 campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.

    1983-01-01

    In 1981 ESA (European Space Agency) organized a large measurement campaign in Europe to stimulate the interest in radar, especially SAR. The Canadian SAR 580 system visited testsites during a 1 month period. Imagery was acquired in X, C and L band. Since several experiments called for calibrated

  10. Reflection on SARS Precautions in a Severe Intellectual Disabilities Hospital in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S. Y.; Lim, W. W. C.; Que, T. L.; Au, D. M. Y.

    2005-01-01

    Hong Kong went through a battle with a new respiratory disease, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), from March to June 2003. All clinical settings, including rehabilitative and infirmary setting, have actively involved in fighting against the infection. The intent of this paper was to reflect on the SARS precautionary measures that had been…

  11. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  12. Microstrip antenna for polarimetric C-band SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, Johan; Woelders, Kim; Dich, Mikael

    1994-01-01

    The paper outlines the design and the measured performance of a 224-element dual-linearly polarized microstrip array antenna with low cross-polarization. The array is currently being flown on the Danish high-resolution polarimetric C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR)......The paper outlines the design and the measured performance of a 224-element dual-linearly polarized microstrip array antenna with low cross-polarization. The array is currently being flown on the Danish high-resolution polarimetric C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR)...

  13. Quartz red TL SAR equivalent dose overestimation for Chinese loess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Z.P.; Murray, A.S.; Bailey, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    For the red TL of quartz extracted from Chinese loess, the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure overestimates the known laboratory doses in dose recovery test. The overestimation is the result of the first heating during the measurement of natural TL signal causing a sensitivity...... reduction, which is not corrected for using a SAR protocol. The SARA procedure was used to measure the sensitivity change. Using this as a correction factor is tested by comparison with the quartz optically stimulated luminiscence (OSL) equivalent dose. SARA is also employed to determine the residual level...

  14. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  15. Geodetic imaging of tectonic deformation with InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Heresh

    Precise measurements of ground deformation across the plate boundaries are crucial observations to evaluate the location of strain localization and to understand the pattern of strain accumulation at depth. Such information can be used to evaluate the possible location and magnitude of future earthquakes. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) potentially can deliver small-scale (few mm/yr) ground displacement over long distances (hundreds of kilometers) across the plate boundaries and over continents. However, Given the ground displacement as our signal of interest, the InSAR observations of ground deformation are usually affected by several sources of systematic and random noises. In this dissertation I identify several sources of systematic and random noise, develop new methods to model and mitigate the systematic noise and to evaluate the uncertainty of the ground displacement measured with InSAR. I use the developed approach to characterize the tectonic deformation and evaluate the rate of strain accumulation along the Chaman fault system, the western boundary of the India with Eurasia tectonic plates. I evaluate the bias due to the topographic residuals in the InSAR range-change time-series and develope a new method to estimate the topographic residuals and mitigate the effect from the InSAR range-change time-series (Chapter 2). I develop a new method to evaluate the uncertainty of the InSAR velocity field due to the uncertainty of the satellite orbits (Chapter 3) and a new algorithm to automatically detect and correct the phase unwrapping errors in a dense network of interferograms (Chapter 4). I develop a new approach to evaluate the impact of systematic and stochastic components of the tropospheric delay on the InSAR displacement time-series and its uncertainty (Chapter 5). Using the new InSAR time-series approach developed in the previous chapters, I study the tectonic deformation across the western boundary of the India plate with Eurasia and

  16. Monitoring of Land-Surface Deformation in the Karamay Oilfield, Xinjiang, China, Using SAR Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusupujiang Aimaiti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR interferometry is a technique that provides high-resolution measurements of the ground displacement associated with various geophysical processes. To investigate the land-surface deformation in Karamay, a typical oil-producing city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China, Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR data were acquired for the period from 2007 to 2009, and a two-pass differential SAR interferometry (D-InSAR process was applied. The experimental results showed that two sites in the north-eastern part of the city exhibit a clear indication of land deformation. For a further evaluation of the D-InSAR result, the Persistent Scatterer (PS and Small Baseline Subset (SBAS-InSAR techniques were applied for 21 time series Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT C-band Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR data from 2003 to 2010. The comparison between the D-InSAR and SBAS-InSAR measurements had better agreement than that from the PS-InSAR measurement. The maximum deformation rate attributed to subsurface water injection for the period from 2003 to 2010 was up to approximately 33 mm/year in the line of sight (LOS direction. The interferometric phase change from November 2007 to June 2010 showed a clear deformation pattern, and the rebound center has been expanding in scale and increasing in quantity.

  17. Mass Spectrometry Analysis Coupled with de novo Sequencing Reveals Amino Acid Substitutions in Nucleocapsid Protein from Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijian Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid substitutions in influenza A virus are the main reasons for both antigenic shift and virulence change, which result from non-synonymous mutations in the viral genome. Nucleocapsid protein (NP, one of the major structural proteins of influenza virus, is responsible for regulation of viral RNA synthesis and replication. In this report we used LC-MS/MS to analyze tryptic digestion of nucleocapsid protein of influenza virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1, which was isolated and purified by SDS poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Thus, LC-MS/MS analyses, coupled with manual de novo sequencing, allowed the determination of three substituted amino acid residues R452K, T423A and N430T in two tryptic peptides. The obtained results provided experimental evidence that amino acid substitutions resulted from non-synonymous gene mutations could be directly characterized by mass spectrometry in proteins of RNA viruses such as influenza A virus.

  18. Accelerated Scientific InSAR Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Neva Ridge Technologies proposes to develop a suite of software tools for the analysis of SAR and InSAR data, focused on having a robust and adopted capability well...

  19. SAR Image Enhancement using Particle Filters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this paper, we propose a novel approach to reduce the noise in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images using particle filters. Interpretation of SAR images is a...

  20. Polarimetric and Interferometric SAR Calibration Verification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Zyl, J van

    2001-01-01

    It is necessary to calibrate SAR data in order to use the data for science applications. When both polarimetric and interferometric data are collected simultaneously, these SAR data can be used for cross-calibration and verification.

  1. Novel Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Algorithms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polarimetric radar interferometry (PolInSAR) is a new SAR imaging mode that is rapidly becoming an important technique for bare earth topographic mapping, tree...

  2. SAR Tomography Based on Block Compressive Sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang Aichun; Xiang Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    While the use of SAR Tomography (TomoSAR) based on Compressive Sensing (CS) makes it possible to reconstruct the height profile of an observed scene, the performance of the reconstruction decreases for a structural observed scene...

  3. Transdermal delivery of plasmid encoding truncated nucleocapsid protein enhanced PRRSV-specific immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suradhat, Sanipa; Wongyanin, Piya; Sirisereewan, Chaitawat; Nedumpun, Teerawut; Lumyai, Mongkol; Triyarach, Sittikorn; Chaturavittawong, Damnoen; Paphavasit, Termsit; Panyatong, Raphee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2016-01-27

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV) induces several immunomodulatory mechanisms that resulted in delayed and ineffective anti-viral immune responses. Recently, it has been shown that intradermal immunization of plasmid encoding truncated nucleocapsid protein (pORF7t) could reduce PRRSV-induced immunomodulatory activities and enhances anti-PRRSV immunity in vaccinated pigs. However, intradermal immunization may not be practical for farm setting. Currently, there are several transdermal delivery systems available in the market, although they were not originally designed for plasmid delivery. To investigate the potential use of a transdermal delivery system for delivering of pORF7t and its immunological outcomes. The immunomodulatory effects induced by transdermal delivery of pORF7t were compared with intradermal immunization in an experimental pig model. In addition, immunomodulatory effects of the DNA vaccine were determined in the fattening pigs kept in a PRRSV-positive farm environment, and in the experimental pigs receiving heterologous prime-boost, pORF7t-modified live vaccine (MLV) immunization. The patterns of PRRSV-specific cellular responses induced by transdermal and intradermal immunizations of pORF7t were similar. Interestingly, the pigs transdermally immunized with pORF7t exhibited higher number of PRRSV-specific CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells. Pigs immunized with pORF7t and kept at PRRSV-positive environment exhibited enhanced PRRSV-specific IFN-γ(+) production, reduced numbers of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) and lower lung scores at the end of the finishing period. In the heterologous prime-boost experiment, priming with pORF7t prior to MLV vaccination resulted in significantly higher numbers of CD3(+)IFN-γ(+) subpopulations, lower numbers of PRRSV-specific CD3(+)IL-10(+) cells and Tregs, and rapid antibody responses in immunized pigs. Transdermal immunization with pORF7t reduced PRRRSV-induced immunomodulatory effects and enhanced

  4. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Augments mRNA Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeva, Subbiah; Cheng, Erdong; Ganaie, Safder S; Mir, Mohammad A

    2017-08-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne Nairovirus of the Bunyaviridae family, causing severe illness with high mortality rates in humans. Here, we demonstrate that CCHFV nucleocapsid protein (CCHFV-NP) augments mRNA translation. CCHFV-NP binds to the viral mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) with high affinity. It facilitates the translation of reporter mRNA both in vivo and in vitro with the assistance of the viral mRNA 5' UTR. CCHFV-NP equally favors the translation of both capped and uncapped mRNAs, demonstrating the independence of this translation strategy on the 5' cap. Unlike the canonical host translation machinery, inhibition of eIF4F complex, an amalgam of three initiation factors, eIF4A, eIF4G, and eIF4E, by the chemical inhibitor 4E1RCat did not impact the CCHFV-NP-mediated translation mechanism. However, the proteolytic degradation of eIF4G alone by the human rhinovirus 2A protease abrogated this translation strategy. Our results demonstrate that eIF4F complex formation is not required but eIF4G plays a critical role in this translation mechanism. Our results suggest that CCHFV has adopted a unique translation mechanism to facilitate the translation of viral mRNAs in the host cell cytoplasm where cellular transcripts are competing for the same translation apparatus.IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, a highly contagious viral disease endemic to more than 30 countries, has limited treatment options. Our results demonstrate that NP favors the translation of a reporter mRNA harboring the viral mRNA 5' UTR. It is highly likely that CCHFV uses an NP-mediated translation strategy for the rapid synthesis of viral proteins during the course of infection. Shutdown of this translation mechanism might selectively impact viral protein synthesis, suggesting that an NP-mediated translation strategy is a target for therapeutic intervention against this viral disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. SAR matrices: automated extraction of information-rich SAR tables from large compound data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Haebel, Peter; Weskamp, Nils; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-07-23

    We introduce the SAR matrix data structure that is designed to elucidate SAR patterns produced by groups of structurally related active compounds, which are extracted from large data sets. SAR matrices are systematically generated and sorted on the basis of SAR information content. Matrix generation is computationally efficient and enables processing of large compound sets. The matrix format is reminiscent of SAR tables, and SAR patterns revealed by different categories of matrices are easily interpretable. The structural organization underlying matrix formation is more flexible than standard R-group decomposition schemes. Hence, the resulting matrices capture SAR information in a comprehensive manner.

  6. SARS among Critical Care Nurses, Toronto

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Mark; McGeer, Allison; Henry, Bonnie; Ofner, Marianna; Rose, David; Hlywka, Tammy; Levie, Joanne; McQueen, Jane; Smith, Stephanie; Moss, Lorraine; Smith, Andrew; Green, Karen; Walter, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    To determine factors that predispose or protect healthcare workers from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), we conducted a retrospective cohort study among 43 nurses who worked in two Toronto critical care units with SARS patients. Eight of 32 nurses who entered a SARS patient’s room were infected. The probability of SARS infection was 6% per shift worked. Assisting during intubation, suctioning before intubation, and manipulating the oxygen mask were high-risk activities. Consistently ...

  7. Wind class sampling of satellite SAR imagery for offshore wind resource mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Badger, Jake; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution wind fields retrieved from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are combined for mapping of wind resources offshore where site measurements are costly and sparse. A new sampling strategy for the SAR scenes is introduced, based on a method for statistical-dynamical down......High-resolution wind fields retrieved from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are combined for mapping of wind resources offshore where site measurements are costly and sparse. A new sampling strategy for the SAR scenes is introduced, based on a method for statistical......-dynamical downscaling of large-scale wind conditions using a set of wind classes that describe representative wind situations. One or more SAR scenes are then selected to represent each wind class and the classes are weighted according to their frequency of occurrence. The wind class methodology was originally...

  8. The aetiology of SARS: Koch's postulates fulfilled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractProof that a newly identified coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the primary cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) came from a series of studies on experimentally infected cynomolgus macaques (Macaca, fascicularis). SARS-CoV-infected

  9. Convolutional Neural Networks for SAR Image Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren-Hansen, David; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images has several uses, but it is a difficult task due to a number of properties related to SAR images. In this article we show how Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) can easily be trained for SAR image segmentation with good results. Besides...

  10. SAR Systems and Related Signal Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is today a valuable source of remote sensing information. SAR is a side-looking imaging radar and operates from airborne and spacebome platforms. Coverage, resolution and image quality are strongly influenced by the platform. SAR processing can be performed on standard

  11. Squint mode SAR processing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. Y.; Jin, M.; Curlander, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    The unique characteristics of a spaceborne SAR (synthetic aperture radar) operating in a squint mode include large range walk and large variation in the Doppler centroid as a function of range. A pointing control technique to reduce the Doppler drift and a new processing algorithm to accommodate large range walk are presented. Simulations of the new algorithm for squint angles up to 20 deg and look angles up to 44 deg for the Earth Observing System (Eos) L-band SAR configuration demonstrate that it is capable of maintaining the resolution broadening within 20 percent and the ISLR within a fraction of a decibel of the theoretical value.

  12. Noise Removal in SAR Images using Orthonormal Ridgelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ravi,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Development in the field of image processing for reducing speckle noise from digital images/satellite images is a challenging task for image processing applications. Previously many algorithms were proposed to de-speckle the noise in digital images. Here in this article we are presenting experimental results on de-speckling of Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR images. SAR images have wide applications in remote sensing and mapping the surfaces of all planets. SAR can also be implemented as "inverse SAR" by observing a moving target over a substantial time with a stationary antenna. Hence denoising of SAR images is an essential task for viewing the information. Here we introduce a transformation technique called ―Ridgelet‖, which is an extension level of wavelet. Ridgelet analysis can be done in the similar way how wavelet analysis was done in the Radon domain as it translates singularities along lines into point singularities under different frequencies. Simulation results were show cased for proving that proposed work is more reliable than compared to other despeckling processes, and the quality of de-speckled image is measured in terms of Peak Signal to Noise Ratio and Mean Square Error.

  13. Validation of Forested Inundation Extent Revealed by L-Band Polarimetric and Interferometric SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Bruce; Celi, Jorge; Hamilton, Steve; McDonald, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    UAVSAR, NASA's airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), conducted an extended observational campaign in Central and South America in March 2013, primarily related to volcanic deformations along the Andean Mountain Range but also including a large number of flights studying other scientific phenomena. During this campaign, the L-Band SAR collected data over the Napo River in Ecuador. The objectives of this experiment were to acquire polarimetric and interferometric L-Band SAR data over an inundated tropical forest in Ecuador simultaneously with on-the-ground field work ascertaining the extent of inundation, and to then derive from this data a quantitative estimate for the error in the SAR-derived inundation extent. In this paper, we will first describe the processing and preliminary analysis of the SAR data. The polarimetric SAR data will be classified by land cover and inundation state. The interferometric SAR data will be used to identify those areas where change in inundation extent occurred, and to measure the change in water level between two observations separated by a week. Second, we will describe the collection of the field estimates of inundation, and have preliminary comparisons of inundation extent measured in the field field versus that estimated from the SAR data.

  14. Open reading frame 94 of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus encodes a novel conserved occlusion-derived virion protein, ODV-EC43

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, M.; Wang, H.; Yuan, L.; Chen Xinwen,; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Open reading frame 94 (Ha94) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) is 1086 bp long and a homologue of Autographa californica multiple NPV ORF109. The gene is conserved among all baculoviruses whose genomes have been completely sequenced so far and is thus

  15. Pulse-based internal calibration of polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Skou, Niels; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1994-01-01

    Internal calibration greatly diminishes the dependence on calibration target deployment compared to external calibration. Therefore the Electromagnetics Institute (EMI) at the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) has equipped its polarimetric SAR, EMISAR, with several calibration loops and devel......Internal calibration greatly diminishes the dependence on calibration target deployment compared to external calibration. Therefore the Electromagnetics Institute (EMI) at the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) has equipped its polarimetric SAR, EMISAR, with several calibration loops...... and developed a procedure for calibrating the entire system except a few passive components which must be measured in the laboratory. The calibration procedure has great potential as it takes into account the SAR point target response (PTR) unlike most other internal calibration schemes. However, it requires...

  16. THz-SAR Vibrating Target Imaging via the Bayesian Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Target vibration bears important information for target recognition, and terahertz, due to significant micro-Doppler effects, has strong advantages for remotely sensing vibrations. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of vibrating targets with THz-SAR are at first analyzed. An improved algorithm based on an excellent Bayesian approach, that is, the expansion-compression variance-component (ExCoV method, has been proposed for reconstructing scattering coefficients of vibrating targets, which provides more robust and efficient initialization and overcomes the deficiencies of sidelobes as well as artifacts arising from the traditional correlation method. A real vibration measurement experiment of idle cars was performed to validate the range model. Simulated SAR data of vibrating targets and a tank model in a real background in 220 GHz show good performance at low SNR. Rapidly evolving high-power terahertz devices will offer viable THz-SAR application at a distance of several kilometers.

  17. Genetic variation of the human α-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG) gene associated with the risk of SARS-CoV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohui; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Xuan; Chen, Ting; Yang, Ruifu; Shi, Yuling; Cao, Wuchun; Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun; Zhai, Yun; He, Fuchu; Zhou, Gangqiao; Cao, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Genetic background may play an important role in the process of SARS-CoV infection and SARS development. We found several proteins that could interact with the nucleocapsid protein of the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). α-2-Heremans-Schmid Glycoprotein (AHSG), which is required for macrophage deactivation by endogenous cations, is associated with inflammatory regulation. Cytochrome P450 Family 3A (CYP4F3A) is an ω-oxidase that inactivates Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in human neutrophils and the liver. We investigated the association between the polymorphisms of these two inflammation-associated genes and SARS development. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps of these two genes were built with Haploview using data on CHB+JPT (version 2) from the HapMap. A total of ten tag SNPs were selected and genotyped. In the Guangzhou cohort study, after adjusting for age and sex, two AHSG SNPs and one CYP4F3 SNP were found to be associated with SARS susceptibility: rs2248690 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-4.51); rs4917 (AOR 1.84; 95% CI 1.02-3.34); and rs3794987 (AOR 2.01; 95% CI 1.10-3.68). To further validate the association, the ten tag SNPs were genotyped in the Beijing cohort. After adjusting for age and sex, only rs2248690 (AOR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.30-2.04) was found to be associated with SARS susceptibility. The combined analysis of the two studies confirmed tag SNP rs2248690 in AHSG as a susceptibility variant (AOR 1.70; 95% CI 1.37-2.09). The statistical analysis of the rs2248690 genotype data among the patients and healthy controls in the HCW cohort, who were all similarly exposed to the SARS virus, also supported the findings. Further, the SNP rs2248690 affected the transcriptional activity of the AHSG promoter and thus regulated the AHSG serum level. Therefore, our study has demonstrated that the AA genotype of rs2268690, which leads to a higher AHSG serum concentration, was significantly associated with protection against SARS development.

  18. Genetic variation of the human α-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG gene associated with the risk of SARS-CoV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Zhu

    Full Text Available Genetic background may play an important role in the process of SARS-CoV infection and SARS development. We found several proteins that could interact with the nucleocapsid protein of the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV. α-2-Heremans-Schmid Glycoprotein (AHSG, which is required for macrophage deactivation by endogenous cations, is associated with inflammatory regulation. Cytochrome P450 Family 3A (CYP4F3A is an ω-oxidase that inactivates Leukotriene B4 (LTB4 in human neutrophils and the liver. We investigated the association between the polymorphisms of these two inflammation-associated genes and SARS development. The linkage disequilibrium (LD maps of these two genes were built with Haploview using data on CHB+JPT (version 2 from the HapMap. A total of ten tag SNPs were selected and genotyped. In the Guangzhou cohort study, after adjusting for age and sex, two AHSG SNPs and one CYP4F3 SNP were found to be associated with SARS susceptibility: rs2248690 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-4.51; rs4917 (AOR 1.84; 95% CI 1.02-3.34; and rs3794987 (AOR 2.01; 95% CI 1.10-3.68. To further validate the association, the ten tag SNPs were genotyped in the Beijing cohort. After adjusting for age and sex, only rs2248690 (AOR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.30-2.04 was found to be associated with SARS susceptibility. The combined analysis of the two studies confirmed tag SNP rs2248690 in AHSG as a susceptibility variant (AOR 1.70; 95% CI 1.37-2.09. The statistical analysis of the rs2248690 genotype data among the patients and healthy controls in the HCW cohort, who were all similarly exposed to the SARS virus, also supported the findings. Further, the SNP rs2248690 affected the transcriptional activity of the AHSG promoter and thus regulated the AHSG serum level. Therefore, our study has demonstrated that the AA genotype of rs2268690, which leads to a higher AHSG serum concentration, was significantly associated with protection against SARS

  19. Polarimetric scattering and SAR information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Taking an innovative look at Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), this practical reference fully covers new developments in SAR and its various methodologies and enables readers to interpret SAR imagery An essential reference on polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), this book uses scattering theory and radiative transfer theory as a basis for its treatment of topics. It is organized to include theoretical scattering models and SAR data analysis techniques, and presents cutting-edge research on theoretical modelling of terrain surface. The book includes quantitative app

  20. Stalking SARS: CDC at Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the SARS outbreak and how CDC worked to solve the mystery.  Created: 5/22/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  1. Signal processing for FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meta, A.; Hoogeboom, P.; Ligthart, L.P.

    2007-01-01

    The combination of frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) technology and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques leads to lightweight cost-effective imaging sensors of high resolution. One limiting factor to the use of FMCW sensors is the well-known presence of nonlinearities in the

  2. SARS – virus jumps species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SARS – virus jumps species. Coronavirus reshuffles genes; Rotteir et al, Rotterdam showed the virus to jump from cats to mouse cells after single gene mutation ? Human disease due to virus jumping from wild or domestic animals; Present favourite animal - the cat; - edible or domestic.

  3. Coseismic Deformation Detection of the 1997 Mani Earthquake Using ERS SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhong; Tang, Lingli; Li, Chuanrong; Ouyang, Guangzhou; Zhang, Jingfa

    2010-12-01

    D-InSAR has been proven a powerful technique to measure coseismic deformation. This paper will describe an application of D-InSAR on earthquake deformation detecting. On the basis of analysis of fundamentals of D-InSAR, coseismic displacement fields corresponding to Mani earthquake which took place in November 1997, has been successfully extracted. Through the coseismic displacement information, the largest surface displacement value on LOS direction can then be estimated. Four ERS SAR images were used for the D-InSAR processing, in which three images were acquired prior to the earthquake event, and the other one were acquired after the earthquake. The resultant coseismic displacement field image clearly shows the spatial distribution pattern of the deformation magnitude and the location of the earthquake epicentre. From the number of deformation fringes, the most large displacement can be estimated to be at least 92.4 cm in the line of sight direction of the radar.

  4. The ONERA Airborne Multi Frequency SAR Imaging Systems (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    cover many SAR applications mainly dedicated to environment surveillance domain e.g. tropical forest density estimation, tree height measurements or... deforestation damages. VHF-UHF band demonstrate foliage and ground penetration capability. Ocean observation is also considered with focus on

  5. Wind Atlas of Aegean Sea with SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete

    2013-01-01

    in satellite radar technologies made it possible to use Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) for wind speed and direction measurements at offshore locations. In this study, a new technique of making wind atlases is applied to the region of Aegean Sea is presented. The method has been tested and validated...

  6. Hand effect on head specific absorption rate (SAR) exposed by two realistic phone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.

    2013-04-01

    There have been some reports about possible effect of the hand presence on the head SAR if hand phantom is included in the measurements of the head SAR compliance assessment procedure. The objective of this computational study was to examine the reported effect by using realistic head models and realistic CAD based phone models. A commercially available FDTD based EM solver was used to carry out the computational work. Based on the results of this study considering the SAR values without hand phantom as reference, following conclusions can be made: 1. In general presence of the hand lead to significantly less conservative SAR values in the head for large majority of cases 2. For lower band GSM frequencies the presence of the hand decreases the head SAR up to ~70%. 3. For the upper band GSM frequencies the presence of the hand decreases the head SAR up to ~55%. Based on the results of this study the present SAR compliance protocol where hand phantom is not included leads to more conservative head SAR results compared to the cases where hand is included.

  7. 3D Monitoring of Buildings Using TerraSAR-X InSAR, DInSAR and PolSAR Capacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Weissgerber

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of cities increases the need of urban remote sensing for a large scale monitoring. This paper provides greater understanding of how TerraSAR-X (TSX high-resolution abilities enable to reach the spatial precision required to monitor individual buildings, through the use of a 4 year temporal stack of 100 images over Paris (France. Three different SAR modes are investigated for this purpose. First a method involving a whole time-series is proposed to measure realistic heights of buildings. Then, we show that the small wavelength of TSX makes the interferometric products very sensitive to the ordinary building-deformation, and that daily deformation can be measured over the entire building with a centimetric accuracy, and without any a priori on the deformation evolution, even when neglecting the impact of the atmosphere. Deformations up to 4 cm were estimated for the Eiffel Tower and up to 1 cm for other lower buildings. These deformations were analyzed and validated with weather and in situ local data. Finally, four TSX polarimetric images were used to investigate geometric and dielectric properties of buildings under the deterministic framework. Despite of the resolution loss of this mode, the possibility to estimate the structural elements of a building orientations and their relative complexity in the spatial organization are demonstrated.

  8. Mapping Regional Inundation with Spaceborne L-Band SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Chapman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the launch of ALOS PALSAR L-band SAR by the Japan Space Exploration Agency (JAXA, a program to develop an Earth Science Data Record (ESDR for inundated wetlands was funded by NASA. Using established methodologies, extensive multi-temporal L-band ALOS ScanSAR data acquired bi-monthly by the PALSAR instrument onboard ALOS were used to classify the inundation state for South America for delivery as a component of this Inundated Wetlands ESDR (IW-ESDR and in collaboration with JAXA’s ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative science programme. We describe these methodologies and the final classification of the inundation state, then compared this with results derived from dual-season data acquired by the JERS-1 L-band SAR mission in 1995 and 1996, as well as with estimates of surface water extent measured globally every 10 days by coarser resolution sensors. Good correspondence was found when comparing open water extent classified from multi-temporal ALOS ScanSAR data with surface water fraction identified from coarse resolution sensors, except in those regions where there may be differences in sensitivity to widespread and shallow seasonal flooding event, or in areas that could be excluded through use of a continental-scale inundatable mask. It was found that the ALOS ScanSAR classification of inundated vegetation was relatively insensitive to inundated herbaceous vegetation. Inundation dynamics were examined using the multi-temporal ALOS ScanSAR acquisitions over the Pacaya-Samiria and surrounding areas in the Peruvian Amazon.

  9. A key role for the carboxy-terminal tail of the murine coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in coordination of genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The prototype coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) exhibits highly selective packaging of its genomic positive-stranded RNA into assembled virions, despite the presence in infected cells of a large excess of subgenomic viral mRNAs. One component of this selectivity is the MHV packaging signal (PS), an RNA structure found only in genomic RNA and not in subgenomic RNAs. It was previously shown that a major determinant of PS recognition is the second of the two RNA-binding domains of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein. We have now found that PS recognition additionally depends upon a segment of the carboxy-terminal tail (domain N3) of the N protein. Since domain N3 is also the region of N protein that interacts with the membrane (M) protein, this finding suggests a mechanism by which selective genome packaging is accomplished, through the coupling of genome encapsidation to virion assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Newly Formed Sea Ice in Arctic Leads Monitored by C- and L-Band SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A. Malin; Brekke, Camilla; Spreen, Gunnar; King, Jennifer A.; Gerland, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the scattering entropy and co-polarization ratio for Arctic lead ice using C- and L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite scenes. During the Norwegian Young sea ICE (N-ICE2015) cruise campaign overlapping SAR scenes, helicopter borne sea ice thickness measurements and photographs were collected. We can therefore relate the SAR signal to sea ice thickness measurements as well as photographs taken of the sea ice. We show that a combination of scattering and co-polarization ratio values can be used to distinguish young ice from open water and surrounding sea ice.

  11. Evaluation of the Potentials and Challenges of an Airborne InSAR System for Deformation Mapping: A Case Study over the Slumgullion Landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, N.; Lee, H.; Zaugg, E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Diaz, J. C. F.

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) is a technique which uses two or more SAR images of the same area to estimate landscape topography or ground surface displacement. Differential InSAR (DInSAR) is capable of measuring ground displacements at the millimeter level, but a major drawback of traditional DInSAR is that only the deformation along the line-of-sight direction can be detected. Because most of the current spaceborne SAR systems have near-polar, sun-synchronous orbits, deformation measurements in the South-North direction are limited (except for polar regions). Compared with spaceborne SAR, airborne SAR systems have the advantages of flexible scanning geometry and revisit time, high spatial resolution, and no ionospheric distortion. In this study, we present a case study of the Slumgullion landslide conducted in July 2015 to assess an airborne SAR system known as ARTEMIS SlimSAR, which is a compact, modular, and multi-frequency radar system. The Slumgullion landslide, located in the San Juan Mountains near Lake City, Colorado is a long-term slow moving landslide that moves downhill continuously. For this study, the L-band SlimSAR was installed and data were collected on July 3, 7, and 10 and processed using the time-domain backprojection algorithm. GPS surveys and spaceborne DInSAR analysis using COSMO-SkyMed images were also conducted to verify the performance of the airborne SAR system. The airborne DInSAR results showed satisfying agreement with the GPS and spaceborne DInSAR results. The root mean square of the differences between the SlimSAR, and GPS and satellite derived velocities, were 0.6 mm/day, and 0.9 mm/day, respectively. A 3-D deformation map over Slumgullion landslide was generated, which displayed distinct correlation between the landslide motion and topography. This study also indicated that the primary source of the error for the SlimSAR system is the trajectory turbulences of the aircraft. The effect of the trajectory

  12. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment - The Home Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its third and final year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE is a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors enabling scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites to new geophysical products with relative ease. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. Upcoming international SAR missions will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment has the functionality to become a key element in processing data from NASA's proposed DESDynI mission into higher level data products, supporting a new class of analyses that take advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data. At the core of ISCE is a new set of efficient and accurate InSAR algorithms. These algorithms are placed into an object-oriented, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models. The environment is designed to easily allow user contributions, enabling an open source community to extend the framework into the indefinite future. ISCE supports data from nearly all of the available satellite platforms, including ERS, EnviSAT, Radarsat-1, Radarsat-2, ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and Cosmo-SkyMed. The code applies a number of parallelization techniques and sensible approximations for speed. It is configured to work on modern linux-based computers with gcc compilers and python

  13. Results of InSAR and GPS Measurement of Tectonic Deformation of the Eastern California Shear Zone and Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, W. C.; Li, Z.; Plag, H.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2006-12-01

    Across the Eastern California Shear Zone, southern Walker Lane Belt and Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the geodetically measured deformation rate decreases eastward from the Sierra Nevada Mountains toward the central Basin and Range. In the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, the horizontal crustal deformation rate (~20 nanostrains/yr) and vertical velocity variations (Frenchman Flat earthquake (Mw 4.8), groundwater pumping, and what may be atmosphere variations in Death Valley. We are developing an improved time series approach for analyzing the 11-years of ERS data that uses realistic errors in the interferograms. We will evaluate the results for their ability to improve constraint on the pattern of tectonic deformation in the rapidly deforming Eastern California Shear zone and southern Walker Lane belt, and to constrain the less rapid tectonic deformation in the vicinity of the Yucca Mountain.

  14. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  15. Vegetation canopy discrimination and biomass assessment using multipolarized airborne SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Held, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarized airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were acquired over a largely agricultural test site near Macomb, Illinois, in conjunction with the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) experiment in October 1984. The NASA/JPL L-band SAR operating at 1.225 GHz made a series of daily overflights with azimuth view angles both parallel and orthogonal to those of SIR-B. The SAR data was digitally recorded in the quadpolarization configuration. An extensive set of ground measurements were obtained throughout the test site and include biophysical and soil measurements of approximately 400 agricultural fields. Preliminary evaluation of some of the airborne SAR imagery indicates a great potential for crop discrimination and assessment of canopy condition. False color composites constructed from the combination of three linear polarizations (HH, VV, and HV) were found to be clearly superior to any single polarization for purposes of crop classification. In addition, an image constructed using the HH return to modulate intensity and the phase difference between HH and VV returns to modulate chroma indicates a clear capability for assessment of canopy height and/or biomass. In particular, corn fields heavily damaged by infestations of corn borer are readily distinguished from noninfested fields.

  16. Evaluation of Sentinel-3 SAR Performance over Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, A.; Simonsen, S.; Skourup, H.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Forsberg, R.

    2016-12-01

    Sea ice is a fundamental component of the Earth climate system since it influences directly the albedo of our planet and regulates the heat exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. Global weather patterns and climate are therefore strictly connected to the presence and properties of sea ice which represents an important element in short- and long-term climate modelling. The launch of the EC/ESA's Sentinel-3 mission offers the opportunity to prolong the observation of sea ice topography and dynamics as well as it provides essential near real-time information for ocean and weather forecasting. In particular, the SAR radar altimeter (SRAL) carried on board of this satellite enables to estimate sea ice thickness in ice-covered areas by measuring directly the sea ice freeboard. This work evaluates Sentinel-3 SAR performance over Arctic sea ice using laser altimetry data collected during a Sentinel-3 underflight - the first with the SRAL instrument operating in SAR mode - performed as a part of the CryoVEx 2016 campaign. Snow freeboard heights derived from airborne laser scanner measurements are used to validate the sea ice freeboard obtained by processing Sentinel-3 SAR level 1b waveforms. We present the results of the freeboard comparison from a statistical point of view.

  17. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  18. Analysis of the Effect of Radio Frequency Interference on Repeat Track Airborne InSAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Bin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The SAR system operating at low frequency is susceptible to Radio Frequency Interference (RFI from television station, radio station, and some other civil electronic facilities. The presence of RFI degrades the SAR image quality, and obscures the targets in the scene. Furthermore, RFI can cause interferometric phase error in repeat track InSAR system. In order to analyze the effect of RFI on interferometric phase of InSAR, real measured RFI signal are added on cone simulated SAR echoes. The imaging and interferometric processing results of both the RFI-contaminated and raw data are given. The effect of real measured RFI signal on repeat track InSAR system is analyzed. Finally, the imaging and interferometric processing results of both with and without RFI suppressed of the P band airborne repeat track InSAR real data are presented, which demonstrates the efficiency of the RFI suppression method in terms of decreasing the interferometric phase errors caused by RFI.

  19. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Qiu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR research and application.

  20. Forest biomass estimation from polarimetric SAR interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mette, T.

    2007-07-01

    Polarimetric SAR interferometry (Pol-InSAR) is a radar remote sensing technique that allows extracting forest heights by means of model-based inversions. Forest biomass is closely related to forest height, and can be derived from it with allometric relations. This work investigates the combination of the two methods to estimate forest biomass from Pol-InSAR. It develops a concept for the use of height-biomass allometry, and outlines the Pol-InSAR height inversion. The methodology is validated against a set of forest inventory data and Pol-InSAR data at L-band of the test site Traunstein. The results allow drawing conclusions on the potential of Pol-InSAR forest biomass missions. (orig.)

  1. Identifying SARS-CoV membrane protein amino acid residues linked to virus-like particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Tzu Tseng

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV membrane (M proteins are capable of self-assembly and release in the form of membrane-enveloped vesicles, and of forming virus-like particles (VLPs when coexpressed with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. According to previous deletion analyses, M self-assembly involves multiple M sequence regions. To identify important M amino acid residues for VLP assembly, we coexpressed N with multiple M mutants containing substitution mutations at the amino-terminal ectodomain, carboxyl-terminal endodomain, or transmembrane segments. Our results indicate that a dileucine motif in the endodomain tail (218LL219 is required for efficient N packaging into VLPs. Results from cross-linking VLP analyses suggest that the cysteine residues 63, 85 and 158 are not in close proximity to the M dimer interface. We noted a significant reduction in M secretion due to serine replacement for C158, but not for C63 or C85. Further analysis suggests that C158 is involved in M-N interaction. In addition to mutations of the highly conserved 107-SWWSFNPE-114 motif, substitutions at codons W19, W57, P58, W91, Y94 or F95 all resulted in significantly reduced VLP yields, largely due to defective M secretion. VLP production was not significantly affected by a tryptophan replacement of Y94 or F95 or a phenylalanine replacement of W19, W57 or W91. Combined, these results indicate the involvement of specific M amino acids during SARS-CoV virus assembly, and suggest that aromatic residue retention at specific positions is critical for M function in terms of directing virus assembly.

  2. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  3. High-Resolution TomoSAR & PS-InSAR Analysis in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lianhuan; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Liu, Kang; Jendryke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of urban infrastructures is of great importance. Urban infrastructure monitoring benefits from the launch of the new generation of high-resolution SAR satellites. With high-resolution SAR stacks, even deformation details of different building parts can be observed by PS-InSAR technique. However, high-rise building areas suffer severely from layover effects, which can cause serious phase unwrapping errors in PS-InSAR processing. SAR tomography (TomoSAR) provides a method of overcoming layover effects in urban areas. With tomographic techniques, the 3D distribution of multiple scatterers and their position can be reconstructed. In this poster, the PS-InSAR method is illustrated first, followed with PS-InSAR analysis results in Shanghai. Then, we will describe SAR tomography and why we need TomoSAR, especially in dense cities like Shanghai. Finally, preliminary tomographic results are presented. By combining PS-InSAR and TomoSAR, a 4D dynamic mapping of urban areas could be executed.

  4. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    The development of Radar Polarimetry and Radar Interferometry is advancing rapidly, and these novel radar technologies are revamping Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging decisively. In this exposition the successive advancements are sketched; beginning with the fundamental formulations and high-lighting the salient points of these diverse remote sensing techniques. Whereas with radar polarimetry the textural fine-structure, target-orientation and shape, symmetries and material constituents can be recovered with considerable improvements above that of standard amplitude-only Polarization Radar ; with radar interferometry the spatial (in depth) structure can be explored. In Polarimetric-Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POL-IN-SAR) Imaging it is possible to recover such co-registered textural plus spatial properties simultaneously. This includes the extraction of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) from either fully Polarimetric (scattering matrix) or Interferometric (dual antenna) SAR image data takes with the additional benefit of obtaining co-registered three-dimensional POL-IN-DEM information. Extra-Wide-Band POL-IN-SAR Imaging - when applied to Repeat-Pass Image Overlay Interferometry - provides differential background validation and measurement, stress assessment, and environmental stress-change monitoring capabilities with hitherto unattained accuracy, which are essential tools for improved global biomass estimation. More recently, by applying multiple parallel repeat-pass EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging along stacked (altitudinal) or displaced (horizontal) flight-lines will result in Tomographic (Multi- Interferometric) Polarimetric SAR Stereo-Imaging , including foliage and ground penetrating capabilities. It is shown that the accelerated advancement of these modern EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging techniques is of direct relevance and of paramount priority to wide-area dynamic homeland security surveillance and local-to-global environmental ground-truth measurement

  5. First Image Products from EcoSAR - Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Rincon, Rafael; Fatuyinbo, Lola; Bollian, Tobias; Ranson, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Designed especially for forest ecosystem studies, EcoSAR employs state-of-the-art digital beamforming technology to generate wide-swath, high-resolution imagery. EcoSARs dual antenna single-pass imaging capability eliminates temporal decorrelation from polarimetric and interferometric analysis, increasing the signal strength and simplifying models used to invert forest structure parameters. Antennae are physically separated by 25 meters providing single pass interferometry. In this mode the radar is most sensitive to topography. With 32 active transmit and receive channels, EcoSARs digital beamforming is an order of magnitude more versatile than the digital beamforming employed on the upcoming NISAR mission. EcoSARs long wavelength (P-band, 435 MHz, 69 cm) measurements can be used to simulate data products for ESAs future BIOMASS mission, allowing scientists to develop algorithms before the launch of the satellite. EcoSAR can also be deployed to collect much needed data where BIOMASS satellite wont be allowed to collect data (North America, Europe and Arctic), filling in the gaps to keep a watchful eye on the global carbon cycle. EcoSAR can play a vital role in monitoring, reporting and verification schemes of internationals programs such as UN-REDD (United Nations Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) benefiting global society. EcoSAR was developed and flown with support from NASA Earth Sciences Technology Offices Instrument Incubator Program.

  6. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  7. C-terminal Domain Modulates the Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein via an Electrostatic Mechanism*

    OpenAIRE

    Qualley, Dominic F.; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M.; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retrovir...

  8. Estimating soil moisture using the Danish polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiankang, Ji; Thomsen, A.; Skriver, Henning

    1995-01-01

    The results of applying data from the Danish polarimetric SAR (EMISAR) to estimate soil moisture for bare fields are presented. Fully calibrated C-band SAR images for hh, vv and cross polarizations have been used in this study. The measured surface roughness data showed that classical roughness...... autocorrelation functions (Gaussian and Exponential) were not able to fit natural surfaces well. A Gauss-Exp hybrid model which agreed better with the measured data has been proposed. Theoretical surface scattering models (POM, IEM), as well as an empirical model for retrieval of soil moisture and surface rms...... of surface parameters with the bilinear model, the correlation coefficient between the estimated and measured soil moisture, as well as rms height, is about 0.77. To improve the result, the local incidence angles need to be taken into account...

  9. Community under stress: trust, reciprocity, and community collective efficacy during SARS outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eric; Chang, Ly-Yun

    2011-10-01

    The study of epidemics is almost non-existent in sociological literature, even though such outbreaks can have detrimental effects on communities. The occurrence of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) in 2003 provides a rare opportunity to understand the social functioning of a community during the outbreak of an epidemic. To evaluate the extensive social impact of such an outbreak, we focus on the effects of perceived collective efficacy. Specifically, we focus on how the collective efficacy of a community, measured by trust and reciprocal relations, is related to collective action in places where SARS occurred and those where SARS did not occur. The study is based on a unique data set, the 2003 Taiwan Social Image Survey, collected during the outbreak of SARS in Taiwan. Our findings show that community collective efficacy, measured by trust and reciprocity, is not associated with community collective action when an outbreak of an epidemic occurs.

  10. 3D Imaging Algorithm for Down-Looking MIMO Array SAR Based on Bayesian Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Down-looking MIMO array SAR can reconstruct 3D images of the observed area in the inferior of the platform of the SAR and has wide application prospects. In this paper, a new strategy based on Bayesian compressive sensing theory is proposed for down-looking MIMO array SAR imaging, which transforms the cross-track imaging process of down-looking MIMO array SAR into the problem of sparse signal reconstruction from noisy measurements. Due to account for additive noise encountered in the measurement process, high quality image can be achieved. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method can provide better resolution and lower sidelobes compared to the conventional method.

  11. Mapping ground surface deformation using temporarily coherent point SAR interferometry: Application to Los Angeles Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Lu, Zhong; Ding, X.; Jung, H.-S.; Feng, G.; Lee, C.-W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is an effective tool to detect long-term seismotectonic motions by reducing the atmospheric artifacts, thereby providing more precise deformation signal. The commonly used approaches such as persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) and small baseline subset (SBAS) algorithms need to resolve the phase ambiguities in interferogram stacks either by searching a predefined solution space or by sparse phase unwrapping methods; however the efficiency and the success of phase unwrapping cannot be guaranteed. We present here an alternative approach – temporarily coherent point (TCP) InSAR (TCPInSAR) – to estimate the long term deformation rate without the need of phase unwrapping. The proposed approach has a series of innovations including TCP identification, TCP network and TCP least squares estimator. We apply the proposed method to the Los Angeles Basin in southern California where structurally active faults are believed capable of generating damaging earthquakes. The analysis is based on 55 interferograms from 32 ERS-1/2 images acquired during Oct. 1995 and Dec. 2000. To evaluate the performance of TCPInSAR on a small set of observations, a test with half of interferometric pairs is also performed. The retrieved TCPInSAR measurements have been validated by a comparison with GPS observations from Southern California Integrated GPS Network. Our result presents a similar deformation pattern as shown in past InSAR studies but with a smaller average standard deviation (4.6 mm) compared with GPS observations, indicating that TCPInSAR is a promising alternative for efficiently mapping ground deformation even from a relatively smaller set of interferograms.

  12. Monitoring interseismic activity on the Ilan Plain (NE Taiwan) using Small Baseline PS-InSAR, GPS and leveling measurements: partitioning from arc-continent collision and backarc extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhe; Hu, Jyr-Ching; Wang, Erchie; Li, Yongsheng; Yang, Yinghui; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2018-01-01

    The Ilan Plain, located in Northeast Taiwan, represents a transition zone between oblique collision (between the Luzon Arc and the Eurasian Plate) and backarc extension (the Okinawa Trough). The mechanism for this abrupt transition from arc-continent collision to backarc extension remains uncertain. We used Global Positioning System (GPS), leveling and multi-interferogram Small Baseline Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (SBAS-PSI) data to monitor the interseismic activity in the basin. A common reference site was selected for the data sets. The horizontal component of GPS and the vertical measurements of the leveling data were converted to line-of-sight (LOS) data and compared with the SBAS-PSI data. The comparison shows that the entire Ilan Plain is undergoing rapid subsidence at a maximum rate of -11 ± 2 mm yr-1 in the LOS direction. We speculate that vertical deformation and anthropogenic activity may play important roles in this deformation. We also performed a joint inversion modeling that combined both the DInSAR and strong motion data to constrain the source model of the 2005 Ilan earthquake. The best-fitting model predicts that the Sansing fault caused the 2005 Ilan earthquake. The observed transtensional deformation is dominated by the normal faulting with a minor left-lateral strike-slip motion. We compared our SBAS-PSI results with the short-term (2005-2009) groundwater level changes. The results indicate that although pumping-induced surface subsidence cannot be excluded, tectonic deformation, including rapid southward movement of the Ryukyu arc and backarc extension of the Okinawa Trough, characterizes the opening of the Ilan Plain. Furthermore, a series of normal and left-lateral strike-slip transtensional faults, including the Choshui and Sansing faults, form a bookshelf-like structure that accommodates the extension of the plain. Although situated in a region of complex structural interactions, the Ilan Plain is primarily controlled by extension

  13. SAR/MTI on small airborne platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Vermeulen, B.C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A small SAR-MTI system is being developed at TNO, aimed at deployment on tactical UAV. The system makes use of modern front-end technology, to provide flexible SAR imaging and MTI modes. Major design goals are 50 kg weight, 500 W power consumption and 50 cm resolution in order to comply with typical

  14. A Simple Model for a SARS Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Keng Cheng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the use of an ordinary differential equation in modelling the SARS outbreak in Singapore. The model provides an excellent example of using mathematics in a real life situation. The mathematical concepts involved are accessible to students with A level Mathematics backgrounds. Data for the SARS epidemic in Singapore are…

  15. SAR change detection techniques and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Change detection, the comparison of remote sensing images from different moments in time, is an important technique in environmental earth observation and security. SAR change detection is useful when weather and light conditions are unfavourable. Five methods of SAR change detection are

  16. Geologic mapping in Greenland with polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Madsen, Søren Nørvang; Brooks, C. K.

    1995-01-01

    The application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for geologic mapping in Greenland is investigated by the Danish Center for Remote Sensing (DCRS) in co-operation with the Danish Lithosphere Centre (DLC). In 1994 a pilot project was conducted in East Greenland. The Danish airborne SAR, EMISAR...

  17. Real-time brute force SAR processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlothuizen, W.J.; Ditzel, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brute force method to perform real-time SAR processing. The method has several advantages over traditional so-called fast SAR implementations, as it does not make any approximations to alleviate the processing burden. However, the method does allow efficient implementation on

  18. Deep learning for SAR image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Eric; Yonel, Bariscan; Yazici, Birsen

    2017-04-01

    The recent success of deep learning has lead to growing interest in applying these methods to signal processing problems. This paper explores the applications of deep learning to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation. We review deep learning from a perspective relevant to SAR image formation. Our objective is to address SAR image formation in the presence of uncertainties in the SAR forward model. We present a recurrent auto-encoder network architecture based on the iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (ISTA) that incorporates SAR modeling. We then present an off-line training method using stochastic gradient descent and discuss the challenges and key steps of learning. Lastly, we show experimentally that our method can be used to form focused images in the presence of phase uncertainties. We demonstrate that the resulting algorithm has faster convergence and decreased reconstruction error than that of ISTA.

  19. Geometric calibration of ERS satellite SAR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2001-01-01

    Geometric calibration of the European Remote Sensing (ERS) Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) slant range images is important in relation to mapping areas without ground reference points and also in relation to automated processing. The relevant SAR system parameters are discussed and calib......Geometric calibration of the European Remote Sensing (ERS) Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) slant range images is important in relation to mapping areas without ground reference points and also in relation to automated processing. The relevant SAR system parameters are discussed...... on a seven-year ERS-1 and a four-year ERS-2 time series, the long term stability is found to be sufficient to allow a single calibration covering the entire mission period. A descending and an ascending orbit tandem pair of the ESA calibration site on Flevoland, suitable for calibration of ERS SAR processors...

  20. Composite SAR imaging using sequential joint sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Toby; Gelb, Anne; Platte, Rodrigo B.

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates accurate and efficient ℓ1 regularization methods for generating synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Although ℓ1 regularization algorithms are already employed in SAR imaging, practical and efficient implementation in terms of real time imaging remain a challenge. Here we demonstrate that fast numerical operators can be used to robustly implement ℓ1 regularization methods that are as or more efficient than traditional approaches such as back projection, while providing superior image quality. In particular, we develop a sequential joint sparsity model for composite SAR imaging which naturally combines the joint sparsity methodology with composite SAR. Our technique, which can be implemented using standard, fractional, or higher order total variation regularization, is able to reduce the effects of speckle and other noisy artifacts with little additional computational cost. Finally we show that generalizing total variation regularization to non-integer and higher orders provides improved flexibility and robustness for SAR imaging.

  1. Polarimetric differential SAR interferometry in an arid natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullissa, Adugna G.; Tolpekin, Valentyn; Stein, Alfred; Perissin, Daniele

    2017-07-01

    Ground deformation measurements have contributed to a better understanding of the processes and mechanisms involved in natural hazards. Those include landslides, subsidence, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Spaceborne Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture RADAR (DInSAR) is a well studied technique for measuring ground deformation. Quality of deformation measurements, however, is often degraded by decorrelation. With the advent of fully polarimetric SAR satellite sensors, polarimetric optimization techniques exploiting polarimetric diversity improve the phase quality of interferograms. In this paper, we analyzed three polarimetric optimization methods to determine the optimal one for application in an arid natural environment. We considered coherence decomposition in single and double phase center scenarios. Coherence estimation bias associated with each optimization method has been analyzed. We compared the derived displacement values with terrestrial GPS measurements. The study shows that polarimetric optimization increases the number of coherent pixels by upto 6.89% as compared with a single polarization channel. The study concludes that polarimetric optimization coupled with DInSAR analysis yields more reliable deformation results in a low coherence region.

  2. SARS and MERS: recent insights into emerging coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Emmie; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Falzarano, Darryl; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 marked the second introduction of a highly pathogenic coronavirus into the human population in the twenty-first century. The continuing introductions of MERS-CoV from dromedary camels, the subsequent travel-related viral spread, the unprecedented nosocomial outbreaks and the high case-fatality rates highlight the need for prophylactic and therapeutic measures. Scientific advancements since the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic allowed for rapid progress in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of MERS-CoV and the development of therapeutics. In this Review, we detail our present understanding of the transmission and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, and discuss the current state of development of measures to combat emerging coronaviruses.

  3. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940s. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analysts understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  4. InSAR Terrain Mapping Using ICESat Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, D.; Guritz, R.; Muskett, R.; Lingle, C.; Sauber, J.

    2006-12-01

    High quality geodetic ground control is time-consuming and costly to acquire in remote regions, where logistical operations are difficult to support. Hence, there is a strong interest in establishing new sources of ground control points that can be used in conjunction with Interferometric SAR (InSAR) for producing accurate digital elevation models (DEMs). In January 2003, NASA launched the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) into high polar orbit onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). A major objective of this spaceborne laser altimeter system, with orbital coverage extending from 86° N to 86° S, is to provide elevation measurements of the Earth's topography with unprecedented accuracy. The intent of our project is to assess the accuracy of ICESat elevation data and evaluate its utility as ground control for topographic mapping. Our study area lies near Barrow, Alaska; 15,650 sq. km of coastal plain adjacent to the Arctic Ocean, characterized by vast expanses of tundra, lakes, and arctic wetlands of such low relief as to be nearly devoid of terrain features. Accuracy of the ICESat elevation measurements is assessed through comparison with differential GPS (DGPS) data, acquired along ICESat ground tracks crossing our study area. Using DGPS as the reference, ICESat yields a mean offset of -0.04 ± 0.15 m for fast static measurements on frozen tundra lakes and 0.22 ± 0.96 m for two kinematic DGPS profiles along the ICESat ground track. These results suggests that ICESat-derived elevations on the Arctic coastal plain are more than sufficiently accurate for use as ground control in DEM generation. The only clear limitation of the ICESat data is the non-uniform distribution of the ICESat tracks within the 33 day near-repeat sub-cycle. Although the coverage is poor at equatorial latitudes, track separation in the Arctic is on the order of tens of kilometers because of orbital convergence at the Poles. To test whether these data can be used

  5. Generation and characterization of a potentially applicable Vero cell line constitutively expressing the Schmallenberg virus nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongning; Wu, Shaoqiang; Song, Shanshan; Lv, Jizhou; Feng, Chunyan; Lin, Xiangmei

    2017-02-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a Culicoides-transmitted orthobunyavirus that poses a threat to susceptible livestock species such as cattle, sheep and goats. The nucleocapsid (N) protein of SBV is an ideal diagnostic antigen for the detection of viral infection. In this study, a stable Vero cell line, Vero-EGFP-SBV-N, constitutively expressing the SBV-N protein was established using a lentivirus system combined with puromycin selection. This cell line spontaneously emitted green fluorescent signals distributed throughout the cytoplasm, in which the expression of SBV-N fusion protein was confirmed by western blot analysis. The expression of SBV-N protein in Vero-EGFP-SBV-N cells was stable for more than fifty passages without puromycin pressure. The SBV-N fusion protein contained both an N-terminal enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) tag and a C-terminal hexa-histidine (6 × His) tag, by which the N protein was successfully purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The cell line was further demonstrated to be reactive with SBV antisera and an anti-SBV monoclonal antibody in indirect immunofluorescence assays. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Vero-EGFP-SBV-N cell line has potential for application in the serological diagnosis of SBV infection.

  6. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  7. Biological characterization and variability of the nucleocapsid protein gene of Groundnut bud necrosis virus isolates infecting pea from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad AKRAM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A disease of pea characterized by browning in veins, leaves and stems, mostly in growing tips, and brown circular spots on pods, was recorded in four districts of Uttar Pradesh, India. The causal agent of this disease was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using primers pair HRP 26/HRP 28 and identified as Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV on the basis of nucleocapsid protein (NP gene sequence. Virus isolates from Bareilly (BRY, Kanpur (KNP, Udham Singh Nagar (USN and Shahjahanpur (SJP were designated as GBNV-[Pea_BRY], GBNV-[Pea_KNP], GBNV-[Pea_USN] and GBNV-[Pea_SJP] and their NP genes sequenced. The sequence data of each isolate were deposited at NCBI database (JF281101-JF281104. The complete nucleotide sequence of the NP genes of all the GBNV isolates had a single open reading frame of 831 nucleotides and 276 amino acids. The isolates had among them 2% variability at amino acid level and 2‒3 variability at nucleotide level, but had variability with other GBNV isolates of fabaceous hosts in the range of 0‒6% at amino acid level and 1‒8% at nucleotide level. Though this variation in nucleotide sequences of GBNV isolates from fabaceous hosts is within the limits of species demarcation for tospoviruses, formation of a separate cluster within the GBNV isolates indicates the possibility of distinct variants in GBNV.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag engages the Bro1 domain of ALIX/AIP1 through the nucleocapsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Sergei; Popova, Elena; Inoue, Michio; Göttlinger, Heinrich G

    2008-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses harbor short peptide motifs in Gag that promote the release of infectious virions. These motifs, known as late assembly (L) domains, recruit a cellular budding machinery that is required for the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). The primary L domain of HIV-1 maps to a PTAP motif in the p6 region of Gag and engages the MVB pathway by binding to Tsg101. Additionally, HIV-1 p6 harbors an auxiliary L domain that binds to the V domain of ALIX, another component of the MVB pathway. We now show that ALIX also binds to the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of HIV-1 Gag and that ALIX and its isolated Bro1 domain can be specifically packaged into viral particles via NC. The interaction with ALIX depended on the zinc fingers of NC, which mediate the specific packaging of genomic viral RNA, but was not disrupted by nuclease treatment. We also observed that HIV-1 zinc finger mutants were defective for particle production and exhibited a similar defect in Gag processing as a PTAP deletion mutant. The effects of the zinc finger and PTAP mutations were not additive, suggesting a functional relationship between NC and p6. However, in contrast to the PTAP deletion mutant, the double mutants could not be rescued by overexpressing ALIX, further supporting the notion that NC plays a role in virus release.

  9. Validation of a commercially available indirect ELISA using a nucleocapside recombinant protein for detection of Schmallenberg virus antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Bréard

    Full Text Available A newly developed Enzym Like Immuno Sorbant Assay (ELISA based on the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (N of Schmallenberg virus (SBV was evaluated and validated for the detection of SBV-specific IgG antibodies in ruminant sera by three European Reference Laboratories. Validation data sets derived from sheep, goat and bovine sera collected in France and Germany (n = 1515 in 2011 and 2012 were categorized according to the results of a virus neutralization test (VNT or an indirect immuno-fluorescence assay (IFA. The specificity was evaluated with 1364 sera from sheep, goat and bovine collected in France and Belgium before 2009. Overall agreement between VNT and ELISA was 98.9% and 98.3% between VNT and IFA, indicating a very good concordance between the different techniques. Although cross-reactions with other Orthobunyavirus from the Simbu serogroup viruses might occur, it is a highly sensitive, specific and robust ELISA-test validated to detect anti-SBV antibodies. This test can be applied for SBV sero-diagnostics and disease-surveillance studies in ruminant species in Europe.

  10. Fidelity of plus-strand priming requires the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Klara; Kankia, Besik; Gopalakrishnan, Swathi; Yang, Victoria; Cramer, Elizabeth; Saladores, Pilar; Gorelick, Robert J.; Guo, Jianhui; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Levin, Judith G.

    2009-01-01

    During minus-strand DNA synthesis, RNase H degrades viral RNA sequences, generating potential plus-strand DNA primers. However, selection of the 3′ polypurine tract (PPT) as the exclusive primer is required for formation of viral DNA with the correct 5′-end and for subsequent integration. Here we show a new function for the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) in reverse transcription: blocking mispriming by non-PPT RNAs. Three representative 20-nt RNAs from the PPT region were tested for primer extension. Each primer had activity in the absence of NC, but less than the PPT. NC reduced priming by these RNAs to essentially base-line level, whereas PPT priming was unaffected. RNase H cleavage and zinc coordination by NC were required for maximal inhibition of mispriming. Biophysical properties, including thermal stability, helical structure and reverse transcriptase (RT) binding affinity, showed significant differences between PPT and non-PPT duplexes and the trends were generally correlated with the biochemical data. Binding studies in reactions with both NC and RT ruled out a competition binding model to explain NC's observed effects on mispriming efficiency. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NC chaperone activity has a major role in ensuring the fidelity of plus-strand priming. PMID:19158189

  11. Reflectors for SAR performance testing-second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  12. InSAR datum connection using GNSS-augmented radar transponders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Pooja; der Marel, Hans van; van Leijen, Freek; Samiei-Esfahany, Sami; Klees, Roland; Hanssen, Ramon

    2017-06-01

    Deformation estimates from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) are relative: they form a `free' network referred to an arbitrary datum, e.g. by assuming a reference point in the image to be stable. However, some applications require `absolute' InSAR estimates, i.e. expressed in a well-defined terrestrial reference frame, e.g. to compare InSAR results with those of other techniques. We propose a methodology based on collocated InSAR and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements, achieved by rigidly attaching phase-stable millimetre-precision compact active radar transponders to GNSS antennas. We demonstrate this concept through a simulated example and practical case studies in the Netherlands.

  13. Forest Structure Characterization Using Jpl's UAVSAR Multi-Baseline Polarimetric SAR Interferometry and Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott; Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns forest remote sensing using JPL's multi-baseline polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data. It presents exemplary results and analyzes the possibilities and limitations of using SAR Tomography and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques for the estimation of forest structure. Performance and error indicators for the applicability and reliability of the used multi-baseline (MB) multi-temporal (MT) PolInSAR random volume over ground (RVoG) model are discussed. Experimental results are presented based on JPL's L-band repeat-pass polarimetric interferometric UAVSAR data over temperate and tropical forest biomes in the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, and in the La Amistad Park, Panama and Costa Rica. The results are partially compared with ground field measurements and with air-borne LVIS lidar data.

  14. Assessing land features in semi-arid regions from multi-temporal SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, M.; Macelloni, G.; Paloscia, S.; Pampaloni, P.; Santi, E.; Aqid, N.; Ouazar, D.; Zribi, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper an experiment aimed at evaluating the potential of SAR systems in monitoring hydrological parameters in a large watershed of a semi-desert area was described. Remote sensing and ground truth measurements were carried out in Morocco, within the framework of the EC project FLAUBERT (Flood in Arid Units By Earth Remote Techniques). ERS/C-band SAR and JERS/L-band SAR images collected from October 97 to June 99 were analyzed. In spite of the very low changes in space and time, the spatial and temporal analysis of L- and C-band backscattering showed the capability of SAR to point out yearly variations due to vegetation cycle and rain events and to map semi-arid vegetation. By using interferometric coherence a separation of several soil and vegetation classes in the same image was obtained.

  15. Validation of burst overlapping for ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuaki, Ryo; Motohka, Takeshi; Ohki, Masato; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite- 2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2") is the latest L-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). PALSAR-2 observes the world mainly with 10 m resolution / 70 km swath Stripmap mode and 25 m resolution / 350 km swath ScanSAR mode. The 3-m resolution Stripmap mode is mainly used upon Japan. 350 km ScanSAR observation could detect large scale deformation e.g., the Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake and its aftershocks in 2015. ALOS-2 ScanSAR is the first one that supports ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry in L-band spaceborne SAR. However, because of the parameter setting error for the orbit estimation, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR could achieve little number of interferometric pair until the software modification on February 8, 2015. That is, the burst overlap timing required for the interferometric analysis was insufficient and it depends on the observation date. In this paper, we report the investigation results of this case and discuss the current status of the ALOS-2 ScanSAR InSAR. Some archives achieved before February 8, 2015 can be used for interferometric analysis with after Feb. 8. However, most of them have no interferometric pair. We also report that the archives acquired after February 8, have enough burst overlapping.

  16. High Resolution TomoSAR & PS-InSAR Analysis in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lianhuan; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Liu, Kang; Jendryke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of urban infrastructures is of great importance. Urban infrastructure monitoring benefits from the launch of the new generation of high-resolution SAR satellites. With high-resolution SAR stacks, even deformation details of different building parts can be observed. The PS-InSAR technique has become a favorable tool for urban area subsidence monitoring, and it has been demonstrated that millimeter accuracy can be achieved. However, high-rise building areas suffer severely from layover effects, which can cause serious phase unwrapping errors. SAR tomography provides a method of overcoming layover effects in urban areas. With tomographic techniques, the 3D distribution of multiple scatterers and their position can be reconstructed. In this paper, the PS-InSAR method is briefly described first, followed by PS-InSAR analysis results in Shanghai. Then, we will describe SAR tomography and why we need TomoSAR, especially in dense cities like Shanghai. Finally, preliminary tomographic results about Shanghai are presented. By combining PS-InSAR and TomoSAR, a 4D dynamic mapping of urban areas could be executed.

  17. Detection and Monitoring of Inundation with Polarimetric L-Band SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B. D.; Celi, J. E.; Hamilton, S. K.; McDonald, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    It has been known for decades that at wavelengths L-band or longer, SAR is a sensitive indicator of inundation underneath forest canopies. The high resolution detection of below-canopy inundation is difficult to accomplish at regional to continental scales using other types of remote sensing sensors, making it a compelling SAR measurement especially useful for studying wetland inundation dynamics, particularly in difficult-to-reach access, canopy-covered tropical forest environments. Most results have utilized spaceborne SAR observations with less than fully polarimetric data. Since one of the objectives of the NISAR mission is to characterize and understand the fundamental process that drives changes to ecosystems such as wetland inundated areas, we will discuss the sensitivity of L-band SAR to inundation. We will illustrate the detection of inundation using fully polarimetric L-band SAR data from UAVSAR, NASA's airborne SAR, over a tropical forest region in Ecuador and Peru. At the same time as the data collection, measurements were made on the ground to characterize vegetation and inundation characteristics. The field data were used to validate the results of classifying the vanZyl decomposition of the polarimetric data. We compare this classification with that possible with a reduced subset of the polarimetric observations.

  18. Volcanic activity monitoring in Mt. Baekdu using SAR and LAHARZ model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changwook; Lee, Moungjin

    2017-04-01

    Mt. Baekdu is located on the border between China and North Korea with high risk to large explosive eruptions with not available efficient field work because of rugged mountain terrain. A multi-band SAR interferometry was applied to a time-series processing from 1992 to now in this study. First of all, Japanese Earth Resources Satellites (JERS-1) L-band SAR data is useful to measure surface deformation with time-series method in heavily vegetation area such as mountain and forest regions. We make multiple-interferogram to measure surface deformation with time-series in Mt. Baekdu area and successfully generate time-series rate map from 1992 to 1998 using JERS-1 SAR data at previous work. We also used ALOS-PALSAR data for making time-series surface deformation map from 2006 to 2011. Radarsat-2 C-band SAR data is not proper to make interferogram in this area because of relatively short wavelength from 2010 to 2012. Moreover, TerraSAR-X X-band SAR data is not easily make interferograms with time-series continuously from 2012 to 2015. We also generate inundation area map from simulation of Laharz model for volcanic hazards risk estimation in Mt. Baekdu area. This study can help to monitor of active volcano with a dangerous and thick forest area covered by snow mostly half of the year.

  19. PS-InSAR experiments for the analysis of urban ground deformation using StaMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chendeb El Rai, Marwa; Simonetto, Elisabeth

    2009-09-01

    Many works and European projects have proven the ability of Permanent Scatterers Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (PS-InSAR) to measure the slow deformation of the persistent ground objects with a millimetric precision measurement. Compared to the classical differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR), PS-InSAR is an approach that estimates several contributions: atmospheric disturbances, orbital errors, deformation signal as well as topographical errors. In this paper, we propose to apply PS-InSAR for the analysis of the ground deformation phenomena in a urban context. For that purpose, the Stanford Method for Permanent Scatterers (StaMPS) is applied using an ERS data archive. StaMPS was developed in Stanford University by Andy Hooper. The advantages to use StaMPS were that it is free and many scripts are already available to process the dataset. In first steps of the processing, differential interferograms are produced using the Delft Object-oriented Radar Interferometric Software (DORIS), developed in Delft University of Technology . Doris is also a free tool. StaMPS method is briefly explained. A first experiment on the city of Paris, France, is presented, especially because PSINSAR and DInSAR results have already been published by several researchers. Therefore, the processing of Nantes (French city) is carried out. Some important results are shown.

  20. GF-3 SAR Ocean Wind Retrieval: The First View and Preliminary Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gaofen-3 (GF-3 is the first Chinese civil C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR launched on 10 August 2016 by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST, which operates in 12 imaging modes with a fine spatial resolution up to 1 m. As one of the primary users, the State Oceanic Administration (SOA operationally processes GF-3 SAR Level-1 products into ocean surface wind vector and plans to officially release the near real-time SAR wind products in the near future. In this paper, the methodology of wind retrieval at C-band SAR is introduced and the first results of GF-3 SAR-derived winds are presented. In particular, the case of the coastal katabatic wind off the west coast of the U.S. captured by GF-3 is discussed. The preliminary accuracy assessment of wind speed and direction retrievals from GF-3 SAR is carried out against in situ measurements from National Data Buoy Center (NDBC buoy measurements of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA. Only the buoys located inside the GF-3 SAR wind cell (1 km were considered as co-located in space, while the time interval between observations of SAR and buoy was limited to less the 30 min. These criteria yielded 56 co-locations during the period from January to April 2017, showing the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 2.46 m/s and 22.22° for wind speed and direction, respectively. Different performances due to geophysical model function (GMF and Polarization Ratio (PR are discussed. The preliminary results indicate that GF-3 wind retrievals are encouraging for operational implementation.

  1. Comparison of four moderate-size earthquakes in southern California using seismology and InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellors, R.J.; Magistrale, H.; Earle, P.; Cogbill, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Source parameters determined from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements and from seismic data are compared from four moderate-size (less than M 6) earthquakes in southern California. The goal is to verify approximate detection capabilities of InSAR, assess differences in the results, and test how the two results can be reconciled. First, we calculated the expected surface deformation from all earthquakes greater than magnitude 4 in areas with available InSAR data (347 events). A search for deformation from the events in the interferograms yielded four possible events with magnitudes less than 6. The search for deformation was based on a visual inspection as well as cross-correlation in two dimensions between the measured signal and the expected signal. A grid-search algorithm was then used to estimate focal mechanism and depth from the InSAR data. The results were compared with locations and focal mechanisms from published catalogs. An independent relocation using seismic data was also performed. The seismic locations fell within the area of the expected rupture zone for the three events that show clear surface deformation. Therefore, the technique shows the capability to resolve locations with high accuracy and is applicable worldwide. The depths determined by InSAR agree with well-constrained seismic locations determined in a 3D velocity model. Depth control for well-imaged shallow events using InSAR data is good, and better than the seismic constraints in some cases. A major difficulty for InSAR analysis is the poor temporal coverage of InSAR data, which may make it impossible to distinguish deformation due to different earthquakes at the same location.

  2. Landslide risk assessment with multi pass DInSAR analysis and error suppressing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    yun, H.; Kim, J.; Lin, S.; Choi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Landslide is one of the most dreadful natural hazards and the prime risk source causing lethal damages in many countries. In spite of various attempts to measure the landslide susceptibility by the remote sensed method including Differential Interferometric SAR (DInSAR) analysis, the construction of reliable forecasting systems still remains unsolved. Thus, we tackled the problem of DInSAR analysis for monitoring landslide risk over the mountainous areas where InSAR observations are usually contaminated by the orographic effects and other error elements. In order to measure the correct surface deformation which might be a prelude of landslide, time series analysis and atmospheric correction of DInSAR interferograms were conducted and crossly validated. The target area of this experiment is the eastern part of Korean peninsula centered in Uljin. In there, the landslide originated by the geomorphic factors such as high sloped topography and localized torrential down pour is critical issue. The landslide cases frequently occurred in the cutting side of mountainous area by the anthropogenic construction activities. Although high precision DInSAR measurements for monitoring the landslide risks are essential in such circumstances, it is difficult to attain sufficient enough accuracy because of the external factors inducing the error component in electromagnetic wave propagation. For instance, the local climate characteristics such as orographic effect and the proximity to seashore can produce the significant anomalies in the water vapor distribution and consequently result in the error components of InSAR phase angle measurements. Moreover the high altitude parts of target area cause the stratified tropospheric delay error in DInSAR measurement. After all, the improved DInSAR approaches to cope all above obstacles are highly necessary. Thus we employed two approaches i.e. StaMPS/MTI (Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers/Multi-Temporal InSAR, Hopper et al., 2007

  3. The Effects of Metallic Loop-Like Accessory Worn on the Human Body on SAR at 2.45 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal H. H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Specific Absorption Rates (SAR in the human body with a monopole antenna. The distance between the antenna and the body were varied at different distances. The parameters (εr, σ used in the human body set according to the standard tissue equivalent liquids recommended by the IEEE and FCC. The simulations were made by means of CST Microwave Studio software at frequencies of 2.45GHz .The effect of the body on the SAR calculation in the body were measured. The SAR values were recorded in term of SAR for 10g of tissue. The TM is positioned against the metallic loop-like accessory, place on the left wrist of the generic arm at a varied distance from the cylindrical phantom. Numerical analysis conducted using a broadband textile monopole antenna (TM with variations of orientation and distance showed that SAR values increased when the TM is horizontally polarized.

  4. 3D Forest Structure Estimation from SAR Tomography by Means of a Full Rank Polarimetric Inversion Based on Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazcarra Bes, Victor; Tello-Alonso, Maria; Papathanassiou, Kostas

    2015-04-01

    SAR tomography (TomoSAR) techniques allow a direct 3D imaging by exploiting angular diversity with different passes of the sensor. One of the main drawbacks of SAR tomography is that the estimation of the vertical reflectivity profile has to be performed through a limited set of multibaseline acquisitions, which requires solving a highly underdetermined system of equations. In TomoSAR literature, the Capon and the Fourier beamforming spectral estimators are widely employed. As an alternative, the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) techniques to the estimation of forest profiles has been recently introduced. In this paper, a different algorithm based on CS is proposed. It performs a full rank polarimetric inversion, allowing thus an estimation of the 3D coherency matrices. To study the full rank polarimetric TomoSAR inversion, a temporal series of airborne data is used. The results of the 3D polarimetric inversion will be contrasted to in situ measurements and LIDAR data.

  5. CFAR Edge Detector for Polarimetric SAR Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper; Skriver, Henning; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2003-01-01

    Finding the edges between different regions in an image is one of the fundamental steps of image analysis, and several edge detectors suitable for the special statistics of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images have previously been developed. In this paper, a new edge detector for polar......Finding the edges between different regions in an image is one of the fundamental steps of image analysis, and several edge detectors suitable for the special statistics of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images have previously been developed. In this paper, a new edge detector...... for polarimetric SAR images is presented using a newly developed test statistic in the complex Wishart distribution to test for equality of covariance matrices. The new edge detector can be applied to a wide range of SAR data from single-channel intensity data to multifrequency and/or multitemporal polarimetric...... SAR data. By simply changing the parameters characterizing the test statistic according to the applied SAR data, constant false-alarm rate detection is always obtained. An adaptive filtering scheme is presented, and the distributions of the detector are verified using simulated polarimetric SAR images...

  6. SARS - infectious disease of 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is an emerging viral infectious disease. According to the World Health Organization, a suspected case of SARS is defined as documented fever (temperature >38°C, lower respiratory tract symptoms, and contact with a person believed to have had SARS or history of travel to an area of documented transmission. A probable case is a suspected case with chest radiographic findings of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, or an unexplained respiratory illness resulting in death, with autopsy findings of ARDS without identifiable cause. In this article some SARS epidemiological data in Indonesia will also presented. There are 7 SARS suspected cases and 2 probable cases were registered in Indonesia on the period of 1 March to 9 July 2003, and no more cases were reported after that time. How will be SARS progression in the future will be a subject of discussion among scientist, and we will have to wait and be prepared for any development might occur. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 59-63Keywords: SARS, Case Definition, Etiology, Indonesia

  7. The discrimination of sea ice types using SAR backscatter statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuchman, Robert A.; Wackerman, Christopher C.; Maffett, Andrew L.; Onstott, Robert G.; Sutherland, Laura L.

    1989-01-01

    X-band (HH) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of sea ice collected during the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment in March and April of 1987 was statistically analyzed with respect to discriminating open water, first-year ice, multiyear ice, and Odden. Odden are large expanses of nilas ice that rapidly form in the Greenland Sea and transform into pancake ice. A first-order statistical analysis indicated that mean versus variance can segment out open water and first-year ice, and skewness versus modified skewness can segment the Odden and multilayer categories. In additions to first-order statistics, a model has been generated for the distribution function of the SAR ice data. Segmentation of ice types was also attempted using textural measurements. In this case, the general co-occurency matrix was evaluated. The textural method did not generate better results than the first-order statistical approach.

  8. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    and surface wind waves, especially swell. SAR is also useful for ship detection Ocean waves are weakly 10 A.A. Fernandes et al. imaged and can be recognized from SAR imagery from their fine "finger print" like signature. In contrast with ocean waves.../internal waves by all types of radar including ship radar, Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mounted on aeroplanes and Synthetic. Aperture Radar (SAR) mounted on satellites, is by modulation of the back-scatter from short Bragg resonant capillary-gravity waves...

  9. Offshore wind mapping Mediterranean area using SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaudi, Rosamaria; Arena, Felice; Badger, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ocean surface, for example from Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR), provide information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is of special interest in the Mediterranean Sea, where spatial wind information is only provided by sparse buoys, often...... with long periods of missing data. Here, we focus on evaluating the use of SAR for offshore wind mapping. Preliminary results from the analysis of SAR-based ocean winds in Mediterranean areas show interesting large scale wind flow features consistent with results from previous studies using numerical models...

  10. NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, N. (Editor); Evans, D. L. (Editor); Held, D. N. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Speaker-supplied summaries of the talks given at the NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop on February 4 and 5, 1985, are provided. These talks dealt mostly with composite quadpolarization imagery from a geologic or ecologic prespective. An overview and summary of the system characteristics of the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft are included as supplementary information. Other topics ranging from phase imagery and interferometric techniques classifications of specific areas, and the potentials and limitations of SAR imagery in various applications are discussed.

  11. Monitoring forest carbon in a Tanzanian woodland using interferometric SAR: a novel methodology for REDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Svein; Gizachew, Belachew; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Bollandsås, Ole Martin; Mauya, Ernest William; Olsson, Håkan; Malimbwi, Rogers; Zahabu, Eliakimu

    2015-12-01

    REDD+ implementation requires establishment of a system for measuring, reporting and verification (MRV) of forest carbon changes. A challenge for MRV is the lack of satellite based methods that can track not only deforestation, but also degradation and forest growth, as well as a lack of historical data that can serve as a basis for a reference emission level. Working in a miombo woodland in Tanzania, we here aim at demonstrating a novel 3D satellite approach based on interferometric processing of radar imagery (InSAR). Forest carbon changes are derived from changes in the forest canopy height obtained from InSAR, i.e. decreases represent carbon loss from logging and increases represent carbon sequestration through forest growth. We fitted a model of above-ground biomass (AGB) against InSAR height, and used this to convert height changes to biomass and carbon changes. The relationship between AGB and InSAR height was weak, as the individual plots were widely scattered around the model fit. However, we consider the approach to be unique and feasible for large-scale MRV efforts in REDD+ because the low accuracy was attributable partly to small plots and other limitations in the data set, and partly to a random pixel-to-pixel variation in trunk forms. Further processing of the InSAR data provides data on the categories of forest change. The combination of InSAR data from the Shuttle RADAR Topography Mission (SRTM) and the TanDEM-X satellite mission provided both historic baseline of change for the period 2000-2011, as well as annual change 2011-2012. A 3D data set from InSAR is a promising tool for MRV in REDD+. The temporal changes seen by InSAR data corresponded well with, but largely supplemented, the changes derived from Landsat data.

  12. Prince Edward Island wind assessment demonstrating the potential of SAR for sites classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, A.L.; Bergeron, T.; Bernier, M.; Chokmani, K.; Lafrance, G. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Varennes, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation described a research project conducted to map surface winds on the coast of Prince Edward Island (PEI) using SAR satellite imagery. The project ranked sites in relation to wind criteria and tested the correlation between inland and SAR data. Wind maps are obtained from the SAR backscatter signals by monitoring the capillary waves that form with any changes in wind regimes. A geophysical model function is used to relate wind speed and direction to the signal backscatter. Use of the technology allows for wind speed estimations over a larger region than meteorological masts, and provides a more accurate picture of wind speed spatial distribution. In this study, 40 images of SAR data were correlated with meteorological mast data in PEI. The data were divided into subgroups depending on wind direction. SAR scenes from the same direction were superimposed and the mean wind speed per direction was then calculated. A directional relative classification was conducted to measure speed differences between the speed at a specific location and the mean speed of a 10 km zone surrounding the island. A directional coefficient factor in relation to wind frequency was then calculated for each direction. Data were then compared with results obtained from a wind energy atlas. The study showed that optimal wind sites are located close to the sea. It was concluded that further research is needed to understand discrepancies between the SAR data and the Canadian wind atlas. tabs., figs.

  13. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  14. AUTOMATIC INTERPRETATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR IMAGES: FIRST RESULTS OF SAR IMAGE SIMULATION FOR SINGLE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the all-weather data acquisition capabilities, high resolution space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR plays an important role in remote sensing applications like change detection. However, because of the complex geometric mapping of buildings in urban areas, SAR images are often hard to interpret. SAR simulation techniques ease the visual interpretation of SAR images, while fully automatic interpretation is still a challenge. This paper presents a method for supporting the interpretation of high resolution SAR images with simulated radar images using a LiDAR digital surface model (DSM. Line features are extracted from the simulated and real SAR images and used for matching. A single building model is generated from the DSM and used for building recognition in the SAR image. An application for the concept is presented for the city centre of Munich where the comparison of the simulation to the TerraSAR-X data shows a good similarity. Based on the result of simulation and matching, special features (e.g. like double bounce lines, shadow areas etc. can be automatically indicated in SAR image.

  15. Evaluation of InSAR and TomoSAR for Monitoring Deformations Caused by Mining in a Mountainous Area with High Resolution Satellite-Based SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglie Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR and Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR have shown numerous applications for subsidence monitoring. In the past 10 years, the Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSI and Small BAseline Subset (SBAS approaches were developed to overcome the problem of decorrelation and atmospheric effects, which are common in interferograms. However, DInSAR or PSI applications in rural areas, especially in mountainous regions, can be extremely challenging. In this study we have employed a combined technique, i.e., SBAS-DInSAR, to a mountainous area that is severely affected by mining activities. In addition, L-band (ALOS and C-band (ENVISAT data sets, 21 TerraSAR-X images provided by German Aerospace Center (DLR with a high resolution have been used. In order to evaluate the ability of TerraSAR-X for mining monitoring, we present a case study of TerraSAR-X SAR images for Subsidence Hazard Boundary (SHB extraction. The resulting data analysis gives an initial evaluation of InSAR applications within a mountainous region where fast movements and big phase gradients are common. Moreover, the experiment of four-dimension (4-D Tomography SAR (TomoSAR for structure monitoring inside the mining area indicates a potential near all-wave monitoring, which is an extension of conventional InSAR.

  16. Analysis of snowpack properties and structure from TerraSAR-X data, based on multilayer backscattering and snow evolution modeling approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Xuan-Vu; Gay, Michel; Durand, Yves; Dumont, Marie; Allain, Sophie; D'Urso, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Recently launched high precision Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites such as TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SkyMed, etc. present a high potential for better observation and characterization of the cryosphere. This study introduces a new approach using high frequency (X-band) SAR data and an Electromagnetic Backscattering Model (EBM) to constrain the detailed snowpack model Crocus. A snowpack EBM based on radiative transfer theory, previously used for C-band applications, is adapted for the X-band. From measured or simulated snowpack stratigraphic profiles consisting of snow optical grain radius and density, this forward model calculates the backscattering coefficient for different polarimetric channels. The output result is then compared with spaceborne TerraSAR-X acquisitions to evaluate the forward model. Next, from the EBM, the adjoint operator is developed and used in a variational analysis scheme in order to minimize the discrepancies between simulations and SAR observations. A time series of TerraSAR-X acquisi...

  17. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  18. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy and immunoreactivity of recombinant Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Lesley A; Yu, Meng; Waddington, Lynne J; Barr, Jennifer A; Scoble, Judith A; Crameri, Gary S; McKinstry, William J

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus (family Paramyxoviridae) is a negative sense single-stranded RNA virus (NSRV) which has been found to cause disease in humans, horses, and experimentally in other animals, e.g. pigs and cats. Pteropid bats commonly known as flying foxes have been identified as the natural host reservoir. The Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein (HeV N) represents the most abundant viral protein produced by the host cell, and is highly immunogenic with naturally infected humans and horses producing specific antibodies towards this protein. The purpose of this study was to express and purify soluble, functionally active recombinant HeV N, suitable for use as an immunodiagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against HeV. We expressed both full-length HeV N, (HeV NFL), and a C-terminal truncated form, (HeV NCORE), using a bacterial heterologous expression system. Both HeV N constructs were engineered with an N-terminal Hisx6 tag, and purified using a combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Purified recombinant HeV N proteins self-assembled into soluble higher order oligomers as determined by SEC and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Both HeV N proteins were highly immuno-reactive with sera from animals and humans infected with either HeV or the closely related Nipah virus (NiV), but displayed no immuno-reactivity towards sera from animals infected with a non-pathogenic paramyxovirus (CedPV), or animals receiving Equivac® (HeV G glycoprotein subunit vaccine), using a Luminex-based multiplexed microsphere assay. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  20. Dynamics of Linker Residues Modulate the Nucleic Acid Binding Properties of the HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Zinc Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity. PMID:25029439

  1. Differential cellular protein expression in continuous porcine alveolar macrophages regulated by the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagong, Mingeun; Lee, Changhee

    2010-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a leading cause of significant economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. PRRSV infects preferentially porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and subsequently utilizes the host cell biosynthetic machinery for its own replication. To date, a number of studies have been conducted to investigate compensatory changes of cellular gene expression of PAMs upon PRRSV infection. However, very little information exists about differential cellular protein expression of the natural target cells regulated by each viral protein. This study was therefore designed to examine the dynamics of host protein expression of continuous PAM cells by the PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein that is the most abundant and multifunctional viral component. We first established sublines of PAM cells to stably express the PRRSV N protein and assessed alterations in cellular protein productions of N-expressing PAM (PAM-pCD163-N) cells at different time courses by the use of proteomic analysis. A total of 23 protein spots were initially found to be differentially expressed in PAM-pCD163-N cells compared with normal PAM cells by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Of these spots, 15 protein spots with statistically significant alteration, including 4 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated protein spots, were picked out for subsequent protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting after matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). The altered cellular proteins identified in this study were classified into the functions involved in a variety of cellular processes such as cell division, metabolism, inflammation response, stress response, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, protein folding and synthesis, and transportation. Notably, heat shock 27kDa protein (HSP27) was found to be up-regulated in PAM-pCD163-N cells. The proteomics data will provide insights into the specific

  2. MiTAP for SARS Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damianos, Laurie E; Bayer, Samuel; Chisholm, Michael A; Henderson, John; Hirschman, Lynette; Morgan, William; Ubaldino, Marc; Zarrella, Guido; Wilson, V, James M; Polyak, Marat G

    2006-01-01

    The MiTAP prototype for SARS detection uses human language technology for detecting, monitoring, and analyzing potential indicators of infectious disease outbreaks and reasoning for issuing warnings and alerts...

  3. Attribute Learning for SAR Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a classification approach based on attribute learning for high spatial resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. To explore the representative and discriminative attributes of SAR images, first, an iterative unsupervised algorithm is designed to cluster in the low-level feature space, where the maximum edge response and the ratio of mean-to-variance are included; a cross-validation step is applied to prevent overfitting. Second, the most discriminative clustering centers are sorted out to construct an attribute dictionary. By resorting to the attribute dictionary, a representation vector describing certain categories in the SAR image can be generated, which in turn is used to perform the classifying task. The experiments conducted on TerraSAR-X images indicate that those learned attributes have strong visual semantics, which are characterized by bright and dark spots, stripes, or their combinations. The classification method based on these learned attributes achieves better results.

  4. A New Approach for SAR Image Denoising

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murali Mohan Babu Y; Subramanyam M V; Giri Prasad M N

    2015-01-01

      In synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, the transmitted pulses from space born antenna interacts with ground objects and returned energy or back scattered energy will be collected to get backscattered image...

  5. Satellite sar detection of hurricane helene (2006)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ju, Lian; Cheng, Yongcun; Xu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the wind structure of hurricane Helene (2006) over the Atlantic Ocean is investigated from a C-band RADARSAT-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired on 20 September 2006. First, the characteristics, e.g., the center, scale and area of the hurricane eye (HE) are determined....... There is a good agreement between the SAR-estimated HE center location and the best track data from the National Hurricane Center. The wind speeds at 10 m above the ocean surface are also retrieved from the SAR data using the geophysical model function (GMF), CMOD5, and compared with in situ wind speed...... observations from the stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR) on NOAA P3 aircraft. All the results show the capability of hurricane monitoring by satellite SAR. Copyright © 2013 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  6. Advanced Antenna for Digital Beamforming SAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a wideband (500 MHz) L-band phased-array antenna for airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications based on a novel approach that will make possible...

  7. Charge neutralization as the major factor for the assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Luiz Ferraz de Souza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein, in addition to its structural role to form the nucleocapsid assembly, plays a critical role in HCV pathogenesis by interfering in several cellular processes, including microRNA and mRNA homeostasis. The C-terminal truncated HCV core protein (C124 is intrinsically unstructured in solution and is able to interact with unspecific nucleic acids, in the micromolar range, and to assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs in vitro. The specificity and propensity of C124 to the assembly and its implications on HCV pathogenesis are not well understood. Methods Spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy and calorimetry were used to better understand the propensity of C124 to fold or to multimerize into NLPs when subjected to different conditions or in the presence of unspecific nucleic acids of equivalent size to cellular microRNAs. Results The structural analysis indicated that C124 has low propensity to self-folding. On the other hand, for the first time, we show that C124, in the absence of nucleic acids, multimerizes into empty NLPs when subjected to a pH close to its isoelectric point (pH ≈ 12, indicating that assembly is mainly driven by charge neutralization. Isothermal calorimetry data showed that the assembly of NLPs promoted by nucleic acids is enthalpy driven. Additionally, data obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that C124, in nanomolar range, was able to interact and to sequester a large number of short unspecific nucleic acids into NLPs. Discussion Together, our data showed that the charge neutralization is the major factor for the nucleocapsid-like particles assembly from C-terminal truncated HCV core protein. This finding suggests that HCV core protein may physically interact with unspecific cellular polyanions, which may correspond to microRNAs and mRNAs in a host cell infected by HCV, triggering their confinement into infectious particles.

  8. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  9. Sample Extraction Bsaed on Helix Scattering for Polarimetric SAR Calibratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.; Yang, J.; Li, P.; Zhao, L.; Shi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Polarimetric calibration (PolCAL) of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a significant preprocessing for further applications. Since the reflection symmetry property of distributed objects can provide stable constraints for PolCAL. It is reasonable to extract these reference samples before calibration. The helix scattering generally appears in complex urban area and disappears for a natural scatterer, making it a good measure to extract distributed objects. In this paper, a novel technique that extracts reflecting symmetry samples is proposed by using helix scattering. The helix scattering information is calculated by Yamaguchi four-component decomposition algorithm. An adaptive threshold selection algorithm based on generalized Gaussian distribution is also utilized to scale the helix scattering components automatically, getting rid of the problem of various numerical range. The extracting results will be taken as PolCAL reference samples and the Quegan method are utilized to calibrate these PolSAR images. A C-band airborne PolSAR data was taken as examples to evaluate its ability in improving calibration precision. Traditional method i.e. extracting samples with span power was also evaluated as contrast experiment. The results showed that the samples extracting method based on helix scattering can improve the Polcal precision preferably.

  10. SAMPLE EXTRACTION BSAED ON HELIX SCATTERING FOR POLARIMETRIC SAR CALIBRATIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarimetric calibration (PolCAL of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images is a significant preprocessing for further applications. Since the reflection symmetry property of distributed objects can provide stable constraints for PolCAL. It is reasonable to extract these reference samples before calibration. The helix scattering generally appears in complex urban area and disappears for a natural scatterer, making it a good measure to extract distributed objects. In this paper, a novel technique that extracts reflecting symmetry samples is proposed by using helix scattering. The helix scattering information is calculated by Yamaguchi four-component decomposition algorithm. An adaptive threshold selection algorithm based on generalized Gaussian distribution is also utilized to scale the helix scattering components automatically, getting rid of the problem of various numerical range. The extracting results will be taken as PolCAL reference samples and the Quegan method are utilized to calibrate these PolSAR images. A C-band airborne PolSAR data was taken as examples to evaluate its ability in improving calibration precision. Traditional method i.e. extracting samples with span power was also evaluated as contrast experiment. The results showed that the samples extracting method based on helix scattering can improve the Polcal precision preferably.

  11. 4G antennas for wireless eyewear devices and related SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihangir, Aykut; Whittow, Will; Panagamuwa, Chinthana; Jacquemod, Gilles; Gianesello, Frédéric; Luxey, Cyril

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we first present a feasibility study to design 4G antennas (700-960 MHz and 1.7-2.7 GHz) for eyewear devices. Those eyewear devices should be connected to the last generation cellular networks, Wireless Local Area Networks or wireless hotspots. Three coupling element type antennas with their matching networks are evaluated in terms of reflection coefficient and total radiation efficiency when the eyewear is placed on the user's head. We also present Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) simulations when the eyewear is positioned over a homogeneous SAM phantom and over a heterogeneous VH (Visible Human) phantom: the SAR levels are compared to international limit values. In a second step, we present experimental results obtained with 3D printed eyewear and coupling elements etched on a classical PCB substrate where the matching circuits are optimized close to the feeding point of the coupling element. Simulated and measured values are in very good agreement: 7 to 16% and 9 to 35% total efficiency are respectively obtained for the low- and high-frequency bands. However, simulated SAR values are somewhat higher than authorized levels with preoccupant high electromagnetic field distribution close to the eye of the user.

  12. Safety analysis and review system (SARS) assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, E.T.

    1981-03-01

    Under DOE Order 5481.1, Safety Analysis and Review System for DOE Operations, safety analyses are required for DOE projects in order to ensure that: (1) potential hazards are systematically identified; (2) potential impacts are analyzed; (3) reasonable measures have been taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the hazards; and (4) there is documented management authorization of the DOE operation based on an objective assessment of the adequacy of the safety analysis. This report is intended to provide the DOE Office of Plans and Technology Assessment (OPTA) with an independent evaluation of the adequacy of the ongoing safety analysis effort. As part of this effort, a number of site visits and interviews were conducted, and FE SARS documents were reviewed. The latter included SARS Implementation Plans for a number of FE field offices, as well as safety analysis reports completed for certain FE operations. This report summarizes SARS related efforts at the DOE field offices visited and evaluates the extent to which they fulfill the requirements of DOE 5481.1.

  13. Ocean Wave Parameters Retrieval from Sentinel-1 SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizeng Shao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a semi-empirical algorithm for significant wave height (Hs and mean wave period (Tmw retrieval from C-band VV-polarization Sentinel-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery is presented. We develop a semi-empirical function for Hs retrieval, which describes the relation between Hs and cutoff wavelength, radar incidence angle, and wave propagation direction relative to radar look direction. Additionally, Tmw can be also calculated through Hs and cutoff wavelength by using another empirical function. We collected 106 C-band stripmap mode Sentinel-1 SAR images in VV-polarization and wave measurements from in situ buoys. There are a total of 150 matchup points. We used 93 matchups to tune the coefficients of the semi-empirical algorithm and the rest 57 matchups for validation. The comparison shows a 0.69 m root mean square error (RMSE of Hs with a 18.6% of scatter index (SI and 1.98 s RMSE of Tmw with a 24.8% of SI. Results indicate that the algorithm is suitable for wave parameters retrieval from Sentinel-1 SAR data.

  14. Emergency product generation for disaster management using RISAT and DMSAR quick look SAR processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nilesh; Sharma, Ritesh; Kumar, Saravana; Misra, Tapan; Gujraty, Virendra; Rana, SurinderSingh

    2006-12-01

    Since last few years, ISRO has embarked upon the development of two complex Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) missions, viz. Spaceborne Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT) and Airborne SAR for Disaster Mangement (DMSAR), as a capacity building measure under country's Disaster Management Support (DMS) Program, for estimating the extent of damage over large areas (~75 Km) and also assess the effectiveness of the relief measures undertaken during natural disasters such as cyclones, epidemics, earthquakes, floods and landslides, forest fires, crop diseases etc. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has an unique role to play in mapping and monitoring of large areas affected by natural disasters especially floods, owing to its unique capability to see through clouds as well as all-weather imaging capability. The generation of SAR images with quick turn around time is very essential to meet the above DMS objectives. Thus the development of SAR Processors, for these two SAR systems poses considerable challenges and design efforts. Considering the growing user demand and inevitable necessity for a full-fledged high throughput processor, to process SAR data and generate image in real or near-real time, the design and development of a generic SAR Processor has been taken up and evolved, which will meet the SAR processing requirements for both Airborne and Spaceborne SAR systems. This hardware SAR processor is being built, to the extent possible, using only Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) DSP and other hardware plug-in modules on a Compact PCI (cPCI) platform. Thus, the major thrust has been on working out Multi-processor Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture and algorithm development and optimization rather than hardware design and fabrication. For DMSAR, this generic SAR Processor operates as a Quick Look SAR Processor (QLP) on-board the aircraft to produce real time full swath DMSAR images and as a ground based Near-Real Time high precision full swath Processor (NRTP). It will

  15. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  16. SARS among Critical Care Nurses, Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeer, Allison; Henry, Bonnie; Ofner, Marianna; Rose, David; Hlywka, Tammy; Levie, Joanne; McQueen, Jane; Smith, Stephanie; Moss, Lorraine; Smith, Andrew; Green, Karen; Walter, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    To determine factors that predispose or protect healthcare workers from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), we conducted a retrospective cohort study among 43 nurses who worked in two Toronto critical care units with SARS patients. Eight of 32 nurses who entered a SARS patient’s room were infected. The probability of SARS infection was 6% per shift worked. Assisting during intubation, suctioning before intubation, and manipulating the oxygen mask were high-risk activities. Consistently wearing a mask (either surgical or particulate respirator type N95) while caring for a SARS patient was protective for the nurses, and consistent use of the N95 mask was more protective than not wearing a mask. Risk was reduced by consistent use of a surgical mask, but not significantly. Risk was lower with consistent use of a N95 mask than with consistent use of a surgical mask. We conclude that activities related to intubation increase SARS risk and use of a mask (particularly a N95 mask) is protective. PMID:15030692

  17. SAR Tomography Based on Block Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Aichun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While the use of SAR Tomography (TomoSAR based on Compressive Sensing (CS makes it possible to reconstruct the height profile of an observed scene, the performance of the reconstruction decreases for a structural observed scene. To deal with this issue, we propose using TomoSAR based on Block Compressive Sensing (BCS, which changes the reconstruction of the structural observed scene into a BCS problem under the principles of CS. Further, the block size is established by utilizing the relationship between the characteristics of the structural observed scene and the SAR parameters, such that the BCS problem is efficiently solved with a block sparse l1/l2 norm optimization signal model. Compared with existing CSTomoSAR methods, the proposed BCS-TomoSAR method makes better use of the sparsity and structure information of a structural observed scene, and has higher precision and better reconstruction performance. We used simulations and Radarsat-2 data to verify the effectiveness of this proposed method.

  18. Ionospheric errors compensation for ground deformation estimation with new generation SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomba, Giorgio; De Zan, Francesco; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR (InSAR) measurements are disturbed by the propagation velocity changes of microwaves that are caused by the high density of free electrons in the ionosphere. Most affected are low-frequency (L- or P-band) radars, as the recently launched ALOS-2 and the future Tandem-L and NISAR, although higher frequency (C- or X-band) systems, as the recently launched Sentinel-1, are not immune. Since the ionosphere is an obstacle to increasing the precision of new generation SAR systems needed to remotely measure the Earth's dynamic processes as for example ground deformation, it is necessary to estimate and compensate ionospheric propagation delays in SAR signals. In this work we discuss about the influence of the ionosphere on interferograms and the possible correction methods with relative accuracies. Consequently, the effect of ionospheric induced errors on ground deformation measurements prior and after ionosphere compensation will be analyzed. Examples will be presented of corrupted measurements of earthquakes and fault motion along with the corrected results using different methods.

  19. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christina; Ott, Melanie; Raschbichler, Verena; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M

    2015-06-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment.

  20. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Funk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary

  1. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  2. Validation of CryoSat-2 SAR mode based lake levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Lake level serve as an important indicator of the climate and continuous measurements are therefore essential. Satellite radar altimetry has now been used successfully for more than two decades to measure lake level as an addition to gauge measurements. The technique has, due to the large footprint...... of conventional altimetry, primarily been used for large lakes. CryoSat-2, which was launched in 2010, carries the first altimeter that is able to operate in SAR mode. The along-track resolution is approximately 300. m in SAR mode thus enabling us to accurately monitor substantially smaller lakes.Here we evaluate...

  3. Supersites: An Initiative towards open access for InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelung, Falk; Lengert, W.; Puglisi, G.

    2010-05-01

    Over the last decade Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has evolved to an important geophysical measurement technique for the study of tectonic and volcanic processes an can be considered to be on equal footing with seismology and GPS. However, the access to SAR data is much more difficult than the access to seismic data (such as from IRIS) and to GPS data. SAR data are acquired by satellites operated by national and international Space Agencies (such as the European Space Agency, ESA, and the Japanese Space Agency, Jaxa) with each agency having different data policies and access procedures. Unlike in seismology, data access is a major limitation for scientific progress in InSAR science. Over the last decade Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has evolved to an important geophysical measurement technique for the study of tectonic and volcanic processes an can be considered to be on equal footing with seismology and GPS. However, the access to SAR data is much more difficult than the access to seismic data (such as from IRIS) and to GPS data. SAR data are acquired by satellites operated by national and international Space Agencies (such as the European Space Agency, ESA, and the Japanese Space Agency, Jaxa) with each agency having different data policies and access procedures. Unlike in seismology, data access is a major limitation for scientific progress in InSAR science. The Supersite initiative, led by the intergovernmental Group of Earth Observation (GEO) and the European Space Agency is designed to change this. SAR data along with ground-based data will be made available for selected sites with volcanic or earthquake hazard to stimulate fundamental research. Current Supersites include the volcanoes Mt. Etna, Vesuvius/Campi Phlegrei and Hawaii and the earthquake-prone cities Istanbul, Tokyo, Vancouver/Seattle and Los Angeles. Supersites will provide complete multi-satellite SAR data sets as well as ground-based data (seismic and GPS

  4. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  6. Online Health Education on SARS to University Students during the SARS Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mee Lian; Koh, David; Iyer, Prasad; Seow, Adeline; Goh, Lee Gan; Chia, Sin Eng; Lim, Meng Kin; Ng, Daniel; Ong, Choon Nam; Phua, Kai Hong; Tambyah, Paul; Chow, Vincent T K; Chew, Suok Kai; Chandran, Ravi; Lee, Hin Peng

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how online learning may be used to disseminate health information rapidly and widely to large university populations if there is an infectious disease outbreak. During the SARS outbreak in Singapore in 2003, a six-lesson elearning module on SARS was developed for a large university population of 32,000 students. The module…

  7. SAR-PC: Edge Detection in SAR Images via an Advanced Phase Congruency Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Edge detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images has been a challenging task due to the speckle noise. Ratio-based edge detectors are robust operators for SAR images that provide constant false alarm rates, but they are only optimal for step edges. Edge detectors developed by the phase congruency model provide the identification of different types of edge features, but they suffer from speckle noise. By combining the advantages of the two edge detectors, we propose a SAR phase congruency detector (SAR-PC. Firstly, an improved local energy model for SAR images is obtained by replacing the convolution of raw image and the quadrature filters by the ratio responses. Secondly, a new noise level is estimated for the multiplicative noise. Substituting the SAR local energy and the new noise level into the phase congruency model, SAR-PC is derived. Edge response corresponds to the max moment of SAR-PC. We compare the proposed detector with the ratio-based edge detectors and the phase congruency edge detectors. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves and visual effects are used to evaluate the performance. Experimental results of simulated images and real-world images show that the proposed edge detector is robust to speckle noise and it provides a consecutive edge response.

  8. Sequential Ensembles Tolerant to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Soil Moisture Retrieval Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyoung Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to complicated and undefined systematic errors in satellite observation, data assimilation integrating model states with satellite observations is more complicated than field measurements-based data assimilation at a local scale. In the case of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR soil moisture, the systematic errors arising from uncertainties in roughness conditions are significant and unavoidable, but current satellite bias correction methods do not resolve the problems very well. Thus, apart from the bias correction process of satellite observation, it is important to assess the inherent capability of satellite data assimilation in such sub-optimal but more realistic observational error conditions. To this end, time-evolving sequential ensembles of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF is compared with stationary ensemble of the Ensemble Optimal Interpolation (EnOI scheme that does not evolve the ensembles over time. As the sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the surface roughness is more sensitive to the SAR retrievals than measurement errors, it is a scope of this study to monitor how data assimilation alters the effects of roughness on SAR soil moisture retrievals. In results, two data assimilation schemes all provided intermediate values between SAR overestimation, and model underestimation. However, under the same SAR observational error conditions, the sequential ensembles approached a calibrated model showing the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE, while the stationary ensemble converged towards the SAR observations exhibiting the highest RMSE. As compared to stationary ensembles, sequential ensembles have a better tolerance to SAR retrieval errors. Such inherent nature of EnKF suggests an operational merit as a satellite data assimilation system, due to the limitation of bias correction methods currently available.

  9. The Utility of SAR to Monitor Ocean Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    parameters a2 and y were then estimated by applying a least-squares fit of the SAR measured power and the surface measured winds. The surface winds used...1354, 1974. Apel, J.R., H.M. Byrne, J.R. Proni and R.L. Charnell, Observations of Oceanic Internal and Surface Waves from the Earth Resources Tech...significantly from the surface slope spectrum. The radar-derived mean directions and model- fitted direc- tional spreads of wave energy were close to the values

  10. A Detailed View of Rockslide Deformation Patterns in Northern Norway Using Both Ascending and Descending High-Resolution TerraSAR-X Satellite InSAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, H.; Lauknes, T.; Dehls, J. F.; Larsen, Y.; Corner, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    Norway is particularly susceptible to large rockslides due to its many fjords and steep mountains. One of the most dangerous hazards related to rock slope failures are tsunamis that can lead to large loss of life. Many rockslides are clustered east of the Lyngen fjord in Troms county, northern Norway, where several mapped unstable rock slopes occur within the zone of sporadic permafrost. Among these, the Jettan rockslide at Nordnes has been classified as high-risk due to the severe consequences should catastrophic failure occur. In order to fully understand the kinematics and geometric configurations susceptible for sliding, it is imperative to obtain precise measurements of the stability of potential unstable rock slopes. Multi-temporal satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques involve comparing the phase information from multiple spaceborne SAR images, produced at different times, to detect millimeter to centimeter scale ground deformation patterns. However, the satellite radar is only capable of measuring displacement that has a component in the radar line-of-sight (LOS). By combining InSAR data acquired in both ascending and descending orbits, it is possible to extract more information about the true displacement vector, increasing the interpretability of the displacement patterns. In this study, we apply multitemporal InSAR methods to an extensive time series of TerraSAR-X data collected in both ascending and descending geometries during the summer seasons in the period 2009-2012. The estimated deformation rates from the ascending and descending geometries are decomposed into deformation in the vertical and east/west directions, dip angle and total deformation. For the study area, we present examples of the detailed deformation patterns obtained by using both ascending and descending SAR data, together with mapped geological structures and geomorphological elements in the field. Finally, we validate the estimated displacement

  11. Satellite SAR interferometry for monitoring dam deformation in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim, Sousa; Lazecky, Milan; Hlavacova, Ivana; Bakon, Matus; Patrício, Glória

    2016-01-01

    The paper offers three examples of satellite SAR interferometry (InSAR) application for monitoring dam deformations: Paradela, Raiva and Alto Ceira, all of them in Portugal. Dam deformations were estimated using several sets of ERS and Envisat C-band SAR data by PS-InSAR method that offers accuracy of a millimeter per year at monitoring man-made tructures. The results show potential of InSAR but also summarize limits of C-band InSAR in these particular cases and can be handful to recogn...

  12. Human monoclonal antibody as prophylaxis for SARS coronavirus infection in ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Meulen, Jan; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; van den Brink, Edward N.; Weverling, Gerrit J.; Martina, Byron E. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Kuiken, Thijs; de Kruif, John; Preiser, Wolfgang; Spaan, Willy; Gelderblom, Hans R.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2004-01-01

    SARS coronavirus continues to cause sporadic cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in China. No active or passive immunoprophylaxis for disease induced by SARS coronavirus is available. We investigated prophylaxis of SARS coronavirus infection with a neutralising human monoclonal

  13. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  14. T-cell immunity of SARS-CoV: Implications for vaccine development against MERS-CoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, William J; Zhao, Min; Liu, Kefang; Xu, Kun; Wong, Gary; Tan, Wenjie; Gao, George F

    2017-01-01

    Over 12 years have elapsed since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) triggered the first global alert for coronavirus infections. Virus transmission in humans was quickly halted by public health measures and human infections of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) have not been observed since. However, other coronaviruses still pose a continuous threat to human health, as exemplified by the recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in humans. The work on SARS-CoV widens our knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and immunology of coronaviruses and may shed light on MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It has been confirmed that T-cell immunity plays an important role in recovery from SARS-CoV infection. Herein, we summarize T-cell immunological studies of SARS-CoV and discuss the potential cross-reactivity of the SARS-CoV-specific immunity against MERS-CoV, which may provide useful recommendations for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against coronavirus infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. TerraSAR-X StripMap Data Interpretation of Complex Urban Scenarios with 3D SAR Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianhuan Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The severe layover problem of complex urban scenarios in SAR data makes SAR data interpretation very difficult, especially for nonexperts. In this paper, we use 3D SAR tomography for SAR data interpretation of dense urban areas. An efficient and robust approach named Butterworth-filter based singular value decomposition (BSVD is used for tomographic analysis. Two typical dense urban areas of interest located in Shanghai are analyzed. The tomographic results could help users to better understand the backscattering scenario. The experimental results indicate that SAR tomography is a promising and effective way to facilitate SAR data interpretation of complex urban areas.

  16. Quantitative investigation of the affinity of human respiratory syncytial virus phosphoprotein C-terminus binding to nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; O'Connell, Nichole; Hu, Jun; Thresher, Jason; Gu, Rong-Fang; Overman, Ross; Hardern, Ian M; Sproat, Graham G

    2014-11-19

    There are no approved small molecule drug therapies for human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), a cause of morbidity and mortality in at-risk newborns, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. We have investigated as a potential novel hRSV drug target the protein-protein interaction between the C-terminus of the viral phosphoprotein (P) and the viral nucleocapsid protein (N), components of the ribonucleoprotein complex that contains, replicates, and transcribes the viral RNA genome. Earlier work by others established that the 9 C-terminal residues of P are necessary and sufficient for binding to N. We used a fluorescence anisotropy assay, surface plasmon resonance and 2-D NMR to quantify the affinities of peptides based on the C terminus of P for RNA-free, monomeric N-terminal-truncated N(13-391). We calculated the contributions to the free energies of binding of P to N(13-391) attributable to the C-terminal 11 residues, phosphorylation of the C-terminal 2 serine residues, the C-terminal Asp-Phe, and the phenyl ring of the C-terminal Phe. Binding studies confirmed the crucial role of the phosphorylated C-terminal peptide D(pS)DNDL(pS)LEDF for binding of P to RNA-free, monomeric N(13-391), contributing over 90% of the binding free energy at low ionic strength. The phenyl ring of the C-terminal Phe residue contributed an estimated -2.7 kcal/mole of the free energy of binding, the C-terminal Asp-Phe residues contributed -3.8 kcal/mole, the sequence DSDNDLSLE contributed -3.1 kcal/mole, and phosphorylation of the 2 Ser residues contributed -1.8 kcal/mole. Due to the high negative charge of the C-terminal peptide, the affinity of the P C-terminus for N(13-391) decreased as the ionic strength increased. The results support the idea that the interaction of the C-terminal residues of P with N constitutes a protein-protein interaction hotspot that may be a suitable target for small-molecule drugs that inhibit viral genome replication and transcription.

  17. Long term landslide monitoring with Ground Based SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Oriol; Crosetto, Michele; Luzi, Guido; Gili, Josep; Moya, Jose; Corominas, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, Ground-Based (GBSAR) has proven to be a reliable microwave Remote Sensing technique in several application fields, especially for unstable slopes monitoring. GBSAR can provide displacement measurements over few squared kilometres areas and with a very high spatial and temporal resolution. This work is focused on the use of GBSAR technique for long term landslide monitoring based on a particular data acquisition configuration, which is called discontinuous GBSAR (D-GBSAR). In the most commonly used GBSAR configuration, the radar is left installed in situ, acquiring data periodically, e.g. every few minutes. Deformations are estimated by processing sets of GBSAR images acquired during several weeks or months, without moving the system. By contrast, in the D-GBSAR the radar is installed and dismounted at each measurement campaign, revisiting a given site periodically. This configuration is useful to monitor slow deformation phenomena. In this work, two alternative ways for exploiting the D-GBSAR technique will be presented: the DInSAR technique and the Amplitude based Technique. The former is based on the exploitation of the phase component of the acquired SAR images and it allows providing millimetric precision on the deformation estimates. However, this technique presents several limitations like the reduction of measurable points with an increase in the period of observation, the ambiguous nature of the phase measurements, and the influence of the atmospheric phase component that can make it non applicable in some cases, specially when working in natural environments. The second approach, that is based on the use of the amplitude component of GB-SAR images combined with a image matching technique, will allow the estimation of the displacements over specific targets avoiding two of the limitations commented above: the phase unwrapping and atmosphere contribution but reducing the deformation measurement precision. Two successful examples of D

  18. Land subsidence in the Yangtze River Delta, China revealed from multi-frequency SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhong; Motagh, Mahdi; Yu, Jun; Gong, Xulong; Wu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Huogen; Zhang, Dengming; Xu, Yulin

    2014-05-01

    Land subsidence is a major worldwide hazard, and its principal causes are subsurface fluid withdrawal, drainage of organic soils, sinkholes, underground mining, hydrocompaction, thawing permafrost, and natural consolidation. Land subsidence causes many problems including: damage to public facilities such as bridges, roads, railroads, electric power lines, underground pipes; damage to private and public buildings; and in some cases of low-lying land, can increase the risk of coastal flooding from storm surges and rising sea-levels. In China, approximately 48600 km2 of land, an area roughly 30 times of the size of the Greater London, has subsided (nearly 50 cities across 16 provinces), and the annual direct economic loss is estimated to be more than RMB 100 million (~12 million). It is believed that the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region within the Yangtze River Delta is the most severely affected area for subsidence hazards in China. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) is revolutionizing our ability to image the Earth's surface and the evolution of its shape over time. In this paper, an advanced InSAR time series technique, InSAR TS + AEM, has been employed to analysed ERS (C-band), Envisat (C-band) and TerraSAR-X (X-band) data collected over the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region during the period from 1992 to 2013. Validation with precise levelling and GPS data suggest: (1) the accuracy of the InSAR-derived mean velocity measurements is 1-3 mm/yr; (2) InSAR-derived displacements agreed with precise levelling with root mean square errors around 5 mm. It is evident that InSAR TS + AEM can be used to image the evolution of deformation patterns in the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region over time: the maximum mean velocity decreased from ~12 cm/yr during the period of 1992-1993 to ~2 cm/yr in 2003-2013. This is believed to be a result of the prohibition of groundwater use carried out by Jiangsu provincial government. The combination

  19. MONITORING OF LAND SUBSIDENCE IN RAVENNA MUNICIPALITY USING INTEGRATED SAR - GPS TECHNIQUES: DESCRIPTION AND FIRST RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Artese

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Emilia Romagna Region (N-E Italy and in particular the Adriatic Sea coastline of Ravenna, is affected by a noticeable subsidence that started in the 1950s, when the exploitation of on and off-shore methane reservoirs began, along with the pumping of groundwater for industrial uses. In such area the current subsidence rate, even if lower than in the past, reaches the -2 cm/y. Over the years, local Authorities have monitored this phenomenon with different techniques: spirit levelling, GPS surveys and, more recently, Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR techniques, confirming the critical situation of land subsidence risk. In this work, we present the comparison between the results obtained with DInSAR and GPS techniques applied to the study of the land subsidence in the Ravenna territory. With regard to the DInSAR, the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS and the Coherent Pixel Technique (CPT techniques have been used. Different SAR datasets have been exploited: ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, TerraSAR-X and Sentinel-1. Some GPS campaigns have been also carried out in a subsidence prone area. 3D vertices have been selected very close to existing persistent scatterers in order to link the GPS measurement results to the SAR ones. GPS data were processed into the International reference system and the comparisons between the coordinates, for the first 6 months of the monitoring, provided results with the same trend of the DInSAR data, even if inside the precision of the method.

  20. L-band InSAR Penetration Depth Experiment, North Slope Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskett, Reginald

    2017-04-01

    Since the first spacecraft-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission NASA's SEASAT in 1978 radars have been flown in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by other national space agencies including the Canadian Space Agency, European Space Agency, India Space Research Organization and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency. Improvements in electronics, miniaturization and production have allowed for the deployment of SAR systems on aircraft for usage in agriculture, hazards assessment, land-use management and planning, meteorology, oceanography and surveillance. LEO SAR systems still provide a range of needful and timely information on large and small-scale weather conditions like those found across the Arctic where ground-base weather radars currently provide limited coverage. For investigators of solid-earth deformation attention must be given to the atmosphere on Interferometric SAR (InSAR) by aircraft and spacecraft multi-pass operations. Because radar has the capability to penetrate earth materials at frequencies from the P- to X-band attention must be given to the frequency dependent penetration depth and volume scattering. This is the focus of our new research project: to test the penetration depth of L-band SAR/InSAR by aircraft and spacecraft systems at a test site in Arctic Alaska using multi-frequency analysis and progressive burial of radar mesh-reflectors at measured depths below tundra while monitoring environmental conditions. Knowledge of the L-band penetration depth on lowland Arctic tundra is necessary to constrain analysis of carbon mass balance and hazardous conditions arising form permafrost degradation and thaw, surface heave and subsidence and thermokarst formation at local and regional scales.

  1. Soil moisture retrieval using the Danish L- & C-band polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JIANKANG, JI; Keur, Peter van der; Thomsen, Anton

    1996-01-01

    Danish polarimetric SAR data have been applied to estimate soil moisture (SM). The preliminary results evaluated with the L- and C-band SAR data acquired at the Danish test site Foulum during a number of missions in 1994 and 1995 are presented. In situ data have been collected during the SAR...... and the in situ measured data showed that the Dubois empirical model gave the best results for inversion of SM. The standard deviations between the inversed and the measured data at C-band are s(mu)=6.1% for SM and sσ=0.37 cm for soil surface rms height, respectively. C-band data are better than L-band data...

  2. Impacts of Temporal-Spatial Variant Background Ionosphere on Repeat-Track GEO D-InSAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An L band geosynchronous synthetic aperture radar (GEO SAR differential interferometry system (D-InSAR will be obviously impacted by the background ionosphere, which will give rise to relative image shifts and decorrelations of the SAR interferometry (InSAR pair, and induce the interferometric phase screen errors in interferograms. However, the background ionosphere varies within the long integration time (hundreds to thousands of seconds and the extensive imaging scene (1000 km levels of GEO SAR. As a result, the conventional temporal-spatial invariant background ionosphere model (i.e., frozen model used in Low Earth Orbit (LEO SAR is no longer valid. To address the issue, we firstly construct a temporal-spatial background ionosphere variation model, and then theoretically analyze its impacts, including relative image shifts and the decorrelation of the GEO InSAR pair, and the interferometric phase screen errors, on the repeat-track GEO D-InSAR processing. The related impacts highly depend on the background ionosphere parameters (constant total electron content (TEC component, and the temporal first-order and the temporal second-order derivatives of TEC with respect to the azimuth time, signal bandwidth, and integration time. Finally, the background ionosphere data at Isla Guadalupe Island (29.02°N, 118.27°W on 7–8 October 2013 is employed for validating the aforementioned analysis. Under the selected background ionosphere dataset, the temporal-spatial background ionosphere variation can give rise to a relative azimuth shift of dozens of meters at most, and even the complete decorrelation in the InSAR pair. Moreover, the produced interferometric phase screen error corresponds to a deformation measurement error of more than 0.2 m at most, even in a not severely impacted area.

  3. Completing the gaps in Kilauea's Father's Day InSAR displacement signature with ScanSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertran Ortiz, A.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.; Lundgren, P.; Rosen, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Currently there are gaps in the known displacement signature obtained with InSAR at Kilauea between 2002 and 2009. InSAR data can be richer than GPS because of denser spatial cover. However, to better model rapidly varying and non-steady geophysical events InSAR is limited because of its less dense time observations of the area under study. The ScanSAR mode currently available in several satellites mitigates this effect because the satellite may illuminate a given area more than once within an orbit cycle. The Kilauea displacement graph below from Instituto per Il Rilevamento Electromagnetico dell'Ambiente (IREA) is a cut in space of the displacement signature obtained from a time series of several stripmap-to-stripmap interferograms. It shows that critical information is missing, especially between 2006 and 2007. The displacement is expected to be non-linear judging from the 2007-2008 displacement signature, thus simple interpolation would not suffice. The gap can be filled by incorporating Envisat stripmap-to-ScanSAR interferograms available during that time period. We propose leveraging JPL's new ROI-PAC ScanSAR module to create stripmap-to-ScanSAR interferograms. The new interferograms will be added to the stripmap ones in order to extend the existing stripmap time series generated by using the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique. At AGU we will present denser graphs that better capture Kilauea's displacement between 2003 and 2009.

  4. Infrastructure monitoring with spaceborne SAR sensors

    CERN Document Server

    ANGHEL, ANDREI; CACOVEANU, REMUS

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a novel non-intrusive infrastructure monitoring technique based on the detection and tracking of scattering centers in spaceborne SAR images. The methodology essentially consists of refocusing each available SAR image on an imposed 3D point cloud associated to the envisaged infrastructure element and identifying the reliable scatterers to be monitored by means of four dimensional (4D) tomography. The methodology described in this book provides a new perspective on infrastructure monitoring with spaceborne SAR images, is based on a standalone processing chain, and brings innovative technical aspects relative to conventional approaches. The book is intended primarily for professionals and researchers working in the area of critical infrastructure monitoring by radar remote sensing.

  5. Verification of L-band SAR calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Kasischke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Absolute calibration of a digital L-band SAR system to an accuracy of better than 3 dB has been verified. This was accomplished with a calibration signal generator that produces the phase history of a point target. This signal relates calibration values to various SAR data sets. Values of radar cross-section (RCS) of reference reflectors were obtained using a derived calibration relationship for the L-band channel on the ERIM/CCRS X-C-L SAR system. Calibrated RCS values were compared to known RCS values of each reference reflector for verification and to obtain an error estimate. The calibration was based on the radar response to 21 calibrated reference reflectors.

  6. Junction Point Detection Algorithm for SAR Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel junction point detector based on an azimuth consensus for remote sensing images. To eliminate the impact of noise and some noncorrelated edges of SAR image, an azimuth consensus constraint is developed. In addition to detecting the locations of junctions at the subpixel level, this operator recognizes their structures as well. A new formula that includes a minimization criterion for the total weighted distance is proposed to compute the locations of junction points accurately. Compared with other well-known detectors, including Forstner, JUDOCA, and CPDA, the experimental results indicate that our operator outperforms them both in location accuracy of junction points and in angle accuracy of branch edges. Moreover, our method possesses satisfying robustness to the impact of noise and changes of the SAR images. Our operator can be potentially used to solve a number of problems in computer vision, such as SAR image registration, wide-baseline matching, and UAV navigation system.

  7. Compact L-band SAR payload for UAV

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza Arbo, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Design and development of a Compact L-band SAR payload for UAV Design of a signal interference canceller due to the coupling between antennas for a SAR system. Diseño de un cancelador de señal interferente debido al acoplamiento entre antenas para un sistema SAR. Disseny d'un cancel·lador de senyal interferent degut a l'acoblament entre antenes per un sistema SAR.

  8. Fusion of synthetic aperture radiometer and noise waveform SAR images

    OpenAIRE

    Lukin, Konstantin A.; Kudriashov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Noise waveform SAR generates 2D SAR images of a scene. Advanced radiometric SAR imaging provides information on the objects thermal radiation, angular coordinates and even range. The brightness temperatures of rough and smooth surfaces are different. An active, noise waveform, operating mode of bistatic radiometer, based on antennae with beam synthesis, is considered with respect to the roughness criteria. The optimal and quasi-optimal algorithms for fusion of radiometric and SAR images are p...

  9. Significant wave heights from Sentinel-1 SAR: Validation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, J. E.; Mouche, A.

    2017-03-01

    Two empirical algorithms are developed for wave mode images measured from the synthetic aperture radar aboard Sentinel-1 A. The first method, called CWAVE_S1A, is an extension of previous efforts developed for ERS2 and the second method, called Fnn, uses the azimuth cutoff among other parameters to estimate significant wave heights (Hs) and average wave periods without using a modulation transfer function. Neural networks are trained using colocated data generated from WAVEWATCH III and independently verified with data from altimeters and in situ buoys. We use neural networks to relate the nonlinear relationships between the input SAR image parameters and output geophysical wave parameters. CWAVE_S1A performs well and has reduced precision compared to Fnn with Hs root mean square errors within 0.5 and 0.6 m, respectively. The developed neural networks extend the SAR's ability to retrieve useful wave information under a large range of environmental conditions including extratropical and tropical cyclones in which Hs estimation is traditionally challenging.Plain Language SummaryTwo empirical algorithms are developed to estimate integral wave parameters from high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ocean images measured from recently launched the Sentinel 1 satellite. These methods avoid the use of the complicated image to wave mapping typically used to estimate sea state parameters. In addition, we are able to estimate wave parameters that are not able to be measured using existing techniques for the Sentinel 1 satellite. We use a machine learning technique to create a model that relates the ocean image properties to geophysical wave parameters. The models are developed using data from a numerical model because of the sufficiently large sample of global ocean conditions. We then verify that our developed models perform well with respect to independently measured wave observations from other satellite sensors and buoys. We successfully created models that

  10. The Recent Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Epidemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The symptoms of SARS are quite similar to those of common cold, malaria and respiratory tract infections all of which are common in our environment. SARS, being a new disease, has as yet neither a definite diagnostic test nor treatment. With the international transmission of SARS first reported in March 2003, it became ...

  11. (Q)SARs for human toxicological endpoints: a literature search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos E; Schielen P; Masilankiewicz L; CSR; NVIC

    1999-01-01

    The goal here was to describe human toxicological SARs (structure-activity relationships) available in the literature and used by the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). The CSR laboratory investigated implementation of SARs for the effect assessment. SARs correlate the molecular structure

  12. (Q)SARs for human toxicological endpoints: a literature search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos E; Schielen P; Masilankiewicz L; CSR; NVIC

    1999-01-01

    Het doel van dit rapport is het beschrijven van humaan toxicologische SARs (structuur-activiteitsrelaties) die beschikbaar zijn in de literatuur alsmede de SARs die gebruikt worden door de US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). De implementatie van het gebruik van SARs voor de effect assessment

  13. Digital demodulator for wide bandwidth SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørn Hjelm

    2000-01-01

    A novel approach to the design of efficient digital quadrature demodulators for wide bandwidth SAR systems is described. Efficiency is obtained by setting the intermediate frequency to 1/4 the ADC sampling frequency. One channel is made filter-free by synchronizing the local oscillator with the o......A novel approach to the design of efficient digital quadrature demodulators for wide bandwidth SAR systems is described. Efficiency is obtained by setting the intermediate frequency to 1/4 the ADC sampling frequency. One channel is made filter-free by synchronizing the local oscillator...

  14. SAR clutter simulation with terrain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, David W.; Scott, Iain

    2002-02-01

    A model for the signal returns from terrain features for a Synthetic Aperture Radar is developed. A standard range-azimuth geometry is used to divide the surface area into cells for which clutter returns are generated. This geometry is extended to a spherical Earth to introduce effects due to varying terrain height and slope, and to determine areas of shadow. The calculation of phase variation in the returned pulses at the IQ level required to successfully form a SAR is discussed. The technique is illustrated with an example which demonstrates the effect of look angle on SAR images.

  15. Automatic Transfer of SAR Patterns for AUXSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    RB M RB S)− - , - − CG HC-130J, MH-65, MH-60T (PFPS) − CG GCCS .ovl for Mission Suite/Pallet (HU-144/130J) − Cutter VEGA (ECS/ECDIS) − Garmin Flight...rom • GoogleEarth /eGIS .kml (pattern name) ( S CG Ai f )• .xml PFP : Large rcra t • .fpl ( Garmin Flight Plan: G1000 etc) • .txt (ForeFlight) • .sar...Transfer of SAR Patterns for AUXSAR| RDC Mr. Sean Lester | CG-761| Oct 2015 17 AUXSAR Field Test– Garmin GPSmap 496 In Flight 7/8/2016

  16. Science data collection with polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Woelders, Kim; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1996-01-01

    Discusses examples on the use of polarimetric SAR in a number of Earth science studies. The studies are presently being conducted by the Danish Center for Remote Sensing. A few studies of the European Space Agency's EMAC programme are also discussed. The Earth science objectives are presented......, and the potential of polarimetric SAR is discussed and illustrated with data collected by the Danish airborne EMISAR system during a number of experiments in 1994 and 1995. The presentation will include samples of data acquired for the different studies...

  17. SAR System for UAV Operation with Motion Error Compensation beyond the Resolution Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Partida, José-Tomás; Almorox-González, Pablo; Burgos-García, Mateo; Dorta-Naranjo, Blas-Pablo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system that is under development in the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. The system uses Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (LFM-CW) radar with a two antenna configuration for transmission and reception. The radar operates in the millimeter-wave band with a maximum transmitted bandwidth of 2 GHz. The proposed system is being developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operation. Motion errors in UAV operation can be critical. Therefore, this paper proposes a method for focusing SAR images with movement errors larger than the resolution cell. Typically, this problem is solved using two processing steps: first, coarse motion compensation based on the information provided by an Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU); and second, fine motion compensation for the residual errors within the resolution cell based on the received raw data. The proposed technique tries to focus the image without using data of an IMU. The method is based on a combination of the well known Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA) for SAR imagery and typical algorithms for translational motion compensation on Inverse SAR (ISAR). This paper shows the first real experiments for obtaining high resolution SAR images using a car as a mobile platform for our radar. PMID:27879884

  18. Permanent Scatterer InSAR Analysis and Validation in the Gulf of Corinth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Panagiotis; Kontoes, Charalabos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Kotsis, Ioannis; Marinou, Aggeliki; Paradissis, Dimitris; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    The Permanent Scatterers Interferometric SAR technique (PSInSAR) is a method that accurately estimates the near vertical terrain deformation rates, of the order of ∼1 mm year-1, overcoming the physical and technical restrictions of classic InSAR. In this paper the method is strengthened by creating a robust processing chain, incorporating PSInSAR analysis together with algorithmic adaptations for Permanent Scatterer Candidates (PSCs) and Permanent Scatterers (PSs) selection. The processing chain, called PerSePHONE, was applied and validated in the geophysically active area of the Gulf of Corinth. The analysis indicated a clear subsidence trend in the north-eastern part of the gulf, with the maximum deformation of ∼2.5 mm year-1 occurring in the region north of the Gulf of Alkyonides. The validity of the results was assessed against geophysical/geological and geodetic studies conducted in the area, which include continuous seismic profiling data and GPS height measurements. All these observations converge to the same deformation pattern as the one derived by the PSInSAR technique. PMID:22389587

  19. Detecting Landscape Disturbance at the Nasca Lines Using SAR Data Collected from Airborne and Satellite Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C. Comer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We used synthetic aperture radar (SAR data collected over Peru’s Lines and Geoglyphs of the Nasca and Palpa World Heritage Site to detect and measure landscape disturbance threatening world-renowned archaeological features and ecosystems. We employed algorithms to calculate correlations between pairs of SAR returns, collected at different times, and generate correlation images. Landscape disturbances even on the scale of pedestrian travel are discernible in correlation images generated from airborne, L-band SAR. Correlation images derived from C-band SAR data collected by the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 satellites also provide detailed landscape change information. Because the two Sentinel-1 satellites together have a repeat pass interval that can be as short as six days, products derived from their data can not only provide information on the location and degree of ground disturbance, but also identify a time window of about one to three weeks during which disturbance must have occurred. For Sentinel-1, this does not depend on collecting data in fine-beam modes, which generally sacrifice the size of the area covered for a higher spatial resolution. We also report on pixel value stretching for a visual analysis of SAR data, quantitative assessment of landscape disturbance, and statistical testing for significant landscape change.

  20. SAR image change detection algorithm based on stationary wavelet and bi-dimensional intrinsic mode function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Q.; Wang, Z. L.; Xie, T. G.; Li, Z. C.

    2017-09-01

    Speckle noise in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by the coherent imaging mechanism, which brings a great impact on the change information acquisition of multi-temporal SAR images. Two-dimensional stationary wavelet transform (SWT) and bi-dimensional empirical mode decomposition (BEMD) are the non-stationary signal processing theory of multi-scale transform. According to their implementation process and SAR image characteristic, this paper proposed a new multi-temporal SAR image change detection method based on the combination of the stationary wavelet transform and the bi-dimensional intrinsic mode function (BIMF) features, called SWT-BIMF algorithm. The contribution of the new algorithm includes two aspects. One is the design of the two selections of decomposition features, that is, the speckle noise filtering; another is the selected features to perform the enhance processing, so more effective change information will obtain. The feasibility of the SWT-BIMF algorithm is verified by the measured SAR image data, and good experimental results are obtained.

  1. SAR System for UAV Operation with Motion Error Compensation beyond the Resolution Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas-Pablo Dorta-Naranjo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR system that is under development in the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. The system uses Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (LFM-CW radar with a two antenna configuration for transmission and reception. The radar operates in the millimeter-wave band with a maximum transmitted bandwidth of 2 GHz. The proposed system is being developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV operation. Motion errors in UAV operation can be critical. Therefore, this paper proposes a method for focusing SAR images with movement errors larger than the resolution cell. Typically, this problem is solved using two processing steps: first, coarse motion compensation based on the information provided by an Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU; and second, fine motion compensation for the residual errors within the resolution cell based on the received raw data. The proposed technique tries to focus the image without using data of an IMU. The method is based on a combination of the well known Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA for SAR imagery and typical algorithms for translational motion compensation on Inverse SAR (ISAR. This paper shows the first real experiments for obtaining high resolution SAR images using a car as a mobile platform for our radar.

  2. The potential of targeted antibody prophylaxis in SARS outbreak control: a mathematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaards, Johannes Antonie; Putter, Hein; Jan Weverling, Gerrit; Ter Meulen, Jan; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2007-03-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus-like viruses continue to circulate in animal reservoirs. If new mutants of SARS coronavirus do initiate another epidemic, administration of prophylactic antibodies to risk groups may supplement the stringent isolation procedures that contained the first SARS outbreak. We developed a mathematical model to investigate the effects of hospital admission and targeted antibody prophylaxis on the reproduction number R, defined as the number of secondary cases generated by an index case, during different SARS outbreak scenarios. Assuming a basic reproduction number R(0)=3, admission of patients to hospital within 4.3 days of symptom onset is necessary to achieve outbreak control without the need to further reduce community-based transmission. Control may be enhanced by providing pre-exposure prophylaxis to contacts of hospitalized patients, and through contact tracing and provision of post-exposure prophylaxis. Antibody prophylaxis may also be employed to reduce R below one and thereby restrict outbreak size and duration. Patient isolation alone can be sufficient to control SARS outbreaks provided that the time from onset to admission is short. Antibody prophylaxis as supplemental measure generally allows for containment of higher R(0) values and restricts both the size and duration of an outbreak.

  3. Utility of Characterizing and Monitoring Suspected Underground Nuclear Sites with VideoSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, S. M.; Yocky, D. A.; Riley, R.; Calloway, T. M.; Wahl, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories proposed using airborne synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) collected in VideoSAR mode to characterize the Underground Nuclear Explosion Signature Experiment (UNESE) test bed site at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The SNL SAR collected airborne, Ku-band (16.8 GHz center frequency), 0.2032 meter ground resolution over NNSS in August 2014 and X-band (9.6 GHz), 0.1016 meter ground resolution fully-polarimetric SAR in April 2015. This paper reports the findings of processing and exploiting VideoSAR for creating digital elevation maps, detecting cultural artifacts and exploiting full-circle polarimetric signatures. VideoSAR collects a continuous circle of phase history data, therefore, imagery can be formed over the 360-degrees of the site. Since the Ku-band VideoSAR had two antennas suitable for interferometric digital elevation mapping (DEM), DEMs could be generated over numerous aspect angles, filling in holes created by targets with height by imaging from all sides. Also, since the X-band VideoSAR was fully-polarimetric, scattering signatures could be gleaned from all angles also. Both of these collections can be used to find man-made objects and changes in elevation that might indicate testing activities. VideoSAR provides a unique, coherent measure of ground objects allowing one to create accurate DEMS, locate man-made objects, and identify scattering signatures via polarimetric exploitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. The authors would like to thank the National Nuclear Security Administration, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development, for sponsoring this work. We would also like to thank the Underground Nuclear Explosion Signatures Experiment team, a multi

  4. A time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayas using SBAS InSAR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Venkataraman, G.

    2012-12-01

    A time series land deformation studies in north western Himalayan region has been presented in this study. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) is an important tool for measuring the land displacement caused by different geological processes [1]. Frequent spatial and temporal decorrelation in the Himalayan region is a strong impediment in precise deformation estimation using conventional interferometric SAR approach. In such cases, advanced DInSAR approaches PSInSAR as well as Small base line subset (SBAS) can be used to estimate earth surface deformation. The SBAS technique [2] is a DInSAR approach which uses a twelve or more number of repeat SAR acquisitions in different combinations of a properly chosen data (subsets) for generation of DInSAR interferograms using two pass interferometric approach. Finally it leads to the generation of mean deformation velocity maps and displacement time series. Herein, SBAS algorithm has been used for time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayan region. ENVISAT ASAR IS2 swath data from 2003 to 2008 have been used for quantifying slow deformation. Himalayan region is a very active tectonic belt and active orogeny play a significant role in land deformation process [3]. Geomorphology in the region is unique and reacts to the climate change adversely bringing with land slides and subsidence. Settlements on the hill slopes are prone to land slides, landslips, rockslides and soil creep. These hazardous features have hampered the over all progress of the region as they obstruct the roads and flow of traffic, break communication, block flowing water in stream and create temporary reservoirs and also bring down lot of soil cover and thus add enormous silt and gravel to the streams. It has been observed that average deformation varies from -30.0 mm/year to 10 mm/year in the NW Himalayan region . References [1] Massonnet, D., Feigl, K.L.,Rossi, M. and Adragna, F. (1994) Radar interferometry mapping of

  5. MIRANDA 35 GHz SAR Based Non-Coherent Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noetel, Denis; Kloeppel, Frank; Sieger, Stefan; Janssen, Daniel; Pohl, Nils

    2017-03-01

    Up to now, the high effort involved with airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems has led to the effect that SAR image processing is mostly restricted to single images of a scene. Recent developments like the MIRANDA 35 and its matching flight platform allow for frequent revisits of the same scene at very high repeatability. MIRANDA 35 has been designed as a lightweight and compact SAR sensor for altitudes of up to 1 km while providing a resolution of 15 cm. In combination with a highly flexible ultralight aircraft we have recently obtained 28 measurements of a scene within 2 h of flight time at very high repeatability. Two sets of flight courses, each with 7 flyovers of the reference scene and 7 of a modified change scene, are investigated here using statistical change detection methods like Informational Difference and Universal Image Quality Index.

  6. Non-Cooperative Bistatic SAR Clock Drift Compensation for Tomographic Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Azcueta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, an important amount of research has been headed towards the measurement of above-ground forest biomass with polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR tomography techniques. This has motivated the proposal of future bistatic SAR missions, like the recent non-cooperative SAOCOM-CS and PARSIFAL from CONAE and ESA. It is well known that the quality of SAR tomography is directly related to the phase accuracy of the interferometer that, in the case of non-cooperative systems, can be particularly affected by the relative drift between onboard clocks. In this letter, we provide insight on the impact of the clock drift error on bistatic interferometry, as well as propose a correction algorithm to compensate its effect. The accuracy of the compensation is tested on simulated acquisitions over volumetric targets, estimating the final impact on tomographic profiles.

  7. Tissue distribution of ACE2 protein, the functional receptor for SARS coronavirus. A first step in understanding SARS pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, [No Value; Timens, W; Bulthuis, MLC; Lely, AT; Navis, GJ; van Goor, H

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute infectious disease that spreads mainly via the respiratory route. A distinct coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been identified as the aetiological agent of SARS. Recently, a metallopeptidase named angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been

  8. SARS knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors: a comparison between Finns and the Dutch during the SARS outbreak in 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vartti, A.M.; Oenema, A.; Schreck, M.; Uutela, A.; Zwart, de O.; Brug, J.; Aro, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SARS outbreak served to test both local and international outbreak management and risk communication practices. PURPOSE: The study compares SARS knowledge, perceptions, behaviors, and information between Finns and the Dutch during the SARS outbreak in 2003. METHOD: The participants

  9. Eucaryotic expression of the nucleocapsid protein gene of porcine circovirus type 2 and use of the protein in an indirect immunofluorescence assay for serological diagnosis of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sébastien; Kheyar, Ali; Gagnon, Carl A; Charbonneau, Benoît; Dea, Serge

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using a recombinant porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) nucleocapsid protein for the serological detection of PCV2-specific antibodies in pig sera. The viral nucleocapsid protein encoded by the PCV2 ORF2 gene has recently been identified as the most immunoreactive viral protein that carries type-specific antigenic determinants. The ORF2 sequence of the IAF-2897 strain of PCV2 has been cloned into a pCEP5 eucaryotic expression vector under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter, downstream of a polyhistidine sequence tag. The recombinant plasmid was used in transfection experiments with human epithelial kidney 293 cells that were further tested, and positive expression of the viral nucleocapsid protein was confirmed by IFA and Western blotting. Strong, specific fluorescence was observed in the nuclei of transfected cells. Test specificity to PCV2 was verified with several related infectious agents. Sensitivity was compared to that of standard IFA using PCV2-infected cells by evaluating the reactivities of 44 field serum samples from pigs on farms with a porcine population suffering from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. The recombinant nucleocapsid-based test was able to detect 15 more positive-testing pigs than the PCV2-based IFA. Therefore, the relative sensitivity of the latter test was estimated at only 57.1% compared to that of the recombinant nucleocapsid-based test. The recombinant fusion protein has been purified by affinity chromatography and is being used to develop further sensitive serological tests.

  10. Oil spill detection from SAR image using SVM based classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Matkan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the potential of fully polarimetric L-band SAR data for detecting sea oil spills is investigated using polarimetric decompositions and texture analysis based on SVM classifier. First, power and magnitude measurements of HH and VV polarization modes and, Pauli, Freeman and Krogager decompositions are computed and applied in SVM classifier. Texture analysis is used for identification using SVM method. The texture features i.e. Mean, Variance, Contrast and Dissimilarity from them are then extracted. Experiments are conducted on full polarimetric SAR data acquired from PALSAR sensor of ALOS satellite on August 25, 2006. An accuracy assessment indicated overall accuracy of 78.92% and 96.46% for the power measurement of the VV polarization and the Krogager decomposition respectively in first step. But by use of texture analysis the results are improved to 96.44% and 96.65% quality for mean of power and magnitude measurements of HH and VV polarizations and the Krogager decomposition. Results show that the Krogager polarimetric decomposition method has the satisfying result for detection of sea oil spill on the sea surface and the texture analysis presents the good results.

  11. Calibration Results for J-ERS-1 SAR Data Produced by the Alaska SAR Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, A.; Alves, M.; Williams, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Alaska SAR Facility has been receiving and processing SAR data from the J-ERS-1 satellite since Spring 1992. Corner reflectors have been set up for J-ERS-1 SAR calibration at a site near Delta Junction, in central Alaska. Image quality and calibration analysis results from the Delta Junction site and others will be presented in this paper. The impact of the 3-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter and the automatic stepping of the gain as a function of range in the J-ERS-1 radar receiver on calibration performance has been assessed. Preliminary observations on J-ERS-1 SAR data are that the average Signal-to-Noise ratio is generally fairly low, in the range 5-6 dB. Azimuth ambiguity levels are higher than preflight analysis indicated. Over land, the dynamic range in the backscatter at L-band for approximately 36 degree incidence angle is often fairly high...

  12. TomoSAR Platform: The New Irstea Service as Demand for SAR, Interferometry, Polarimetry and Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Tong Minh, Dinh; Ngo, Yen-Nhi; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Maurel, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Developing and improving methods to monitor both natural and non-natural environments such as forest and urban in space and time is a timely challenge. To overcome this challenge, we created a software platform - TomoSAR. The kernel of this platform supports the entire processing from SAR, Interferometry, Polarimetry, to Tomography (so called TomoSAR). The objective of this paper is to introduce this platform about its design architecture and its capacity. We showed four examples to highlight the TomoSAR platform capacities. First, the useful of the interferometric coherence of TOPS Sentinel-1 for land cover classification was highlighted. Second, a TOPS Sentinel-1 differential interferogram in a complex scenario volcano was successfully produced. Third, a TOPS Persistent Scatterers Interferometry analysis for estimating subsidence in Ho Chi Minh City area was demonstrated. Finally, the capability of processing and modelling of 3D P-band tomography in volume forest scattering were reported.

  13. Identification of three antigen epitopes on the nucleocapsid protein of the genotype C of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-Le; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Zhou, Yue-Hui; Lv, Chuang; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Shi, Hong-Fei; Xue, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important respiratory tract pathogen for both young and adult cattle. So far, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis. But fine mapping of epitopes of BPIV3 is scant and the antigenic variations among the three genotypes of BPIV3 have not been reported. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) is the most abundant protein in the virion and highly conserved in BPIV3, which is crucial for the induction of protective immunity in host. To identify antigenic determinants of BPIV3 NP, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was tested against a series of overlapping recombinant NP fragments expressed in Escherichia coli. Firstly, six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against NP of the genotype C of BPIV3 (BPIV3c) were generated by using the purified BPIV3c strain SD0835 as immunogen and the recombinant NP of SD0835 as screening antigen. Then three antigen epitopes were identified with the six mAbs. One epitope (91)GNNADVKYVIYM(102) was recognized by mAb 5E5. The mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 were reactive with another epitope (407)FYKPTGG(413). The third epitope (428)ESRGDQDQ(435) was reactive with mAb 6F8. Further analysis showed that the epitope (91-102 amino acids [aa]) was the most conserved and reactive with mAb 5E5 for all three genotypes of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The epitope (407-413 aa) was relatively conserved and reactive with mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 for BPIV3a, BPIV3c and HPIV3, but not reactive with BPIV3b. The epitope (428-435 aa) was less conserved and was reactive only with mAb 6F8 for BPIV3a and BPIV3c. These results suggested that there were evident antigenic variations among the three genotypes of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The mAb 6F8 could be used to detect BPIV3a and BPIV3c. The mAbs 7G5, 7G8, 7G9, and 7H5 might be used for differentiate BPIV3a, BPIV3c and HPIV3 from BPIV3b. The mAb 5E5 might be used for detecting all three types of BPIV3 and HPIV3. The results in this

  14. Enhanced SAR data processing for land instability forecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentiero, Ilenia; Pellicani, Roberta; Spilotro, Giuseppe; Parisi, Alessandro; Bovenga, Fabio; Pasquariello, Guido; Refice, Alberto; Nutricato, Raffaele; Nitti, Davide Oscar; Chiaradia, Maria Teresa

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring represents the main tool for carrying out evaluation procedures and criteria for spatial and temporal landslide forecast. The forecast of landslide behaviour depends on the possibility to identify either evidences of activity (displacement, velocity, volume of unstable mass, direction of displacement, and their temporal variation) or triggering parameters (rainfalls). Generally, traditional geotechnical landslide monitoring technologies permit to define, if correctly positioned and with adequate accuracy, the critical value of displacement and/or acceleration into landslide body. In most cases, they do not allow real time warning signs to be generated, due to environmental induced errors, and the information is related to few points on unstable area. Remote-sensing monitoring instruments are capable of inspecting an unstable slope with high spatial and temporal frequency, but allow solely measurements of superficial displacements and deformations. Among these latest technologies, the satellite Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry (PSInSAR) is very useful to investigate the unstable area both in terms of space and time. Indeed, this technique allows to analyse wide areas, individuate critical unstable areas, not identifiable by means detailed in situ surveys, and study the phenomenon evolution in a long time-scale. Although this technique usually adopts, as first approximation, a linear model to describe the displacement of the detected targets, also non-linear models can be used. However, the satellite revisit time, which defines the time sampling of the detected displacement signal, limits the maximum measurable velocity and acceleration. This makes it difficult to assess in the short time any acceleration indicating a loss of equilibrium and, therefore, a probable reactivation of the landslide. The recent Sentinel-1 mission from the European Space Agency (ESA), provides a spatial resolution comparable to the previous ESA missions, but a nominal

  15. Multiplier-free filters for wideband SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    2001-01-01

    This paper derives a set of parameters to be optimized when designing filters for digital demodulation and range prefiltering in SAR systems. Aiming at an implementation in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), an approach for the design of multiplier-free filters is outlined. Design results...

  16. Epidemic Models for SARS and Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Recent events have led to an increased interest in emerging infectious diseases. This article applies various deterministic models to the SARS epidemic of 2003 and a measles outbreak in the Netherlands in 1999-2000. We take a historical approach beginning with the well-known logistic curve and a lesser-known extension popularized by Pearl and Reed…

  17. What is Gammarus campylops of Sars, 1894

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, J.H.; Kant, P.

    1966-01-01

    A revision of the specimens described by Sars, 1894, as Gammarus campylops Leach, 1814, proved that they did not belong to that species, nor to Gammarus ochlos Reid, 1945 (= G. sarsi Reid, 1943), as Reid believed. Reid’s species, of which also original specimens have been reexamined, is identical

  18. Abundant SAR11 viruses in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Temperton, Ben; Thrash, J Cameron; Schwalbach, Michael S; Vergin, Kevin L; Landry, Zachary C; Ellisman, Mark; Deerinck, Tom; Sullivan, Matthew B; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2013-02-21

    Several reports proposed that the extraordinary dominance of the SAR11 bacterial clade in ocean ecosystems could be a consequence of unusual mechanisms of resistance to bacteriophage infection, including 'cryptic escape' through reduced cell size and/or K-strategist defence specialism. Alternatively, the evolution of high surface-to-volume ratios coupled with minimal genomes containing high-affinity transporters enables unusually efficient metabolism for oxidizing dissolved organic matter in the world's oceans that could support vast population sizes despite phage susceptibility. These ideas are important for understanding plankton ecology because they emphasize the potentially important role of top-down mechanisms in predation, thus determining the size of SAR11 populations and their concomitant role in biogeochemical cycling. Here we report the isolation of diverse SAR11 viruses belonging to two virus families in culture, for which we propose the name 'pelagiphage', after their host. Notably, the pelagiphage genomes were highly represented in marine viral metagenomes, demonstrating their importance in nature. One of the new phages, HTVC010P, represents a new podovirus subfamily more abundant than any seen previously, in all data sets tested, and may represent one of the most abundant virus subfamilies in the biosphere. This discovery disproves the theory that SAR11 cells are immune to viral predation and is consistent with the interpretation that the success of this highly abundant microbial clade is the result of successfully evolved adaptation to resource competition.

  19. Matrix approach to modelling of SAR signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lidicky, L.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a matrix approach to implementation of SAR signal generating and processing schemes. This approach is advantageous when matrix oriented software such as Matlab is used. Algorithms written in this type of software packages run faster compared to the same algorithms written for the

  20. Peptide Mimicrying Between SARS Coronavirus Spike Protein and Human Proteins Reacts with SARS Patient Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-Y. Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mimicry, defined as similar structures shared by molecules from dissimilar genes or proteins, is a general strategy used by pathogens to infect host cells. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a new human respiratory infectious disease caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV. The spike (S protein of SARS-CoV plays an important role in the virus entry into a cell. In this study, eleven synthetic peptides from the S protein were selected based on its sequence homology with human proteins. Two of the peptides D07 (residues 927–937 and D08 (residues 942–951 were recognized by the sera of SARS patients. Murine hyperimmune sera against these peptides bound to proteins of human lung epithelial cells A549. Another peptide D10 (residues 490–502 stimulated A549 to proliferate and secrete IL-8. The present results suggest that the selected S protein regions, which share sequence homology with human proteins, may play important roles in SARS-CoV infection.

  1. Dual-Frequency, Dual-Polarization Microstrip Antenna Development for High-Resolution, Airborne SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, Johan; Skou, N.

    2000-01-01

    synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system. The dual-frequency array concept adopted relies on the use of probe-fed perforated, stacked patches for L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz). Inside these perforations probe-fed, wideband stacked microstrip patches for C-band (4.9-5.7 GHz) are placed. Measured impedance and radiation...

  2. The management of scarce water resources using GNSS, InSAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A high percentage of the Earth's water supply is stored underground which can be extracted either through pumping or using artesian pressure. This paper describes the application of GNSS, InSAR and In-Situ Micro Gravity measurements for the monitoring of an artesian wellfield in the Oudtshoorn District in the Western ...

  3. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry based modeling for tree height and aboveground biomass retrieval in a tropical deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Khati, Unmesh G.; Chandola, Shreya; Agrawal, Shefali; Kushwaha, Satya P. S.

    2017-08-01

    The regulation of the carbon cycle is a critical ecosystem service provided by forests globally. It is, therefore, necessary to have robust techniques for speedy assessment of forest biophysical parameters at the landscape level. It is arduous and time taking to monitor the status of vast forest landscapes using traditional field methods. Remote sensing and GIS techniques are efficient tools that can monitor the health of forests regularly. Biomass estimation is a key parameter in the assessment of forest health. Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) remote sensing has already shown its potential for forest biophysical parameter retrieval. The current research work focuses on the retrieval of forest biophysical parameters of tropical deciduous forest, using fully polarimetric spaceborne C-band data with Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) techniques. PolSAR based Interferometric Water Cloud Model (IWCM) has been used to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB). Input parameters to the IWCM have been extracted from the decomposition modeling of SAR data as well as PolInSAR coherence estimation. The technique of forest tree height retrieval utilized PolInSAR coherence based modeling approach. Two techniques - Coherence Amplitude Inversion (CAI) and Three Stage Inversion (TSI) - for forest height estimation are discussed, compared and validated. These techniques allow estimation of forest stand height and true ground topography. The accuracy of the forest height estimated is assessed using ground-based measurements. PolInSAR based forest height models showed enervation in the identification of forest vegetation and as a result height values were obtained in river channels and plain areas. Overestimation in forest height was also noticed at several patches of the forest. To overcome this problem, coherence and backscatter based threshold technique is introduced for forest area identification and accurate height estimation in non-forested regions. IWCM based modeling for forest

  4. Citizens’ Health Information Behaviors During SARS Spread Periods in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nei-Ching Yeh

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the information behaviors of citizens during the periods of SARS spreading in Taiwan. This study is exploratory in nature, and the naturalistic inquiry approach was applied. Sixteen persons, aged from 20 to 62 years old, were interviewed in order to understand their primary information channels of obtaining SARS information, the characteristics of information communication, the methods of infection, the attitudes toward SARS news, and the influences of SARS to life. The findings show that most participants obtained SARS information from televisions. SARS became the major topic of chatting between people, but telephone communication replaced face to face communication. Part of interviewers applied folk medicine to guard against SARS. Participant dissatisfied that governments did not announce much more authoritative information. The results also found participants’ information sharing and information avoidance behaviors.[Article content in Chinese

  5. SAR Raw Data Generation for Complex Airport Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The method of generating the SAR raw data of complex airport scenes is studied in this paper. A formulation of the SAR raw signal model of airport scenes is given. Via generating the echoes from the background, aircrafts and buildings, respectively, the SAR raw data of the unified SAR imaging geometry is obtained from their vector additions. The multipath scattering and the shadowing between the background and different ground covers of standing airplanes and buildings are analyzed. Based on the scattering characteristics, coupling scattering models and SAR raw data models of different targets are given, respectively. A procedure is given to generate the SAR raw data of airport scenes. The SAR images from the simulated raw data demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  6. Combination of Conventional and Advanced DInSAR to Monitor Very Fast Mining Subsidence with TerraSAR-X Data: Bytom City (Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Przyłucka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the analysis of TerraSAR-X satellite images combining both conventional and advanced Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR approaches has proven to be effective to detect and monitor fast evolving mining subsidence on urban areas in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (Poland. This region accounts for almost three million inhabitants where mining subsidence has produced severe damage to urban structures and infrastructures in recent years. Conventional DInSAR approach was used to generate 28 differential interferograms between 5 July 2011 and 21 June 2012 identifying 31 subsidence troughs that account up to 245 mm of displacement in 54 days (equivalent to 1660 mm/year. SqueeSARTM processing yielded a very dense measurement point distribution, failing to detect faster displacements than 330 mm/year, which occur within the subsidence troughs detected with conventional DInSAR. Despite this limitation, this approach was useful to delimit stable areas where mining activities are not conducted and areas affected by residual subsidence surrounding the detected subsidence troughs. These residual subsidence mining areas are located approximately 1 km away from the 31 detected subsidence troughs and account for a subsidence rate greater than 17 mm/year on average. The validation of this methodology has been performed over Bytom City were underground mining activity produced severe damages in August 2011. Conventional DInSAR permitted to successfully map subsidence troughs between July and August 2011 that coincide spatially and temporally with the evolution of underground mining excavations, as well as with the demolition of 28 buildings of Karb district. Additionally, SqueeSARTM displacement estimates were useful to delimit an area of 8.3 km2 of Bytom city that is affected by a residual mining subsidence greater than 5 mm/year and could potentially suffer damages in the midterm. The comparison between geodetic data and

  7. The nucleocapsid protein of Rift Valley fever virus is a potent human CD8+ T cell antigen and elicits memory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Xu

    Full Text Available There is no licensed human vaccine currently available for Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV, a Category A high priority pathogen and a serious zoonotic threat. While neutralizing antibodies targeting the viral glycoproteins are protective, they appear late in the course of infection, and may not be induced in time to prevent a natural or bioterrorism-induced outbreak. Here we examined the immunogenicity of RVFV nucleocapsid (N protein as a CD8(+ T cell antigen with the potential for inducing rapid protection after vaccination. HLA-A*0201 (A2-restricted epitopic determinants were identified with N-specific CD8(+ T cells from eight healthy donors that were primed with dendritic cells transduced to express N, and subsequently expanded in vitro by weekly re-stimulations with monocytes pulsed with 59 15mer overlapping peptides (OLPs across N. Two immunodominant epitopes, VT9 (VLSEWLPVT, N(121-129 and IL9 (ILDAHSLYL, N165-173, were defined. VT9- and IL9-specific CD8(+ T cells identified by tetramer staining were cytotoxic and polyfunctional, characteristics deemed important for viral control in vivo. These peptides induced specific CD8(+ T cell responses in A2-transgenic mice, and more importantly, potent N-specific CD8(+ T cell reactivities, including VT9- and IL9-specific ones, were mounted by mice after a booster vaccination with the live attenuated RVF MP-12. Our data suggest that the RVFV N protein is a potent human T cell immunogen capable of eliciting broad, immunodominant CD8(+ T cell responses that are potentially protective. Understanding the immune responses to the nucleocapsid is central to the design of an effective RVFV vaccine irrespective of whether this viral protein is effective as a stand-alone immunogen or only in combination with other RVFV antigens.

  8. Remotely Sensing Tundra Fire Impacts Using InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Jafarov, E. E.; Williams, C. A.; Rogan, J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fire is a major disturbance affecting the arctic tundra and boreal forests, with a significant impacts on the ecosystem, soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost. The increasing trend in frequency and severity of large fires since 1980, associated with progressively drier conditions, is expected to continue and lead to still greater impacts. In this study, we explore the use of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to map and quantify several results of tundra fires, including fire severity, the increase in permafrost active layer thickness (ALT), and changes in organic layer thickness. Here we present as an example observations of the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska, which burned over 1,000 km2 of tundra in the summer of 2007. Fire causes an abrupt change in the surface scattering characteristics and results in a large drop in InSAR coherence. The magnitude of coherence loss is proportional to the amount of vegetation burned, and thus fire severity. Coherence between two PALSAR images taken by the Japanese ALOS satellite before and after the Anaktuvuk River fire shows a spatial pattern consistent with a map of burn severity based on optical MODIS images using differential Normalized Burn Ratio. Additionally, we used InSAR to calculate the seasonal ground subsidence for the 2006 and 2009 thaw seasons representing pre- and post-fire conditions, and estimated the change in ALT using a retrieval algorithm. Our results are consistent with the 8 to 24 cm ALT increases derived from in situ probing measurements, which we relate to the change in the organic layer thickness due to the fire. Our results illustrate the potential of InSAR for remote sensing of fire impacts in Arctic regions. (a) Burn severity for the Anaktuvuk Rivre Fire based on differential Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) from MODIS images. (b) Interferometric coherence loss due to the fire. Spatial mean has been subtracted. Negative values (yellow and red colors) indicate

  9. Soil parameter retrieval under vegetation cover using SAR polarimetery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagdhuber, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Soil conditions under vegetation cover and their spatial and temporal variations from point to catchment scale are crucial for understanding hydrological processes within the vadose zone, for managing irrigation and consequently maximizing yield by precision farming. Soil moisture and soil roughness are the key parameters that characterize the soil status. In order to monitor their spatial and temporal variability on large scales, remote sensing techniques are required. Therefore the determination of soil parameters under vegetation cover was approached in this thesis by means of (multi-angular) polarimetric SAR acquisitions at a longer wavelength (L-band, {lambda}{sub c}=23cm). In this thesis, the penetration capabilities of L-band are combined with newly developed (multi-angular) polarimetric decomposition techniques to separate the different scattering contributions, which are occurring in vegetation and on ground. Subsequently the ground components are inverted to estimate the soil characteristics. The novel (multi-angular) polarimetric decomposition techniques for soil parameter retrieval are physically-based, computationally inexpensive and can be solved analytically without any a priori knowledge. Therefore they can be applied without test site calibration directly to agricultural areas. The developed algorithms are validated with fully polarimetric SAR data acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) for three different study areas in Germany. The achieved results reveal inversion rates up to 99% for the soil moisture and soil roughness retrieval in agricultural areas. However, in forested areas the inversion rate drops significantly for most of the algorithms, because the inversion in forests is invalid for the applied scattering models at L-band. The validation against simultaneously acquired field measurements indicates an estimation accuracy (root mean square error) of 5-10vol.% for the soil moisture (range of in situ

  10. Calibration of a Land Subsidence Model Using InSAR Data via the Ensemble Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangping; Zhang, Meijing; Katzenstein, Kurt

    2017-05-23

    The application of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been increasingly used to improve capabilities to model land subsidence in hydrogeologic studies. A number of investigations over the last decade show how spatially detailed time-lapse images of ground displacements could be utilized to advance our understanding for better predictions. In this work, we use simulated land subsidences as observed measurements, mimicking InSAR data to inversely infer inelastic specific storage in a stochastic framework. The inelastic specific storage is assumed as a random variable and modeled using a geostatistical method such that the detailed variations in space could be represented and also that the uncertainties of both characterization of specific storage and prediction of land subsidence can be assessed. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a real-time data assimilation algorithm, is used to inversely calibrate a land subsidence model by matching simulated subsidences with InSAR data. The performance of the EnKF is demonstrated in a synthetic example in which simulated surface deformations using a reference field are assumed as InSAR data for inverse modeling. The results indicate: (1) the EnKF can be used successfully to calibrate a land subsidence model with InSAR data; the estimation of inelastic specific storage is improved, and uncertainty of prediction is reduced, when all the data are accounted for; and (2) if the same ensemble is used to estimate Kalman gain, the analysis errors could cause filter divergence; thus, it is essential to include localization in the EnKF for InSAR data assimilation. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  11. InSAR to support sustainable urbanization over compacting aquifers: The case of Toluca Valley, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Garfias, Jaime; Martel, Richard; Brouard, Charles; Rivera, Alfonso

    2017-12-01

    This paper illustrates how InSAR alone can be used to delineate potential ground fractures related to aquifer system compaction. An InSAR-derived ground fracturing map of the Toluca Valley, Mexico, is produced and validated through a field campaign. The results are of great interest to support sustainable urbanization and show that InSAR processing of open-access Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from the Sentinel-1 satellites can lead to reliable and cost-effective products directly usable by cities to help decision-making. The Toluca Valley Aquifer (TVA) sustains the water needs of two million inhabitants living within the valley, a growing industry, an intensively irrigated agricultural area, and 38% of the water needs of the megalopolis of Mexico City, located 40 km east of the valley. Ensuring water sustainability, infrastructure integrity, along with supporting the important economic and demographic growth of the region, is a major challenge for water managers and urban developers. This paper presents a long-term analysis of ground fracturing by interpreting 13 years of InSAR-derived ground displacement measurements. Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) techniques are applied over three SAR datasets totalling 93 acquisitions from Envisat, Radarsat-2, and Sentinel-1A satellites and covering the period from 2003 to 2016. From 2003 to 2016, groundwater level declines of up to 1.6 m/yr, land subsidence up to 77 mm/yr, and major infrastructure damages are observed. Groundwater level data show highly variable seasonal responses according to their connectivity to recharge areas. However, the trend of groundwater levels consistently range from -0.5 to -1.5 m/yr regardless of the well location and depth. By analysing the horizontal gradients of vertical land subsidence, we provide a potential ground fracture map to assist in future urban development planning in the Toluca Valley.

  12. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  13. Enhanced Assimilation of InSAR Displacement and Well Data for Groundwater Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullin, A.; Jonsson, S.

    2016-12-01

    Ground deformation related to aquifer exploitation can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure leading to major economic losses and sometimes even loss of human lives. Understanding reservoir behavior helps in assessing possible future ground movement and water depletion hazard of a region under study. We have developed an InSAR-based data assimilation framework for groundwater reservoirs that efficiently incorporates InSAR data for improved reservoir management and forecasts. InSAR displacement data are integrated with the groundwater modeling software MODFLOW using ensemble-based assimilation approaches. We have examined several Ensemble Methods for updating model parameters such as hydraulic conductivity and model variables like pressure head while simultaneously providing an estimate of the uncertainty. A realistic three-dimensional aquifer model was built to demonstrate the capability of the Ensemble Methods incorporating InSAR-derived displacement measurements. We find from these numerical tests that including both ground deformation and well water level data as observations improves the RMSE of the hydraulic conductivity estimate by up to 20% comparing to using only one type of observations. The RMSE estimation of this property after the final time step is similar for Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), Ensemble Smoother (ES) and ES with multiple data assimilation (ES-MDA) methods. The results suggest that the high spatial and temporal resolution subsidence observations from InSAR are very helpful for accurately quantifying hydraulic parameters. We have tested the framework on several different examples and have found good performance in improving aquifer properties estimation, which should prove useful for groundwater management. Our ongoing work focuses on assimilating real InSAR-derived time series and hydraulic head data for calibrating and predicting aquifer properties of basin-wide groundwater systems.

  14. Implementation of integrated circuit and design of SAR ADC for fully implantable hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2017-07-20

    designed SAR ADC occupied 124.9 μm × 152.1 μm. The circuit verification was performed by layout versus schematic (LVS) and design rule check (DRC) which are provided by Calibre (Mentor Graphics, USA), and it was confirmed that there was no error. The designed SAR ADC was implemented in SMIC 180 nm CMOS technology. The operation of the manufactured SAR ADC was confirmed by using an oscilloscope. The SAR ADC output was measured using a distortion meter (HM 8027), when applying pure tone sounds of 94 dB SPL at 500, 800, and 1600 Hz regions. As a result, the THD performance of the proposed chip was satisfied with the ANSI. s3. 22. 2003 standard. We proposed a low-power 16-bit 32 kHz SAR ADC for fully implantable hearing aids. The manufactured SAR ADC based on this design was confirmed to have advantages in power consumption and size through the comparison with the conventional ADC. Therefore, the manufactured SAR ADC is expected to be used in the implantable medical device field and speech signal processing field, which require small size and low power consumption.

  15. Acquisition of new protein domains by coronaviruses: analysis of overlapping genes coding for proteins N and 9b in SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Aditi; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    Acquisition of new proteins by viruses usually occurs through horizontal gene transfer or through gene duplication, but another, less common mechanism is the usage of completely or partially overlapping reading frames. A case of acquisition of a completely new protein through introduction of a start codon in an alternative reading frame is the protein encoded by open reading frame (orf) 9b of SARS coronavirus. This gene completely overlaps with the nucleocapsid (N) gene (orf9a). Our findings indicate that the orf9b gene features a discordant codon-usage pattern. We analyzed the evolution of orf9b in concert with orf9a using sequence data of betacoronavirus-lineage b and found that orf9b, which encodes the overprinting protein, evolved largely independent of the overprinted orf9a. We also examined the protein products of these genomic sequences for their structural flexibility and found that it is not necessary for a newly acquired, overlapping protein product to be intrinsically disordered, in contrast to earlier suggestions. Our findings contribute to characterizing sequence properties of newly acquired genes making use of overlapping reading frames.

  16. Tracking morphological changes and slope instability using spaceborne and ground-based SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Nolesini, Teresa; Ciampalini, Andrea; Solari, Lorenzo; Frodella, William; Bellotti, Fernando; Fumagalli, Alfio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Casagli, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy) is an active volcano that is frequently affected by moderate to large mass wasting, which has occasionally triggered tsunamis. With the aim of understanding the relationship between the geomorphologic evolution and slope instability of Stromboli, remote sensing information from space-born Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) change detection and interferometry (InSAR) () and Ground Based InSAR (GBInSAR) was compared with field observations and morphological analyses. Ground reflectivity and SqueeSAR™ (an InSAR algorithm for surface deformation monitoring) displacement measurements from X-band COSMO-SkyMed satellites (CSK) were analysed together with displacement measurements from a permanent-sited, Ku-band GBInSAR system. Remote sensing results were compared with a preliminary morphological analysis of the Sciara del Fuoco (SdF) steep volcanic flank, which was carried out using a high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Finally, field observations, supported by infrared thermographic surveys (IRT), allowed the interpretation and validation of remote sensing data. The analysis of the entire dataset (collected between January 2010 and December 2014) covers a period characterized by a low intensity of Strombolian activity. This period was punctuated by the occurrence of lava overflows, occurring from the crater terrace evolving downslope toward SdF, and flank eruptions, such as the 2014 event. The amplitude of the CSK images collected between February 22nd, 2010, and December 18th, 2014, highlights that during periods characterized by low-intensity Strombolian activity, the production of materials ejected from the crater terrace towards the SdF is generally low, and erosion is the prevailing process mainly affecting the central sector of the SdF. CSK-SqueeSAR™ and GBInSAR data allowed the identification of low displacements in the SdF, except for high displacement rates (up to 1.5 mm/h) that were measured following both lava

  17. Federated query services provided by the Seamless SAR Archive project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Meertens, C. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Fielding, E. J.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.; Baru, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a 2-year collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). A major milestone for the first year of the SSARA project was a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at ASF and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives (http://www.unavco.org/ws/brokered/ssara/sar/search). A command line client that utilizes this new service is provided as an open source utility for the community on GitHub (https://github.com/bakerunavco/SSARA). Further API development and enhancements added more InSAR specific keywords and quality control parameters (Doppler centroid, faraday rotation, InSAR stack size, and perpendicular baselines). To facilitate InSAR processing, the federated query service incorporated URLs for DEM (from OpenTopography) and tropospheric corrections (from the JPL OSCAR service) in addition to the URLs for SAR data. This federated query service will provide relevant QC metadata for selecting pairs of SAR data for InSAR processing and all the URLs necessary for interferogram generation. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate other SAR data archives (the ESA Virtual Archive 4 and the DLR TerraSAR-X_SSC Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories collections) into the federated query service which provide data for researchers outside the US and North America.

  18. Complementing geotechnical slope stability and land movement analysis using satellite DInSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolitsiotis, Achilleas; Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Papadaki, Eirini; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Mertikas, Stelios; Partsinevelos, Panagiotis

    2014-03-01

    This paper explores the potential of using satellite radar inteferometry to monitor time-varying land movement prior to any visible tension crack signs. The idea was developed during dedicated geotechnical studies at a large open-pit lignite mine, where large slope movements (10-20 mm/day) were monitored and large fissures were observed in the immediate area outside the current pit limits. In this work, differential interferometry (DInSAR), using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ALOS images, was applied to monitor the progression of land movement that could potentially thwart mine operations. Early signs of land movements were captured by this technique well before their visual observation. Moreover, a qualitative comparison of DInSAR and ground geodetic measurements indicates that the technique can be used for the identification of high risk areas and, subsequently, for the optimization of the spatial distribution of the available ground monitoring equipment. Finally, quantitative land movement results from DInSAR are shown to be in accordance with simultaneous measurements obtained by ground means.

  19. PolInSAR tomography for vertical profile retrieval of forest vegetation using spaceborne SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sushil K.; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali; Dinh, Ho T. M.

    2016-05-01

    Forest height plays a crucial role to investigate the bio-physical parameters of forest and the terrestrial carbon. PolInSAR based inversion modeling has been successfully implemented on airborne and space-borne SAR data. SAR tomography, which is an extension of cross-track interferometric processing is a recent approach to separate scatterers in cross range direction, thus generates its vertical profile. This study highlighted the potential of tomographic processing of fully polarimetric Radarsat-2 SAR system to retrieve backscatter power at different height levels. Teak forest in Haldwani forest division of Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the test site. Since SAR tomography is a spectral estimation problem, Fourier transform and beamforming based spectral estimations were applied on the dataset to obtain their vertical profiles. Fourier severely suffered from high side lobes which was drastically reduced by implementing beam-forming by taking into account the multi-looking effect at the expense of radiometric accuracy. Backscattered power values were found to be different at different height levels of the forest vegetation. Vertical profile for Fourier as well as beam-forming were also retrieved.

  20. SARS: Safeguards Accounting and Reporting Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammedi, B.; Saadi, S.; Ait-Mohamed, S.

    In order to satisfy the requirements of the SSAC (State System for Accounting and Control of nuclear materials), for recording and reporting objectives; this computer program comes to bridge the gape between nuclear facilities operators and national inspection verifying records and delivering reports. The SARS maintains and generates at-facility safeguards accounting records and generates International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards reports based on accounting data input by the user at any nuclear facility. A database structure is built and BORLAND DELPHI programming language has been used. The software is designed to be user-friendly, to make extensive and flexible management of menus and graphs. SARS functions include basic physical inventory tacking, transaction histories and reporting. Access controls are made by different passwords.

  1. Estimating the Doppler centroid of SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1989-01-01

    After reviewing frequency-domain techniques for estimating the Doppler centroid of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data, the author describes a time-domain method and highlights its advantages. In particular, a nonlinear time-domain algorithm called the sign-Doppler estimator (SDE) is shown to have...... attractive properties. An evaluation based on an existing SEASAT processor is reported. The time-domain algorithms are shown to be extremely efficient with respect to requirements on calculations and memory, and hence they are well suited to real-time systems where the Doppler estimation is based on raw SAR...... data. For offline processors where the Doppler estimation is performed on processed data, which removes the problem of partial coverage of bright targets, the ΔE estimator and the CDE (correlation Doppler estimator) algorithm give similar performance. However, for nonhomogeneous scenes it is found...

  2. SAR observations in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheres, David

    1992-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) exhibits a wealth of energetic ocean features; they include the Loop Current with velocities of about 2 m/s and strong shear fronts, mesoscale eddies, double vortices, internal waves, and the outflow of the 'Mighty Mississippi' river. These energetic features can have a strong impact on the economies of the states surrounding the Gulf. Large fisheries, oil and gas production as well as pollution transport are relevant issues. These circulation features in the Gulf are invisible to conventional IR and visible satellite imagery during the Summer months due to cloud cover and uniform surface temperatures. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Gulf does penetrate the cloud cover and shows a rich assembly of features there year-round. Below are preliminary results from GOM SAR imagery taken by SEASAT in 1978 and by the AIRSAR program in 1991.

  3. Potential of X-Band TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed SAR Data for the Assessment of Physical Soil Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza Gorrab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the potential of X-band SAR measurements (COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X made over bare soils for the estimation of soil moisture and surface geometry parameters at a semi-arid site in Tunisia (North Africa. Radar signals acquired with different configurations (HH and VV polarizations, incidence angles of 26° and 36° are statistically compared with ground measurements (soil moisture and roughness parameters. The radar measurements are found to be highly sensitive to the various soil parameters of interest. A linear relationship is determined for the radar signals as a function of volumetric soil moisture, and a logarithmic correlation is observed between the radar signals and three surface roughness parameters: the root mean square height (Hrms, the parameter Zs = Hrms2/l (where l is the correlation length and the parameter Zg = Hrms × (Hrms/lα (where α is the power of the surface height correlation function. The highest dynamic sensitivity is observed for Zg at high incidence angles. Finally, the performance of different physical and semi-empirical backscattering models (IEM, Baghdadi-calibrated IEM and Dubois models is compared with SAR measurements. The results provide an indication of the limits of validity of the IEM and Dubois models, for various radar configurations and roughness conditions. Considerable improvements in the IEM model performance are observed using the Baghdadi-calibrated version of this model.

  4. EPOSAR: an innovative service to provide EPOS community with advanced DInSAR products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manunta, Michele; De Luca, Claudio; Elefante, Stefano; Lanari, Riccardo; Pepe, Antonio; Zinno, Ivana; Casu, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The quantitative evaluation of ground deformation is traditionally based on in-situ surveying techniques that, through the intensive use of GPS stations, automatic total stations and levelling benchmarks, can measure up to sub-centimetre displacements. In the last decades, the extensive use of satellite remote sensing data, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, has represented an important breakthrough in the context of non-invasive ground deformation analyses over large areas, thanks to their large spatial coverage and relatively short revisit time, as well as to their medium-high ground resolution. In such a context, the well-known Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) technique allows us to map and measure deformation phenomena due to both natural and man-made causes with centimetre to millimetre accuracy. The Earth Science community has a wide interest in the use of DInSAR displacement maps both for crisis management and risk mitigation activities, and for surveillance, monitoring and analysis of geophysical phenomena. In areas characterized by high level of hazards the availability of routinely generated advanced DInSAR products would allow a fast analysis of their current status, providing a near real time monitoring. Similarly, an on-demand service would allow the customization of the products by selecting the area of interest, the SAR data to be processed, and other processing parameters to be set by the users to edit/correct/improve the final products. In this work we discuss the Satellite Data Thematic Core Service of EPOS and we present the EPOSAR service. In particular, the EPOSAR service, based on the well-known DInSAR approach referred to as Small Baseline Subset (SBAS), accomplishes a shared and synergic Earth Observation (EO) service aimed at designing, implementing and harmonizing efficient satellite data processing chains capable of ingesting the significantly increased data stream expected from the ESA Sentinel-1 satellites. EPOSAR

  5. SAR Product Improvements and Enhancements - SARprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    paper on current fields at Orkney, Scotland, was accepted for publication in IEEE - TGARS and is currently in press (available on IEEE Xplore as Early...Sea surface velocity vector retrieval using dual-beam interferometry: First demonstration, IEEE TGARS, 43, 2494- 2502, 2005. [2] Chapron, B., F...Bight by airborne along-track interferometric SAR, Proc. IGARSS 2002, 1822-1824, IEEE , 2002. [4] Bjerklie, D.M., S.L. Dingman, C.J. Vorosmarty, C.H

  6. SAR Polarimetric Scattering from Natural Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    calculate the polarimetric speckle statistics (amplitude and phase difference), followed by a comparison with theoretical distributions . For fully developed...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0013 SAR Polarimetric Scattering from Natural Terrains Kun-Shan Chen National Central University Final Report 02/17/2017... DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research

  7. SARS: Down But Still a Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Diphtheria Tickborne Encephalitis E. coli 0157:H7 Avian Influenza SARS Nipah virus Japanese Encephalitis Hendra virus Lyssavirus Ross River Fever virus ...pandemic. When a new type of flu virus emerges from a reassortment of animal and human viruses to which humans have no prior immunity, a pandemic...utilized the World Health Organization’s (WHO) global network of research facilities to share data and speed the identification of the virus causing

  8. Cross-calibration of interferometric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Generation of digital elevation models from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is a well established technique. Achieving a high geometric fidelity calls for a calibration accounting for inaccurate navigation data and system parameters as well as system imperfections. Fully...... automated calibration techniques are preferable, especially for operational mapping. The author presents one such technique, called cross-calibration. Though developed for single-pass interferometry, it may be applicable to multi-pass interferometry, too. Cross-calibration requires stability during mapping...

  9. InSAR imagery pattern matching validation for landslide assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbulea, Manole-Stelian; Gogu, Radu; Teleaga, Delia; Marcel Manoli, Daniel; Priceputu, Adrian; Gaitanaru, Dragos Stefan; Ungureanu, Constantin; Anghel, Alexandra; Andronic, Adrian; Niculescu, Alexandru; Liviu Bugea, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The need for identifying over large areas ongoing instability phenomena and spotting the old ones pushed the boundaries of geotechnical engineering from numerical modeling and point-wise in-situ measurements towards geodesic and geographic sciences. Regardless of the ground-based monitoring techniques' precision and reliability, a larger scale monitoring is often useful to either better correlate the scattered results or to identify additional monitoring points. Using aerial ortho-photogrammetry and site visit recognition represent a good, yet costly method to obtain qualitative information about old inactive landslides. A more suitable approach is using ground-based or satellite radar interferometry (InSAR). The obvious disadvantage of the ground-based system is that the monitoring has to be carried out on a predetermined site while the space-borne system may be set to collect information from various sites in range by each successive passing. The quantitative results acquired through the means of InSAR provide a precise set of information regarding the soil surface displacement, with high accuracy and reliability. They provide a great means of identifying danger zones as well as a way of calibrating and augmenting the classical monitoring techniques. This work describes the possibility of integrating the InSAR measurements with the ground monitoring techniques to identify landslide occurrence hazard and reveal the whole of affected areas even when minute symptoms develop. One of the objectives is to propose InSAR monitoring as a fast and efficient mapping tool to help authorities minimize the damage produced by landslides. It can also provide engineers and scientists additional information to further study landslides dynamics phenomena (such as propagation). Interferometry on SAR data uses phase values from two radar images. When a point changes position, the distance between it and the sensor alters, modifying the phase of the signal. This change is used to

  10. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  11. Stochastic Approach in Wet Snow Detection Using Multitemporal SAR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Besic, Nikola; Vasile, Gabriel; Dedieu, Jean-Pierre; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Stankovic, Srdjan

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper introduces an alternative strategy for wet snow detection using multitemporal SAR data. The proposed change detection method is primarily based on the comparison between two X band SAR images acquired during the accumulation (winter) and the melting (spring) seasons, in the French Alps. The new decision criterion relies on the local intensity statistics of the SAR images by considering the backscattering ratio as a stochastic process: the probability that "t...

  12. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. SAR11 bacteria are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes have vital roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas...... activity. These results link SAR11 to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss, redefining the ecological niche of Earth’s most abundant organismal group....

  13. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  14. Noise Removal in SAR Images using Orthonormal Ridgelet Transform

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ravi,; Dr. P.V.Naganjaneyulu

    2015-01-01

    Development in the field of image processing for reducing speckle noise from digital images/satellite images is a challenging task for image processing applications. Previously many algorithms were proposed to de-speckle the noise in digital images. Here in this article we are presenting experimental results on de-speckling of Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) images. SAR images have wide applications in remote sensing and mapping the surfaces of all planets. SAR can also be implemen...

  15. Bistatic SAR: State of the Art and Development Trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Tao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic SAR (BiSAR systems have attracted the interests from global researchers and become a hotspot in the international radar community due to the progress of radar technology and rapidly increased applications nowadays. Based on the BiSAR experiments and breakthrough of the key technology, the paper summarized the general progresses of BiSAR systems, especially in European radar community, from different aspects such as system design, processing idea and topology etc. Different bistatic image formation algorithms have been analyzed and reviewed. Finally, the development trend is discussed in the paper.

  16. Rough Set Based Classification rules generation for SARS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honghai, Feng; Guoshun, Chen; Yufeng, Wang; Bingru, Yang; Yumei, Chen

    2005-01-01

    SARS is an acute infectious disease and can cause a large amount of death. Up until now we have not known it well. With the experimental results of micronutrients of 30 SARS patients and 30 non-SARS patients, using rough set theory we induce some classification rules. Attribute reduction results show that micronutrients Fe, Ca, K and Na are necessary and sufficient for classification, whereas micronutrients Zn, Cu and Mg are not necessary or are redundant. Additionally, we find that micronutrient Ca has a strong correlation to SARS. The classification results of 30 other examples show that the rough set classification method is available.

  17. Anti-SARS coronavirus agents: a patent review (2008 - present).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vathan; Jung, Young-Sik; Liang, Po-Huang

    2013-10-01

    A novel coronavirus (CoV), unlike previous typical human coronaviruses (HCoVs), was identified as causative agent for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). SARS first surfaced as a pandemic in late 2002 and originated in southern China. SARS-CoV rapidly spread to > 30 countries by 2003, infecting nearly 8,000 people and causing around 800 fatalities. After 10 years of silence, a 2012 report alarmed researchers about the emergence of a new strain of CoV causing SARS-like disease. To combat SARS, scientists applied for patents on various therapeutic agents, including small-molecule inhibitors targeting the essential proteases, helicase and other proteins of the virus, natural products, approved drugs, molecules binding to the virus, neutralizing antibodies, vaccines, anti-sense RNA, siRNA and ribozyme against SARS-CoV. In this article, the patents published from 2008 to the present for the new therapeutics that could potentially be used in the prophylaxis and treatment of SARS are reviewed. The therapeutic interventions or prophylaxis discussed in this review seems to offer promising solutions to tackle SARS. Rather than being complacent about the results, we should envisage how to transform them into drug candidates that may be useful in combating SARS and related viral infections in the future.

  18. Observation Properties Analysis of Geo-SAR with Attitude Steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yu-run

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitude Steering has been widely applied to the current low orbit SAR system to decrease the rang/azimuth coupling of the received data. This paper focuses on the impacts of attitude steering to the observation properties of Geo-SAR, namely, Doppler parameters, range swath, and rang cell migration effect, and a comparisonbetween 3 different ways of attitude steering is made. Based on the simulation results, the necessity of attitude steering for Geo-SAR is validated, and for Geo-SAR on elliptical orbit, 2D attitude steering is the most effective.

  19. SAR Subsets for Selected Field Sites, 2007-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for 42 selected sites from various terrestrial ecology and meteorological monitoring networks including...

  20. SAR Subsets for Selected Field Sites, 2007-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for 42 selected sites from various terrestrial ecology and meteorological monitoring networks...

  1. Flood hazard maps from SAR data and global hydrodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustarini, Laura; Chini, Marci; Hostache, Renaud; Matgen, Patrick; Pappenberger, Florian; Bally, Phillippe

    2015-04-01

    With flood consequences likely to amplify because of growing population and ongoing accumulation of assets in flood-prone areas, global flood hazard and risk maps are greatly needed for improving flood preparedness at large scale. At the same time, with the rapidly growing archives of SAR images of floods, there is a high potential of making use of these images for global and regional flood management. In this framework, an original method is presented to integrate global flood inundation modeling and microwave remote sensing. It takes advantage of the combination of the time and space continuity of a global inundation model with the high spatial resolution of satellite observations. The availability of model simulations over a long time period offers the opportunity to estimate flood non-exceedance probabilities in a robust way. The probabilities can later be attributed to historical satellite observations. SAR-derived flood extent maps with their associated non-exceedance probabilities are then combined to generate flood hazard maps with a spatial resolution equal to that of the satellite images, which is most of the time higher than that of a global inundation model. The method can be applied to any area of interest in the world, provided that a sufficient number of relevant remote sensing images are available. We applied the method on the Severn River (UK) and on the Zambezi River (Mozambique), where large archives of Envisat flood images can be exploited. The global ECMWF flood inundation model is considered for computing the statistics of extreme events. A comparison with flood hazard maps estimated with in situ measured discharge is carried out. An additional analysis has been performed on the Severn River, using high resolution SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed SAR constellation, acquired for a single flood event (one flood map per day between 27/11/2012 and 4/12/2012). The results showed that it is vital to observe the peak of the flood. However, a single

  2. AUTOMATIC SHIP DETECTION IN SINGLE-POL SAR IMAGES USING TEXTURE FEATURES IN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Khesali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for detecting ships from high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR images. This method categorizes ship targets from single-pol SAR images using texture features in artificial neural networks. As such, the method tries to overcome the lack of an operational solution that is able to reliably detect ships with one SAR channel. The method has the following three main stages: 1 feature extraction; 2 feature selection; and 3 ship detection. The first part extracts different texture features from SAR image. These textures include occurrence and co occurrence measures with different window sizes. Then, best features are selected. Finally, the artificial neural network is used to extract ship pixels from sea ones. In post processing stage some morphological filters are used to improve the result. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified using Sentinel-1 data in VV polarization. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can be implemented with time-saving, high precision ship extraction, feature analysis, and detection. The results also show that using texture features the algorithm properly discriminates speckle noise from ships.

  3. Post-eruptive inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR, 2008–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Feifei; Lu, Zhong; Poland, Michael; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Qin; Jung, Hyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Okmok, a ~10-km wide caldera that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far its largest and most explosive since at least the early 19th century. We investigate post-eruptive magma supply and storage at the volcano during 2008–2014 by analyzing all available synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Okmok acquired during that time period using the multi-temporal InSAR technique. Data from the C-band Envisat and X-band TerraSAR-X satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating very soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a time-variable rate of 48-130 mm/y, consistent with GPS measurements. The “model-assisted” phase unwrapping method is applied to improve the phase unwrapping operation for long temporal baseline pairs. The InSAR time-series is used as input for deformation source modeling, which suggests magma accumulating at variable rates in a shallow storage zone at ~3.9 km below sea level beneath the summit caldera, consistent with previous studies. The modeled volume accumulation in the 6 years following the 2008 eruption is ~75% of the 1997 eruption volume and ~25% of the 2008 eruption volume.

  4. Post-Eruptive Inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR, 2008–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Qu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Okmok, a ~10-km wide caldera that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July–August 2008 was by far its largest and most explosive since at least the early 19th century. We investigate post-eruptive magma supply and storage at the volcano during 2008–2014 by analyzing all available synthetic aperture radar (SAR images of Okmok acquired during that time period using the multi-temporal InSAR technique. Data from the C-band Envisat and X-band TerraSAR-X satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating very soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a time-variable rate of 48–130 mm/y, consistent with GPS measurements. The “model-assisted” phase unwrapping method is applied to improve the phase unwrapping operation for long temporal baseline pairs. The InSAR time-series is used as input for deformation source modeling, which suggests magma accumulating at variable rates in a shallow storage zone at ~3.9 km below sea level beneath the summit caldera, consistent with previous studies. The modeled volume accumulation in the six years following the 2008 eruption is ~75% of the 1997 eruption volume and ~25% of the 2008 eruption volume.

  5. Observations and Mitigation of RFI in ALOS PALSAR SAR Data; Implications for the Desdyni Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Le, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Initial examination of ALOS PALSAR synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data has indicated significant radio frequency interference (RFI) in several geographic locations around the world. RFI causes significant reduction in image contrast, introduces periodic and quasi-periodic image artifacts, and introduces significant phase noise in repeat pass interferometric data reduction. The US National Research Council Decadal Survey of Earth Science has recommended DESDynI, a Deformation, Ecosystems, and Dynamics of Ice satellite mission comprising an L-band polarimetric radar configured for repeat pass interferometry. There is considerable interest internationally in other future L-band and lower frequency systems as well. Therefore the issues of prevalence and possibilities of mitigation of RFI in these crowded frequency bands is of considerable interest. RFI is observed in ALOS PALSAR in California, USA, and in southern Egypt in data examined to date. Application of several techniques for removing it from the data prior to SAR image formation, ranging from straightforward spectral normalization to time-domain, multi-phase filtering techniques are considered. Considerable experience has been gained from the removal of RFI from P-band acquired by the GeoSAR system. These techniques applied to the PALSAR data are most successful when the bandwidth of any particular spectral component of the RFI is narrow. Performance impacts for SAR imagery and interferograms are considered in the context of DESDynI measurement requirements.

  6. Fast correlation technique for glacier flow monitoring by digital camera and space-borne SAR images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Luc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most of the image processing techniques have been first proposed and developed on small size images and progressively applied to larger and larger data sets resulting from new sensors and application requirements. In geosciences, digital cameras and remote sensing images can be used to monitor glaciers and to measure their surface velocity by different techniques. However, the image size and the number of acquisitions to be processed to analyze time series become a critical issue to derive displacement fields by the conventional correlation technique. In this paper, a mathematical optimization of the classical normalized cross-correlation and its implementation are described to overcome the computation time and window size limitations. The proposed implementation is performed with a specific memory management to avoid most of the temporary result re-computations. The performances of the software resulting from this optimization are assessed by computing the correlation between optical images of a serac fall, and between Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images of Alpine glaciers. The optical images are acquired by a digital camera installed near the Argentière glacier (Chamonix, France and the SAR images are acquired by the high resolution TerraSAR-X satellite over the Mont-Blanc area. The results illustrate the potential of this implementation to derive dense displacement fields with a computational time compatible with the camera images acquired every 2 h and with the size of the TerraSAR-X scenes covering 30 × 50 km2.

  7. Potential of C and X Band SAR for Shrub Growth Monitoring in Sub-Arctic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Duguay

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic and sub-Arctic environments have seen a rapid growth of shrub vegetation at the expense of the Arctic tundra in recent decades. In order to develop better tools to assess and understand this phenomenon, the sensitivity of multi-polarized SAR backscattering at C and X band to shrub density and height is studied under various conditions. RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X images were acquired from November 2011 to March 2012 over the Umiujaq community in northern Quebec (56.55°N, 76.55°W and compared to in situ measurements of shrub vegetation density and height collected during the summer of 2009. The results show that σ0 is sensitive to changes in shrub coverage up to 20% and is sensitive to changes in shrub height up to around 1 m. The cross-polarized backscattering (σ0 HV displays the best sensitivity to both shrub height and density, and RADARSAT-2 is more sensitive to shrub height, as TerraSAR-X tends to saturate more rapidly with increasing volume scattering from the shrub branches. These results demonstrate that SAR data could provide essential information, not only on Remote Sens. 2015, 7 9411 the spatial expansion of shrub vegetation, but also on its vertical growth, especially at early stages of colonization.

  8. A NEW 2D OTSU FOR WATER EXTRACTION FROM SAR IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available SAR image segmentation is a crucial step that heavily influences the performance of image interpretation. The texture factor to replace the neighborhood mean dimension in the traditional Otsu method is proposed in this work, aiming at the problem that the SAR image has unique characteristics and the original 2D Otsu method only considers the pixel neighborhood mean information. In this paper, TerraSAR image with the single band and single polarization is used to water extraction. Firstly, the semantic function is used to analyze the structural characteristics of the sample image to determine the optimal parameters of the texture information extraction. Then, calculate the textural measures such as contrast, entropy, homogeneity, mean and second moment based on gray level co-occurrence matrix(GLCM method. The results are compared with the artificially marked images and the results of the original 2D Otsu.The experimental results achieve higher objective values, which shows the proposed algorithm using texture factor has a high practical value for SAR Image water segmentation.

  9. Estimation and characterization of physical and inorganic chemical indicators of water quality by using SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Muntadher A.; Toumi, Abdelmalek; Khenchaf, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Recently, remote sensing is considering one of the most important tools in studies of water scattering and water characterization. Traditional methods for monitoring pollutants depended on optical satellite rather than Radar data. Thus, many of Water Quality Parameters (WQP) from optical imagery are still limited. In this paper, a new approach based on the TerraSAR-X images has been presented which it is used to map the region of interest and to estimate physical and chemical WQPs. This approach based on a Small Perturbation Model (SPM) for the electromagnetic scattering is applied by using the Elfouhaily spectrum. A series of inversions have been included in this model started by finding the reflectivity from backscattering coefficients which are calculated from SAR images. Another inversion has been applied to find dielectric constant from the calculation models of the reflectivity (in HH and VV polarizations). Then, a Stogryn Debye formulation has been used to estimate temperature and salinity of water surface from SAR images. After many derivations we got a new model able to estimate temperature and salinity directly from backscattering coefficients obtained from radar images. Inorganic chemical parameters which are represented by Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) and the Electrical Conductivity (EC) are estimated directly from salinity. A tow dataset of instu data have been used to validate this work. The validation included a comparison between parameters measured in situ and those estimated from Terra SAR-X image.

  10. SARS (SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME – A NEW CHALLENGE FOR THE MANKIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Trampuž

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome is a recently recognized new infectious respiratory illness, which first appeared in southern China in November 2002, and has since then within months spread to 29 countries. In total, 8437 cases and 813 deaths occurred (situation as of August 1, 2003. SARS is caused by a novel coronavirus that is primarily spread by large droplet transmission, less commonly by surface contamination or by air (airborne. Around half of the infected were health care workers; the majority of cases acquired the infection in the hospital.Conclusions. Incubation period of SARS is 2 to 10 days. Early manifestations include fever, myalgia, and headache, followed 2 to 4 days later by cough, shortness of breath, and diarrhea. In 10–20% of patients, tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation is required. Case-fatality is approximately 15%, in patients aged 60 years or older may be higher than 40%. There is no specific therapy or vaccine, and management consists of supportive care. This article summarizes updated information regarding epidemiology, clinical features, etiologic agent, modes of transmission of the disease, and infection control measures to contain SARS.

  11. Weighted Exponential Region Energy Model for River Segmentation of SAR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Bin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional active contour models can hardly achieve the accurate river segmentation of SAR images. To solve this problem, a novel active contour model with weighted exponential region energy is proposed, which can extract rivers in SAR images accurately. The exponential region energy is incorporated into the energy functional of the Chan-Vese model, which can measure the difference between the segmented image and the original image, resulting in the improvement of segmentation accuracy of the model. In addition, the maximum absolute differences of the pixel grayscale values inside the object and background regions are utilized to replace the original constant region energy weights, which can adaptively adjust the ratios of the object and background region energies and accelerate the motion of the curve towards the boundaries of the object region, resulting in the higher segmentation efficiency. The experiments are performed on real SAR images of rivers and results demonstrate that compared with the traditional active contour models, the proposed model can segment rivers in SAR images more rapidly and accurately and has some advantages in terms of both segmentation performance and segmentation efficiency.

  12. The Use of InSAR Data to Map Hydraulic Head Levels in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of hydraulic head in the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Here we report on the use of InSAR data to inform groundwater management in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. We selected the SLV for study, as it is an important agricultural area struggling with groundwater management after a period of extreme drought. The techniques developed here can also be used to assist groundwater management in other agricultural areas, such as California's Central Valley. Reeves at al. (2013) analyzed 30 C-band ERS scenes over the SLV between 1992 and 2000 using the small baseline subset method (SBAS). They concluded that InSAR data can be used to calibrate the subsidence-to-head relationship and temporally extend hydraulic head measurements. To study the extent to which InSAR deformation time series can be used to interpolate spatial gaps in the well-based head measurements, we need to derive an InSAR ground deformation map due to groundwater extraction over the entire SLV. A major error source of InSAR data is highly variable temporal decorrelation over agricultural areas such as the SLV, which limits the number of InSAR pixels that can be selected for the SBAS analysis. Because L-band spaceborne radar systems such as ALOS PALSAR suffer less from temporal decorrelation than C-band and X-band spaceborne radar systems, we processed 92 small baseline interferograms using 17 ALOS scenes acquired between January 2007 and March 2011. We further employed an SBAS ground deformation model to represent surface subsidence due to groundwater extraction, which consists of a seasonal deformation superimposed on a linear trend. We observed that the long-term subsidence rate is smaller than 5 mm/year over the entire SLV and the magnitude of the seasonal subsidence can be up to 2 cm. Our results indicate that there is no severe long-term water storage loss in the confined aquifer at the SLV, consistent with previous C-band InSAR study (Reeves at

  13. A Constellation of CubeSat InSAR Sensors for Rapid-Revisit Surface Deformation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wye, L.; Lee, S.; Yun, S. H.; Zebker, H. A.; Stock, J. D.; Wicks, C. W., Jr.; Doe, R.

    2016-12-01

    The 2007 NRC Decadal Survey for Earth Sciences highlights three major Earth surface deformation themes: 1) solid-earth hazards and dynamics; 2) human health and security; and 3) land-use change, ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity. Space-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a key change detection tool for addressing these themes. Here, we describe the mission and radar payload design for a constellation of S-band InSAR sensors specifically designed to provide the global, high temporal resolution, sub-cm level deformation accuracy needed to address some of the major Earth system goals. InSAR observations with high temporal resolution are needed to properly monitor certain nonlinearly time-varying features (e.g., unstable volcanoes, active fault lines, and heavily-used groundwater or hydrocarbon reservoirs). Good temporal coverage is also needed to reduce atmospheric artifacts by allowing multiple acquisitions to be averaged together, since each individual SAR measurement is corrupted by up to several cm of atmospheric noise. A single InSAR platform is limited in how often it can observe a given scene without sacrificing global spatial coverage. Multiple InSAR platforms provide the spatial-temporal flexibility required to maximize the science return. However, building and launching multiple InSAR platforms is cost-prohibitive for traditional satellites. SRI International (SRI) and our collaborators are working to exploit developments in nanosatellite technology, in particular the emergence of the CubeSat standard, to provide high-cadence InSAR capabilities in an affordable package. The CubeSat Imaging Radar for Earth Science (CIRES) subsystem, a prototype SAR elec­tronics package developed by SRI with support from a 2014 NASA ESTO ACT award, is specifically scaled to be a drop-in radar solution for resource-limited delivery systems like CubeSats and small airborne vehicles. Here, we present our mission concept and flow-down requirements for a

  14. Answering the right question - integration of InSAR with other datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Rachel; McCormack, Harry; Burren, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The capabilities of satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) are well known, and utilized across a wide range of academic and commercial applications. However there is a tendency, particularly in commercial applications, for users to ask 'What can we study with InSAR?'. When establishing a new technique this approach is important, but InSAR has been possible for 20 years now and, even accounting for new and innovative algorithms, this ground has been thoroughly explored. Too many studies conclude 'We show the ground is moving here, by this much', and mention the wider context as an afterthought. The focus needs to shift towards first asking the right questions - in fields as diverse as hazard awareness, resource optimization, financial considerations and pure scientific enquiry - and then working out how to achieve the best possible answers. Depending on the question, InSAR (and ground deformation more generally) may provide a large or small contribution to the overall solution, and there are usually benefits to integrating a number of techniques to capitalize on the complementary capabilities and provide the most useful measurements. However, there is still a gap between measurements and answers, and unlocking the value of the data relies heavily on appropriate visualization, integrated analysis, communication between technique and application experts, and appropriate use of modelling. We present a number of application examples, and demonstrate how their usefulness can be transformed by moving from a focus on data to answers - integrating complementary geodetic, geophysical and geological datasets and geophysical modeling with appropriate visualization, to enable comprehensive solution-focused interpretation. It will also discuss how forthcoming developments are likely to further advance realisation of the full potential satellite InSAR holds.

  15. Influenza and SARS: the impact of viral pandemics on maritime health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Poh Lian

    2011-01-01

    Global travel and transport play a critical role in the spread of infections. We see this clearly in the first two pandemics of the 21st century: SARS and influenza H1N1-2009. Although air travel contributed to dissemination in these two pandemics, the travel restrictions, quarantines, and heightened vigilance which resulted had an impact on maritime health. Seasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza have some important differences with regards to exposure risks, infectivity, and severity. Most of the data for maritime influenza outbreaks focus on seasonal influenza on cruise ships, but influenza among crew members occurs due to close working conditions and is potentially preventable with staff vaccination programs. To date, avian influenza has low human-to-human transmission; infection typically requires close contact with poultry, but presents with severe disease and a high fatality rate. Pandemic (swine) influenza was readily transmitted between people, including young adults, and caused severe illness in high-risk groups including pregnant women, children, and those with co-morbidities and obesity. In contrast, SARS had lower infectivity compared to influenza, and a longer incubation period. These characteristics slowed its propagation enough that outbreak control measures, such as isolation of infected cases and quarantine of exposed but well persons, were effective in terminating this pandemic. No effective vaccine exists for SARS at this time, whereas countries were able to deploy millions of doses of pandemic influenza vaccine within 7 months after the outbreak was first recognized in Mexico. The lack of a protective vaccine and the higher case fatality rate in SARS will mean that stringent quarantine measures may still be required for outbreak control if SARS ever occurs again. Compliance with international health regulations, and the ability to adapt these to maritime health needs, will be important in the shipping industry.

  16. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth\\'s ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields. Within this model framework the effect of the

  17. Sea ice thickness in the Beaufort Sea and comparisons with C-band SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, J. A.; Haas, C.; Bublitz, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Beaufort Sea is a region of significant interest for both climate science and marine operations, as summer sea ice extent and ice age have shown strong declines in recent years, while interest in oil and gas activities have increased dramatically. As a result, there is high demand for sea ice information products in this region. In particular, routine observations of ice thickness are desired at regional and local scales for parameterization and validation of seasonal and long-term ice forecasts, as well as ensuring safe marine operations. We present ice thickness measurements acquired in April 2009-2016 with an airborne electromagnetic induction system (AEM). The AEM data are compared to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery acquired by RADARSAT-2 (RS2) in 2015 and 2016 to determine if ice thickness can be inverted from C-band SAR data. The RS2 data include ScanSAR dual-pol (HH/HV) and high-resolution quad-pol images. The AEM measurements indicate that the thickest multi-year ice (MYI) often occurs in a narrow band at the southern edge of the MYI zone, and that there is high interannual variability in modal MYI thickness. The southern Beaufort Sea is dominated by first-year ice (FYI) that is consistently 2 m thick. Significant areas of thin FYI were present in 2016 due to strong divergent ice motion and westward advection in February-April. Extreme ice features (> 6 m thick for 100+ m along flight track) were observed in all study years in both MYI and FYI regions. The AEM data were averaged in 0.5 to 5 km intervals and compared to SAR backscatter and polarimetric parameters. Correlations between ice thickness and SAR backscatter and polarimetric parameters were generally weak to moderate, and inconsistent between study years. Work is ongoing to compare AEM and SAR data at the floe scale instead of at fixed distance intervals. Depolarization parameters, which are strongly related to volume scattering, show potential for identifying thick deformed ice features

  18. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields

  19. Potential and limitations of high resolution multitemporal sar images in river morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitidieri, Francesco; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Amitrano, Donato; Ruello, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    In this study we test the capability of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to enrich the monitoring of river geomorphological processes. A case study on the Italian River Orco is presented; a set of 100 COSMO-SkyMed stripmap images (from October 2008 to December 2016) from Italian Space Agency was employed. All the data, acquired with medium look angle (almost 30°) and HH polarization for increasing the land-water contrast, were processed in order to calibrate, register and reduce the speckle effect. Moreover, the optimal weighting multi-temporal De Grandi filter was adopted to allow an effective extraction of the water surfaces contour. This method was applied to extract water contours over the entire historical series of SAR datasets available. Thanks to the generated information we were able to monitor the lateral dynamic of the water channels and infer on the relations between low or peak flow and river morphology. Multi-temporal SAR images were compared to orthophotos and in situ measurements (performed at the same time of a SAR acquisition) in terms of river features extraction (e.g. active channel, vegetated islands) and measurements of morphometric parameters (e.g. reach length, channel width, curvature and sinuosity). Results of this comparison highlighted the potential offered by the use of SAR technology, with some limitations. In particular, good performances were reached by the extraction of the active channel and vegetated island compared to the ones obtained using the orthophotos. On the other hand, some issues were encountered in extracting water surfaces where riffles exhibit surface waves having heights greater than the wavelength of the electromagnetic signal of SAR, which causes a low land-water contrast. Hence, given the high spatial (3 m) and temporal resolution (15 days) of SAR images and the all-weather all-time acquisition conditions, a significant enhancement in the river management capabilities is possible, in particular

  20. The sf32 unique gene of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV is a non-essential gene that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization in occlusion-derived virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Beperet

    Full Text Available A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null, unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV, was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac. Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration, speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs.

  1. Analysis of summer subsidence in Barrow, Alaska, using InSAR and hyperspectral remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud Haghshenas Haghighi; M. Motagh; B. Heim; S. Chabrillat; D. Streletskiy; G. Grosse; T. Sachs; Katrin Kohnert

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gradual elevation change due to summer thawing of active layer in tundra permafrost landscape of Barrow, Alaska is investigated using SAR interferometry (InSAR) technique. We used a variety of SAR sensors including TerraSAR-X, ALOS, and Sentinel-1 images to assess elevation changes in summer season. Preliminary result, obtained by TerraSAR-X InSAR analysis, clearly delineates subsidence during the summer by identifying thousands of coherent pixels on ...

  2. Anti–SARS-CoV Immunoglobulin G in Healthcare Workers, Guangzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei-Qing; Lu, Ci-Yong; Wong, Tze-wai; Ling, Wen-Hua; Lin, Zhong-Ning; Hao, Yuan-Tao; LIU, Qing; Fang, Ji-Qian; He, Yun; Luo, Fu-Tian; Jing, Jin; Ling, Li; Ma, Xiang; Liu, Yi-Min; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of inapparent infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among healthcare workers, we performed a serosurvey to test for immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) among 1,147 healthcare workers in 3 hospitals that admitted SARS patients in mid-May 2003. Among them were 90 healthcare workers with SARS. As a reference group, 709 healthcare workers who worked in 2 hospitals that never admitted any SARS patients were similarly tes...

  3. FDTD calculation of whole-body average SAR in adult and child models for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jianqing [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Fujiwara, Osamu [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kodera, Sachiko [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Watanabe, Soichi [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Nukui-kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2006-09-07

    Due to the difficulty of the specific absorption rate (SAR) measurement in an actual human body for electromagnetic radio-frequency (RF) exposure, in various compliance assessment procedures the incident electric field or power density is being used as a reference level, which should never yield a larger whole-body average SAR than the basic safety limit. The relationship between the reference level and the whole-body average SAR, however, was established mainly based on numerical calculations for highly simplified human modelling dozens of years ago. Its validity is being questioned by the latest calculation results. In verifying the validity of the reference level with respect to the basic SAR limit for RF exposure, it is essential to have a high accuracy of human modelling and numerical code. In this study, we made a detailed error analysis in the whole-body average SAR calculation for the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method in conjunction with the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries. We derived a basic rule for the PML employment based on a dielectric sphere and the Mie theory solution. We then attempted to clarify to what extent the whole-body average SAR may reach using an anatomically based Japanese adult model and a scaled child model. The results show that the whole-body average SAR under the ICNIRP reference level exceeds the basic safety limit nearly 30% for the child model both in the resonance frequency and 2 GHz band.

  4. A brief review on tsunami early warning detection using BPR approach and post analysis by SAR satellite dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar Chaturvedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsunami early warning systems have provided to be the extreme importance after the tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011. This research article presents a case study based on the tsunami detection using Bottom Pressure Rate (BPR measurement and the post the analysis using the SAR datasets. A final decision based system using BPR has been studied to carry out the measurements of tsunami wave parameters. SAR based study has also been carried out for the post tsunami studies. Wiener filters are utilized to remove the speckle noise presents in imagery. Future scope of this work has also been proposed.

  5. InSAR investigation of crustal deformation associated with the 2011 eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiel, Y.; Grandin, R.; Baer, G.; Wright, T. J.; Doubre, C.; Hamlyn, J.; Pagli, C.; Peltzer, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Nabro volcano, Afar, Eritrea, erupted on the night of June 12, 2011. The volcano emitted ~ 1.5 Tg of sulfur dioxide (SO2), one of the highest mass ever recorded, with a volcanic plume reaching about 15 km elevation. A seismic sequence started on June 12, 15:37 UTC time, a few hours before the onset of the volcanic eruption. It included in total 18 M>4 earthquakes, of which two Mw 5.6 normal fault earthquakes occurred on June 12, and an Mw 5.6 strike-slip earthquake occurred at the end of the sequence on June 17. The deformation associated with the eruption and the seismic activity was resolved by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements of the TerraSAR-X satellite. Interferograms as well as range and azimuth offset maps were generated using ascending and descending track pairs. The Nabro caldera and the associated channel of magma flow are characterized by significant loss of coherence which limited our InSAR observations at the near field of the volcano. Elastic modeling based on these InSAR measurements are thus ambiguous resulting in several possible mechanisms, with various interactions between faults and magmatic sources. Detailed assessment of co- and post-eruptive seismicity and monitoring of post-eruptive deformation using continued InSAR observations are used to discriminate between the different magmatic and tectonic components that triggered and sustained the eruption.

  6. Combining SBAS InSAR Time Series and GPS to Study the Dynamics of the Hawaiian Island Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S.; Amelung, F.; Gourmelen, N.

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we use Radarsat1 data covering the time period from 1997 to 2008, and data from 53 continuous global positioning system (GPS) stations covering the time period from 1996 to 2008, to study Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes. Using the small baseline subset (SBAS) algorithm, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series were created and compared with GPS time series. InSAR provides a relative measurement of ground displacement in the radar line of sight while GPS provides measurements of the displacement in three dimensions. GPS data have a higher temporal resolution than InSAR data with daily solutions of displacement but are limited in their spatial extent. InSAR data provide improved spatial resolution, but the repeat cycle for one Radarsat1 satellite track is only 24 days. In the case of the Hawaiian Island volcanoes, the deformation observed is spatially heterogeneous with areas separated by 10's of km exhibiting different rates and orientations of deformation. The combined InSAR and GPS dataset improves the analysis both spatially and temporally to better understand the dynamics of magmatic systems within volcanoes.

  7. SarA is a repressor of hla (alpha-hemolysin) transcription in Staphylococcus aureus: its apparent role as an activator of hla in the prototype strain NCTC 8325 depends on reduced expression of sarS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarsson, Jan; Kanth, Anna; Tegmark-Wisell, Karin; Arvidson, Staffan

    2006-12-01

    In most Staphylococcus aureus strains, inactivation of sarA increases hla transcription, indicating that sarA is a repressor. However, in S. aureus NCTC 8325 and its derivatives, used for most studies of hla regulation, inactivation of sarA resulted in decreased hla transcription. The disparate phenotype of strain NCTC 8325 seems to be associated with its rsbU mutation, which leads to sigma(B) deficiency. This has now been verified by the demonstration that sarA repressed hla transcription in an rsbU+ derivative of strain 8325-4 (SH1000). That sarA could act as a repressor of hla in an 8325-4 background was confirmed by the observation that inactivation of sarA in an agr sarS rot triple mutant dramatically increased hla transcription to wild-type levels. However, the apparent role of sarA as an activator of hla in 8325-4 was not a result of the rsbU mutation alone, as inactivation of sarA in another rsbU mutant, strain V8, led to increased hla transcription. Northern blot analysis revealed much higher levels of sarS mRNA in strain V8 than in 8325-4, which was likely due to the mutation in the sarS activator, tcaR, in 8325-4, which was not found in strain V8. On the other hand, the relative increase in sarS transcription upon the inactivation of sarA was 15-fold higher in 8325-4 than in strain V8. Because of this, inactivation of sarA in 8325-4 means a net increase in repressor activity, whereas in strain V8, inactivation of sarA means a net decrease in repressor activity and, therefore, enhanced hla transcription.

  8. The final size of a SARS epidemic model without quarantine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sze-Bi; Roeger, Lih-Ing W.

    2007-09-01

    In this article, we present the continuing work on a SARS model without quarantine by Hsu and Hsieh [Sze-Bi Hsu, Ying-Hen Hsieh, Modeling intervention measures and severity-dependent public response during severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 66 (2006) 627-647]. An "acting basic reproductive number" [psi] is used to predict the final size of the susceptible population. We find the relation among the final susceptible population size S[infinity], the initial susceptible population S0, and [psi]. If [psi]>1, the disease will prevail and the final size of the susceptible, S[infinity], becomes zero; therefore, everyone in the population will be infected eventually. If [psi]0 which means part of the population will never be infected. Also, when S[infinity]>0, S[infinity] is increasing with respect to the initial susceptible population S0, and decreasing with respect to the acting basic reproductive number [psi].

  9. FPGA Implementation of a SAR Two-dimensional Autofocus Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jiangzhe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For real-time autofocus of defocused images produced by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR, the twodimensional autofocus approach proposed in this study is used to correct the residual range cell migration and compensate for the phase error. Next, a block-wise Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA is used to correct the space-variant phase error. The Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA design procedures, resource utilization, processing speed, accuracy, and autofocus are discussed in detail. The system is able to autofocus an 8K × 8K complex image with single precision within 5.7 s when the FPGA works at 200 MHz. The processing of the measured data verifies the effectiveness and real-time capability of the proposed method.

  10. Erectile properties of the Rho-kinase inhibitor SAR407899 in diabetic animals and human isolated corpora cavernosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background RhoA-Rho kinase complex contributes to keep the cavernosus smooth muscle contracted and its inhibition is considered a potential strategy for the therapy of erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods We compared the effects of SAR407899, the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil for their ability to relax corpus cavernosum strips contracted with phenylephrine in healthy and diabetic animals. Strips were obtained from WKY, spontaneous hypertensive (SHR), control CD, and diabetic CD rats, humans, control and diabetic rabbits. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin or alloxan injection. In vivo penile erection (length) induced by drugs was measured in conscious rabbits. Results SAR407899 dose-dependently relaxed the pre-contracted corpora cavernosa in all species, with similar potency and efficacy in healthy vs diabetic rats, WKY vs SHR rats, healthy vs diabetic rabbits (IC50 range from 0.05 to 0.29 μM, Emax range 89 to 97%). In the presence of the NO-synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, the SAR407899 response did not decrease in any of the species or experimental conditions. The effect was confirmed in human strips where sildenafil was significantly less potent and effective, with IC50 respectively 0.13 and 0.51 μM; Emax 92 and 43%. Unlike SAR407899, the potency and efficacy of sildenafil and Y27632 were significantly reduced by diabetes and L-NAME. In vivo, SAR407899 dose-dependently induced rabbit penile erection, with greater potency and longer duration of action than sildenafil. Sildenafil, but not SAR407899, was less effective in alloxan-induced diabetes. Conclusion The induction of penile erection by SAR407899, unlike that by sildenafil, is largely independent of e-NO activity. This suggests its use in erectile dysfunction for diabetic and hypertensive patients where e-NO activity is impaired. PMID:22444253

  11. Multi-Feature Segmentation for High-Resolution Polarimetric SAR Data Based on Fractal Net Evolution Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihao Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation techniques play an important role in understanding high-resolution polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR images. PolSAR image segmentation is widely used as a preprocessing step for subsequent classification, scene interpretation and extraction of surface parameters. However, speckle noise and rich spatial features of heterogeneous regions lead to blurred boundaries of high-resolution PolSAR image segmentation. A novel segmentation algorithm is proposed in this study in order to address the problem and to obtain accurate and precise segmentation results. This method integrates statistical features into a fractal net evolution algorithm (FNEA framework, and incorporates polarimetric features into a simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC superpixel generation algorithm. First, spectral heterogeneity in the traditional FNEA is substituted by the G0 distribution statistical heterogeneity in order to combine the shape and statistical features of PolSAR data. The statistical heterogeneity between two adjacent image objects is measured using a log likelihood function. Second, a modified SLIC algorithm is utilized to generate compact superpixels as the initial samples for the G0 statistical model, which substitutes the polarimetric distance of the Pauli RGB composition for the CIELAB color distance. The segmentation results were obtained by weighting the G0 statistical feature and the shape features, based on the FNEA framework. The validity and applicability of the proposed method was verified with extensive experiments on simulated data and three real-world high-resolution PolSAR images from airborne multi-look ESAR, spaceborne single-look RADARSAT-2, and multi-look TerraSAR-X data sets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method obtains more accurate and precise segmentation results than the other methods for high-resolution PolSAR images.

  12. Pasture Monitoring Using SAR with COSMO-SkyMed, ENVISAT ASAR, and ALOS PALSAR in Otway, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Li

    2013-07-01

    . The L-band SAR is the less accurate one for grass biomass measurement due to stronger penetration.

  13. Satellite on-board real-time SAR processor prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Alain; Doucet, Michel; Harnisch, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Marchese, Linda; Bourqui, Pascal; Desnoyers, Nicholas; Legros, Mathieu; Guillot, Ludovic; Mercier, Luc; Châteauneuf, François

    2017-11-01

    A Compact Real-Time Optronic SAR Processor has been successfully developed and tested up to a Technology Readiness Level of 4 (TRL4), the breadboard validation in a laboratory environment. SAR, or Synthetic Aperture Radar, is an active system allowing day and night imaging independent of the cloud coverage of the planet. The SAR raw data is a set of complex data for range and azimuth, which cannot be compressed. Specifically, for planetary missions and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems with limited communication data rates this is a clear disadvantage. SAR images are typically processed electronically applying dedicated Fourier transformations. This, however, can also be performed optically in real-time. Originally the first SAR images were optically processed. The optical Fourier processor architecture provides inherent parallel computing capabilities allowing real-time SAR data processing and thus the ability for compression and strongly reduced communication bandwidth requirements for the satellite. SAR signal return data are in general complex data. Both amplitude and phase must be combined optically in the SAR processor for each range and azimuth pixel. Amplitude and phase are generated by dedicated spatial light modulators and superimposed by an optical relay set-up. The spatial light modulators display the full complex raw data information over a two-dimensional format, one for the azimuth and one for the range. Since the entire signal history is displayed at once, the processor operates in parallel yielding real-time performances, i.e. without resulting bottleneck. Processing of both azimuth and range information is performed in a single pass. This paper focuses on the onboard capabilities of the compact optical SAR processor prototype that allows in-orbit processing of SAR images. Examples of processed ENVISAT ASAR images are presented. Various SAR processor parameters such as processing capabilities, image quality (point target analysis), weight and

  14. Integration of GPS and InSAR Data for Optimal 3-Dimensional Crustal Deformation Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Liu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    GPS and InSAR are complementary to each other for crustal deformation monitoring, We develop an algorithm to integrate the two data sets for the production of 3-dimensional crustal motion map. In the algorithm point-based discrete GPS measurements are first interpolated to produce continuous 3-D vector map at chosen grids covered by the InSAR data. The interpolation is based on an algorithm of Shen et al. [2015], which takes into account of GPS station distance, network density and configuration for data weighting. A Gaussian distance weighting function and a Voronoi cell spatial weighting function are used in the interpolation. The amount of weighting and degree of smoothing can be spatially variable and optimally determined based on in situ data strength. This approach can effectively smooth out the incoherencies in discretized GPS velocity data. At the locations where both InSAR and interpolated GPS data are available, optimal 3-D components are solved for using a weighted least square method. The InSAR data are weighted by their LOS uncertainties. The GPS interpolated data are weighted by their re-estimated uncertainties assuming a uniform smoothing instead of variable smoothing used for data interpolation as mentioned above, to ensure that the uncertainty estimates reflect the in situ data strength consistently and not biased by uneven degree of smoothing. Including InSAR data from both ascending and descending viewing geometry, if available, provides improved constraint on the 3-D deformation when integrating with GPS data. We apply this algorithm to a test region in southern California covering most of the active faults in the region such as the San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Garlock. We use LOS rate data derived from 18 years of ERS-Envisat InSAR data, and a combination of continuous and campaign GPS data of more than two decades of time span. Our preliminary result shows that the GPS and InSAR data are generally consistent for the horizontal velocities at

  15. The InSAR Italy portal for open access to crustal deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Stefano; Tolomei, Cristiano; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Lanari, Riccardo; Pepe, Antonio; Marchetti, Pier Giorgio; Della Vecchia, Andrea; Mantovani, Simone

    2014-05-01

    InSAR Italy is a web portal devised to provide open access services to crustal deformation data measured using multitemporal SAR Interferometry techniques over the Italian territory. It is an evolution of the VELISAR initiative, promoted in 2006 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, and originally participated by IREA-CNR and TRE srl. InSAR Italy was developed tailoring the Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) environment, an Earth Observation and geospatial data analysis tool empowered with OGC standard interfaces. The web interface allows an easy browsing of the ground deformation maps obtained for each satellite image dataset, leading to a clear picture and improved analysis of the displacement time series over single pixels or large areas. Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) are used to access and process the maps, respectively. The crustal deformation data are provided by INGV and IREA-CNR as products of publicly-funded research projects, and are disseminated in compliance with the national legislation on the Open Data Access; metadata associated to the products are published according to the INSPIRE specifications. The information provided through InSAR Italy is mainly based on InSAR data maintained in the ESA archives, in particular from the ERS satellites for the 1992-2000 period, and ENVISAT for the period 2003-2010, however, ground velocity maps obtained from COSMO-SkyMed data will also be released in the near future. The InSAR Italy deformation maps consist of time series of ground displacement at resolution varying between 5 and 80 m, and the relative mean velocity values. The data sets can be queried and mean velocities can be recalculated over user-defined time periods, to account for possible non-linear displacement trends. The MEA spatiotemporal data analysis capability allows to investigate deformation phenomena occurring at very different spatial scales, from single buildings to entire regions

  16. A new implementation of full resolution SBAS-DInSAR processing chain for the effective monitoring of structures and infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonano, Manuela; Buonanno, Sabatino; Ojha, Chandrakanta; Berardino, Paolo; Lanari, Riccardo; Zeni, Giovanni; Manunta, Michele

    2017-04-01

    memory. Moreover, in some processing steps very heavy from the computational point of view, the Graphical Processing Units (GPU) are exploited for the processing of blocks working on a pixel-by-pixel basis, requiring strong modifications on some key parts of the sequential full resolution SBAS-DInSAR processing chain. GPU processing is implemented by efficiently exploiting parallel processing architectures (as CUDA) for increasing the computing performances, in terms of optimization of the available GPU memory, as well as reduction of the Input/Output operations on the GPU and of the whole processing time for specific blocks w.r.t. the corresponding sequential implementation, particularly critical in presence of huge DInSAR datasets. Moreover, to efficiently handle the massive amount of DInSAR measurements provided by the new generation SAR constellations (CSK and Sentinel-1), we perform a proper re-design strategy aimed at the robust assimilation of the full resolution SBAS-DInSAR results into the web-based Geonode platform of the Spatial Data Infrastructure, thus allowing the efficient management, analysis and integration of the interferometric results with different data sources.

  17. Tropospheric correction of InSAR time-series with the weather research forecasting model: an application to volcanic deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.; Lu, Z.

    2010-12-01

    The potential of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) for surveying volcanic deformation has been proven extensively over the last few decades. However, the value and applicability of InSAR for detecting the subtle signs of the onset of an eruptive even is limited by the influence of temporal decorrelation and electromagnetic path delay variations (e.g. the troposphere and ionosphere effects), as they reduce the sensitivity and accuracy of the technique. In this paper, we will present an integration of time series InSAR processing with predictions from the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to improve the performance of InSAR for volcano monitoring application, especially to increase InSAR ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive deformation. The non-hydrostatic WRF model is part of the latest generation of numerical weather prediction (NWP) and atmospheric simulation systems. WRF can be implemented with a nested grid system, allowing atmospheric delay phase maps to be created at a spatial resolution down to the 500 m and is expected to outperform other NWPs in term of prediction accuracy. We show that the integration of WRF with InSAR measurements allows reducing the amplitude and variance of atmospheric phase delay signals which increases the sensitivity of InSAR to deformation signals. Moreover, for some InSAR algorithms that select Phase-stable-points based on an analysis of phase variance, the mitigation of atmospheric signals with WRF leads to an increase of the density of detected coherent points. We apply the WRF-assisted InSAR technique to Unimak Island at the eastern Aleutians, where three active volcanic systems exist. By comparing the deformation monitoring results from the InSAR time series with and without the tropospheric correction, we demonstrate the advantage of applying WRF simulation result in InSAR tropospheric correction and the contribution this technique will provide to volcano monitoring. Structure

  18. Improved satellite observations in coastal areas from altimetry and SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Paolo; Martin, Adrien; Gommenginger, Christine; Calafat, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The coastal environment is under constant pressure by natural forces and anthropogenic activities and is very sensitive to climate change. Observations of many physical and biological parameters are critical for its monitoring and management. Satellite observations constitute an efficient way to observe the global coastal environment, but ocean satellite observations have often been designed and optimised for the open ocean: algorithms and processing techniques need to be revisited and adapted for application in the coastal zone. A case in point is that of satellite altimetry, which over the oceans is regarded as one of the most successful remote sensing techniques, as it has allowed an unprecedented mapping of the ocean surface dynamics at the large- and meso-scale. With the improvements in orbit models, radar processing, atmospheric and geophysical effect corrections that have emerged over the years, altimetry gives today also a very accurate estimation of the rate of sea level rise and its geographical variability. However, altimetric data in the near-land strip (0 to 50 km from the coastline) are often flagged as bad and left unused, essentially owing to 1) difficulties with the corrections; and/or 2) the modification of the radar returns due to the presence of land in the footprint, which makes the fitting of the altimetric echoes with a waveform model (the so-called "retracking") problematic. Techniques to recover meaningful estimates of the altimeter-derived parameters (height, significant wave height and wind) in the coastal zone have been developed and lead to a number of new applications, which will be presented here. The new observation from coastal altimetry are highly synergistic with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). SAR imagers measure the backscattered signal from the ocean surface at spatial resolution better than 100m. This backscattered signal gives knowledge on the sea surface roughness, which is related to wind and waves. The very high resolution

  19. From Regional Hazard Assessment to Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Support - InSAR Ground Motion Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lege, T.; Kalia, A.; Gruenberg, I.; Frei, M.

    2016-12-01

    There are numerous scientific applications of InSAR methods in tectonics, earthquake analysis and other geologic and geophysical fields. Ground motion on local and regional scale measured and monitored via the application of the InSAR techniques provide scientists and engineers with plenty of new insights and further understanding of subsurface processes. However, the operational use of InSAR is not yet very widespread. To foster the operational utilization of the Copernicus Sentinel Satellites in the day-to-day business of federal, state and municipal work and planning BGR (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources) initiated workshops with potential user groups. Through extensive reconcilement of interests and demands with scientific, technical, economic and governmental stakeholders (e.g. Ministries, Mining Authorities, Geological Surveys, Geodetic Surveys and Environmental Agencies on federal and state level, SMEs, German Aerospace Center) BGR developed the concept of the InSAR based German National Ground Motion Service. One important backbone for the nationwide ground motion service is the so-called Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Wide Area Product (WAP) approach developed with grants of European research funds. The presentation shows the implementation of the ground motion service and examples for product developments for operational supervision of mining, water resources management and spatial planning. Furthermore the contributions of Copernicus Sentinel 1 radar data in the context of CTBT are discussed. The DInSAR processing of Sentinel 1 IW (Interferometric Wide Swath) SAR acquisitions from January 1st and 13th Jan. 2016 allow for the first time a near real time ground motion measurement of the North Korean nuclear test site. The measured ground displacements show a strong spatio-temporal correlation to the calculated epicenter measured by teleseismic stations. We are convinced this way another space technique will soon contribute even

  20. Converses amb Cèsar Coll

    OpenAIRE

    Valls, Enric

    1992-01-01

    sar Coll i Salvador, Catedràtic de Psicologia Evolutiva i de l'Educació a la Facultat de Psicologia de la Universitat de Barcelona, ha estat al capdavant de la Reforma educativa des dels primers moments, com a redactor del Marc curricular per a l'ensenyament obligatori (Barcelona, 1986), com a propulsor de la reflexió per a l'elaboració dels dissenys curriculars, com a coordinador d'un grup de discussió i recerca per al desenvolupament del currículum a la Universitat, com a consultor de ref...