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Sample records for sarotherodon melanotheron acclimatised

  1. espèce de tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron melanothero

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci-Nat

    L'étude comparative de la variabilité morphologique de quatre populations naturelles de Sarotherodon melanotheron melanotheron révèle l'existence de différenciations significatives et importantes entre ces dernières. 16 des 24 caractères analysés sont discriminants et permettent, par leur combinaison, de caractériser ...

  2. Impact of environmental DDT concentrations on gill adaptation to increased salinity in the tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, Virginie; Ndiaye, Awa; Budzinski, Hélène; Dugué, Rémi; Le Ménach, Karyn; Combes, Yan; Bossus, Maryline; Durand, Jean-Dominique; Charmantier, Guy; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Estuaries of tropical developing countries suffering from severe droughts induced by climate change are habitats to fish, which face drastic salinity variations and the contact with pollutants. The Western Africa tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron is highly resistant to hypersalinity, but the effect of human-released xenobiotics on its adaptation is barely known. Controlled experiments were conducted to observe S. melanotheron gill adaptation to abrupt salinity variations in the presence of waterborne DDT, at concentrations detected in their natural habitat. The gills appeared as an important site of DDT conversion to DDD and/or depuration. A 12-days DDT exposure resulted in decreased gill epithelium thickness at all salinities (from fresh- to hypersaline-water), and the structure of gills from freshwater fish was particularly altered, relative to controls. No unbalance in tilapia blood osmolality was observed following DDT exposure, which however caused a decrease in branchial Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity. Gill cellular NKA expression was reduced in salt-water, together with the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in hypersaline water. Although S. melanotheron seems very resistant (especially in seawater) to short-term waterborne DDT contamination, the resulting alterations of the gill tissue, cells and enzymes might affect longer term respiration, toxicant depuration and/or osmoregulation in highly fluctuating salinities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA barcoding of Clarias gariepinus, Coptodon zillii and Sarotherodon melanotheron from Southwestern Nigeria [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mofolusho O. Falade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding has been adopted as a gold standard rapid, precise and unifying identification system for animal species and provides a database of genetic sequences that can be used as a tool for universal species identification. In this study, we employed mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI for the identification of some Nigerian freshwater catfish and Tilapia species. Approximately 655 bp were amplified from the 5′ region of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI gene whereas 570 bp were amplified for the 16S rRNA gene. Nucleotide divergences among sequences were estimated based on Kimura 2-parameter distances and the genetic relationships were assessed by constructing phylogenetic trees using the neighbour-joining (NJ and maximum likelihood (ML methods. Analyses of consensus barcode sequences for each species, and alignment of individual sequences from within a given species revealed highly consistent barcodes (99% similarity on average, which could be compared with deposited sequences in public databases. The nucleotide distance between species belonging to different genera based on COI ranged from 0.17% between Sarotherodon melanotheron and Coptodon zillii to 0.49% between Clarias gariepinus and C. zillii, indicating that S. melanotheron and C. zillii are closely related. Based on the data obtained, the utility of COI gene was confirmed in accurate identification of three fish species from Southwest Nigeria.

  4. Sexual dimorphism in black jaw tiliapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron and banded jewelfish (Hemichromis fasciatus from the Great Kwa River, Calabar, Nigeria

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    Ibor Oju Richard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the pattern and magnitude of sexual dimorphic differences have been investigated in black jaw tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron (n = 160; 74 males and 86 females and banded jewelfish (Hemichromis fasciatus (n = 120; 42 males and 78 females from the Great Kwa River, Calabar, Nigeria. Fish samples were collected between July and December 2015. Fourteen morphometric variables, including body weight, total length, standard length, body depth, cheek depth, pre-orbital length, postorbital length, pectoral fin length (right and left, pelvic fin length (right and left, head length, gonad weight, eye diameter and four meristic variables, including number of pectoral fins (right and left and number of pelvic fins (right and left, were taken using standard methods. Size-adjusted morphometric measurements subjected to step-wise discriminant function analysis were used to determine predictor variables to morphologically differentiate sexes for both species; magnitude of dimorphism between sexes was estimated using percentage classification accuracy of the discriminant function analysis. From the discriminant function analysis, the pectoral fin length and gonad weight positively contributed significantly to morphometric dimorphism (magnitude=69.2% in male and female S. melanotheron suggesting adaptation for reproductive function; while for H. fasciatus the body depth and standard length were important contributors to sexual dimorphism (magnitude=84.2% suggesting size dimorphism for aggressiveness, territorial behavior and improving swimming performance. Overall, our results indicate that the different magnitude of sexual dimorphism between the two species could be attributable to the type and functional role of sexual dimorphic traits.

  5. [cDNA cloning and tissue-differential expression of Na+/K+/2Cl(-)-cotransporter 1-alpha isoform in Sarotherodon melanotheron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wu-Jiang; Li, Si-Fa

    2010-12-01

    The gills are the major apparatus for osmoregulation in fish to acclimate the changes of salinities. Na+/K+/2Cl(-)cotransporter 1-alpha (NKCC1 alpha) is one of the key ion cotransporter locoalized in gill chloride cells which has been associated with the maintence of osmotic homeostasis. The transport process mediated by NKCC1 alpha is characterized by electroneutrality with a stoichiometry of 1Na:1K:2Cl. Sarotherodon melanotheron is one of the most euryhaline teleosts able to withstand variations in environmental salinity ranging from freshwater to hyper-saline waters. In this study, the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of 3' and 5'cDNA ends methods were used to identify the full cDNA of the NKCC1 alpha with an Open Reading Frame which contains 1 151aa of S.melanotheron. The amino acid multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that this isoform is more similar with isoforms in Oreochromis mossambicus, Salmo salar and Anguilla anguilla, and there is the highest homologous of 99% between Sarotherodon and Mossambique. The predicted protein secondly structure of NKCC1 alpha contains 10 transmenbrane domains, which were highly conserved in sequences and locoalization sites relatively to other species. The quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed to estimate the mRNA expression levels in gill, liver, intestine and kidney in freshwater, the results showed a tissue-specific model. Furthermore, the sanility significantly affects the relative expression level of NKCC1 alpha mRNA in gill with a 4.9 times higher in 136 salinity water than that in 0 salinity. The results suggest that the NKCC1 alpha is closely related to the salt tolerance in S.melanotheron.

  6. Fish condition factor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptors and biotransformation responses in Sarotherodon melanotheron from a contaminated freshwater dam (Awba Dam) in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Onoja, Anyebe B; Arukwe, Augustine

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between condition factor (CF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), phase 1 biotransformation (CYP1A isoforms) and contaminant burden has been studied in Sarotherodon melanotheron from a contaminated tropical freshwater dam (Awba Dam) and compared to a reference site (Modete Dam) in Southwest, Nigeria. A total of 89 fish (57 males and 32 females) was collected from Awba Dam and 95 fish (48 males and 47 females) from the reference site. In general, fish sampled from Awba Dam were bigger than reference site. Sediment samples were also collected from both sites for contaminant analysis. Expression of ppar and cyp1 isoforms was analyzed using validated real-time PCR, while CYP1A and PPAR protein levels were analyzed using immunochemical method with specific antibodies. CYP-mediated catalytic responses (EROD, MROD and BROD) were performed by biochemical methods. We observed significant increases in ppar and cyp1 isoforms mRNA in both male and female fish from Awba Dam, compared to the reference site. Catalytic activities of EROD, MROD and BROD paralleled cyp1 transcript levels. Sex-related differences in PPAR and CYP1A protein levels were also observed, showing higher CYP1A proteins in males, compared with females, and higher PPAR proteins in females compared with males. Principal component analysis (PCA) biplot showed positive relationships between biological responses (ppar isoforms), condition factor (CF) and sediment PCBs, PAHs, OCPs and heavy metal concentrations. The present study shows that S. melanotheron inhabiting Awba Dam are severely affected by different classes of environmental contaminants that target metabolic processes (PPAR) and biotransformation pathways (CYP1A) in male and female fish, compared to a reference site. Interestingly, fish from Awba Dam were exhibiting good growth (evidence by high CF values) that paralleled increases in the transcriptional activation of ppar and cyp1 isoforms, despite the high

  7. Levels of Platinum Group Metals in Selected Species (Sarotherodon melanotheron, Chonophorus lateristriga, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii and Crassostrea tulipa in Some Estuaries and Lagoons Along the Coast of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Essumang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of some biota as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution has been demonstrated as particularly adequate due to their capacity of bioconcentration. This study evaluated the levels of platinum group metals (PGMs in some selected species along the coastal belt of Ghana, using the neutron activation analysis (NAA method. The result was processed to evaluate pollution indices in order to map the distribution of the metals in those species in the lagoons and estuaries along the costal belt of Ghana. The analysis showed significant levels of all PGMs in blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron Cichlidae, brown goby (Chonophorus lateristriga Gobiidae, shrimp (Macrobrachium vollenhovenii Palaemonidae, and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea tulipa Ostreidae in the lagoons and river Pra estuary. However, the oysters showed an elevated mean concentration of 0.13 μ/g (dry weight Pd. From the pollution indices, most of the sampling sites registered mean contamination factor (CF values between 1.20 and 3.00 for Pt, Pd, and Rh. The pollution load index (PLI conducted also gave an average pollution index between 0.79 and 2.37, indicating progressive contamination levels. The results revealed that anthropogenic sources, industrial and hospital effluent, etc., together with vehicular emissions, could be the contributing factors to the deposition of PGMs along the Ghanaian coast.

  8. ( Sarotherodon Melanotheron ) from Lagos Lagoon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increases in industrial activities and rapid urban development which occur along the shores of the lagoon have resulted in serious pollution problems. The release of wastes containing hazardous substances and dumping of waste indiscriminately into water bodies could lead to environmental disturbance that might be ...

  9. Growth, Mortality and Exploitation Rates of Sarotherodon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evans

    ABSTRACT. Sarotherodon melanotheron population of Dominli Lagoon in the Western Region of Ghana was studied for its growth and mortality parameters as well as exploitation rate. The study generally aimed at providing basic information necessary for the assessment and management of the fish stock in the lagoon.

  10. Morphometric Variations in Sarotherodon melanotheron (Pisces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    counted on the opercular bone lifting. Scales on both lateral lines .... they still remain dependable tools to characterize fish species especially on the field and they are sensitive to any environmental ... differences in BD, CPD, and the number of scales and gill rakers could mark the beginning of differentiation between the ...

  11. espèce de tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron melanothero

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci-Nat

    A phylogenetic reanalysis of allozyme variation among populations of Galapagos finches. Zool. J. Linn. Soc., 118: 119–134. Teugels G. G. & Thys van den Audenaerde D. F.. E., 2003. Cichlidae. In Lévêque, D. Paugy et G.G.. Teugels Eds., Faune des poissons d'eaux douces et saumâtres de l'Afrique de l'Ouest. Tome II.C.,.

  12. Adipose tissue cells in cold-acclimatised sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, R W; Leat, W M; Chauca, D; Peacock, M A; Bligh, J

    1978-07-01

    The morphology and lipid content of adipose tissue from sheep subjected to cold acclimatisation were examined. In two sheep the perirenal adipose tissue contained virtually no triglyceride (less than 2 mg/100 mg wet tissue) and the appearance on electron microscopy was typical of that of a depleted white fat cell. The morphological, chemical and physiological evidence indicates that, in the sheep, white adipose tissue does not revert to brown adipose tissue during depletion resulting from cold acclimatisation.

  13. Plasticity of gene expression according to salinity in the testis of broodstock and F1 black-chinned tilapia, Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avarre, Jean-Christophe; Guinand, Bruno; Dugué, Rémi; Cosson, Jacky; Legendre, Marc; Panfili, Jacques; Durand, Jean-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    ...) displays remarkable acclimation capacities. When exposed to drastic changes of salinity, which can be the case in its natural habitat, it develops quick physiological responses and keeps reproducing...

  14. Couverture des besoins énergétiques des poissons tropicaux en aquaculture : purification et comparaison des amylases de deux tilapias Oreochromisniloticus et Sarotherodon melanotheron

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Yann

    2001-01-01

    La couverture des besoins énergétiques alimentaires a été étudiée chez des poissons tropicaux utilisés en aquaculture et connus pour leur meilleure utilisation de l'énergie non-protéique. Ces besoins ont été évalués, et l'utilisation de l'amidon évaluée comme source potentielle d'énergie alimentaire. Les besoins ont été déterminés en fournissant des rations croissantes d'un aliment unique, riche en protéines, ne pouvant avoir d'effet limitant. L'utilisation de l'amidon a été étudiée par calor...

  15. Effects of photoperiod, growth temperature and cold acclimatisation on glucosinolates, sugars and fatty acids in kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindal, Anne Linn Hykkerud; Rødven, Rolf; Hansen, Espen; Mølmann, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Curly kale is a robust, cold tolerant plant with a high content of health-promoting compounds, grown at a range of latitudes. To assess the effects of temperature, photoperiod and cold acclimatisation on levels of glucosinolates, fatty acids and soluble sugars in kale, an experiment was set up under controlled conditions. Treatments consisted of combinations of the temperatures 15/9 or 21/15 °C, and photoperiods of 12 or 24h, followed by a cold acclimatisation period. Levels of glucosinolates and fatty acid types in leaves were affected by growth conditions and cold acclimatisation, being generally highest before acclimatisation. The effects of growth temperature and photoperiod on freezing tolerance were most pronounced in plants grown without cold acclimatisation. The results indicate that cold acclimatisation can increase the content of soluble sugar and can thereby improve the taste, whilst the content of unsaturated fatty and glucosinolates acids may decrease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Différenciation morphologique des populations naturelles d\\'une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparative survey of morphometric variability of four natural populations of Sarotherodon melanotheron melanotheron reveals meaningful and important differentiations between them. 16 of the 24 characters analyzed are ... Keywords: Biometry, adaptation, Cichlidae, lagoon, Lake, West Africa. Sciences & Nature Vol.

  17. Is decision making in hypoxia affected by pre-acclimatisation? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, Martin; Weisleitner, Andreas; Lamm, Claus; Ledochowski, Larissa; Frühauf, Anika; Wille, Maria; Burtscher, Martin; Kopp, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Decision making is impaired in hypoxic environments, which may have serious or even lethal consequences for mountaineers. An acclimatisation period prior to high altitude exposures may help to overcome adverse effects of hypoxia. Thus, we investigated possible effects of short-term pre-acclimatisation on decision making in hypoxia. In a randomized controlled study design, 52 healthy participants were allocated to a hypoxia group (HG: short-term pre-acclimatisation by the use of intermittent hypoxia 7×1h at FiO2=12.6%, equivalent to 4500m) or a control group (CG: sham pre-acclimatisation 7×1h at FiO2=20.9%, equivalent to 600m). The number of risky decisions was assessed using the Game of Dice Task at four time points during a 12-hours stay in hypoxia (FiO2=12.6%). 42 (HG: 27, CG: 25) participants completed the study. The number of risky decisions was significantly (p=0.048 as determined by 4×2 ANCOVA) reduced in the hypoxia group compared to the control group, partial η(2)=0.11, when the age-effect on decision making was controlled. Self-reported positive affective valence prior to decision making was negatively related to the number of risky decisions, rdecision making in hypoxia in a positive way and might be considered as a risk-reducing preparation method prior to exposures to hypoxic environments. Positive affective states seem to have a medium-sized protective effect against risky decision making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of pre-cooling on repeat-sprint performance in seasonally acclimatised males during an outdoor simulated team-sport protocol in warm conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brade, Carly J; Dawson, Brian T; Wallman, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of precooling on repeat-sprint performance during a simulated team-sport circuit performed outdoors in warm, dry field conditions in seasonally acclimatised males (n = 10...

  19. EFFECT OF PRE-COOLING ON REPEAT-SPRINT PERFORMANCE IN SEASONALLY ACCLIMATISED MALES DURING AN OUTDOOR SIMULATED TEAM-SPORT PROTOCOL IN WARM CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly J. Brade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether precooling is beneficial for exercise performance in warm climates when heat acclimatised is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of precooling on repeat-sprint performance during a simulated team-sport circuit performed outdoors in warm, dry field conditions in seasonally acclimatised males (n = 10. They performed two trials, one with precooling (PC; ice slushy and cooling jacket and another without (CONT. Trials began with a 30-min baseline/cooling period followed by an 80 min repeat-sprint protocol, comprising 4 x 20-min quarters, with 2 x 5-min quarter breaks and a 10-min half-time recovery/cooling period. A clear and substantial (negative; PC slower effect was recorded for first quarter circuit time. Clear and trivial effects were recorded for overall circuit time, third and fourth quarter sprint times and fourth quarter best sprint time, otherwise unclear and trivial effects were recorded for remaining performance variables. Core temperature was moderately lower (Cohen's d=0.67; 90% CL=-1.27, 0.23 in PC at the end of the precooling period and quarter 1. No differences were found for mean skin temperature, heart rate, thermal sensation, or rating of perceived exertion, however, moderate Cohen's d effect sizes suggested a greater sweat loss in PC compared with CONT. In conclusion, repeat- sprint performance was neither clearly nor substantially improved in seasonally acclimatised players by using a combination of internal and external cooling methods prior to and during exercise performed in the field in warm, dry conditions. Of practical importance, precooling appears unnecessary for repeat-sprint performance if athletes are seasonally acclimatised or artificially acclimated to heat, as it provides no additional benefit

  20. A Fischery Closing Proposal in Ayamé's Dam in Order to a Rational Management (Ivory Coast

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    Ladokun, AO.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of 10 main commercial fish species of Ayamé man-made lake, Ivory Coast, is discussed and their reproductive cycles are analyzed. Two proposals are made for rational stock management, based on the protection of the breeding seasons of the major species, particularly Sarotherodon melanotheron, which forms more than 50% of the landed biomass. The first proposal is to declare a three-month universal closed season from March to May, coinciding with the sexual maturation peak of Sarotherodon melanotheron as well as with a period of intense fishing activity. The second proposal, which takes into account the lake's two-compartment morphology, and the duration of the breeding season of Sarotherodon melanotheron, is to proclaim alternating closed seasons in the two compartments throughout that three-months breeding season.

  1. The status of fish diversity and fisheries of the Keta lagoon, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fish and fisheries of three fish landing sites around the Keta lagoon in Ghana have been studied. A total of 18 fish species belonging to 13 families were encountered in the study. Four of the species were found to be commercially important notably, the cichlids (Tilapia guineensis and Sarotherodon melanotheron), the ...

  2. 2763-IJBCS-Article-Tandji Olivier Amoussou

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Olivier AMOUSSOU exprime également sa gratitude à l'endroit de l'Union Européenne pour lui avoir accordé une bourse complémentaire de Doctorat à travers le projet HAAGRIM (Programme de mobilité universitaire. INTRA-ACP). RESUME. A l'instar du tilapia du Nil Oreochromis niloticus, Sarotherodon melanotheron, ...

  3. Co-Parasitism And Morphometrics Of Three Clinostomatids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In ever competitive environment of nature, evolution of most attributes of an organism - anatomy,physiology, and behaviour are determined by the environment through selection. The same is the microhabitats of Sarotherodon melanotheron where three Clinostomatids; Clinostomum tilapiae, Clinostomum complanatum, and ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 5, No 2 (2003), Existence d'une proteine de diapause dans l'hemolymphe de callosobruchus maculatus f. (coleoptera : bruchidae) ravageur du niebe, Abstract. ET Zannou, AI Glitho, J Huignard, A Sanni, C Dossou. Vol 17, No 1 (2013), Facteur De Condition De Sarotherodon melanotheron (Pisces, Cichlidae) Dans Les ...

  5. Growth, feed efficiency and carcass mineral composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of substitution dietary fish protein by soybean protein on growth, survival, biochemical composition and mineral composition of juvenile Heterobranchus longifilis, Sarotherodon melanotheron and Oreochromis niloticus were evaluated. Three diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous (35% crude protein) by ...

  6. Effects of pollution on oxidative stress in aquatic species: case of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to assess heavy metals accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in the fish Sarotherodon melanotheron from a site receiving discharges from industrial and harbor activities (Bè Lagoon) and a reference or control site in Lake Togo, Togo. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) targeting four ...

  7. Variations saisonnières des indices épidémiologiques de trois ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les valeurs des indices épidémiologiques des monogènes branchiaux parasites de. Sarotherodon melanotheron sont présentées dans le tableau 1. Ce tableau montre que les paramètres d'infestation (prévalence, intensité moyenne et abondance) des trois parasites. Cichlidogyrus halli, Scutogyrus minus et C. acerbus.

  8. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ofori-Danson, PK. Vol 14, No 1 (2009) - Articles Exploitation Rates and Management Implications for the Fisheries of Bontanga Reservoir in the Northern Region of Ghana Abstract PDF · Vol 10, No 1 (2006) - Articles Food and feeding habit of Sarotherodon melanotheron, Rüppell, 1852 (Pisces: Cichlidae) in Sakumo ...

  9. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chinned Tilapia, Sarotherodon Melanotheron in the Aglor Lagoon in Ghana Abstract. ISSN: 0855-3823. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  10. Comparative study of mercury accumulation in some brackish water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Generally, higher mercury values were recorded in sediment than in the water in both the lagoon and the creek. For the fish species 0.72. ± 0.05 µg/g of Hg was detected in Sarotherodon melanotheron, more than in both Tilapia guineensis and. Hemichromis fasciatus, this is related mainly to the mode of feeding. Hg content ...

  11. Growth pattern, condition factor and heavy metal concentration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth pattern, condition factor and heavy metals concentrations in tissues of Sarotherodon melanotheron from Lagos Lagoon were investigated from April to July 2013. The Lagos Lagoon has been under intensified pollution, which affects fish and poses a public health risk. The size of the 55 specimens of S.

  12. Histological and biochemical evaluations of the liver and kidney of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate the toxicity of fish captured with Tephrosia Vogelii (TV), an ichtyotoxic plant, the Wistar albino rats were fed with the flour of tilapias Sarotherodon melanotheron poisoned with TV leaves powder. This study aimed to evaluate the poisonous effects of TV on various organs of rats, especially the liver and kidney.

  13. HAEMATOLOGICAL INDICES AND ENZYMATIC BIOMAKER OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGROSEARCH UIL

    out on the fish to ascertain the normal range of blood parameter, find out the variation with age, sex, season, and determine the effects of disease condition on the fish. This study is aimed at assessing the enzymatic biomarkers and haematological indices of Tilapia specie (Sarotherodon melanotheron) of the Lagos lagoon.

  14. Growth, feed efficiency and carcass mineral composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... diets. In these proteins, soybean meal has one of the most plant proteins used for substituting fish meal in the world (Yigit et al., 2010). This ingredient has ..... parable growth and feed utilization in tilapia Sarotherodon galilaeus fed soybean meal diet with those fish meal based diet. Since S. melanotheron is ...

  15. 1687-IJBCS-Article-Siméon M. Fagnon+

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pr GATSING

    A partir de 900 spécimens de poissons, une étude de la caractérisation morphologique des populations de Sarotherodon melanotheron melanotheron a été réalisée dans six plans d'eau au sud et au centre du Bénin. Les données ont été collectées de juillet à septembre 2011 dans le Lac Nokoué, la Lagune de Porto Novo, ...

  16. Survival response of Sarotheron melanotheron (Ruppel, 1852 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , 13% after 24 hours, 20% after 36 hours and 7% mortality after 48 hours. This increased to 43% after 60 hours and remained at 47% mortality from the 72nd hour till the end of experiment. At concentration level 5.6mg/l, mortality was 43%

  17. 1528-IJBCS-Article-Yao Kouakou

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Cette étude a évalué les performances zootechniques des hybrides F2 issus du croisement intergénérique entre Oreochromis niloticus et Sarotherodon melanotheron et comparé à celles des parents en élevage en milieu lagunaire. Des essais de pré grossissement en élevage monosexe mâle et femelle ont été réalisés ...

  18. An Investigation into the Food and Feeding Ecology of Sarotherodon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diet indices such as percentage composition by number and frequency of occurrence methods used to analyze the stomach contents which showed that the food items covered a wide range of diatoms, desmids, blue green algae, green algae, protozoan, detritus and unidentified plants material suggesting that the fish ...

  19. Pen Culture of the Black-Chinned Tilapia, Sarotherodon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the second treatment, bamboo was stacked at a density of 6 per metre square in pens to serve as substrate for periphyton growth and development. In the third ... From the results, the least yield was obtained from the unfed control pen (0.045 kg/m2), whilst the highest was from the bamboo equipped pens (0.183 kg/m2).

  20. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic...

  1. Permanent genetic resources added to molecular ecology resources database 1 December 2012-31 January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Silvia E; Avarre, Jean-Christophe; Balasundaram, Chellam; Bouza, Carmen; Calcaterra, Nora B; Cezilly, Frank; Chen, Shi-long; Cipriani, Guido; Cruz, V P; D'Esposito, D; Daniel, Carla; Dejean, Alain; Dharaneedharan, Subramanian; Díaz, Juan; Du, Man; Durand, Jean-Dominique; Dziadek, Jarosław; Foresti, F; Peng-cheng, Fu; Gao, Qing-bo; García, Graciela; Gauffre-Autelin, Pauline; Giovino, Antonio; Goswami, Mukunda; Guarino, Carmine; Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Verónica; Harris, D J; Heo, Moon-Soo; Khan, Gulzar; Kim, Mija; Lakra, Wazir S; Lauth, Jérémie; Leclercq, Pierre; Lee, Jeonghwa; Lee, Seung-Ho; Lee, Soohyung; Lee, Theresa; Li, Yin-hu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Shufang; Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Mandhan, Rishi Pal; Martinez, Paulino; Mayer, Veronika E; Mendel, Jan; Mendes, N J; Mendonça, F F; Minias, Alina; Minias, Piotr; Oh, Kyeong-Suk; Oliveira, C; Orivel, Jérôme; Orsini, L; Pardo, Belén G; Perera, A; Procaccini, G; Rato, C; Ríos, Néstor; Scibetta, Silvia; Sharma, Bhagwati S; Sierens, Tim; Singh, Akhilesh; Terer, Taita; Triest, Ludwig; Urbánková, Soňa; Vera, Manuel; Villanova, Gabriela V; Voglmayr, Hermann; Vyskočilová, Martina; Wang, Hongying; Wang, Jiu-li; Wattier, Rémi A; Xing, Rui; Yadav, Kamalendra; Yin, Guibo; Yuan, Yanjiao; Yun, Jong-Chul; Zhang, Fa-qi; Zhang, Jing-hua; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2013-05-01

    This article documents the addition of 268 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alburnoides bipunctatus, Chamaerops humilis, Chlidonias hybrida, Cyperus papyrus, Fusarium graminearum, Loxigilla barbadensis, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Odontesthes bonariensis, Pelteobagrus vachelli, Posidonia oceanica, Potamotrygon motoro, Rhamdia quelen, Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii, Sibiraea angustata, Takifugu rubripes, Tarentola mauritanica, Trimmatostroma sp. and Wallago attu. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Alburnoides fasciatus, Alburnoides kubanicus, Alburnoides maculatus, Alburnoides ohridanus, Alburnoides prespensis, Alburnoides rossicus, Alburnoides strymonicus, Alburnoides thessalicus, Alburnoides tzanevi, Carassius carassius, Fusarium asiaticum, Leucaspius delineatus, Loxigilla noctis dominica, Pelecus cultratus, Phoenix canariensis, Potamotrygon falkneri, Trachycarpus fortune and Vimba vimba. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Effect of different types of fertilizer on the growth of Sarotherodon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cost of feed has been recognized as a major factor affecting the development and expansion of aquaculture in Nigeria. This is due to the fact that feed ingredients normally used for fish diets are seriously competed for by the livestock feed industry as well as for human consumption. The effect is that the potential for ...

  3. Gastrointestinal Helminth Parasites Community of Fish Species in a Niger Delta Tidal Creek, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ekata Ogbeibu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A pool of fish species in a Niger Delta tidal creek, Buguma Creek, Nigeria, collected monthly from November 2004 to June 2006, at flood tides, were examined for gastrointestinal helminth parasites. The fish species were caught with hooks and lines and cast nets. Only nematode parasites were encountered in the study. Of the 1,149 fish specimens examined, 213 (representing 18.5% were infected with various nematodes parasites. Dasyatis margarita had the highest prevalence rate of 66.7% (2 infected out of 3 examined, followed by Pseudotolithus (Pseudotolithus senegalensis with a prevalence of 41.7% (10 infected out of 24, while the least infected were Arius gigas and Pomadasys jubelini with prevalence of 3.8% and 1.4%, respectively. No infection was recorded in Elops lacerta, Gobius sp., Lutjanus agennes, L. goreensis, Argyrosomus regius, Sphyraena guachancho, S. sphyraena, Cynoglossus senegalensis, Sarotherodon melanotheron, Tilapia guineensis, Liza falcipinnis, Mugil cephalus, and M. curema. The nematode parasites, Capillaria zederi, and Aplectana hamatospicula had the highest prevalence of 33.3% in D. margarita. Laurotravassoxyuris sp. also had the same prevalence in Trichiurus lepturus. Goezia sigalasi had the second highest prevalence of 12.5% in P. (Fonticulus elongatus which had the highest number examined, due to its high dominance in the water.

  4. Phytoremediation of wastewater toxicity using water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Kouamé Kouamé; Séka, Yapoga; Norbert, Kouadio Kouakou; Sanogo, Tidou Abiba; Celestin, Atsé Boua

    2016-10-02

    This paper elucidates the phytoremediation potential of water hyacinth and water lettuce on the reduction of wastewater toxicity. Acute toxicity tests were performed in an aquarium with a population of Sarotherodon melanotheron, contaminated by different concentrations of wastewaters before and after phytoremediation with Eichhornia crassipes and Pistia stratiotes. Lethal concentrations (LC50) of the fish's population obtained during 24 hours of exposures were determined. COD, BOD, ammonium, TKN and PO4(3-) concentrations in wastewaters were of 1850.29, 973.33, 38.34, 61.49 and 39.23 mg L(-1), respectively, for each plant. Phytoremediation reduced 58.87% of ammonium content, 50.04% of PO4(3-), 82.45% of COD and 84.91% of BOD. After 15 days of the experiment, metal contents in treated wastewaters decreased from 6.65 to 97.56% for water hyacinth and 3.51 to 93.51% for water lettuce tanks. Toxicity tests showed that the mortality of fish exposed increased with increase in concentration of pollutants in wastewaters and the time of exposure. Therefore, the highest value of LC50 was recorded for fish subjected to 3 hours of exposure (16.37%). The lowest rate was obtained after an exposure of 20 to 24 hours (5.85%). After phytoremediation, the effluents purified by Eichhornia crassipes can maintain the fish life beyond 24 hours of exposure.

  5. A clarification of the origins of birds released by the Otago Acclimatisation Society from 1876 to 1882

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pipek, P.; Pyšek, Petr; Blackburn, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2015), s. 105-112 ISSN 0029-4470 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1002 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : bird invasions * historical records * New Zealand Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  6. An Ocean Acidification Acclimatised Green Tide Alga Is Robust to Changes of Seawater Carbon Chemistry but Vulnerable to Light Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Gao

    Full Text Available Ulva is the dominant genus in the green tide events and is considered to have efficient CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. However, little is understood regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the CCMs of Ulva and the consequences of thalli's acclimation to ocean acidification in terms of responding to environmental factors. Here, we grew a cosmopolitan green alga, Ulva linza at ambient (LC and elevated (HC CO2 levels and investigated the alteration of CCMs in U. linza grown at HC and its responses to the changed seawater carbon chemistry and light intensity. The inhibitors experiment for photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization demonstrated that acidic compartments, extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA and intracellular CA worked together in the thalli grown at LC and the acquisition of exogenous carbon source in the thalli could be attributed to the collaboration of acidic compartments and extracellular CA. Contrastingly, when U. linza was grown at HC, extracellular CA was completely inhibited, acidic compartments and intracellular CA were also down-regulated to different extents and thus the acquisition of exogenous carbon source solely relied on acidic compartments. The down-regulated CCMs in U. linza did not affect its responses to changes of seawater carbon chemistry but led to a decrease of net photosynthetic rate when thalli were exposed to increased light intensity. This decrease could be attributed to photodamage caused by the combination of the saved energy due to the down-regulated CCMs and high light intensity. Our findings suggest future ocean acidification might impose depressing effects on green tide events when combined with increased light exposure.

  7. Effect of blood haemoglobin concentration on V(O2,max) and cardiovascular function in lowlanders acclimatised to 5260 m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Rådegran, G; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2002-01-01

    )) and the measurements were repeated, increasing the work rate as tolerated. Hyperoxia increased maximal power output and leg V(O(2),max), showing that breathing ambient air at 5260 m, V(O(2),max) is limited by the availability of O(2) rather than by muscular oxidative capacity. Altitude increased [Hb] by 36 % from 136...... and maximal V(O(2)) was thus maintained by higher O(2) extraction. While CO increased linearly with work rate irrespective of [Hb] or inspired oxygen fraction (F(I,O(2))), both LBF and leg vascular conductance were systematically higher when [Hb] was low. Close and significant relationships were seen between...

  8. An Ocean Acidification Acclimatised Green Tide Alga Is Robust to Changes of Seawater Carbon Chemistry but Vulnerable to Light Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang; Liu, Yameng; Li, Xinshu; Feng, Zhihua; Xu, Juntian

    2016-01-01

    Ulva is the dominant genus in the green tide events and is considered to have efficient CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). However, little is understood regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the CCMs of Ulva and the consequences of thalli's acclimation to ocean acidification in terms of responding to environmental factors. Here, we grew a cosmopolitan green alga, Ulva linza at ambient (LC) and elevated (HC) CO2 levels and investigated the alteration of CCMs in U. linza grown at HC and its responses to the changed seawater carbon chemistry and light intensity. The inhibitors experiment for photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization demonstrated that acidic compartments, extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) and intracellular CA worked together in the thalli grown at LC and the acquisition of exogenous carbon source in the thalli could be attributed to the collaboration of acidic compartments and extracellular CA. Contrastingly, when U. linza was grown at HC, extracellular CA was completely inhibited, acidic compartments and intracellular CA were also down-regulated to different extents and thus the acquisition of exogenous carbon source solely relied on acidic compartments. The down-regulated CCMs in U. linza did not affect its responses to changes of seawater carbon chemistry but led to a decrease of net photosynthetic rate when thalli were exposed to increased light intensity. This decrease could be attributed to photodamage caused by the combination of the saved energy due to the down-regulated CCMs and high light intensity. Our findings suggest future ocean acidification might impose depressing effects on green tide events when combined with increased light exposure.

  9. Summit metabolism and metabolic expansibility in Wahlberg's epauletted fruit bats (Epomophorus wahlbergi): seasonal acclimatisation and effects of captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnaar, Ingrid A; Bennett, Nigel C; Chimimba, Christian T; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2014-04-15

    Summit metabolism (M sum), the maximum rate of resting metabolic thermogenesis, has been found to be broadly correlated with climatic variables and the use of heterothermy in some endotherms. Far less is known about M sum and metabolic expansibility [ME, the ratio of M sum to basal metabolic rate (BMR)] in bats compared with many other endotherm taxa. We measured BMR and M sum during winter and summer in captive and wild populations of a pteropodid from the southern subtropics, Wahlberg's epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus wahlbergi) in Pretoria, South Africa. The M sum of fruit bats ranged from 5.178 ± 0.611 W (captive, summer) to 6.006 ± 0.890 W (captive, winter), and did not vary significantly between seasons. In contrast, BMR decreased by 17-25% in winter. The combination of seasonally stable M sum but flexible BMR resulted in ME being significantly higher in winter than in summer, ranging from 7.24 ± 1.49 (wild, summer) to 13.11 ± 2.14 (captive, winter). The latter value is well above the typical mammalian range. Moreover, both M sum and ME were significantly higher in captive bats than in wild individuals; we speculate this represents a phenotypic response to a reduction in exercise-associated heat production while in captivity. Our data for E. wahlbergi, combined with those currently available for other chiropterans, reveal that M sum in bats is highly variable compared with allometrically expected values for other mammals.

  10. Effect of blood haemoglobin concentration on V(O2,max) and cardiovascular function in lowlanders acclimatised to 5260 m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Rådegran, G; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2002-01-01

    of cardiac output (CO), blood pressure and muscular blood flow (LBF) during exercise. Eight Danish lowlanders (three females and five males; 24 +/- 0.6 years, mean +/- S.E.M.) performed submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer after 9 weeks at an altitude of 5260 m (Mt Chacaltaya, Bolivia......)) and the measurements were repeated, increasing the work rate as tolerated. Hyperoxia increased maximal power output and leg V(O(2),max), showing that breathing ambient air at 5260 m, V(O(2),max) is limited by the availability of O(2) rather than by muscular oxidative capacity. Altitude increased [Hb] by 36 % from 136...

  11. Endocrine-disruptor molecular responses, occurrence of intersex and gonado-histopathological changes in tilapia species from a tropical freshwater dam (Awba Dam) in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeogun, Aina O.; Onibonoje, Kolawole; Ibor, Oju R.; Omiwole, Roseline A.; Chukwuka, Azubuike V.; Ugwumba, Alex O.; Ugwumba, Adiaha A.A. [Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Arukwe, Augustine, E-mail: arukwe@bio.ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Occurrence and severity of intersex in Nigerian aquatic environment. • Estrogenic and reproductive developmental effects of effluents from a University community. • Biomarker of endocrine disruption in fish from a developing country. • Relationship between estrogenic responses and sediment contaminants burden in a dam used for University domestic water supply and for fisheries. • Possible health consequences of environmental contamination - Abstract: In the present study, the occurrence of endocrine disruptive responses in Tilapia species from Awba Dam has been investigated, and compared to a reference site (Modete Dam). The Awba Dam is a recipient of effluents from University of Ibadan (Nigeria) and several other anthropogenic sources. A total of 132 Tilapia species (Sarotherodon malenotheron (n = 57 and 32, males and females, respectively) and Tilapia guineensis (n = 23 and 20, males and females, respectively)) were collected from June to September 2014. At the reference site, samples of adult male and female S. melanotheron (48 males and 47 females) and T. guineensis (84 males and 27 females) were collected. Gonads were morphologically and histologically examined and gonadosomatic index (GSI) was calculated. Hepatic mRNA transcriptions of vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata protein (Zrp) genes were analyzed using validated RT-qPCR. Significant increase in Vtg and Zrp transcripts were observed in male tilapias from Awba Dam, compared to males from the reference site. In addition, male tilapias from Awba Dam produced significantly higher Vtg and Zrp mRNA, compared to females in June and July. However, at the natural peak spawning period in August and September, females produced, significantly higher Vtg and Zrp mRNA, compared to males. Fish gonads revealed varying incidence of intersex with a striking presence of two (2) pairs of testes and a pair of ovary in S. melanotheron from Awba Dam. The entire fish population examined at Awba Dam

  12. Assessment of trace element contamination and bioaccumulation in algae (Ulva lactuca), mussels (Perna perna), shrimp (Penaeus kerathurus), and fish (Mugil cephalus, Saratherondon melanotheron) along the Senegalese coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mamadou; Howsam, Michael; Diop, Cheikh; Goossens, Jean F; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid

    2016-02-15

    Concentrations of 11 elements were quantified in five marine species from different trophic levels of a food web (algae, mussel, shrimp and fish), representative for shallow Senegalese coastal waters, and including species of commercial importance. Significant differences in element concentrations and bioaccumulation were demonstrated, revealing the utility of employing a suite of organisms as bioindicators to monitor metal contamination in coastal areas. There was no clear seasonal pattern in concentration of elements, however inter-site differences were observed. Calculations of transfer factors for all the studied elements showed that transfer factors from water were greater than those from sediments. For shrimp and mussel, the concentrations of Pb and Cd were below the EU's maximum level for human consumption, however high concentrations of arsenic in shrimp were recorded at all sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Why are there so few freshwater fish species in most estuaries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, A K

    2015-04-01

    The freshwater fish assemblage in most estuaries is not as species rich as the marine assemblage in the same systems. Coupled with this differential richness is an apparent inability by most freshwater fish species to penetrate estuarine zones that are mesohaline (salinity: 5·0-17·9), polyhaline (salinity: 18·0-29·9) or euhaline (salinity: 30·0-39·9). The reason why mesohaline waters are avoided by most freshwater fishes is difficult to explain from a physiological perspective as many of these species would be isosmotic within this salinity range. Perhaps, a key to the poor penetration of estuarine waters by freshwater taxa is an inability to develop chloride cells in gill filament epithelia, as well as a lack of other osmoregulatory adaptations present in euryhaline fishes. Only a few freshwater fish species, especially some of those belonging to the family Cichlidae, have become fully euryhaline and have successfully occupied a wide range of estuaries, sometimes even dominating in hyperhaline systems (salinity 40+). Indeed, this review found that there are few fish species that can be termed holohaline (i.e. capable of occupying waters with a salinity range of 0-100+) and, of these taxa, there is a disproportionally high number of freshwater species (e.g. Cyprinodon variegatus, Oreochromis mossambicus and Sarotherodon melanotheron). Factors such as increased competition for food and higher predation rates by piscivorous fishes and birds may also play an important role in the low species richness and abundance of freshwater taxa in estuaries. Added to this is the relatively low species richness of freshwater fishes in river catchments when compared with the normally higher diversity of marine fish species for potential estuarine colonization from the adjacent coastal waters. The almost complete absence of freshwater fish larvae from the estuarine ichthyoplankton further reinforces the poor representation of this guild within these systems. An explanation as

  14. Biomarker responses as indicator of contaminant effects in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase (CAT) activities on the other hand were significantly decreased in liver of S. melanotheron from Agboyi creek in relation to reference location. The decrease of catalase (CAT) activity in the liver of S. melanotheron together with increase of SOD activity, could explain the increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in ...

  15. 225-IJBCS-Article-Dr A Toguyeni

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    Bounouna,. Dangouindougou, Tounoura) au Burkina Faso, a permis de recenser 40 espèces. Dans ces retenues,. Oreochromis niloticus, Tilapia zillii, Sarotherodon galilaeus (Cichlidae) et Heterotis niloticus (Osteoglossidae) sont les espèces les ...

  16. Use of slaughter house waste as a feed for shrimps and prawns

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Royan, J.P.; Krishnakumari, L.

    Feeding experiments with some shrimps and fishes (Metapenaeus monoceros, Metapenaeus dobsoni, Sarotherodon mossambicus and Etroplus suratensis) using slaughter house waste as food, showed that the shrimps and arotherodon were able to utilize...

  17. Analysis of Sedimentation Rates in the Densu River Channel: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST USER

    Abstract. The exploitation rates of eight major component fishery species, Auchenoglanis occidentalis, Brycinus nurse, Clarias gariepinus, Hemichromis fasciatus, Marcusenius senegalensis, Oreochromis niloticus, Sarotherodon galilaeus and. Tilapia zillii, of gill net fishery of Bontanga reservoir, were studied from March ...

  18. Potential for Introduction of Invasive Species into Louisiana from Illinois River Dredged Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Although not collected in the aforementioned surveys, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and the Asian clam ( Corbicula fluminea ) do occur in the...Sarotherodon, or Tilapia Tilapia Fish Tinca tinca Tench Mammals Myocastor coypus Nutria Mammals Sus scrofa Feral hog Mollusks Corbicula fluminea Asian...Oreochromis, Sarotherodon Tilapia Finfish PA Corbicula fluminea Asian clam Mollusk EE Dreissena polymorpha Zebra mussel Mollusk EE Perna perna Brown mussel

  19. Trace Metals in Water, Fish and Sediments from Elechi Creek, Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Freshwater Biology ... The concentration of trace metals: Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb), magnesium (Mn), Nickel (Ni) and Zinc (Zn) were determined in water, sediment and in the tissues of Sarontheron melanotheron, Tympanotonus fuscatus and Tilapia guineensis collected from Elechi creek in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

  20. Inoculum and zeolite synergistic effect on anaerobic digestion of poultry manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Zaganas, Ioannis D.

    2014-01-01

    zeolite dosages on the mesophilic AD of poultry manure inoculated with a non-acclimatised to ammonia inoculum (dairy manure) was investigated. Additionally, a comparative analysis was performed between the data extracted from this study and the results of a previous study which has been conducted under...... the same experimental conditions but with the use of ammonia acclimatised inoculum (swine manure). At 5 and 10 g zeolite L−1, the methane yield of poultry manure was 43.4% and 80.3% higher compared with the experimental set without zeolite addition. However, the ammonia non-acclimatised inoculum...... was not efficient in digesting poultry manure even in the presence of 10 g zeolite L−1, due to low methane production (only 39%) compared to the maximum theoretical yield. Finally, ammonia acclimatised inoculum and zeolite have demonstrated a possible “synergistic effect” which led to a more efficient AD of poultry...

  1. Dynamic Length Metrology (DLM) for measurements with sub-micrometre uncertainty in a production environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Conventional length metrology for traceable accurate measurements requires costly temperature controlled facilities, long waiting time for part acclimatisation, and separate part material characterisation. This work describes a method called Dynamic Length Metrology (DLM) developed to achieve sub...

  2. Salinity and survival of Martesia striata (Linn) in Cochin harbour

    OpenAIRE

    Cheriyan, P.V.; Cherian, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of salinity variations on the survival of Martesia striata from Cochin harbour are presented. It is observed that at least a few of the animals survive the low saline conditions during monsoon. Laboratory experiments showed the lethal salinity as 6‰ when animals acclimatised in 34‰ were subjected to abrupt changes in salinity. But acclimatisation to 17‰ salinity showed a downward shift in the lethal salinity to 4‰. The present observations indicate that M. striata is euryhaline ar...

  3. Growth Rates of Two African Catfishes Osteichthys: ( Clariidae ) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yields of two African catfishes, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell) and Heterobranchus longifilis (Valenciennes) in polyculture with Sarotherodon nilotica (Artedi) as trash fish were investigated over a 10 month period. The growth rate of H. longifilis was siginificantly higher (P < 0.05) than of C. gariepinus under identical culture ...

  4. An investigation into the food and feeding ecology of a potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation into the food and feeding ecology of a potential aquaculture candidate, Sarotherodon galilaeus multifasciatus in a meteoritic crater lake in Ghana. ... zones of the lake. Further studies to include growth and recruitment are recommended to enhance future production of the species under culture conditions .

  5. Determination of Heavy Metal Genotoxicity and their Accumulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: This study investigated bioaccumulation of heavy metals and cytogenotoxic effects that could result from exposure of fish to heavy metals in the Asa River, Ilorin, Nigeria. The three different fish species, Tilapia zilli, Oreochromis niloticus and Sarotherodon galilaeus were obtained from the Asa River and the ...

  6. An analysis of some heavy metals in the water, sediments and some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of heavy metals(Zn, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cu) in the muscle of three fishery organisms (Chrysicththys nigrodigitatus, Sarotherodon galilaeus and Peneaus monodon)and in environmental samples of waterand sediment were tested in Yewa Lagoon, Nigeria. Five fishing villages along the lagoon were selected as ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 708 ... Vol 39, No 1 (2014), Detection of land cover changes around Lake Mutirikwi, Zimbabwe, based on traditional remote sensing image classification techniques, Abstract. T Dube, W Gumindoga, M Chawira. Vol 42, No 2 (2017), Determination of water quality, and trace metals in endemic Sarotherodon ...

  8. 501-IJBCS-Article-Chioma Nzeh

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    Merlucciidae) in Chilean fjords. Fisheries Research, 83: 23-32. Fawole OO, Arawomo GAO. 2000. Fecundity of Sarotherodon galilaeus (Pisces: Cichlidae) in the Opa reservoir, Ile–Ife,. Nigeria. Revista the Biologia Tropical,. 48: 201-204. Holden M, Reed W. 1972. West African freshwater fish. Longman Group Ltd: Lond, 68p.

  9. 291-IJBCS-Article-Dr Elie Montchwui

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Gatsing

    Clarias gariepinus or allometric growth for. Heterotis niloticus, Gymnarchus niloticus,. Hepsetus odoe, Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus,. Parachanna obscura, Hemichromis fasciatus,. Tilapia mariae and Sarotherodon galilaeus. (Table 1). These results indicate that the growth in length is equal to the growth in weight for species ...

  10. Studies on Some Major and Trace Metals in Smoked and Oven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mineral (Li, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn and Pb) composition of each of five species of fish, including Sarotherodon galilaues, Cyprinus carpio, Clarias gariepinus, Sardinella spp. and Labeo spp. Was determined in samples previously dried, either by traditional smoking method, or in laboratory oven, to gain ...

  11. Exploitation Rates and Management Implications for the Fisheries of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exploitation rates of eight major component fishery species, Auchenoglanis occidentalis, Brycinus nurse, Clarias gariepinus, Hemichromis fasciatus, Marcusenius senegalensis, Oreochromis niloticus, Sarotherodon galilaeus and Tilapia zillii, of gill net fishery of Bontanga reservoir, were studied from March 2004 to ...

  12. Travelling with football teams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jet lag will have a negative effect on performance and players will need a day for every time zone crossed to acclimatise, i.e. allowing the body clock time to gradually adapt to the local time.5,12. Information on the availability of medical support services at the destination country, the size and health profile of the travelling.

  13. Ant colony induced decision trees for intrusion detection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botes, FH

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the ashes of Moore’s Law, companies have to acclimatise to the vast increase of data flowing through their networks. Reports on information breaches and hackers claiming ransom for company data are rampant. We live in a world where data...

  14. Zidovudine therapy: Effect(s) on histology of the kidney of wister rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the histo-morphological effect(s) of Zidovudine therapy on the kidney of Wister rats. Fifteen Wistar rats obtained from the Animal house of the College of Medicine, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria, were used for this study. A three week period of acclimatisation was allowed.

  15. The collapsed football pla yer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sello Motaung, BSc, MB ChB, DOH. FIFA Medical Officer and Honorary Part-time Lecturer, Wits Centre for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Johannesburg ... parts of the body that may be affected by blows that result in the collapse of a ... temperatures and humidity), especially if players are not acclimatised to such.

  16. Accumulation pattern of endogenous cytokinins and phenolics in different organs of 1-year-old cytokinin pre-incubated plants: implications for conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aremu, A.O.; Plačková, Lenka; Grúz, Jiří; Bíba, Ondřej; Šubrtová, Michaela; Novák, Ondřej; Doležal, Karel; van Staden, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2015), s. 1146-1155 ISSN 1435-8603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA MŠk LK21306 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Acclimatisation * conservation * meta-topolins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.216, year: 2015

  17. Drone Age Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    such physical movements and responses through vectors, droning, kinetics, telesomatics and volatility and in so doing unveils new modes of perception that acclimatise us for warfare. Drawing on theories from film-philosophy and a consideration of the aesthetics and phenomenology of war, this is an innovative...

  18. Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Altitude Acclimatisation' tells us about the physiological consequences we face when we go to higher alti- tudes; and 'Ramanujan's Circle', curiously, has nothing to do with the geometric figure but with the well-wishers and promot- ers who ...

  19. “IN VITRO” MULTIPLICATION OF CALENDULA OFFICINALIS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Vantu

    2015-09-01

    steps: the shoots were excised and transferred to fresh medium and then rooting of these shoots was achieved on the same medium with 0,02 mg/l benzylaminopurine and 1 mg/l 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The excised shoots were subcultured for roots induction. Regenerated plants were transferred to ex vitro conditions for an acclimatisation period.

  20. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 10, No 29 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro adventitious shoot regeneration and acclimatisation of Brassica oleracea subsp. italica cv. Green Marvel · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. SA Ravanfar, MA Aziz, MA Kadir, AA Rashid, F Haddadi, 5614-5619 ...

  1. Rutin has anti-asthmatic effects in an ovalbumin-induced asthmatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allergic asthma is a chronic airway disorder characterised by airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) ... °C, 40–60 % humidity) and were supplied with water and food ad libitum. The mice were acclimatised to ..... Ovalbumin induced allergic rhinitis and development of prediabetes to rats: possible role of.

  2. Heat-related illness in the African wilderness | Hofmeyr | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilderness heat-related illnesses span a variety of conditions caused by excessive or prolonged heat exposure, and/or the inability to compensate adequately for increased endogenous production during strenuous outdoor activities. Despite management of well-known risk factors, such as lack of fitness or acclimatisation, ...

  3. Efficacy of Clove flower bud powder as anaesthetic for three life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In S. melanotheron- The range of the induction time for the fingerlings, juveniles and adults from 5mg/l to 30mg/l were: 52.00 ± 4.71 - 107.40 ± 12.43s, 43.00 ± 4.83 - 98.70 ± 3.92s, and 45.60 ± 4.48 - 89.80 ± 3.93s, respectively. The recovery time at 5mg/l compared with that at 30 mg/l were: fingerlings- 62.0 ± 4.45 and ...

  4. The Sparrow Question: Social and Scientific Accord in Britain, 1850-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    During the latter-half of the nineteenth century, the utility of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) to humankind was a contentious topic. In Britain, numerous actors from various backgrounds including natural history, acclimatisation, agriculture and economic ornithology converged on the bird, as contemporaries sought to calculate its economic cost and benefit to growers. Periodicals and newspapers provided an accessible and anonymous means of expression, through which the debate raged for over 50 years. By the end of the century, sparrows had been cast as detrimental to agriculture. Yet consensus was not achieved through new scientific methods, instruments, or changes in practice. This study instead argues that the rise and fall of scientific disciplines and movements paved the way for consensus on "the sparrow question." The decline of natural history and acclimatisation stifled a raging debate, while the rising science of economic ornithology sought to align itself with agricultural interests: the latter overwhelmingly hostile to sparrows.

  5. Respiratory physiology at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, C; Naylor, J

    2011-03-01

    The changes in respiratory physiology that occur with increasing altitude are driven by the fall in the partial pressure of oxygen that occurs with decreasing barometric pressure. At altitude, respiratory system changes occur which impact on each step of the oxygen cascade that occurs within the body. These changes are pivotal to the process of acclimatisation to altitude. The study of human respiratory physiology at altitude has the potential to produce research that will be translational to disease states characterised by hypoxaemia.

  6. Black Paul: a soul music no Brasil nos anos 1970

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo Amaral de [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the acclimatisation of soul music genres in Brazil in the 70's by the analysing the songs of important black musicians of the era: Tim Maia, Jorge Ben and Tony Tornado as well as the movement called Black Rio. We suggest an inflection on the formation of the black identity in the country that represented the emergence of a black structure of feelings in transnational levels. This structure of feelings is chacacterised by its ethinic affirmation and its internationalis...

  7. Ecological traits and genetic variation in Amazonian populations of the neotropical millipede Poratia obliterata (Kraus, 1960) (Diplopoda: Pyrgodesmidae) (Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Bergholz, N.

    2006-01-01

    The periodic flood pulse of the Amazon River has been the main controlling factor in the local riverine ecosystem for at least two million years. The disturbance caused by the annual inundation is reflected in poorer species diversity in affected lowlands compared to upland areas. Seasonality of flooding, however, has enabled long-term acclimatisation in resident flora and fauna. Numerous adaptations, in some cases along with speciation, have evolved in local terrestrial invertebrates, such a...

  8. Strategies and factors associated with preparing for competing in the heat: a cohort study at the 2015 IAAF World Athletics Championships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Julien D; Racinais, Sébastien; Timpka, Toomas; Dahlström, Örjan; Spreco, Armin; Jacobsson, Jenny; Bargoria, Victor; Halje, Karin; Alonso, Juan-Manuel

    2017-02-01

    Assess exertional heat illness (EHI) history and preparedness in athletes competing in a World Athletics Championships under hot/humid conditions and identify the factors associated with preparedness strategies. Of the 207 registered national teams invited to participate in the study, 50 (24%) accepted. The 957 athletes (49% of all 1965 registered) in these teams were invited to complete a precompetition questionnaire evaluating EHI history, heat stress prevention (heat acclimatisation, precooling and hydration) and recovery. Responses from 307 (32%) athletes were separated in field events, sprints, middle-distance and long-distance running, and decathlon/heptathlon for analysis. 48% of athletes had previously experienced EHI symptoms and 8.5% had been diagnosed with EHI. 15% heat acclimatised (∼20 days) before the championships. 52% had a precooling strategy, ice slurry ingestion (24%) being the most prevalent and women using it more frequently than men (p=0.005). 96% of athletes had a fluid consumption strategy, which differed between event categories (pathletes planned on using at least one recovery strategy. Female sex (p=0.024) and a previous EHI diagnosis increased the likelihood of using all 3 prevention strategies (pathletes heat acclimatised, half had a precooling strategy and almost all a hydration plan. Women, and especially athletes with an EHI history, were more predisposed to use a complete heat stress prevention strategy. More information regarding heat acclimatisation should be provided to protect athlete health and optimise performance at major athletics competitions in the heat. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Measurement of the capacity of a freezer for active demand side management

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Meerssche, Bert; Deconinck, Geert; Van Ham, Geert

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the research on the buffer capacity for a domestic freezer in view of using it in an active demand side management strategy. The dynamic characteristic of a freezer has been measured by monitoring temperature and energy consumption in an acclimatised room. The measurements consider a number of parameters like filling degree, ambient temperature, setpoint of the freezer and consumer behaviour. From the measurement results a model of the freezer has been built. As a case st...

  10. Identifications of captive and wild tilapia species existing in Hawaii by mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for

  11. Toxaphene and Other Organochlorine Pesticides in Fish and Sediment from Lake Xolotlán, Nicaragua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero, S.; Fomsgaard, Inge S.; Lacayo, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The levels of 11 organochlorine pesticides were analyzed in samples of two fish species (Sarotherodon mossambicus and Cichlasoma managüense) and sediments. Due to a toxaphene-producing factory located on the shore of Lake Xolotlán, toxaphene was detected in more than 80% of the fish specimens...... and in all the sediment samples analyzed. α-BHC, heptachlor, heptachlor-epoxide, aldrin and dieldrin were detected neither in fish nor in sediment samples. DDT or its metabolites DDE or DDD (∊DDT) were present in almost all the fish and sediment samples but in low concentrations. The presence of β......-BHC and lindane (τ-BHC) in fish and lindane in sediment was insignificant....

  12. Callus induction in papaya (Carica papaya L. and synseed production for low temperature storage and cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira da Silva Jaime A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mid- to long-term preservation of papaya (Carica papaya L. would allow for the safeguarding of important germplasm. In this study, soft friable callus (SFC and hard callus (HC were induced from the first two true leaves of 10-day-old seedlings containing a midrib derived from the germinated seed of two cultivars (‘Rainbow’ and ‘Sunrise Solo’. Following germination on a Murashige and Skoog (MS medium that contained 3% sucrose and was free of plant growth regulators (PGRs, sections of the first true leaves from 10-day-old seedlings were exposed to seven published callus or somatic embryogenesis protocols for zygotic embryos, leaves or hypocotyls. Optimal SFC and HC induction was carried out on a half-strength MS medium following the Fitch (1993 or the Ascêncio-Cabral et al. (2008 protocol, respectively. SFC formed shoots that could then convert to plants when transferred to a full-strength MS medium devoid of PGRs. Plantlets 10-cm tall were acclimatised in two steps: first by in vitro acclimatisation in aerated vessels, the Vitron, under CO2-enriched (3000 ppm CO2, then by the transfer of individually rooted plantlets in Rockwool® blocks to a substrate of soil: pine bark : perlite (1:1:1, v/v/v. SFC and HC were then encapsulated in alginate beads, which were exposed to low temperature storage (LTS at 10°C and 15°C, and also cryopreserved for 30 days. All encapsulated alginate beads that contained SFC, HC or leaf tissue that had been stored under LTS or cryopreserved were able to regenerate callus when placed on an optimal callus induction medium. Plants derived from the control, LTS and cryopreservation protocols, either from SFC or HC, were successfully acclimatised.

  13. In vitro behaviour of Aspasia variegata, an epiphytic orchid from the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vespasiano Borges de Paiva Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspasia variegata occurs naturally in the savanna of the Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil and it has been widely collected for its beautiful flowers. Additionally, its habitat has been greatly reduced and little or no investigation of its spread has been performed. Aiming to establish a protocol to obtain seedlings of the orchid A. variegata, different compositions of culture medium were tested to identify which one provided better in vitro growth and development and to assess the influence of these media in seedling acclimatisation. Thus, seeds obtained from mature capsules were inoculated in Knudson culture medium for 120 days until the protocorm stage. They were transferred to different culture media formulations, including MS and Knudson with half or full formulation, and 3.0 and 6.0g L-1 activated charcoal were added to them or not. After 180 days of protocorm inoculation, seedlings were evaluated for length of roots and shoots, number of roots and leaves, and chlorophyll contents. After that, seedlings were transferred to trays containing a mixture of Plantmax® and coconut fibre (1:1 for acclimatisation. Best results for the in vitro growth of A. variegata were obtained with the use of MS medium supplemented with 6.0g L-1 activated charcoal. Higher levels of chlorophyll were obtained, however, in treatments containing MS salts without activated charcoal presence, and lower levels in media containing Knudson salts with the presence of activated charcoal. The seedlings originated by higher chlorophyll levels during in vitro cultivation presented the highest survival rates and better development in the acclimatisation phase.

  14. Sheep numbers required for dry matter digestibility evaluations when fed fresh perennial ryegrass or forage rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhao Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research trials with fresh forages often require accurate and precise measurement of digestibility and variation in digestion between individuals, and the duration of measurement periods needs to be established to ensure reliable data are obtained. The variation is likely to be greater when freshly harvested feeds are given, such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. and forage rape (Brassica napus L., because the nutrient composition changes over time and in response to weather conditions. Daily feed intake and faeces output data from a digestibility trial with these forages were used to calculate the effects of differing lengths of the measurement period and differing numbers of sheep, on the precision of digestibility, with a view towards development of a protocol. Sixteen lambs aged 8 months and weighing 33 kg at the commencement of the trial were fed either perennial ryegrass or forage rape (8/treatment group over 2 periods with 35 d between measurements. They had been acclimatised to the diets, having grazed them for 42 d prior to 11 days of indoor measurements. The sheep numbers required for a digestibility trial with different combinations of acclimatisation and measurement period lengths were subsequently calculated for 3 levels of imposed precision upon the estimate of mean dry matter (DM digestibility. It is recommended that if the standard error of the mean for digestibility is equal to or higher than 5 g/kg DM, and if sheep are already used to a fresh perennial ryegrass or forage rape diet, then a minimum of 6 animals are needed and 4 acclimatisation days being fed individually in metabolic crates followed by 7 days of measurement.

  15. Changing geographies of access to medical education in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gavin; Garlick, Pamela

    2007-06-01

    This paper highlights the need for health geographers to consider the social and cultural geographies of who gets to train as a doctor. The paper presents a case study of a scheme intended to widen access to medical education for working class students from inner London. This work examines the role of local education markets and cultures of education in shaping the aspirations and achievements of potential future doctors. It employs ethnographic data to consider how 'non-traditional' learners acclimatise to medical school. Our findings indicate that the students who succeed best are those who can see themselves as belonging within the education system, regardless of their social and cultural background.

  16. FRESHWATER FISH AND DECAPOD CRUSTACEAN POPULATIONS ON RÉUNION ISLAND, WITH AN ASSESSMENT OF SPECIES INTRODUCTIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEITH P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Streams of Réunion Island shelter with 26 fish species and 11 decapod crustacean species. Some species have been introduced (18%, some other are endemic to the island or to the Madagascar-Mascarenes region (16.2%, are originated from Indo-Pacific area (35.2% or from Indo-African area (27%. Gobiidae and Palaemonidae are the prevailing family in freshwaters, with the highest number of species. 16 species were introduced, mainly fishes, beginning at the turn of the 19th century, but only 4 of those have become acclimatised, while 7 have disappeared and the status of the other is uncertain.

  17. Exploring the Symbiodinium rare biosphere provides evidence for symbiont switching in reef-building corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulotte, Nadine M; Dalton, Steven J; Carroll, Andrew G; Harrison, Peter L; Putnam, Hollie M; Peplow, Lesa M; van Oppen, Madeleine Jh

    2016-11-01

    Reef-building corals possess a range of acclimatisation and adaptation mechanisms to respond to seawater temperature increases. In some corals, thermal tolerance increases through community composition changes of their dinoflagellate endosymbionts (Symbiodinium spp.), but this mechanism is believed to be limited to the Symbiodinium types already present in the coral tissue acquired during early life stages. Compelling evidence for symbiont switching, that is, the acquisition of novel Symbiodinium types from the environment, by adult coral colonies, is currently lacking. Using deep sequencing analysis of Symbiodinium rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) PCR amplicons from two pocilloporid coral species, we show evidence consistent with de novo acquisition of Symbiodinium types from the environment by adult corals following two consecutive bleaching events. Most of these newly detected symbionts remained in the rare biosphere (background types occurring below 1% relative abundance), but one novel type reached a relative abundance of ~33%. Two de novo acquired Symbiodinium types belong to the thermally resistant clade D, suggesting that this switching may have been driven by consecutive thermal bleaching events. Our results are particularly important given the maternal mode of Symbiodinium transmission in the study species, which generally results in high symbiont specificity. These findings will cause a paradigm shift in our understanding of coral-Symbiodinium symbiosis flexibility and mechanisms of environmental acclimatisation in corals.

  18. Consensus recommendations on training and competing in the heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racinais, S; Alonso, J M; Coutts, A J; Flouris, A D; Girard, O; González-Alonso, J; Hausswirth, C; Jay, O; Lee, J K W; Mitchell, N; Nassis, G P; Nybo, L; Pluim, B M; Roelands, B; Sawka, M N; Wingo, J; Périard, J D

    2015-01-01

    Exercising in the heat induces thermoregulatory and other physiological strain that can lead to impairments in endurance exercise capacity. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide up-to-date recommendations to optimise performance during sporting activities undertaken in hot ambient conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimise performance is to heat acclimatise. Heat acclimatisation should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1–2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in a euhydrated state and minimise dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (eg, cooling-vest), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organisers should plan for large shaded areas, along with cooling and rehydration facilities, and schedule events in accordance with minimising the health risks of athletes, especially in mass participation events and during the first hot days of the year. Following the recent examples of the 2008 Olympics and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, sport governing bodies should consider allowing additional (or longer) recovery periods between and during events, for hydration and body cooling opportunities, when competitions are held in the heat. PMID:26069301

  19. In vitro accelerated mass propagation and ex vitro evaluation of Aloe vera L. with aloin content and superoxide dismutase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantait, Saikat; Mandal, Nirmal; Das, Prakash Kanti

    2011-08-01

    An innovative protocol on accelerated in vitro propagation and acclimatisation was developed in Aloe vera L. Culture was initiated with rhizomatous stem where Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium fortified with 0.5 mg L(-1) α-naphthalene acetic acid and 1.5 mg L(-1) N(6)-benzylaminopurine (BAP) promoted earliest shoot induction. Maximum shoot multiplication was achieved in MS medium supplemented with 2.5 mg L(-1)BAP. The best in vitro rooting was observed in the MS medium with 0.5 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid plus 2 g L(-1) activated charcoal. The simple acclimatisation process, primarily with a combination of sand and soil (1 : 1 v/v) and finally with a blend of sand, soil and farm yard manure (2 : 1 : 1 v/v), ensured a 98% survival rate. Overall, 192 true-to-type plantlets were achieved from a single explant within 85 days. Morphologically, in vitro generated plants performed better than conventionally propagated plants; nevertheless the similarity in aloin content, gel content and superoxide dismutase activity was corroborated.

  20. Respiratory changes due to extreme cold in the Arctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, P.; Selvamurthy, W.

    1993-03-01

    Effects of acute exposure and acclimatisation to cold stress on respiratory functions were investigated in healthy tropical Indian men ( n=10). Initial baseline recordings were carried out at Delhi and thereafter serially thrice at the arctic region and once on return to Delhi. For comparison the respiratory functions were also evaluated on Russian migrants (RM; n=7) and Russian natives (RN; n=6). The respiratory functions were evaluated using standard methodology on a Vitalograph: In Indians, there was an initial decrease in lung vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume 1st s (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) on acute exposure to cold stress, followed by gradual recovery during acclimatisation for 4 weeks and a further significant improvement after 9 weeks of stay at the arctic region. On return to India all the parameters reached near baseline values except for MVV which remained slightly elevated. RM and RN showed similar respiratory functions at the beginning of acute cold exposure at the arctic zone. RN showed an improvement after 10 weeks of stay whereas RM did not show much change. The respiratory responses during acute cold exposure are similar to those of initial altitude responses.

  1. Mercury concentrations in the coastal marine food web along the Senegalese coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mamadou; Amara, Rachid

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of seasonal (wet and dry seasons) and spatial (five sites) variation of mercury concentration in seven marine organisms representative for shallow Senegalese coastal waters and including species of commercial importance. Total mercury levels were recorded in the green algae (Ulva lactuca); the brown mussel (Perna perna); the Caramote prawn (Penaeus kerathurus); and in the liver and muscles of the following fish: Solea senegalensis, Mugil cephalus, Saratherondon melanotheron, and Sardinella aurita. The total selenium (Se) contents were determined only in the edible part of Perna perna, Penaeus kerathurus and in the muscles of Sardinella aurita and Solea senegalensis. Hg concentration in fish species was higher in liver compared to the muscle. Between species differences in Hg, concentrations were recorded with the highest concentration found in fish and the lowest in algae. The spatiotemporal study showed that there was no clear seasonal pattern in Hg concentrations in biota, but spatial differences existed with highest concentrations in sites located near important anthropogenic pressure. For shrimp, mussel, and the muscles of sardine and sole, Hg concentrations were below the health safety limits for human consumption as defined by the European Union. The Se/Hg molar ratio was always higher than one whatever the species or location suggesting a protection of Se against Hg potential adverse effect.

  2. Micropropagation of Salvia wagneriana Polak and hairy root cultures with rosmarinic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoni, Barbara; Bertoli, Alessandra; Pistelli, Laura; Pistelli, Luisa

    2016-01-04

    Salvia wagneriana Polak is a tropical species native to Central America, well adapted to grow in the Mediterranean basin for garden decoration. Micropropagation has been assessed from axillary shoots of adult plants using a Murashige and Skoog basal medium, with the addition of 1.33-μM 6-benzylaminopurine for shoot proliferation; the subsequent rooting phase occurred in plant growth regulator-free medium. The plants were successfully acclimatised with high survival frequency. Hairy roots were induced after co-cultivation of leaf lamina and petiole fragments with Agrobacterium rhizogenes and confirmed by PCR. The establishment and proliferation of the selected HRD3 line were obtained in hormone-free liquid medium and the production of rosmarinic acid (RA) was evaluated after elicitation. The analysis of RA was performed by LC-ESI-DAD-MS in the hydroalcoholic extracts. The addition of casein hydrolysate increased the RA production, whereas no enrichment was observed after the elicitation with jasmonic acid.

  3. Population changes in a biofilm reactor for phosphorus removal as evidenced by the use of FISH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, C.M.; Müller, E.; Arnz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Induction ofdenitrification was investigated for a lab-scale phosphate removing biofilm reactor where oxygen was replaced with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Acetate was used as the carbon source. The original biofilm (acclimatised with oxygen) was taken from a well-established large...... collected and analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Concurrently, samples were taken from the original reactor with oxygen as electron acceptor in order to investigate natural microbial fluctuations. A similar decrease in the activity...... hybridised to the dominant bacterial groups in the reactors investigated. No noticeable changes were detected in the aerobic bench-scale reactor during this period, indicating that the observed changes in the lab-scale reactor were caused by the changed environment. r 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights...

  4. The effects of radiant cooling versus convective cooling on human eye tear film stability and blinking rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Linette; Uth, Simon C.; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    2014-01-01

    The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation. The subj......The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation....... The subjects participated in four two-hour experiments. The room air temperature was kept at 26 °C or 28 °C. Tear film samples were collected after 30 min of acclimatisation and at the end of the exposures. Eye blinking frequency was analysed for the first and last 15 min of each exposure. The tear film...

  5. Seasonal variability in voluntary dive duration of the Mediterranean loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flegra Bentivegna

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available We characterised the effect of seasonal fluctuations in water temperature (Tw on the nonventilatory period (NVP of Mediterranean loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta. Ten captive turtles, that were subject to the natural variations in Tw found in the Gulf of Naples, dived significantly longer when Tw decreased. More than 50% of summer and winter dives lasted between 2 and 10 min; the maximum dive duration (120 min occurred in winter at a Tw of 13°C. The longest NVP coincided with a low level of activity and a lower food consumption. This, and a reduced metabolic rate consequent to acclimatisation to a low Tw were likely to have influenced NVP.

  6. [Investigations on the influence of selected compulsory measures on clinically relevant haematological and blood-chemical parameters of racing pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautwald-Junghanns, M E; Bartels, T; Richter, A; Pees, M

    2006-10-01

    In the presented study the influence of stress and environmental factors on selected haematological and blood-chemical parameters in racing pigeons was examined. Blood was taken at three defined days and haematological as well as blood-chemical parameters of clinical relevance were determined. In comparison to reference values published for pigeons, the majority of the values obtained in this study were within physiological borders. The daily handling of the pigeons did not have any significant effect on the examined parameters. Also the heterophile/lymphocyte ratio did not show any changes characteristic of a stress reaction. In contrast, after change of the housing dies with pigeons originating normally from a flock, the first blood sampling should be performed after a 4 or 5-day lasting period of acclimatisation to the the individual housing conditions.

  7. “IN VITRO” MULTIPLICATION OF CALENDULA OFFICINALIS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vantu Smaranda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a regeneration procedures for Calendula officinalis L., as analternative for biomass production. Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae is an important medicinal plant species withmultitherapeutic, cosmetic, values. Meristematic explants taken from seedlings of Calendula officinalis L. germinated inaseptic conditions were tested for their regenerative potential. The regeneration of whole plants was obtained in twosteps: the shoots were excised and transferred to fresh medium and then rooting of these shoots was achieved on the samemedium with 0,02 mg/l benzylaminopurine and 1 mg/l 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The excised shoots weresubcultured for roots induction. Regenerated plants were transferred to ex vitro conditions for an acclimatisation period

  8. Drone Age Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    At a time when technological advances are transforming cultures and supporting new automated military operations, action films engage the senses and, in doing so, allow viewers to embody combat roles. This book argues that through film the viewer adapts to an ecology of fear, one that reflects...... global panic at the near-constant threat of conflict and violence. Often overwhelming in its audiovisual assault, action cinema attempts to overpower our bodies with its own through force and intensity. In this book, Steen Ledet Christiansen identifies five aspects central to how action films produce...... such physical movements and responses through vectors, droning, kinetics, telesomatics and volatility and in so doing unveils new modes of perception that acclimatise us for warfare. Drawing on theories from film-philosophy and a consideration of the aesthetics and phenomenology of war, this is an innovative...

  9. Travelling safely to places at high altitude - Understanding and preventing altitude illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Greater numbers of people are travelling to places at high altitude each year. Altitude illness is common in places at high altitude and may be life-threatening. General practitioners (GPs) are best placed to provide evidence-based advice to keep travellers well informed of the possible risks they may encounter in places at high altitude. The aim of this article is to review knowledge on altitude illness in order to help GPs assist patients to travel safely to places at high altitude. Acclimatisation to high altitude is a complex process and when inadequate leads to the pathological changes of altitude illness, including high-altitude headache, cerebral oedema, pulmonary oedema and acute mountain sickness. Higher ascent, faster rate of ascent and a previous history of altitude illness increase the risk of altitude illness. Acetazolamide and other medications used to prevent altitude illness are discussed in detail, including the finding that inhaled budesonide may prevent altitude illness.

  10. Factors affecting the within-river spawning migration of Atlantic salmon, with emphasis on human impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstad, E.B.; Okland, F.; Aarestrup, Kim

    2008-01-01

    We review factors affecting the within-river spawning migration of Atlantic salmon. With populations declining across the entire distribution range, it is important that spawners survive in the last phase of the spawning migration. Knowledge on the factors affecting migration is essential...... migration. Impacts of human activities may also cause altered migration patterns, affect the within-river distribution of the spawning population, and severe barriers may result in displacement of the spawning population to other rivers. Factors documented to affect within-river migration include previous...... experience, water discharge, water temperature, water velocity, required jump heights, fish size, fish acclimatisation, light, water quality/pollution, time of the season, and catch and handling stress. How each of these factors affects the upstream migration is to a varying extent understood; however...

  11. Propagation of Dianthus deltoides L. by shoot culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Marija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving D. deltoides micropropagation was studied in the aim of reducing the number of vitrified and necrotic shoots. Micropropagation was performed on the medium with MS mineral solution, supplemented with 3% sucrose, 0.8% agar, 50 mg·L-1 mio-inositol, 0.025 mg·L-1 thiamin, 0.125 mg·L-1 nicotinic acid and 0.5 mg·L-1 glycine. The shoot multiplication was induced on 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP and α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA. Vitrification was successfully reduced, and the best results were achieved on the medium with 1 mg·L-1 BAP and 0.1 mg·L-1 NAA. Rooting was successful on the medium without hormones, and the acclimatisation percentage accounted for 92%.

  12. Integration of biotechnology, robot technoplogy and visualisation technology for development of methods for autamated mass production of elite trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Find, Jens; Krogstrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    for purpose' and guarantee a consumer oriented and tailor made wood supply. However, commercial application of the technology has until now been hampered by two essential problems: 1) the production costs per plant must be reduced, 2) improved methods must be developed for transfer and acclimatisation...... of plants from sterile in vitro conditions to non sterile (ex vitro/in vivo) conditions in the nursery. To solve these problems, a Danish based project has been established to combine clonal propagation by somatic embryogenesis (SE) with biotechnological breeding tools, and with robot - and visualisation...... technologies. The present project takes advantage of effective methods developed at the University of Copenhagen for SE in nordmanns fir and sitka spruce. These methods are used as a model system for development of biotechnological breeding tools in combination with automated plant production of plants...

  13. Interactive Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Growth, Fitness and Survival of the Cold-Water Coral Lophelia pertusa under Different Food Availabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina V. Büscher

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cold-water corals are important bioengineers that provide structural habitat for a diverse species community. About 70% of the presently known scleractinian cold-water corals are expected to be exposed to corrosive waters by the end of this century due to ocean acidification. At the same time, the corals will experience a steady warming of their environment. Studies on the sensitivity of cold-water corals to climate change mainly concentrated on single stressors in short-term incubation approaches, thus not accounting for possible long-term acclimatisation and the interactive effects of multiple stressors. Besides, preceding studies did not test for possible compensatory effects of a change in food availability. In this study a multifactorial long-term experiment (6 months was conducted with end-of-the-century scenarios of elevated pCO2 and temperature levels in order to examine the acclimatisation potential of the cosmopolitan cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to future climate change related threats. For the first time multiple ocean change impacts including the role of the nutritional status were tested on L. pertusa with regard to growth, “fitness,” and survival. Our results show that while L. pertusa is capable of calcifying under elevated CO2 and temperature, its condition (fitness is more strongly influenced by food availability rather than changes in seawater chemistry. Whereas growth rates increased at elevated temperature (+4°C, they decreased under elevated CO2 concentrations (~800 μatm. No difference in net growth was detected when corals were exposed to the combination of increased CO2 and temperature compared to ambient conditions. A 10-fold higher food supply stimulated growth under elevated temperature, which was not observed in the combined treatment. This indicates that increased food supply does not compensate for adverse effects of ocean acidification and underlines the importance of considering the nutritional status

  14. Extreme heat and cultural and linguistic minorities in Australia: perceptions of stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alana; Nitschke, Monika; Saniotis, Arthur; Benson, Jill; Tan, Yan; Smyth, Val; Wilson, Leigh; Han, Gil-Soo; Mwanri, Lillian; Bi, Peng

    2014-06-03

    Despite acclimatisation to hot weather, many individuals in Australia are adversely affected by extreme heat each summer, placing added pressure on the health sector. In terms of public health, it is therefore important to identify vulnerable groups, particularly in the face of a warming climate. International evidence points to a disparity in heat-susceptibility in certain minority groups, although it is unknown if this occurs in Australia. With cultural diversity increasing, the aim of this study was to explore how migrants from different cultural backgrounds and climate experiences manage periods of extreme heat in Australia. A qualitative study was undertaken across three Australian cities, involving interviews and focus groups with key informants including stakeholders involved in multicultural service provision and community members. Thematic analysis and a framework approach were used to analyse the data. Whilst migrants and refugees generally adapt well upon resettlement, there are sociocultural barriers encountered by some that hinder environmental adaptation to periods of extreme heat in Australia. These barriers include socioeconomic disadvantage and poor housing, language barriers to the access of information, isolation, health issues, cultural factors and lack of acclimatisation. Most often mentioned as being at risk were new arrivals, people in new and emerging communities, and older migrants. With increasing diversity within populations, it is important that the health sector is aware that during periods of extreme heat there may be disparities in the adaptive capacity of minority groups, underpinned by sociocultural and language-based vulnerabilities in migrants and refugees. These factors need to be considered by policymakers when formulating and disseminating heat health strategies.

  15. Alpha-MSH, the melanocortin-1 receptor and background adaptation in the Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Salm, A L; Metz, J R; Bonga, S E Wendelaar; Flik, G

    2005-11-01

    The regulation of skin darkness in vertebrates is mediated by alpha-melanophore-stimulating-hormone (alphaMSH). For this action, alphaMSH binds to the melanocortin (MC)-1 receptor, a 7-transmembrane receptor located in melanophore cell membranes. The Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus, can change the hue of its body in response to a change in background, a process that may involve alphaMSH and the MC1R. Scale melanophores were isolated from tilapia that were acclimatised for 25 days to a black, control grey or white background and then tested for their sensitivity to des-, mono-, and di-acetylated alphaMSH. On all backgrounds, mono-acetylated alphaMSH was the dominant isoform present in pituitary homogenates. Mono-acetylated alphaMSH also had the highest potency to disperse melanosomes. Black background adapted fish showed the highest dispersing response to alphaMSH, independent of the isoform applied. We elucidated the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the tilapia MC1R. We show that its expression in skin does not change when tilapia are acclimatised for 25 days to a black, grey or white background, while a clear change in hue is visible. This finding, combined with the absence of differential MC1R gene expression following background acclimation indicates that the increased sensitivity to alphaMSH is most likely a result of changes in the intracellular signalling system in melanophores of black background adapted fish, rather than up-regulation of the MC1R.

  16. Assessing the dietary sources of two cichlid species in River Nile sub-branches: Stomach contents, fatty acids and stable isotopes analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad S. Abd El-Karim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the importance of four different food sources as dietary components of Oreochromis niloticus and Sarotherodon galilaeus in Nile sub-branches using stomach contents, fatty acids (FA and stable isotopes (SI analyses. Diatoms were the dominant food items, whereas sand and mud constitute a major part of the stomach contents of both cichlids in the northern ElBehery canal. FAs and SI were compared in cichlids and four potential food sources. Carbon isotopes excluded the fresh macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum and its epiphytes as a potential food source, whereas FA biomarkers indicated that M. spicatum is assimilated in cichlids’ muscles as detrital materials. FA profiles of cichlids’ muscles were highly enriched by live diatom markers whereas decayed diatoms and bacterial markers were partially present. Carbon isotope signatures of cichlids were much close to that of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM which elucidated that SPOM was the source of diatoms and bacterial detritus incorporated in cichlids muscles. Cichlids were highly enriched with nitrogen signatures which was a result of increased anthropogenic effects and incorporation of bacterial films. SI and FA analyses precisely indicated that live diatoms and bacteria, detrital macrophytes are the main sources of organic matter incorporated in cichlids muscles.

  17. Gyrodactylus malalai sp. nov. (Monogenea, Gyrodactylidae) from Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.) and Redbelly tilapia, Tilapia zillii (Gervais) (Teleostei, Cichlidae) in the Lake Turkana, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přikrylová, Iva; Radim, Blažek; Gelnar, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Gyrodactylus malalai sp. nov. is described from the fin surface of cichlid fishes Oreochromis niloticus (L.) and Tilapia zillii (Gervais) caught in Lake Turkana (Kenya). The new species morphologically resembles Gyrodactylus nyanzae Paperna, 1973, but can be readily distinguished by the shape of the marginal hook sickles and the size of its hamuli. The sequence data of rDNA spanning partial 18S, internal transcribe spacer 1 and 2 and the 5.8S gene is unique within GenBank. Genetically, as most similar Gyrodactylus ergensi Přikrylová, Matějusová, Musilová et Gelnar, 2009 was found (97.5%). Moreover, a specimen of G. cichlidarum from O. niloticus, and a specimen G. ergensi from Sarotherodon galilaeus (L.) were collected during sampling in Kenya. Likewise, additional sampling of O. niloticus from the Blue Nile in Sudan revealed the presence of the newly described species. These findings represent the first records of gyrodactylids in both African countries.

  18. Male-specific protein (MSP): a new gene linked to sexual behavior and aggressiveness of tilapia males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnes, Ziv; Avtalion, Ramy; Shirak, Andrey; Trombka, David; Wides, Ron; Fellous, Marc; Don, Jeremy

    2008-08-01

    MSP is a male-specific protein initially identified in the serum of sexually active Sarotherodon galilaeus males, and is shown herein to be present in the serum of sexually mature males, but not females, of three other tilapia species. Cloning of the MSP cDNA and analysis of its predicted amino-acid sequence revealed that it is an outlier lipocalin that contains a signal peptide in its N-terminal region. The abundance of highly homologous sequences found in fish and the monophyletic relationship to tetrapod Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) places it as a clade XII lipocalin. MSP was shown to undergo major N-glycosylation, characteristic of many lipocalins. The expression pattern of MSP, as determined at both the RNA and protein levels, points to the liver, head kidney and testis as production tissues, and resembles a pattern typical of some hormones. We found that MSP is secreted in urine and seminal fluids, and is present in the skin mucus of socially dominant males. Moreover, we discovered a positive correlation between MSP levels in the serum and the dominance and aggressive behavior displayed by socially dominant males. Based on these data, we suggest that MSP is a novel male-specific lipocalin that may function in intra and inter-sex communication.

  19. Impact of climate change on the relict tropical fish fauna of central sahara: threat for the survival of adrar mountains fishes, mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trape, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Four central Sahara mountainous massifs provide habitats for relict populations of fish. In the Adrar of Mauritania all available data on the presence and distribution of fish come from pre-1960 surveys where five fish species were reported: Barbus pobeguini, Barbus macrops, Barbus mirei, Sarotherodon galilaeus, and Clarias anguillaris. Since 1970, drought has had a severe impact in the Adrar where rainfall decreased by 35%. To investigate whether the relict populations of fish have survived the continuing drought, a study was carried out from 2004 to 2008. An inventory of perennial bodies of water was drawn up using a literature review and analysis of topographical and hydrological maps. Field surveys were carried out in order to locate the bodies of water described in the literature, identify the presence of fish, determine which species were present and estimate their abundance. The thirteen sites where the presence of fish was observed in the 1950s -Ksar Torchane, Ilij, Molomhar, Agueni, Tachot, Hamdoun, Terjit, Toungad, El Berbera, Timagazine, Dâyet el Mbârek, Dâyet et-Tefla, Nkedeï- were located and surveyed. The Ksar Torchane spring -type locality and the only known locality of B. mirei- has dried up at the height of the drought in 1984, and any fish populations have since become extinct there. The Timagazine, Dâyet el Mbârek and Dâyet et-Tefla pools have become ephemeral. The Hamdoun guelta appears to be highly endangered. The fish populations at the other sites remain unchanged. Four perennial pools which are home to populations of B. pobeguini are newly recorded. The tropical relict fish populations of the Adrar mountains of Mauritania appear to be highly endangered. Of thirteen previously recorded populations, four have become extinct since the beginning of the drought period. New fish population extinctions may occur should low levels of annual rainfall be repeated.

  20. Impact of climate change on the relict tropical fish fauna of central sahara: threat for the survival of adrar mountains fishes, mauritania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Trape

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Four central Sahara mountainous massifs provide habitats for relict populations of fish. In the Adrar of Mauritania all available data on the presence and distribution of fish come from pre-1960 surveys where five fish species were reported: Barbus pobeguini, Barbus macrops, Barbus mirei, Sarotherodon galilaeus, and Clarias anguillaris. Since 1970, drought has had a severe impact in the Adrar where rainfall decreased by 35%. To investigate whether the relict populations of fish have survived the continuing drought, a study was carried out from 2004 to 2008. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An inventory of perennial bodies of water was drawn up using a literature review and analysis of topographical and hydrological maps. Field surveys were carried out in order to locate the bodies of water described in the literature, identify the presence of fish, determine which species were present and estimate their abundance. The thirteen sites where the presence of fish was observed in the 1950s -Ksar Torchane, Ilij, Molomhar, Agueni, Tachot, Hamdoun, Terjit, Toungad, El Berbera, Timagazine, Dâyet el Mbârek, Dâyet et-Tefla, Nkedeï- were located and surveyed. The Ksar Torchane spring -type locality and the only known locality of B. mirei- has dried up at the height of the drought in 1984, and any fish populations have since become extinct there. The Timagazine, Dâyet el Mbârek and Dâyet et-Tefla pools have become ephemeral. The Hamdoun guelta appears to be highly endangered. The fish populations at the other sites remain unchanged. Four perennial pools which are home to populations of B. pobeguini are newly recorded. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The tropical relict fish populations of the Adrar mountains of Mauritania appear to be highly endangered. Of thirteen previously recorded populations, four have become extinct since the beginning of the drought period. New fish population extinctions may occur should low levels of annual rainfall be

  1. New record of a fossil haplotilapiine cichlid from Central Kenya

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    Stefanie B. R. Penk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available African freshwater cichlids (Cichlidae: Pseudocrenilabrinae are well known for their exceptionally great diversity and their capability of rapid speciation as well as diverse adaptations. The extant Pseudocrenilabrinae can be grouped into 27 tribes, with more than 2000 species harbored in the Great Lakes and surrounding water bodies of the East African Rift System. However, this unique diversity is not reflected in the fossil record because fossil cichlids were predominantly reported based on isolated teeth and bones. Moreover, the few articulated specimens that are known have not been analyzed sufficiently with regard to their systematic position due to lack of comparative material. Here we present a new extraordinarily well-preserved cichlid fish fossil from the Middle Miocene (c. 12.5 Ma Lagerstaette Kabchore, which was recovered during recent fieldwork in the Tugen Hills (Baringo County, Central Kenya Rift. Based on the evidence of tricuspid teeth, the Kabchore fossil can be assigned to the subclade of the Haplotilapiines within the Pseudocrenilabrinae. The multivariate analysis of a large meristic data set, derived from 1014 extant specimens (encompassing all main lineages of Haplotilapiines and usage of available osteological data suggest that this fossil is most likely related to one of the three haplotilapiine tribes Tilapiini, Haplochromini or Oreochromini. Moreover, the fossil specimen closely resembles the extinct cichlid Oreochromis martyni (Van Couvering, 1982, previously described as species of Sarotherodon from the Middle Miocene alkaline Kapkiamu Lake in the Tugen Hills. The analysis of the greatly preserved fossil fish specimen from Kabchore definitely supplements the fragmentary fossil record of Africa’s Cichlidae and will afford new insights into its evolutionary history. We also expect that this fossil will be useful as calibration point for new divergence-time estimates.

  2. [Canaries, germs, and poison gas. The physiologist J.S. Haldane's contributions to public health and hygiene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The Scottish physiologist John Scott Haldane (1860-1936) spent most of his professional career in Oxford after graduating from the medical school in Edinburgh. He was deeply involved in applying basic science on problems in society but also making these problems guide his choice of projects in his experimental work. Thus, he has demonstrated that the increased contents of carbon dioxide in dwellings, schools, and factories was of less importance than the high contents of bacteria and fungal spores, and that even the foul air in the sewers was less harmful than that in crowded dwellings. He demonstrated that most miners did not die of lack of oxygen or trauma after colliery accidents but of carbon monoxide poisoning. The miners had relied on the ability of their candle or lamp to burn, but this would not be influenced by the presence of carbon monoxide. Thus, he introduced the canaries, which due to their small size and correspondingly relatively higher metabolism would faint about 20 minutes prior to humans. Haldane was called to investigate the ventilation and quality of the air in Cornish tin mines, since the miners suffered from fatigue or even fainted. The air and ventilation was sufficient, but the miners suffered from anaemia due to ankylostomiasis. After improving the hygienic conditions in the mines this became a minor problem although not completely eradicated. During World War I, Haldane became involved in protection of the allied soldiers when the German troops started using poison gas. In all cases he made rather drastic experiments on himself, his coworkers and even his son by exposing them to low oxygen, high carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or chlorine. He improved the gasmasks and introduced oxygen as a therapeutic agent. His big scientific mistake was that he insisted on the presence of an active oxygen secretion in the alveoli in order to explain the increased oxygen uptake during work and as part of acclimatisation to high altitude. workers and

  3. The thermal environment of the human being on the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendritzky, Gerd; Tinz, Birger

    2009-11-11

    The close relationship between human health, performance, well-being and the thermal environment is obvious. Nevertheless, most studies of climate and climate change impacts show amazing shortcomings in the assessment of the environment. Populations living in different climates have different susceptibilities, due to socio-economic reasons, and different customary behavioural adaptations. The global distribution of risks of hazardous thermal exposure has not been analysed before. To produce maps of the baseline and future bioclimate that allows a direct comparison of the differences in the vulnerability of populations to thermal stress across the world. The required climatological data fields are obtained from climate simulations with the global General Circulation Model ECHAM4 in T106-resolution. For the thermo-physiologically relevant assessment of these climate data a complete heat budget model of the human being, the 'Perceived Temperature' procedure has been applied which already comprises adaptation by clothing to a certain degree. Short-term physiological acclimatisation is considered via Health Related Assessment of the Thermal Environment. The global maps 1971-1980 (control run, assumed as baseline climate) show a pattern of thermal stress intensities as frequencies of heat. The heat load for people living in warm-humid climates is the highest. Climate change will lead to clear differences in health-related thermal stress between baseline climate and the future bioclimate 2041-2050 based on the 'business-as-usual' greenhouse gas scenario IS92a. The majority of the world's population will be faced with more frequent and more intense heat strain in spite of an assumed level of acclimatisation. Further adaptation measures are crucial in order to reduce the vulnerability of the populations. This bioclimatology analysis provides a tool for various questions in climate and climate change impact research. Considerations of regional or local scale require climate

  4. Timing and presence of an attachment person affect sensitivity of aggression tests in shelter dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, A; Klausz, B; Persa, E; Miklósi, Á; Gácsi, M

    2014-02-22

    Different test series have been developed and used to measure behaviour in shelter dogs in order to reveal individuals not suitable for re-homing due to their aggressive tendencies. However, behavioural tests previously validated on pet dogs seem to have relatively low predictability in the case of shelter dogs. Here, we investigate the potential effects of (1) timing of the behaviour testing and (2) presence of a human companion on dogs' aggressive behaviour. In Study I, shelter dogs (n=25) showed more aggression when tested in a short test series two weeks after they had been placed in the shelter compared to their responses in the same test performed 1-2 days after arrival. In Study II, the occurrence of aggressive behaviour was more probable in pet dogs (n=50) in the presence than in the absence of their passive owner. We conclude that the sensitivity of aggression tests for shelter dogs can be increased by running the test in the presence of a caretaker, and after some period of acclimatisation to the new environment. This methodology could also provide better chances for successful adoption.

  5. High temperature simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of starch from inedible wild cassava (Manihot glaziovii) to bioethanol using Caloramator boliviensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshi, Anselm P; Hosea, Ken M M; Elisante, Emrode; Mamo, G; Mattiasson, Bo

    2015-03-01

    The thermoanaerobe, Caloramator boliviensis was used to ferment starch hydrolysate from inedible wild cassava to ethanol at 60°C. A raw starch degrading α-amylase was used to hydrolyse the cassava starch. During fermentation, the organism released CO2 and H2 gases, and Gas Endeavour System was successfully used for monitoring and recording formation of these gaseous products. The bioethanol produced in stoichiometric amounts to CO2 was registered online in Gas Endeavour software and correlated strongly (R(2)=0.99) with values measured by HPLC. The organism was sensitive to cyanide that exists in cassava flour. However, after acclimatisation, it was able to grow and ferment cassava starch hydrolysate containing up to 0.2ppm cyanide. The reactor hydrogen partial pressure had influence on the bioethanol production. In fed-batch fermentation by maintaining the hydrogen partial pressure around 590Pa, the organism was able to ferment up to 76g/L glucose and produced 33g/L ethanol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of the toxic effects of flame retardant PBDE-47 on the clam Chamelea gallina (Linnaeus, 1758

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    Salvatora Angela Angioni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenylether (PBDE-47 on the Chamelea gallina clam (according to current commercial regulations: Venus gallina. PBDEs, which are used as flame retardants in various industrial products, are classed as hazardous substances by Directive 2011/65/EU. They are bioaccumulative compounds, considered to be endocrine disruptors, genotoxic, neurotoxic and practically ubiquitous, and their concentration in the environment has considerably increased in recent years. The aim of this study is to establish the effects of PBDE-47 on Chamelea gallina: toxic power and any harmful effects on the gonads, bioaccumulation capacity in the tissues, and possible entry into the food chain. The research used 96-hour and 21-day experimental tests on clams housed in filtered seawater. The tests were preceded by a period of acclimatisation of the molluscs lasting five to seven days. The clams were fed on seaweed (Dunaliella tertiolecta. The choice of the toxic compound PBDE-47 was based on the high concentration, among the congeners of PBDE, found in some aquatic species. The study demonstrated that the concentration of the contaminant used did not alter the vital functions, cause significant levels of mortality or lead to evident alteration in the gonads of Chamelea gallina. However, the research demonstrated the bioaccumulation capacity of the bivalve mollusc, allowing PBDE-47 to enter the food chain.

  7. The role of light in the regulation of ascorbate metabolism during berry development in the cultivated grapevine Vitis vinifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melino, Vanessa J; Hayes, Matthew A; Soole, Kathleen L; Ford, Christopher M

    2011-07-01

    The accumulation of L-ascorbate (Asc) in fruits is influenced by environmental factors including light quantity. Fruit exposure to ambient light is often reduced by the surrounding leaf canopy, and can be altered by cultivation practices. The influence of reduced sunlight exposure on the accumulation of Asc and its catabolites was investigated in field-grown berries of the cultivated grapevine Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz. Growth under sunlight-eliminated conditions resulted in reduced berry fresh weight, chlorosis and a reduced total L-ascorbate pool size. The concentration of the Asc catabolite L-tartaric acid (TA) was reduced in berries grown without light. Conversely, concentrations of oxalic acid (OA), an alternative catabolite of Asc, and malic acid (MA), were unaffected by shading the berries during development. Brief and significant reductions in transcription of the Asc metabolic genes were observed in shade-grown berries after 4 weeks of dark acclimatisation whilst a key TA biosynthetic gene was not regulated by light. The results demonstrate that light-regulation of Asc and TA occurs only at brief stages of development and that OA and MA accumulation is light independent. Additionally, the comparable ratios of TA product to Asc precursor under both light regimes suggest that the diversion of Asc to TA is driven by factors that are not responsive to light. These findings suggest that an altered light regime is not the key to manipulating TA or MA levels in the harvested berry. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Deschampsia antarctica and its expression regulated by cold and UV stresses

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    Gidekel Manuel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Copper/Zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD gene, SOD gene, was isolated from a Deschampsia antarctica Desv. by cDNA library screening. The expression of SOD gene in the leaves of D. antarctica was determined by RT-PCR and its differential expression of gene transcripts in conditions of cold and UV radiation stresses was revealed by northern blot. Findings The molecular characterization shows that SOD cDNA is 709 bp in length, which translates an ORF of 152 amino acids that correspond to a protein of predicted molecular mass of 15 kDa. The assay shows that the expression of SOD gene increases when D. antarctica is acclimatised to 4°C and exposed to UV radiation. These results indicate that the SOD gene of D. antarctica is involved in the antioxidative process triggered by oxidative stress induced by the conditions of environmental change in which they live. Conclusion The present results allow us to know the characteristics of Cu/ZnSOD gene from D. antarctica and understand that its expression is regulated by cold and UV radiation.

  9. A Conceptual Framework for Planning Systemic Human Adaptation to Global Warming

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    Peter W. Tait

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human activity is having multiple, inter-related effects on ecosystems. Greenhouse gas emissions persisting along current trajectories threaten to significantly alter human society. At 0.85 °C of anthropogenic warming, deleterious human impacts are acutely evident. Additional warming of 0.5 °C–1.0 °C from already emitted CO2 will further intensify extreme heat and damaging storm events. Failing to sufficiently address this trend will have a heavy human toll directly and indirectly on health. Along with mitigation efforts, societal adaptation to a warmer world is imperative. Adaptation efforts need to be significantly upscaled to prepare society to lessen the public health effects of rising temperatures. Modifying societal behaviour is inherently complex and presents a major policy challenge. We propose a social systems framework for conceptualizing adaptation that maps out three domains within the adaptation policy landscape: acclimatisation, behavioural adaptation and technological adaptation, which operate at societal and personal levels. We propose that overlaying this framework on a systems approach to societal change planning methods will enhance governments’ capacity and efficacy in strategic planning for adaptation. This conceptual framework provides a policy oriented planning assessment tool that will help planners match interventions to the behaviours being targeted for change. We provide illustrative examples to demonstrate the framework’s application as a planning tool.

  10. A Conceptual Framework for Planning Systemic Human Adaptation to Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Peter W.; Hanna, Elizabeth G.

    2015-01-01

    Human activity is having multiple, inter-related effects on ecosystems. Greenhouse gas emissions persisting along current trajectories threaten to significantly alter human society. At 0.85 °C of anthropogenic warming, deleterious human impacts are acutely evident. Additional warming of 0.5 °C–1.0 °C from already emitted CO2 will further intensify extreme heat and damaging storm events. Failing to sufficiently address this trend will have a heavy human toll directly and indirectly on health. Along with mitigation efforts, societal adaptation to a warmer world is imperative. Adaptation efforts need to be significantly upscaled to prepare society to lessen the public health effects of rising temperatures. Modifying societal behaviour is inherently complex and presents a major policy challenge. We propose a social systems framework for conceptualizing adaptation that maps out three domains within the adaptation policy landscape: acclimatisation, behavioural adaptation and technological adaptation, which operate at societal and personal levels. We propose that overlaying this framework on a systems approach to societal change planning methods will enhance governments’ capacity and efficacy in strategic planning for adaptation. This conceptual framework provides a policy oriented planning assessment tool that will help planners match interventions to the behaviours being targeted for change. We provide illustrative examples to demonstrate the framework’s application as a planning tool. PMID:26334285

  11. Assessment of heat-related health impacts in Brisbane, Australia: comparison of different heatwave definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shilu; Wang, Xiao Yu; Barnett, Adrian Gerard

    2010-08-13

    There is no global definition of a heatwave because local acclimatisation and adaptation influence the impact of extreme heat. Even at a local level there can be multiple heatwave definitions, based on varying temperature levels or time periods. We investigated the relationship between heatwaves and health outcomes using ten different heatwave definitions in Brisbane, Australia. We used daily data on climate, air pollution, and emergency hospital admissions in Brisbane between January 1996 and December 2005; and mortality between January 1996 and November 2004. Case-crossover analyses were used to assess the relationship between each of the ten heatwave definitions and health outcomes. During heatwaves there was a statistically significant increase in emergency hospital admissions for all ten definitions, with odds ratios ranging from 1.03 to 1.18. A statistically significant increase in the odds ratios of mortality was also found for eight definitions. The size of the heat-related impact varied between definitions. Even a small change in the heatwave definition had an appreciable effect on the estimated health impact. It is important to identify an appropriate definition of heatwave locally and to understand its health effects in order to develop appropriate public health intervention strategies to prevent and mitigate the impact of heatwaves.

  12. The clam (Chamelea gallina: evaluation of the effects of solids suspended in seawater on bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatora Angela Angioni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the effects of solids in suspension in seawater on clams (Chamelea gallina. The aim was to investigate the possible correlation between the widespread deaths of clams in the coastal waters of the central and northern Adriatic in the last five years and increased concentrations of solids in suspension. The research involved conducting 96-hour tests on clams farmed in aquariums containing filtered seawater. The tests were preceded by a 7-day adaptation stage to allow the molluscs to acclimatise. During this period, the clams were fed on unicellular seaweed (Dunaliella tertiolecta. The molluscs were exposed to particles of solids in suspension consisting of pools of silica gel (SiO2 granules of various sizes, similar to those constituting silt, whose presence and suspension in the sea considerably increase after heavy rain and heavy seas. The study established that the number of deaths caused by solids suspended in seawater at the concentrations used in the tests was not statistically significant.

  13. Assessment of heat-related health impacts in Brisbane, Australia: comparison of different heatwave definitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilu Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is no global definition of a heatwave because local acclimatisation and adaptation influence the impact of extreme heat. Even at a local level there can be multiple heatwave definitions, based on varying temperature levels or time periods. We investigated the relationship between heatwaves and health outcomes using ten different heatwave definitions in Brisbane, Australia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used daily data on climate, air pollution, and emergency hospital admissions in Brisbane between January 1996 and December 2005; and mortality between January 1996 and November 2004. Case-crossover analyses were used to assess the relationship between each of the ten heatwave definitions and health outcomes. During heatwaves there was a statistically significant increase in emergency hospital admissions for all ten definitions, with odds ratios ranging from 1.03 to 1.18. A statistically significant increase in the odds ratios of mortality was also found for eight definitions. The size of the heat-related impact varied between definitions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Even a small change in the heatwave definition had an appreciable effect on the estimated health impact. It is important to identify an appropriate definition of heatwave locally and to understand its health effects in order to develop appropriate public health intervention strategies to prevent and mitigate the impact of heatwaves.

  14. NMR metabolomics demonstrates phenotypic plasticity of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries with respect to growth conditions in Finland and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortesniemi, Maaria; Sinkkonen, Jari; Yang, Baoru; Kallio, Heikki

    2017-03-15

    The berries of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides ssp. rhamnoides) cultivars 'Terhi' and 'Tytti' were studied with respect to their growth location, 60° and 68°N latitude in Finland and 46°N in Canada, using 1 H NMR metabolomics. The berries of 'Terhi' were characterised by stronger signals of quinic acid, while 'Tytti' had higher levels of O-ethyl β-d-glucopyranoside. The metabolic profile of the northernmost berries was distinctly different from those grown in southern Finland or Canada. Berries from northern Finland had relatively higher levels of quinic acid, glucose, l-quebrachitol and ascorbic acid. Ethyl glucoside was shown to accumulate by several fold at the late stage of maturation in the south as it correlated with degree days (r=0.63) and global radiation (r=0.59), but not in the north. The variance in the composition of the sea buckthorn berries demonstrates plasticity in the acclimatisation to growth environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Adaptive mechanisms and behavioural recommendations: playing football in heat, cold and high altitude conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, D-P; Hoppe, M W; Lindner, N; Freiwald, J; Holmberg, H-C; Sperlich, B

    2014-03-01

    Football is played worldwide and players often have to cope with hot and cold temperatures as well as high altitude conditions. The upcoming and past world championships in Brazil, Qatar and South Africa illustrate the necessity for behavioural strategies and adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. When playing football in the heat or cold, special clothing, hydration and nutritional and acclimatisation strategies are vital for high-level performance. When playing at high altitude, the reduced oxygen partial pressure impairs endurance performance and alters the technical and tactical requirements. Special high-altitude adaptation and preparation strategies are essential for football teams based at sea-level in order to perform well and compete successfully. Therefore, the aim of the underlying review is: 1) to highlight the difficulties and needs of football teams competing in extreme environmental conditions, 2) to summarise the thermoregulatory, physiological, neuronal and psychological mechanism, and 3) to provide recommendations for coping with extreme environmental conditions in order to perform at a high level when playing football in the heat, cold and at high altitude. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. [Water requirements, water supply and thermoregulation in small ruminants in pasture-based husbandry systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, D; Strobel, H; Axt, H; Voigt, K

    2015-01-01

    Water is an essential source of life and is available to animals as free water, water content of feed, film water (e. g. dew) and metabolic water. The water requirements of small ruminants are influenced by the type of feed, climate, stage of production, type and length of the fleece or hair coat, husbandry factors and the general health of the animal. Differences in water metabolism, drinking behaviour and the efficiency of temperature regulation are further influenced by species, breed, production type, husbandry system, acclimatisation and adaptation. Small ruminants have been, and are still predominantly kept in extensive husbandry systems. They are therefore genetically and phenotypically well adapted to these conditions and possess a range of physiological and behavioural mechanisms to deal with adverse and suboptimal weather conditions. Regarding animal welfare, there is considerable debate in the discussion and assessment of what constitutes a sufficient water supply for small ruminants under different husbandry conditions, often involving differences between theoretical demands and practical experience. This publication reviews and summarises the current literature regarding water requirements, water metabolism and thermoregulatory mechanisms of small ruminants to provide the basis for an informed assessment of extensive husbandry systems in terms of compliance with animal-welfare requirements.

  17. Breaking away to South America

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    In December 2010, Peter Dreesen of CERN’s Technology Department (TE) returned from a long trip to South America. In four months he traversed the entire Andean range, from the equator to a latitude of 55 degrees south—on a bicycle!   Peter Dreesen on the Salar de Uyuni Lake, Bolivia. 11 000 kilometres is one long bike ride! And yet, that’s what Peter Dreesen did, travelling from Quito, Ecuador to Ushuaia, Argentina. Peter, an engineer in the TE Department, is no novice: the year before, he cycled from Paris to Peking, a distance of 13 500 kilometres, in just over four months. His latest voyage began last August, when he loaded his bicycle and boarded a plane for South America. In the saddle. After a week of acclimatisation at three thousand metres altitude, Peter left Quito on 6 August 2010. He arrived in Ushuaia (el fin del mundo, the end of the world, as it’s known in South America) on 12 December 2010. He recounts: “It was a bizarre sensation...

  18. Walking with robot assistance: the influence of body weight support on the trunk and pelvis kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Eva; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Knaepen, Kristel; Michielsen, Marc; Hens, Gerrit; Clijsen, Ron; Goossens, Maggie; Buyl, Ronald; Meeusen, Romain; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2015-05-01

    The goal was to assess in healthy participants the three-dimensional kinematics of the pelvis and the trunk during robot-assisted treadmill walking (RATW) at 0%, 30% and 50% body weight support (BWS), compared with treadmill walking (TW). 18 healthy participants walked (2 kmph) on a treadmill with and without robot assistance (Lokomat; 60% guidance force; 0%, 30% and 50% BWS). After an acclimatisation period (four minutes), trunk and pelvis kinematics were registered in each condition (Polhemus Liberty [240 Hz]). The results were analysed using a repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction, with the level of suspension as within-subject factor. During RATW with BWS, there were significantly (1) smaller antero-posterior and lateral translations of the trunk and the pelvis; (2) smaller antero-posterior flexion and axial rotation of the trunk; (3) larger lateral flexion of the trunk; and (4) larger antero-posterior tilting of the pelvis compared with TW. There are significant differences in trunk and pelvis kinematics in healthy persons during TW with and without robot assistance. These data are relevant in gait rehabilitation, relating to normal balance regulation. Additional research is recommended to further assess the influence of robot assistance on human gait. The trunk and pelvis moves in a different way during walking with robot assistance. The data suggest that the change in movement is due to the robot device and the harness of the suspension system more than due to the level of suspension itself.

  19. Micropropagation of Origanum acutidens (HAND.-MAZZ.) IETSWAART Using Stem Node Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Mehmet Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Origanum acutidens (HAND.-MAZZ.) IETSWAART is a promising ornamental plant that can be widely used in landscape management. It is endemic to Eastern Anatolian region of Turkey. Tissue culture has not been used to micropropagate it. The study reports stem node explants from one-week-old seedlings of the plant for successful micropropagation. The stem nodes were cultured on MS medium containing 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, and 2.4 mg/L BAP with 0.2 mg/L NAA. Visible effects of culture media on shoot proliferation were recorded. Shoot regeneration rate was maximum on MS medium containing 1.80 mg/L BAP-0.2 mg/L NAA. The micropropagated shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 0.2 mg/L NAA. All microrooted plantlets survived during acclimatisation on peat moss. It was concluded that O. acutidens can be successfully micropropagated under in vitro conditions. PMID:23983625

  20. Heat illness in athletes: the dangerous combination of heat, humidity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coris, Eric E; Ramirez, Arnold M; Van Durme, Daniel J

    2004-01-01

    In 1980, 1700 people died during a prolonged heat wave in a region under-prepared for heat illness prevention. Dramatically underreported, heat-related pathology contributes to significant morbidity as well as occasional mortality in athletic, elderly, paediatric and disabled populations. Among US high school athletes, heat illness is the third leading cause of death. Significant risk factors for heat illness include dehydration, hot and humid climate, obesity, low physical fitness, lack of acclimatisation, previous history of heat stroke, sleep deprivation, medications (especially diuretics or antidepressants), sweat gland dysfunction, and upper respiratory or gastrointestinal illness. Many of these risk factors can be addressed with education and awareness of patients at risk. Dehydration, with fluid loss occasionally as high as 6-10% of bodyweight, appears to be one of the most common risk factors for heat illness in patients exercising in the heat. Core body temperature has been shown to rise an additional 0.15-0.2 degrees C for every 1% of bodyweight lost to dehydration during exercise. Identifying athletes at risk, limiting environmental exposure, and monitoring closely for signs and symptoms are all important components of preventing heat illness. However, monitoring hydration status and early intervention may be the most important factors in preventing severe heat illness.

  1. The practicalities of establishing a porcine isolated heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Warren; Raisis, Anthea; Dunne, Ben; Van Laeken, Els; Jenkinson, Charles; Vincent, Viji; Baird, Peter; Prince, Stuart; Ho, Kwok M; Merry, Christopher; Gilfillan, Ian

    2017-12-01

    The isolated heart apparatus is over 100 years old, but remains a useful research tool today. While designs of many large animal systems have been described in the literature, trouble-shooting and refining such a model to yield a stable, workable system has not been previously described. This paper outlines the issues, in tabular form, that our group encountered in developing our own porcine isolated heart rig with the aim of assisting other workers in the field planning similar work. The paper also highlights some of the modern applications of the isolated heart apparatus. Methods Landrace pigs (50-80 kg) were used in a pilot project to develop the model. The model was then used in a study examining the effects of various cardioplegic solutions on function after reanimation of porcine hearts. During the two projects, non-protocol issues were documented as well as their solutions. These were aggregated in this paper. Issues faced by the group without explicit literature solutions included pig size selection, animal acclimatisation, porcine transoesophageal echocardiography, cannulation and phlebotomy for cross-clamping, cardioplegia delivery, heart suspension and rig tuning. Prior recognition of issues and possible solutions faced by workers establishing a porcine isolated heart system will speed progress towards a useable system for research. The isolated heart apparatus remains applicable in transplant, ischaemia reperfusion, heart failure and organ preservation research.

  2. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  3. Navigating physical activity engagement following a diagnosis of cancer: A qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, C; Kayes, N M; Reeve, J; Smith, G; MacLeod, R; McPherson, K M

    2017-07-01

    This qualitative descriptive study explored cancer survivors' experiences of barriers and facilitators to undertaking physical activity to inform how services and professionals might offer better support. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to recruit 25 people who were up to 5 years post-cancer diagnosis. Participants took part in face to face, semi-structured interviews, and transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis identified five interrelated themes which represented cancer survivors' views: 1) You're on your own-a sense of abandonment post-treatment, and lack of sufficient and tailored information; 2) Dis-ease-disruption to self and identity, and a heightened awareness of physical self and fragility; 3) Becoming acclimatised-physical activity in the face of treatment-related side effects and residual impairment; 4) Importance of others-encouragement and support from health professionals, family and friends, and cancer-specific exercise groups; 5) Meanings people ascribed to physical activity-these were central and could help or hinder engagement. Our findings suggest being able to live well and re-engage in meaningful activities following a diagnosis of cancer is both complex and challenging. There appear to be gaps in current service provision in supporting the broader health and well-being of cancer survivors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Reuse of Winery Wastewater by Application to Vineyard Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, K. P.; Patti, A. F.; Parikh, S.; Steenwerth, K. L.; Buelow, M. C.; Cavagnaro, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to reuse winery wastewater (WWW) has potential benefits both with respect to treatment of a waste stream, as well as providing a beneficial water resource in water limited regions such as south-eastern Australia, California and South Africa. Our study in south-eastern Australia and California has focused on characterizing the physicochemical properties and microbial communities on soils following WWW application. Studies in the Yarra Valley, Victoria, Australia considered the effect of a single WWW application on paired soil sites, one of which was acclimatized to WWW application via 30 years of this practice, and the other of which was not. Soils that had received WWW appear to have a primed microbial population, with soil respiration showing a significantly greater spike following the single WWW application. In addition, the nitrate and ammonium spikes were impacted upon in the acclimatised site. Taken together, this information suggests that long-term WWW application causes an alteration to the microbial community, which may be more readily able to assimilate the carbon and nitrogen sources present in WWW. Studies are currently underway to assess the impacts of the application of a synthetic WWW on vineyard soils in Davis, California. In this study, four different synthetic WWWs are being applied as irrigation water, and soil will be sampled at the time of grape harvest. Results from this ongoing work will be presented with a view to informing long term vineyard management for sustainability.

  5. Application of enhanced membrane bioreactor (eMBR) to treat dye wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, Hector; El-Cheikh, William; Boluarte, Ida Alicia Rodriguez; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Bagshaw, Steve; Farago, Leanne; Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Shu, Li

    2015-05-01

    An enhanced membrane bioreactor (eMBR) consisting of two anoxic bioreactors (ARs) followed by an aerated membrane bioreactor (AMBR), UV-unit and a granular activated carbon (GAC) filter was employed to treat 50-100 mg/L of remazol blue BR dye. The COD of the feed was 2334 mg/L and COD:TN:TP in the feed was 119:1.87:1. A feed flow rate of 5 L/d was maintained when the dye concentration was 50 mg/L; 10 L/d of return activated sludge was recirculated to each AR from the AMBR. Once the biological system is acclimatised, 95% of dye, 99% of COD, 97% of nitrogen and 73% of phosphorus were removed at a retention time of 74.4 h. When the effluent from the AMBR was drawn at a flux rate of 6.5 L/m(2)h, the trans-membrane pressure reached 40 kPa in every 10 days. AMBR effluent was passed through the UV-unit and GAC filter to remove the dye completely. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cortisol response and subjective sleep disturbance after low-frequency noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Waye, K.; Agge, A.; Clow, A.; Hucklebridge, F.

    2004-10-01

    A previous experimental study showed that the cortisol response upon awakening was reduced following nights with low-frequency noise exposure. This study comprised a larger number of subjects and an extended period of acclimatisation nights. In total, 26 male subjects slept during five consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the subjects were exposed to low-frequency noise (40 dBA) on the 4th night and had their reference night (24 dBA) on the 5th night, while the reverse conditions were present for the other half of the group. Subjective sleep disturbances were recorded by questionnaires and cortisol response upon awakening was measured in saliva. The results showed that subjects were more tired and felt less socially orientated in the morning after nights with low-frequency noise. Mood was negatively affected in the evening after nights with low-frequency noise. No effect of noise condition was found on the cortisol secretion. There was a significant effect of group and weekday, indicating that further methodological developments are necessary before saliva cortisol secretion can be reliably used as an indicator of noise-disturbed sleep.

  7. Ploidy Variation in Hybrids from Interploid 3x X 2x Crosses in Musa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osuji, JO.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids were obtained after in vitro germination of embryos from interploid crosses between triploid 'French' plantain cultivars (Musa spp. AAB group 'Ntanga 2' and 'Bobby Tannap' with diploid banana (Ivlusa acuminata subsp. burmannicoidesj 'Calcutta 4'. Cross-pollinated bunches were harvested at full maturity and ripened with acetylene in a room for 4 days. Seeds were extracted from peeled ripe fruits by squashing. Embryos from the seeds were excised aseptically after 2 days and germinated in vitro. Seedlings were subsequently planted in early evaluation trials after acclimatising in the greenhouse. Chromosome counts were carried out on root tips of mature and maiden suckers to determine ploidy levels using a modified squashing technique. Counts showed that two of the hybrids were aneuploids (trisomies with somatic chromosome number of 2n = 2x + 1 = 23, one hybrid was diploid while the other two were tetraploids. Tetraploids are the most promising hybrids for the genetic improvement of plantains. Diploids are valuable material for further improvement of the plantain genome at this ploidy level. Trisomies provide means for further characterisation of the Musa genome and physical gene mapping in plantain and banana.

  8. Alterations to the protein profile of bladder carcinoma cell lines induced by plant extract MINA-05 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; White, Melanie Y; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Seeto, Shona; Thomas, Melissa L; Fitzgerald, Anna M; Martucci, Carlos E; Luk, Sharon; Pang, Shiu-Fu; Russell, Pamela J; Walsh, Bradley J

    2009-04-01

    Bladder cancer (BLCa) is a severe urological cancer of both men and women that commonly recurs and once invasive, is difficult to treat. MINA-05 (CK Life Sciences Int'l, Hong Kong) is a derivative of complex botanical extracts, shown to reduce cellular proliferation of bladder and prostate carcinomas. We tested the effects of MINA-05 against human BLCa cell sublines, B8, B8-RSP-GCK, B8-RSP-LN and C3, from a transitional cell carcinoma, grade IV, to determine the molecular targets of treatment by observing the cellular protein profile. Cells were acclimatised for 48 h then treated for 72 h with concentrations of MINA-05 reflecting 1/2 IC(50), IC(50) and 2 x IC(50) (n = 3) or with vehicle, (0.5% DMSO). Dose-dependant changes in protein abundance were detected and characterised using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and MS. We identified 10 proteins that underwent changes in abundance, pI and/or molecular mass in response to treatment. MINA-05 was shown to influence proteins across numerous functional classes including cytoskeletal proteins, energy metabolism proteins, protein degradation proteins and tumour suppressors, suggesting a global impact on these cell lines. This study implies that the ability of MINA-05 to retard cellular proliferation is attributed to its ability to alter cell cycling, metabolism, protein degradation and the cancer cell environment.

  9. Attenuation of stress-induced anorexia in brown trout (Salmo trutta) by pre-treatment with dietary l-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Erik; Sørensen, Christina; Bakke, Marit Jørgensen; Nilsson, Göran E; Overli, Oyvind

    2007-04-01

    The general consensus is that brain serotonin (5-HT) inhibits feed intake in teleost fishes and other vertebrates. Dietary manipulations with the 5-HT precursor tryptophan (TRP) have, however, yielded contradictory effects on feed intake, while studies of the endocrine response to stress indicate that the effects of TRP-enriched feed are context dependent. A characteristic behavioural response to stress is a reduction in feed intake, and in the present study we investigated whether pre-treatment with TRP-enriched feed affected stress-induced changes in feeding behaviour in brown trout (Salmo trutta). After acclimatisation in observation aquaria, isolated fish were fed control or TRP-supplemented feed for 7 d, whereupon they were transferred to a novel environment, in which all fish were fed control feed. Transfer to a new environment resulted in decreased feeding in both the TRP pre-treated and the control-treated group. However, this decrease was more pronounced in the control-treated group. Previous experiments have concluded that stimulation of brain 5-HT systems by TRP enhancement does not affect feed intake in salmonid fishes, but in these studies food intake was observed in unstressed animals only. The present study suggests that pre-treatment with dietary TRP attenuates stress-induced anorexia. Hence, it appears that the effect of dietary manipulations of TRP on feeding behaviour is dependent on the stress levels experienced by experimental animals. These behavioural data are discussed in the context of the involvement of 5-HT in appetite regulation.

  10. In Vitro Propagation of Pink Lapacho: Response Surface Methodology and Factorial Analysis for Optimisation of Medium Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Enrique Larraburu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Handroanthus impetiginosus, pink lapacho, is a timber, ornamental, and medicinal tree. Experiments on the in vitro propagation of H. impetiginosus were conducted using nodal segments cultivated in both Murashige and Skoog salts with Gamborg vitamins (MSG and Woody Plant Medium (WPM with different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BA and indole butyric acid (IBA. Morphogenic responses were differentially affected by salt compositions and their interactions with plant growth regulators in each micropropagation stage. According to response surface analysis, the optimum multiplication rate with 1 μM IBA ranged from 16.7 to 21.3 μM BA in WPM, and the inhibitors of endogenous auxins could increase multiplication rates. A pulse with 50 μM IBA in 1/2 MSG produced 83% rooting with 3.2 roots per shoots and higher fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots. In the acclimatisation stage, 50% of plants survived after 1 year. This methodology optimised the culture media for the in vitro propagation of the H. impetiginosus clonal pool and could be applied to related species, several of which are categorised as vulnerable on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List.

  11. [Preconditions for a stay in high altitude areas in the case of existing health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, J H B M

    2004-11-06

    Various symptoms can arise during a stay in high altitude areas (above 2500 m), such as tissue hypoxia and in particular pulmonary and brain oedema. Patients with existing health problems can expect to develop more complaints or more severe complaints at an earlier stage. For a number of these patients a stay in high altitude areas should be advised against or should only take place if certain measures are taken. The advising physician should have knowledge about the reactions of the human body on hypoxy, and about (derailments of) the acclimatisation proces in high altitude areas. Every patient with a disease that can interfere with hypoxia should be assessed on an individual basis. The most important absolute and relative contraindications are cardiac and pulmonary conditions, haemoglobin abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, epilepsy, severe obesity, kidney diseases and pregnancy. In the case of an existing health problem, a stay in high altitude should only be considered if medical care can be quickly and adequately provided on the spot.

  12. Efficient Micropropagation of Highly Economic, Medicinal and Ornamental Plant Lallemantia iberica (Bieb.) Fisch. and C. A. Mey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Fethi Ahmet; Yildirim, Mehmet Ugur; Pourali Kahriz, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Lallemantia iberica (Bieb.) Fisch. and C. A. Mey is high valued annual ornamental and medicinal plant from Lamiaceae family that prefers dry sunny hillsides, roadsides, slopes, and fallow fields over an altitude of 500–2150 m. It bears beautiful white flowers and bloom from April to June each year. This study reports L. iberica micropropagation using cotyledon node explants isolated from 15-day-old in vitro regenerated plantlets. The cotyledon node explants were cultured on MS medium containing 0.50, 1.00 plus 2.00 mg/L BAP, 0.00, 0.01, and 0.02 mg/L NAA. Maximum shoot regeneration was noted on MS medium containing 0.50 mg/L BAP. Well-developed micropropagated shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 1.00 mg/L IBA. The rooted plants were easily hardened in the growth chamber and acclimatised in greenhouse. PMID:25247175

  13. Effects of altitude on exercise level and heart rate in patients with coronary artery disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, S T; Komdeur, P; Aalbersberg, S; van Enst, G C; Breeman, A; van 't Hof, A W J

    2010-03-01

    Background. To evaluate the safety and effects of high altitude on exercise level and heart rate in patients with coronary artery disease compared with healthy controls.Methods. Eight patients with a history of an acute myocardial infarction (ejection fraction >5%) with a low-risk score were compared with seven healthy subjects during the Dutch Heart Expedition at the Aconcagua in Argentina in March 2007. All subjects underwent a maximum exercise test with a cycle ergometer at sea level and base camp, after ten days of acclimatisation, at an altitude of 4200 m. Exercise capacity and maximum heart rate were compared between groups and within subjects.Results. There was a significant decrease in maximum heart rate at high altitude compared with sea level in both the patient and the control group (166 vs. 139 beats/min, pheart rate between patients and healthy controls (-31 vs. -30%, p=0.673).Conclusion. Both patients and healthy controls showed a similar decrease in exercise capacity and maximum heart rate at 4200 m compared with sea level, suggesting that patients with a history of coronary artery disease may tolerate stay and exercise at high altitude similarly to healthy controls. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:118-21.).

  14. Travel health prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  15. A Conceptual Framework for Planning Systemic Human Adaptation to Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Peter W; Hanna, Elizabeth G

    2015-08-31

    Human activity is having multiple, inter-related effects on ecosystems. Greenhouse gas emissions persisting along current trajectories threaten to significantly alter human society. At 0.85 °C of anthropogenic warming, deleterious human impacts are acutely evident. Additional warming of 0.5 °C-1.0 °C from already emitted CO₂ will further intensify extreme heat and damaging storm events. Failing to sufficiently address this trend will have a heavy human toll directly and indirectly on health. Along with mitigation efforts, societal adaptation to a warmer world is imperative. Adaptation efforts need to be significantly upscaled to prepare society to lessen the public health effects of rising temperatures. Modifying societal behaviour is inherently complex and presents a major policy challenge. We propose a social systems framework for conceptualizing adaptation that maps out three domains within the adaptation policy landscape: acclimatisation, behavioural adaptation and technological adaptation, which operate at societal and personal levels. We propose that overlaying this framework on a systems approach to societal change planning methods will enhance governments' capacity and efficacy in strategic planning for adaptation. This conceptual framework provides a policy oriented planning assessment tool that will help planners match interventions to the behaviours being targeted for change. We provide illustrative examples to demonstrate the framework's application as a planning tool.

  16. Small but Manifold - Hidden Diversity in "Spumella-like Flagellates".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Lars; Bock, Christina; Schweikert, Michael; Boenigk, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Colourless, nonscaled chrysophytes comprise morphologically similar or even indistinguishable flagellates which are important bacterivors in water and soil crucial for ecosystem functioning. However, phylogenetic analyses indicate a multiple origin of such colourless, nonscaled flagellate lineages. These flagellates are often referred to as "Spumella-like flagellates" in ecological and biogeographic studies. Although this denomination reflects an assumed polyphyly, it obscures the phylogenetic and taxonomic diversity of this important flagellate group and, thus, hinders progress in lineage- and taxon-specific ecological surveys. The smallest representatives of colourless chrysophytes have been addressed in very few taxonomic studies although they are among the dominant flagellates in field communities. To overcome the blurred picture and set the field for further investigation in biogeography and ecology of the organisms in question, we studied a set of strains of specifically small, colourless, nonscaled chrysomonad flagellates by means of electron microscopy and molecular analyses. They were isolated by a filtration-acclimatisation approach focusing on flagellates of around 5 μm. We present the phylogenetic position of eight different lineages on both the ordinal and the generic level. Accordingly, we describe the new genera Apoikiospumella, Chromulinospumella, Segregatospumella, Cornospumella and Acrispumella Boenigk et Grossmann n. g. and different species within them. © 2015 The Author(s). Journal of The Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  17. [Otorhinolaryngological aspects of high altitude medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mees, K; Olzowy, B

    2008-04-01

    The World Health Organisation estimates that about 40 million tourists every year climb to high (2,500-5,300 m) and extremely high altitudes (5,300-8,850 m). Thus altitude sickness and other health risks are increasing accordingly and so this fact requires clarification and advice for tourists in order to reduce the risks. That applies to the otolaryngologist, too. The non-traumatic health risks all result from the atmospheric conditions at high altitudes, in particular due to the lower atmospheric pressure. The partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), the temperature and the partial pressure of water vapour decrease continuously with increasing altitude and at the summit of the highest mountain on earth, Mt. Everest, the pO2 is reduced by two-thirds, from 212 to about 70 hPa. The temperature drops on average 6.5 degrees C per 1,000 m and at -20 degrees C 1 m3 of air contains at most just about 1 g of water vapour. The shortage of oxygen above 2500 m cannot be compensated for at once. Respiratory alcalosis, followed by hyperventilation, improves the alveolar loading of red blood cells (RBC) with oxygen, however, it also reduces the ventilatory drive from the central CO2-chemosensors as well from the peripheral O2-chemosensors located in the carotid bodies. Not until the alcalosis has been balanced by a renal secretion of bicarbonate, does the pO2-driven ventilatory stimulus normalize and the relative increase of RBC as a result of altitude diuresis improve and complete the acclimatisation. Up to an altitude of 4,000 m this adaptation takes several days to one week and up to 5,000 m up to 2 weeks. If acclimatisation has not taken place or has been insufficient, acute mountain sickness may develop. It is a harmless disorder, although it noticeably affects people physically and mentally and in some rare cases it might even develop into a life-threatening high-altitude edema in the brain or in the lung. Hematocrit values of up to 58 or even 60% at great altitudes are quite

  18. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, James R; Baird, Andrew H; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Muttaqin, Efin; Edwards, Alasdair J; Campbell, Stuart J; Yewdall, Katie; Affendi, Yang Amri; Chou, Loke Ming

    2012-01-01

    Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; pBleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia) where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  19. Comparison of whole animal costs of protein synthesis among polar and temperate populations of the same species of gammarid amphipod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastrick, S P S; Whiteley, N M

    2017-05-01

    Protein synthesis can account for a substantial proportion of metabolic rate. Energetic costs of protein synthesis, should in theory, be the same in marine invertebrates from a range of thermal habitats, and yet direct measurements using inhibitors produce widely differing values, especially in the cold. The present study aimed to remove any potential confounding interspecific effects by determining costs of protein synthesis in two latitudinally separated populations of the same species (amphipod, Gammarus oceanicus) living in two different thermal regimes; polar vs cold-temperate. Costs of protein synthesis were determined in summer acclimatised G. oceanicus from Svalbard (79°N) at 5°C and from Scotland (58°N) at 13°C. Amphipods were injected with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX), at 9mmoll-1 in crab saline to give a tissue concentration of 0.05mgCHXg-1FW and left for 60min before the injection of [3H] phenylalanine. After incubation for 120min (180min in total from initial injection), both whole-animal rates of oxygen uptake and absolute rates of protein synthesis were significantly reduced in CHX-treated amphipods vs controls injected with saline. Both populations exhibited similar costs of protein synthesis of ~7μmolO2mg-1protein which is close to the estimated theoretical minimum for peptide bond formation, and similar to the values obtained in cell-free systems. The study demonstrates that in G. oceanicus, costs of protein synthesis rates were not elevated in the cold but were fixed among polar and cold-temperate populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Torpor expression in juvenile and adult Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) differs in frequency, duration and onset in response to a daily cycle in ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Victoria; Bank, Jonathan H; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    In addition to morphological and physiological traits of short-day acclimatisation, Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) from Central Asia exhibit spontaneous daily torpor to decrease energy demands during winter. Environmental factors such as food scarcity and low temperatures have been shown to facilitate the use of this temporal reduction in metabolism and body temperature. We investigated the effect of a daily cycle in ambient temperature on short-day acclimation and torpor expression in juvenile and adult Djungarian hamsters. The animals were exposed to a cold dark phase (6°C) and a warmer light phase (18°C) and were compared with control hamsters kept at a constant ambient temperature of 18°C. Under constant conditions, torpor expression did not differ between adult and juvenile hamsters. Although the daily temperature cycle evoked an increased metabolic rate in adult and juvenile hamsters during the dark phase and strengthened the synchronization between torpor entrance and the beginning of the light phase, it did not induce the expected torpor facilitation. In adult hamsters, torpor expression profiles did not differ from those under constant conditions at all. In contrast, juvenile hamsters showed a delayed onset of torpor season, a decreased torpor frequency, depth and duration, as well as an increased number of early torpor terminations coinciding with the rise in ambient temperature after the beginning of the light phase. While the temperature challenge appeared to be of minor importance for energy balance and torpor expression in adult hamsters, it profoundly influenced the overall energy saving strategy of juvenile hamsters, promoting torpor-alleviating active foragers over torpor-prone energy-savers. In addition, our data suggest a more efficient acclimation in juvenile hamsters under additional energy challenges, which reduces the need for torpor expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of dietary fibre of barley variety 'Rihane' on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci development and on colonic microbiota diversity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahouar, Lamia; Pochart, Philippe; Salem, Hichem Ben; El Felah, Mouledi; Mokni, Moncef; Magne, Fabien; Mangin, Irène; Suau, Antonia; Pereira, Ester; Hammami, Mohamed; Achour, Lotfi

    2012-12-14

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested an important role for dietary fibre (DF) of cereals in the prevention of colon cancer. The objective of the present study was to explain the effects of the DF of barley Rihane (BR) on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colonic bacterial diversity in rats. Following an acclimatisation period, rats were divided into four groups and fed a control (C) diet or experimental diet containing 30 % of BR. DF content in the experimental diet was twice that of the C diet (total DF was 8·69 % in the C diet and 15·24 % in the BR diet). At 7 and 8 weeks of age, rats received two successive subcutaneous injections of AOM at 20 mg/kg body weight. At 12 weeks after the first injection, ten animals from each group were killed. The BR diet decreased colonic pH (P colonic microbiota species between the different groups. In addition, we showed inter-individual variability within the same group. This similarity was affected by BR and AOM. The present results show that bifidobacteria numbers were lower in rats fed the BR diet compared with those fed the C diet. However, the number of enterobacteria in colonic content was increased (P < 0·05) in the BR group compared with the C group. The results from the present study show that the DF of BR reduced the incidence of AOM-induced ACF and increased microbiota biodiversity.

  2. Influence of a user-adaptive prosthetic knee on quality of life, balance confidence, and measures of mobility: a randomised cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Erik C; Nederhand, Marc J; Olsman, Jeroen; Rietman, Johan S

    2015-06-01

    To study the influence of a transition from a non-microprocessor controlled to the Rheo Knee(®) II on quality of life, balance confidence and measures of mobility. Randomised crossover trial. Research department of a rehabilitation centre. Persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation (n=10). Participants were assessed with their own non-microprocessor controlled knee and with the Rheo Knee(®) II. The low-profile Vari-Flex with EVO foot was installed in both knee conditions, followed by eight weeks of acclimatisation. The order in which knees were tested was randomised. Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire with addendum, Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale, Timed "up & go" test, Timed up and down stairs test, Hill Assessment Index, Stairs Assessment Index, Standardized Walking Obstacle Course and One Leg Balance test. Significant higher scores were found for the Rheo Knee(®) II on the Residual Limb Health subscale of the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire when compared to the non-microprocessor controlled prosthetic knee (median [interquartile range] resp. 86.67 [62.21-93.08] and 68.71 [46.15-94.83]; P=0.047) In addition, participants needed significantly more steps to complete an obstacle course when walking with the Rheo Knee(®) II compared to the non-microprocessor controlled prosthetic knee (median [interquartile range] resp. 23.50 [19.92-26.25] and 22.17 [19.50-25.75]; P=0.041). On other outcome measures, no significant differences were found. Transition towards the Rheo Knee(®) II had little effect on the studied outcome measures. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Incidence of acute mountain sickness in UK Military Personnel on Mount Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlerigg, Antonia; Woods, D R; Mellor, A J

    2016-12-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem of trekkers to high altitude. The UK military train at high altitude through adventurous training (AT) or as exercising troops. The ascent of Point Lenana at 4985 m on Mount Kenya is frequently attempted on AT. This study sought to establish the incidence of AMS within this population, to aid future planning for military activities at altitude. A voluntary questionnaire was distributed to all British Army Training Unit Kenya based expeditions attempting to ascend Mount Kenya during the period from February to April 2014. The questionnaire included twice daily Lake Louise and Borg (perceived exertion scale) self-scoring. All expeditions were planned around a 5-day schedule, which included reserve time for acclimatisation, illness and inclement weather. Data were collected on 47 participants, 70% of whom reached the summit of Point Lenana. 62% (29/47) self-reported AMS (defined as Lake Louise score (LLS) ≥3) on at least one occasion during the ascent, and 34% (10/29) suffered severe AMS (LLS ≥6). Those who attempted the climb within 2 weeks of arrival in Kenya had a higher incidence of AMS (12/15 (80%) vs 17/32 (53%), p=0.077). Participants recording a high Borg score were significantly more likely to develop AMS (16/18 vs 9/21, p=0.003). This represents the first informative dataset for Mount Kenya ascents and altitude. The incidence of AMS during AT on Mount Kenya using this ascent profile is high. Adapting the current ascent profile, planning the ascent after time in country and reducing perceived exertion during the trek may reduce the incidence of AMS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Effects of arsenic supplementation in feed on laying performance, arsenic retention of eggs and organs, biochemical indices and endocrine hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X Y; Zhou, M Y; Li, L L; Jiang, Y J; Zou, X T

    2017-02-01

    1. The primary objective of this experiment was to estimate the toxic effects of arsenic (As) supplementation in feed on laying performance, As retention by eggs and organs, serum biochemical indices and endocrine hormones in laying hens. 2. A total of 320 "Jinghong Number 1" hens, 56-week-old, were randomly allocated into four treatments of four replicates with 20 layers in each. Graded arsenical was added to the basal diet in the experimental diets at As levels of 0, 17, 34 and 51 mg/kg, respectively. The trial lasted for 9 weeks including 1 week for acclimatisation. 3. Supplementation of dietary As for eight weeks had no effect on laying performance. As retention in albumen, yolk, egg, liver and kidney increased as As levels increased The level of serum phosphorus (P) was minimised at the 17 mg As/kg group. The activity of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) increased linearly. No differences were observed for levels of serum calcium (Ca), alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). Concentrations of estradiol (E2) and progesterone (PG) declined at 34 and 51 mg/kg As levels compared with the control group. As supplementation exerted no influence on levels of serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and the ratio between T3 and T4. 4. In conclusion, dietary As supplementation accelerated retention in tissues and eggs, and affected the laying rate by diminishing hormone levels of E2 and PG at 51 mg/kg.

  5. Time-of-day effects of exposure to solar radiation on thermoregulation during outdoor exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Goto, Takayuki; Goto, Heita; Shirato, Minayuki

    2017-01-01

    High solar radiation has been recognised as a contributing factor to exertional heat-related illness in individuals exercising outdoors in the heat. Although solar radiation intensity has been known to have similar time-of-day variation as body temperature, the relationship between fluctuations in solar radiation associated with diurnal change in the angle of sunlight and thermoregulatory responses in individuals exercising outdoors in a hot environment remains largely unknown. The present study therefore investigated the time-of-day effects of variations in solar radiation associated with changing solar elevation angle on thermoregulatory responses during moderate-intensity outdoor exercise in the heat of summer. Eight healthy, high school baseball players, heat-acclimatised male volunteers completed a 3-h outdoor baseball trainings under the clear sky in the heat. The trainings were commenced at 0900 h in AM trial and at 1600 h in PM trial each on a separate day. Solar radiation and solar elevation angle during exercise continued to increase in AM (672-1107 W/m 2 and 44-69°) and decrease in PM (717-0 W/m 2 and 34-0°) and were higher on AM than on PM (both P  0.05). Tympanic temperature measured by an infrared tympanic thermometer and mean skin temperature were higher in AM than PM at 120 and 180 min (P  0.05). The current study demonstrates a greater thermoregulatory strain in the morning than in the afternoon resulting from a higher body temperature and heart rate in relation to an increase in environmental heat stress with rising solar radiation and solar elevation angle during moderate-intensity outdoor exercise in the heat. This response is associated with a lesser net heat loss at the skin and a greater body heat gain from the sun in the morning compared with the afternoon.

  6. Efficacy of a single dose of milbemycin oxime/praziquantel combination tablets, Milpro(®), against adult Echinococcus multilocularis in dogs and both adult and immature E. multilocularis in young cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvejic, Dejan; Schneider, Claudia; Fourie, Josephus; de Vos, Christa; Bonneau, Stephane; Bernachon, Natalia; Hellmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two single-site, laboratory, negatively controlled, masked, randomised dose confirmation studies were performed: one in dogs, the other in cats. After a period of acclimatisation, both the dogs and cats were orally infected with Echinococcus multilocularis protoscoleces. In the dog study, 10 dogs received a single dose of Milpro® tablets at a minimum dose of 0.5 mg/kg milbemycin oxime and 5 mg/kg praziquantel 18 days post-infection and 10 dogs received no treatment. In the cat study, 10 cats received a single dose of Milpro® tablets at a minimum dose of 2 mg/kg milbemycin oxime and 5 mg/kg praziquantel 7 days post-infection, 10 cats received a single dose of the treatment 18 days post-infection and 10 cats remained untreated. In both studies, intestinal worm counts were performed 23 days post-infection at necropsy. No worms were retrieved from any of the 30 treated animals. Nine of 10 control dogs had multiple worms (geometric mean 91, arithmetic mean 304) and all 10 control cats had multiple worms (geometric mean 216, arithmetic mean 481). The difference in worm counts between all three treated groups and their controls was highly significant (ANOVA p values of log transformed data dogs and cats as well as for elimination of immature E. multilocularis in cats as evidenced by the effectiveness of treatment 7 days post-infection. The treatments were well accepted and tolerated, and there were no adverse drug reactions observed.

  7. An observational study on the spectrum of heat-related illness, with a proposal on classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, T K; Grimshaw, D

    2005-03-01

    During operations in subtropical areas over the summer months of 2001 and 2003 the authors audited 80 patients with heat-related illness, with the intention of defining the nature and distribution of the underlying pathophysiology. Haematological, biochemical and clinical data were gathered prospectively and patients allocated to diagnostic categories on the basis of the combination of clinical findings and investigations. Four basic types of heat-related illness could be distinguished: (1) excessive salt loss with hyponatraemic dehydration, (2) hypokalaemic alkalosis with low serum bicarbonate, (3) haemodilution associated with excessive water intake in stressed individuals, and (4) loss of normal thermoregulation, characterised by high core temperature and paradoxical cessation of sweating. Most of the patients fell clearly into a single distinct category, but there was a degree of overlap. Reduction of extracellular fluid volume was a common central mechanism. Common provoking factors identified were: gastrointestinal upset, history of previous heat intolerance (35%) environmental temperatures exceeding 45 degrees C, short period of acclimatisation (55%), travel, sleep loss, hard physical work especially if directly preceded by a period of sleep, work in confined humid spaces (45%), and lack of additional salt intake. When several of these factors were present together admission rate over one 24-hour period reached 3% of persons at risk per day. Patients are often more ill than they appear. To reduce the incidence of heat illness during future operations the following measures are proposed: 1. Avoidance of physical exertion during the heat of the day for the first 7-10 days. 2. Progressive gentle exercise in the early morning or late evening over the same period. 3. Increase in daily salt intake to 15-20gm for the first 2-3 weeks. 4. Only sufficient water intake to relieve thirst and to ensure the flow of abundant dilute urine.

  8. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility of red (Macropus rufus) and grey (Macropus fuliginosus and Macropus giganteus) kangaroos and free-ranging sheep of the arid regions of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffenstein, R; McCarron, H C; Dawson, T J

    2001-02-01

    The mean corpuscular fragility (MCF) of erythrocytes may reflect phylogenetic characteristics as well as an animal's ability to respond to the osmotic challenges associated with cyclic dehydration and rehydration. This type of ecophysiological stress is commonly encountered by animals living in arid regions and low MCF may contribute to their ability to survive and thrive in these xeric habitats. The eastern grey kangaroo has only in recent times extended its range into the arid zone, and is considered a more mesic inhabitant than the red kangaroo. We therefore compared the ability of eastern grey kangaroos and red kangaroos to handle prolonged periods of water restriction, as well as the MCF of the erythrocytes of free-ranging red, eastern grey and western grey kangaroos found at the Fowlers Gap field station. In addition, the MCF of free-ranging sheep inhabiting the same pastures were used as an experimental control; they are phylogenetically unrelated yet are subjected to the same acclimatisation stresses. While red kangaroos exhibited greater tolerance of dehydration compared to eastern grey kangaroos, the MCF of all three kangaroo species was similar and more resilient to osmotic stresses (MCF, 130 mosmol/kg) than erythrocytes of sheep (MCF, 220 mosmol/kg). The MCF did not change with water restriction, however, the erythrocytes of long-term captive populations fed a comparatively better quality diet were more resistant to osmotic shock than the free-ranging animals. Phylogenetic commonality rather than ecophysiological responses to life in the arid zone appeared to influence MCF. The MCF values of sheep corresponded to that of other ovines; similarly the MCF of kangaroos concurred regardless of their preferred habitats. ecological history and differential success in the arid zone.

  9. Contoured, prefabricated foot orthoses demonstrate comparable mechanical properties to contoured, customised foot orthoses: a plantar pressure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Anthony C; Landorf, Karl B; Keenan, Anne-Maree

    2009-06-16

    Foot orthoses have been demonstrated to be effective in the management of a range of conditions, but there is debate as to the benefits of customised foot orthoses over less expensive, prefabricated devices. In a randomised, cross-over trial, 15 flat-footed participants aged between 18 and 45 years were provided with semi-rigid, customised orthoses and semi-rigid, contoured, prefabricated orthoses. Pressures and forces were measured using an in-shoe system with subjects wearing shoes alone, wearing customised orthoses, and again when wearing contoured prefabricated orthoses. Two weeks acclimatisation was included between cross-over of therapy. Repeated measures ANOVA models with post-hoc, pair-wise comparisons were used to test for differences. When compared to wearing shoes alone, wearing either the customised orthoses or the prefabricated orthoses was associated with increases in force and force time integrals in the midfoot region. Peak and maximum mean pressure and pressure-time, and force-time integrals were reduced in both the medial and lateral forefoot. There were, however, no significant differences between the customised orthoses and the prefabricated orthoses at any site. There was a similar change in loading with both the semi-rigid customised and the semi-rigid prefabricated orthoses when compared to the shoe alone condition. However, while customised devices offered minor differences over prefabricated orthoses in some variables, these were not statistically significant. The results suggest that there may be only minor differences in the effects on plantar pressures between the customised and the less expensive prefabricated orthoses tested in this study, however further research is warranted.

  10. Rapid adaptation of microalgae to bodies of water with extreme pollution from uranium mining: An explanation of how mesophilic organisms can rapidly colonise extremely toxic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Balboa, C.; Baselga-Cervera, B. [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García-Sanchez, A.; Igual, J.M. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Salamanca (IRNASA-CSIC), PO Box 257, 37071 Salamanca (Spain); Lopez-Rodas, V. [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Costas, E., E-mail: ecostas@vet.ucm.es [Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Some microalgae species survive to extreme environments in ponds of residual waters from uranium mining. •Adaptation of microalgae to U arose very fast. •Spontaneous mutations that confer large adaptive value were able to produce the adaptation to residual waters of U mining. •Adaptation to more extreme waters of U mining is only possible after the recombination subsequent to sexual mating. •Resistant microalgae bio-adsorbs uranium to the cell wall and internalises uranium inside the cytoplasm. -- Abstract: Extreme environments may support communities of microalgae living at the limits of their tolerance. It is usually assumed that these extreme environments are inhabited by extremophile species. However, global anthropogenic environmental changes are generating new extreme environments, such as mining-effluent pools of residual waters from uranium mining with high U levels, acidity and radioactivity in Salamanca (Spain). Certain microalgal species have rapidly adapted to these extreme waters (uranium mining in this area began in 1960). Experiments have demonstrated that physiological acclimatisation would be unable to achieve adaptation. In contrast, rapid genetic adaptation was observed in waters ostensibly lethal to microalgae by means of rare spontaneous mutations that occurred prior to the exposure to effluent waters from uranium mining. However, adaptation to the most extreme conditions was only possible after recombination through sexual mating because adaptation requires more than one mutation. Microalgae living in extreme environments could be the descendants of pre-selective mutants that confer significant adaptive value to extreme contamination. These “lucky mutants” could allow for the evolutionary rescue of populations faced with rapid environmental change.

  11. Model assisted startup of anaerobic digesters fed with thermally hydrolysed activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, D J; Balthes, C; Barr, K

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of the IWA ADM1 to predict and interpret results from two full-scale anaerobic digesters fed with thermal hyrolysate (waste activated sludge with a long upstream sludge age) from a Cambi hydrolysis process operating at 165°C and 6 bar-g. The first digester was fed conventionally-though intermittently, while the second was heavily diluted through a substantial component of the evaluation period (110 days). There were a number of important outcomes-related to both model application, and model predictions. Input and inert COD: mass ratio was very important, and was considerably higher than the 1.42 g g⁻¹ used for biomass throughout the IWA activated sludge and anaerobic digestion models. Input COD: VS ratio was 1.6 g g⁻¹, and inert COD: VS ratio was 1.7 g g⁻¹. The model succeeded on a number of levels, including effective prediction of important outputs (degradability, gas flow and composition, and final solids), clarification of the substantial data scatter, prediction of recovery times during operationally poor periods, and cross-validation of the results between digester 1 and digester 2. Key failures in model performance were related to an early incorrect assumption of the COD: VS ratio of 1.42 g g⁻¹, and intermittent high acetate levels, most likely caused by inhibition, and rapid acclimatisation to ammonia. The acute free ammonia limit was found to be 0.008 M NH(3)-N, while the chronic inhibition constant (K(I,NH₃,ac)) was 0.007 ± 0.001 M NH₃-N. Overall, this is a complex system, and application of the model added significant confidence to the initial operational decisions during an aggressive startup on an atypical feed.

  12. Subclinical zinc deficiency impairs pancreatic digestive enzyme activity and digestive capacity of weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Daniel; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of short-term subclinical Zn deficiency on exocrine pancreatic activity and changes in digestive capacity. A total of forty-eight weaned piglets were fed ad libitum a basal diet (maize and soyabean meal) with adequate Zn supply (88 mg Zn/kg diet) during a 2-week acclimatisation phase. Animals were then assigned to eight dietary treatment groups (n 6) according to a complete randomised block design considering litter, live weight and sex. All pigs were fed restrictively (450 g diet/d) the basal diet but with varying ZnSO4.7H2O additions, resulting in 28·1, 33·6, 38·8, 42·7, 47·5, 58·2, 67·8 and 88·0 mg Zn/kg diet for a total experimental period of 8 d. Pancreatic Zn concentrations and pancreatic activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and α-amylase exhibited a broken-line response to stepwise reduction in dietary Zn by declining beneath thresholds of 39·0, 58·0, 58·0, 41·2, 47·5, 57·7 and 58·0 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. Furthermore, carboxypeptidase B and α-amylase activities were significantly lower in samples with reduced pancreatic Zn contents. Coefficients of faecal digestibility of DM, crude protein, total lipids and crude ash responded similarly to pancreatic enzyme activities by declining below dietary thresholds of 54·7, 45·0, 46·9 and 58·2 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. In conclusion, (1) subclinical Zn deficiency impaired pancreatic exocrine enzymes, (2) this response was connected to pancreatic Zn metabolism and (3) the decline in catalytic activity impaired faecal digestibility already after 1 week of insufficient alimentary Zn supply and very early before clinical deficiency symptoms arise.

  13. Position statement—altitude training for improving team-sport players’ performance: current knowledge and unresolved issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Amann, Markus; Aughey, Robert; Billaut, François; Bishop, David J; Bourdon, Pitre; Buchheit, Martin; Chapman, Robert; D'Hooghe, Michel; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Gore, Christopher J; Millet, Grégoire P; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Saunders, Philo U; Schmidt, Walter; Schumacher, Yorck O

    2013-01-01

    Despite the limited research on the effects of altitude (or hypoxic) training interventions on team-sport performance, players from all around the world engaged in these sports are now using altitude training more than ever before. In March 2013, an Altitude Training and Team Sports conference was held in Doha, Qatar, to establish a forum of research and practical insights into this rapidly growing field. A round-table meeting in which the panellists engaged in focused discussions concluded this conference. This has resulted in the present position statement, designed to highlight some key issues raised during the debates and to integrate the ideas into a shared conceptual framework. The present signposting document has been developed for use by support teams (coaches, performance scientists, physicians, strength and conditioning staff) and other professionals who have an interest in the practical application of altitude training for team sports. After more than four decades of research, there is still no consensus on the optimal strategies to elicit the best results from altitude training in a team-sport population. However, there are some recommended strategies discussed in this position statement to adopt for improving the acclimatisation process when training/competing at altitude and for potentially enhancing sea-level performance. It is our hope that this information will be intriguing, balanced and, more importantly, stimulating to the point that it promotes constructive discussion and serves as a guide for future research aimed at advancing the bourgeoning body of knowledge in the area of altitude training for team sports. PMID:24282213

  14. Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopharatana, Annop; Pullammanappallil, Pratap C; Clarke, William P

    2007-01-01

    A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 degrees C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

  15. Adaptive divergence in a scleractinian coral: physiological adaptation of Seriatopora hystrix to shallow and deep reef habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oppen Madeleine JH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergent natural selection across environmental gradients has been acknowledged as a major driver of population and species divergence, however its role in the diversification of scleractinian corals remains poorly understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that the brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix and its algal endosymbionts (Symbiodinium are genetically partitioned across reef environments (0-30 m on the far northern Great Barrier Reef. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms underlying this differentiation and assess the stability of host-symbiont associations through a reciprocal transplantation experiment across habitats ('Back Reef', 'Upper Slope' and 'Deep Slope', in combination with molecular (mtDNA and ITS2-DGGE and photo-physiological analyses (respirometry and HPLC. Results The highest survival rates were observed for native transplants (measured 14 months after transplantation, indicating differential selective pressures between habitats. Host-symbiont assemblages remained stable during the experimental duration, demonstrating that the ability to "shuffle" or "switch" symbionts is restricted in S. hystrix. Photo-physiological differences were observed between transplants originating from the shallow and deep habitats, with indirect evidence of an increased heterotrophic capacity in native deep-water transplants (from the 'Deep Slope' habitat. Similar photo-acclimatisation potential was observed between transplants originating from the two shallow habitats ('Back Reef' and 'Upper Slope', highlighting that their genetic segregation over depth may be due to other, non-photo-physiological traits under selection. Conclusions This study confirms that the observed habitat partitioning of S. hystrix (and associated Symbiodinium is reflective of adaptive divergence along a depth gradient. Gene flow appears to be reduced due to divergent selection, highlighting the potential role of ecological mechanisms, in addition to

  16. Life on the edge: O2 binding in Atlantic cod red blood cells near their southern distribution limit is not sensitive to temperature or haemoglobin genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Samantha L; Metcalfe, Julian; Righton, David A; Berenbrink, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Atlantic cod are a commercially important species believed to be threatened by warming seas near their southern, equatorward upper thermal edge of distribution. Limitations to circulatory O2 transport, in particular cardiac output, and the geographic distribution of functionally different haemoglobin (Hb) genotypes have separately been suggested to play a role in setting thermal tolerance in this species. The present study assessed the thermal sensitivity of O2 binding in Atlantic cod red blood cells with different Hb genotypes near their upper thermal distribution limit and modelled its consequences for the arterio-venous O2 saturation difference, Sa-vO2 , another major determinant of circulatory O2 supply rate. The results showed statistically indistinguishable red blood cell O2 binding between the three HbI genotypes in wild-caught Atlantic cod from the Irish Sea (53° N). Red blood cells had an unusually low O2 affinity, with reduced or even reversed thermal sensitivity between pH 7.4 and 7.9, and 5.0 and 20.0°C. This was paired with strongly pH-dependent affinity and cooperativity of red blood cell O2 binding (Bohr and Root effects). Modelling of Sa-vO2  at physiological pH, temperature and O2 partial pressures revealed a substantial capacity for increases in Sa-vO2  to meet rising tissue O2 demands at 5.0 and 12.5°C, but not at 20°C. Furthermore, there was no evidence for an increase of maximal Sa-vO2  with temperature. It is suggested that Atlantic cod at such high temperatures may solely depend on increases in cardiac output and blood O2 capacity, or thermal acclimatisation of metabolic rate, for matching circulatory O2 supply to tissue demand. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. On the character and production of 'active participation' in neuro-rehabilitation: an Actor-Network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Simon; Mares, Kathryn; Coull, Neil; Poland, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    The importance of patients' active involvement in neuro-rehabilitation after acquired brain injury has been consistently emphasised in recent years. However, most approaches fail to show how 'active participation' is practically enacted, focusing on individualised explanations of patient choice and behaviours, or notions of inherent patient traits. Using actor-network theory (ANT) as a sensitising concept, we investigated neuro-rehabilitation practices, asking how participation is shaped through biological and socio-material specificities, how rights to knowledge and expertise are constructed, and how a body acclimatises and adjusts within an order of participation and transformation. We analysed video-recorded fieldwork extracts, examining the work of adjusting, testing and transforming; the construction of competence and incompetence; and material and social processes involved in the division of the body and its re-composition. Our findings show how an ANT-sensitised approach provides a critical understanding and context-specific characterisation of 'active participation', produced through the association of heterogeneous actors at any one time. Such specificity and the distribution of work suggest that efforts to account for optimum therapy 'dosages', and clinical attention to establishing individually-located levels of 'self-efficacy' or 'motivation' are misdirected. The performance of 'active participation', rather, should be re-imagined as a product of diverse, mutually attuned entities. A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  18. Mapping heat wave risk in the UK: Proactive planning for the 2050s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oven, Katie; Reaney, Sim; Ohlemüller, Ralf; Nodwell, Sarah; Curtis, Sarah; Riva, Mylène; Dunn, Christine; Val, Dimitri; Burkhard, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Climate change projections suggest an increased frequency of heat waves in the UK over the coming decades. Such extreme events pose a serious threat to human health and are likely to impact upon health and social care systems and the infrastructures supporting them. This stress will result from both increased demands upon healthcare services and the ability of the infrastructure to cope, such as sufficient climate control in hospitals. Certain sectors of the population, such as older people, have an increased susceptibility to heat waves and hence are the focus of this research. There is no universal definition of a heat wave, reflecting the acclimatisation of a population. Based on a review of the literature, this research therefore sets out a series of working definitions of a heat wave in the UK context from a human health perspective. Drawing on these definitions, the UK heat wave hazard was mapped for the 2050s (2040-2069) using daily minimum and maximum temperature data derived from the UKCP09 Weather Generator at 50 km resolution. The analysis was undertaken for the three different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios within UKCP09 (low, medium and high). Hot spots of increased heat wave risk were identified and comparisons made between the various model outputs. These data were then combined with demographic forecasts for the 2050s enabling the identification of areas with an ageing population. Results are presented showing the scale of the projected change in heat wave risk across the UK and the location of older people. These results will be used in proactive planning to help policymakers and practitioners respond more appropriately to the needs of vulnerable populations in the coming decades. Key words: climate change; heat wave; risk mapping; vulnerability; risk reduction.

  19. Elucidation of biotransformation of diclofenac and 4′hydroxydiclofenac during biological wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouju, Helene; Nastold, Peter [Institute for Ecopreneurship, School of Life Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Gründenstrasse 40, CH 4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Beck, Birgit; Hollender, Juliane [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Corvini, Philippe F.-X. [Institute for Ecopreneurship, School of Life Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Gründenstrasse 40, CH 4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wintgens, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wintgens@fhnw.ch [Institute for Ecopreneurship, School of Life Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Gründenstrasse 40, CH 4132 Muttenz (Switzerland)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • The presence of DF specific degraders in activated sludge was confirmed. • The hydroxylation of DF to 4′OHDF is a bottleneck in diclofenac biodegradation. • Two biotransformation end products of DF and 4'OHDF were identified. • In wastewater treatment plants 4′-OHDF can be of both human and microbial origin. • A tentative biotransformation pathway for DF and 4′OHDF was proposed. - Abstract: This study aimed at gaining knowledge on the degradation pathway during biological treatment of wastewater of diclofenac and 4′-hydroxydiclofenac, its main human metabolite. For that purpose, an aerobic MBR was acclimatised to diclofenac, and the MBR biomass subsequently incubated with {sup 14}C-diclofenac or {sup 14}C-4′hydroxydiclofenac over 25 days. It was demonstrated that diclofenac degradation was much slower and limited than that of 4′-hydroxydiclofenac. Indeed, after 18 days of batch incubation, diclofenac was removed up to 40%, this rate remained stable till the end of the experiment, while 4′-hydroxydiclofenac was completely degraded within nine days. The analyses of supernatant samples have shown that diclofenac degradation led to four transformation products, more polar than the parent compound, one of them being 4′-hydroxydiclofenac. The degradation of 4′-hydroxydiclofenac led to the formation of the same metabolites than those detected during diclofenac degradation. With these results, the hydroxylation of diclofenac to 4′-hydroxydiclofenac was identified as one major bottleneck in diclofenac degradation during biological treatment of wastewater.

  20. Sensitivity of two green microalgae to copper stress: Growth, oxidative and antioxidants analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Seham M; Selim, Samy; Klöck, Gerd; AbdElgawad, Hamada

    2017-10-01

    Depending on species, heavy metals, including copper (Cu), differentially affect algal growth and metabolism. Here, we aim to evaluate the differential responses of two green microalgae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus acuminatus, exposed to sub-lethal doses of Cu (25 and 50µM, respectively) for 7 days. The changes in growth, oxidative damage markers, and antioxidants were analysed. We found that S. acuminatus could acclimatise during long-term exposure to Cu stress. S. acuminatus accumulated lower Cu content and showed a slight decrease in H 2 O 2 levels when compared to C. sorokiniana. Cu stress induced membrane damage in the two microalgae species, however, this increase was slightly lower in S. acuminatus. To mitigate Cu stress impact, C. sorkiniana markedly increased proline, polyphenols, flavonoids, tocopherols, glutathione levels, as well as the activities of GST, APX, GR and SOD enzymes, which could explain less-stress sensitivity. On the other hand, S. acuminatus exhibited significant increases in proline, polyphenol, and tocopherol contents. Activity levels of POX, APX, GR and SOD enzymes, were also increased. These results suggest that the two microalgae differentially induced the antioxidant defence system to neutralise the oxidative damage induced by Cu stress. This study also provided new data for Cu tolerance and Cu removal abilities of two microalgal species, which commonly exist in surface water bodies, where low Cu uptake and efficient antioxidant defence system protected S. acuminatus against oxidative stress induced by Cu stress. This makes it feasible for treatment of Cu contaminated waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A mobile, high-throughput semi-automated system for testing cognition in large non-primate animal models of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Sebastian D; Perentos, Nicholas; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-05-30

    For reasons of cost and ethical concerns, models of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) are currently being developed in farm animals, as an alternative to non-human primates. Developing reliable methods of testing cognitive function is essential to determining the usefulness of such models. Nevertheless, cognitive testing of farm animal species presents a unique set of challenges. The primary aims of this study were to develop and validate a mobile operant system suitable for high throughput cognitive testing of sheep. We designed a semi-automated testing system with the capability of presenting stimuli (visual, auditory) and reward at six spatial locations. Fourteen normal sheep were used to validate the system using a two-choice visual discrimination task. Four stages of training devised to acclimatise animals to the system are also presented. All sheep progressed rapidly through the training stages, over eight sessions. All sheep learned the 2CVDT and performed at least one reversal stage. The mean number of trials the sheep took to reach criterion in the first acquisition learning was 13.9±1.5 and for the reversal learning was 19.1±1.8. This is the first mobile semi-automated operant system developed for testing cognitive function in sheep. We have designed and validated an automated operant behavioural testing system suitable for high throughput cognitive testing in sheep and other medium-sized quadrupeds, such as pigs and dogs. Sheep performance in the two-choice visual discrimination task was very similar to that reported for non-human primates and strongly supports the use of farm animals as pre-clinical models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Changing air mass frequencies in Canada: potential links and implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanos, J K; Cakmak, S

    2014-03-01

    Many individual variables have been studied to understand climate change, yet an overall weather situation involves the consideration of many meteorological variables simultaneously at various times diurnally, seasonally, and yearly. The current study identifies a full weather situation as an air mass type using synoptic scale classification, in 30 population centres throughout Canada. Investigative analysis of long-term air mass frequency trends was completed, drawing comparisons between seasons and climate zones. We find that the changing air mass trends are highly dependent on the season and climate zone being studied, with an overall increase of moderate ('warm') air masses and decrease of polar ('cold') air masses. In the summertime, general increased moisture content is present throughout Canada, consistent with the warming air masses. The moist tropical air mass, containing the most hot and humid air, is found to increase in a statistically significant fashion in the summertime in 46% of the areas studied, which encompass six of Canada's ten largest population centres. This emphasises the need for heat adaptation and acclimatisation for a large proportion of the Canadian population. In addition, strong and significant decreases of transition/frontal passage days were found throughout Canada. This result is one of the most remarkable transition frequency results published to date due to its consistency in identifying declining trends, coinciding with research completed in the United States (US). We discuss relative results and implications to similar US air mass trend analyses, and draw upon research studies involving large-scale upper-level air flow and vortex connections to air mass changes, to small-scale meteorological and air pollution interactions. Further research is warranted to better understand such connections, and how these air masses relate to the overall and city-specific health of Canadians.

  3. Risk factors for heat illness among British soldiers in the hot Collective Training Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alice C; Stacey, M J; Bailey, K G H; Bunn, R J; Woods, D R; Haworth, K J; Brett, S J; Folkes, S E F

    2016-12-01

    Heat illness is a preventable disorder in military populations. Measures that protect vulnerable individuals and contribute to effective Immediate Treatment may reduce the impact of heat illness, but depend upon adequate understanding and awareness among Commanders and their troops. To assess risk factors for heat illness in British soldiers deployed to the hot Collective Training Environment (CTE) and to explore awareness of Immediate Treatment responses. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to British soldiers deployed in the hot CTEs of Kenya and Canada. Responses were analysed to determine the prevalence of individual (Intrinsic) and Command-practice (Extrinsic) risk factors for heat illness and the self-reported awareness of key Immediate Treatment priorities (recognition, first aid and casualty evacuation). The prevalence of Intrinsic risk factors was relatively low in comparison with Extrinsic risk factors. The majority of respondents were aware of key Immediate Treatment responses. The most frequently reported factors in each domain were increased risk by body composition scoring, inadequate time for heat acclimatisation and insufficient briefing about casualty evacuation. Novel data on the distribution and scale of risk factors for heat illness are presented. A collective approach to risk reduction by the accumulation of 'marginal gains' is proposed for the UK military. This should focus on limiting Intrinsic risk factors before deployment, reducing Extrinsic factors during training and promoting timely Immediate Treatment responses within the hot CTE. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Physiological Effects of Ergot Alkaloid and Indole-Diterpene Consumption on Sheep under Hot and Thermoneutral Ambient Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. E. Henry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A controlled feeding study was undertaken to determine the physiological and production effects of consuming perennial ryegrass alkaloids (fed via seed under extreme heat in sheep. Twenty-four Merino ewe weaners (6 months; initial BW 30.8 ± 1.0 kg were selected and the treatment period lasted 21 days following a 14 day acclimatisation period. Two levels of two factors were used. The first factor was alkaloid, fed at a nil (NilAlk or moderate level (Alk; 80 μg/kg LW ergovaline and 20.5 μg/kg·LW lolitrem B. The second factor was ambient temperature applied at two levels; thermoneutral (TN; constant 21–22 °C or heat (Heat; 9:00 AM–5:00 PM at 38 °C; 5:00 PM–9:00 AM at 21–22 °C, resulting in four treatments, NilAlk TN, NilAlk Heat, Alk TN and Alk Heat. Alkaloid consumption reduced dry matter intake ( p = 0.008, and tended to reduce liveweight ( p = 0.07. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were increased by both alkaloid and heat ( p < 0.05 for all. Respiration rate increased to severe levels when alkaloid and heat were combined, indicating the short term effects which may be occurring in perennial ryegrass toxicosis (PRGT areas during severe weather conditions, a novel finding. When alkaloid ingestion and heat were administered separately, similar physiological responses occurred, indicating alkaloid ingestion causes a similar heat stress response to 38 °C heat.

  5. Methods of the international study on soccer at altitude 3600 m (ISA3600)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Christopher J; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Gregory D; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Pepper, Mark; Edwards, Alistair; Cuenca, Douglas; Vidmar, Tony; Spielvogel, Hilde; Schmidt, Walter F

    2013-01-01

    Background We describe here the 3-year process underpinning a multinational collaboration to investigate soccer played at high altitude—La Paz, Bolivia (3600 m). There were two main aims: first, to quantify the extent to which running performance would be altered at 3600 m compared with near sea level; and second, to characterise the time course of acclimatisation of running performance and underlying physiology to training and playing at 3600 m. In addition, this project was able to measure the physiological changes and the effect on running performance of altitude-adapted soccer players from 3600 m playing at low altitude. Methods A U20 Bolivian team (‘The Strongest’ from La Paz, n=19) played a series of five games against a U17 team from sea level in Australia (The Joeys, n=20). 2 games were played near sea level (Santa Cruz 430 m) over 5 days and then three games were played in La Paz over the next 12 days. Measures were (1) game and training running performance—including global positioning system (GPS) data on distance travelled and velocity of movement; (2) blood—including haemoglobin mass, blood volume, blood gases and acid–base status; (3) acclimatisation—including resting heart rate variability, perceived altitude sickness, as well as heart rate and perceived exertion responses to a submaximal running test; and (4) sleep patterns. Conclusions Pivotal to the success of the project were the strong professional networks of the collaborators, with most exceeding 10 years, the links of several of the researchers to soccer federations, as well as the interest and support of the two head coaches. PMID:24282214

  6. First isolation of an aquatic birnavirus from farmed and wild fish species in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, M S; Hardy-Smith, P; Williams, L M; Hyatt, A D; Eaton, L M; Gould, A; Handlinger, J; Kattenbelt, J; Gudkovs, N

    2000-10-25

    During routine sampling and testing, as part of a systematic surveillance program (the Tasmanian Salmonid Health Surveillance Program), an aquatic birnavirus was isolated from 'pin-head' (fish exhibiting deficient acclimatisation on transfer to saltwater) Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, approximately 18 mo old, farmed in net-pens located in Macquarie Harbour on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. The isolate grows readily in a range of fish cell lines including CHSE-214, RTG-2 and BF-2 and is neutralised by a pan-specific rabbit antiserum raised against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) Ab strain and by a commercial pan-specific IPNV-neutralising monoclonal antibody. Presence of the virus was not associated with gross clinical signs. Histopathological examination revealed a range of lesions particularly in pancreatic tissue. The virus was localised in pancreas sections by immunoperoxidase staining using the polyclonal antiserum and by electron microscopy. Examination by electron microscopy demonstrated that the virus isolated in cell culture (1) belongs to the family Birnaviridae, genus Aquabirnaviridae; (2) was ultrastructurally and antigenically similar to virus identified in the index fish; (3) is related to IPNV. Western blot analysis using the polyclonal rabbit antiserum confirmed the cross-reactions between various aquatic birnavirus isolates. In addition, PCR analysis of isolated viral nucleic acid from the index case indicated that the virus is more closely related to IPNV fr21 and N1 isolates than to other birnavirus isolates available for comparison. Sampling of other fish species within Macquarie Harbour has demonstrated that the virus is present in several other species of fish including farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, wild flounder Rhombosolea tapirina, cod Pseudophycis sp., spiked dogfish Squalus megalops and ling Genypterus blacodes.

  7. Position statement--altitude training for improving team-sport players' performance: current knowledge and unresolved issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Amann, Markus; Aughey, Robert; Billaut, François; Bishop, David J; Bourdon, Pitre; Buchheit, Martin; Chapman, Robert; D'Hooghe, Michel; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Gore, Christopher J; Millet, Grégoire P; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Saunders, Philo U; Schmidt, Walter; Schumacher, Yorck O

    2013-12-01

    Despite the limited research on the effects of altitude (or hypoxic) training interventions on team-sport performance, players from all around the world engaged in these sports are now using altitude training more than ever before. In March 2013, an Altitude Training and Team Sports conference was held in Doha, Qatar, to establish a forum of research and practical insights into this rapidly growing field. A round-table meeting in which the panellists engaged in focused discussions concluded this conference. This has resulted in the present position statement, designed to highlight some key issues raised during the debates and to integrate the ideas into a shared conceptual framework. The present signposting document has been developed for use by support teams (coaches, performance scientists, physicians, strength and conditioning staff) and other professionals who have an interest in the practical application of altitude training for team sports. After more than four decades of research, there is still no consensus on the optimal strategies to elicit the best results from altitude training in a team-sport population. However, there are some recommended strategies discussed in this position statement to adopt for improving the acclimatisation process when training/competing at altitude and for potentially enhancing sea-level performance. It is our hope that this information will be intriguing, balanced and, more importantly, stimulating to the point that it promotes constructive discussion and serves as a guide for future research aimed at advancing the bourgeoning body of knowledge in the area of altitude training for team sports.

  8. Influence of soil drying on root development, water relations and leaf growth of Ceratonia siliqua L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopoulou, S; Davies, W J

    1991-09-01

    Seedlings of Ceratonia siliqua L., an evergreen sclerophyll species native to the Mediterranean region, were grown in 30-cm deep tubes of John Innes II potting compost in a growth cabinet maintained at 15° C during a 12-h day where PAR was 400 μmol m-2 s-1. After a period of acclimatisation to the conditions in the cabinet during which plants were watered every day, water was withheld from the soil in some tubes for 24 days. These conditions may be regarded as a simulation of the natural situation. Estimates of leaf and root water potential and solute potential, leaf growth and root development were made at intervals during the soil drying cycle on both watered and unwatered plants. Water potential and solute potential measurements were made both on young expanding and on fully expanded leaves. During the experimental period, root growth of C. siliqua was not much affected by soil drying, and roots in both the watered and the unwatered columns penetrated to the bottom of the soil tubes by the end of the drying treatment. Expanded leaves showed significant limitation in stomatal conductance as soil drying progressed. Leaf water potential of fully expanded leaves of unwatered plants declined substantially. In contrast, water potential of young expanding leaves on unwatered plants declined to only a limited extent and turgor was sustained. As the soil dried, stomatal conductance of young leaves was always higher than that of mature leaves; also, placticity and elasticity of young leaves slowly decreased whereas mature leaves became stiff. Changing leaf cell wall properties may determine different patterns of water use as the leaves age. A mechanism of continuous diffusion of water through the soil towards the tip and pumping towards the young leaves is proposed.

  9. Importance of plasticity and local adaptation for coping with changing salinity in coastal areas: a test case with barnacles in the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrange, Anna-Lisa; André, Carl; Lundh, Torbjörn; Lind, Ulrika; Blomberg, Anders; Jonsson, Per J; Havenhand, Jon N

    2014-07-19

    Salinity plays an important role in shaping coastal marine communities. Near-future climate predictions indicate that salinity will decrease in many shallow coastal areas due to increased precipitation; however, few studies have addressed this issue. The ability of ecosystems to cope with future changes will depend on species' capacities to acclimatise or adapt to new environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the effects of a strong salinity gradient (the Baltic Sea system--Baltic, Kattegat, Skagerrak) on plasticity and adaptations in the euryhaline barnacle Balanus improvisus. We used a common-garden approach, where multiple batches of newly settled barnacles from each of three different geographical areas along the Skagerrak-Baltic salinity gradient were exposed to corresponding native salinities (6, 15 and 30 PSU), and phenotypic traits including mortality, growth, shell strength, condition index and reproductive maturity were recorded. We found that B. improvisus was highly euryhaline, but had highest growth and reproductive maturity at intermediate salinities. We also found that low salinity had negative effects on other fitness-related traits including initial growth and shell strength, although mortality was also lowest in low salinity. Overall, differences between populations in most measured traits were weak, indicating little local adaptation to salinity. Nonetheless, we observed some population-specific responses--notably that populations from high salinity grew stronger shells in their native salinity compared to the other populations, possibly indicating adaptation to differences in local predation pressure. Our study shows that B. improvisus is an example of a true brackish-water species, and that plastic responses are more likely than evolutionary tracking in coping with future changes in coastal salinity.

  10. Changes in the metabolic footprint of placental explant-conditioned medium cultured in different oxygen tensions from placentas of small for gestational age and normal pregnancies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) confers significantly increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Accumulating evidence suggests that an SGA fetus results from a poorly perfused and abnormally developed placenta. Some of the placental features seen in SGA, such as abnormal cell turnover and impaired nutrient transport, can be reproduced by culture of placental explants in hypoxic conditions. Metabolic footprinting offers a hypothesis-generating strategy to investigate factors absorbed by and released from this tissue in vitro. Previously, metabolic footprinting of the conditioned culture media has identified differences in placental explants cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and between normal pregnancies and those complicated by pre-eclampsia. In this study we aimed to examine the differences in the metabolic footprint of placental villous explants cultured at different oxygen (O(2)) tensions between women who deliver an SGA baby (n = 9) and those from normal controls (n = 8). Placental villous explants from cases and controls were cultured for 96 h in 1% (hypoxic), 6% (normoxic) and 20% (hyperoxic) O(2). Metabolic footprints were analysed by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to an electrospray hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-MS). 574 metabolite features showed significant difference between SGA and normal at one or more of the oxygen tensions. SGA explant media cultured under hypoxic conditions was observed, on a univariate level, to exhibit the same metabolic signature as controls cultured under normoxic conditions in 49% of the metabolites of interest, suggesting that SGA tissue is acclimatised to hypoxic conditions in vivo. No such behaviour was observed under hyperoxic culture conditions. Glycerophospholipid and tryptophan metabolism were highlighted as areas of particular interest.

  11. An efficient method for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation and plant regeneration in cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sonika; Mishra, Avinash; Patel, Manish Kumar; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-09-01

    Cumin is an annual herbaceous medicinally important plant having diverse applications. An efficient and reproducible method of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation was herein established for the first time. A direct regeneration method without callus induction was optimised using embryos as explant material in Gamborg's B5 medium supplemented with 0.5-μM 6-benzyladenine and 2.0-μM α-naphthalene acetic acid. About 1,020 embryos (a mean of 255 embryos per batch) were used for the optimisation of transformation conditions. These conditions were an Agrobacterium cell suspension of 0.6 OD600, a co-cultivation time of 72 h, 300-μM acetosyringone and wounding of explants using a razor blade. Pre-cultured elongated embryos were treated using optimised conditions. About 720 embryos (a mean of 180 embryos per batch) were used for transformation and 95 % embryos showed transient β-glucuronidase expression after co-cultivation. Putative transformed embryos were cultured on B5 medium for shoot proliferation and 21 regenerated plants were obtained after selection and allowed to root. T0 plantlets showed β-glucuronidase expression and gene integration was confirmed via PCR amplification of 0.96 and 1.28 kb fragments of the hygromycin-phosphotransferase II and β-glucuronidase genes, respectively. In this study, a transformation efficiency of 1.5 % was demonstrated and a total of 11 transgenic plants were obtained at the hardening stage, however, only four plants acclimatised during hardening. Gene copy number was analysed by Southern blot analysis of hardened plants and single-copy gene integration was observed. This is the first successful attempt of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of cumin.

  12. No Protection against DSS-induced Colitis by Short-term Pretreatment with Seal or Fish Oils in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülen Arslan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have modulating effects in several chronic inflammatory conditions. The aim of the present study was to test whether prior short-term dietary supplementation with n-3 (fish or seal oil or n-6 (soy oil PUFA rich oils would protect the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis in rats.Methods: Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: no intervention, sham, DSS, seal oil + DSS, fi sh oil +DSS and soy oil + DSS. Following 7 days of acclimatisation, 1 mL oil (seal, fish or soy or distilled water (sham was administered by gavage day 8 to 14. Colitis was induced by 5% DSS in drinking water from day 15 to 21. Rats were sacrificed on day 23. Histological colitis (crypt and inflammation scores, faecal granulocyte marker protein (GMP and quantitative fatty acid composition in red blood cells were measured.Results: Pretreatment with fish or seal oils did not significantly influence DSS induced inflammation. In fact, all the oils tended to exacerbate the inflammation. Soy oil increased the mean crypt score (P < 0.04, but not the inflammation score or GMP. The ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids (FAs was 11 to 1 and 10 to 1 in standard diet and in red blood cells of control rats, respectively. Following administration of DSS, the ratio fell in all treatment groups (P < 0.001. The lowest ratios were seen in the groups receiving DSS + fi sh or seal oils (around 6 to 1.Conclusion: Short-term pretreatment with fish or seal oils did not protect against subsequent induction of colitis by DSS in this rat model. Whether the high ratio of n-6 to n-3 FAs in the standard diet concealed effects of n-3 FA supplementation should be further investigated.

  13. Determination of future prevention strategies in elite track and field: analysis of Daegu 2011 IAAF Championships injuries and illnesses surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Juan-Manuel; Edouard, Pascal; Fischetto, Giuseppe; Adams, Bob; Depiesse, Frédéric; Mountjoy, Margo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and characteristics of newly incurred injuries and illnesses during international Athletics Championships, by improving the medical surveillance coverage, in order to determine future prevention strategies. Design Prospective recording of newly occurred injuries and illnesses. Setting 13th International Association of Athletics Federations World Championships in Athletics 2011 in Daegu, Korea. Participants National team and Local Organising Committee physicians; and 1851 registered athletes. Main outcome measures Incidence and characteristics of newly incurred injuries and illnesses. Results 82% of athletes were covered by medical teams participating with a response rate of 94%. A total of 249 injuries were reported, representing an incidence of 134.5 injuries per 1000 registered athletes, and 119 (48%) resulted in time loss from sport. A total of 185 injuries affected the lower limb (74%). Hamstring strain was the main diagnosis and 67% resulted in absence from sport. Overuse (n=148; 59%) was the predominant cause. A total of 126 illnesses were reported, signifying an incidence of 68.1 per 1000 registered athletes. Upper respiratory tract infection was the most common reported diagnosis (18%), followed by exercise-induced dehydration (12%), and gastroenteritis/diarrhoea (10%). The highest incidences of injuries were found in combined events and middle and long-distance events, and of illness in race walking events. Conclusion During elite Athletics World Championships, 135 injuries, 60 time-loss injuries and 68 illnesses per 1000 registered athletes were reported. Higher risks of injuries were found in combined events and long-distance runs. Preventive interventions should focus on overuse injuries and hamstring strains, decreasing the risk of transmission of infectious diseases, appropriate event scheduling and heat acclimatisation. PMID:22522588

  14. Mannan-oligosaccharide and organic acids for weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Souza Vieira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of acetic, propionic, and formic (50% organic acids and mannan-oligosaccharide (50% on growth performance, digestibility, and faecal score in challenged weaned piglets. Twenty male piglets (5.57 ± 0.32 kg of BW; 21-24 days of age were housed individually in metabolic cages for 28 days in an acclimatised room. The treatments were composed of the inclusion (0.1%; n = 10 or not (n = 10 of additive in the diet. The experimental design was completely randomised with two treatments, 10 replicates, and one piglet per replicate. The nutritional matrix was supplemented with 10% of barley and 35.9 to 34.0% of soybean meal in the pre-starter diet (3-14 days post-weaning and the starter diet (15-28 days post-weaning, respectively, to cause an intestinal challenge. Diets did not include any antimicrobial or growth promoters. Weekly, the animal and the leftover diet were weighed to evaluate growth performance. Digestibility was evaluated through total faeces and urine collection. Piglets fed diets with additive had 8.7% greater weight gain (P < 0.05 compared to those piglets in the control treatment in the starter phase. For other growth performance responses there was no treatment effect. Similarly, the inclusion of additive in the piglet diets did not affect the faecal score or the energy and nutrient digestibility. In the starter phase and throughout the experimental period, piglets fed diets with additive had 18.37% and 15.07% greater nitrogen (N intake and 19.53% and 16.05% greater N retention, respectively, compared to piglets in the control treatment (P < 0.05. In conclusion, the addition of additive composed by organic acids and mannan-oligosaccharide does not improve energy and nutrient digestibility but increases the N retention and weight gain in weaned piglets in the starting phase.

  15. Safety and function of a prototype microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis for low active transfemoral amputees switching from a mechanic knee prosthesis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenoehrl, Timothy; Schmalz, Thomas; Windhager, Reinhard; Domayer, Stephan; Dana, Sara; Ambrozy, Clemens; Palma, Stefano; Crevenna, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Aim of this pilot study was to assess safety and functioning of a microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis (MPK) after a short familiarization time and no structured physical therapy. Five elderly, low-active transfemoral amputees who were fitted with a standard non-microprocessor controlled knee prosthesis (NMPK) performed a baseline measurement consisting of a 3 D gait analysis, functional tests and questionnaires. The first follow-up consisted of the same test procedure and was performed with the MPK after 4 to 6 weeks of familiarization. After being refitted to their standard NMPK again, the subjects undertook the second follow-up which consisted of solely questionnaires 4 weeks later. Questionnaires and functional tests showed an increase in the perception of safety. Moreover, gait analysis revealed more physiologic knee and hip extension/flexion patterns when using the MPK. Our results showed that although the Genium with Cenior-Leg ruleset-MPK (GCL-MPK) might help to improve several safety-related outcomes as well as gait biomechanics the functional potential of the GCL-MPK may have been limited without specific training and a sufficient acclimation period. Implications for Rehabilitation Elderly transfemoral amputees are often limited in their activity by safety issues as well as insufficient functioning regarding the non microprocessor-controlled knee prostheses (NMPK), thing that could be eliminated with the use of suitable microprocessor-controlled prostheses (MPK). The safety and functioning of a prototype MPK (GCL-MPK) specifically designed for the needs of older and low-active transfemoral amputees was assessed in this pilot study. The GCL-MPK showed indicators of increased safety and more natural walking patterns in older and low-active transfemoral amputees in comparison to the standard NMPK already after a short acclimatisation time and no structured physical therapy. Regarding functional performance it seems as if providing older and low

  16. Response of Sphagnum mosses to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J.

    1998-12-31

    The main objective of this work was to study the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentration and N deposition rates on Sphagna adapted to grow along a nutrient availability gradient (i.e. ombrotrophy-mesotrophy-eutrophy). The study investigated: (i) the effects of various longterm CO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of net photosynthesis in Sphagna, (ii) the effects of the CO{sub 2} and N treatments on the moss density, shoot dry masses, length increment and dry mass production in Sphagna, (iii) the concentrations of the major nutrients in Sphagna after prolonged exposure to the CO{sub 2} and N treatments, and (iv) species dependent differences in potential NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake rates. The internal nutrient concentration of the capitulum and the production of biomass were effected less by the elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations because the availability of N was a controlling factor. In addition responses to the N treatments were related to ecological differences between the Sphagna species. Species with a high tolerance of N availability were able to acclimatise to the increased N deposition rates. The data suggests a high nutrient status is less significant than the adaptation of the Sphagna to their ecological niche (e.g. low tolerance of meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii to high N deposition rate). At the highest N deposition rate the ombrotrophic S. fuscum had the highest increase in tissue N concentration among the Sphagna studied. S. fuscum almost died at the highest N deposition rate because of the damaging effects of N to the plant`s metabolism. Ombrotrophic hummock species such as S. fuscum, were also found to have the highest potential N uptake rate (on density of dry mass basis) compared to lawn species. The rate of net photosynthesis was initially increased with elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, but photosynthesis was down regulated with prolonged exposure to CO{sub 2}. The water use efficiency in Sphagna appeared not to be coupled

  17. Physiological and molecular analysis on root growth associated with the tolerance to aluminum and drought individual and combined in Tibetan wild and cultivated barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imrul Mosaddek; Nadira, Umme Aktari; Cao, Fangbin; He, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Guoping; Wu, Feibo

    2016-04-01

    The drought-stimulated gene expression of NCED, SUS, and KS - DHN and ABA signal cross-talk with other phytohormones maintains barley root growth under drought stress at pH 4.0 plus polyethylene glycol plus aluminum. Aluminum (Al) toxicity and drought are two major factors that limit barley production. In this work, the individual and combined effects of Al/acid and polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) induced drought stress that suppressed root growth and caused oxidative damage as characterized by increased H2O2 and O2(.-) accumulation. The wild-barley genotypes, XZ5 and XZ29, exhibited a higher tolerance than the two cultivars Dayton (Al tolerant) and Tadmor (drought tolerant) under combined stress (pH 4.0 + PEG + Al). The oxidative damage induced by PEG was more severe at pH 4.0 than at pH 6.0. In XZ29, the highest root secretion of malate and citrate was recorded, and the least Al uptake in the four genotypes. In XZ5, a peak accumulation of ABA and minor synthesis of zeatin riboside and ethylene were found being essential in maintaining primary root elongation and root hair development. PEG-induced drought stress repressed Al uptake in root tips, with a lower increase in callose formation and HvMATE (Hordeum vulgare multidrug and toxic compound exudation) expression compared to Al-induced callose production. Stress by pH 4.0 + PEG + Al up-regulated 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) which is involved in ABA biosynthesis. Such treatment stimulated the regulation of ABA-dependent genes sucrose synthase (SUS) and KS-type dehydrin (KS-DHN) in root tips. Our results suggest that the tolerance ranking to pH 4.0 + PEG + Al stress in Tibetan wild barley by gene expression is closely correlated to physiological indices. The results show that acclimatisation to pH 4.0 + PEG + Al stress involves specific responses in XZ5 and XZ29. The present study provides insights into the effects of Al/acid and drought combined stress on the abundance of physiological indices in the

  18. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  19. Herd specific risk factors for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections in suckling pigs at the age of weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, Heiko; Woeste, Henrike; Doehring, Stefanie; Fahrion, Anna S; Doherr, Marcus G; Beilage, Elisabeth grosse

    2013-04-12

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiologic agent of enzootic pneumonia mainly occurring in fattening pigs. It is assumed that horizontal transmission of the pathogen during nursery and growing phase starts with few suckling pigs vertically infected by the sow. The aim of the present study was the exploration of the herd prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae infections in suckling pigs followed by an investigation of various herd specific factors for their potential of influencing the occurrence of this pathogen at the age of weaning. In this cross-sectional study, 125 breeding herds were examined by taking nasal swabs from 20 suckling pigs in each herd. In total, 3.9% (98/2500) of all nasal swabs were tested positive for M. hyopneumoniae by real-time PCR. Piglets tested positive originated from 46 different herds resulting in an overall herd prevalence of 36.8% (46/125) for M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs at the age of weaning. While the herds were epidemiologically characterized, the risk for demonstration of M. hyopneumoniae was significantly increased, when the number of purchased gilts per year was more than 120 (OR: 5.8), and when the number of farrowing pens per compartment was higher than 16 (OR: 3.3). In herds with a planned and segregated production, where groups of sows entered previously emptied farrowing units, the risk for demonstration of M. hyopneumoniae in piglets was higher in herds with two or four weeks between batches than in herds with one or three weeks between batches (OR: 2.7). In this cross-sectional study, several risk factors could be identified enhancing the probability of breeding herds to raise suckling pigs already infected with M. hyopneumoniae at the time of weaning. Interestingly, some factors (farrowing rhythm, gilt acclimatisation issues) were overlapping with those also influencing the seroprevalences among sows or the transmission of the pathogen between older age groups. Taking the multifactorial character of enzootic pneumonia

  20. Conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake - implications for net CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Glatzel, Stephan; Hofmann, Joachim; Forbrich, Inke; Jurasinski, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    ). However, flooding causes a short-term ecosystem shift with severe consequences for Reco and GEP. Our results indicate that after a relatively short period of time, the plant community can acclimatise to inundation with increasing rates of GEP and autotrophic respiration.

  1. Expression of an antisense Datura stramonium S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase cDNA in tobacco: changes in enzyme activity, putrescine-spermidine ratio, rhizogenic potential, and response to methyl jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrigiani, Patrizia; Scaramagli, Sonia; Ziosi, Vanina; Mayer, Melinda; Biondi, Stefania

    2005-05-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity (SAMDC; EC 4.1.1.21) leads to spermidine and spermine synthesis through specific synthases which use putrescine, spermidine and decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine as substrates. In order to better understand the regulation of polyamine (PA), namely spermidine and spermine, biosynthesis, a SAMDC cDNA of Datura stramonium was introduced in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) in antisense orientation under the CaMV 35S promoter, by means of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and leaf disc transformation. The effect of the genetic manipulation on PA metabolism, ethylene production and plant morphology was analysed in primary transformants (R0), and in the transgenic progeny (second generation, R1) of self-fertilised primary transformants, relative to empty vector-transformed (pBin19) and wild-type (WT) controls. All were maintained in vitro by micropropagation. Primary transformants, which were confirmed by Southern and northern analyses, efficiently transcribed the antisense SAMDC gene, but SAMDC activity and PA titres did not change. By contrast, in most transgenic R1 shoots, SAMDC activity was remarkably lower than in controls, and the putrescine-to-spermidine ratio was altered, mainly due to increased putrescine, even though putrescine oxidising activity (diamine oxidase, EC 1.4.3.6) did not change relative to controls. Despite the reduction in SAMDC activity, the production of ethylene, which shares with PAs the common precursor SAM, was not influenced by the foreign gene. Some plants were transferred to pots and acclimatised in a growth chamber. In these in vivo-grown second generation transgenic plants, at the vegetative stage, SAMDC activity was scarcely reduced, and PA titres did not change. Finally, the rhizogenic potential of in vitro-cultured leaf explants excised from antisense plants was significantly diminished as compared with WT ones, and the response to methyl jasmonate, a stress-mimicking compound, in terms

  2. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments

  3. In vitro propagation, carotenoid, fatty acid and tocopherol content of Ajuga multiflora Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesan, Iyyakkannu; Saini, Ramesh Kumar; Noorzai, Rafi; Zamany, Ahmad Jawid; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The effect of plant growth regulators on shoot proliferation from shoot tip explants of Ajuga multiflora was studied. The highest number of shoots (17.1) was observed when shoot tip explants were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium fortified with 8.0 µM 6-Benzyladenine (BA) and 2.7 µM α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). The mean number of shoots per explant was increased 1.6-fold in liquid medium as compared with semi-solid medium. Maximum rooting (100 %) with an average of 7.2 roots per shoot was obtained on MS basal medium. Rooted plantlets were successfully acclimatised in the greenhouse with 100 % survival rate. Composition of carotenoids, fatty acids and tocopherols was also studied from leaves of greenhouse-grown plants and in vitro-regenerated shoots of A. multiflora. The greatest amounts of carotenoids, fatty acids and tocopherols were obtained from leaves of in vitro-regenerated shoots cultured on MS basal medium, followed by leaves of greenhouse-grown plants and leaves of in vitro-regenerated shoots cultured on MS basal medium with 2.0 µM BA or thidiazuron. The most abundant carotenoid in A. multiflora leaves was all-E-lutein (89.4-382.6 μg g-1 FW) followed by all-E-β-carotene (32.0-156.7 μg g-1 FW), 9'-Z-neoxanthin (14.2-63.4 μg g-1 FW), all-E-violaxanthin (13.0-45.9 μg g-1 FW), all-E-zeaxanthin (1.3-2.5 μg g-1 FW) and all-E-β-cryptoxanthin (0.3-0.9 μg g-1 FW). α-Tocopherol was the predominant tocopherol in A. multiflora leaves. Linolenic acid (49.03-52.59 %) was detected in higher amounts in A. multiflora leaf samples followed by linoleic acid (18.95-21.39 %) and palmitic acid (15.79-18.66 %).

  4. Can lichen species of BSC acclimate to changing environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura; Colesie, Claudia; Büdel, Burkhard

    2015-04-01

    sites. Lichen species are also analysed to investigate the variability within their morphological and physiological traits and whether this is site specific. From the transplant experiment lichen samples are analysed to find whether lichen species can readily switch their photobiont to a locally adapted symbiont and whether the morphological and physiological parameters change in order to acclimatise to the new conditions. This work is currently ongoing and here the initial results from the lichen species Psora decipiens, Fulgensia fulgens (green algal lichens) and Peltigera rufescens (cyanolichen) are presented.

  5. Effects of different gamma exposure regimes on reproduction in the earthworm Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel-Aas, Turid, E-mail: turid.hertel-aas@umb.no [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway); Brunborg, Gunnar, E-mail: Gunnar.Brunborg@fhi.no [Department of Chemical Toxicology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo (Norway); Jaworska, Alicja, E-mail: Alicja.Jaworska@nrpa.no [Department of Emergency Preparedness and Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, 1332, Osteraas (Norway); Salbu, Brit, E-mail: brit.salbu@umb.no [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway); Oughton, Deborah Helen, E-mail: deborah.oughton@umb.no [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway)

    2011-12-15

    Ecological risk assessment of ionising radiation requires knowledge about the responses of individuals and populations to chronic exposures, including situations when exposure levels change over time. The present study investigated processes such as recovery and the adaptive response with respect to reproduction endpoints in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation. Furthermore, a crossed experiment was performed to investigate the influence of F0 parental and F1 embryonic irradiation history on the response of irradiated or non-irradiated F1 offspring. Recovery: The sterility induced by sub-chronic exposure at 17 mGy/h (accumulated dose: 25 Gy) was temporary, and 8 weeks after irradiation the worms had regained their reproductive capacity (number of viable offspring produced per adult per week). Adaptive response: Adult worms were continuously exposed at a low priming dose rate of 0.14 mGy/h for 12 weeks (accumulated dose: 0.24 Gy), followed by 14 weeks exposure at a challenge dose rate of 11 mGy/h. The results suggest a lack of adaptive response, since there were no significant differences in the effects on reproduction capacity between the primed and the unprimed groups after challenge doses ranging from 7.6 to 27 Gy. Crossed experiment: The effects of exposure at 11 mGy/h for 21 weeks on growth, sexual maturation and reproduction of offspring, derived either from parent worms and cocoons both exposed at 11 mGy/h, or from non-irradiated parents and cocoons (total accumulated dose 44 and 38 Gy, respectively) were compared. There were no significant differences between the two exposed offspring groups for any of the endpoints. The reproduction capacity was very low for both groups compared to the controls, but the reproduction seemed to be maintained at the reduced level, which could indicate acclimatisation or stabilisation. Finally, parental and embryonic exposures at 11 mGy/h did not affect reproduction in the F1 offspring as adults.

  6. Packaging of Post Acclimatized Somatic Embryogenesis Cocoa Plantlet (Theobroma cacao L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soedarsianto Soedarsianto

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Clonal plants that produced by somatic embryogenesis technique is one of the best choice to produce supperior clonal cacao (Theobroma cacao L. planting materials. The somatic embryogenesis technique is a possible way for massive propagation, the outcome is true to type plants, the architecture similarity that the seedlings but there is not segregation like seedlings plants. At present mass production started of plantlets production until post-acclimatized plantlets of somatic embryogenesis cocoa was done at Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute. Distribution system of the planting materials to whole areas in form of as up-rooted post-acclimatized plantlet. Some problems identified to reduce probability of decreasing viability of up-rooted post-acclimatized plantlets and one of them is extreme internal water deficit. This research investigate of the influece storage condition (air tight and non-air tight and box storage (mica plastic and cardboardbox. The first experiment result show, there is no significant different between mica plastic and cardboard box usage for storage of post-acclimatized cocoa pantlet. Viability of up-rooted post acclimatized cocoa plantlet influenced exactly by air tight and non-air tight storage condition. Air tight storage condition have better viability of up-rooted post acclimatised (81,58% than non-air tight storage condition (65,00%. Leaf sanasence on air tight storage condition (10,33% lower than non-air tight storage (32,58%. There is not significantly on volume storage per plantlet between 4.416 cm3 and 12.600 cm3. Relationship between fallen leaves and cocoa planlet viability follow negative linear correlation y = -1,4719x + 104,88 (R2 = 0,9772. The second experiment treatment showed that maximal storage periode of post cclimatized cocoa plantlet just until 6 days stored (97% and not significant with 3 days one. Viability of post acclimatized cocoa plantlet decreased after 6 days storage period

  7. Methane emissions from two breeds of beef cows offered diets containing barley straw with either grass silage or brewers' grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, C-A; Rooke, J A; Hyslop, J J; Waterhouse, A

    2015-10-01

    Increasing the concentration of dietary lipid is a promising strategy for reducing methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants. This study investigated the effect of replacing grass silage with brewers' grains on CH4 emissions of pregnant, non-lactating beef cows of two breeds. The experiment was a two×two factorial design comprising two breeds (LIMx, crossbred Limousin; and LUI, purebred Luing) and two diets consisting of (g/kg diet dry matter (DM)) barley straw (687) and grass silage (301, GS), or barley straw (763) and brewers' grains (226, BG), which were offered ad libitum. Replacing GS with BG increased the acid-hydrolysed ether extract concentration from 21 to 37 g/kg diet DM. Cows (n=48) were group-housed in equal numbers of each breed across two pens and each diet was allocated to one pen. Before measurements of CH4, individual dry matter intake (DMI), weekly BW and weekly body condition score were measured for a minimum of 3 weeks, following a 4-week period to acclimatise to the diets. CH4 emissions were subsequently measured on one occasion from each cow using individual respiration chambers. Due to occasional equipment failures, CH4 measurements were run over 9 weeks giving 10 observations for each breed×treatment combination (total n=40). There were no differences between diets for daily DMI measured in the chambers (9.92 v. 9.86 kg/day for BG and GS, respectively; P>0.05). Cows offered the BG diet produced less daily CH4 than GS-fed cows (131 v. 156 g/day: P0.05). However, when expressed as a proportion of metabolic BW (BW0.75), LUI cows had greater DMI than LIMx cows (84.5 v. 75.7 g DMI/kg BW0.75, Pcows (1.30 v. 1.05 g CH4/kg BW0.75; Pcows. This study demonstrated that replacing GS with BG in barley straw-based diets can effectively reduce CH4 emissions from beef cows, with no suppression of DMI.

  8. Effects of different gamma exposure regimes on reproduction in the earthworm Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel-Aas, Turid; Brunborg, Gunnar; Jaworska, Alicja; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah Helen

    2011-12-15

    Ecological risk assessment of ionising radiation requires knowledge about the responses of individuals and populations to chronic exposures, including situations when exposure levels change over time. The present study investigated processes such as recovery and the adaptive response with respect to reproduction endpoints in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to (60)Co γ-radiation. Furthermore, a crossed experiment was performed to investigate the influence of F0 parental and F1 embryonic irradiation history on the response of irradiated or non-irradiated F1 offspring. Recovery: The sterility induced by sub-chronic exposure at 17 m Gy/h (accumulated dose: 25 Gy) was temporary, and 8 weeks after irradiation the worms had regained their reproductive capacity (number of viable offspring produced per adult per week). Adaptive response: Adult worms were continuously exposed at a low priming dose rate of 0.14 mGy/h for 12 weeks (accumulated dose: 0.24 Gy), followed by 14 weeks exposure at a challenge dose rate of 11 mGy/h. The results suggest a lack of adaptive response, since there were no significant differences in the effects on reproduction capacity between the primed and the unprimed groups after challenge doses ranging from 7.6 to 27 Gy. Crossed experiment: The effects of exposure at 11 mGy/h for 21 weeks on growth, sexual maturation and reproduction of offspring, derived either from parent worms and cocoons both exposed at 11 mGy/h, or from non-irradiated parents and cocoons (total accumulated dose 44 and 38 Gy, respectively) were compared. There were no significant differences between the two exposed offspring groups for any of the endpoints. The reproduction capacity was very low for both groups compared to the controls, but the reproduction seemed to be maintained at the reduced level, which could indicate acclimatisation or stabilisation. Finally, parental and embryonic exposures at 11 mGy/h did not affect reproduction in the F1 offspring as adults

  9. ALMA to Help Solving Acute Mountain Sickness Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    , family and social isolation, commuting, intermittent high altitude exposure and other environmental challenges such as low temperatures. "An adequate acclimatisation to 2500m altitude requires around two weeks, and we can thus speculate that going to 5000m would require more than one month to achieve complete acclimatisation," said Professor Juan Silva Urra, from the University of Antofagasta. However, short and long term effects of regular commuting between sea level and high altitude have scarcely been studied in biomedical terms. Scientifically based guidelines for appropriate preventive handling and care under these conditions are lacking and the new study will help bridging this gap. Among the studies to be done, some involve continuous monitoring of the human body through portable devices, including measurements of hormone levels and application of psychometric tests. All measurements at 5000m will be carried out on a voluntary basis, under strict safety protocols, with the presence of a doctor from the investigation team, paramedic personnel form ALMA and an ambulance. The symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness are headache, sicknesses, gastrointestinal inconveniences, fatigue and insomnia that, depending on their intensities, decrease the capacity to carry out the most routine activities. The valuable data collected will enhance our knowledge of human physiology in extreme environments, generating recommendations that will improve wellbeing and health not only in high-altitude observatories, but also in mining and Antarctic personnel. "We are pleased that ALMA is contributing to other disciplines, like medicine, even before the antennas begin to explore the universe," said Felix Mirabel, ESO's representative in Chile. "This outstanding long-term research that will provide crucial information of human physiology to experts worldwide, has been made possible thanks to the combined effort of Chilean and European universities, in collaboration with ALMA". The Atacama

  10. Effects of summer frost exposures on the cold tolerance strategy of a sub-Antarctic beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, J S.; Worland, M R.; Block, W

    2001-09-01

    The sub-Antarctic beetle Hydromedion sparsutum (Coleoptera, Perimylopidae) is common locally on the island of South Georgia where sub-zero temperatures can be experienced in any month of the year. Larvae were known to be weakly freeze tolerant in summer with a mean supercooling point (SCP) around -4 degrees C and a lower lethal temperature of -10 degrees C (15min exposure). This study investigated the effects of successive freezing exposures on the SCP and subsequent survival of summer acclimatised larvae. The mean SCP of field fresh larvae was -4.2+/-0.2 degrees C with a range from -1.0 to -6.1 degrees C. When larvae were cooled to -6.5 degrees C on 10 occasions at intervals of 30min and one and four days, survival was 44, 70 and 68%, respectively. The 'end of experiment' SCP of larvae surviving 10 exposures at -6.5 degrees C showed distinct changes and patterns from the original field population depending on the interval between exposure. In the 30min interval group, most larvae froze between -6 and -8 degrees C, a depression of up to 6 degrees C from the original sample; all larvae were dead when cooling was continued below the SCP to -12 degrees C. In the one and four day interval groups, most larvae froze above -6 degrees C, showing no change as a result of the 10 exposures at -6.5 degrees C. As with the 30min interval group, some larvae froze below -6 degrees C, but with a wider range, and again, all were dead when cooled to -12 degrees C. However, in the one and four day interval groups, some larvae remained unfrozen when cooled to -12 degrees C, a depression of their individual SCP of at least 6 degrees C, and were alive 24h after cooling. In a further experiment, larvae were cooled to their individual SCP temperature at daily intervals on 10 occasions to ensure that every larva froze every day. Most larvae which showed a depression of their SCP of 2-4 degrees C from their day one value became moribund or died after six or seven freezing events. Survival

  11. Tissue culture techniques in the proliferation of shoots and roots of Calendula officinalis Utilização de técnicas de cultura de tecidos na proliferação de brotos e enraizamento de Calendula officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pimentel Victório

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The high demand for plant material from Calendula officinalis in the production of herbal medicines and cosmetics, turns the technique of plant-tissue culture into one of the alternatives for the improvement of crops over a short period of time. A protocol for tissue culture was developed from segments of seedlings of C. officinalis, in order to improve the proliferation of shoots and roots. We used a Murashige and Skoog (MS½N medium, reduced to half the concentrations of NH4NO3 and KNO3 to verify the effect of different types of explants (basal, intermediate, and apical, a medium containing beach sand as support instead of agar, and the effect of auxins and cytokinins (TDZ tidiazuron; BAP, 6-benzylaminopurine, IAA, indol-3-acetic acid, IBA, indol-3-butyric acid, NAA, naphthalene-acetic acid on plant development in vitro. The results showed pronounced rooting from the apical explants, as well as a greater elongation of shoots and number of leaves. The solid medium was more suitable for the C. officinalis cultures. Shoot proliferation was dependent on cytokinins with better results from the influence of TDZ or BAP compared to the other treatments. Plants regenerated from the medium containing TDZ displayed a glazed appearance and morphogenetic deformations. The highest rate for rooting (80% was obtained using IAA 0.1mgL-1. Through in-vitro propagation, healthy C. officinalis plants were obtained with roots which can acclimatise, allowing the continuous supplement of raw material.A alta demanda por material vegetal de Calendula officinalis para produção de fitoterápicos e cosméticos, configura a técnica de cultura de tecidos vegetais como uma das alternativas para o aprimoramento das culturas em curto período de tempo. Um protocolo de cultura de tecidos foi desenvolvido a partir de segmentos de plântulas de C. officinalis, no intuito de melhorar a proliferação de brotos e o enraizamento. Foi utilizado o meio Murashige e Skoog (MS

  12. Interprofessional collaboration to improve professional practice and healthcare outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott; Pelone, Ferruccio; Harrison, Reema; Goldman, Joanne; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-06-22

    communications between health professionals (1 study, 100 participants; low-certainty evidence). Given that the certainty of evidence from the included studies was judged to be low to very low, there is not sufficient evidence to draw clear conclusions on the effects of IPC interventions. Neverthess, due to the difficulties health professionals encounter when collaborating in clinical practice, it is encouraging that research on the number of interventions to improve IPC has increased since this review was last updated. While this field is developing, further rigorous, mixed-method studies are required. Future studies should focus on longer acclimatisation periods before evaluating newly implemented IPC interventions, and use longer follow-up to generate a more informed understanding of the effects of IPC on clinical practice.

  13. Cultivation of Hylocerus sp. focusing on vegetative propagation, shading and mineral fertiliser=Cultivo de Hylocereus sp. com enfoque na propagação vegetativa, sombreamento e adubação mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmilson Igor Bernardo Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The red pitahaya is a semi-epiphytic cactaceous plant, whose cultivation has attracted great interest in recent years as a result of the growing demand for the fruit, characterised by an exotic appearance and the significant price acquired in the market. However, studies and information on this crop are still rare, especially for the conditions of soil and climate found in Brazil. Currently there are areas in Brazil for the commercial cultivation of red pitahaya, which are based on information adapted from such countries as Colombia, Israel, Mexico and Vietnam, pioneers with greater experience in the cultivation of this fruit. Information generated in the state of São Paulo is also used for other producing regions of Brazil; however it is basic and insufficient for achieving maximum potential productivity. Basic information regarding vegetative propagation, shading and mineral nutrition has not been scientifically defined, and acts as a limitation to crop development and production in the country, particularly in the Northeast. The aim therefore, was to make a brief presentation of the red pitahaya crop and gather relevant scientific results, so that they can contribute to improve exploitation of the crop in Brazil. Studies of Hylocereus sp. in the state of Ceará and other producing regions of Brazil point to the excellent adaptation of this species to environmental conditions in Brazil, and indicate its high productive potential. Some characteristics, such as the easy rooting of cuttings, acclimatisation to cultivation in full sunlight, positive response to mineral fertilizer, and precocity, make Hylocereus sp. a potential option for the diversification of irrigated fruit production in Brazil. = A pitaia vermelha é uma cactácea semi-epífita, cujo cultivo vem despertando grande interesse nos últimos anos em função da crescente demanda pelos seus frutos, caracterizados pela aparência exótica e pelos preços expressivos que adquirem no