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Sample records for sargasso sea metagenome

  1. Screening the Sargasso Sea metagenome for data to investigate genome evolution in Ostreococcus (Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piganeau, Gwenaël; Moreau, Hervé

    2007-12-30

    The Sargasso Sea water shotgun sequencing unveiled an unprecedented glimpse of marine prokaryotic diversity and gene content. The sequence data was gathered from 0.8 microm filtered surface water extracts, and revealed picoeukaryotic (cell sizeChlorophyta) as a benchmark for the eukaryotic sequence content of the Sargasso Sea metagenome. Sequence data from at least two new Ostreococcus strains were identified and analyzed, and showed a bias towards higher coverage of the AT-rich organellar genomes. The Ostreococcus nuclear sequence data retrieved from the Sargasso metagenome is divided onto 731 scaffolds of average size 3917 bp, and covers 23% of the complete nuclear genome and 14% of the total number of protein coding genes in O. tauri. We used this environmental Ostreococcus sequence data to estimate the level of constraint on intronic and intergenic sequences in this compact genome.

  2. Fishing for biodiversity: Novel methanopterin-linked C1 transfergenes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2004-07-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from anoligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1,800 of major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this paper we analyze the Sargasso Sea metagenome in terms of the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment, and a few of these are relatively abundant species. The sequences representative of the major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, they separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing towards their affiliation with a novel microbial phylum. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than previously known.

  3. Mimivirus relatives in the Sargasso sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The discovery and genome analysis of Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus, the largest known DNA virus, challenged much of the accepted dogma regarding viruses. Its particle size (>400 nm, genome length (1.2 million bp and huge gene repertoire (911 protein coding genes all contribute to blur the established boundaries between viruses and the smallest parasitic cellular organisms. Phylogenetic analyses also suggested that the Mimivirus lineage could have emerged prior to the individualization of cellular organisms from the three established domains, triggering a debate that can only be resolved by generating and analyzing more data. The next step is then to seek some evidence that Mimivirus is not the only representative of its kind and determine where to look for new Mimiviridae. An exhaustive similarity search of all Mimivirus predicted proteins against all publicly available sequences identified many of their closest homologues among the Sargasso Sea environmental sequences. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses suggested that unknown large viruses evolutionarily closer to Mimivirus than to any presently characterized species exist in abundance in the Sargasso Sea. Their isolation and genome sequencing could prove invaluable in understanding the origin and diversity of large DNA viruses, and shed some light on the role they eventually played in the emergence of eukaryotes.

  4. Studies on the small invertebrate plankton of the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Ruth

    1982-09-01

    During the German Eel Expedition in Spring 1979, the horizontal and vertical distribution of the invertebrate plankton was studied in the epipelagic zone of the western central Sargasso Sea, based on 55 µm and 100 µm mesh net samples. In the isothermal waters north of the thermal front, plankton biomass was on average 2-3 times higher than in the warmer stratified waters south of the front. With regard to the fraction of small invertebrates (nauplii and microcopepods) the differences in numerical abundance between the two areas were similar to those reported in the literature for other size ranges of organisms. No divergency was obvious in the plankton composition in terms of major taxonomic groups and size classes. In both parts of the area, organisms smaller than 400 µm, which form a fraction not quantitatively sampled by the conventional 200 µm or 300 µm mesh nets, accounted for 71-92 % of the total number of organisms in the 55 µm net samples and for more than 50 % in the 100 µm net samples. Average concentrations of the potential food supply for early larval fish stages in the upper 100 m appear to be comparable with values reported in the literature for areas well known for larval fish development, such as the California Current.

  5. Race and Gender in Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea | Samb | Lwati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the social demarcations between English and Creole cultural identities foregrounding race and gender in Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea. Set in a post Emancipation West Indian colony, the novel dramatizes the impossibility of mutual and creative exchanges between the fragments of a disintegrating ...

  6. Sargassum-associated mobile fauna communities in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.; Schell, J. M.; Goodwin, D.; Biggs, D.; Siuda, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Sargassum natans and S. fluitans are entirely pelagic, offering a pseudo-benthic structural habitat for an associated community of mobile fauna. In turn, the mobile fauna community supports foraging seabirds, fish, and turtles. Recent satellite observations suggest Sargassum in the Sargasso Sea is seeded annually from the Gulf of Mexico. Furthermore, the Caribbean is in the midst of a Sargassum inundation that appears disconnected in origin from the Sargasso Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Sargassum and fauna were collected via dip net during spring and summer 2015 from the Gulf of Mexico, Sargasso Sea and Eastern Caribbean to study the impacts that region, aggregation pattern (isolated clump, windrow, mat), and Sargassum variety morphology have on mobile fauna community composition. Sargassum from all three regions shared five common (frequency >10%) species: flatworm spp., Portunus sayi, Litiopa melanostoma, Leander tenuicornis, and Latreutes fucorum). The Gulf presented the most unique species (9 unique / 16 total) followed by the Sargasso Sea (5 unique / 12 total) and the Caribbean (1 unique / 6 total). The majority of species unique to the Gulf of Mexico were juvenile fish while those in the Caribbean and Sargasso Sea were benthic-like species residing on the Sargassum itself. Differences in the morphological forms of Sargassum had a marked effect on fauna diversity and abundance. In all three regions, fewer individuals and species were found on the broad-leafed, less compact S. natans VIII than on the denser S. natans I and S. fluitans III. This study identifies the differences in macrofauna abundance and diversity between varieties of Sargassum and highlights the potential for dramatic community changes that could result from largescale Sargassum blooms and species shifts. Any shift in these keystone communities could result in negative cascading effects on seabirds, economically important fish populations, and juvenile turtles which use the seaweed as a nursery

  7. Gender, identity and power: a reflection on Wide sargasso sea, by Jean Rhys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley de Souza Gomes Carreira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to analyze Jean Rhys’s novel Wide Sargasso Sea in order to display the author’s strategy to deconstruct Charlotte Brontë’s eurocentric discourse in Jane Eyre, granting voice to the colonized subject, besides allowing a “dive” into the web woven by patriarchy, getting men and women stuck in predetermined social roles.

  8. Marine Spatial Planning Applied to the High Seas - Process and Results of an Exercise Focused on the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda, A. N.; Smythe, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Sargasso Sea, at the center of the North Atlantic gyre, is recognized by the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity as a globally unique ecosystem threatened by anthropogenic activity. In its stewardship capacity, the Sargasso Sea Commission works within the current system of international organizations and treaties to secure protection for particular species or areas. Without a single governing authority to implement and enforce protective measures across the region, a coordinated management plan for the region is lacking. A research team comprised of 20 advanced undergraduate scientists participating in the spring 2015 SEA Semester: Marine Biodiversity and Conservation program of Sea Education Association (Woods Hole, MA) engaged in a groundbreaking simulated high seas marine spatial planning process resulting in A Marine Management Proposal for the Sargasso Sea. Based on natural and social science research, the interdisciplinary Proposal outlines goals, objectives and realistic strategies that encompass ecological, economic, human use, and future use considerations. Notably, the Proposal is the product of a classroom-based simulation intended to improve emerging scientists' understanding of how research is integrated into the policy process and how organizations work across disciplinary boundaries to address complex ocean management problems. Student researchers identified several discrete management areas and associated policy recommendations for those areas, as well as strategies for coordinated management across the entire Sargasso Sea region. The latter include establishment of a United Nations Regional Ocean Management Organization as well as provisions for monitoring and managing high seas traffic. To make progress toward these strategies, significant attention to the importance of high seas regions for global-scale conservation will be necessary.

  9. Qualitative assessment of the diet of European eel larvae in the Sargasso Sea resolved by DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemann, L.; Alfredsson, H.; Hansen, Michael Møller

    2010-01-01

    that even the smallest larvae feed on a striking variety of plankton organisms, and that gelatinous zooplankton is of fundamental dietary importance. Hence, the specific plankton composition seems essential for eel larval feeding and growth, suggesting a linkage between eel survival and regional plankton......, the Sargasso Sea is oligotrophic, with generally low plankton biomass, and the feeding biology of eel larvae has so far remained a mystery, hampering understanding of this peculiar life history. DNA barcoding of gut contents of 61 genetically identified A. anguilla larvae caught in the Sargasso Sea showed...

  10. Accumulation and enhanced cycling of polyphosphate by Sargasso Sea plankton in response to low phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Lomas, Michael W.; Poulton, Nicole J.; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.

    2014-06-01

    Phytoplankton alter their biochemical composition according to nutrient availability, such that their bulk elemental composition varies across oceanic provinces. However, the links between plankton biochemical composition and variation in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients remain largely unknown. In a survey of phytoplankton phosphorus stress in the western North Atlantic, we found that phytoplankton in the phosphorus-depleted subtropical Sargasso Sea were enriched in the biochemical polyphosphate (polyP) compared with nutrient-rich temperate waters, contradicting the canonical oceanographic view of polyP as a luxury phosphorus storage molecule. The enrichment in polyP coincided with enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and substitution of sulfolipids for phospholipids, which are both indicators of phosphorus stress. Further, polyP appeared to be liberated preferentially over bulk phosphorus from sinking particles in the Sargasso Sea, thereby retaining phosphorus in shallow waters. Thus, polyP cycling may form a feedback loop that attenuates the export of phosphorus when it becomes scarce, contributes bioavailable P for primary production, and supports the export of carbon and nitrogen via sinking particles.

  11. Accumulation and enhanced cycling of polyphosphate by Sargasso Sea plankton in response to low phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick; Dyhrman, Sonya T; Lomas, Michael W; Poulton, Nicole J; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2014-06-03

    Phytoplankton alter their biochemical composition according to nutrient availability, such that their bulk elemental composition varies across oceanic provinces. However, the links between plankton biochemical composition and variation in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients remain largely unknown. In a survey of phytoplankton phosphorus stress in the western North Atlantic, we found that phytoplankton in the phosphorus-depleted subtropical Sargasso Sea were enriched in the biochemical polyphosphate (polyP) compared with nutrient-rich temperate waters, contradicting the canonical oceanographic view of polyP as a luxury phosphorus storage molecule. The enrichment in polyP coincided with enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and substitution of sulfolipids for phospholipids, which are both indicators of phosphorus stress. Further, polyP appeared to be liberated preferentially over bulk phosphorus from sinking particles in the Sargasso Sea, thereby retaining phosphorus in shallow waters. Thus, polyP cycling may form a feedback loop that attenuates the export of phosphorus when it becomes scarce, contributes bioavailable P for primary production, and supports the export of carbon and nitrogen via sinking particles.

  12. Misrepresentations of Sargasso Sea temperatures by Arthur B. Robinson et al.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keigwin, Lloyd (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA); Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2010-10-01

    Keigwin (Science 274:1504-1508, 1996) reconstructed the sea surface temperature (SST) record in the northern Sargasso Sea to document natural climate variability in recent millennia. The annual average SST proxy used {delta}{sup 18}O in planktonic foraminifera in a radiocarbon-dated 1990 Bermuda Rise box core. Keigwin's Fig. 4B (K4B) shows a 50-year-averaged time series along with four decades of SST measurements from Station S near Bermuda, demonstrating that the Sargasso Sea is now at its warmest in more than 400 years, and well above the most recent box-core temperature. Taken together, Station S and paleo-temperatures suggest there was an acceleration of warming in the 20th century, though this was not an explicit conclusion of the paper. Keigwin concluded that anthropogenic warming may be superposed on a natural warming trend. In an unpublished paper circulated with the anti-Kyoto 'Oregon Petition,' Robinson et al. ('Environmental Effects of Increased Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide,' 1998) reproduced K4B but (1) omitted Station S data, (2) incorrectly stated that the time series ended in 1975, (3) conflated Sargasso Sea data with global temperature, and (4) falsely claimed that Keigwin showed global temperatures 'are still a little below the average for the past 3,000 years.' Keigwin's Fig. 2 showed that {delta}{sup 18}O has increased over the past 6000 years, so SSTs calculated from those data would have a long term decrease. Thus, it is inappropriate to compare present-day SST to a long term mean unless the trend is removed. Slight variations of Robinson et al. (1998) have been repeatedly published with different author rotations. Various mislabeled, improperly-drawn, and distorted versions of K4B have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, in weblogs, and even as an editorial cartoon-all supporting baseless claims that current temperatures are lower than the long-term mean, and traceable to Robinson's misrepresentation

  13. Profiles of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and other measurements collected in the Sargasso Sea as part of the SYNOP project (NODC Accession 0046703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and other measurements collected in the Sargasso Sea as part of the SYNoptic Ocean Prediction (SYNOP) experiment. The...

  14. Oceanic fronts in the Sargasso Sea control the early life and drift of Atlantic eels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Hansen, Michael Møller; Maas, Gregory E.

    2010-01-01

    Anguillid freshwater eels show remarkable life histories. In the Atlantic, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and American eel (Anguilla rostrata) undertake extensive migrations to spawn in the oceanic Sargasso Sea, and subsequently the offspring drift to foraging areas in Europe and North...... America, first as leaf-like leptocephali larvae that later metamorphose into glass eels. Since recruitment of European and American glass eels has declined drastically during past decades, there is a strong demand for further understanding of the early, oceanic phase of their life cycle. Consequently...... to the eastward flowing Subtropical Counter Current indicates that these larvae could follow a shorter, eastward route towards the Azores and Europe. The findings emphasize the significance of oceanic physical–biological linkages in the life-cycle completion of Atlantic eels....

  15. Comparative metagenomics of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-26

    Metagenome produces a tremendous amount of data that comes from the organisms living in the environments. This big data enables us to examine not only microbial genes but also the community structure, interaction and adaptation mechanisms at the specific location and condition. The Red Sea has several unique characteristics such as high salinity, high temperature and low nutrition. These features must contribute to form the unique microbial community during the evolutionary process. Since 2014, we started monthly samplings of the metagenomes in the Red Sea under KAUST-CCF project. In collaboration with Kitasato University, we also collected the metagenome data from the ocean in Japan, which shows contrasting features to the Red Sea. Therefore, the comparative metagenomics of those data provides a comprehensive view of the Red Sea microbes, leading to identify key microbes, genes and networks related to those environmental differences.

  16. Seasonal occurrence of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) around Kelvin Seamount in the Sargasso Sea in relation to oceanographic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sarah N. P.; Whitehead, Hal

    2014-09-01

    Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are widely distributed in all oceans, but they are clumped geographically, generally in areas associated with high primary and secondary productivity. The warm, clear waters of the Sargasso Sea are traditionally thought to be low in productivity, however recent surveys have found large numbers of sperm whales there. The New England Seamount Chain bisects the north-western portion of the Sargasso Sea, and might influence the mesoscale eddies associated with the Gulf Stream; creating areas of higher productivity within the Sargasso Sea. We investigated the seasonal occurrence of sperm whales over Kelvin Seamount (part of the New England Seamount Chain) and how it is influenced by oceanographic variables. An autonomous recording device was deployed over Kelvin Seamount from May to June 2006 and November 2006 to June 2007. A total of 6505 hourly two-minute recordings were examined for the presence of sperm whale echolocation clicks. Sperm whales were more prevalent around Kelvin in the spring (April to June: mean=51% of recordings contained clicks) compared to the winter (November to March: mean=16% of recordings contained clicks). Sperm whale prevalence at Kelvin was related to chlorophyll-a concentration four weeks previous, eddy kinetic energy and month. The mesoscale activity associated with the Gulf Stream and the Gulf Stream's interaction with the New England Seamount Chain likely play an important role in sperm whale occurrence in this area, by increasing productivity and perhaps concentration of cephalopod species.

  17. Qualitative assessment of the diet of European eel larvae in the Sargasso Sea resolved by DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, Lasse; Alfredsson, Hanna; Hansen, Michael M; Als, Thomas D; Nielsen, Torkel G; Munk, Peter; Aarestrup, Kim; Maes, Gregory E; Sparholt, Henrik; Petersen, Michael I; Bachler, Mirjam; Castonguay, Martin

    2010-12-23

    European eels (Anguilla anguilla) undertake spawning migrations of more than 5000 km from continental Europe and North Africa to frontal zones in the Sargasso Sea. Subsequently, the larval offspring are advected by large-scale eastward ocean currents towards continental waters. However, the Sargasso Sea is oligotrophic, with generally low plankton biomass, and the feeding biology of eel larvae has so far remained a mystery, hampering understanding of this peculiar life history. DNA barcoding of gut contents of 61 genetically identified A. anguilla larvae caught in the Sargasso Sea showed that even the smallest larvae feed on a striking variety of plankton organisms, and that gelatinous zooplankton is of fundamental dietary importance. Hence, the specific plankton composition seems essential for eel larval feeding and growth, suggesting a linkage between eel survival and regional plankton productivity. These novel insights into the prey of Atlantic eels may furthermore facilitate eel larval rearing in aquaculture, which ultimately may replace the unsustainable use of wild-caught glass eels.

  18. Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea as a Hypertext of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre: A Postmodern Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Herischian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study gains significance as the findings can shed more lights on the postmodern concept of hypertextuality to show that there is no originality in literature and any literary work can be the repetition, continuation, or mixture of previous texts. In the case of this study, that is to show, how a twentieth-century literary work like Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea can be the parody of Brontë’s nineteenth-century novel Jane Eyre. Moreover, such a postmodern perspective widens various ways of concentration on the literary works, so that, one could interpret in what ways two texts are united and grafted which results in either parody or pastiche. This study attempts to demonstrate mostly those focused aspects in Wide Sargasso Sea and Jane Eyre that highlight the concept of hypertextuality, including the analyses of Rochester’s character in the novels, as a Byronic hero in Jane Eyre and an anti-Byronic hero in Wide Sargasso Sea; and also the study of the characters of Jane Eyre and Antoinette Cosway, as women narrator of the novels as well as focusing on the dream texts of the novels.

  19. Two decades and counting: 24-years of sustained open ocean biogeochemical measurements in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, M. W.; Bates, N. R.; Johnson, R. J.; Knap, A. H.; Steinberg, D. K.; Carlson, C. A.

    2013-09-01

    The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program has sampled the northwestern Sargasso Sea on a biweekly (January to April) to monthly basis since October 1988. The primary objective of the core BATS program continues to be an improved understanding of the time-variable processes and mechanisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and related elements in the surface ocean. With 24 years of measurements for most chemical, physical and biological variables, we have moved beyond descriptions of seasonal and interannual variability to examination of multi-year trends and potential controls, however there remain substantial gaps in our knowledge of the ecosystem mechanisms related to organic matter production, export and remineralization. While earlier BATS overviews have focused on describing seasonal and year-to-year variability, this overview provides new information on three long-standing biogeochemical questions in Sargasso Sea biogeochemistry. First, why is there a discrepancy between biological (i.e., sediment trap) and geochemical estimates of carbon export production? Winter storms and mesoscale eddies have now been clearly shown to contribute to annual nutrient budgets and carbon export production. Recent information on phytoplankton natural isotopic nitrogen composition, and data from profiling floats suggests that small phytoplankton are important contributors to new production in summer despite the apparent absence of a mechanism to entrain nitrate into the euphotic zone. These findings aid in closing the gap between these two different estimates of carbon export production. Second, what supports the seasonal drawdown of carbon dioxide in the absence of detectable nutrients? The zooplankton timeseries at BATS highlights the importance of zooplankton as a conduit for carbon removal due to grazing and vertical migration. Although increases in cellular elemental stoichiometry to values greater than the canonical Redfield Ratio, and the

  20. Distribution and potential sources and sinks of copper chelators in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, J. W.; Zika, R. G.; Brand, L. E.

    1990-01-01

    Copper speciation has been studied at an oligotrophic station in the southwestern Sargasso Sea to determine the distribution of Cu binding ligands and evaluate their potential sources and sinks. Speciation was studied using a ligand exchange/liquid-liquid partition procedure used in a previous study in Florida coastal waters [ MOFFET and ZIKA (1987a) Marine Chemistry, 21, 301-313]. Copper speciation was dominated by organic complexation at all depths studied (16-950 m). Complexation was greatest in the region of the chlorophyll maximum. In this region, speciation was dominated by two ligands or ligand classes; L 1, with K cond. = 10 13.2, concentration = 2 nM, and a weaker but more abundant ligand class, L 2 with Kincond. = 10 9.7, concentration = 80 nM. From 140 to 16 m, [Cu(II)] free/[Cu(II)] total increases by a factor of 20, due to a decrease in [L 1] to a value below the ambient Cu concentration. Exposure of water from 140 m to sunlight indicated that photochemical decomposition of L 1 may account for the decrease. Below the chlorophyll maximum there is a gradual increase in [Cu(II)] free/[Cu(II)] total suggesting that the ligands are of recent biological origin rather than derived from refractory materials. Cultures of a ubiquitous marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. produced a ligand with K cond. comparable to L 1, indicating that a biological source is plausible.

  1. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied among marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmoregulation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1-3°C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and

  2. Distribution and production of plankton communities in the subtropical convergence zone of the Sargasso Sea. II. Protozooplankton and copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nikolaj G.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The oligotrophic Sargasso Sea in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean is influenced by a complex set of oceanographic features that might introduce nutrients and enhance productivity in certain areas. To increase our understanding of the variability in plankton communities and to determine...... and metazooplankton were investigated at 33 stations along 3 north to south transects ranging from 64 to 70 degrees W to a depth of 400 m. Copepods dominated the metazooplankton, while heterotrophic athecate dinoflagellates dominated the protozoan biomass. Other important groups were appendicularians, gastropod...

  3. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese and nickel in the incubation water. Over the three-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon (POC increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived cobalt (Co, manganese, and nickel were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Copper (Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu2+ concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1 atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2 these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3 growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic

  4. An Eolian Source of Non-Radiogenic Osmium to Surface Waters of the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R. E.; Sedwick, P. N.; Sharma, M.

    2006-12-01

    We have recently identified a significant seasonal-scale variability in the Os concentration and isotopic composition of the surface waters of the Sargasso Sea (BATS region), where aeolian dust is known to constitute a significant source of lithogenic trace metals. The Os concentration varies from 19 to 34 fM and ^{187}Os/^{188}Os ratio ranges from ~0.7 (filtered seawater) to ~1.2 (unfiltered seawater). The surface waters are relatively depleted in Os, with concentrations increasing with depth in a nutrient-like manner to values lower than observed in the deep Pacific and Indian Oceans (~55 fM). The ^{187}Os/^{188}Os ratio at depth is ~1.06, identical to that observed in the deep oceans. Previously, eolian dust has not been considered as a significant source of Os to the oceans, since loess samples are not enriched in this element ([Os] ~30 pg/g; average ^{187}Os/^{188}Os = 1.26). These observations suggest that eolian dust may provide a significant input of Os to the oceans, although our results raise new questions regarding the seawater solubility, isotopic composition and provenance of this eolian Os. The Os isotope data require contributions from at least two sources. While it is easy to imagine that the radiogenic Os component has a continental source, the origin of the non-radiogenic Os is unclear. Interestingly, we also find that a sample of Saharan dust is highly enriched in Os and gives an ^{187}Os/^{188}Os ratio of ~0.5, which is much lower than that obtained for other aerosols and loess samples. Additional analyses of airborne dust collected at Bermuda are underway to further address this issue.

  5. Photosynthetic oxygen production in a warmer ocean: the Sargasso Sea as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    2017-08-01

    Photosynthetic O2 production can be an important source of oxygen in sub-surface ocean waters especially in permanently stratified oligotrophic regions of the ocean where O2 produced in deep chlorophyll maxima (DCM) is not likely to be outgassed. Today, permanently stratified regions extend across approximately 40% of the global ocean and their extent is expected to increase in a warmer ocean. Thus, predicting future ocean oxygen conditions requires a better understanding of the potential response of photosynthetic oxygen production to a warmer ocean. Based on our own and published observations of water column processes in oligotrophic regions, we develop a one-dimensional water column model describing photosynthetic oxygen production in the Sargasso Sea to quantify the importance of photosynthesis for the downward flux of O2 and examine how it may be influenced in a warmer ocean. Photosynthesis is driven in the model by vertical mixing of nutrients (including eddy-induced mixing) and diazotrophy and is found to substantially increase the downward O2 flux relative to physical-chemical processes alone. Warming (2°C) surface waters does not significantly change oxygen production at the DCM. Nor does a 15% increase in re-mineralization rate (assuming Q10 = 2; 2°C warming) have significant effect on net sub-surface oxygen accumulation. However, changes in the relative production of particulate (POM) and dissolved organic material (DOM) generate relatively large changes in net sub-surface oxygen production. As POM/DOM production is a function of plankton community composition, this implies plankton biodiversity and food web structure may be important factors influencing O2 production in a warmer ocean. This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'.

  6. Species composition and diversity of fish larvae in the Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Sargasso Sea from morphology and DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayala, Daniel Jiro; Munk, Peter; Riemann, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Specific regions of otherwise oligotrophic oceans seem to attract fish spawning and sustain significant abundances of fish larvae. The Sargasso Sea in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre is known as the spawning area of the Atlantic eels, but numerous other fish species also spawn in the area. In...

  7. Horizontal and vertical distribution of Chaetognatha in the upper 1000 m of the western Sargasso Sea and the Central and South-east Atlantic.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pierrot-Bultsa, A.C.; Nair, V.R.

    The chaetognath abundance, species richness and bathymetric distribution in the upper 1000 m in two regions of the Atlantic Ocean is discussed based on samples collected on two cruises, one to the Sargasso Sea (Northwest Atlantic) on board the R/V R...

  8. Physical and chemical data collected from bottle casts in the Sargasso Sea from CAPE HENLOPEN and other platforms from 21 January 1988 to 10 December 1988 (NODC Accession 0000407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts in the Sargasso sea from CAPE HENLOPEN, CAPE HATTERAS, and WEATHERBIRD from 21 January 1988 to 10...

  9. Community differentiation and population enrichment of Sargasso Sea bacterioplankton in the euphotic zone of a mesoscale mode-water eddy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Craig E; Carlson, Craig A; Ewart, Courtney S; Halewood, Elisa R

    2014-03-01

    Eddies are mesoscale oceanographic features (∼ 200 km diameter) that can cause transient blooms of phytoplankton by shifting density isoclines in relation to light and nutrient resources. To better understand how bacterioplankton respond to eddies, we examined depth-resolved distributions of bacterial populations across an anticyclonic mode-water eddy in the Sargasso Sea. Previous work on this eddy has documented elevated phytoplankton productivity and diatom abundance within the eddy centre with coincident bacterial productivity and biomass maxima. We illustrate bacterial community shifts within the eddy centre, differentiating populations uplifted along isopycnals from those enriched or depleted at horizons of enhanced bacterial and primary productivity. Phylotypes belonging to the Roseobacter, OCS116 and marine Actinobacteria clades were enriched in the eddy core and were highly correlated with pigment-based indicators of diatom abundance, supporting developing hypotheses that members of these clades associate with phytoplankton blooms. Typical mesopelagic clades (SAR202, SAR324, SAR406 and SAR11 IIb) were uplifted within the eddy centre, increasing bacterial diversity in the lower euphotic zone. Typical surface oligotrophic clades (SAR116, OM75, Prochlorococcus and SAR11 Ia) were relatively depleted in the eddy centre. The biogeochemical context of a bloom-inducing eddy provides insight into the ecology of the diverse uncultured bacterioplankton dominating the oligotrophic oceans. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Seasonal dynamics of SAR11 populations in the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the northwestern Sargasso Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Craig A; Morris, Robert; Parsons, Rachel; Treusch, Alexander H; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Vergin, Kevin

    2009-03-01

    Bacterioplankton belonging to the SAR11 clade of a-proteobacteria were counted by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) over eight depths in the surface 300 m at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site from 2003 to 2005. SAR11 are dominant heterotrophs in oligotrophic systems; thus, resolving their temporal dynamics can provide important insights to the cycling of organic and inorganic nutrients. This quantitative time-series data revealed distinct annual distribution patterns of SAR11 abundance in the euphotic (0-120) and upper mesopelagic (160-300 m) zones that were reproducibly correlated with seasonal mixing and stratification of the water column. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data generated from a decade of samples collected at BATS were combined with the FISH data to model the annual dynamics of SAR11 subclade populations. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed to verify the correlation of the T-RFLP data with SAR11 clade structure. Clear vertical and temporal transitions were observed in the dominance of three SAR11 ecotypes. The mechanisms that lead to shifts between the different SAR11 populations are not well understood, but are probably a consequence of finely tuned physiological adaptations that partition the populations along physical and chemical gradients in the ecosystem. The correlation between evolutionary descent and temporal/spatial patterns we describe, confirmed that a minimum of three SAR11 ecotypes occupy the Sargasso Sea surface layer, and revealed new details of their population dynamics.

  11. An application of statistics to comparative metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohwer Forest

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics, sequence analyses of genomic DNA isolated directly from the environments, can be used to identify organisms and model community dynamics of a particular ecosystem. Metagenomics also has the potential to identify significantly different metabolic potential in different environments. Results Here we use a statistical method to compare curated subsystems, to predict the physiology, metabolism, and ecology from metagenomes. This approach can be used to identify those subsystems that are significantly different between metagenome sequences. Subsystems that were overrepresented in the Sargasso Sea and Acid Mine Drainage metagenome when compared to non-redundant databases were identified. Conclusion The methodology described herein applies statistics to the comparisons of metabolic potential in metagenomes. This analysis reveals those subsystems that are more, or less, represented in the different environments that are compared. These differences in metabolic potential lead to several testable hypotheses about physiology and metabolism of microbes from these ecosystems.

  12. Distinct protistan assemblages characterize the euphotic zone and deep sea (2500 m) of the western North Atlantic (Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Countway, Peter D; Gast, Rebecca J; Dennett, Mark R; Savai, Pratik; Rose, Julie M; Caron, David A

    2007-05-01

    Protistan diversity was characterized at three locations in the western North Atlantic (Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream) by sequencing 18S rRNA genes in samples from euphotic (< or = 125 m) and bathypelagic depths (2500 m). A total of 923 partial-length protistan sequences were analysed, revealing 324 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by an automated OTU-calling program set to 95% sequence similarity. Most OTUs were comprised of only one or two sequences suggesting a large but rare pool of protistan diversity. Many OTUs from both depth strata were associated with recently described novel alveolate and stramenopile lineages while many OTUs from the bathypelagic were affiliated with Acantharea, Polycystinea and Euglenozoa and were not observed in euphotic zone libraries. Protistan assemblages from the euphotic zone and the deep sea were largely composed of distinct OTUs; only 28 of the 324 protistan OTUs were detected in both shallow and deep sea clone libraries. The diversity of protistan assemblages in the deep sea was distinctly lower than the diversity of euphotic zone assemblages. Protistan assemblages from the Gulf Stream were the most diverse for either depth strata. Overall, protistan assemblages from different stations but comparable depths were more similar than the assemblages from different depths at the same station. These data suggest that particular groups of protistan OTUs formed distinct 'shallow' and 'deep-sea' assemblages across widely spaced oceanic locales.

  13. Storm impact on sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a in the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea based on daily cloud-free satellite data reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Taylor; Li, Yizhen; He, Ruoying

    2016-12-01

    Upper ocean responses to tropical storms/hurricanes have been extensively studied using satellite observations. However, resolving concurrent sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll a (chl a) responses along storm tracks remains a major challenge due to extensive cloud coverage in satellite images. Here we produce daily cloud-free SST and chl a reconstructions based on the Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Function method over a 10 year period (2003-2012) for the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea regions. Daily reconstructions allow us to characterize and contrast previously obscured subweekly SST and chl a responses to storms in the two main storm-impacted regions of the Atlantic Ocean. Statistical analyses of daily SST and chl a responses revealed regional differences in the response time as well as the response sensitivity to maximum sustained wind speed and translation speed. This study demonstrates that SST and chl a responses clearly depend on regional ocean conditions and are not as universal as might have been previously suggested.

  14. Physical, nutrient, chlorophyll a and plankton abundance data collected from CTD and bottle casts aboard the R/Vs OCEANUS and ENDEAVOR in the Western Sargasso Sea and Northeast U.S. Shelf from 2004 to 2005 (NODC Accession 0053611)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical and biologic parameters were measured in the Western Sargasso Sea and Northeast U.S. shelf aboard the R/V Endeavor from 13 May to 31 May, 2004 and...

  15. [Mini review] metagenomic studies of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Hayedeh

    2015-10-23

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied amongst marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmolyte C1 oxidation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1–3 °C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the

  16. L’image du père et du jardin : Jane Eyre de Charlotte Brontë  et WideSargasso Sea de Jean Rhys Of Father Figures and Gardens: Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Baranowski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Though no father actually appears as a character either in Jane Eyre or in Wide Sargasso Sea, the father figure looms large in both novels, as a complex, protean and paradoxical entity, playing a crucial part in the fate of the protagonists. Jane Eyre and Antoinette Cosway are orphaned at an early age, Rochester’s father is depicted as remote and insensitive; the surrogate fathers —Antoinette’s stepfather, Jane’s uncles— mostly fail when they try to replace the missing one. Rochester himself is an ambiguous character who appears in both novels as a son, lover and husband on the one side, as a father figure on the other. In Wide Sargasso Sea he acquires through his marriage to the heiress Antoinette Cosway a legal authority which he eventually uses to destroy his wife; in Jane Eyre he first appears as the wealthier, more knowledgeable, stronger character before he discovers a female counterpart who does more than merely hold her ground.These different aspects of the father figure are closely linked to the motif of the garden which mirrors the inner development of the —mostly— female characters. It is not entirely similar to nature itself, though it is part of it; the latter means in both novels lethal dangers and elemental violence, whereas the garden is a sheltered place. In Wide Sargasso Sea, the debased garden of Coulibri simultaneously conveys a distorted, though by no means untrue reflection of the father figure and a sanctuary from the harshness of the outside world. It also means a place of peace and of simple joys for Jane Eyre, making up for the deprived life at the Lowood boarding school; but contrasting with Coulibri it does not preclude the contact with the outside world which she actually longs for. Hence the garden mirrors the crucial moments and experiences in the lives of both heroines, including love, married life and loss.

  17. “Madwoman in the Post-Colonial Era” A Study of the Female Voice in Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nushrat Azam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to analyze the mediums and effects of voice and silence in the life of a female character of the re-written post-colonial text Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea. The analysis shows how a re-written text can give a new meaning to a character and story of a novel, where the character of Antoinette tells the untold story of Bertha in Jane Eyre. The method of investigation for this research is analytical and descriptive; the research was completed by analyzing the events, actions and the interactions of the female character, Antoinette with the other major characters in the novel in order to identify how the character of Antoinette was portrayed throughout the novel. It is understood through the study of the text, that the post-colonial novel gave the female voice much more importance than its previous counterpart. This represents the early post-colonial times during which women were starting to gain liberation but had still not completely moved on from the notions of patriarchal societies that they had grown up in.

  18. Tracking upwind areas associated with enhanced chlorophyll-a concentrations to examine the impact of atmospheric deposition on phytoplankton production in the Sargasso and Mediterranean Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Transports of terrestrial materials through the atmosphere and their depositions influence ocean biogeochemistry. In particular, growth of phytoplankton in oligotrophic oceans may be stimulated by the atmospheric deposition of nutrients (e.g. reactive nitrogen species and iron). The Sargasso and Mediterranean Seas are two oligotrophic oceans that may show the enhancements in phytoplankton production by the atmospheric deposition, because their upwind areas include African deserts and urban areas of the United States and the Europe. To test this hypothesis, time series of chlorophyll-a concentration (from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) were combined with air mass back trajectory (from Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) to perform the Concentration-Weighted Trajectory (CWT) receptor model. In this model, all individual endpoints of a single air mass back trajectory are associated with a chlorophyll-a concentration measured at the starting time of air mass back trajectory. The upwind areas showing relatively high CWT values represent they are mostly associated with enhanced chlorophyll-a concentration and contribute to phytoplankton production. We carried out the CWT in 65 and 188 stations for the Mediterranean and Saragossa Seas, respectively. The results showed relatively high CWT values in the North American and northern African continents. However, wind usually flows from these continents to ocean during cold months when chlorophyll-a concentrations are generally high. Thus the results appeared to largely originate from seasonal cycle of ocean mixed layer depth. To minimize the effect of seasonal variations, we divided chlorophyll-a concentrations by monthly climatology, which resulted in much reduced contrast in the CWT values between land and ocean areas. However, some upwind areas including the northern African desert regions still showed relatively high CWT values, maybe implying deposition-induced stimulation of

  19. Carbon dioxide seasonal cycle in the sea euphotic zone - a study in the Sargasso Sea; Cycle saisonnier du CO{sub 2} dans la zone euphotique marine - une etude dans la mer des sargasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchal, O.

    1996-05-28

    Between 1750 and 1990, the human activities (mainly fossil carbon combustion and deforestation) have lead to an increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, the carbon dioxide actively takes part to the greenhouse effect and then to the energetic balance of the climatic system. The study which is carried out consists of the forecasting of the CO{sub 2} future concentrations in the atmosphere (from 10, 100 years). The chosen site (BATS: Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study) is located in the Sargasso Sea. The factors leading to seasonal variations have been determined. Several bio-geochemical models have been developed in order to on the one hand simulate the seasonal dynamics of the mixture layer observed in the Bats site and on the other hand explain the main characteristics of the observed phytoplankton seasonal cycle, of its nutriments and of the dissolved oxygen. (O.M.). 375 refs.

  20. A REPRESENTAÇÃO FEMININA EM JANE EYRE E WIDE SARGASSO SEA: DIÁLOGOS ENTRE O ROMANCE DE AUTORIA FEMININA NOS SÉCULOS XIX E XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Soares Zukoski (UNESPAR

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available

    O presente trabalho tem por objetivo apresentar uma análise da representação feminina nas obras Jane Eyre (1847, da romancista inglesa Charlotte Brontë, e Wide sargasso sea (1966, publicado pela escritora dominiquesa Jean Rhys. Wide sargasso sea emerge no contexto da narrativa pós-colonial como uma reescrita do romance inglês, ao dar voz à personagem Bertha Mason, apenas mencionada vagamente em Jane Eyre, como a “louca do sótão”. Nesse sentido, pode-se refletir sobre o diálogo entre as obras no que tange ao modo de representação das personagens femininas, tendo como base teórica os pressupostos da crítica feminista e do pós-colonialismo, como Bonnici (2000, Vasconcelos (2002, Reis (1992, Muzart (2011, entre outros.

    Palavras-chave: Literatura de autoria feminina. Crítica feminista. Literatura em língua inglesa. Pós-colonialismo.

  1. A “Rosetta Stone” for metazoan zooplankton: DNA barcode analysis of species diversity of the Sargasso Sea (Northwest Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Ann; Ortman, Brian D.; Jennings, Robert M.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Sweetman, Christopher J.; Copley, Nancy J.; Sutton, Tracey; Wiebe, Peter H.

    2010-12-01

    Species diversity of the metazoan holozooplankton assemblage of the Sargasso Sea, Northwest Atlantic Ocean, was examined through coordinated morphological taxonomic identification of species and DNA sequencing of a ˜650 base-pair region of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) as a DNA barcode (i.e., short sequence for species recognition and discrimination). Zooplankton collections were made from the surface to 5,000 meters during April, 2006 on the R/V R.H. Brown. Samples were examined by a ship-board team of morphological taxonomists; DNA barcoding was carried out in both ship-board and land-based DNA sequencing laboratories. DNA barcodes were determined for a total of 297 individuals of 175 holozooplankton species in four phyla, including: Cnidaria (Hydromedusae, 4 species; Siphonophora, 47); Arthropoda (Amphipoda, 10; Copepoda, 34; Decapoda, 9; Euphausiacea, 10; Mysidacea, 1; Ostracoda, 27); and Mollusca (Cephalopoda, 8; Heteropoda, 6; Pteropoda, 15); and Chaetognatha (4). Thirty species of fish (Teleostei) were also barcoded. For all seven zooplankton groups for which sufficient data were available, Kimura-2-Parameter genetic distances were significantly lower between individuals of the same species (mean=0.0114; S.D. 0.0117) than between individuals of different species within the same group (mean=0.3166; S.D. 0.0378). This difference, known as the barcode gap, ensures that mtCOI sequences are reliable characters for species identification for the oceanic holozooplankton assemblage. In addition, DNA barcodes allow recognition of new or undescribed species, reveal cryptic species within known taxa, and inform phylogeographic and population genetic studies of geographic variation. The growing database of "gold standard" DNA barcodes serves as a Rosetta Stone for marine zooplankton, providing the key for decoding species diversity by linking species names, morphology, and DNA sequence variation. In light of the pivotal position of zooplankton in ocean

  2. Natural variation in SAR11 marine bacterioplankton genomes inferred from metagenomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Larry J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One objective of metagenomics is to reconstruct information about specific uncultured organisms from fragmentary environmental DNA sequences. We used the genome of an isolate of the marine alphaproteobacterium SAR11 ('Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'; strain HTCC1062, obtained from the cold, productive Oregon coast, as a query sequence to study variation in SAR11 metagenome sequence data from the Sargasso Sea, a warm, oligotrophic ocean gyre. Results The average amino acid identity of SAR11 genes encoded by the metagenomic data to the query genome was only 71%, indicating significant evolutionary divergence between the coastal isolates and Sargasso Sea populations. However, an analysis of gene neighbors indicated that SAR11 genes in the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data match the gene order of the HTCC1062 genome in 96% of cases (> 85,000 observations, and that rearrangements are most frequent at predicted operon boundaries. There were no conserved examples of genes with known functions being found in the coastal isolates, but not the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data, or vice versa, suggesting that core regions of these diverse SAR11 genomes are relatively conserved in gene content. However, four hypervariable regions were observed, which may encode properties associated with variation in SAR11 ecotypes. The largest of these, HVR2, is a 48 kb region flanked by the sole 5S and 23S genes in the HTCC1062 genome, and mainly encodes genes that determine cell surface properties. A comparison of two closely related 'Candidatus Pelagibacter' genomes (HTCC1062 and HTCC1002 revealed a number of "gene indels" in core regions. Most of these were found to be polymorphic in the metagenomic data and showed evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that the same "polymorphic gene indels" are maintained in physically isolated SAR11 populations. Conclusion These findings suggest that natural selection has conserved many core features of SAR11

  3. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2013-04-29

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens.

  4. Comparative metagenomics of bathypelagic plankton and bottom sediment from the Sea of Marmara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaiser, Achim; Zivanovic, Yvan; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2011-02-01

    To extend comparative metagenomic analyses of the deep-sea, we produced metagenomic data by direct 454 pyrosequencing from bathypelagic plankton (1000  m depth) and bottom sediment of the Sea of Marmara, the gateway between the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Seas. Data from small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene libraries and direct pyrosequencing of the same samples indicated that Gamma- and Alpha-proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, dominated the bacterial fraction in Marmara deep-sea plankton, whereas Planctomycetes, Delta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the most abundant groups in high bacterial-diversity sediment. Group I Crenarchaeota/Thaumarchaeota dominated the archaeal plankton fraction, although group II and III Euryarchaeota were also present. Eukaryotes were highly diverse in SSU rRNA gene libraries, with group I (Duboscquellida) and II (Syndiniales) alveolates and Radiozoa dominating plankton, and Opisthokonta and Alveolates, sediment. However, eukaryotic sequences were scarce in pyrosequence data. Archaeal amo genes were abundant in plankton, suggesting that Marmara planktonic Thaumarchaeota are ammonia oxidizers. Genes involved in sulfate reduction, carbon monoxide oxidation, anammox and sulfatases were over-represented in sediment. Genome recruitment analyses showed that Alteromonas macleodii 'surface ecotype', Pelagibacter ubique and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were highly represented in 1000  m-deep plankton. A comparative analysis of Marmara metagenomes with ALOHA deep-sea and surface plankton, whale carcasses, Peru subsurface sediment and soil metagenomes clustered deep-sea Marmara plankton with deep-ALOHA plankton and whale carcasses, likely because of the suboxic conditions in the deep Marmara water column. The Marmara sediment clustered with the soil metagenome, highlighting the common ecological role of both types of microbial communities in the degradation of organic matter and the completion of biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Metagenomic potential for and diversity of N-cycle driving microorganisms in the Bothnian Sea sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Schmitt, Julia; Jetten, M.S.M.; Lüke, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle is driven by a plethora of reactions transforming nitrogen compounds between various redox states. Here, we investigated the metagenomic potential for nitrogen cycle of the in situ microbial community in an oligotrophic, brackish environment of the Bothnian Sea

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed

    2016-02-11

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column.

  7. A Novel Cold Active Esterase from a Deep Sea Sponge Stelletta normani Metagenomic Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Borchert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Esterases catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in fatty acid esters with short-chain acyl groups. Due to the widespread applications of lipolytic enzymes in various industrial applications, there continues to be an interest in novel esterases with unique properties. Marine ecosystems have long been acknowledged as a significant reservoir of microbial biodiversity and in particular of bacterial enzymes with desirable characteristics for industrial use, such as for example cold adaptation and activity in the alkaline pH range. We employed a functional metagenomic approach to exploit the enzymatic potential of one particular marine ecosystem, namely the microbiome of the deep sea sponge Stelletta normani. Screening of a metagenomics library from this sponge resulted in the identification of a number of lipolytic active clones. One of these encoded a highly, cold-active esterase 7N9, and the recombinant esterase was subsequently heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The esterase was classified as a type IV lipolytic enzyme, belonging to the GDSAG subfamily of hormone sensitive lipases. Furthermore, the recombinant 7N9 esterase was biochemically characterized and was found to be most active at alkaline pH (8.0 and displays salt tolerance over a wide range of concentrations. In silico docking studies confirmed the enzyme's activity toward short-chain fatty acids while also highlighting the specificity toward certain inhibitors. Furthermore, structural differences to a closely related mesophilic E40 esterase isolated from a marine sediment metagenomics library are discussed.

  8. Rhizosphere microbiome metagenomics of gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Alzubaidy, Hanin S.

    2015-11-10

    Mangroves are unique, and endangered, coastal ecosystems that play a vital role in the tropical and subtropical environments. A comprehensive description of the microbial communities in these ecosystems is currently lacking, and additional studies are required to have a complete understanding of the functioning and resilience of mangroves worldwide. In this work, we carried out a metagenomic study by comparing the microbial community of mangrove sediment with the rhizosphere microbiome of Avicennia marina, in northern Red Sea mangroves, along the coast of Saudi Arabia. Our results revealed that rhizosphere samples presented similar profiles at the taxonomic and functional levels and differentiated from the microbiome of bulk soil controls. Overall, samples showed predominance by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, with high abundance of sulfate reducers and methanogens, although specific groups were selectively enriched in the rhizosphere. Functional analysis showed significant enrichment in ‘metabolism of aromatic compounds’, ‘mobile genetic elements’, ‘potassium metabolism’ and ‘pathways that utilize osmolytes’ in the rhizosphere microbiomes. To our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study on the microbiome of mangroves in the Red Sea, and the first application of unbiased 454-pyrosequencing to study the rhizosphere microbiome associated with A. marina. Our results provide the first insights into the range of functions and microbial diversity in the rhizosphere and soil sediments of gray mangrove (A. marina) in the Red Sea.

  9. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Claudia; Speth, Daan R; Kox, Martine A R; Villanueva, Laura; Jetten, Mike S M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen loss. The contribution of anammox and denitrification to nitrogen loss seems to vary in different OMZs. In the Arabian Sea, both processes were reported. Here, we performed a metagenomics study of the upper and core zone of the Arabian Sea OMZ, to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic potential for nitrogen and methane cycling. We propose that aerobic ammonium oxidation is carried out by a diverse community of Thaumarchaeota in the upper zone of the OMZ, whereas a low diversity of Scalindua-like anammox bacteria contribute significantly to nitrogen loss in the core zone. Aerobic nitrite oxidation in the OMZ seems to be performed by Nitrospina spp. and a novel lineage of nitrite oxidizing organisms that is present in roughly equal abundance as Nitrospina. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) can be carried out by yet unknown microorganisms harbouring a divergent nrfA gene. The metagenomes do not provide conclusive evidence for active methane cycling; however, a low abundance of novel alkane monooxygenase diversity was detected. Taken together, our approach confirmed the genomic potential for an active nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea and allowed detection of hitherto overlooked lineages of carbon and nitrogen cycle bacteria.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lüke

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen loss. The contribution of anammox and denitrification to nitrogen loss seems to vary in different OMZs. In the Arabian Sea, both processes were reported. Here, we performed a metagenomics study of the upper and core zone of the Arabian Sea OMZ, to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic potential for nitrogen and methane cycling. We propose that aerobic ammonium oxidation is carried out by a diverse community of Thaumarchaeota in the upper zone of the OMZ, whereas a low diversity of Scalindua-like anammox bacteria contribute significantly to nitrogen loss in the core zone. Aerobic nitrite oxidation in the OMZ seems to be performed by Nitrospina spp. and a novel lineage of nitrite oxidizing organisms that is present in roughly equal abundance as Nitrospina. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA can be carried out by yet unknown microorganisms harbouring a divergent nrfA gene. The metagenomes do not provide conclusive evidence for active methane cycling; however, a low abundance of novel alkane monooxygenase diversity was detected. Taken together, our approach confirmed the genomic potential for an active nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea and allowed detection of hitherto overlooked lineages of carbon and nitrogen cycle bacteria.

  11. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Luke R; Field, Chris; Romanuk, Tamara; Ngugi, David; Siam, Rania; El Dorry, Hamza; Stingl, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability.

  12. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Luke R

    2013-05-11

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability. 2013 The

  13. Initiation of a comparative metagenomic study of the Red Sea and Pacific Ocean marine microbiomes

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-03-26

    The marine microbiome is a fundamental component of the biosphere. Its bacteria are abundant and play critical roles within the ocean environment. The majority of this important group of bacteria are genetically uncharacterized. Relatively few species have been studied in the laboratory. However, by applying metagenomic analyses to marine microbial populations, genomic ‘snapshots’ may be taken and from appropriate time series experiments their dynamics established. As a key component of the CBRC Centre Research Program (2014-2020), we are initiating a comparative study of the Red Sea and North Eastern Japanese coast and bay complexes. These environments differ in physical characteristics significantly. The Red Sea exhibits consistently high salinity, temperature and insolation characteristics, whereas the Japanese waters are less saline, cooler and receive lower insolation. Here, we present initial data and analytical pipelines for Phase 1 of our collaborative research program.

  14. Metagenomic Signatures of Microbial Communities in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sediments of Azores Vent Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Teresa; Barroso, Cristina; Froufe, Hugo; Egas, Conceição; Bettencourt, Raul

    2018-01-21

    The organisms inhabiting the deep-seafloor are known to play a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles. Chemolithoautotrophic prokaryotes, which produce biomass from single carbon molecules, constitute the primary source of nutrition for the higher organisms, being critical for the sustainability of food webs and overall life in the deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems. The present study investigates the metabolic profiles of chemolithoautotrophs inhabiting the sediments of Menez Gwen and Rainbow deep-sea vent fields, in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Differences in the microbial community structure might be reflecting the distinct depth, geology, and distance from vent of the studied sediments. A metagenomic sequencing approach was conducted to characterize the microbiome of the deep-sea hydrothermal sediments and the relevant metabolic pathways used by microbes. Both Menez Gwen and Rainbow metagenomes contained a significant number of genes involved in carbon fixation, revealing the largely autotrophic communities thriving in both sites. Carbon fixation at Menez Gwen site was predicted to occur mainly via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, likely reflecting the dominance of sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria at this site, while different autotrophic pathways were identified at Rainbow site, in particular the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle. Chemolithotrophy appeared to be primarily driven by the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds, whether through the SOX-dependent pathway at Menez Gwen site or through reverse sulfate reduction at Rainbow site. Other energy-yielding processes, such as methane, nitrite, or ammonia oxidation, were also detected but presumably contributing less to chemolithoautotrophy. This work furthers our knowledge of the microbial ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal sediments and represents an important repository of novel genes with potential biotechnological interest.

  15. Metagenome Fragment Classification Using -Mer Frequency Profiles

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    Gail Rosen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of microbial sequencing data is being generated through large-scale projects in ecology, agriculture, and human health. Efficient high-throughput methods are needed to analyze the mass amounts of metagenomic data, all DNA present in an environmental sample. A major obstacle in metagenomics is the inability to obtain accuracy using technology that yields short reads. We construct the unique -mer frequency profiles of 635 microbial genomes publicly available as of February 2008. These profiles are used to train a naive Bayes classifier (NBC that can be used to identify the genome of any fragment. We show that our method is comparable to BLAST for small 25 bp fragments but does not have the ambiguity of BLAST's tied top scores. We demonstrate that this approach is scalable to identify any fragment from hundreds of genomes. It also performs quite well at the strain, species, and genera levels and achieves strain resolution despite classifying ubiquitous genomic fragments (gene and nongene regions. Cross-validation analysis demonstrates that species-accuracy achieves 90% for highly-represented species containing an average of 8 strains. We demonstrate that such a tool can be used on the Sargasso Sea dataset, and our analysis shows that NBC can be further enhanced.

  16. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Mohamed F.; Thompson, Luke R.; Parks, Donovan H.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea.

  17. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed

    2016-07-05

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea.

  18. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. indicated by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Lamellomorpha sp.. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp..

  19. Novel Lipolytic Enzymes Identified from Metagenomic Library of Deep-Sea Sediment

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    Jeong Ho Jeon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic library was constructed from a deep-sea sediment sample and screened for lipolytic activity. Open-reading frames of six positive clones showed only 33–58% amino acid identities to the known proteins. One of them was assigned to a new group while others were grouped into Families I and V or EstD Family. By employing a combination of approaches such as removing the signal sequence, coexpression of chaperone genes, and low temperature induction, we obtained five soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes had optimum temperatures of 30–35°C and the cold-activity property. Among them, one enzyme showed lipase activity by preferentially hydrolyzing p-nitrophenyl palmitate and p-nitrophenyl stearate and high salt resistance with up to 4 M NaCl. Our research demonstrates the feasibility of developing novel lipolytic enzymes from marine environments by the combination of functional metagenomic approach and protein expression technology.

  20. Hypersaline Subsurface Microbial Communities from the Dead Sea Viewed from Their Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.; Ionescu, D.; Ariztegui, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) is an international research initiative aiming to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental and paleoseismic history of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) in the Levantine region. Within this framework, analysis of microbial communities intend to qualify the extent of life in this extreme environment, the factors allowing its development and their contribution to the sedimentary and geochemical record. The extreme chemistry of the Dead Sea prevents the use of common in situ imaging techniques leaving little information on the general activity of the subsurface biosphere. Cloning and metagenomic techniques have however been implemented at different levels of a 457 m deep core. Results suggest a differential development or survival of the microbial community along the sedimentary column. Reasons for such distribution remain unclear but cannot only be imparted to salinity. Poorly known communities (e.g. Candidate Divisions MSBL1 and KB1) with strong potential for adaptations to anoxic hypersaline environments are recovered in some intervals. Halobacteria classes generally dominate the assemblages. Metagenomic data allowed characterizing their presence in two evaporitic facies of the core (aragonite at 2.7 m and gypsum at 90.6 m below lake floor), where they exhibit both salt-in and salt-out strategies to cope with the high salinities of the Dead Sea. Metabolisms are also adapted to the high heavy metal concentrations and low nutrient availability in the sediment. Although more work is needed in order to infer the impact of these microorganisms on the sediment and element cycles, indices of methanogenesis, fermentation and sulfate reducing activity imply influence on the carbon and sulfur cycle of the Dead Sea subsurface. This is highlighted by traces of microbial degradation of organic matter viewed under SEM, and by the formation of euhedral Fe-S mineralizations as a result of reduction of sulfur. Overall, this work calls for the importance

  1. Metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Luke R

    2016-07-15

    Oceanic microbial diversity covaries with physicochemical parameters. Temperature, for example, explains approximately half of global variation in surface taxonomic abundance. It is unknown, however, whether covariation patterns hold over narrower parameter gradients and spatial scales, and extending to mesopelagic depths. We collected and sequenced 45 epipelagic and mesopelagic microbial metagenomes on a meridional transect through the eastern Red Sea. We asked which environmental parameters explain the most variation in relative abundances of taxonomic groups, gene ortholog groups, and pathways—at a spatial scale of <2000 km, along narrow but well-defined latitudinal and depth-dependent gradients. We also asked how microbes are adapted to gradients and extremes in irradiance, temperature, salinity, and nutrients, examining the responses of individual gene ortholog groups to these parameters. Functional and taxonomic metrics were equally well explained (75–79%) by environmental parameters. However, only functional and not taxonomic covariation patterns were conserved when comparing with an intruding water mass with different physicochemical properties. Temperature explained the most variation in each metric, followed by nitrate, chlorophyll, phosphate, and salinity. That nitrate explained more variation than phosphate suggested nitrogen limitation, consistent with low surface N:P ratios. Covariation of gene ortholog groups with environmental parameters revealed patterns of functional adaptation to the challenging Red Sea environment: high irradiance, temperature, salinity, and low nutrients. Nutrient-acquisition gene ortholog groups were anti-correlated with concentrations of their respective nutrient species, recapturing trends previously observed across much larger distances and environmental gradients. This dataset of metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients includes online data exploration supplements, serving as a community

  2. The 3He flux gauge in the Sargasso Sea: a determination of physical nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at the Bermuda Atlantic time series site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, R. H. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Doney, S. C.; Lott, D. E., III

    2015-03-01

    We provide a new determination of the annual mean physical supply of nitrate to the euphotic zone in the western subtropical North Atlantic based on a three year time-series of measurements of tritiugenic 3He from 2003 to 2006 in the surface ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site. We combine the 3He data with a sophisticated noble gas calibrated air-sea gas exchange model to constrain the 3He flux across the sea-air interface, which must closely balance the upward 3He flux into the euphotic zone. The product of the 3He flux and the observed subsurface nitrate-3He relationship provides an estimate of the minimum rate of new production in the BATS region. We also applied the gas model to an earlier time series of 3He measurements at BATS in order to recalculate new production fluxes for the 1985 to 1988 time period. The observations, despite an almost three-fold difference in the nitrate-3He relationship, yield a roughly consistent estimate of nitrate flux. In particular, the nitrate flux from 2003-2006 is estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.3 mol m-2 y-1, which is ~ 40% smaller than the calculated flux for the period from 1985 to 1988. The difference between the time periods, which is barely significant, may be due to a real difference in new production resulting from changes in subtropical mode water formation. Overall, the nitrate flux is larger than most estimates of export fluxes or net community production fluxes made locally for BATS site, which is likely a reflection of the larger spatial scale covered by the 3He technique and potentially also by decoupling of 3He and nitrate during obduction of water masses from the main thermocline into the upper ocean.

  3. The 3He flux gauge in the Sargasso Sea: a determination of physical nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, R. H. R.; Jenkins, W. J.; Doney, S. C.; Lott, D. E., III

    2015-09-01

    Significant rates of primary production occur in the oligotrophic ocean, without any measurable nutrients present in the mixed layer, fueling a scientific paradox that has lasted for decades. Here, we provide a new determination of the annual mean physical supply of nitrate to the euphotic zone in the western subtropical North Atlantic. We combine a 3-year time series of measurements of tritiugenic 3He from 2003 to 2006 in the surface ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site with a sophisticated noble gas calibrated air-sea gas exchange model to constrain the 3He flux across the sea-air interface, which must closely mirror the upward 3He flux into the euphotic zone. The product of the 3He flux and the observed subsurface nitrate-3He relationship provides an estimate of the minimum rate of new production in the BATS region. We also apply the gas model to an earlier time series of 3He measurements at BATS in order to recalculate new production fluxes for the 1985 to 1988 time period. The observations, despite an almost 3-fold difference in the nitrate-3He relationship, yield a roughly consistent estimate of nitrate flux. In particular, the nitrate flux from 2003 to 2006 is estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.14 mol m-2 yr-1, which is ~40 % smaller than the calculated flux for the period from 1985 to 1988. The difference in nitrate flux between the time periods may be signifying a real difference in new production resulting from changes in subtropical mode water formation. Overall, the nitrate flux is larger than most estimates of export fluxes or net community production fluxes made locally for the BATS site, which is likely a reflection of the larger spatial scale covered by the 3He technique and potentially also by the decoupling of 3He and nitrate during the obduction of water masses from the main thermocline into the upper ocean. The upward nitrate flux is certainly large enough to support observed rates of primary production at BATS and more generally

  4. Exploring Genomic Diversity Using Metagenomics of Deep-Sea Subsurface Microbes from the Louisville Seamount and the South Pacific Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, B. J.; Sylvan, J. B.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Huber, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are many limitations involved with sampling microbial diversity from deep-sea subsurface environments, ranging from physical sample collection, low microbial biomass, culturing at in situ conditions, and inefficient nucleic acid extractions. As such, we are continually modifying our methods to obtain better results and expanding what we know about microbes in these environments. Here we present analysis of metagenomes sequences from samples collected from 120 m within the Louisville Seamount and from the top 5-10cm of the sediment in the center of the south Pacific gyre (SPG). Both systems are low biomass with ~102 and ~104 cells per cm3 for Louisville Seamount samples analyzed and the SPG sediment, respectively. The Louisville Seamount represents the first in situ subseafloor basalt and the SPG sediments represent the first in situ low biomass sediment microbial metagenomes. Both of these environments, subseafloor basalt and sediments underlying oligotrophic ocean gyres, represent large provinces of the seafloor environment that remain understudied. Despite the low biomass and DNA generated from these samples, we have generated 16 near complete genomes (5 from Louisville and 11 from the SPG) from the two metagenomic datasets. These genomes are estimated to be between 51-100% complete and span a range of phylogenetic groups, including the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, and unclassified bacterial groups. With these genomes, we have assessed potential functional capabilities of these organisms and performed a comparative analysis between the environmental genomes and previously sequenced relatives to determine possible adaptations that may elucidate survival mechanisms for these low energy environments. These methods illustrate a baseline analysis that can be applied to future metagenomic deep-sea subsurface datasets and will help to further our understanding of microbiology within these environments.

  5. High nutrient transport and cycling potential revealed in the microbial metagenome of Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea faeces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish J Lavery

    Full Text Available Metagenomic analysis was used to examine the taxonomic diversity and metabolic potential of an Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea gut microbiome. Bacteria comprised 98% of classifiable sequences and of these matches to Firmicutes (80% were dominant, with Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria representing 8% and 2% of matches respectively. The relative proportion of Firmicutes (80% to Bacteriodetes (2% is similar to that in previous studies of obese humans and obese mice, suggesting the gut microbiome may confer a predisposition towards the excess body fat that is needed for thermoregulation within the cold oceanic habitats foraged by Australian sea lions. Core metabolic functions, including carbohydrate utilisation (14%, protein metabolism (9% and DNA metabolism (7% dominated the metagenome, but in comparison to human and fish gut microbiomes there was a significantly higher proportion of genes involved in phosphorus metabolism (2.4% and iron scavenging mechanisms (1%. When sea lions defecate at sea, the relatively high nutrient metabolism potential of bacteria in their faeces may accelerate the dissolution of nutrients from faecal particles, enhancing their persistence in the euphotic zone where they are available to stimulate marine production.

  6. Metabolic Potential of Microbial Genomes Reconstructed from a Deep-Sea Oligotrophic Sediment Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, B. J.; Huber, J. A.; Heidelberg, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) possesses the lowest rates of sedimentation, surface chlorophyll concentration and primary productivity in the global oceans, making it one of the most oligotrophic environments on earth. As a direct result of the low-standing biomass in surface waters, deep-sea sediments are thin and contain small amount of labile organic carbon. It was recently shown that the sediment column within the SPG is fully oxic through to the underlying basalt basement and may be representative of 9-37% of the global marine environment. In addition, it appears that approximately 50% of the total organic carbon is removed from the oligotrophic sediments within the first 20 centimeters beneath the sea floor (cmbsf). To understand the microbial processes that contribute to the removal of the labile organic matter, metagenomic sequencing and analysis was carried out on a sample of sediment collected from 0-5 cmbsf from SPG site 10 (U1369). Analysis of 9 partially reconstructed environmental genomes revealed that the members of the SPG surface sediment microbial community are phylogenetically distinct from surface/upper ocean organisms, with deep branches within the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Nitrospina, the phylum NC10, and several unique phylogenetic groups. Within these partially complete genomes there is evidence for microbially mediated metal (iron/manganese) oxidation and carbon fixation linked to the nitrification. Additionally, despite low sedimentation and hypothesized energy-limitation, members of the SPG microbial community had motility and chemotactic genes and possessed mechanisms for the utilization of high molecular weight organic matter, including exoproteases and peptide specific membrane transporters. Simultaneously, the SPG genomes showed a limited potential for the degradation of recalcitrant carbon compounds. Finally, the presence of putative genes with functions involved with denitrification and the consumption of C1

  7. Identification and characterization of a chitin deacetylase from a metagenomic library of deep-sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinlin; Jia, Zhijuan; Li, Sha; Li, Yan; You, Qiang; Zhang, Chunyan; Zheng, Xiaotong; Xiong, Guomei; Zhao, Jin; Qi, Chao; Yang, Jihong

    2016-09-15

    The chemical and biological compositions of deep-sea sediments are interesting because of the underexplored diversity when it comes to bioprospecting. The special geographical location and climates make Arctic Ocean a unique ocean area containing an abundance of microbial resources. A metagenomic library was constructed based on the deep-sea sediments of Arctic Ocean. Part of insertion fragments of this library were sequenced. A chitin deacetylase gene, cdaYJ, was identified and characterized. A metagenomic library with 2750 clones was obtained and ten clones were sequenced. Results revealed several interesting genes, including a chitin deacetylase coding sequence, cdaYJ. The CdaYJ is homologous to some known chitin deacetylases and contains conserved chitin deacetylase active sites. CdaYJ protein exhibits a long N-terminal and a relative short C-terminal. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CdaYJ showed highest homology to CDAs from Alphaproteobacteria. The cdaYJ gene was subcloned into the pET-28a vector and the recombinant CdaYJ (rCdaYJ) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). rCdaYJ showed a molecular weight of 43kDa, and exhibited deacetylation activity by using p-nitroacetanilide as substrate. The optimal pH and temperature of rCdaYJ were tested as pH7.4 and 28°C, respectively. The construction of metagenomic library of the Arctic deep-sea sediments provides us an opportunity to look into the microbial communities and exploiting valuable gene resources. A chitin deacetylase CdaYJ was identified from the library. It showed highest deacetylation activity under slight alkaline and low temperature conditions. CdaYJ might be a candidate chitin deacetylase that possesses industrial and pharmaceutical potentials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The GAAS metagenomic tool and its estimations of viral and microbial average genome size in four major biomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent E Angly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic studies characterize both the composition and diversity of uncultured viral and microbial communities. BLAST-based comparisons have typically been used for such analyses; however, sampling biases, high percentages of unknown sequences, and the use of arbitrary thresholds to find significant similarities can decrease the accuracy and validity of estimates. Here, we present Genome relative Abundance and Average Size (GAAS, a complete software package that provides improved estimates of community composition and average genome length for metagenomes in both textual and graphical formats. GAAS implements a novel methodology to control for sampling bias via length normalization, to adjust for multiple BLAST similarities by similarity weighting, and to select significant similarities using relative alignment lengths. In benchmark tests, the GAAS method was robust to both high percentages of unknown sequences and to variations in metagenomic sequence read lengths. Re-analysis of the Sargasso Sea virome using GAAS indicated that standard methodologies for metagenomic analysis may dramatically underestimate the abundance and importance of organisms with small genomes in environmental systems. Using GAAS, we conducted a meta-analysis of microbial and viral average genome lengths in over 150 metagenomes from four biomes to determine whether genome lengths vary consistently between and within biomes, and between microbial and viral communities from the same environment. Significant differences between biomes and within aquatic sub-biomes (oceans, hypersaline systems, freshwater, and microbialites suggested that average genome length is a fundamental property of environments driven by factors at the sub-biome level. The behavior of paired viral and microbial metagenomes from the same environment indicated that microbial and viral average genome sizes are independent of each other, but indicative of community responses to stressors and

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Nutrient Cycling Pathways in the Microbiota of Deep-Sea and Shallow-Water Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Jinlong; Liu, Fang; He, Liming; He, Ying; Wang, Shenyue

    2016-12-01

    Sponges host complex symbiotic communities, but to date, the whole picture of the metabolic potential of sponge microbiota remains unclear, particularly the difference between the shallow-water and deep-sea sponge holobionts. In this study, two completely different sponges, shallow-water sponge Theonella swinhoei from the South China Sea and deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi from the Indian Ocean, were selected to compare their whole symbiotic communities and metabolic potential, particularly in element transformation. Phylogenetically diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi, and algae were detected in both shallow-water sponge T. swinhoei and deep-sea sponge N. huxleyi, and different microbial community structures were indicated between these two sponges. Metagenome-based gene abundance analysis indicated that, though the two sponge microbiota have similar core functions, they showed different potential strategies in detailed metabolic processes, e.g., in the transformation and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur by corresponding microbial symbionts. This study provides insight into the putative metabolic potentials of the microbiota associated with the shallow-water and deep-sea sponges at the whole community level, extending our knowledge of the sponge microbiota's functions, the association of sponge- microbes, as well as the adaption of sponge microbiota to the marine environment.

  10. Comparative metagenomics reveals insights into the deep-sea adaptation mechanism of the microorganisms in Iheya hydrothermal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Liang; Sun, Li

    2017-05-01

    In this study, comparative metagenomic analysis was performed to investigate the genetic profiles of the microbial communities inhabiting the sediments surrounding Iheya North and Iheya Ridge hydrothermal fields. Four samples were used, which differed in their distances from hydrothermal vents. The results showed that genes involved in cell surface structure synthesis, polyamine metabolism and homeostasis, osmoadaptation, pH and Na+ homeostasis, and heavy-metal transport were abundant. Pathways for putrescine and spermidine synthesis and transport were identified in the four metagenomes, which possibly participate in the regulation of cytoplasmic pH. Genes involved in the transport of K+ and the biosynthesis of glycine betaine, proline, and trehalose, together with genes encoding mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, were contributors of osmoadaptation. Detection of genes encoding F1Fo-ATPase and cation/proton antiporters indicated critical roles played by pH and sodium homeostasis. Cu2+-exporting and Cd2+/Zn2+-exporting ATPases functioned in the expulsion of toxic metals across cellular membranes. It is noteworthy that the distribution of some genes, such as that encoding cardiolipin synthase, was apparently affected by distance to the vent site. These findings provide insight into microbial adaptation mechanisms in deep-sea sediment environments.

  11. The Cyanobacteria-Dominated Sponge Dactylospongia elegans in the South China Sea: Prokaryotic Community and Metagenomic Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Ming Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The South China Sea is a special reservoir of sponges of which prokaryotic communities are less studied. Here, a new record of the sponge Dactylospongia elegans is reported near the coast of Jinqing Island in the South China Sea, and its prokaryotic community is comprehensively investigated. Sponge specimens displayed lower microbial diversity compared with surrounding seawater. At the phylum level, prokaryotic communities were consistently dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Thaumarchaeota, and Poribacteria. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU analysis alternatively showed that the most abundant symbiont was the sponge-specific cyanobacterial species “Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum,” followed by OTUs belonging to the unidentified Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria. Phylogenetic tree based on 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions indicated that the dominated cyanobacterial OTU represented a new clade of “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum.” More reliable metagenomic data further revealed that poribacterial symbionts were highly abundant and only secondary to the cyanobacterial symbiont. One draft genome for each of the Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria and three poribacterial genomes were extracted from the metagenomes. Among them, genomes affiliated with the Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria were reported for the first time in sponge symbionts. Eukaryotic-like domains were found in all the binned genomes, indicating their potential symbiotic roles with the sponge host. The high quality of the six recovered genomes of sponge symbionts from the sponge D. elegans makes it possible to understand their symbiotic roles and interactions with the sponge host as well as among one another.

  12. A novel esterase gene cloned from a metagenomic library from neritic sediments of the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qing

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine microbes are a large and diverse group, which are exposed to a wide variety of pressure, temperature, salinity, nutrient availability and other environmental conditions. They provide a huge potential source of novel enzymes with unique properties that may be useful in industry and biotechnology. To explore the lipolytic genetic resources in the South China Sea, 23 sediment samples were collected in the depth Results A metagenomic library of South China Sea sediments assemblage in plasmid vector containing about 194 Mb of community DNA was prepared. Screening of a part of the unamplified library resulted in isolation of 15 unique lipolytic clones with the ability to hydrolyze tributyrin. A positive recombinant clone (pNLE1, containing a novel esterase (Est_p1, was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified. In a series of assays, Est_p1 displayed maximal activity at pH 8.57, 40°C, with ρ-Nitrophenyl butyrate (C4 as substrate. Compared to other metagenomic esterases, Est_p1 played a notable role in specificity for substrate C4 (kcat/Km value 11,500 S-1m M-1 and showed no inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, suggested that the substrate binding pocket was suitable for substrate C4 and the serine active-site residue was buried at the bottom of substrate binding pocket which sheltered by a lid structure. Conclusions Esterase, which specificity towards short chain fatty acids, especially butanoic acid, is commercially available as potent flavoring tools. According the outstanding activity and specificity for substrate C4, Est_p1 has potential application in flavor industries requiring hydrolysis of short chain esters.

  13. A metagenomics transect into the deepest point of the Baltic Sea reveals clear stratification of microbial functional capacities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Thureborn

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea is characterized by hyposaline surface waters, hypoxic and anoxic deep waters and sediments. These conditions, which in turn lead to a steep oxygen gradient, are particularly evident at Landsort Deep in the Baltic Proper. Given these substantial differences in environmental parameters at Landsort Deep, we performed a metagenomic census spanning surface to sediment to establish whether the microbial communities at this site are as stratified as the physical environment. We report strong stratification across a depth transect for both functional capacity and taxonomic affiliation, with functional capacity corresponding most closely to key environmental parameters of oxygen, salinity and temperature. We report similarities in functional capacity between the hypoxic community and hadal zone communities, underscoring the substantial degree of eutrophication in the Baltic Proper. Reconstruction of the nitrogen cycle at Landsort deep shows potential for syntrophy between archaeal ammonium oxidizers and bacterial denitrification at anoxic depths, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation genes are absent, despite substantial ammonium levels below the chemocline. Our census also reveals enrichment in genetic prerequisites for a copiotrophic lifestyle and resistance mechanisms reflecting adaptation to prevalent eutrophic conditions and the accumulation of environmental pollutants resulting from ongoing anthropogenic pressures in the Baltic Sea.

  14. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Grey Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea - A Metagenomic Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Simoes, Marta

    2015-11-05

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea grey mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from grey mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the grey mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  15. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A.; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. PMID:26549842

  16. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Filipa Simões

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%, while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%, yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  18. A novel esterase gene cloned from a metagenomic library from neritic sediments of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Marine microbes are a large and diverse group, which are exposed to a wide variety of pressure, temperature, salinity, nutrient availability and other environmental conditions. They provide a huge potential source of novel enzymes with unique properties that may be useful in industry and biotechnology. To explore the lipolytic genetic resources in the South China Sea, 23 sediment samples were collected in the depth South China Sea sediments assemblage in plasmid vector containing about 194 Mb of community DNA was prepared. Screening of a part of the unamplified library resulted in isolation of 15 unique lipolytic clones with the ability to hydrolyze tributyrin. A positive recombinant clone (pNLE1), containing a novel esterase (Est_p1), was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified. In a series of assays, Est_p1 displayed maximal activity at pH 8.57, 40°C, with ρ-Nitrophenyl butyrate (C4) as substrate. Compared to other metagenomic esterases, Est_p1 played a notable role in specificity for substrate C4 (kcat/Km value 11,500 S-1m M-1) and showed no inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, suggested that the substrate binding pocket was suitable for substrate C4 and the serine active-site residue was buried at the bottom of substrate binding pocket which sheltered by a lid structure. Conclusions Esterase, which specificity towards short chain fatty acids, especially butanoic acid, is commercially available as potent flavoring tools. According the outstanding activity and specificity for substrate C4, Est_p1 has potential application in flavor industries requiring hydrolysis of short chain esters. PMID:22067554

  19. Databases of the marine metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Databases of the marine metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-28

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  1. Metagenomic and whole-genome analysis reveals new lineages of gokushoviruses and biogeographic separation in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Myriam Labonté

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Much remains to be learned about single-stranded (ss DNA viruses in natural systems, and the evolutionary relationships among them. One of the eight recognized families of ssDNA viruses is the Microviridae, a group of viruses infecting bacteria. In this study we used metagenomic analysis, genome assembly and amplicon sequencing of purified ssDNA to show that bacteriophages belonging to the subfamily Gokushovirinae within the Microviridae are genetically diverse and widespread members of marine microbial communities. Metagenomic analysis of coastal samples from the Gulf of Mexico and British Columbia, Canada, revealed numerous sequences belonging to gokushoviruses and allowed the assembly of five putative genomes with an organization similar to chlamydiamicroviruses. Fragment recruitment to these genomes from different metagenomic data sets is consistent with gokushovirus genotypes being restricted to specific oceanic regions. Conservation among the assembled genomes allowed the design of degenerate primers that target an 800 bp fragment from the gene encoding the major capsid protein. Sequences could be amplified from coastal temperate and subtropical waters, but not from samples collected from the Arctic Ocean, or freshwater lakes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most sequences were distantly related to those from cultured representatives. Moreover, the sequences fell into at least seven distinct evolutionary groups, most of which were represented by one of the assembled metagenomes. Our results greatly expand the known sequence space for gokushoviruses, and reveal biogeographic separation and new evolutionary lineages of gokushoviruses in the oceans.

  2. Metabarcoding Baseline for the Sargasso Sea Zooplankton Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Bercial, L.; Alam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the responses and evolution of any community over space and time requires a deep knowledge of the species present at each location and their interactions. Where taxonomy turns out to be challenging, as it is in the case of zooplankton, supra-species grouping is a common resort in community characterization. Although this makes morphological identification manageable, there is the associated price of a limited depth of study and the risk of mixing different species' organismal responses. As global change begins to influence species distributions and physiologies, it becomes ever more important to discriminate at a species specific level. The development of DNA-based identification protocols during the last decades are rapidly driving these limitations away, increasing our understanding of the existing complexity of even very close taxa to different stressors or environmental conditions. Beyond the mere taxonomic discrimination of the analyzed community, the use of DNA sequences allows for the rapid integration of phylogenetic measurements and related indexes. In this presentation, we show our first results tackling one of the regions with the highest zooplankton diversity, the Subtropical North Atlantic at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study (BATS) site. The chosen metabarcoding region was the hypervariable V9 region of the 18S rRNA gene. In this first investigation, we establish the baseline information needed for further and more comprehensive analyses on the time series: minimum coverage depth per sample, taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity of the community and effect of the Diel Vertical Migration in the epipelagic community. We also analyze the limitations of the species identification in relation to the variability of the V9 region within and between species.

  3. Beyond biodiversity: fish metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ardura

    Full Text Available Biodiversity and intra-specific genetic diversity are interrelated and determine the potential of a community to survive and evolve. Both are considered together in Prokaryote communities treated as metagenomes or ensembles of functional variants beyond species limits.Many factors alter biodiversity in higher Eukaryote communities, and human exploitation can be one of the most important for some groups of plants and animals. For example, fisheries can modify both biodiversity and genetic diversity (intra specific. Intra-specific diversity can be drastically altered by overfishing. Intense fishing pressure on one stock may imply extinction of some genetic variants and subsequent loss of intra-specific diversity. The objective of this study was to apply a metagenome approach to fish communities and explore its value for rapid evaluation of biodiversity and genetic diversity at community level. Here we have applied the metagenome approach employing the barcoding target gene coi as a model sequence in catch from four very different fish assemblages exploited by fisheries: freshwater communities from the Amazon River and northern Spanish rivers, and marine communities from the Cantabric and Mediterranean seas.Treating all sequences obtained from each regional catch as a biological unit (exploited community we found that metagenomic diversity indices of the Amazonian catch sample here examined were lower than expected. Reduced diversity could be explained, at least partially, by overexploitation of the fish community that had been independently estimated by other methods.We propose using a metagenome approach for estimating diversity in Eukaryote communities and early evaluating genetic variation losses at multi-species level.

  4. Metagenomic analysis and metabolite profiling of deep-sea sediments from the Gulf of Mexico following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikole Elizabeth Kimes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine subsurface environments, such as deep-sea sediments, house abundant and diverse microbial communities that are believed to influence large-scale geochemical processes. These processes include the biotransformation and mineralization of numerous petroleum constituents. Thus, microbial communities in the Gulf of Mexico are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic bioremediation of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill. While hydrocarbon contamination is known to enrich for aerobic, oil-degrading bacteria in deep-seawater habitats, relatively little is known about the response of communities in deep-sea sediments, where low oxygen levels may hinder such a response. Here, we examined the hypothesis that increased hydrocarbon exposure results in an altered sediment microbial community structure that reflects the prospects for oil biodegradation under the prevailing conditions. We explore this hypothesis using metagenomic analysis and metabolite profiling of deep-sea sediment samples following the DWH oil spill. The presence of aerobic microbial communities and associated functional genes was consistent among all samples, whereas, a greater number of Deltaproteobacteria and anaerobic functional genes were found in sediments closest to the DWH blowout site. Metabolite profiling also revealed a greater number of putative metabolites in sediments surrounding the blowout zone relative to a background site located 127 km away. The mass spectral analysis of the putative metabolites revealed that alkylsuccinates remained below detection levels, but a homologous series of benzylsuccinates (with carbon chain lengths from 5 to 10 could be detected. Our findings suggest that increased exposure to hydrocarbons enriches for Deltaproteobacteria, which are known to be capable of anaerobic hydrocarbon metabolism. We also provide evidence for an active microbial community metabolizing aromatic hydrocarbons in deep-sea sediments of the

  5. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals significant abundance but low diversity of "Candidatus Scalindua" marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Speth, Daan R; van Alen, Theo; Hoischen, Alexander; Jetten, Mike S M

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to "Candidatus Scalindua" species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by "Candidatus Scalindua profunda" became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep) and center (600 m) area of the OMZ in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of "Candidatus Scalindua profunda" served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV) analysis was performed to assess diversity of the "Candidatus Scalindua" populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA) and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh), while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA, and ACS) had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that "Candidatus Scalindua" is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low.

  6. Metagenomic 16s rRNA investigation of microbial communities in the Black Sea estuaries in South-West of Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrova, Oleksandra; Kristoffersen, Jon Bent; Oulas, Anastasis; Ivanytsia, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The Black Sea estuaries represent interfaces of the sea and river environments. Microorganisms that inhabit estuarine water play an integral role in all biochemical processes that occur there and form unique ecosystems. There are many estuaries located in the Southern-Western part of Ukraine and some of them are already separated from the sea. The aim of this research was to determine the composition of microbial communities in the Khadzhibey, Dniester and Sukhyi estuaries by metagenomic 16S rDNA analysis. This study is the first complex analysis of estuarine microbiota based on isolation of total DNA from a biome that was further subjected to sequencing. DNA was extracted from water samples and sequenced on the Illumina Miseq platform using primers to the V4 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Computer analysis of the obtained raw sequences was done with QIIME (Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology) software. As the outcome, 57970 nucleotide sequences were retrieved. Bioinformatic analysis of bacterial community in the studied samples demonstrated a high taxonomic diversity of Prokaryotes at above genus level. It was shown that majority of 16S rDNA bacterial sequences detected in the estuarine samples belonged to phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes. The Khadhzibey estuary was dominated by the Proteobacteria phylum, while Dniester and Sukhyi estuaries were characterized by dominance of Cyanobacteria. The differences in bacterial populations between the Khadzhibey, Dniester and Sukhyi estuaries were demonstrated through the Beta-diversity analysis. It showed that the Khadzhibey estuary's microbial community significantly varies from the Sukhyi and Dniester estuaries. The majority of identified bacterial species is known as typical inhabitants of marine environments, however, for 2.5% of microbial population members in the studied estuaries no relatives were determined.

  7. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals significant abundance but low diversity of “Candidatus Scalindua” marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Speth, Daan R.; van Alen, Theo; Hoischen, Alexander; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to “Candidatus Scalindua” species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by “Candidatus Scalindua profunda” became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep) and center (600 m) area of the OMZ in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of “Candidatus Scalindua profunda” served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV) analysis was performed to assess diversity of the “Candidatus Scalindua” populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA) and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh), while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA, and ACS) had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that “Candidatus Scalindua” is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low. PMID:24550902

  8. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals signifcant abundance but low diversity of Candidatus Scalindua marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    laura eVillanueva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to Candidatus Scalindua species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by Candidatus Scalindua profunda became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones. Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep and center (600 m area of the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of Candidatus Scalindua profunda served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV analysis was performed to assess diversity of the Candidatus Scalindua populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh, while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA and ACS had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that Candidatus Scalindua is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low.

  9. Unraveling RubisCO Form I and Form II Regulation in an Uncultured Organism from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent via Metagenomic and Mutagenesis Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Böhnke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO catalyzes the first major step of carbon fixation in the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle. This autotrophic CO2 fixation cycle accounts for almost all the assimilated carbon on Earth. Due to the primary role that RubisCO plays in autotrophic carbon fixation, it is important to understand how its gene expression is regulated and the enzyme is activated. Since the majority of all microorganisms are currently not culturable, we used a metagenomic approach to identify genes and enzymes associated with RubisCO expression. The investigated metagenomic DNA fragment originates from the deep-sea hydrothermal vent field Nibelungen at 8°18′ S along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is 13,046 bp and resembles genes from Thiomicrospira crunogena. The fragment encodes nine open reading frames (ORFs which include two types of RubisCO, form I (CbbL/S and form II (CbbM, two LysR transcriptional regulators (LysR1 and LysR2, two von Willebrand factor type A (CbbO-m and CbbO-1, and two AAA+ ATPases (CbbQ-m and CbbQ-1, expected to function as RubisCO activating enzymes. In silico analyses uncovered several putative LysR binding sites and promoter structures. Functions of some of these DNA motifs were experimentally confirmed. For example, according to mobility shift assays LysR1’s binding ability to the intergenic region of lysR1 and cbbL appears to be intensified when CbbL or LysR2 are present. Binding of LysR2 upstream of cbbM appears to be intensified if CbbM is present. Our study suggests that CbbQ-m and CbbO-m activate CbbL and that LysR1 and LysR2 proteins promote CbbQ-m/CbbO-m expression. CbbO-1 seems to activate CbbM and CbbM itself appears to contribute to intensifying LysR’s binding ability and thus its own transcriptional regulation. CbbM furthermore appears to impair cbbL expression. A model summarizes the findings and predicts putative interactions of the different proteins influencing Rubis

  10. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  11. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Metagenomics at Grass Roots. Sudeshna ... benefit human health, agriculture, and ecosystemfunctions. This article provides a brief history of technicaladvances in metagenomics, including DNA sequencing methods,and some case studies.

  12. Metagenomic Analysis of Silage

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, Richard K.; Sambles, Christine M; Diffey, Georgina E.; Moore, Karen A.; Love, John

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics is defined as the direct analysis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) purified from environmental samples and enables taxonomic identification of the microbial communities present within them. Two main metagenomic approaches exist; sequencing the 16S rRNA gene coding region, which exhibits sufficient variation between taxa for identification, and shotgun sequencing, in which genomes of the organisms that are present in the sample are analyzed and ascribed to "operational taxonomic uni...

  13. Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sczyrba, Alexander; Hofmann, Peter; Belmann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Methods for assembly, taxonomic profiling and binning are key to interpreting metagenome data, but a lack of consensus about benchmarking complicates performance assessment. The Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) challenge has engaged the global developer community to benchmark...

  14. Metagenomics and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Rafati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteria are a group of microorganisms which in contrast to their diversity in nature, only very few of them can be grown and isolated in the current standard laboratories. Metagenomics as a new field of research, during the last decade has worked on clarification of the genomes of the non-cultured microbes and researchers around the world with serious study of this group of bacteria, looking for new compounds such as new antibiotics, anti-cancer agents, new enzymes and biomolecules. Methods: This article is reviews study which with study of Texts and Internet and handy browsing of key words from reliable scientific resources and sites amongst: Google Scholar, Pub med, Science direct, Sid and Scopus in the years 2000 to 2013 were collected and studied. Results: The data collection instrument in the study includes all printed metagenomics related texts. Although, nowadays metagenomics is used to screen samples but now as a perfect technique beside the medium application and other traditional techniques will have better position. The highest usage of metagenomics is in clinical cases where with conventional techniques can't be discovered microbial reasons. So for tests and analyze information need to skilled scientists. Conclusion: This paper focuses on some of the latest achievements of Metagenomics and its application in new drugs, detection of enzymes, potential of biotechnology and environment.

  15. Phosphorus Phase Associations in the Deep Ocean Particle Flux in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, A. M.; Conte, M. H.; Weber, J. C.; Shaw, L.

    2016-02-01

    The carrier phases of phosphorus influence its flux and remineralization in the water column and burial in ocean sediments. Sequential extraction methods (SEDEX, Ruttenberg et al. 1992) have been developed to measure sedimentary phosphorus associated with specific mineral analogs, however these may not be representative of key carrier phases in the water column. To better understand P carrier phases in the deep particle flux, we applied a modified SEDEX method to partition P in sinking particles collected by the Oceanic Flux Program sediment traps (500m, 1500m and 3200m depths) into seven fractions, which were then analyzed by ICPMS for elemental composition. The samples spanned a time period from Nov 2008 (seasonal flux minimum) to Mar 2009 (spring bloom). At 500m depth, approximately 75% of the total P flux ( 200 ugP m-2 d-1) was loosely sorbed and released into the supernatant during sample collection. This flux of loosely-sorbed P decreased by an order of magnitude between 500 and 1500m depths, and by 3200m depth constituted only 25% of the total P flux ( 40 ugP m-2 d-1). In contrast, the P flux in non-soluble phases decreased by only 50% between 500m ( 55 ugP m-2 d-1) and 3200m ( 34 ugP m-2 d-1) depths. SEDEX/ICPMS results indicate that the distribution of P among non-soluble carrier phases varies little with depth: approximately 30-35% is associated with Mn-Fe hydroxides, 20-30% with opal, and 15-30% with carbonate/authigenic P/biogenic apatite phases. Smaller fractions are associated with ion exchangeable phases (12-15%), detrital apatite (4-8%), and refractory organics and inorganic minerals released by a final ashing/acid extraction step (1-4%). There is a small trend toward more recalcitrant Mn-Fe hydroxides and opal carrier phases with depth. The P flux associated with Mn/Fe hydroxides and opal (and at 500m, ion exchangeable material) showed strong seasonality and covaried over the time-series with peak fluxes during the spring bloom, while P fluxes associated with other carriers were less variable.

  16. Bacterioplankton Populations within the Oxygen Minimum Zone of the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, G.; Parsons, R. J.; Johnson, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are present throughout the world's oceans, and occur at depths between 200 to 1000m. Heterotrophic bacteria reduce the dissolved oxygen within this layer through respiration, while metabolizing falling particles. This report studied the bacterioplankton in the oxygen minimum zone at the BATS (Bermuda Atlantic Times-series Study) site from July 2014 until November 2014. Total bacterioplankton populations were enumerated through direct counts. In the transitional zone (400m-800m) of the oxygen minimum zone, a secondary bacterioplankton peak formed. This study used FISH (Fluorescent in situ hybridization) and CARD-FISH (Catalyzed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescent in situ hybridization) to enumerate specific bacterial and archaeal taxa. Crenarchaeota (including Thaumarchaeota) increased in abundance within the upper oxycline. Thaumarchaeota have the ammonia monooxygenase gene that oxidizes ammonium into nitrite in low oxygen conditions. Amplification of the amoA gene confirmed that ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) were present within the OMZ. Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), the bacterial community structure showed high similarity based depth zones (0-80m, 160-600m, and 800-4500m). Niskin experiments determined that water collected at 800m had an exponential increase in bacterioplankton over time. While experimental design did not allow for oxygen levels to be maintained, the bacterioplankton community was predominantly bacteria with eubacteria positive cells making up 89.3% of the of the total bacterioplankton community by day 34. Improvements to the experimental design are required to determine which specific bacterial taxa caused this increase at 800m. This study suggests that there are factors other than oxygen influencing bacterioplankton populations at the BATS site, and more analysis is needed once the BATS data is available to determine the key drivers of bacterioplankton dynamics within the BATS OMZ.

  17. Annual flux of dissolved organic carbon from the euphotic zone in the northwestern Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Craig A.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Michaels, Anthony F.

    1994-09-01

    THE export of biogenic carbon from the upper ocean is responsible for maintaining the vertical gradient of dissolved inorganic carbon and thus indirectly for regulating the level of atmospheric CO2 (ref. 1). Large, rapidly sinking particles are thought to dominate this export2, and this sinking flux has been thought to balance new production3. Recent measurements of particle export4-6 and estimates of new production7-9 have questioned this picture, however. Here we report measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) off Bermuda, which provide strong support for the idea10-15 that this component of oceanic carbon is also an important and dynamic part of the ocean carbon cycle. We find that DOC accumulates in the early spring owing to increased primary production, and is partially consumed in the summer and autumn. The DOC that escapes remineralization is exported from the surface ocean the following winter, and we estimate this export to be equal to or greater than the measured particle flux, allowing us to close the annual vertical carbon budget for this site to within a factor of two. Our observations should be applicable to other temperate, sub-polar and continental-shelf regions of the world ocean which exhibit convective mixing and vernal restratification.

  18. Differential timing of gene expression regulation between leptocephali of North Atlantic eels in the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatchez, Louis; Saint-Cyr, Jérôme; Maes, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    the alternative hypotheses of (1) differential timing of gene expression regulation during early development versus (2) species-specific differences in expression of particular genes. Our results provide much stronger support for the former hypothesis since no gene showed consistent significant differences...... in expression levels between the two species. In contrast, 146 genes showed differential timings of expression between species, although the observed expression level differences between the species were generally small. Consequently, species-specific gene expression regulation seems to play a minor role...... in species differentiation. Overall, these results show that the basis of the early developmental divergence between the American and European eel is probably influenced by differences in the timing of gene expression regulation for genes involved in a large array of biological functions...

  19. Recent progresses in metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomics addresses the collective genetic structure and functional composition of a microbial community at its native habitat. This approach has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and function of the microbiota for the past few years and is revolutionizing studies of microbial ec...

  20. The metagenomic telescope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Szalkai

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies led to the discovery of numerous new microbe species in diverse environmental samples. Some of the new species contain genes never encountered before. Some of these genes encode proteins with novel functions, and some of these genes encode proteins that perform some well-known function in a novel way. A tool, named the Metagenomic Telescope, is described here that applies artificial intelligence methods, and seems to be capable of identifying new protein functions even in the well-studied model organisms. As a proof-of-principle demonstration of the Metagenomic Telescope, we considered DNA repair enzymes in the present work. First we identified proteins in DNA repair in well-known organisms (i.e., proteins in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair and DNA break repair; next we applied multiple alignments and then built hidden Markov profiles for each protein separately, across well-researched organisms; next, using public depositories of metagenomes, originating from extreme environments, we identified DNA repair genes in the samples. While the phylogenetic classification of the metagenomic samples are not typically available, we hypothesized that some very special DNA repair strategies need to be applied in bacteria and Archaea living in those extreme circumstances. It is a difficult task to evaluate the results obtained from mostly unknown species; therefore we applied again the hidden Markov profiling: for the identified DNA repair genes in the extreme metagenomes, we prepared new hidden Markov profiles (for each genes separately, subsequent to a cluster analysis; and we searched for similarities to those profiles in model organisms. We have found well known DNA repair proteins, numerous proteins with unknown functions, and also proteins with known, but different functions in the model organisms.

  1. Structural and Functional Insights from the Metagenome of an Acidic Hot Spring Microbial Planktonic Community in the Colombian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez Avella, Diego; Dini Andreote, Fernando; Chaves, Diego; Montaña, José Salvador; Osorio-Forero, Cesar; Junca, Howard; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level) acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC). A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads

  2. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  3. Metagenomics and CAZyme Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Benoit J; Bremges, Andreas; Weimann, Aaron; McHardy, Alice C; Pope, Phillip B

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms play a primary role in regulating biogeochemical cycles and are a valuable source of enzymes that have biotechnological applications, such as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). However, the inability to culture the majority of microorganisms that exist in natural ecosystems using common culture-dependent techniques restricts access to potentially novel cellulolytic bacteria and beneficial enzymes. The development of molecular-based culture-independent methods such as metagenomics enables researchers to study microbial communities directly from environmental samples, and presents a platform from which enzymes of interest can be sourced. We outline key methodological stages that are required as well as describe specific protocols that are currently used for metagenomic projects dedicated to CAZyme discovery.

  4. The YNP metagenome project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment......, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) “filamentous streamer” communities, and (3...

  5. Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Dupont, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics literally means “beyond the genome.” Marine microbial metagenomic databases presently comprise ˜400 billion base pairs of DNA, only ˜3% of that found in 1 ml of seawater. Very soon a trillion-base-pair sequence run will be feasible, so it is time to reflect on what we have learned from metagenomics. We review the impact of metagenomics on our understanding of marine microbial communities. We consider the studies facilitated by data generated through the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, as well as the revolution wrought at the individual laboratory level through next generation sequencing technologies. We review recent studies and discoveries since 2008, provide a discussion of bioinformatic analyses, including conceptual pipelines and sequence annotation and predict the future of metagenomics, with suggestions of collaborative community studies tailored toward answering some of the fundamental questions in marine microbial ecology.

  6. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eHe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  7. Assembling large, complex environmental metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, A. C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Jansson, J. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Malfatti, S. A. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tringe, S. G. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tiedje, J. M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Brown, C. T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Computer Science and Engineering

    2012-12-28

    The large volumes of sequencing data required to sample complex environments deeply pose new challenges to sequence analysis approaches. De novo metagenomic assembly effectively reduces the total amount of data to be analyzed but requires significant computational resources. We apply two pre-assembly filtering approaches, digital normalization and partitioning, to make large metagenome assemblies more computationaly tractable. Using a human gut mock community dataset, we demonstrate that these methods result in assemblies nearly identical to assemblies from unprocessed data. We then assemble two large soil metagenomes from matched Iowa corn and native prairie soils. The predicted functional content and phylogenetic origin of the assembled contigs indicate significant taxonomic differences despite similar function. The assembly strategies presented are generic and can be extended to any metagenome; full source code is freely available under a BSD license.

  8. Open resource metagenomics: a model for sharing metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, J D; Engel, K; Cheng, J; Moreno-Hagelsieb, G; Rose, D R; Charles, T C

    2011-11-30

    Both sequence-based and activity-based exploitation of environmental DNA have provided unprecedented access to the genomic content of cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. Although researchers deposit microbial strains in culture collections and DNA sequences in databases, activity-based metagenomic studies typically only publish sequences from the hits retrieved from specific screens. Physical metagenomic libraries, conceptually similar to entire sequence datasets, are usually not straightforward to obtain by interested parties subsequent to publication. In order to facilitate unrestricted distribution of metagenomic libraries, we propose the adoption of open resource metagenomics, in line with the trend towards open access publishing, and similar to culture- and mutant-strain collections that have been the backbone of traditional microbiology and microbial genetics. The concept of open resource metagenomics includes preparation of physical DNA libraries, preferably in versatile vectors that facilitate screening in a diversity of host organisms, and pooling of clones so that single aliquots containing complete libraries can be easily distributed upon request. Database deposition of associated metadata and sequence data for each library provides researchers with information to select the most appropriate libraries for further research projects. As a starting point, we have established the Canadian MetaMicroBiome Library (CM(2)BL [1]). The CM(2)BL is a publicly accessible collection of cosmid libraries containing environmental DNA from soils collected from across Canada, spanning multiple biomes. The libraries were constructed such that the cloned DNA can be easily transferred to Gateway® compliant vectors, facilitating functional screening in virtually any surrogate microbial host for which there are available plasmid vectors. The libraries, which we are placing in the public domain, will be distributed upon request without restriction to members of both the

  9. Integrated Metagenomic and Metatranscriptomic Analyses of Microbial Communities in the Meso- and Bathypelagic Realm of North Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre R. Meldrum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although emerging evidence indicates that deep-sea water contains an untapped reservoir of high metabolic and genetic diversity, this realm has not been studied well compared with surface sea water. The study provided the first integrated meta-genomic and -transcriptomic analysis of the microbial communities in deep-sea water of North Pacific Ocean. DNA/RNA amplifications and simultaneous metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were employed to discover information concerning deep-sea microbial communities from four different deep-sea sites ranging from the mesopelagic to pelagic ocean. Within the prokaryotic community, bacteria is absolutely dominant (~90% over archaea in both metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data pools. The emergence of archaeal phyla Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, sub-phyla Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria, and the decrease of bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria are the main composition changes of prokaryotic communities in the deep-sea water, when compared with the reference Global Ocean Sampling Expedition (GOS surface water. Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria exist in all four metagenomic libraries and two metatranscriptomic libraries. In Eukaryota community, decreased abundance of fungi and algae in deep sea was observed. RNA/DNA ratio was employed as an index to show metabolic activity strength of microbes in deep sea. Functional analysis indicated that deep-sea microbes are leading a defensive lifestyle.

  10. Web Resources for Metagenomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Bhavsar, Sunil; Bhagat, Chintan; Ghelani, Anjana; Bhatt, Shreyas; Patel, Rajesh

    2015-10-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms spawned an enormous volume of data. This explosion in data has unearthed new scalability challenges for existing bioinformatics tools. The analysis of metagenomic sequences using bioinformatics pipelines is complicated by the substantial complexity of these data. In this article, we review several commonly-used online tools for metagenomics data analysis with respect to their quality and detail of analysis using simulated metagenomics data. There are at least a dozen such software tools presently available in the public domain. Among them, MGRAST, IMG/M, and METAVIR are the most well-known tools according to the number of citations by peer-reviewed scientific media up to mid-2015. Here, we describe 12 online tools with respect to their web link, annotation pipelines, clustering methods, online user support, and availability of data storage. We have also done the rating for each tool to screen more potential and preferential tools and evaluated five best tools using synthetic metagenome. The article comprehensively deals with the contemporary problems and the prospects of metagenomics from a bioinformatics viewpoint. Copyright © 2015. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Metagenomics and the niche concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Diana

    2008-08-01

    The metagenomics approach has revolutionised the fields of bacterial diversity, ecology and evolution, as well as derived applications like bioremediation and obtaining bioproducts. A further associated conceptual change has also occurred since in the metagenomics methodology the species is no longer the unit of study, but rather partial genome arrangements or even isolated genes. In spite of this, concepts coming from ecological and evolutionary fields traditionally centred on the species, like the concept of niche, are still being applied without further revision. A reformulation of the niche concept is necessary to deal with the new operative and epistemological challenges posed by the metagenomics approach. To contribute to this end, I review past and present uses of the niche concept in ecology and in microbiological studies, showing that a new, updated definition need to be used in the context of the metagenomics. Finally, I give some insights into a more adequate conceptual background for the utilisation of the niche concept in metagenomic studies. In particular, I raise the necessity of including the microbial genetic background as another variable into the niche space.

  12. Metazen - metadata capture for metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-01-01

    As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. Unfortunately, these tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.

  13. Metagenome of a versatile chemolithoautotroph from expanding oceanic dead zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David A; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles G; Song, Young C; Wright, Jody J; Tringe, Susannah G; Tortell, Philippe D; Hallam, Steven J

    2009-10-23

    Oxygen minimum zones, also known as oceanic "dead zones," are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding because of global warming. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, they support a cryptic microbiota whose metabolic activities affect nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here, we report metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated oxygen minimum zone microbe (SUP05) related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur oxidation, and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water-column redox states. Our analysis provides a genomic foundation for understanding the ecological and biogeochemical role of pelagic SUP05 in oxygen-deficient oceanic waters and its potential sensitivity to environmental changes.

  14. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  15. Metagenomics and novel gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Sleator, Roy D; Marchesi, Julian R; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics provides a means of assessing the total genetic pool of all the microbes in a particular environment, in a culture-independent manner. It has revealed unprecedented diversity in microbial community composition, which is further reflected in the encoded functional diversity of the genomes, a large proportion of which consists of novel genes. Herein, we review both sequence-based and functional metagenomic methods to uncover novel genes and outline some of the associated problems of each type of approach, as well as potential solutions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for metagenomic biotherapeutic discovery, with a particular focus on the human gut microbiome and finally, we outline how the discovery of novel genes may be used to create bioengineered probiotics. PMID:24317337

  16. Novel Strategies for Applied Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Connors, Jessica M; Dunn, Katherine A; Bielawski, Joseph P; Van Limbergen, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Detailed analyses of the gut microbiome and its effect on human physiology and disease are emerging, thanks to advances in high-throughput DNA-sequencing technology and the burgeoning field of metagenomics. Metagenomics examines the structure and functional potential of microbial communities in their native habitats through the direct isolation and analysis of community DNA. In inflammatory bowel disease, gut microbiome studies have shown an association with perturbations in community composition and, especially, function. In this review, we discuss the application of next-generation sequencing to microbiome research and highlight the importance of modeling microbiome structure and function to the future of inflammatory bowel disease research and treatment.

  17. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses....... It will illustrate the general workflow of a metagenomic study and introduce the three different metagenomic approaches: (1) the random shotgun approach that focuses on the metagenome as a whole, (2) the targeted approach that focuses on metagenomic amplicon sequences, and (3) the function-driven approach that uses...... heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA fragments to discover novel metabolic functions. Lastly, the chapter will shortly discuss the meta-analysis of gene expression of microbial communities, more precisely metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics....

  18. Functional Intestinal Metagenomics (Chapter 18)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Leimena, M.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    The premiere two-volume reference on revelations from studying complex microbial communities in many distinct habitats Metagenomics is an emerging field that has changed the way microbiologists study microorganisms. It involves the genomic analysis of microorganisms by extraction and cloning of DNA

  19. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of Dairy Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammed, Musemma K.; Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Despite their huge potential for characterizing the biodiversity of phages, metagenomic studies are currently not available for dairy bacteriophages, partly due to the lack of a standard procedure for phage extraction. We optimized an extraction method that allows to remove the bulk protein from...

  1. The metagenomics RAST server - a public resource for the automatic phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F; Paarmann, D; D'Souza, M; Olson, R; Glass, E M; Kubal, M; Paczian, T; Rodriguez, A; Stevens, R; Wilke, A; Wilkening, J; Edwards, R A

    2008-09-19

    Random community genomes (metagenomes) are now commonly used to study microbes in different environments. Over the past few years, the major challenge associated with metagenomics shifted from generating to analyzing sequences. High-throughput, low-cost next-generation sequencing has provided access to metagenomics to a wide range of researchers. A high-throughput pipeline has been constructed to provide high-performance computing to all researchers interested in using metagenomics. The pipeline produces automated functional assignments of sequences in the metagenome by comparing both protein and nucleotide databases. Phylogenetic and functional summaries of the metagenomes are generated, and tools for comparative metagenomics are incorporated into the standard views. User access is controlled to ensure data privacy, but the collaborative environment underpinning the service provides a framework for sharing datasets between multiple users. In the metagenomics RAST, all users retain full control of their data, and everything is available for download in a variety of formats. The open-source metagenomics RAST service provides a new paradigm for the annotation and analysis of metagenomes. With built-in support for multiple data sources and a back end that houses abstract data types, the metagenomics RAST is stable, extensible, and freely available to all researchers. This service has removed one of the primary bottlenecks in metagenome sequence analysis - the availability of high-performance computing for annotating the data. http://metagenomics.nmpdr.org.

  2. Localised mixing and heterogeneity in the plankton food web in a frontal region of the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Joøgen; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2014-01-01

    calculated from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements. Combining these mixing estimates with vertical nutrient gradients suggests that nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone at these mixing sites may be an order of magnitude greater than elsewhere in the frontal region. This mixing may...

  3. Empirical observations of the spawning migration of European eels: The long and dangerous road to the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Righton, David; Westerberg, H.; Feunteun, E.

    2016-01-01

    Fresh data on the timing and speed of the oceanic spawning migration of European eels suggest a new paradigm for spawning ecology.......Fresh data on the timing and speed of the oceanic spawning migration of European eels suggest a new paradigm for spawning ecology....

  4. Evidence for aggregation and export of cyanobacteria and nano-eukaryotes from the Sargasso Sea euphotic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Lomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pico-plankton and nano-plankton are generally thought to represent a negligible fraction of the total particulate organic carbon (POC export flux in oligotrophic gyres due to their small size, slow individual sinking rates, and tight grazer control that leads to high rates of recycling in the euphotic zone. Based upon recent inverse modeling and network analysis however, it has been hypothesized that pico-plankton, including the cyanobacteria Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, and nano-plankton contribute significantly to POC export, via formation and gravitational settling of aggregates and/or consumption of those aggregates by mesozooplankton, in proportion to their contribution to net primary production. This study presents total suspended particulate (>0.7 μm and particle size-fractionated (10–20 μm, 20–53 μm, >53 μm pigment concentrations from within and below the euphotic zone in the oligotrophic subtropical North Atlantic, collected using Niskin bottles and large volume in-situ pumps, respectively. Results show the indicator pigments for Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus and nano-eukaryotes are; (1 found at depths down to 500 m, and; (2 essentially constant, relative to the sum of all indicator pigments, across particle size fractions ranging from 10 μm to >53 μm. Based upon the presence of chlorophyll precursor and degradation pigments, and that in situ pumps do not effectively sample fecal pellets, it is concluded that these pigments were redistributed to deeper waters on larger, more rapidly sinking aggregates likely by gravitational settling and/or convective mixing. Using available pigment and ancillary data from these cruises, these Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus and nano-plankton derived aggregates are estimated to contribute 2–13% (5 ± 4%, 1–20% (5 ± 7%, and 6–43% (23 ± 14% of the total sediment trap POC flux measured on the same cruises, respectively. Furthermore, nano-eukaryotes contribute equally to POC export and autotrophic biomass, while cyanobacteria contributions to POC export are one-tenth of their contribution to autotrophic biomass. These field observations provide direct evidence that pico- and nano-plankton represent a significant contribution to the total POC export via formation of aggregates in this oligotrophic ocean gyre. We suggest that aggregate formation and fate should be included in ecosystem models, particularly as oligotrophic regions are hypothesized to expand in areal extent with warming and increased stratification in the future.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of SAR11 populations in the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the northwestern Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Craig A; Morris, Robert; Parsons, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bacterioplankton belonging to the SAR11 clade of a-proteobacteria were counted by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) over eight depths in the surface 300 m at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site from 2003 to 2005. SAR11 are dominant heterotrophs in oligotrophic systems; thus...

  6. Abundance of broad bacterial Taxa in the Sargasso Sea explained by environmental conditions but not water mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstedt, Johanna; Martiny, Jennifer Bellanca Hughes; Munk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    on information from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from various locations and two depths, abundances of the predominant taxa (eubacteria, Archaea, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and the Roseobacter, SAR11, and SAR86 clades) were quantified by real-time PCR. In addition, the abundances...... were significantly related to any particular taxon's abundance. Most of the variation in abundance was explained by depth and chlorophyll a. The predominant phototrophs, Prochlorococcus and picoalgae, were negatively correlated with phosphate, whereas eubacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, and SAR86 were...

  7. Evidence for aggregation and export of cyanobacteria and nano-eukaryotes from the Sargasso Sea euphotic zone

    OpenAIRE

    M. W. Lomas; Moran, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    Pico-plankton and nano-plankton are generally thought to represent a negligible fraction of the total particulate organic carbon (POC) export flux in oligotrophic gyres due to their small size, slow individual sinking rates, and tight grazer control that leads to high rates of recycling in the euphotic zone. Based upon recent inverse modeling and network analysis however, it has been hypothesized that pico-plankton, including the cyanobacteria Synechococcus and Pro...

  8. Evidence for aggregation and export of cyanobacteria and nano-eukaryotes from the Sargasso Sea euphotic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, M. W.; Moran, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Pico-plankton and nano-plankton are generally thought to represent a negligible fraction of the total particulate organic carbon (POC) export flux in oligotrophic gyres due to their small size, slow individual sinking rates, and tight grazer control that leads to high rates of recycling in the euphotic zone. Based upon recent inverse modeling and network analysis however, it has been hypothesized that pico-plankton, including the cyanobacteria Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, and nano-plankton contribute significantly to POC export, via formation and gravitational settling of aggregates and/or consumption of those aggregates by mesozooplankton, in proportion to their contribution to net primary production. This study presents total suspended particulate (>0.7 μm) and particle size-fractionated (10-20 μm, 20-53 μm, >53 μm) pigment concentrations from within and below the euphotic zone in the oligotrophic subtropical North Atlantic, collected using Niskin bottles and large volume in-situ pumps, respectively. Results show the indicator pigments for Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus and nano-eukaryotes are; (1) found at depths down to 500 m, and; (2) essentially constant, relative to the sum of all indicator pigments, across particle size fractions ranging from 10 μm to >53 μm. Based upon the presence of chlorophyll precursor and degradation pigments, and that in situ pumps do not effectively sample fecal pellets, it is concluded that these pigments were redistributed to deeper waters on larger, more rapidly sinking aggregates likely by gravitational settling and/or convective mixing. Using available pigment and ancillary data from these cruises, these Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus and nano-plankton derived aggregates are estimated to contribute 2-13% (5 ± 4%), 1-20% (5 ± 7%), and 6-43% (23 ± 14%) of the total sediment trap POC flux measured on the same cruises, respectively. Furthermore, nano-eukaryotes contribute equally to POC export and autotrophic biomass, while cyanobacteria contributions to POC export are one-tenth of their contribution to autotrophic biomass. These field observations provide direct evidence that pico- and nano-plankton represent a significant contribution to the total POC export via formation of aggregates in this oligotrophic ocean gyre. We suggest that aggregate formation and fate should be included in ecosystem models, particularly as oligotrophic regions are hypothesized to expand in areal extent with warming and increased stratification in the future.

  9. Localised mixing and heterogeneity in the plankton food web in a frontal region of the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Joøgen; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2014-01-01

    the diatom communities at 10 m and > 100 m (in the deep chlorophyll maximum, DCM) than in other parts of the frontal region. Thorpe displacements supported the hypothesis of elevated mixing intensities around these stations, as did vertical mixing rates inferred from stratification and vertical current shear...... influence the plankton food web, as indicated by elevated values/concentrations of (1) primary production, (2) variable fluorescence (F-v/F-m) and (3) total seston. In addition, the fraction of the total biomass of both copepods and nauplii found closest to the DCM in the frontal region correlated...

  10. Metagenomics of the deep Mediterranean, a warm bathypelagic habitat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Belen Martín-Cuadrado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metagenomics is emerging as a powerful method to study the function and physiology of the unexplored microbial biosphere, and is causing us to re-evaluate basic precepts of microbial ecology and evolution. Most marine metagenomic analyses have been nearly exclusively devoted to photic waters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We constructed a metagenomic fosmid library from 3,000 m-deep Mediterranean plankton, which is much warmer (approximately 14 degrees C than waters of similar depth in open oceans (approximately 2 degrees C. We analyzed the library both by phylogenetic screening based on 16S rRNA gene amplification from clone pools and by sequencing both insert extremities of ca. 5,000 fosmids. Genome recruitment strategies showed that the majority of high scoring pairs corresponded to genomes from Rhizobiales within the Alphaproteobacteria, Cenarchaeum symbiosum, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gammaproteobacteria. We have found a community structure similar to that found in the aphotic zone of the Pacific. However, the similarities were significantly higher to the mesopelagic (500-700 m deep in the Pacific than to the single 4000 m deep sample studied at this location. Metabolic genes were mostly related to catabolism, transport and degradation of complex organic molecules, in agreement with a prevalent heterotrophic lifestyle for deep-sea microbes. However, we observed a high percentage of genes encoding dehydrogenases and, among them, cox genes, suggesting that aerobic carbon monoxide oxidation may be important in the deep ocean as an additional energy source. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The comparison of metagenomic libraries from the deep Mediterranean and the Pacific ALOHA water column showed that bathypelagic Mediterranean communities resemble more mesopelagic communities in the Pacific, and suggests that, in the absence of light, temperature is a major stratifying factor in the oceanic water column, overriding

  11. [Meta-Mesh: metagenomic data analysis system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoquan; Song, Baoxing; Wang, Xuetao; Ma, Xinle; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    With the current accumulation of metagenome data, it is possible to build an integrated platform for processing of rigorously selected metagenomic samples (also referred as "metagenomic communities" here) of interests. Any metagenomic samples could then be searched against this database to find the most similar sample(s). However, on one hand, current databases with a large number of metagenomic samples mostly serve as data repositories but not well annotated database, and only offer few functions for analysis. On the other hand, the few available methods to measure the similarity of metagenomic data could only compare a few pre-defined set of metagenome. It has long been intriguing scientists to effectively calculate similarities between microbial communities in a large repository, to examine how similar these samples are and to find the correlation of the meta-information of these samples. In this work we propose a novel system, Meta-Mesh, which includes a metagenomic database and its companion analysis platform that could systematically and efficiently analyze, compare and search similar metagenomic samples. In the database part, we have collected more than 7 000 high quality and well annotated metagenomic samples from the public domain and in-house facilities. The analysis platform supplies a list of online tools which could accept metagenomic samples, build taxonomical annotations, compare sample in multiple angle, and then search for similar samples against its database by a fast indexing strategy and scoring function. We also used case studies of "database search for identification" and "samples clustering based on similarity matrix" using human-associated habitat samples to demonstrate the performance of Meta-Mesh in metagenomic analysis. Therefore, Meta-Mesh would serve as a database and data analysis system to quickly parse and identify similar

  12. Metagenomic Detection Methods in Biopreparedness Outbreak Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Oskar Erik; Hansen, Trine; Knutsson, Rickard

    2013-01-01

    of a clinical sample, creating a metagenome, in a single week of laboratory work. As new technologies emerge, their dissemination and capacity building must be facilitated, and criteria for use, as well as guidelines on how to report results, must be established. This article focuses on the use of metagenomics......, gaps in research, and future directions. Examples of metagenomic detection, as well as possible applications of the methods, are described in various biopreparedness outbreak scenarios....

  13. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-08-12

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals.

  14. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Gojobori, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Metagenomics and the protein universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics sequencing projects have dramatically increased our knowledge of the protein universe and provided over one-half of currently known protein sequences; they have also introduced a much broader phylogenetic diversity into the protein databases. The full analysis of metagenomic datasets is only beginning, but it has already led to the discovery of thousands of new protein families, likely representing novel functions specific to given environments. At the same time, a deeper analysis of such novel families, including experimental structure determination of some representatives, suggests that most of them represent distant homologs of already characterized protein families, and thus most of the protein diversity present in the new environments are due to functional divergence of the known protein families rather than the emergence of new ones. PMID:21497084

  16. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrative workflows for metagenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoukakis, Efthymios; Kolisis, Fragiskos N; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of all sequencing technologies, described by the term Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), have revolutionized metagenomic analysis. They constitute a combination of high-throughput analytical protocols, coupled to delicate measuring techniques, in order to potentially discover, properly assemble and map allelic sequences to the correct genomes, achieving particularly high yields for only a fraction of the cost of traditional processes (i.e., Sanger). From a bioinformatic perspective, this boils down to many GB of data being generated from each single sequencing experiment, rendering the management or even the storage, critical bottlenecks with respect to the overall analytical endeavor. The enormous complexity is even more aggravated by the versatility of the processing steps available, represented by the numerous bioinformatic tools that are essential, for each analytical task, in order to fully unveil the genetic content of a metagenomic dataset. These disparate tasks range from simple, nonetheless non-trivial, quality control of raw data to exceptionally complex protein annotation procedures, requesting a high level of expertise for their proper application or the neat implementation of the whole workflow. Furthermore, a bioinformatic analysis of such scale, requires grand computational resources, imposing as the sole realistic solution, the utilization of cloud computing infrastructures. In this review article we discuss different, integrative, bioinformatic solutions available, which address the aforementioned issues, by performing a critical assessment of the available automated pipelines for data management, quality control, and annotation of metagenomic data, embracing various, major sequencing technologies and applications.

  18. Integrative Workflows for Metagenomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymios eLadoukakis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of all sequencing technologies, described by the term Next Generation Sequencing (NGS, have revolutionized metagenomic analysis. They constitute a combination of high-throughput analytical protocols, coupled to delicate measuring techniques, in order to potentially discover, properly assemble and map allelic sequences to the correct genomes, achieving particularly high yields for only a fraction of the cost of traditional processes (i.e. Sanger. From a bioinformatic perspective, this boils down to many gigabytes of data being generated from each single sequencing experiment, rendering the management or even the storage, critical bottlenecks with respect to the overall analytical endeavor. The enormous complexity is even more aggravated by the versatility of the processing steps available, represented by the numerous bioinformatic tools that are essential, for each analytical task, in order to fully unveil the genetic content of a metagenomic dataset. These disparate tasks range from simple, nonetheless non-trivial, quality control of raw data to exceptionally complex protein annotation procedures, requesting a high level of expertise for their proper application or the neat implementation of the whole workflow. Furthermore, a bioinformatic analysis of such scale, requires grand computational resources, imposing as the sole realistic solution, the utilization of cloud computing infrastructures. In this review article we discuss different, integrative, bioinformatic solutions available, which address the aforementioned issues, by performing a critical assessment of the available automated pipelines for data management, quality control and annotation of metagenomic data, embracing various, major sequencing technologies and applications.

  19. Subtractive assembly for comparative metagenomics, and its application to type 2 diabetes metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-11-02

    Comparative metagenomics remains challenging due to the size and complexity of metagenomic datasets. Here we introduce subtractive assembly, a de novo assembly approach for comparative metagenomics that directly assembles only the differential reads that distinguish between two groups of metagenomes. Using simulated datasets, we show it improves both the efficiency of the assembly and the assembly quality of the differential genomes and genes. Further, its application to type 2 diabetes (T2D) metagenomic datasets reveals clear signatures of the T2D gut microbiome, revealing new phylogenetic and functional features of the gut microbial communities associated with T2D.

  20. Exploring neighborhoods in the metagenome universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßhauer, Kathrin P; Klingenberg, Heiner; Lingner, Thomas; Meinicke, Peter

    2014-07-14

    The variety of metagenomes in current databases provides a rapidly growing source of information for comparative studies. However, the quantity and quality of supplementary metadata is still lagging behind. It is therefore important to be able to identify related metagenomes by means of the available sequence data alone. We have studied efficient sequence-based methods for large-scale identification of similar metagenomes within a database retrieval context. In a broad comparison of different profiling methods we found that vector-based distance measures are well-suitable for the detection of metagenomic neighbors. Our evaluation on more than 1700 publicly available metagenomes indicates that for a query metagenome from a particular habitat on average nine out of ten nearest neighbors represent the same habitat category independent of the utilized profiling method or distance measure. While for well-defined labels a neighborhood accuracy of 100% can be achieved, in general the neighbor detection is severely affected by a natural overlap of manually annotated categories. In addition, we present results of a novel visualization method that is able to reflect the similarity of metagenomes in a 2D scatter plot. The visualization method shows a similarly high accuracy in the reduced space as compared with the high-dimensional profile space. Our study suggests that for inspection of metagenome neighborhoods the profiling methods and distance measures can be chosen to provide a convenient interpretation of results in terms of the underlying features. Furthermore, supplementary metadata of metagenome samples in the future needs to comply with readily available ontologies for fine-grained and standardized annotation. To make profile-based k-nearest-neighbor search and the 2D-visualization of the metagenome universe available to the research community, we included the proposed methods in our CoMet-Universe server for comparative metagenome analysis.

  1. Functional Metagenomics to Study Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boolchandani, Manish; Patel, Sanket; Dantas, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    The construction and screening of metagenomic expression libraries has great potential to identify novel genes and their functions. Here, we describe metagenomic library preparation from fecal DNA, screening of libraries for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), massively parallel DNA sequencing of the enriched DNA fragments, and a computational pipeline for high-throughput assembly and annotation of functionally selected DNA.

  2. Metagenomic data analysis : computational methods and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics is the study of the genomic content of microbial communities, acquired through DNA sequencing technology. The main advantage of metagenomics is that it can overcome the limitations of individual genome sequencing, that can work only on the few culturable microbes. Unfortunately, the

  3. Genome diversity of marine phages recovered from Mediterranean metagenomes: Size matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario López-Pérez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine viruses play a critical role not only in the global geochemical cycles but also in the biology and evolution of their hosts. Despite their importance, viral diversity remains underexplored mostly due to sampling and cultivation challenges. Direct sequencing approaches such as viromics has provided new insights into the marine viral world. As a complementary approach, we analysed 24 microbial metagenomes (>0.2 μm size range obtained from six sites in the Mediterranean Sea that vary by depth, season and filter used to retrieve the fraction. Filter-size comparison showed a significant number of viral sequences that were retained on the larger-pore filters and were different from those found in the viral fraction from the same sample, indicating that some important viral information is missing using only assembly from viromes. Besides, we were able to describe 1,323 viral genomic fragments that were more than 10Kb in length, of which 36 represented complete viral genomes including some of them retrieved from a cross-assembly from different metagenomes. Host prediction based on sequence methods revealed new phage groups belonging to marine prokaryotes like SAR11, Cyanobacteria or SAR116. We also identified the first complete virophage from deep seawater and a new endemic clade of the recently discovered Marine group II Euryarchaeota virus. Furthermore, analysis of viral distribution using metagenomes and viromes indicated that most of the new phages were found exclusively in the Mediterranean Sea and some of them, mostly the ones recovered from deep metagenomes, do not recruit in any database probably indicating higher variability and endemicity in Mediterranean bathypelagic waters. Together these data provide the first detailed picture of genomic diversity, spatial and depth variations of viral communities within the Mediterranean Sea using metagenome assembly.

  4. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis.

  5. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.

  6. A metagenomic study of methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haverkamp Thomas HA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane oxidizing prokaryotes in marine sediments are believed to function as a methane filter reducing the oceanic contribution to the global methane emission. In the anoxic parts of the sediments, oxidation of methane is accomplished by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME living in syntrophy with sulphate reducing bacteria. This anaerobic oxidation of methane is assumed to be a coupling of reversed methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. Where oxygen is available aerobic methanotrophs take part in methane oxidation. In this study, we used metagenomics to characterize the taxonomic and metabolic potential for methane oxidation at the Tonya seep in the Coal Oil Point area, California. Two metagenomes from different sediment depth horizons (0-4 cm and 10-15 cm below sea floor were sequenced by 454 technology. The metagenomes were analysed to characterize the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic taxa at the two sediment depths. To gain insight into the metabolic potential the metagenomes were searched for marker genes associated with methane oxidation. Results Blast searches followed by taxonomic binning in MEGAN revealed aerobic methanotrophs of the genus Methylococcus to be overrepresented in the 0-4 cm metagenome compared to the 10-15 cm metagenome. In the 10-15 cm metagenome, ANME of the ANME-1 clade, were identified as the most abundant methanotrophic taxon with 8.6% of the reads. Searches for particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA, marker genes for aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of methane respectively, identified pmoA in the 0-4 cm metagenome as Methylococcaceae related. The mcrA reads from the 10-15 cm horizon were all classified as originating from the ANME-1 clade. Conclusions Most of the taxa detected were present in both metagenomes and differences in community structure and corresponding metabolic potential between the two samples were mainly

  7. Bioprospecting metagenomes: Glycosyl hydrolases for converting biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; van der Lelie, D.; McCorkle, S. R.; Monchy, S.; Taghavi, S.

    2009-05-18

    Throughout immeasurable time, microorganisms evolved and accumulated remarkable physiological and functional heterogeneity, and now constitute the major reserve for genetic diversity on earth. Using metagenomics, namely genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples, this biogenetic diversification can be accessed without the need to cultivate cells. Accordingly, microbial communities and their metagenomes, isolated from biotopes with high turnover rates of recalcitrant biomass, such as lignocellulosic plant cell walls, have become a major resource for bioprospecting; furthermore, this material is a major asset in the search for new biocatalytics (enzymes) for various industrial processes, including the production of biofuels from plant feedstocks. However, despite the contributions from metagenomics technologies consequent upon the discovery of novel enzymes, this relatively new enterprise requires major improvements. In this review, we compare function-based metagenome screening and sequence-based metagenome data mining, discussing the advantages and limitations of both methods. We also describe the unusual enzymes discovered via metagenomics approaches, and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies.

  8. Bioprospecting metagenomes: glycosyl hydrolases for converting biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monchy Sebastien

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Throughout immeasurable time, microorganisms evolved and accumulated remarkable physiological and functional heterogeneity, and now constitute the major reserve for genetic diversity on earth. Using metagenomics, namely genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples, this biogenetic diversification can be accessed without the need to cultivate cells. Accordingly, microbial communities and their metagenomes, isolated from biotopes with high turnover rates of recalcitrant biomass, such as lignocellulosic plant cell walls, have become a major resource for bioprospecting; furthermore, this material is a major asset in the search for new biocatalytics (enzymes for various industrial processes, including the production of biofuels from plant feedstocks. However, despite the contributions from metagenomics technologies consequent upon the discovery of novel enzymes, this relatively new enterprise requires major improvements. In this review, we compare function-based metagenome screening and sequence-based metagenome data mining, discussing the advantages and limitations of both methods. We also describe the unusual enzymes discovered via metagenomics approaches, and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies.

  9. The future of skin metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics, the direct exploitation of environmental microbial DNA, is complementary to traditional culture-based approaches for deciphering taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in a plethora of ecosystems, including those related to the human body such as the mouth, saliva, teeth, gut or skin. DNA extracted from human skin analyzed by sequencing the PCR-amplified rrs gene has already revealed the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities colonizing the human skin ("skin microbiome"). Each individual possesses his/her own skin microbial community structure, with marked taxonomic differences between different parts of the body and temporal evolution depending on physical and chemical conditions (sweat, washing etc.). However, technical limitations due to the low bacterial density at the surface of the human skin or contamination by human DNA still has inhibited extended use of the metagenomic approach for investigating the skin microbiome at a functional level. These difficulties have been overcome in part by the new generation of sequencing platforms that now provide sequences describing the genes and functions carried out by skin bacteria. These methodological advances should help us understand the mechanisms by which these microorganisms adapt to the specific chemical composition of each skin and thereby lead to a better understanding of bacteria/human host interdependence. This knowledge will pave the way for more systemic and individualized pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Metagenomics and future perspectives in virus discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokili, John L; Rohwer, Forest; Dutilh, Bas E

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring the emergence and re-emergence of viral diseases with the goal of containing the spread of viral agents requires both adequate preparedness and quick response. Identifying the causative agent of a new epidemic is one of the most important steps for effective response to disease outbreaks. Traditionally, virus discovery required propagation of the virus in cell culture, a proven technique responsible for the identification of the vast majority of viruses known to date. However, many viruses cannot be easily propagated in cell culture, thus limiting our knowledge of viruses. Viral metagenomic analyses of environmental samples suggest that the field of virology has explored less than 1% of the extant viral diversity. In the last decade, the culture-independent and sequence-independent metagenomic approach has permitted the discovery of many viruses in a wide range of samples. Phylogenetically, some of these viruses are distantly related to previously discovered viruses. In addition, 60-99% of the sequences generated in different viral metagenomic studies are not homologous to known viruses. In this review, we discuss the advances in the area of viral metagenomics during the last decade and their relevance to virus discovery, clinical microbiology and public health. We discuss the potential of metagenomics for characterization of the normal viral population in a healthy community and identification of viruses that could pose a threat to humans through zoonosis. In addition, we propose a new model of the Koch's postulates named the 'Metagenomic Koch's Postulates'. Unlike the original Koch's postulates and the Molecular Koch's postulates as formulated by Falkow, the metagenomic Koch's postulates focus on the identification of metagenomic traits in disease cases. The metagenomic traits that can be traced after healthy individuals have been exposed to the source of the suspected pathogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Human milk metagenome: a functional capacity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human milk contains a diverse population of bacteria that likely influences colonization of the infant gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies, however, have been limited to characterization of this microbial community by 16S rRNA analysis. In the present study, a metagenomic approach using Illumina sequencing of a pooled milk sample (ten donors) was employed to determine the genera of bacteria and the types of bacterial open reading frames in human milk that may influence bacterial establishment and stability in this primal food matrix. The human milk metagenome was also compared to that of breast-fed and formula-fed infants’ feces (n = 5, each) and mothers’ feces (n = 3) at the phylum level and at a functional level using open reading frame abundance. Additionally, immune-modulatory bacterial-DNA motifs were also searched for within human milk. Results The bacterial community in human milk contained over 360 prokaryotic genera, with sequences aligning predominantly to the phyla of Proteobacteria (65%) and Firmicutes (34%), and the genera of Pseudomonas (61.1%), Staphylococcus (33.4%) and Streptococcus (0.5%). From assembled human milk-derived contigs, 30,128 open reading frames were annotated and assigned to functional categories. When compared to the metagenome of infants’ and mothers’ feces, the human milk metagenome was less diverse at the phylum level, and contained more open reading frames associated with nitrogen metabolism, membrane transport and stress response (P milk metagenome also contained a similar occurrence of immune-modulatory DNA motifs to that of infants’ and mothers’ fecal metagenomes. Conclusions Our results further expand the complexity of the human milk metagenome and enforce the benefits of human milk ingestion on the microbial colonization of the infant gut and immunity. Discovery of immune-modulatory motifs in the metagenome of human milk indicates more exhaustive analyses of the functionality of the human

  12. A retrospective metagenomics approach to studying Blastocystis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lee O'Brien; Bonde, Ida; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common single-celled intestinal parasitic genus, comprising several subtypes. Here, we screened data obtained by metagenomic analysis of faecal DNA for Blastocystis by searching for subtype-specific genes in coabundance gene groups, which are groups of genes that covary across......- and Prevotella-driven enterotypes. This is the first study to investigate the relationship between Blastocystis and communities of gut bacteria using a metagenomics approach. The study serves as an example of how it is possible to retrospectively investigate microbial eukaryotic communities in the gut using...... metagenomic datasets targeting the bacterial component of the intestinal microbiome and the interplay between these microbial communities....

  13. EBI metagenomics--a new resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sarah; Corbett, Matthew; Denise, Hubert; Fraser, Matthew; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hunter, Christopher; Jones, Philip; Leinonen, Rasko; McAnulla, Craig; Maguire, Eamonn; Maslen, John; Mitchell, Alex; Nuka, Gift; Oisel, Arnaud; Pesseat, Sebastien; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Sterk, Peter; Vaughan, Daniel; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics is a relatively recently established but rapidly expanding field that uses high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies to characterize the microbial communities inhabiting different ecosystems (including oceans, lakes, soil, tundra, plants and body sites). Metagenomics brings with it a number of challenges, including the management, analysis, storage and sharing of data. In response to these challenges, we have developed a new metagenomics resource (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/) that allows users to easily submit raw nucleotide reads for functional and taxonomic analysis by a state-of-the-art pipeline, and have them automatically stored (together with descriptive, standards-compliant metadata) in the European Nucleotide Archive.

  14. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  16. Tapping uncultured microorganisms through metagenomics for drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tapping uncultured microorganisms through metagenomics for drug discovery. Abdelnasser Salah Shebl Ibrahim, Ali Abdullah Al-Salamah, Ashraf A Hatamleh, Mohammed S El-Shiekh, Shebl Salah S Ibrahim ...

  17. Metagenomics insights into food fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; Parente, Eugenio; Ercolini, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the recent advances in the study of food microbial ecology, with a focus on food fermentations. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have been widely applied to the study of food microbial consortia and the different applications of HTS technologies were exploited in order to monitor microbial dynamics in food fermentative processes. Phylobiomics was the most explored application in the past decade. Metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, although still underexploited, promise to uncover the functionality of complex microbial consortia. The new knowledge acquired will help to understand how to make a profitable use of microbial genetic resources and modulate key activities of beneficial microbes in order to ensure process efficiency, product quality and safety. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, H.

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  19. The Amordad database engine for metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Ehsan; Smith, Andrew D

    2014-10-15

    Several technical challenges in metagenomic data analysis, including assembling metagenomic sequence data or identifying operational taxonomic units, are both significant and well known. These forms of analysis are increasingly cited as conceptually flawed, given the extreme variation within traditionally defined species and rampant horizontal gene transfer. Furthermore, computational requirements of such analysis have hindered content-based organization of metagenomic data at large scale. In this article, we introduce the Amordad database engine for alignment-free, content-based indexing of metagenomic datasets. Amordad places the metagenome comparison problem in a geometric context, and uses an indexing strategy that combines random hashing with a regular nearest neighbor graph. This framework allows refinement of the database over time by continual application of random hash functions, with the effect of each hash function encoded in the nearest neighbor graph. This eliminates the need to explicitly maintain the hash functions in order for query efficiency to benefit from the accumulated randomness. Results on real and simulated data show that Amordad can support logarithmic query time for identifying similar metagenomes even as the database size reaches into the millions. Source code, licensed under the GNU general public license (version 3) is freely available for download from http://smithlabresearch.org/amordad andrewds@usc.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. MEBS, a software platform to evaluate large (meta)genomic collections according to their metabolic machinery: unraveling the sulfur cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Anda, Valerie; Zapata-Peñasco, Icoquih; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Eguiarte, Luis E; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Souza, Valeria

    2017-11-01

    The increasing number of metagenomic and genomic sequences has dramatically improved our understanding of microbial diversity, yet our ability to infer metabolic capabilities in such datasets remains challenging. We describe the Multigenomic Entropy Based Score pipeline (MEBS), a software platform designed to evaluate, compare, and infer complex metabolic pathways in large "omic" datasets, including entire biogeochemical cycles. MEBS is open source and available through https://github.com/eead-csic-compbio/metagenome_Pfam_score. To demonstrate its use, we modeled the sulfur cycle by exhaustively curating the molecular and ecological elements involved (compounds, genes, metabolic pathways, and microbial taxa). This information was reduced to a collection of 112 characteristic Pfam protein domains and a list of complete-sequenced sulfur genomes. Using the mathematical framework of relative entropy (H΄), we quantitatively measured the enrichment of these domains among sulfur genomes. The entropy of each domain was used both to build up a final score that indicates whether a (meta)genomic sample contains the metabolic machinery of interest and to propose marker domains in metagenomic sequences such as DsrC (PF04358). MEBS was benchmarked with a dataset of 2107 non-redundant microbial genomes from RefSeq and 935 metagenomes from MG-RAST. Its performance, reproducibility, and robustness were evaluated using several approaches, including random sampling, linear regression models, receiver operator characteristic plots, and the area under the curve metric (AUC). Our results support the broad applicability of this algorithm to accurately classify (AUC = 0.985) hard-to-culture genomes (e.g., Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator), previously characterized ones, and metagenomic environments such as hydrothermal vents, or deep-sea sediment. Our benchmark indicates that an entropy-based score can capture the metabolic machinery of interest and can be used to efficiently classify

  1. The metagenomics RAST server – a public resource for the automatic phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random community genomes (metagenomes are now commonly used to study microbes in different environments. Over the past few years, the major challenge associated with metagenomics shifted from generating to analyzing sequences. High-throughput, low-cost next-generation sequencing has provided access to metagenomics to a wide range of researchers. Results A high-throughput pipeline has been constructed to provide high-performance computing to all researchers interested in using metagenomics. The pipeline produces automated functional assignments of sequences in the metagenome by comparing both protein and nucleotide databases. Phylogenetic and functional summaries of the metagenomes are generated, and tools for comparative metagenomics are incorporated into the standard views. User access is controlled to ensure data privacy, but the collaborative environment underpinning the service provides a framework for sharing datasets between multiple users. In the metagenomics RAST, all users retain full control of their data, and everything is available for download in a variety of formats. Conclusion The open-source metagenomics RAST service provides a new paradigm for the annotation and analysis of metagenomes. With built-in support for multiple data sources and a back end that houses abstract data types, the metagenomics RAST is stable, extensible, and freely available to all researchers. This service has removed one of the primary bottlenecks in metagenome sequence analysis – the availability of high-performance computing for annotating the data. http://metagenomics.nmpdr.org

  2. The metagenomic data life-cycle: standards and best practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ten Hoopen, Petra; Finn, Robert D.; Bongo, Lars Ailo; Corre, Erwan; Fosso, Bruno; Meyer, Folker; Mitchell, Alex; Pelletier, Eric; Pesole, Graziano; Santamaria, Monica; Willassen, Nils Peder; Cochrane, Guy

    2017-06-16

    Metagenomics data analyses from independent studies can only be compared if the analysis workflows are described in a harmonised way. In this overview, we have mapped the landscape of data standards available for the description of essential steps in metagenomics: (1) material sampling, (2) material sequencing (3) data analysis and (4) data archiving & publishing. Taking examples from marine research, we summarise essential variables used to describe material sampling processes and sequencing procedures in a metagenomics experiment. These aspects of metagenomics dataset generation have been to some extent addressed by the scientific community but greater awareness and adoption is still needed. We emphasise the lack of standards relating to reporting how metagenomics datasets are analysed and how the metagenomics data analysis outputs should be archived and published. We propose best practice as a foundation for a community standard to enable reproducibility and better sharing of metagenomics datasets, leading ultimately to greater metagenomics data reuse and repurposing.

  3. Metagenome Analysis: a Powerful Tool for Enzyme Bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sindhu, Raveendran; Parameswaran, Binod; Sukumaran, Rajeev K; Pandey, Ashok

    2017-10-01

    Microorganisms are found throughout every corner of nature, and vast number of microorganisms is difficult to cultivate by classical microbiological techniques. The advent of metagenomics has revolutionized the field of microbial biotechnology. Metagenomics allow the recovery of genetic material directly from environmental niches without any cultivation techniques. Currently, metagenomic tools are widely employed as powerful tools to isolate and identify enzymes with novel biocatalytic activities from the uncultivable component of microbial communities. The employment of next-generation sequencing techniques for metagenomics resulted in the generation of large sequence data sets derived from various environments, such as soil, the human body and ocean water. This review article describes the state-of-the-art techniques and tools in metagenomics and discusses the potential of metagenomic approaches for the bioprospecting of industrial enzymes from various environmental samples. We also describe the unusual novel enzymes discovered via metagenomic approaches and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies.

  4. Metagenomics of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Metagenomics approach was used to identify unknown organisms which live in association with the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). Metagenomics combines molecular biology and genetics to identify, and characterize genetic material from unique biological ...

  5. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondov, Brian D; Bergman, Nicholas H; Phillippy, Adam M

    2011-09-30

    A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  6. Metagenomic Guilt by Association: An Operonic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vey, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing projects continue to drive a vast accumulation of metagenomic sequence data. Given the growth rate of this data, automated approaches to functional annotation are indispensable and a cornerstone heuristic of many computational protocols is the concept of guilt by association. The guilt by association paradigm has been heavily exploited by genomic context methods that offer functional predictions that are complementary to homology-based annotations, thereby offering a means to extend functional annotation. In particular, operon methods that exploit co-directional intergenic distances can provide homology-free functional annotation through the transfer of functions among co-operonic genes, under the assumption that guilt by association is indeed applicable. Although guilt by association is a well-accepted annotative device, its applicability to metagenomic functional annotation has not been definitively demonstrated. Here a large-scale assessment of metagenomic guilt by association is undertaken where functional associations are predicted on the basis of co-directional intergenic distances. Specifically, functional annotations are compared within pairs of adjacent co-directional genes, as well as operons of various lengths (i.e. number of member genes), in order to reveal new information about annotative cohesion versus operon length. The results suggests that co-directional gene pairs offer reduced confidence for metagenomic guilt by association due to difficulty in resolving the existence of functional associations when intergenic distance is the sole predictor of pairwise gene interactions. However, metagenomic operons, particularly those with substantial lengths, appear to be capable of providing a superior basis for metagenomic guilt by association due to increased annotative stability. The need for improved recognition of metagenomic operons is discussed, as well as the limitations of the present work. PMID:23940763

  7. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippy Adam M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Results Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Conclusions Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  8. Marine Metagenomics activities at KAUST

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-09-19

    Renaissance of Middle East countries King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC) The Red Sea as a source for our research Pipeline for the research platform Comparative Genomics and Genetics (CGG) laboratory

  9. Exploring nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses in Tara Oceans microbial metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingamp, Pascal; Grimsley, Nigel; Acinas, Silvia G; Clerissi, Camille; Subirana, Lucie; Poulain, Julie; Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Villar, Emilie; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Moreau, Hervé; Desdevises, Yves; Bork, Peer; Raes, Jeroen; de Vargas, Colomban; Karsenti, Eric; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Jaillon, Olivier; Not, Fabrice; Pesant, Stéphane; Wincker, Patrick; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    Nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) constitute a group of eukaryotic viruses that can have crucial ecological roles in the sea by accelerating the turnover of their unicellular hosts or by causing diseases in animals. To better characterize the diversity, abundance and biogeography of marine NCLDVs, we analyzed 17 metagenomes derived from microbial samples (0.2-1.6 μm size range) collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition. The sample set includes ecosystems under-represented in previous studies, such as the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and Indian Ocean lagoons. By combining computationally derived relative abundance and direct prokaryote cell counts, the abundance of NCLDVs was found to be in the order of 10(4)-10(5) genomes ml(-1) for the samples from the photic zone and 10(2)-10(3) genomes ml(-1) for the OMZ. The Megaviridae and Phycodnaviridae dominated the NCLDV populations in the metagenomes, although most of the reads classified in these families showed large divergence from known viral genomes. Our taxon co-occurrence analysis revealed a potential association between viruses of the Megaviridae family and eukaryotes related to oomycetes. In support of this predicted association, we identified six cases of lateral gene transfer between Megaviridae and oomycetes. Our results suggest that marine NCLDVs probably outnumber eukaryotic organisms in the photic layer (per given water mass) and that metagenomic sequence analyses promise to shed new light on the biodiversity of marine viruses and their interactions with potential hosts.

  10. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  11. Metagenomics for pathogen detection in public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Traditional pathogen detection methods in public health infectious disease surveillance rely upon the identification of agents that are already known to be associated with a particular clinical syndrome. The emerging field of metagenomics has the potential to revolutionize pathogen detection in public health laboratories by allowing the simultaneous detection of all microorganisms in a clinical sample, without a priori knowledge of their identities, through the use of next-generation DNA sequencing. A single metagenomics analysis has the potential to detect rare and novel pathogens, and to uncover the role of dysbiotic microbiomes in infectious and chronic human disease. Making use of advances in sequencing platforms and bioinformatics tools, recent studies have shown that metagenomics can even determine the whole-genome sequences of pathogens, allowing inferences about antibiotic resistance, virulence, evolution and transmission to be made. We are entering an era in which more novel infectious diseases will be identified through metagenomics-based methods than through traditional laboratory methods. The impetus is now on public health laboratories to integrate metagenomics techniques into their diagnostic arsenals. PMID:24050114

  12. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  13. Shotgun metagenomic data streams: surfing without fear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berendzen, Joel R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Timely information about bio-threat prevalence, consequence, propagation, attribution, and mitigation is needed to support decision-making, both routinely and in a crisis. One DNA sequencer can stream 25 Gbp of information per day, but sampling strategies and analysis techniques are needed to turn raw sequencing power into actionable knowledge. Shotgun metagenomics can enable biosurveillance at the level of a single city, hospital, or airplane. Metagenomics characterizes viruses and bacteria from complex environments such as soil, air filters, or sewage. Unlike targeted-primer-based sequencing, shotgun methods are not blind to sequences that are truly novel, and they can measure absolute prevalence. Shotgun metagenomic sampling can be non-invasive, efficient, and inexpensive while being informative. We have developed analysis techniques for shotgun metagenomic sequencing that rely upon phylogenetic signature patterns. They work by indexing local sequence patterns in a manner similar to web search engines. Our methods are laptop-fast and favorable scaling properties ensure they will be sustainable as sequencing methods grow. We show examples of application to soil metagenomic samples.

  14. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. Unfortunately, these tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusions Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility. PMID:25780508

  15. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha

    2015-01-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing...... laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human...... counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies....

  16. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  17. Viral metagenomics: are we missing the giants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halary, S; Temmam, S; Raoult, D; Desnues, C

    2016-06-01

    Amoeba-infecting giant viruses are recently discovered viruses that have been isolated from diverse environments all around the world. In parallel to isolation efforts, metagenomics confirmed their worldwide distribution from a broad range of environmental and host-associated samples, including humans, depicting them as a major component of eukaryotic viruses in nature and a possible resident of the human/animal virome whose role is still unclear. Nevertheless, metagenomics data about amoeba-infecting giant viruses still remain scarce, mainly because of methodological limitations. Efforts should be pursued both at the metagenomic sample preparation level and on in silico analyses to better understand their roles in the environment and in human/animal health and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  20. Gene Prediction in Metagenomic Fragments with Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Wu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies used in metagenomics yield numerous sequencing fragments which come from thousands of different species. Accurately identifying genes from metagenomics fragments is one of the most fundamental issues in metagenomics. In this article, by fusing multifeatures (i.e., monocodon usage, monoamino acid usage, ORF length coverage, and Z-curve features and using deep stacking networks learning model, we present a novel method (called Meta-MFDL to predict the metagenomic genes. The results with 10 CV and independent tests show that Meta-MFDL is a powerful tool for identifying genes from metagenomic fragments.

  1. Gene Prediction in Metagenomic Fragments with Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Jin, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Teng

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies used in metagenomics yield numerous sequencing fragments which come from thousands of different species. Accurately identifying genes from metagenomics fragments is one of the most fundamental issues in metagenomics. In this article, by fusing multifeatures (i.e., monocodon usage, monoamino acid usage, ORF length coverage, and Z-curve features) and using deep stacking networks learning model, we present a novel method (called Meta-MFDL) to predict the metagenomic genes. The results with 10 CV and independent tests show that Meta-MFDL is a powerful tool for identifying genes from metagenomic fragments.

  2. Comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence signatures, as defined by the frequencies of k-tuples (or k-mers, k-grams, have been used extensively to compare genomic sequences of individual organisms, to identify cis-regulatory modules, and to study the evolution of regulatory sequences. Recently many next-generation sequencing (NGS read data sets of metagenomic samples from a variety of different environments have been generated. The assembly of these reads can be difficult and analysis methods based on mapping reads to genes or pathways are also restricted by the availability and completeness of existing databases. Sequence-signature-based methods, however, do not need the complete genomes or existing databases and thus, can potentially be very useful for the comparison of metagenomic samples using NGS read data. Still, the applications of sequence signature methods for the comparison of metagenomic samples have not been well studied. Results We studied several dissimilarity measures, including d2, d2* and d2S recently developed from our group, a measure (hereinafter noted as Hao used in CVTree developed from Hao’s group (Qi et al., 2004, measures based on relative di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide frequencies as in Willner et al. (2009, as well as standard lp measures between the frequency vectors, for the comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures. We compared their performance using a series of extensive simulations and three real next-generation sequencing (NGS metagenomic datasets: 39 fecal samples from 33 mammalian host species, 56 marine samples across the world, and 13 fecal samples from human individuals. Results showed that the dissimilarity measure d2S can achieve superior performance when comparing metagenomic samples by clustering them into different groups as well as recovering environmental gradients affecting microbial samples. New insights into the environmental factors affecting microbial compositions in metagenomic samples

  3. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  4. Metagenomic assembly through the lens of validation: recent advances in assessing and improving the quality of genomes assembled from metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nathan D; Treangen, Todd J; Hill, Christopher M; Cepeda-Espinoza, Victoria; Ghurye, Jay; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai

    2017-08-07

    Metagenomic samples are snapshots of complex ecosystems at work. They comprise hundreds of known and unknown species, contain multiple strain variants and vary greatly within and across environments. Many microbes found in microbial communities are not easily grown in culture making their DNA sequence our only clue into their evolutionary history and biological function. Metagenomic assembly is a computational process aimed at reconstructing genes and genomes from metagenomic mixtures. Current methods have made significant strides in reconstructing DNA segments comprising operons, tandem gene arrays and syntenic blocks. Shorter, higher-throughput sequencing technologies have become the de facto standard in the field. Sequencers are now able to generate billions of short reads in only a few days. Multiple metagenomic assembly strategies, pipelines and assemblers have appeared in recent years. Owing to the inherent complexity of metagenome assembly, regardless of the assembly algorithm and sequencing method, metagenome assemblies contain errors. Recent developments in assembly validation tools have played a pivotal role in improving metagenomics assemblers. Here, we survey recent progress in the field of metagenomic assembly, provide an overview of key approaches for genomic and metagenomic assembly validation and demonstrate the insights that can be derived from assemblies through the use of assembly validation strategies. We also discuss the potential for impact of long-read technologies in metagenomics. We conclude with a discussion of future challenges and opportunities in the field of metagenomic assembly and validation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. A Metagenomic Survey of Serpentinites and Nearby Soils in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K. Y.; Hsu, Y. W.; Chen, Y. W.; Huang, T. Y.; Shih, Y. J.; Chen, J. S.; Hsu, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    The serpentinite of Taiwan is originated from the subduction zone of the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. Many small bodies of serpentinite are scattered around the lands of the East Rift Valley, which are also one of the major agricultural areas in Taiwan. Since microbial communities play a role both on weathering process and soil recovery, uncovering the microbial compositions in serpentinites and surrounding soils may help people to understand the roles of microorganisms on serpentinites during the nature weathering process. In this study, microorganisms growing on the surface of serpentinites, in the surrounding soil, and agriculture soils that are miles of horizontal distance away from serpentinite were collected. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was carried out to examine the metagenomics of uncultured microbial community in these samples. The metagenomics were further clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to analyze relative abundance, heatmap of OTUs, and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA). Our data revealed the different types of geographic material had their own distinct structures of microbial community. In serpentinites, the heatmaps based on the phylogenetic pattern showed that the OTUs distributions were similar in phyla of Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and WPS-1/WPS-2. On the other hand, the heatmaps of phylogenetic pattern of agriculture soils showed that the OTUs distributions in phyla of Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, WPS-1/WPS-2, and Proteobacteria were similar. In soil nearby the serpentinite, some clusters of OTUs in phyla of Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and WPS-1/WPS-2 have disappeared. Our data provided evidence regarding kinetic evolutions of microbial communities in different geographic materials.

  6. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia L Smits

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes.

  7. The metagenomic approach and causality in virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Beres Castrignano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the metagenomic approach has been a very important tool in the discovery of new viruses in environmental and biological samples. Here we discuss how these discoveries may help to elucidate the etiology of diseases and the criteria necessary to establish a causal association between a virus and a disease.

  8. Towards a more complete metagenomics toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerging scientific discipline of metagenomics has not only created a myriad of opportunities for biologists to reveal new insights into the microbial underpinnings of our environment, but has also presented a number of interesting challenges for bioinformatics algorithms and software developers...

  9. Applications of metagenomics for industrial bioproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent progress in mining the rich genetic resource of non-culturable microbes has led to the discovery of new genes, enzymes, and natural products. The impact of metagenomics is witnessed in the development of commodity and fine chemicals, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals where the benefit of enz...

  10. Bracken: estimating species abundance in metagenomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic experiments attempt to characterize microbial communities using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Identification of the microorganisms in a sample provides information about the genetic profile, population structure, and role of microorganisms within an environment. Until recently, most metagenomics studies focused on high-level characterization at the level of phyla, or alternatively sequenced the 16S ribosomal RNA gene that is present in bacterial species. As the cost of sequencing has fallen, though, metagenomics experiments have increasingly used unbiased shotgun sequencing to capture all the organisms in a sample. This approach requires a method for estimating abundance directly from the raw read data. Here we describe a fast, accurate new method that computes the abundance at the species level using the reads collected in a metagenomics experiment. Bracken (Bayesian Reestimation of Abundance after Classification with KrakEN uses the taxonomic assignments made by Kraken, a very fast read-level classifier, along with information about the genomes themselves to estimate abundance at the species level, the genus level, or above. We demonstrate that Bracken can produce accurate species- and genus-level abundance estimates even when a sample contains multiple near-identical species.

  11. Clustering metagenomic sequences with interpolated Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing of environmental DNA (often called metagenomics) has shown tremendous potential to uncover the vast number of unknown microbes that cannot be cultured and sequenced by traditional methods. Because the output from metagenomic sequencing is a large set of reads of unknown origin, clustering reads together that were sequenced from the same species is a crucial analysis step. Many effective approaches to this task rely on sequenced genomes in public databases, but these genomes are a highly biased sample that is not necessarily representative of environments interesting to many metagenomics projects. Results We present SCIMM (Sequence Clustering with Interpolated Markov Models), an unsupervised sequence clustering method. SCIMM achieves greater clustering accuracy than previous unsupervised approaches. We examine the limitations of unsupervised learning on complex datasets, and suggest a hybrid of SCIMM and supervised learning method Phymm called PHYSCIMM that performs better when evolutionarily close training genomes are available. Conclusions SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are highly accurate methods to cluster metagenomic sequences. SCIMM operates entirely unsupervised, making it ideal for environments containing mostly novel microbes. PHYSCIMM uses supervised learning to improve clustering in environments containing microbial strains from well-characterized genera. SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are available open source from http://www.cbcb.umd.edu/software/scimm. PMID:21044341

  12. Clustering metagenomic sequences with interpolated Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, David R; Salzberg, Steven L

    2010-11-02

    Sequencing of environmental DNA (often called metagenomics) has shown tremendous potential to uncover the vast number of unknown microbes that cannot be cultured and sequenced by traditional methods. Because the output from metagenomic sequencing is a large set of reads of unknown origin, clustering reads together that were sequenced from the same species is a crucial analysis step. Many effective approaches to this task rely on sequenced genomes in public databases, but these genomes are a highly biased sample that is not necessarily representative of environments interesting to many metagenomics projects. We present SCIMM (Sequence Clustering with Interpolated Markov Models), an unsupervised sequence clustering method. SCIMM achieves greater clustering accuracy than previous unsupervised approaches. We examine the limitations of unsupervised learning on complex datasets, and suggest a hybrid of SCIMM and supervised learning method Phymm called PHYSCIMM that performs better when evolutionarily close training genomes are available. SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are highly accurate methods to cluster metagenomic sequences. SCIMM operates entirely unsupervised, making it ideal for environments containing mostly novel microbes. PHYSCIMM uses supervised learning to improve clustering in environments containing microbial strains from well-characterized genera. SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are available open source from http://www.cbcb.umd.edu/software/scimm.

  13. Clustering metagenomic sequences with interpolated Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley David R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of environmental DNA (often called metagenomics has shown tremendous potential to uncover the vast number of unknown microbes that cannot be cultured and sequenced by traditional methods. Because the output from metagenomic sequencing is a large set of reads of unknown origin, clustering reads together that were sequenced from the same species is a crucial analysis step. Many effective approaches to this task rely on sequenced genomes in public databases, but these genomes are a highly biased sample that is not necessarily representative of environments interesting to many metagenomics projects. Results We present SCIMM (Sequence Clustering with Interpolated Markov Models, an unsupervised sequence clustering method. SCIMM achieves greater clustering accuracy than previous unsupervised approaches. We examine the limitations of unsupervised learning on complex datasets, and suggest a hybrid of SCIMM and supervised learning method Phymm called PHYSCIMM that performs better when evolutionarily close training genomes are available. Conclusions SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are highly accurate methods to cluster metagenomic sequences. SCIMM operates entirely unsupervised, making it ideal for environments containing mostly novel microbes. PHYSCIMM uses supervised learning to improve clustering in environments containing microbial strains from well-characterized genera. SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are available open source from http://www.cbcb.umd.edu/software/scimm.

  14. Quality control of microbiota metagenomics by k-mer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza Onate, Florian; Batto, Jean-Michel; Juste, Catherine; Fadlallah, Jehane; Fougeroux, Cyrielle; Gouas, Doriane; Pons, Nicolas; Kennedy, Sean; Levenez, Florence; Dore, Joel; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gorochov, Guy; Larsen, Martin

    2015-03-14

    The biological and clinical consequences of the tight interactions between host and microbiota are rapidly being unraveled by next generation sequencing technologies and sophisticated bioinformatics, also referred to as microbiota metagenomics. The recent success of metagenomics has created a demand to rapidly apply the technology to large case-control cohort studies and to studies of microbiota from various habitats, including habitats relatively poor in microbes. It is therefore of foremost importance to enable a robust and rapid quality assessment of metagenomic data from samples that challenge present technological limits (sample numbers and size). Here we demonstrate that the distribution of overlapping k-mers of metagenome sequence data predicts sequence quality as defined by gene distribution and efficiency of sequence mapping to a reference gene catalogue. We used serial dilutions of gut microbiota metagenomic datasets to generate well-defined high to low quality metagenomes. We also analyzed a collection of 52 microbiota-derived metagenomes. We demonstrate that k-mer distributions of metagenomic sequence data identify sequence contaminations, such as sequences derived from "empty" ligation products. Of note, k-mer distributions were also able to predict the frequency of sequences mapping to a reference gene catalogue not only for the well-defined serial dilution datasets, but also for 52 human gut microbiota derived metagenomic datasets. We propose that k-mer analysis of raw metagenome sequence reads should be implemented as a first quality assessment prior to more extensive bioinformatics analysis, such as sequence filtering and gene mapping. With the rising demand for metagenomic analysis of microbiota it is crucial to provide tools for rapid and efficient decision making. This will eventually lead to a faster turn-around time, improved analytical quality including sample quality metrics and a significant cost reduction. Finally, improved quality

  15. An Experimental Metagenome Data Management and AnalysisSystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Korzeniewski, Frank; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-03-01

    The application of shotgun sequencing to environmental samples has revealed a new universe of microbial community genomes (metagenomes) involving previously uncultured organisms. Metagenome analysis, which is expected to provide a comprehensive picture of the gene functions and metabolic capacity of microbial community, needs to be conducted in the context of a comprehensive data management and analysis system. We present in this paper IMG/M, an experimental metagenome data management and analysis system that is based on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides tools and viewers for analyzing both metagenomes and isolate genomes individually or in a comparative context.

  16. Diagnostic metagenomics: potential applications to bacterial, viral and parasitic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallen, M J

    2014-12-01

    The term 'shotgun metagenomics' is applied to the direct sequencing of DNA extracted from a sample without culture or target-specific amplification or capture. In diagnostic metagenomics, this approach is applied to clinical samples in the hope of detecting and characterizing pathogens. Here, I provide a conceptual overview, before reviewing several recent promising proof-of-principle applications of metagenomics in virus discovery, analysis of outbreaks and detection of pathogens in contemporary and historical samples. I also evaluate future prospects for diagnostic metagenomics in the light of relentless improvements in sequencing technologies.

  17. SmashCommunity: A metagenomic annotation and analysis tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Harrington, Eoghan D; Foerstner, Konrad U

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate...... the quantitative phylogenetic and functional compositions of metagenomes, to compare compositions of multiple metagenomes and to produce intuitive visual representations of such analyses. AVAILABILITY: SmashCommunity is freely available at http://www.bork.embl.de/software/smash CONTACT: bork@embl.de....

  18. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    The human microbiome is an integrated part of the human body, outnumbering the human cells by approximately a factor 10. These microorganisms are very important for human health, hence knowledge about this, ”our other genome”, has been growing rapidly in recent years. This is manly due...... to the advances in next generation sequencing, which has allowed for large-scale metagenomics studies of different niches of the human microbiota. Especially the gut microbiota has been studied intensively. However, most studies have been purely descriptive, thus there is still a lot to learn regarding...... the interplay between species in the microbiota and also between the host and the inhabiting microorganisms. Additionally, the non-bacterial part of the microbiota, which includes bacteriophages, plasmids and micro-eukaryotes, is not very well described. In this thesis, metagenomics data from the human gut...

  19. Shotgun metagenomics, from sampling to analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quince, Christopher; Walker, Alan W; Simpson, Jared T; Loman, Nicholas J; Segata, Nicola

    2017-09-12

    Diverse microbial communities of bacteria, archaea, viruses and single-celled eukaryotes have crucial roles in the environment and in human health. However, microbes are frequently difficult to culture in the laboratory, which can confound cataloging of members and understanding of how communities function. High-throughput sequencing technologies and a suite of computational pipelines have been combined into shotgun metagenomics methods that have transformed microbiology. Still, computational approaches to overcome the challenges that affect both assembly-based and mapping-based metagenomic profiling, particularly of high-complexity samples or environments containing organisms with limited similarity to sequenced genomes, are needed. Understanding the functions and characterizing specific strains of these communities offers biotechnological promise in therapeutic discovery and innovative ways to synthesize products using microbial factories and can pinpoint the contributions of microorganisms to planetary, animal and human health.

  20. Genomics and metagenomics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Roshan; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades, sequencing tools have evolved from laborious time-consuming methodologies to real-time detection and deciphering of genomic DNA. Genome sequencing, especially using next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the landscape of microbiology and infectious disease. This deluge of sequencing data has not only enabled advances in fundamental biology but also helped improve diagnosis, typing of pathogen, virulence and antibiotic resistance detection, and development of new vaccines and culture media. In addition, NGS also enabled efficient analysis of complex human micro-floras, both commensal, and pathological, through metagenomic methods, thus helping the comprehension and management of human diseases such as obesity. This review summarizes technological advances in genomics and metagenomics relevant to the field of medical microbiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metagenomics: advances in ecology and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Helen L; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2005-06-15

    This review highlights the significant advances which have been made in prokaryotic ecology and biotechnology due to the application of metagenomic techniques. It is now possible to link processes to specific microorganisms in the environment, such as the detection of a new phototrophic process in marine bacteria, and to characterise the metabolic cooperation which takes place in mixed species biofilms. The range of prokaryote derived products available for biotechnology applications is increasing rapidly. The knowledge gained from analysis of biosynthetic pathways provides valuable information about enzymology and allows engineering of biocatalysts for specific processes. The expansion of metagenomic techniques to include alternative heterologous hosts for gene expression and the development of sophisticated assays which enable screening of thousands of clones offers the possibility to find out even more valuable information about the prokaryotic world.

  2. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  3. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  4. Metagenomics in methane seep detection and studies of the microbial methane sediment filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn Rike, Anne; Håvelsrud, Othilde Elise; Haverkamp, Thomas; Kristensen, Tom; Jakobsen, Kjetill

    2013-04-01

    Metanotrophic prokaryotes with their capacity to oxidize methane to biomass and CO2 contribute considerably in reduction of the global methane emission from oceans. Metagenomic studies of seabed sediments represent a new approach to detect marine methane seeps and to study whether the inhabiting microbial consortium represent a microbial methane filter. We have used next generation high throughput DNA sequencing technology to study microbial consortia and their potential metabolic processes in marine sediment samples from the Håkon Mosby mud volcano (HMMV) in the Barents Sea, the Tonya Seep in the Coal Oil Point area in California and from the pockmarked area at the Troll oil and gas field in the North Sea. Annotation of archaeal reads from the HMMV metagenome resulted in hits to all enzymes supposed to be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) carried out by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME). The presence of several ANME taxa at HMMV has previously been well described (1). The stratification analysis of the Tonya seep sediment showed that both aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs were present at both layers investigated, although total archaea, ANME-1, ANME-2 and ANME-3 were overabundant in the deepest layer. Several sulphate reducing taxa (possibly syntrophic ANME partners) were detected. The Tonya Seep sediment represent a robust methane filter where presently dominating methanotrophic taxa could be replaced by less abundant methanotrophs should the environmental conditions change (2). In the Troll pockmarked sediments several methanotrophic taxa including ANME-1, ANME-2 and candidate division NC10 were detected although there was an overabundance of autotrophic nitrifiers (e.g. Nitrosopumilis, Nitrococcus, Nitrospira) using CO2 as the carbon source. Methane migrating upwards through the sediments is probably oxidized to CO2 in AOM resulting in an upward CO2 flux. The CO2 entering the seafloor may contribute to maintain the pockmark structure

  5. Metagenomics of the Methane Ice Worm, Hesiocaeca methanicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, K. D.; Edsall, L.; Xin, W.; Head, S. R.; Gelbart, T.; Wood, A. M.; Gaasterland, T.

    2012-12-01

    The methane ice worm (Hesiocaeca methanicola) is a polychaete found on methane hydrate deposits for which there appears to be no publically available genomic or metagenomic data. Methane ice worms were collected in 2009 by the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible (543m depth; N 27:44.7526 W 91:13.3168). Next-generation sequencing (HiSeq2000) was applied to samples of tissue and gut contents. A subset of the assembled data (40M reads, randomly selected) was run through MG-RAST. Preliminary results for the gut content (1,269,153 sequences, average length 202 bp) indicated that 0.1% of the sequences contained ribosomal RNA genes with the majority (67%) classified as Bacteria, a relatively small per cent (1.4%) as Archae, and 31% as Eukaryota. Campylobacterales was the predominant order (14%), with unclassified (7.5%) and Desulfobacterales (4%) being the next dominant. Preliminary results for the worm tissue (2,716,461 sequences, average length 241 bp) indicated that the majority of sequences were Eukaryota (73%), with 256 sequences classified as phylum Annelida and 58% of those belonging to class Polychaeta. For the bacterial sequences obtained from the tissue samples, the predominant order was Actinomycetales (2.7%). For both the tissue and gut content samples, the majority of proteins were classified as clustering-based subsystems. This preliminary analysis will be compared to an assembly consisting of 40M of the highest quality reads.; methane ice worms on methane hydrate

  6. The microbiome of Brazilian mangrove sediments as revealed by metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Dini Andreote

    Full Text Available Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04 in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H(2S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments.

  7. A first insight into the occurrence and expression of functional amoA and accA genes of autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing bathypelagic Crenarchaeota of Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; Cono, Violetta La; Denaro, Renata

    2009-05-01

    The autotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeal assemblage at offshore site located in the deep Mediterranean (Tyrrhenian Sea, depth 3000 m) water was studied by PCR amplification of the key functional genes involved in energy (ammonia mono-oxygenase alpha subunit, amoA) and central metabolism (acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha subunit, accA). Using two recently annotated genomes of marine crenarchaeons, an initial set of primers targeting archaeal accA-like genes was designed. Approximately 300 clones were analyzed, of which 100% of amoA library and almost 70% of accA library were unambiguously related to the corresponding genes from marine Crenarchaeota. Even though the acetyl-CoA carboxylase is phylogenetically not well conserved and the remaining clones were affiliated to various bacterial acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes, the pool of archaeal sequences was applied for development of quantitative PCR analysis of accA-like distribution using TaqMan ® methodolgy. The archaeal accA gene fragments, together with alignable gene fragments from the Sargasso Sea and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (ALOHA Station) metagenome databases, were analyzed by multiple sequence alignment. Two accA-like sequences, found in ALOHA Station at the depth of 4000 m, formed a deeply branched clade with 64% of all archaeal Tyrrhenian clones. No close relatives for residual 36% of clones, except of those recovered from Eastern Mediterranean, was found, suggesting the existence of a specific lineage of the crenarchaeal accA genes in deep Mediterranean water. Alignment of Mediterranean amoA sequences defined four cosmopolitan phylotypes of Crenarchaeota putative ammonia mono-oxygenase subunit A gene occurring in the water sample from the 3000 m depth. Without exception all phylotypes fell into Deep Marine Group I cluster that contain the vast majority of known sequences recovered from global deep-sea environment. Remarkably, three phylotypes accounted for 91% of all Mediterranean

  8. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Physical partitioning techniques are routinely employed (during sample preparation stage) for segregating the prokaryotic and eukaryotic fractions of metagenomic samples. In spite of these efforts, several metagenomic studies focusing on bacterial and archaeal populations have reported the presence of contaminating ...

  9. Unlocking the potential of metagenomics through replicated experimental design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knight, R.; Jansson, J.; Field, D.; Fierer, N.; Desai, N.; Fuhrman, J.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; van der Lelie, D.; Meyer, F.; Stevens, R.; Bailey, M.J.; Gordon, J.I.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Gilbert, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics holds enormous promise for discovering novel enzymes and organisms that are biomarkers or drivers of processes relevant to disease, industry and the environment. In the past two years, we have seen a paradigm shift in metagenomics to the application of cross-sectional and longitudinal

  10. Unlocking the potential of metagenomics through replicated experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knight, R.; Jansson, J.; Field, D.; Fierer, N.; Desai, N.; Fuhrman, J.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Van der Lelie, D.; Meyer, F.; Stevens, R.; Bailey, M.J.; Gordon, J.I.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Gilbert, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics holds enormous promise for discovering novel enzymes and organisms that are biomarkers or drivers of processes relevant to disease, industry and the environment. In the past two years, we have seen a paradigm shift in metagenomics to the application of cross-sectional and longitudinal

  11. [A review on the bioinformatics pipelines for metagenomic research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dan-Dan; Fan, Meng-Meng; Guan, Qiong; Chen, Hong-Ju; Ma, Zhan-Shan

    2012-12-01

    Metagenome, a term first dubbed by Handelsman in 1998 as "the genomes of the total microbiota found in nature", refers to sequence data directly sampled from the environment (which may be any habitat in which microbes live, such as the guts of humans and animals, milk, soil, lakes, glaciers, and oceans). Metagenomic technologies originated from environmental microbiology studies and their wide application has been greatly facilitated by next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies. Like genomics studies, the bottle neck of metagenomic research is how to effectively and efficiently analyze the gigantic amount of metagenomic sequence data using the bioinformatics pipelines to obtain meaningful biological insights. In this article, we briefly review the state-of-the-art bioinformatics software tools in metagenomic research. Due to the differences between the metagenomic data obtained from whole genome sequencing (i.e., shotgun metagenomics) and amplicon sequencing (i.e., 16S-rRNA and gene-targeted metagenomics) methods, there are significant differences between the corresponding bioinformatics tools for these data; accordingly, we review the computational pipelines separately for these two types of data.

  12. Functional assignment of metagenomic data: challenges and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Tulika

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomic sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore earth’s limitless environments harboring scores of yet unknown and mostly unculturable microbes and other organisms. Functional analysis of the metagenomic data plays a central role in projects aiming to explore the most essential questions in microbiology, namely ‘In a given environment, among the microbes present, what are they doing, and how are they doing it?’ Toward this goal, several large-scale metagenomic projects have recently been conducted or are currently underway. Functional analysis of metagenomic data mainly suffers from the vast amount of data generated in these projects. The shear amount of data requires much computational time and storage space. These problems are compounded by other factors potentially affecting the functional analysis, including, sample preparation, sequencing method and average genome size of the metagenomic samples. In addition, the read-lengths generated during sequencing influence sequence assembly, gene prediction and subsequently the functional analysis. The level of confidence for functional predictions increases with increasing read-length. Usually, the most reliable functional annotations for metagenomic sequences are achieved using homology-based approaches against publicly available reference sequence databases. Here, we present an overview of the current state of functional analysis of metagenomic sequence data, bottlenecks frequently encountered and possible solutions in light of currently available resources and tools. Finally, we provide some examples of applications from recent metagenomic studies which have been successfully conducted in spite of the known difficulties. PMID:22772835

  13. Cross-cutting activities: Soil quality and soil metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Motavalli, Peter P.; Garrett, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reports on the work of the SANREM CRSP cross-cutting activities "Assessing and Managing Soil Quality for Sustainable Agricultural Systems" and "Soil Metagenomics to Construct Indicators of Soil Degradation." The introduction gives an overview of the extensiveness of soil degradation globally and defines soil quality. The objectives of the soil quality cross cutting activity are: CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  14. Online Semi-Supervised Learning: Algorithm and Application in Metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Tsivtsivadze, E.

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key rolein metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm and

  15. Online semi-supervised learning: algorithm and application in metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; Keijser, B.J.; Crielaard, W.; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Li, G.Z.; Kim, S.; Hughes, M.; McLachlan, G.; Sun, H.; Hu, X.; Ressom, H.; Liu, B.; Liebman, M.

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key role in metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm

  16. Metagenomics as a preliminary screen for antimicrobial bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoudi, Soha; Razali, Rozaimi; Essack, Magbubah; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Bougouffa, Salim; Archer, John A C; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2016-12-15

    Since the composition of soil directs the diversity of the contained microbiome and its potential to produce bioactive compounds, many studies has been focused on sediment types with unique features characteristic of extreme environments. However, not much is known about the potential of microbiomes that inhabit the highly saline and hot Red Sea lagoons. This case study explores mangrove mud and the microbial mat of sediments collected from the Rabigh harbor lagoon and Al Kharrar lagoon for antimicrobial bioprospecting. Rabigh harbor lagoon appears the better location, and the best sediment type for this purpose is mangrove mud. On the other hand, Al Kharrar lagoon displayed increased anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation and an abundance of bacterial DNA associated with antibiotic resistance. Moreover, our findings show an identical shift in phyla associated with historic hydrocarbon contamination exposure reported in previous studies (that is, enrichment of Gamma- and Delta-proteobacteria), but we also report that bacterial DNA sequences associated with antibiotic synthesis enzymes are derived from Gamma-, Delta- and Alpha-proteobacteria. This suggests that selection pressure associated with hydrocarbon contamination tend to enrich the bacterial classes DNA associated with antibiotic synthesis enzymes. Although Actinobacteria tends to be the common target for research when it comes to antimicrobial bioprospecting, our study suggests that Firmicutes (Bacilli and Clostridia), Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria should be antimicrobial bioprospecting targets as well. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study that analyzed the microbiomes in Red Sea lagoons for antimicrobial bioprospecting. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metagenomics as a preliminary screen for antimicrobial bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Al Amoudi, Soha

    2016-09-16

    Since the composition of soil directs the diversity of the contained microbiome and its potential to produce bioactive compounds, many studies has been focused on sediment types with unique features characteristic of extreme environments. However, not much is known about the potential of microbiomes that inhabit the highly saline and hot Red Sea lagoons. This case study explores mangrove mud and the microbial mat of sediments collected from the Rabigh harbor lagoon and Al Kharrar lagoon for antimicrobial bioprospecting. Rabigh harbor lagoon appears the better location, and the best sediment type for this purpose is mangrove mud. On the other hand, Al Kharrar lagoon displayed increased anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation and an abundance of bacterial DNA associated with antibiotic resistance. Moreover, our findings show an identical shift in phyla associated with historic hydrocarbon contamination exposure reported in previous studies (that is, enrichment of Gamma-and Delta-proteobacteria), but we also report that bacterial DNA sequences associated with antibiotic synthesis enzymes are derived from Gamma-, Delta-and Alpha-proteobacteria. This suggests that selection pressure associated with hydrocarbon contamination tend to enrich the bacterial classes DNA associated with antibiotic synthesis enzymes. Although Actinobacteria tends to be the common target for research when it comes to antimicrobial bioprospecting, our study suggests that Firmicutes (Bacilli and Clostridia), Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria should be antimicrobial bioprospecting targets as well. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study that analyzed the microbiomes in Red Sea lagoons for antimicrobial bioprospecting. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Metagenomics: Retrospect and Prospects in High Throughput Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, metagenomics has emerged as a powerful tool for mining of hidden microbial treasure in a culture independent manner. In the last two decades, metagenomics has been applied extensively to exploit concealed potential of microbial communities from almost all sorts of habitats. A brief historic progress made over the period is discussed in terms of origin of metagenomics to its current state and also the discovery of novel biological functions of commercial importance from metagenomes of diverse habitats. The present review also highlights the paradigm shift of metagenomics from basic study of community composition to insight into the microbial community dynamics for harnessing the full potential of uncultured microbes with more emphasis on the implication of breakthrough developments, namely, Next Generation Sequencing, advanced bioinformatics tools, and systems biology.

  19. Assessment of metagenomic assembly using simulated next generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mende, Daniel R; Waller, Alison S; Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the protocols and a limited knowledge of the nature of microbial communities, simulating metagenomic sequences plays an important role in testing the performance of existing tools and data analysis methods with metagenomic data. We developed metagenomic read simulators...... with platform-specific (Sanger, pyrosequencing, Illumina) base-error models, and simulated metagenomes of differing community complexities. We first evaluated the effect of rigorous quality control on Illumina data. Although quality filtering removed a large proportion of the data, it greatly improved....... Although the increase in contig length was accompanied by increased chimericity, it resulted in more complete genes and a better characterization of the functional repertoire. The metagenomic simulators developed for this research are freely available....

  20. Analysis of composition-based metagenomic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Susan; Barreto, André da Motta Salles; Cantão, Maurício Egidio; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    An essential step of a metagenomic study is the taxonomic classification, that is, the identification of the taxonomic lineage of the organisms in a given sample. The taxonomic classification process involves a series of decisions. Currently, in the context of metagenomics, such decisions are usually based on empirical studies that consider one specific type of classifier. In this study we propose a general framework for analyzing the impact that several decisions can have on the classification problem. Instead of focusing on any specific classifier, we define a generic score function that provides a measure of the difficulty of the classification task. Using this framework, we analyze the impact of the following parameters on the taxonomic classification problem: (i) the length of n-mers used to encode the metagenomic sequences, (ii) the similarity measure used to compare sequences, and (iii) the type of taxonomic classification, which can be conventional or hierarchical, depending on whether the classification process occurs in a single shot or in several steps according to the taxonomic tree. We defined a score function that measures the degree of separability of the taxonomic classes under a given configuration induced by the parameters above. We conducted an extensive computational experiment and found out that reasonable values for the parameters of interest could be (i) intermediate values of n, the length of the n-mers; (ii) any similarity measure, because all of them resulted in similar scores; and (iii) the hierarchical strategy, which performed better in all of the cases. As expected, short n-mers generate lower configuration scores because they give rise to frequency vectors that represent distinct sequences in a similar way. On the other hand, large values for n result in sparse frequency vectors that represent differently metagenomic fragments that are in fact similar, also leading to low configuration scores. Regarding the similarity measure, in

  1. Exploiting topic modeling to boost metagenomic reads binning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruichang; Cheng, Zhanzhan; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of high-throughput technologies, researchers can sequence the whole metagenome of a microbial community sampled directly from the environment. The assignment of these metagenomic reads into different species or taxonomical classes is a vital step for metagenomic analysis, which is referred to as binning of metagenomic data. In this paper, we propose a new method TM-MCluster for binning metagenomic reads. First, we represent each metagenomic read as a set of "k-mers" with their frequencies occurring in the read. Then, we employ a probabilistic topic model -- the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model to the reads, which generates a number of hidden "topics" such that each read can be represented by a distribution vector of the generated topics. Finally, as in the MCluster method, we apply SKWIC -- a variant of the classical K-means algorithm with automatic feature weighting mechanism to cluster these reads represented by topic distributions. Experiments show that the new method TM-MCluster outperforms major existing methods, including AbundanceBin, MetaCluster 3.0/5.0 and MCluster. This result indicates that the exploitation of topic modeling can effectively improve the binning performance of metagenomic reads.

  2. [Research in metagenomics and its applications in translational medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-huan; Sun, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-jun; Su, Xiao-quan; Ning, Kang

    2015-07-01

    Humans are born with microbiota, which have accompanied us through our life-span. There is an important symbiotic relationship between us and the microbial communities, thus microbial communities are of great importance to our health. All genomic information within this microbiota is referered to as "metagenomics" (also referred to as "human's second genome"). The analysis of high throughput metagenomic data generated from biomedical experiments would provide new approaches for translational research, and it have several applications in clinics. With the help of next generation sequencing technology and the emerging metagenomic approach (analysis of all genomic information in microbiota as a whole), we can overcome the pitfalls of tedious traditional method of isolation and cultivation of single microbial species. The metagenomic approach can also help us to analyze the whole microbial community efficiently and offer deep insights in human-microbe relationships as well as new ideas on many biomedical problems. In this review, we summarize frontiers in metagenomic research, including new concepts and methods. Then, we focus on the applications of metagenomic research in medical researches and clinical applications in recent years, which would clearly show the importance of metagenomic research in the field of translational medicine.

  3. Metagenomic characterization of ambulances across the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Niamh B; Reed, Harry J; Afshinnekoo, Ebrahim; Harvin, Donell; Caplan, Nora; Rosen, Gail; Frye, Brook; Woloszynek, Stephen; Ounit, Rachid; Levy, Shawn; Butler, Erin; Mason, Christopher E

    2017-09-22

    Microbial communities in our built environments have great influence on human health and disease. A variety of built environments have been characterized using a metagenomics-based approach, including some healthcare settings. However, there has been no study to date that has used this approach in pre-hospital settings, such as ambulances, an important first point-of-contact between patients and hospitals. We sequenced 398 samples from 137 ambulances across the USA using shotgun sequencing. We analyzed these data to explore the microbial ecology of ambulances including characterizing microbial community composition, nosocomial pathogens, patterns of diversity, presence of functional pathways and antimicrobial resistance, and potential spatial and environmental factors that may contribute to community composition. We found that the top 10 most abundant species are either common built environment microbes, microbes associated with the human microbiome (e.g., skin), or are species associated with nosocomial infections. We also found widespread evidence of antimicrobial resistance markers (hits ~ 90% samples). We identified six factors that may influence the microbial ecology of ambulances including ambulance surfaces, geographical-related factors (including region, longitude, and latitude), and weather-related factors (including temperature and precipitation). While the vast majority of microbial species classified were beneficial, we also found widespread evidence of species associated with nosocomial infections and antimicrobial resistance markers. This study indicates that metagenomics may be useful to characterize the microbial ecology of pre-hospital ambulance settings and that more rigorous testing and cleaning of ambulances may be warranted.

  4. Identifying personal microbiomes using metagenomic codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzosa, Eric A; Huang, Katherine; Meadow, James F; Gevers, Dirk; Lemon, Katherine P; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2015-06-02

    Community composition within the human microbiome varies across individuals, but it remains unknown if this variation is sufficient to uniquely identify individuals within large populations or stable enough to identify them over time. We investigated this by developing a hitting set-based coding algorithm and applying it to the Human Microbiome Project population. Our approach defined body site-specific metagenomic codes: sets of microbial taxa or genes prioritized to uniquely and stably identify individuals. Codes capturing strain variation in clade-specific marker genes were able to distinguish among 100s of individuals at an initial sampling time point. In comparisons with follow-up samples collected 30-300 d later, ∼30% of individuals could still be uniquely pinpointed using metagenomic codes from a typical body site; coincidental (false positive) matches were rare. Codes based on the gut microbiome were exceptionally stable and pinpointed >80% of individuals. The failure of a code to match its owner at a later time point was largely explained by the loss of specific microbial strains (at current limits of detection) and was only weakly associated with the length of the sampling interval. In addition to highlighting patterns of temporal variation in the ecology of the human microbiome, this work demonstrates the feasibility of microbiome-based identifiability-a result with important ethical implications for microbiome study design. The datasets and code used in this work are available for download from huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/idability.

  5. New Bacterial Phytase through Metagenomic Prospection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathálya Farias

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline phytases from uncultured microorganisms, which hydrolyze phytate to less phosphorylated myo-inositols and inorganic phosphate, have great potential as additives in agricultural industry. The development of metagenomics has stemmed from the ineluctable evidence that as-yet-uncultured microorganisms represent the vast majority of organisms in most environments on earth. In this study, a gene encoding a phytase was cloned from red rice crop residues and castor bean cake using a metagenomics strategy. The amino acid identity between this gene and its closest published counterparts is lower than 60%. The phytase was named PhyRC001 and was biochemically characterized. This recombinant protein showed activity on sodium phytate, indicating that PhyRC001 is a hydrolase enzyme. The enzymatic activity was optimal at a pH of 7.0 and at a temperature of 35 °C. β-propeller phytases possess great potential as feed additives because they are the only type of phytase with high activity at neutral pH. Therefore, to explore and exploit the underlying mechanism for β-propeller phytase functions could be of great benefit to biotechnology.

  6. Activity-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries for Hydrogenase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nicole; Perner, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Here we outline how to identify hydrogenase enzymes from metagenomic libraries through an activity-based screening approach. A metagenomic fosmid library is constructed in E. coli and the fosmids are transferred into a hydrogenase deletion mutant of Shewanella oneidensis (ΔhyaB) via triparental mating. If a fosmid exhibits hydrogen uptake activity, S. oneidensis' phenotype is restored and hydrogenase activity is indicated by a color change of the medium from yellow to colorless. This new method enables screening of 48 metagenomic fosmid clones in parallel.

  7. Bioprospecting potential of the soil metagenome: novel enzymes and bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Hwan; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2013-09-01

    The microbial diversity in soil ecosystems is higher than in any other microbial ecosystem. The majority of soil microorganisms has not been characterized, because the dominant members have not been readily culturable on standard cultivation media; therefore, the soil ecosystem is a great reservoir for the discovery of novel microbial enzymes and bioactivities. The soil metagenome, the collective microbial genome, could be cloned and sequenced directly from soils to search for novel microbial resources. This review summarizes the microbial diversity in soils and the efforts to search for microbial resources from the soil metagenome, with more emphasis on the potential of bioprospecting metagenomics and recent discoveries.

  8. Bioprospecting Potential of the Soil Metagenome: Novel Enzymes and Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung Hwan Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The microbial diversity in soil ecosystems is higher than in any other microbial ecosystem. The majority of soil microorganisms has not been characterized, because the dominant members have not been readily culturable on standard cultivation media; therefore, the soil ecosystem is a great reservoir for the discovery of novel microbial enzymes and bioactivities. The soil metagenome, the collective microbial genome, could be cloned and sequenced directly from soils to search for novel microbial resources. This review summarizes the microbial diversity in soils and the efforts to search for microbial resources from the soil metagenome, with more emphasis on the potential of bioprospecting metagenomics and recent discoveries.

  9. Metagenomic search strategies for interactions among plants and multiple microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Karl Melcher

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants harbor multiple microbes. Metagenomics can facilitate understanding of the significance, for the plant, of the microbes and of the interactions among them. However, current approaches to metagenomic analysis of plants are computationally time-consuming. Efforts to speed the discovery process include improvement of computational speed, condensing the sequencing reads into smaller datasets before BLAST searches, simplifying the target database of BLAST searches, and flipping the roles of metagenomic and reference datasets. The latter is exemplified by the E-probe diagnostic nucleic acid analysis (EDNA approach originally devised for improving analysis during plant quarantine.

  10. A viral metagenomic approach on a nonmetagenomic experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovo, Samuele; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Ribani, Anisa

    2017-01-01

    unmapped reads on the reference pig genome that were obtained from the two NGS datasets. In silico analyses included read mapping and sequence assembly approaches for a viral metagenomic analysis using the NCBI Viral Genome Resource. Our approach identified sequences matching several viruses...... a retrospective evaluation of apparently asymptomatic parvovirus infected pigs providing information that could be important to define occurrence and prevalence of different parvoviruses in South Europe. This study demonstrated the potential of mining NGS datasets non-originally derived by metagenomics...... experiments for viral metagenomics analyses in a livestock species....

  11. Metagenomics reveals sediment microbial community response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Scott, Nicole M.; Gonzalez, Antonio; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Bælum, Jacob; Kimbrel, Jeffrey; Bouskill, Nicholas J.; Prestat, Emmanuel; Borglin, Sharon; Joyner, Dominique C.; Fortney, Julian L.; Jurelevicius, Diogo; Stringfellow, William T.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Hazen, Terry C.; Knight, Rob; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2014-01-23

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the spring of 2010 resulted in an input of ~4.1 million barrels of oil to the Gulf of Mexico; >22% of this oil is unaccounted for, with unknown environmental consequences. Here we investigated the impact of oil deposition on microbial communities in surface sediments collected at 64 sites by targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, shotgun metagenomic sequencing of 14 of these samples and mineralization experiments using 14C-labeled model substrates. The 16S rRNA gene data indicated that the most heavily oil-impacted sediments were enriched in an uncultured Gammaproteobacterium and a Colwellia species, both of which were highly similar to sequences in the DWH deep-sea hydrocarbon plume. The primary drivers in structuring the microbial community were nitrogen and hydrocarbons. Annotation of unassembled metagenomic data revealed the most abundant hydrocarbon degradation pathway encoded genes involved in degrading aliphatic and simple aromatics via butane monooxygenase. The activity of key hydrocarbon degradation pathways by sediment microbes was confirmed by determining the mineralization of 14C-labeled model substrates in the following order: propylene glycol, dodecane, toluene and phenanthrene. Further, analysis of metagenomic sequence data revealed an increase in abundance of genes involved in denitrification pathways in samples that exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s benchmarks for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with those that did not. Importantly, these data demonstrate that the indigenous sediment microbiota contributed an important ecosystem service for remediation of oil in the Gulf. However, PAHs were more recalcitrant to degradation, and their persistence could have deleterious impacts on the sediment ecosystem.

  12. Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation-a benchmark of metagenomics software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sczyrba, Alexander; Hofmann, Peter; Belmann, Peter; Koslicki, David; Janssen, Stefan; Dröge, Johannes; Gregor, Ivan; Majda, Stephan; Fiedler, Jessika; Dahms, Eik; Bremges, Andreas; Fritz, Adrian; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jørgensen, Tue Sparholt; Shapiro, Nicole; Blood, Philip D; Gurevich, Alexey; Bai, Yang; Turaev, Dmitrij; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Chikhi, Rayan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Quince, Christopher; Meyer, Fernando; Balvočiūtė, Monika; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren J; Chia, Burton K H; Denis, Bertrand; Froula, Jeff L; Wang, Zhong; Egan, Robert; Don Kang, Dongwan; Cook, Jeffrey J; Deltel, Charles; Beckstette, Michael; Lemaitre, Claire; Peterlongo, Pierre; Rizk, Guillaume; Lavenier, Dominique; Wu, Yu-Wei; Singer, Steven W; Jain, Chirag; Strous, Marc; Klingenberg, Heiner; Meinicke, Peter; Barton, Michael D; Lingner, Thomas; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z; Cuevas, Daniel A; Edwards, Robert A; Saha, Surya; Piro, Vitor C; Renard, Bernhard Y; Pop, Mihai; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Rubin, Edward M; Darling, Aaron E; Rattei, Thomas; McHardy, Alice C

    2017-11-01

    Methods for assembly, taxonomic profiling and binning are key to interpreting metagenome data, but a lack of consensus about benchmarking complicates performance assessment. The Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) challenge has engaged the global developer community to benchmark their programs on highly complex and realistic data sets, generated from ∼700 newly sequenced microorganisms and ∼600 novel viruses and plasmids and representing common experimental setups. Assembly and genome binning programs performed well for species represented by individual genomes but were substantially affected by the presence of related strains. Taxonomic profiling and binning programs were proficient at high taxonomic ranks, with a notable performance decrease below family level. Parameter settings markedly affected performance, underscoring their importance for program reproducibility. The CAMI results highlight current challenges but also provide a roadmap for software selection to answer specific research questions.

  13. METAREP: JCVI metagenomics reports--an open source tool for high-performance comparative metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, Johannes; Rusch, Douglas B; Tanenbaum, David M; Thiagarajan, Mathangi; Li, Kelvin; Methé, Barbara A; Yooseph, Shibu

    2010-10-15

    JCVI Metagenomics Reports (METAREP) is a Web 2.0 application designed to help scientists analyze and compare annotated metagenomics datasets. It utilizes Solr/Lucene, a high-performance scalable search engine, to quickly query large data collections. Furthermore, users can use its SQL-like query syntax to filter and refine datasets. METAREP provides graphical summaries for top taxonomic and functional classifications as well as a GO, NCBI Taxonomy and KEGG Pathway Browser. Users can compare absolute and relative counts of multiple datasets at various functional and taxonomic levels. Advanced comparative features comprise statistical tests as well as multidimensional scaling, heatmap and hierarchical clustering plots. Summaries can be exported as tab-delimited files, publication quality plots in PDF format. A data management layer allows collaborative data analysis and result sharing. Web site http://www.jcvi.org/metarep; source code http://github.com/jcvi/METAREP CONTACT: syooseph@jcvi.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Precision Metagenomics: Rapid Metagenomic Analyses for Infectious Disease Diagnostics and Public Health Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshinnekoo, Ebrahim; Chou, Chou; Alexander, Noah; Ahsanuddin, Sofia; Schuetz, Audrey N; Mason, Christopher E

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have ushered in the era of precision medicine, transforming the way we treat cancer patients and diagnose disease. Concomitantly, the advent of these technologies has created a surge of microbiome and metagenomic studies over the last decade, many of which are focused on investigating the host-gene-microbial interactions responsible for the development and spread of infectious diseases, as well as delineating their key role in maintaining health. As we continue to discover more information about the etiology of infectious diseases, the translational potential of metagenomic NGS methods for treatment and rapid diagnosis is becoming abundantly clear. Here, we present a robust protocol for the implementation and application of "precision metagenomics" across various sequencing platforms for clinical samples. Such a pipeline integrates DNA/RNA extraction, library preparation, sequencing, and bioinformatics analyses for taxonomic classification, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) marker screening, and functional analysis (biochemical and metabolic pathway abundance). Moreover, the pipeline has 3 tracks: STAT for results within 24 h; Comprehensive that affords a more in-depth analysis and takes between 5 and 7 d, but offers antimicrobial resistance information; and Targeted, which also requires 5-7 d, but with more sensitive analysis for specific pathogens. Finally, we discuss the challenges that need to be addressed before full integration in the clinical setting.

  15. Comparative Metagenomics of Freshwater Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemme, Chris; Deng, Ye; Tu, Qichao; Fields, Matthew; Gentry, Terry; Wu, Liyou; Tringe, Susannah; Watson, David; He, Zhili; Hazen, Terry; Tiedje, James; Rubin, Eddy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Previous analyses of a microbial metagenome from uranium and nitric-acid contaminated groundwater (FW106) showed significant environmental effects resulting from the rapid introduction of multiple contaminants. Effects include a massive loss of species and strain biodiversity, accumulation of toxin resistant genes in the metagenome and lateral transfer of toxin resistance genes between community members. To better understand these results in an ecological context, a second metagenome from a pristine groundwater system located along the same geological strike was sequenced and analyzed (FW301). It is hypothesized that FW301 approximates the ancestral FW106 community based on phylogenetic profiles and common geological parameters; however, even if is not the case, the datasets still permit comparisons between healthy and stressed groundwater ecosystems. Complex carbohydrate metabolism has been almost entirely lost in the stressed ecosystem. In contrast, the pristine system encodes a wide diversity of complex carbohydrate metabolism systems, suggesting that carbon turnover is very rapid and less leaky in the healthy groundwater system. FW301 encodes many (~;;160+) carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes while FW106 encodes none. This result suggests that the community is frequently exposed to oxygen from aerated rainwater percolating into the subsurface, with a resulting high rate of carbon metabolism and CO production. When oxygen levels fall, the CO then serves as a major carbon source for the community. FW301 appears to be capable of CO2 fixation via the reductive carboxylase (reverse TCA) cycle and possibly acetogenesis, activities; these activities are lacking in the heterotrophic FW106 system which relies exclusively on respiration of nitrate and/or oxygen for energy production. FW301 encodes a complete set of B12 biosynthesis pathway at high abundance suggesting the use of sodium gradients for energy production in the healthy groundwater community. Overall

  16. Consistent metagenomic biomarker detection via robust PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawaqfeh, Mustafa; Bashaireh, Ahmad; Serpedin, Erchin; Suchodolski, Jan

    2017-01-31

    Recent developments of high throughput sequencing technologies allow the characterization of the microbial communities inhabiting our world. Various metagenomic studies have suggested using microbial taxa as potential biomarkers for certain diseases. In practice, the number of available samples varies from experiment to experiment. Therefore, a robust biomarker detection algorithm is needed to provide a set of potential markers irrespective of the number of available samples. Consistent performance is essential to derive solid biological conclusions and to transfer these findings into clinical applications. Surprisingly, the consistency of a metagenomic biomarker detection algorithm with respect to the variation in the experiment size has not been addressed by the current state-of-art algorithms. We propose a consistency-classification framework that enables the assessment of consistency and classification performance of a biomarker discovery algorithm. This evaluation protocol is based on random resampling to mimic the variation in the experiment size. Moreover, we model the metagenomic data matrix as a superposition of two matrices. The first matrix is a low-rank matrix that models the abundance levels of the irrelevant bacteria. The second matrix is a sparse matrix that captures the abundance levels of the bacteria that are differentially abundant between different phenotypes. Then, we propose a novel Robust Principal Component Analysis (RPCA) based biomarker discovery algorithm to recover the sparse matrix. RPCA belongs to the class of multivariate feature selection methods which treat the features collectively rather than individually. This provides the proposed algorithm with an inherent ability to handle the complex microbial interactions. Comprehensive comparisons of RPCA with the state-of-the-art algorithms on two realistic datasets are conducted. Results show that RPCA consistently outperforms the other algorithms in terms of classification accuracy and

  17. Structural and functional insights from the metagenome of an acidic hot spring microbial planktonic community in the Colombian Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Javier Jiménez

    Full Text Available A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC. A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads using different databases showed a high proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (in total read affiliation, and through taxonomic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene fragments we observed the presence of Proteobacteria, micro-algae chloroplast and Firmicutes. Reads mapped against the genomes Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, Legionella pneumophila str. Corby and Acidithiobacillus caldus revealed the presence of transposase-like sequences, potentially involved in horizontal gene transfer. Functional annotation and hierarchical comparison with different datasets obtained by pyrosequencing in different ecosystems showed that the microbial community also contained extensive DNA repair systems, possibly to cope with ultraviolet radiation at such high altitudes. Analysis of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle indicated the presence of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to N2 (narGHI, nirS, norBCDQ and nosZ, associated with Proteobacteria-like sequences. Genes involved in the sulfur cycle (cysDN, cysNC and aprA indicated adenylsulfate and sulfite production that were affiliated to several bacterial species. In summary, metagenomic sequence data provided insight regarding the structure and possible functions of this hot spring microbial community, describing some groups potentially involved in the nitrogen and sulfur cycling in this environment.

  18. Scalable metagenomic taxonomy classification using a reference genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Sasha K; Hysom, David A; Gardner, Shea N; Lloyd, G Scott; Gokhale, Maya B; Allen, Jonathan E

    2013-09-15

    Deep metagenomic sequencing of biological samples has the potential to recover otherwise difficult-to-detect microorganisms and accurately characterize biological samples with limited prior knowledge of sample contents. Existing metagenomic taxonomic classification algorithms, however, do not scale well to analyze large metagenomic datasets, and balancing classification accuracy with computational efficiency presents a fundamental challenge. A method is presented to shift computational costs to an off-line computation by creating a taxonomy/genome index that supports scalable metagenomic classification. Scalable performance is demonstrated on real and simulated data to show accurate classification in the presence of novel organisms on samples that include viruses, prokaryotes, fungi and protists. Taxonomic classification of the previously published 150 giga-base Tyrolean Iceman dataset was found to take contents of the sample. Software was implemented in C++ and is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/lmat allen99@llnl.gov Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Functional metagenomics for the investigation of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human health and well-being. To effectively combat this problem we need to understand the range of different resistance genes that allow bacteria to resist antibiotics. To do this the whole microbiota needs to be investigated. As most bacteria cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes in the non-cultivatable majority remains relatively unexplored. Currently the only way to study antibiotic resistance in these organisms is to use metagenomic approaches. Furthermore, the only method that does not require any prior knowledge about the resistance genes is functional metagenomics, which involves expressing genes from metagenomic clones in surrogate hosts. In this review the methods and limitations of functional metagenomics to isolate new antibiotic resistance genes and the mobile genetic elements that mediate their spread are explored.

  20. Consensus statement: Virus taxonomy in the age of metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Mike J; Benkő, Mária; Breitbart, Mya; Brister, J Rodney; Carstens, Eric B; Davison, Andrew J; Delwart, Eric; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Harrach, Balázs; Hull, Roger; King, Andrew M Q; Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart; Kuhn, Jens H; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Nibert, Max L; Orton, Richard; Roossinck, Marilyn J; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Sullivan, Matthew B; Suttle, Curtis A; Tesh, Robert B; van der Vlugt, René A; Varsani, Arvind; Zerbini, F Murilo

    2017-03-01

    The number and diversity of viral sequences that are identified in metagenomic data far exceeds that of experimentally characterized virus isolates. In a recent workshop, a panel of experts discussed the proposal that, with appropriate quality control, viruses that are known only from metagenomic data can, and should be, incorporated into the official classification scheme of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Although a taxonomy that is based on metagenomic sequence data alone represents a substantial departure from the traditional reliance on phenotypic properties, the development of a robust framework for sequence-based virus taxonomy is indispensable for the comprehensive characterization of the global virome. In this Consensus Statement article, we consider the rationale for why metagenomic sequence data should, and how it can, be incorporated into the ICTV taxonomy, and present proposals that have been endorsed by the Executive Committee of the ICTV.

  1. Functional metagenomics for the investigation of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human health and well-being. To effectively combat this problem we need to understand the range of different resistance genes that allow bacteria to resist antibiotics. To do this the whole microbiota needs to be investigated. As most bacteria cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes in the non-cultivatable majority remains relatively unexplored. Currently the only way to study antibiotic resistance in these organisms is to use metagenomic approaches. Furthermore, the only method that does not require any prior knowledge about the resistance genes is functional metagenomics, which involves expressing genes from metagenomic clones in surrogate hosts. In this review the methods and limitations of functional metagenomics to isolate new antibiotic resistance genes and the mobile genetic elements that mediate their spread are explored. PMID:24556726

  2. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  3. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation, and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique, used for decades to study environmental...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  4. Surveillance of Foodborne Pathogens: Towards Diagnostic Metagenomics of Fecal Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Christine; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Diagnostic metagenomics is a rapidly evolving laboratory tool for culture-independent tracing of foodborne pathogens. The method has the potential to become a generic platform for detection of most pathogens and many sample types. Today, however, it is still at an early and experimental stage....... Studies show that metagenomic methods, from sample storage and DNA extraction to library preparation and shotgun sequencing, have a great influence on data output. To construct protocols that extract the complete metagenome but with minimal bias is an ongoing challenge. Many different software strategies...... for data analysis are being developed, and several studies applying diagnostic metagenomics to human clinical samples have been published, detecting, and sometimes, typing bacterial infections. It is possible to obtain a draft genome of the pathogen and to develop methods that can theoretically be applied...

  5. Quantitative metagenomic analyses based on average genome size normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Jeremy Alexander; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Over the past quarter-century, microbiologists have used DNA sequence information to aid in the characterization of microbial communities. During the last decade, this has expanded from single genes to microbial community genomics, or metagenomics, in which the gene content of an environment can...... provide not just a census of the community members but direct information on metabolic capabilities and potential interactions among community members. Here we introduce a method for the quantitative characterization and comparison of microbial communities based on the normalization of metagenomic data...... by estimating average genome sizes. This normalization can relieve comparative biases introduced by differences in community structure, number of sequencing reads, and sequencing read lengths between different metagenomes. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by comparing metagenomes from two different...

  6. FY11 Report on Metagenome Analysis using Pathogen Marker Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Shea N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Allen, Jonathan E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McLoughlin, Kevin S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Slezak, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-02

    A method, sequence library, and software suite was invented to rapidly assess whether any member of a pre-specified list of threat organisms or their near neighbors is present in a metagenome. The system was designed to handle mega- to giga-bases of FASTA-formatted raw sequence reads from short or long read next generation sequencing platforms. The approach is to pre-calculate a viral and a bacterial "Pathogen Marker Library" (PML) containing sub-sequences specific to pathogens or their near neighbors. A list of expected matches comparing every bacterial or viral genome against the PML sequences is also pre-calculated. To analyze a metagenome, reads are compared to the PML, and observed PML-metagenome matches are compared to the expected PML-genome matches, and the ratio of observed relative to expected matches is reported. In other words, a 3-way comparison among the PML, metagenome, and existing genome sequences is used to quickly assess which (if any) species included in the PML is likely to be present in the metagenome, based on available sequence data. Our tests showed that the species with the most PML matches correctly indicated the organism sequenced for empirical metagenomes consisting of a cultured, relatively pure isolate. These runs completed in 1 minute to 3 hours on 12 CPU (1 thread/CPU), depending on the metagenome and PML. Using more threads on the same number of CPU resulted in speed improvements roughly proportional to the number of threads. Simulations indicated that detection sensitivity depends on both sequencing coverage levels for a species and the size of the PML: species were correctly detected even at ~0.003x coverage by the large PMLs, and at ~0.03x coverage by the smaller PMLs. Matches to true positive species were 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than to false positives. Simulations with short reads (36 nt and ~260 nt) showed that species were usually detected for metagenome coverage above 0.005x and coverage in the PML above 0.05x, and

  7. Phylogenetic and functional metagenomic profiling for assessing microbial biodiversity in environmental monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljo Kisand

    Full Text Available Decisions guiding environmental management need to be based on a broad and comprehensive understanding of the biodiversity and functional capability within ecosystems. Microbes are of particular importance since they drive biogeochemical cycles, being both producers and decomposers. Their quick and direct responses to changes in environmental conditions modulate the ecosystem accordingly, thus providing a sensitive readout. Here we have used direct sequencing of total DNA from water samples to compare the microbial communities of two distinct coastal regions exposed to different anthropogenic pressures: the highly polluted Port of Genoa and the protected area of Montecristo Island in the Mediterranean Sea. Analysis of the metagenomes revealed significant differences in both microbial diversity and abundance between the two areas, reflecting their distinct ecological habitats and anthropogenic stress conditions. Our results indicate that the combination of next generation sequencing (NGS technologies and bioinformatics tools presents a new approach to monitor the diversity and the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Integration of metagenomics into environmental monitoring campaigns should enable the impact of the anthropogenic pressure on microbial biodiversity in various ecosystems to be better assessed and also predicted.

  8. Phylogenetic and functional metagenomic profiling for assessing microbial biodiversity in environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Veljo; Valente, Angelica; Lahm, Armin; Tanet, Gerard; Lettieri, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Decisions guiding environmental management need to be based on a broad and comprehensive understanding of the biodiversity and functional capability within ecosystems. Microbes are of particular importance since they drive biogeochemical cycles, being both producers and decomposers. Their quick and direct responses to changes in environmental conditions modulate the ecosystem accordingly, thus providing a sensitive readout. Here we have used direct sequencing of total DNA from water samples to compare the microbial communities of two distinct coastal regions exposed to different anthropogenic pressures: the highly polluted Port of Genoa and the protected area of Montecristo Island in the Mediterranean Sea. Analysis of the metagenomes revealed significant differences in both microbial diversity and abundance between the two areas, reflecting their distinct ecological habitats and anthropogenic stress conditions. Our results indicate that the combination of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and bioinformatics tools presents a new approach to monitor the diversity and the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Integration of metagenomics into environmental monitoring campaigns should enable the impact of the anthropogenic pressure on microbial biodiversity in various ecosystems to be better assessed and also predicted.

  9. Metagenomic Survey of Viral Diversity Obtained from Feces of Subantarctic and South American Fur Seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Kluge

    Full Text Available The Brazilian South coast seasonally hosts numerous marine species, observed particularly during winter months. Some animals, including fur seals, are found dead or debilitated along the shore and may harbor potential pathogens within their microbiota. In the present study, a metagenomic approach was performed to evaluate the viral diversity in feces of fur seals found deceased along the coast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul. The fecal virome of two fur seal species was characterized: the South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis and the Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis. Fecal samples from 10 specimens (A. australis, n = 5; A. tropicalis, n = 5 were collected and viral particles were purified, extracted and amplified with a random PCR. The products were sequenced through Ion Torrent and Illumina platforms and assembled reads were submitted to BLASTx searches. Both viromes were dominated by bacteriophages and included a number of potentially novel virus genomes. Sequences of picobirnaviruses, picornaviruses and a hepevirus-like were identified in A. australis. A rotavirus related to group C, a novel member of the Sakobuvirus and a sapovirus very similar to California sea lion sapovirus 1 were found in A. tropicalis. Additionally, sequences of members of the Anelloviridae and Parvoviridae families were detected in both fur seal species. This is the first metagenomic study to screen the fecal virome of fur seals, contributing to a better understanding of the complexity of the viral community present in the intestinal microbiota of these animals.

  10. Metagenomics for studying unculturable microorganisms: cutting the Gordian knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Patrick D; Handelsman, Jo

    2005-01-01

    More than 99% of prokaryotes in the environment cannot be cultured in the laboratory, a phenomenon that limits our understanding of microbial physiology, genetics, and community ecology. One way around this problem is metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning and analysis of microbial DNA extracted directly from an environmental sample. Recent advances in shotgun sequencing and computational methods for genome assembly have advanced the field of metagenomics to provide glimpses into the life of uncultured microorganisms.

  11. METAGENassist: a comprehensive web server for comparative metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, David; Xia, Jianguo; Liu, Yifeng; Zhou, You; Guo, An Chi; Cruz, Joseph A; Sinelnikov, Igor; Budwill, Karen; Nesbø, Camilla L; Wishart, David S

    2012-07-01

    With recent improvements in DNA sequencing and sample extraction techniques, the quantity and quality of metagenomic data are now growing exponentially. This abundance of richly annotated metagenomic data and bacterial census information has spawned a new branch of microbiology called comparative metagenomics. Comparative metagenomics involves the comparison of bacterial populations between different environmental samples, different culture conditions or different microbial hosts. However, in order to do comparative metagenomics, one typically requires a sophisticated knowledge of multivariate statistics and/or advanced software programming skills. To make comparative metagenomics more accessible to microbiologists, we have developed a freely accessible, easy-to-use web server for comparative metagenomic analysis called METAGENassist. Users can upload their bacterial census data from a wide variety of common formats, using either amplified 16S rRNA data or shotgun metagenomic data. Metadata concerning environmental, culture, or host conditions can also be uploaded. During the data upload process, METAGENassist also performs an automated taxonomic-to-phenotypic mapping. Phenotypic information covering nearly 20 functional categories such as GC content, genome size, oxygen requirements, energy sources and preferred temperature range is automatically generated from the taxonomic input data. Using this phenotypically enriched data, users can then perform a variety of multivariate and univariate data analyses including fold change analysis, t-tests, PCA, PLS-DA, clustering and classification. To facilitate data processing, users are guided through a step-by-step analysis workflow using a variety of menus, information hyperlinks and check boxes. METAGENassist also generates colorful, publication quality tables and graphs that can be downloaded and used directly in the preparation of scientific papers. METAGENassist is available at http://www.metagenassist.ca.

  12. Metagenomic Sequencing of an In Vitro-Simulated Microbial Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Jenna L.; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2009-12-01

    Background: Microbial life dominates the earth, but many species are difficult or even impossible to study under laboratory conditions. Sequencing DNA directly from the environment, a technique commonly referred to as metagenomics, is an important tool for cataloging microbial life. This culture-independent approach involves collecting samples that include microbes in them, extracting DNA from the samples, and sequencing the DNA. A sample may contain many different microorganisms, macroorganisms, and even free-floating environmental DNA. A fundamental challenge in metagenomics has been estimating the abundance of organisms in a sample based on the frequency with which the organism's DNA was observed in reads generated via DNA sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings: We created mixtures of ten microbial species for which genome sequences are known. Each mixture contained an equal number of cells of each species. We then extracted DNA from the mixtures, sequenced the DNA, and measured the frequency with which genomic regions from each organism was observed in the sequenced DNA. We found that the observed frequency of reads mapping to each organism did not reflect the equal numbers of cells that were known to be included in each mixture. The relative organism abundances varied significantly depending on the DNA extraction and sequencing protocol utilized. Conclusions/Significance: We describe a new data resource for measuring the accuracy of metagenomic binning methods, created by in vitro-simulation of a metagenomic community. Our in vitro simulation can be used to complement previous in silico benchmark studies. In constructing a synthetic community and sequencing its metagenome, we encountered several sources of observation bias that likely affect most metagenomic experiments to date and present challenges for comparative metagenomic studies. DNA preparation methods have a particularly profound effect in our study, implying that samples prepared with

  13. METAGENassist: a comprehensive web server for comparative metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, David; Xia, Jianguo; Liu, Yifeng; Zhou, You; Guo, An Chi; Cruz, Joseph A.; Sinelnikov, Igor; Budwill, Karen; Nesbø, Camilla L.; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in DNA sequencing and sample extraction techniques, the quantity and quality of metagenomic data are now growing exponentially. This abundance of richly annotated metagenomic data and bacterial census information has spawned a new branch of microbiology called comparative metagenomics. Comparative metagenomics involves the comparison of bacterial populations between different environmental samples, different culture conditions or different microbial hosts. However, in order to do comparative metagenomics, one typically requires a sophisticated knowledge of multivariate statistics and/or advanced software programming skills. To make comparative metagenomics more accessible to microbiologists, we have developed a freely accessible, easy-to-use web server for comparative metagenomic analysis called METAGENassist. Users can upload their bacterial census data from a wide variety of common formats, using either amplified 16S rRNA data or shotgun metagenomic data. Metadata concerning environmental, culture, or host conditions can also be uploaded. During the data upload process, METAGENassist also performs an automated taxonomic-to-phenotypic mapping. Phenotypic information covering nearly 20 functional categories such as GC content, genome size, oxygen requirements, energy sources and preferred temperature range is automatically generated from the taxonomic input data. Using this phenotypically enriched data, users can then perform a variety of multivariate and univariate data analyses including fold change analysis, t-tests, PCA, PLS-DA, clustering and classification. To facilitate data processing, users are guided through a step-by-step analysis workflow using a variety of menus, information hyperlinks and check boxes. METAGENassist also generates colorful, publication quality tables and graphs that can be downloaded and used directly in the preparation of scientific papers. METAGENassist is available at http://www.metagenassist.ca. PMID

  14. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  15. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  16. Life on human surfaces: skin metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Mathieu

    Full Text Available The human skin microbiome could provide another example, after the gut, of the strong positive or negative impact that human colonizing bacteria can have on health. Deciphering functional diversity and dynamics within human skin microbial communities is critical for understanding their involvement and for developing the appropriate substances for improving or correcting their action. We present a direct PCR-free high throughput sequencing approach to unravel the human skin microbiota specificities through metagenomic dataset analysis and inter-environmental comparison. The approach provided access to the functions carried out by dominant skin colonizing taxa, including Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus and Propionibacterium, revealing their specific capabilities to interact with and exploit compounds from the human skin. These functions, which clearly illustrate the unique life style of the skin microbial communities, stand as invaluable investigation targets for understanding and potentially modifying bacterial interactions with the human host with the objective of increasing health and well being.

  17. [Metagenomics and biodiversity of sphagnum bogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusin, L Yu

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity of sphagnum bogs is one of the richest and less studied, while these ecosystems are among the top ones in ecological, conservation, and economic value. Recent studies focused on the prokaryotic consortia associated with sphagnum mosses, and revealed the factors that maintain sustainability and productivity of bog ecosystems. High-throughput sequencing technologies provided insight into functional diversity of moss microbial communities (microbiomes), and helped to identify the biochemical pathways and gene families that facilitate the spectrum of adaptive strategies and largely foster the very successful colonization of the Northern hemisphere by sphagnum mosses. Rich and valuable information obtained on microbiomes of peat bogs sets off the paucity of evidence on their eukaryotic diversity. Prospects and expectations of reliable assessment of taxonomic profiles, relative abundance of taxa, and hidden biodiversity of microscopic eukaryotes in sphagnum bog ecosystems are briefly outlined in the context of today's metagenomics.

  18. Expanding the marine virosphere using metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Kimes, Nikole E; Ghai, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Viruses infecting prokaryotic cells (phages) are the most abundant entities of the biosphere and contain a largely uncharted wealth of genomic diversity. They play a critical role in the biology of their hosts and in ecosystem functioning at large. The classical approaches studying phages require isolation from a pure culture of the host. Direct sequencing approaches have been hampered by the small amounts of phage DNA present in most natural habitats and the difficulty in applying meta-omic approaches, such as annotation of small reads and assembly. Serendipitously, it has been discovered that cellular metagenomes of highly productive ocean waters (the deep chlorophyll maximum) contain significant amounts of viral DNA derived from cells undergoing the lytic cycle. We have taken advantage of this phenomenon to retrieve metagenomic fosmids containing viral DNA from a Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum sample. This method allowed description of complete genomes of 208 new marine phages. The diversity of these genomes was remarkable, contributing 21 genomic groups of tailed bacteriophages of which 10 are completely new. Sequence based methods have allowed host assignment to many of them. These predicted hosts represent a wide variety of important marine prokaryotic microbes like members of SAR11 and SAR116 clades, Cyanobacteria and also the newly described low GC Actinobacteria. A metavirome constructed from the same habitat showed that many of the new phage genomes were abundantly represented. Furthermore, other available metaviromes also indicated that some of the new phages are globally distributed in low to medium latitude ocean waters. The availability of many genomes from the same sample allows a direct approach to viral population genomics confirming the remarkable mosaicism of phage genomes.

  19. Expanding the marine virosphere using metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Megumi Mizuno

    Full Text Available Viruses infecting prokaryotic cells (phages are the most abundant entities of the biosphere and contain a largely uncharted wealth of genomic diversity. They play a critical role in the biology of their hosts and in ecosystem functioning at large. The classical approaches studying phages require isolation from a pure culture of the host. Direct sequencing approaches have been hampered by the small amounts of phage DNA present in most natural habitats and the difficulty in applying meta-omic approaches, such as annotation of small reads and assembly. Serendipitously, it has been discovered that cellular metagenomes of highly productive ocean waters (the deep chlorophyll maximum contain significant amounts of viral DNA derived from cells undergoing the lytic cycle. We have taken advantage of this phenomenon to retrieve metagenomic fosmids containing viral DNA from a Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum sample. This method allowed description of complete genomes of 208 new marine phages. The diversity of these genomes was remarkable, contributing 21 genomic groups of tailed bacteriophages of which 10 are completely new. Sequence based methods have allowed host assignment to many of them. These predicted hosts represent a wide variety of important marine prokaryotic microbes like members of SAR11 and SAR116 clades, Cyanobacteria and also the newly described low GC Actinobacteria. A metavirome constructed from the same habitat showed that many of the new phage genomes were abundantly represented. Furthermore, other available metaviromes also indicated that some of the new phages are globally distributed in low to medium latitude ocean waters. The availability of many genomes from the same sample allows a direct approach to viral population genomics confirming the remarkable mosaicism of phage genomes.

  20. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-08-01

    As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe step-by-step the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of a bioinformatician. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning with pre-sequencing considerations such as community composition and sequence data type that will greatly influence downstream analyses. We proceed with recommendations for sampling and data generation including sample and metadata collection, community profiling, construction of shotgun libraries and sequencing strategies. We then discuss the application of generic sequence processing steps (read preprocessing, assembly, and gene prediction and annotation) to metagenomic datasets by contrast to genome projects. Different types of data analyses particular to metagenomes are then presented including binning, dominant population analysis and gene-centric analysis. Finally data management systems and issues are presented and discussed. We hope that this review will assist bioinformaticians and biologists in making better-informed decisions on their journey during a metagenomic project.

  1. Evaluation of ddRADseq for reduced representation metagenome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michael Y; Worden, Paul; Monahan, Leigh G; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Burke, Catherine M; Djordjevic, Steven P; Charles, Ian G; Darling, Aaron E

    2017-01-01

    Profiling of microbial communities via metagenomic shotgun sequencing has enabled researches to gain unprecedented insight into microbial community structure and the functional roles of community members. This study describes a method and basic analysis for a metagenomic adaptation of the double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) protocol for reduced representation metagenome profiling. This technique takes advantage of the sequence specificity of restriction endonucleases to construct an Illumina-compatible sequencing library containing DNA fragments that are between a pair of restriction sites located within close proximity. This results in a reduced sequencing library with coverage breadth that can be tuned by size selection. We assessed the performance of the metagenomic ddRADseq approach by applying the full method to human stool samples and generating sequence data. The ddRADseq data yields a similar estimate of community taxonomic profile as obtained from shotgun metagenome sequencing of the same human stool samples. No obvious bias with respect to genomic G + C content and the estimated relative species abundance was detected. Although ddRADseq does introduce some bias in taxonomic representation, the bias is likely to be small relative to DNA extraction bias. ddRADseq appears feasible and could have value as a tool for metagenome-wide association studies.

  2. Messages from the first International Conference on Clinical Metagenomics (ICCMg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppé, Etienne; Greub, Gilbert; Schrenzel, Jacques

    Metagenomics is recently entering in the clinical microbiology and an increasing number of diagnostic laboratories are now proposing the sequencing & annotation of bacterial genomes and/or the analysis of clinical samples by direct or PCR-based metagenomics with short time to results. In this context, the first International Conference on Clinical Metagenomics (ICCMg) was held in Geneva in October 2016 and several key aspects have been discussed including: i) the need for improved resolution, ii) the importance of interpretation given the common occurrence of sequence contaminants, iii) the need for improved bioinformatic pipelines, iv) the bottleneck of DNA extraction, v) the importance of gold standards, vi) the need to further reduce time to results, vii) how to improve data sharing, viii) the applications of bacterial genomics and clinical metagenomics in better adapting therapeutics and ix) the impact of metagenomics and new sequencing technologies in discovering new microbes. Further efforts in term of reduced turnaround time, improved quality and lower costs are however warranted to fully translate metagenomics in clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. MetaProx: the database of metagenomic proximons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vey, Gregory; Charles, Trevor C

    2014-01-01

    MetaProx is the database of metagenomic proximons: a searchable repository of proximon objects conceived with two specific goals. The first objective is to accelerate research involving metagenomic functional interactions by providing a database of metagenomic operon candidates. Proximons represent a special subset of directons (series of contiguous co-directional genes) where each member gene is in close proximity to its neighbours with respect to intergenic distance. As a result, proximons represent significant operon candidates where some subset of proximons is the set of true metagenomic operons. Proximons are well suited for the inference of metagenomic functional networks because predicted functional linkages do not rely on homology-dependent information that is frequently unavailable in metagenomic scenarios. The second objective is to explore representations for semistructured biological data that can offer an alternative to the traditional relational database approach. In particular, we use a serialized object implementation and advocate a Data as Data policy where the same serialized objects can be used at all levels (database, search tool and saved user file) without conversion or the use of human-readable markups. MetaProx currently includes 4,210,818 proximons consisting of 8 \\,926,993 total member genes. Database URL: http://metaprox.uwaterloo.ca. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Multiple comparative metagenomics using multiset k-mer counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Benoit

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Large scale metagenomic projects aim to extract biodiversity knowledge between different environmental conditions. Current methods for comparing microbial communities face important limitations. Those based on taxonomical or functional assignation rely on a small subset of the sequences that can be associated to known organisms. On the other hand, de novo methods, that compare the whole sets of sequences, either do not scale up on ambitious metagenomic projects or do not provide precise and exhaustive results. Methods These limitations motivated the development of a new de novo metagenomic comparative method, called Simka. This method computes a large collection of standard ecological distances by replacing species counts by k-mer counts. Simka scales-up today’s metagenomic projects thanks to a new parallel k-mer counting strategy on multiple datasets. Results Experiments on public Human Microbiome Project datasets demonstrate that Simka captures the essential underlying biological structure. Simka was able to compute in a few hours both qualitative and quantitative ecological distances on hundreds of metagenomic samples (690 samples, 32 billions of reads. We also demonstrate that analyzing metagenomes at the k-mer level is highly correlated with extremely precise de novo comparison techniques which rely on all-versus-all sequences alignment strategy or which are based on taxonomic profiling.

  5. Evaluation of ddRADseq for reduced representation metagenome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Profiling of microbial communities via metagenomic shotgun sequencing has enabled researches to gain unprecedented insight into microbial community structure and the functional roles of community members. This study describes a method and basic analysis for a metagenomic adaptation of the double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq protocol for reduced representation metagenome profiling. Methods This technique takes advantage of the sequence specificity of restriction endonucleases to construct an Illumina-compatible sequencing library containing DNA fragments that are between a pair of restriction sites located within close proximity. This results in a reduced sequencing library with coverage breadth that can be tuned by size selection. We assessed the performance of the metagenomic ddRADseq approach by applying the full method to human stool samples and generating sequence data. Results The ddRADseq data yields a similar estimate of community taxonomic profile as obtained from shotgun metagenome sequencing of the same human stool samples. No obvious bias with respect to genomic G + C content and the estimated relative species abundance was detected. Discussion Although ddRADseq does introduce some bias in taxonomic representation, the bias is likely to be small relative to DNA extraction bias. ddRADseq appears feasible and could have value as a tool for metagenome-wide association studies.

  6. EBI metagenomics in 2016 - an expanding and evolving resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alex; Bucchini, Francois; Cochrane, Guy; Denise, Hubert; Hoopen, Petra ten; Fraser, Matthew; Pesseat, Sebastien; Potter, Simon; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Sterk, Peter; Finn, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    EBI metagenomics (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/) is a freely available hub for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. Over the last 2 years, the resource has undergone rapid growth, with an increase of over five-fold in the number of processed samples and consequently represents one of the largest resources of analysed shotgun metagenomes. Here, we report the status of the resource in 2016 and give an overview of new developments. In particular, we describe updates to data content, a complete overhaul of the analysis pipeline, streamlining of data presentation via the website and the development of a new web based tool to compare functional analyses of sequence runs within a study. We also highlight two of the higher profile projects that have been analysed using the resource in the last year: the oceanographic projects Ocean Sampling Day and Tara Oceans. PMID:26582919

  7. Characterisation of two bifunctional cellulase-xylanase enzymes isolated from a bovine rumen metagenome library

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rashamuse, KJ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ruminant digestive tract microbes hydrolyse plant biomass, and the application of metagenomic techniques can provide good coverage of their glycosyl hydrolase enzymes. A metagenomic library of circa 70,000 fosmids was constructed from bacterial DNA...

  8. Ultrahigh-throughput discovery of promiscuous enzymes by picodroplet functional metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte M; Fischer, Gerhard; Mohamed, Mark F; Hyvönen, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P; Janssen, Dick B; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in

  9. Differences in sequencing technologies improve the retrieval of anammox bacterial genome from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.; Tringe, S.G.; Folino, G.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Camp, H.J. Op den; Jetten, M.S.; Marchiori, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sequencing technologies have different biases, in single-genome sequencing and metagenomic sequencing; these can significantly affect ORFs recovery and the population distribution of a metagenome. In this paper we investigate how well different technologies represent information related

  10. Differences in sequencing technologies improve the retrieval of anammox bacterial genome from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.; Tringe, S.G.; Folino, G.; Van Hijum, S.A.F.T.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Marchiori, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sequencing technologies have different biases, in single-genome sequencing and metagenomic sequencing; these can significantly affect ORFs recovery and the population distribution of a metagenome. In this paper we investigate how well different technologies represent information related

  11. Metagenomic analysis of kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Park, Moon Su; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2011-04-01

    Kimchi, a traditional food in the Korean culture, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this study, metagenomic approaches were used to monitor changes in bacterial populations, metabolic potential, and overall genetic features of the microbial community during the 29-day fermentation process. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from kimchi samples obtained periodically and was sequenced using a 454 GS FLX Titanium system, which yielded a total of 701,556 reads, with an average read length of 438 bp. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes from the metagenome indicated that the kimchi microbiome was dominated by members of three genera: Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella. Assignment of metagenomic sequences to SEED categories of the Metagenome Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) server revealed a genetic profile characteristic of heterotrophic lactic acid fermentation of carbohydrates, which was supported by the detection of mannitol, lactate, acetate, and ethanol as fermentation products. When the metagenomic reads were mapped onto the database of completed genomes, the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 23K genomes were highly represented. These same two genera were confirmed to be important in kimchi fermentation when the majority of kimchi metagenomic sequences showed very high identity to Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus genes. Besides microbial genome sequences, a surprisingly large number of phage DNA sequences were identified from the cellular fractions, possibly indicating that a high proportion of cells were infected by bacteriophages during fermentation. Overall, these results provide insights into the kimchi microbial community and also shed light on fermentation processes carried out broadly by complex microbial communities.

  12. Environmental Metagenomics: The Data Assembly and Data Analysis Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Maitra, S. S.; Shukla, Rohit Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gene finding is one of the emerging fields in the environmental research. In the past decades the research was focused mainly on the discovery of microorganisms which were capable of degrading a particular compound. A lot of methods are available in literature about the cultivation and screening of these novel microorganisms. All of these methods are efficient for screening of microbes which can be cultivated in the laboratory. Microorganisms which live in extreme conditions like hot springs, frozen glaciers, acid mine drainage, etc. cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, this is because of incomplete knowledge about their growth requirements like temperature, nutrients and their mutual dependence on each other. The microbes that can be cultivated correspond only to less than 1 % of the total microbes which are present in the earth. Rest of the 99 % of uncultivated majority remains inaccessible. Metagenomics transcends the culture requirements of microbes. In metagenomics DNA is directly extracted from the environmental samples such as soil, seawater, acid mine drainage etc., followed by construction and screening of metagenomic library. With the ongoing research, a huge amount of metagenomic data is accumulating. Understanding this data is an essential step to extract novel genes of industrial importance. Various bioinformatics tools have been designed to analyze and annotate the data produced from the metagenome. The Bio-informatic requirements of metagenomics data analysis are different in theory and practice. This paper reviews the tools that are available for metagenomic data analysis and the capability such tools—what they can do and their web availability.

  13. Accessing the Soil Metagenome for Studies of Microbial Diversity▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tom O.; Robe, Patrick; Cecillon, Sébastien; Clark, Ian M.; Constancias, Florentin; Simonet, Pascal; Hirsch, Penny R.; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Soil microbial communities contain the highest level of prokaryotic diversity of any environment, and metagenomic approaches involving the extraction of DNA from soil can improve our access to these communities. Most analyses of soil biodiversity and function assume that the DNA extracted represents the microbial community in the soil, but subsequent interpretations are limited by the DNA recovered from the soil. Unfortunately, extraction methods do not provide a uniform and unbiased subsample of metagenomic DNA, and as a consequence, accurate species distributions cannot be determined. Moreover, any bias will propagate errors in estimations of overall microbial diversity and may exclude some microbial classes from study and exploitation. To improve metagenomic approaches, investigate DNA extraction biases, and provide tools for assessing the relative abundances of different groups, we explored the biodiversity of the accessible community DNA by fractioning the metagenomic DNA as a function of (i) vertical soil sampling, (ii) density gradients (cell separation), (iii) cell lysis stringency, and (iv) DNA fragment size distribution. Each fraction had a unique genetic diversity, with different predominant and rare species (based on ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis [RISA] fingerprinting and phylochips). All fractions contributed to the number of bacterial groups uncovered in the metagenome, thus increasing the DNA pool for further applications. Indeed, we were able to access a more genetically diverse proportion of the metagenome (a gain of more than 80% compared to the best single extraction method), limit the predominance of a few genomes, and increase the species richness per sequencing effort. This work stresses the difference between extracted DNA pools and the currently inaccessible complete soil metagenome. PMID:21183646

  14. COGNIZER: A Framework for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tungadri; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Reddy, Cvsk; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in an unprecedented increase in the number of metagenomes that are being sequenced world-wide. Given their volume, functional annotation of metagenomic sequence datasets requires specialized computational tools/techniques. In spite of having high accuracy, existing stand-alone functional annotation tools necessitate end-users to perform compute-intensive homology searches of metagenomic datasets against "multiple" databases prior to functional analysis. Although, web-based functional annotation servers address to some extent the problem of availability of compute resources, uploading and analyzing huge volumes of sequence data on a shared public web-service has its own set of limitations. In this study, we present COGNIZER, a comprehensive stand-alone annotation framework which enables end-users to functionally annotate sequences constituting metagenomic datasets. The COGNIZER framework provides multiple workflow options. A subset of these options employs a novel directed-search strategy which helps in reducing the overall compute requirements for end-users. The COGNIZER framework includes a cross-mapping database that enables end-users to simultaneously derive/infer KEGG, Pfam, GO, and SEED subsystem information from the COG annotations. Validation experiments performed with real-world metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, generated using diverse sequencing technologies, indicate that the novel directed-search strategy employed in COGNIZER helps in reducing the compute requirements without significant loss in annotation accuracy. A comparison of COGNIZER's results with pre-computed benchmark values indicate the reliability of the cross-mapping database employed in COGNIZER. The COGNIZER framework is capable of comprehensively annotating any metagenomic or metatranscriptomic dataset from varied sequencing platforms in functional terms. Multiple search options in COGNIZER provide end-users the flexibility of

  15. The great screen anomaly-a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been

  16. The magic and menace of metagenomics: prospects for the study of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leveau, J.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to be a pragmatic primer into the field of metagenomics with special emphasis on the prospective contributions of metagenomics to the study of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). After an introduction into the concepts and methodologies of metagenomics and a discussion of

  17. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-21

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of the next-generation sequencing technology, progress has been made in the study of the human intestinal microbiome. Metagenomics can be used to study intestinal microbiome diversity and dysbiosis, as well as its relationship to health and disease. Moreover, functional metagenomics can identify novel functional genes, microbial pathways, antibiotic resistance genes, functional dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome, and determine interactions and co-evolution between microbiota and host, though there are still some limitations. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics represent enormous complements to the understanding of the human gut microbiome. This review aims to demonstrate that metagenomics can be a powerful tool in studying the human gut microbiome with encouraging prospects. The limitations of metagenomics to be overcome are also discussed. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics in relation to the study of the human gut microbiome are also briefly discussed.

  18. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile.

  19. Selection in coastal Synechococcus (cyanobacteria populations evaluated from environmental metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Tai

    Full Text Available Environmental metagenomics provides snippets of genomic sequences from all organisms in an environmental sample and are an unprecedented resource of information for investigating microbial population genetics. Current analytical methods, however, are poorly equipped to handle metagenomic data, particularly of short, unlinked sequences. A custom analytical pipeline was developed to calculate dN/dS ratios, a common metric to evaluate the role of selection in the evolution of a gene, from environmental metagenomes sequenced using 454 technology of flow-sorted populations of marine Synechococcus, the dominant cyanobacteria in coastal environments. The large majority of genes (98% have evolved under purifying selection (dN/dS1, 77 out of 83 (93% were hypothetical. Notable among annotated genes, ribosomal protein L35 appears to be under positive selection in one Synechococcus population. Other annotated genes, in particular a possible porin, a large-conductance mechanosensitive channel, an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter, and a homologue of a pilus retraction protein had regions of the gene with elevated dN/dS. With the increasing use of next-generation sequencing in metagenomic investigations of microbial diversity and ecology, analytical methods need to accommodate the peculiarities of these data streams. By developing a means to analyze population diversity data from these environmental metagenomes, we have provided the first insight into the role of selection in the evolution of Synechococcus, a globally significant primary producer.

  20. MetaStorm: A Public Resource for Customizable Metagenomics Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Singh, Gargi; Heath, Lenwood S; Pruden, Amy; Xiao, Weidong; Zhang, Liqing

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics is a trending research area, calling for the need to analyze large quantities of data generated from next generation DNA sequencing technologies. The need to store, retrieve, analyze, share, and visualize such data challenges current online computational systems. Interpretation and annotation of specific information is especially a challenge for metagenomic data sets derived from environmental samples, because current annotation systems only offer broad classification of microbial diversity and function. Moreover, existing resources are not configured to readily address common questions relevant to environmental systems. Here we developed a new online user-friendly metagenomic analysis server called MetaStorm (http://bench.cs.vt.edu/MetaStorm/), which facilitates customization of computational analysis for metagenomic data sets. Users can upload their own reference databases to tailor the metagenomics annotation to focus on various taxonomic and functional gene markers of interest. MetaStorm offers two major analysis pipelines: an assembly-based annotation pipeline and the standard read annotation pipeline used by existing web servers. These pipelines can be selected individually or together. Overall, MetaStorm provides enhanced interactive visualization to allow researchers to explore and manipulate taxonomy and functional annotation at various levels of resolution.

  1. Random Whole Metagenomic Sequencing for Forensic Discrimination of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakova, Anastasia S.; Smith, Renee J.; Burgoyne, Leigh; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA) and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR) based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification) and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification) databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER); similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF); non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS); and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations. PMID:25111003

  2. Metagenomic Insights into Transferable Antibiotic Resistance in Oral Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, S; Roberts, A P; Martin, F E; Adler, C J

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is considered one of the greatest threats to global public health. Resistance is often conferred by the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which are readily found in the oral microbiome. In-depth genetic analyses of the oral microbiome through metagenomic techniques reveal a broad distribution of ARGs (including novel ARGs) in individuals not recently exposed to antibiotics, including humans in isolated indigenous populations. This has resulted in a paradigm shift from focusing on the carriage of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria to a broader concept of an oral resistome, which includes all resistance genes in the microbiome. Metagenomics is beginning to demonstrate the role of the oral resistome and horizontal gene transfer within and between commensals in the absence of selective pressure, such as an antibiotic. At the chairside, metagenomic data reinforce our need to adhere to current antibiotic guidelines to minimize the spread of resistance, as such data reveal the extent of ARGs without exposure to antimicrobials and the ecologic changes created in the oral microbiome by even a single dose of antibiotics. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metagenomics in the investigation of the oral resistome, including the transmission of antibiotic resistance in the oral microbiome. Future perspectives, including clinical implications of the findings from metagenomic investigations of oral ARGs, are also considered. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  3. Metagenomic analysis of permafrost microbial community response to thaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; DeAngelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-07-01

    We employed deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes and related this data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows for the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses revealed that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there were rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5°C, permafrost metagenomes converged to be more similar to each other than while they were frozen. We found that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shifted rapidly during thaw. We also constructed the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponded to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost was released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost.

  4. Unsupervised Two-Way Clustering of Metagenomic Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Prabhakara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge facing metagenomics is the development of tools for the characterization of functional and taxonomic content of vast amounts of short metagenome reads. The efficacy of clustering methods depends on the number of reads in the dataset, the read length and relative abundances of source genomes in the microbial community. In this paper, we formulate an unsupervised naive Bayes multispecies, multidimensional mixture model for reads from a metagenome. We use the proposed model to cluster metagenomic reads by their species of origin and to characterize the abundance of each species. We model the distribution of word counts along a genome as a Gaussian for shorter, frequent words and as a Poisson for longer words that are rare. We employ either a mixture of Gaussians or mixture of Poissons to model reads within each bin. Further, we handle the high-dimensionality and sparsity associated with the data, by grouping the set of words comprising the reads, resulting in a two-way mixture model. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of this method on simulated and real metagenomes. Our method can accurately cluster reads as short as 100 bps and is robust to varying abundances, divergences and read lengths.

  5. Metagenomic Analysis of Bacterial Communities of Antarctic Surface Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eLopatina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of bacteria present in surface snow around four Russian stations in Eastern Antarctica was studied by high throughput sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Considerable class- and genus-level variation between the samples was revealed indicating a presence of inter-site diversity of bacteria in Antarctic snow. Flavobacterium was a major genus in one sampling site and was also detected in other sites. The diversity of flavobacterial type II-C CRISPR spacers in the samples was investigated by metagenome sequencing. Thousands of unique spacers were revealed with less than 35% overlap between the sampling sites, indicating an enormous natural variety of flavobacterial CRISPR spacers and, by extension, high level of adaptive activity of the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system. None of the spacers matched known spacers of flavobacterial isolates from the Northern hemisphere. Moreover, the percentage of spacers with matches with Antarctic metagenomic sequences obtained in this work was significantly higher than with sequences from much larger publically available environmental metagenomic database. The results indicate that despite the overall very high level of diversity, Antarctic Flavobacteria comprise a separate pool that experiences pressures from mobile genetic elements different from those present in other parts of the world. The results also establish analysis of metagenomic CRISPR spacer content as a powerful tool to study bacterial populations diversity.

  6. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia S Khodakova

    Full Text Available Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER; similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF; non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS; and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations.

  7. Inference of microbial recombination rates from metagenomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L F Johnson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic sequencing projects from environments dominated by a small number of species produce genome-wide population samples. We present a two-site composite likelihood estimator of the scaled recombination rate, rho = 2N(ec, that operates on metagenomic assemblies in which each sequenced fragment derives from a different individual. This new estimator properly accounts for sequencing error, as quantified by per-base quality scores, and missing data, as inferred from the placement of reads in a metagenomic assembly. We apply our estimator to data from a sludge metagenome project to demonstrate how this method will elucidate the rates of exchange of genetic material in natural microbial populations. Surprisingly, for a fixed amount of sequencing, this estimator has lower variance than similar methods that operate on more traditional population genetic samples of comparable size. In addition, we can infer variation in recombination rate across the genome because metagenomic projects sample genetic diversity genome-wide, not just at particular loci. The method itself makes no assumption specific to microbial populations, opening the door for application to any mixed population sample where the number of individuals sampled is much greater than the number of fragments sequenced.

  8. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  9. Metagenomic scaffolds enable combinatorial lignin transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Cameron R; Singh, Rahul; VanInsberghe, David; Ievdokymenko, Kateryna; Budwill, Karen; Mohn, William W; Eltis, Lindsay D; Hallam, Steven J

    2014-07-15

    Engineering the microbial transformation of lignocellulosic biomass is essential to developing modern biorefining processes that alleviate reliance on petroleum-derived energy and chemicals. Many current bioprocess streams depend on the genetic tractability of Escherichia coli with a primary emphasis on engineering cellulose/hemicellulose catabolism, small molecule production, and resistance to product inhibition. Conversely, bioprocess streams for lignin transformation remain embryonic, with relatively few environmental strains or enzymes implicated. Here we develop a biosensor responsive to monoaromatic lignin transformation products compatible with functional screening in E. coli. We use this biosensor to retrieve metagenomic scaffolds sourced from coal bed bacterial communities conferring an array of lignin transformation phenotypes that synergize in combination. Transposon mutagenesis and comparative sequence analysis of active clones identified genes encoding six functional classes mediating lignin transformation phenotypes that appear to be rearrayed in nature via horizontal gene transfer. Lignin transformation activity was then demonstrated for one of the predicted gene products encoding a multicopper oxidase to validate the screen. These results illuminate cellular and community-wide networks acting on aromatic polymers and expand the toolkit for engineering recombinant lignin transformation based on ecological design principles.

  10. Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Lohia, Ruchi; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat.

  11. OTU analysis using metagenomic shotgun sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Hao

    Full Text Available Because of technological limitations, the primer and amplification biases in targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have veiled the true microbial diversity underlying environmental samples. However, the protocol of metagenomic shotgun sequencing provides 16S rRNA gene fragment data with natural immunity against the biases raised during priming and thus the potential of uncovering the true structure of microbial community by giving more accurate predictions of operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Nonetheless, the lack of statistically rigorous comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragments and other data types makes it difficult to interpret previously reported results using 16S rRNA gene fragments. Therefore, in the present work, we established a standard analysis pipeline that would help confirm if the differences in the data are true or are just due to potential technical bias. This pipeline is built by using simulated data to find optimal mapping and OTU prediction methods. The comparison between simulated datasets revealed a relationship between 16S rRNA gene fragments and full-length 16S rRNA sequences that a 16S rRNA gene fragment having a length >150 bp provides the same accuracy as a full-length 16S rRNA sequence using our proposed pipeline, which could serve as a good starting point for experimental design and making the comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragment-based and targeted 16S rRNA sequencing-based surveys possible.

  12. Metagenome and metabolism: the tissue microbiota hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcelin, Rémy; Serino, Matteo; Chabo, Chantal; Garidou, Lucile; Pomié, Celine; Courtney, Michael; Amar, Jacques; Bouloumié, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decade, the research community has revealed the role of a new organ: the intestinal microbiota. It is considered as a symbiont that is part of our organism since, at birth, it educates the immune system and contributes to the development of the intestinal vasculature and most probably the nervous system. With the advent of new generation sequencing techniques, a catalogue of genes that belong to this microbiome has been established that lists more than 5 million non-redundant genes called the metagenome. Using germ free mice colonized with the microbiota from different origins, it has been formally demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota causes the onset of metabolic diseases. Further to the role of point mutations in our genome, the microbiota can explain the on-going worldwide pandemic of obesity and diabetes, its dissemination and family inheritance, as well as the diversity of the associated metabolic phenotypes. More recently, the discovery of bacterial DNA within host tissues, such as the liver, the adipose tissue and the blood, which establishes a tissue microbiota, introduces new opportunities to identify targets and predictive biomarkers based on the host to microbiota interaction, as well as to define new strategies for pharmacological, immunomodulatory vaccines and nutritional applications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Novel thermostable antibiotic resistance enzymes from the Atlantis II Deep Red Sea brine pool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elbehery, Ali H. A; Leak, David J; Siam, Rania

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, we used sequence‐based metagenomics to identify two antibiotic resistance enzymes from the secluded, lower convective layer of Atlantis II Deep Red Sea brine pool (68°C, ~2200 m depth and 250‰ salinity). We assembled > 4 000...

  14. Application of metagenomics in understanding oral health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Gunsolley, John

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases including periodontal disease and caries are some of the most prevalent infectious diseases in humans. Different microbial species cohabitate and form a polymicrobial biofilm called dental plaque in the oral cavity. Metagenomics using next generation sequencing technologies has produced bacterial profiles and genomic profiles to study the relationships between microbial diversity, genetic variation, and oral diseases. Several oral metagenomic studies have examined the oral microbiome of periodontal disease and caries. Gene annotations in these studies support the association of specific genes or metabolic pathways with oral health and with specific diseases. The roles of pathogenic species and functions of specific genes in oral disease development have been recognized by metagenomic analysis. A model is proposed in which three levels of interactions occur in the oral microbiome that determines oral health or disease. PMID:24642489

  15. Is metagenomics resolving identification of functions in microbial communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    We are coming up on the tenth anniversary of the broad use of the method involving whole metagenome shotgun sequencing, referred to as metagenomics. The application of this approach has definitely revolutionized microbiology and the related fields, including the realization of the importance of the human microbiome. As such, metagenomics has already provided a novel outlook on the complexity and dynamics of microbial communities that are an important part of the biosphere of the planet. Accumulation of massive amounts of sequence data also caused a surge in the development of bioinformatics tools specially designed to provide pipelines for data analysis and visualization. However, a critical outlook into the field is required to appreciate what could be and what has currently been gained from the massive sequence databases that are being generated with ever-increasing speed. © 2013 The Author. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The constantly decreasing cost and increasing output of current sequencing technologies enable large scale metagenomic studies of microbial communities from diverse habitats. Therefore, fast and accurate methods for taxonomic classification are needed, which can operate on increasingly larger...... datasets and reference databases. Recently, several fast metagenomic classifiers have been developed, which are based on comparison of genomic k-mers. However, nucleotide comparison using a fixed k-mer length often lacks the sensitivity to overcome the evolutionary distance between sampled species...... and genomes in the reference database. Here, we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju for fast assignment of reads to taxa. Kaiju finds maximum exact matches on the protein-level using the Borrows-Wheeler transform, and can optionally allow amino acid substitutions in the search using a greedy...

  17. Mining anaerobic digester consortia metagenomes for secreted carbohydrate active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Busk, Peter Kamp; Pilgaard, Bo

    . To gain insight into both the degradation of the carbohydrates and the various roles of the microbes in the ADs we have mined metagenomes from both types of ADs for glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases, auxiliary activities, and carbohydrate binding modules. The mining...... thermophilic and mesophilic ADs a wide variety of carbohydrate active enzyme functions were discovered in the metagenomic sequencing of the microbial consortia. The most dominating type of glycoside hydrolases were β-glucosidases (up to 27%), α-amylases (up to 10%), α-glucosidases (up to 8%), α......-galactosidases (up to 9%) and β-galactosidases (up to 7%). For carbohydrate esterases the by far most dominating type was acetylxylan esterases (up to 59%) followed by feruloyl esterases (up to 16%). Less than 15 polysaccharide lyases were identified in the different metagenomes and not surprisingly...

  18. Metagenomes provide valuable comparative information on soil microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Stenbæk, Jonas; Santos, Susana S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the critical ecological roles of microeukaryotes in terrestrial ecosystems, most descriptive studies of soil microbes published so far focused only on specific groups. Meanwhile, the fast development of metagenome sequencing leads to considerable data accumulation in public repositories......, providing microbiologists with substantial amounts of accessible information. We took advantage of public metagenomes in order to investigate microeukaryote communities in a well characterized grassland soil. The data gathered allowed the evaluation of several factors impacting the community structure...... on metagenomic microeukaryote DNA. Choosing the correct annotation procedure and reference database has proven to be crucial, as it considerably limits the risk of wrong assignments. In addition, a significant and pronounced effect of the DNA extraction method on the taxonomical structure of soil microeukaryotes...

  19. Multi-Layer and Recursive Neural Networks for Metagenomic Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Gregory; Polikar, Robi; Rosen, Gail

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in machine learning, specifically in deep learning with neural networks, has made a profound impact on fields such as natural language processing, image classification, and language modeling; however, feasibility and potential benefits of the approaches to metagenomic data analysis has been largely under-explored. Deep learning exploits many layers of learning nonlinear feature representations, typically in an unsupervised fashion, and recent results have shown outstanding generalization performance on previously unseen data. Furthermore, some deep learning methods can also represent the structure in a data set. Consequently, deep learning and neural networks may prove to be an appropriate approach for metagenomic data. To determine whether such approaches are indeed appropriate for metagenomics, we experiment with two deep learning methods: i) a deep belief network, and ii) a recursive neural network, the latter of which provides a tree representing the structure of the data. We compare these approaches to the standard multi-layer perceptron, which has been well-established in the machine learning community as a powerful prediction algorithm, though its presence is largely missing in metagenomics literature. We find that traditional neural networks can be quite powerful classifiers on metagenomic data compared to baseline methods, such as random forests. On the other hand, while the deep learning approaches did not result in improvements to the classification accuracy, they do provide the ability to learn hierarchical representations of a data set that standard classification methods do not allow. Our goal in this effort is not to determine the best algorithm in terms accuracy-as that depends on the specific application-but rather to highlight the benefits and drawbacks of each of the approach we discuss and provide insight on how they can be improved for predictive metagenomic analysis.

  20. The soil microbiome — from metagenomics to metaphenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Janet K.; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.

    2018-06-01

    Soil microorganisms carry out important processes, including support of plant growth and cycling of carbon and other nutrients. However, the majority of soil microbes have not yet been isolated and their functions are largely unknown. Although metagenomic sequencing reveals microbial identities and functional gene information, it includes DNA from microbes with vastly varying physiological states. Therefore, metagenomics is only predictive of community functional potential. We posit that the next frontier lies in understanding the metaphenome, the product of the combined genetic potential of the microbiome and available resources. Here we describe examples of opportunities towards gaining understanding of the soil metaphenome.

  1. Whither or wither geomicrobiology in the era of 'community metagenomics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Capone, D.G.; Stolz, J.F.; Fuhrman, J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular techniques are valuable tools that can improve our understanding of the structure of microbial communities. They provide the ability to probe for life in all niches of the biosphere, perhaps even supplanting the need to cultivate microorganisms or to conduct ecophysiological investigations. However, an overemphasis and strict dependence on such large information-driven endeavours as environmental metagenomics could overwhelm the field, to the detriment of microbial ecology. We now call for more balanced, hypothesis-driven research efforts that couple metagenomics with classic approaches.

  2. Metagenomics: Probing pollutant fate in natural and engineered ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhajja, Emna; Agathos, Spiros N; George, Isabelle F

    2016-12-01

    Polluted environments are a reservoir of microbial species able to degrade or to convert pollutants to harmless compounds. The proper management of microbial resources requires a comprehensive characterization of their genetic pool to assess the fate of contaminants and increase the efficiency of bioremediation processes. Metagenomics offers appropriate tools to describe microbial communities in their whole complexity without lab-based cultivation of individual strains. After a decade of use of metagenomics to study microbiomes, the scientific community has made significant progress in this field. In this review, we survey the main steps of metagenomics applied to environments contaminated with organic compounds or heavy metals. We emphasize technical solutions proposed to overcome encountered obstacles. We then compare two metagenomic approaches, i.e. library-based targeted metagenomics and direct sequencing of metagenomes. In the former, environmental DNA is cloned inside a host, and then clones of interest are selected based on (i) their expression of biodegradative functions or (ii) sequence homology with probes and primers designed from relevant, already known sequences. The highest score for the discovery of novel genes and degradation pathways has been achieved so far by functional screening of large clone libraries. On the other hand, direct sequencing of metagenomes without a cloning step has been more often applied to polluted environments for characterization of the taxonomic and functional composition of microbial communities and their dynamics. In this case, the analysis has focused on 16S rRNA genes and marker genes of biodegradation. Advances in next generation sequencing and in bioinformatic analysis of sequencing data have opened up new opportunities for assessing the potential of biodegradation by microbes, but annotation of collected genes is still hampered by a limited number of available reference sequences in databases. Although metagenomics

  3. Metagenomic Approaches to Assess Bacteriophages in Various Environmental Niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Stephen; Mahony, Jennifer; Nauta, Arjen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are ubiquitous and numerous parasites of bacteria and play a critical evolutionary role in virtually every ecosystem, yet our understanding of the extent of the diversity and role of phages remains inadequate for many ecological niches, particularly in cases in which the host is unculturable. During the past 15 years, the emergence of the field of viral metagenomics has drastically enhanced our ability to analyse the so-called viral ‘dark matter’ of the biosphere. Here, we review the evolution of viral metagenomic methodologies, as well as providing an overview of some of the most significant applications and findings in this field of research. PMID:28538703

  4. Evaluating the Quantitative Capabilities of Metagenomic Analysis Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequencing technologies are applied widely and frequently today to describe metagenomes, i.e., microbial communities in environmental or clinical samples, without the need for culturing them. These technologies usually return short (100-300 base-pairs long) DNA reads, and these reads are processed by metagenomic analysis software that assign phylogenetic composition-information to the dataset. Here we evaluate three metagenomic analysis software (AmphoraNet--a webserver implementation of AMPHORA2--, MG-RAST, and MEGAN5) for their capabilities of assigning quantitative phylogenetic information for the data, describing the frequency of appearance of the microorganisms of the same taxa in the sample. The difficulties of the task arise from the fact that longer genomes produce more reads from the same organism than shorter genomes, and some software assign higher frequencies to species with longer genomes than to those with shorter ones. This phenomenon is called the "genome length bias." Dozens of complex artificial metagenome benchmarks can be found in the literature. Because of the complexity of those benchmarks, it is usually difficult to judge the resistance of a metagenomic software to this "genome length bias." Therefore, we have made a simple benchmark for the evaluation of the "taxon-counting" in a metagenomic sample: we have taken the same number of copies of three full bacterial genomes of different lengths, break them up randomly to short reads of average length of 150 bp, and mixed the reads, creating our simple benchmark. Because of its simplicity, the benchmark is not supposed to serve as a mock metagenome, but if a software fails on that simple task, it will surely fail on most real metagenomes. We applied three software for the benchmark. The ideal quantitative solution would assign the same proportion to the three bacterial taxa. We have found that AMPHORA2/AmphoraNet gave the most accurate results and the other two software were under

  5. Microbial diversity of hypersaline environments: a metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, Antonio; de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Papke, R Thane

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies based on metagenomics and other molecular techniques have permitted a detailed knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic activities of microorganisms in hypersaline environments. The current accepted model of community structure in hypersaline environments is that the square archaeon Haloquadratum waslbyi, the bacteroidete Salinibacter ruber and nanohaloarchaea are predominant members at higher salt concentrations, while more diverse archaeal and bacterial taxa are observed in habitats with intermediate salinities. Additionally, metagenomic studies may provide insight into the isolation and characterization of the principal microbes in these habitats, such as the recently described gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. deFUME: Dynamic exploration of functional metagenomic sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomic selections represent a powerful technique that is widely applied for identification of novel genes from complex metagenomic sources. However, whereas hundreds to thousands of clones can be easily generated and sequenced over a few days of experiments, analyzing the data......-bioinformaticians. The web-server integrates multiple analysis steps into one single workflow: read assembly, open reading frame prediction, and annotation with BLAST, InterPro and GO classifiers. Analysis results are visualized in an online dynamic web-interface. The deFUME webserver provides a fast track from raw sequence...

  7. Toward a Standards-Compliant Genomic and Metagenomic Publication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrity, GM; Field, D; Kyrpides, N

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, we are aware as a community of the growing need to manage the avalanche of genomic and metagenomic data, in addition to related data types like ribosomal RNA and barcode sequences, in a way that tightly integrates contextual data with traditional literature in a machine-readable way...... is in the midst of a publishing revolution. This revolution is marked by a growing shift away from a traditional dichotomy between "journal articles" and "database entries" and an increasing adoption of hybrid models of collecting and disseminating scientific information. With respect to genomes and metagenomes...

  8. Metagenomic Screening of Urban Rattus Norvegicus for Virus and Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Arn

    Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus) are ubiquitous around areas populated by human and are known vectors of pathogens to humans. Therefore the surveillance of R. norvegicus is important if we want to understand which pathogens they spread. Metagenomics and second-generation sequencing are paving...... the way for increasing rates of pathogen discovery and identification, thereby enabling faster containment of wildlife vectors. In this thesis, I have used metagenomics to assess the virome and resistome of the wild urban R. norvegicus. Many new potential viruses are discovered through virome analyses...

  9. Parallel-META 2.0: Enhanced Metagenomic Data Analysis with Functional Annotation, High Performance Computing and Advanced Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xiaoquan; Pan, Weihua; Song, Baoxing; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    The metagenomic method directly sequences and analyses genome information from microbial communities. The main computational tasks for metagenomic analyses include taxonomical and functional structure analysis for all genomes in a microbial community (also referred to as a metagenomic sample). With the advancement of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques, the number of metagenomic samples and the data size for each sample are increasing rapidly. Current metagenomic analysis is both data...

  10. High throughput whole rumen metagenome profiling using untargeted massively parallel sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Elizabeth M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation of microorganism communities in the rumen of cattle (Bos taurus is of great interest because of possible links to economically or environmentally important traits, such as feed conversion efficiency or methane emission levels. The resolution of studies investigating this variation may be improved by utilizing untargeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS, that is, sequencing without targeted amplification of genes. The objective of this study was to develop a method which used MPS to generate “rumen metagenome profiles”, and to investigate if these profiles were repeatable among samples taken from the same cow. Given faecal samples are much easier to obtain than rumen fluid samples; we also investigated whether rumen metagenome profiles were predictive of faecal metagenome profiles. Results Rather than focusing on individual organisms within the rumen, our method used MPS data to generate quantitative rumen micro-biome profiles, regardless of taxonomic classifications. The method requires a previously assembled reference metagenome. A number of such reference metagenomes were considered, including two rumen derived metagenomes, a human faecal microflora metagenome and a reference metagenome made up of publically available prokaryote sequences. Sequence reads from each test sample were aligned to these references. The “rumen metagenome profile” was generated from the number of the reads that aligned to each contig in the database. We used this method to test the hypothesis that rumen fluid microbial community profiles vary more between cows than within multiple samples from the same cow. Rumen fluid samples were taken from three cows, at three locations within the rumen. DNA from the samples was sequenced on the Illumina GAIIx. When the reads were aligned to a rumen metagenome reference, the rumen metagenome profiles were repeatable (P  Conclusions We have presented a simple and high throughput method of

  11. Genome-resolved metagenomics reveals that sulfur metabolism dominates the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Jain, S.; Reed, D. C.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plumes occur when hot fluids from hydrothermal vents replete with chemically reduced elements and compounds like sulfide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, iron and manganese mix with cold, oxic seawater. Chemosynthetic microbes use these reduced chemicals to power primary production and are pervasive throughout the deep sea, even at sites far removed from hydrothermal vents. Although neutrally-buoyant hydrothermal plumes have been well-studied, rising hydrothermal plumes have received little attention even though they represent an important interface in the deep-sea where microbial metabolism and particle formation processes control the transformation of important elements and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we used genome-resolved metagenomic analyses and thermodynamic-bioenergetic modeling to study the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes at five different hydrothermal vents spanning a range of geochemical gradients at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our analyses show that differences in the geochemistry of hydrothermal vents do not manifest in microbial diversity and community composition, both of which display only minor variance across ELSC hydrothermal plumes. Microbial metabolism is dominated by oxidation of reduced sulfur species and supports a diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses that provide intriguing insights into metabolic plasticity and virus-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the microbial community. The manifestation of sulfur oxidation genes in hydrogen and methane oxidizing organisms hints at metabolic opportunism in deep-sea microbes that would enable them to respond to varying redox conditions in hydrothermal plumes. Finally, we infer that the abundance, diversity and metabolic versatility of microbes associated with sulfur oxidation impart functional redundancy that could allow it to persist in the dynamic settings of hydrothermal plumes.

  12. Seasonal Dynamics and Metagenomic Characterization of Marine Viruses in Goseong Bay, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinik; Park, So Yun; Park, Mirye; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans, and account for a significant amount of the genetic diversity of marine ecosystems. However, there is little detailed information about the biodiversity of viruses in marine environments. Rapid advances in metagenomics have enabled the identification of previously unknown marine viruses. We performed metagenomic profiling of seawater samples collected at 6 sites in Goseong Bay (South Sea, Korea) during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter of 2014. The results indicated the presence of highly diverse virus communities. The DNA libraries from samples collected during four seasons were sequenced using Illumina HiSeq 2000. The number of viral reads was 136,850 during March, 70,651 during June, 66,165 during September, and 111,778 during December. Species identification indicated that Pelagibacter phage HTVC010P, Ostreococcus lucimarinus OIV5 and OIV1, and Roseobacter phage SIO1 were the most common species in all samples. For viruses with at least 10 reads, there were 204 species during March, 189 during June, 170 during September, and 173 during December. Analysis of virus families indicated that the Myoviridae was the most common during all four seasons, and viruses in the Polyomaviridae were only present during March. Viruses in the Iridoviridae were only present during three seasons. Additionally, viruses in the Iridoviridae, Herpesviridae, and Poxviridae, which may affect fish and marine animals, appeared during different seasons. These results suggest that seasonal changes in temperature contribute to the dynamic structure of the viral community in the study area. The information presented here will be useful for comparative analyses with other marine viral communities.

  13. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  14. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani D. Alma’abadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 99% of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel biocatalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to a great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metagenomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we discuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  15. Metagenomic Analyses of Drinking Water Receiving Different Disinfection Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A metagenome-based approach was utilized for assessing the taxonomic affiliation and function potential of microbial populations in free chlorine (CHL) and monochloramine (CHM) treated drinking water (DW). A total of 1,024, 242 (averaging 544 bp) and 849, 349 (averaging 554 bp) ...

  16. Oscillospira and related bacteria - from metagenomics species to metabolic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gophna, Uri; Konikoff, Tom; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    with interesting traits, especially leanness. However, very little is known about its metabolism or physiology. Here we used nearly complete genomes derived from shot-gun metagenomic data from the human gut to analyze Oscillospira and related bacteria. We used sequence similarity, gene neighbourhood information...

  17. Metagenomics and other Methods for Measuring Antibiotic Resistance in Agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is broad concern regarding antibiotic resistance on farms and in fields, however there is no standard method for defining or measuring antibiotic resistance in environmental samples. Methods: We used metagenomic, culture-based, and molecular methods to characterize the amount, t...

  18. Accelerating metagenomic read classification on CUDA-enabled GPUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Robin; Hundt, Christian; Müller, André; Schmidt, Bertil

    2017-01-03

    Metagenomic sequencing studies are becoming increasingly popular with prominent examples including the sequencing of human microbiomes and diverse environments. A fundamental computational problem in this context is read classification; i.e. the assignment of each read to a taxonomic label. Due to the large number of reads produced by modern high-throughput sequencing technologies and the rapidly increasing number of available reference genomes software tools for fast and accurate metagenomic read classification are urgently needed. We present cuCLARK, a read-level classifier for CUDA-enabled GPUs, based on the fast and accurate classification of metagenomic sequences using reduced k-mers (CLARK) method. Using the processing power of a single Titan X GPU, cuCLARK can reach classification speeds of up to 50 million reads per minute. Corresponding speedups for species- (genus-)level classification range between 3.2 and 6.6 (3.7 and 6.4) compared to multi-threaded CLARK executed on a 16-core Xeon CPU workstation. cuCLARK can perform metagenomic read classification at superior speeds on CUDA-enabled GPUs. It is free software licensed under GPL and can be downloaded at https://github.com/funatiq/cuclark free of charge.

  19. metaSNV: A tool for metagenomic strain level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costea, Paul Igor; Munch, Robin; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Paoli, Lucas; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer

    2017-01-01

    We present metaSNV, a tool for single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis in metagenomic samples, capable of comparing populations of thousands of bacterial and archaeal species. The tool uses as input nucleotide sequence alignments to reference genomes in standard SAM/BAM format, performs SNV calling for individual samples and across the whole data set, and generates various statistics for individual species including allele frequencies and nucleotide diversity per sample as well as distances and fixation indices across samples. Using published data from 676 metagenomic samples of different sites in the oral cavity, we show that the results of metaSNV are comparable to those of MIDAS, an alternative implementation for metagenomic SNV analysis, while data processing is faster and has a smaller storage footprint. Moreover, we implement a set of distance measures that allow the comparison of genomic variation across metagenomic samples and delineate sample-specific variants to enable the tracking of specific strain populations over time. The implementation of metaSNV is available at: http://metasnv.embl.de/.

  20. DIME: a novel framework for de novo metagenomic sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Yu, Ning; Ding, Xiaojun; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed next generation sequencing platforms not only decrease the cost for metagenomics data analysis, but also greatly enlarge the size of metagenomic sequence datasets. A common bottleneck of available assemblers is that the trade-off between the noise of the resulting contigs and the gain in sequence length for better annotation has not been attended enough for large-scale sequencing projects, especially for the datasets with low coverage and a large number of nonoverlapping contigs. To address this limitation and promote both accuracy and efficiency, we develop a novel metagenomic sequence assembly framework, DIME, by taking the DIvide, conquer, and MErge strategies. In addition, we give two MapReduce implementations of DIME, DIME-cap3 and DIME-genovo, on Apache Hadoop platform. For a systematic comparison of the performance of the assembly tasks, we tested DIME and five other popular short read assembly programs, Cap3, Genovo, MetaVelvet, SOAPdenovo, and SPAdes on four synthetic and three real metagenomic sequence datasets with various reads from fifty thousand to a couple million in size. The experimental results demonstrate that our method not only partitions the sequence reads with an extremely high accuracy, but also reconstructs more bases, generates higher quality assembled consensus, and yields higher assembly scores, including corrected N50 and BLAST-score-per-base, than other tools with a nearly theoretical speed-up. Results indicate that DIME offers great improvement in assembly across a range of sequence abundances and thus is robust to decreasing coverage.

  1. SPHINX--an algorithm for taxonomic binning of metagenomic sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2011-01-01

    Compared with composition-based binning algorithms, the binning accuracy and specificity of alignment-based binning algorithms is significantly higher. However, being alignment-based, the latter class of algorithms require enormous amount of time and computing resources for binning huge metagenomic datasets. The motivation was to develop a binning approach that can analyze metagenomic datasets as rapidly as composition-based approaches, but nevertheless has the accuracy and specificity of alignment-based algorithms. This article describes a hybrid binning approach (SPHINX) that achieves high binning efficiency by utilizing the principles of both 'composition'- and 'alignment'-based binning algorithms. Validation results with simulated sequence datasets indicate that SPHINX is able to analyze metagenomic sequences as rapidly as composition-based algorithms. Furthermore, the binning efficiency (in terms of accuracy and specificity of assignments) of SPHINX is observed to be comparable with results obtained using alignment-based algorithms. A web server for the SPHINX algorithm is available at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/SPHINX/.

  2. A probabilistic model to recover individual genomes from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Dröge (Johannes); A. Schönhuth (Alexander); A.C. McHardy (Alice)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractShotgun metagenomics of microbial communities reveal information about strains of relevance for applications in medicine, biotechnology and ecology. Recovering their genomes is a crucial but very challenging step due to the complexity of the underlying biological system and technical

  3. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Alma’abadi, Amani D.

    2015-11-10

    More than 99% of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel biocatalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metagenomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we discuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  4. MetaGenomic Assembly by Merging (MeGAMerge)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-08-03

    "MetaGenomic Assembly by Merging" (MeGAMerge)Is a novel method of merging of multiple genomic assembly or long read data sources for assembly by use of internal trimming/filtering of data, followed by use of two 3rd party tools to merge data by overlap based assembly.

  5. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e. contigs) of phage origin in metage-nomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic...

  6. Metagenomic species profiling using universal phylogenetic marker genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunagawa, Shinichi; Mende, Daniel R; Zeller, Georg

    2013-01-01

    To quantify known and unknown microorganisms at species-level resolution using shotgun sequencing data, we developed a method that establishes metagenomic operational taxonomic units (mOTUs) based on single-copy phylogenetic marker genes. Applied to 252 human fecal samples, the method revealed...

  7. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, J.; Li, R.; Raes, J.; Arumugam, M.; Tims, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence,

  8. Applications of Metagenomics to Fermented Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Bigot, Céline; Meile, Jean-Christophe; Remize, Fabienne; Strub, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Fermentation is a traditional way of food preservation and is of great importance for human food consumption as it enables the development of nutritional and organoleptic qualities of food. This key traditional process is used for the conservation and transformation of a wide variety of food products of different origins (animal or vegetal) and nature (liquid to solid). For instance, starchy cereal-based food, meat, fish and sea food, vegetables and fruits, dairy produ...

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of Koumiss in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-12-01

    : Lactobacillus diolivorans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. casei, L. curvatus  yeast genus Torula (62.4% and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (37.6%.Conclusion. Thus, the first metagenomic research of koumiss, which was conducted in Kazakhstan, showed significant variations in microbial composition.

  10. Towards diagnostic metagenomics of Campylobacter in fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sandra Christine; Kiil, Kristoffer; Harder, Christoffer Bugge; Josefsen, Mathilde Hasseldam; Persson, Søren; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2017-06-08

    The development of diagnostic metagenomics is driven by the need for universal, culture-independent methods for detection and characterization of pathogens to substitute the time-consuming, organism-specific, and often culture-based laboratory procedures for epidemiological source-tracing. Some of the challenges in diagnostic metagenomics are, that it requires a great next-generation sequencing depth and unautomated data analysis. DNA from human fecal samples spiked with 7.75 × 101-7.75 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml Campylobacter jejuni and chicken fecal samples spiked with 1 × 102-1 × 106 CFU/g Campylobacter jejuni was sequenced and data analysis was done by the metagenomic tools Kraken and CLARK. More hits were obtained at higher spiking levels, however with no significant linear correlations (human samples p = 0.12, chicken samples p = 0.10). Therefore, no definite detection limit could be determined, but the lowest spiking levels found positive were 7.75 × 104 CFU/ml in human feces and 103 CFU/g in chicken feces. Eight human clinical fecal samples with estimated Campylobacter infection loads from 9.2 × 104-1.0 × 109 CFU/ml were analyzed using the same methods. It was possible to detect Campylobacter in all the clinical samples. Sensitivity in diagnostic metagenomics is improving and has reached a clinically relevant level. There are still challenges to overcome before real-time diagnostic metagenomics can replace quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) or culture-based surveillance and diagnostics, but it is a promising new technology.

  11. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuypere, Saskia; Meehan, Conor J; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; De Block, Tessa; Maltha, Jessica; Palpouguini, Lompo; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI) is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI. The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months) with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3-V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046). Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030). Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination.

  12. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk.

  13. Diagnosis of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections: A 16S Metagenomics Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Decuypere

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial bloodstream infection (bBSI is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients and accurate diagnosis is therefore crucial. We here report a 16S metagenomics approach for diagnosing and understanding bBSI.The proof-of-concept was delivered in 75 children (median age 15 months with severe febrile illness in Burkina Faso. Standard blood culture and malaria testing were conducted at the time of hospital admission. 16S metagenomics testing was done retrospectively and in duplicate on the blood of all patients. Total DNA was extracted from the blood and the V3-V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and deep sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Paired reads were curated, taxonomically labeled, and filtered. Blood culture diagnosed bBSI in 12 patients, but this number increased to 22 patients when combining blood culture and 16S metagenomics results. In addition to superior sensitivity compared to standard blood culture, 16S metagenomics revealed important novel insights into the nature of bBSI. Patients with acute malaria or recovering from malaria had a 7-fold higher risk of presenting polymicrobial bloodstream infections compared to patients with no recent malaria diagnosis (p-value = 0.046. Malaria is known to affect epithelial gut function and may thus facilitate bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Importantly, patients with such polymicrobial blood infections showed a 9-fold higher risk factor for not surviving their febrile illness (p-value = 0.030.Our data demonstrate that 16S metagenomics is a powerful approach for the diagnosis and understanding of bBSI. This proof-of-concept study also showed that appropriate control samples are crucial to detect background signals due to environmental contamination.

  14. MetaCRAST: reference-guided extraction of CRISPR spacers from unassembled metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Abraham G.

    2017-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) systems are the adaptive immune systems of bacteria and archaea against viral infection. While CRISPRs have been exploited as a tool for genetic engineering, their spacer sequences can also provide valuable insights into microbial ecology by linking environmental viruses to their microbial hosts. Despite this importance, metagenomic CRISPR detection remains a major challenge. Here we present a reference-guided CRISPR spacer detection tool (Metagenomic CRISPR Reference-Aided Search Tool—MetaCRAST) that constrains searches based on user-specified direct repeats (DRs). These DRs could be expected from assembly or taxonomic profiles of metagenomes. We compared the performance of MetaCRAST to those of two existing metagenomic CRISPR detection tools—Crass and MinCED—using both real and simulated acid mine drainage (AMD) and enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) metagenomes. Our evaluation shows MetaCRAST improves CRISPR spacer detection in real metagenomes compared to the de novo CRISPR detection methods Crass and MinCED. Evaluation on simulated metagenomes show it performs better than de novo tools for Illumina metagenomes and comparably for 454 metagenomes. It also has comparable performance dependence on read length and community composition, run time, and accuracy to these tools. MetaCRAST is implemented in Perl, parallelizable through the Many Core Engine (MCE), and takes metagenomic sequence reads and direct repeat queries (FASTA or FASTQ) as input. It is freely available for download at https://github.com/molleraj/MetaCRAST. PMID:28894651

  15. MetaCRAST: reference-guided extraction of CRISPR spacers from unassembled metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham G. Moller

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR systems are the adaptive immune systems of bacteria and archaea against viral infection. While CRISPRs have been exploited as a tool for genetic engineering, their spacer sequences can also provide valuable insights into microbial ecology by linking environmental viruses to their microbial hosts. Despite this importance, metagenomic CRISPR detection remains a major challenge. Here we present a reference-guided CRISPR spacer detection tool (Metagenomic CRISPR Reference-Aided Search Tool—MetaCRAST that constrains searches based on user-specified direct repeats (DRs. These DRs could be expected from assembly or taxonomic profiles of metagenomes. We compared the performance of MetaCRAST to those of two existing metagenomic CRISPR detection tools—Crass and MinCED—using both real and simulated acid mine drainage (AMD and enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR metagenomes. Our evaluation shows MetaCRAST improves CRISPR spacer detection in real metagenomes compared to the de novo CRISPR detection methods Crass and MinCED. Evaluation on simulated metagenomes show it performs better than de novo tools for Illumina metagenomes and comparably for 454 metagenomes. It also has comparable performance dependence on read length and community composition, run time, and accuracy to these tools. MetaCRAST is implemented in Perl, parallelizable through the Many Core Engine (MCE, and takes metagenomic sequence reads and direct repeat queries (FASTA or FASTQ as input. It is freely available for download at https://github.com/molleraj/MetaCRAST.

  16. MetaCRAST: reference-guided extraction of CRISPR spacers from unassembled metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Abraham G; Liang, Chun

    2017-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) systems are the adaptive immune systems of bacteria and archaea against viral infection. While CRISPRs have been exploited as a tool for genetic engineering, their spacer sequences can also provide valuable insights into microbial ecology by linking environmental viruses to their microbial hosts. Despite this importance, metagenomic CRISPR detection remains a major challenge. Here we present a reference-guided CRISPR spacer detection tool (Metagenomic CRISPR Reference-Aided Search Tool-MetaCRAST) that constrains searches based on user-specified direct repeats (DRs). These DRs could be expected from assembly or taxonomic profiles of metagenomes. We compared the performance of MetaCRAST to those of two existing metagenomic CRISPR detection tools-Crass and MinCED-using both real and simulated acid mine drainage (AMD) and enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) metagenomes. Our evaluation shows MetaCRAST improves CRISPR spacer detection in real metagenomes compared to the de novo CRISPR detection methods Crass and MinCED. Evaluation on simulated metagenomes show it performs better than de novo tools for Illumina metagenomes and comparably for 454 metagenomes. It also has comparable performance dependence on read length and community composition, run time, and accuracy to these tools. MetaCRAST is implemented in Perl, parallelizable through the Many Core Engine (MCE), and takes metagenomic sequence reads and direct repeat queries (FASTA or FASTQ) as input. It is freely available for download at https://github.com/molleraj/MetaCRAST.

  17. EBI metagenomics in 2016--an expanding and evolving resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alex; Bucchini, Francois; Cochrane, Guy; Denise, Hubert; ten Hoopen, Petra; Fraser, Matthew; Pesseat, Sebastien; Potter, Simon; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Sterk, Peter; Finn, Robert D

    2016-01-04

    EBI metagenomics (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/) is a freely available hub for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. Over the last 2 years, the resource has undergone rapid growth, with an increase of over five-fold in the number of processed samples and consequently represents one of the largest resources of analysed shotgun metagenomes. Here, we report the status of the resource in 2016 and give an overview of new developments. In particular, we describe updates to data content, a complete overhaul of the analysis pipeline, streamlining of data presentation via the website and the development of a new web based tool to compare functional analyses of sequence runs within a study. We also highlight two of the higher profile projects that have been analysed using the resource in the last year: the oceanographic projects Ocean Sampling Day and Tara Oceans. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. High throughtput comparisons and profiling of metagenomes for industrially relevant enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Intikhab

    2016-01-26

    More and more genomes and metagenomes are being sequenced since the advent of Next Generation Sequencing Technologies (NGS). Many metagenomic samples are collected from a variety of environments, each exhibiting a different environmental profile, e.g. temperature, environmental chemistry, etc… These metagenomes can be profiled to unearth enzymes relevant to several industries based on specific enzyme properties such as ability to work on extreme conditions, such as extreme temperatures, salinity, anaerobically, etc.. In this work, we present the DMAP platform comprising of a high-throughput metagenomic annotation pipeline and a data-warehouse for comparisons and profiling across large number of metagenomes. We developed two reference databases for profiling of important genes, one containing enzymes related to different industries and the other containing genes with potential bioactivity roles. In this presentation we describe an example analysis of a large number of publicly available metagenomic sample from TARA oceans study (Science 2015) that covers significant part of world oceans.

  19. Metagenomic sequence of saline desert microbiota from wild ass sanctuary, Little Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajesh; Mevada, Vishal; Prajapati, Dhaval; Dudhagara, Pravin; Koringa, Prakash; Joshi, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    We report Metagenome from the saline desert soil sample of Little Rann of Kutch, Gujarat State, India. Metagenome consisted of 633,760 sequences with size 141,307,202 bp and 56% G + C content. Metagenome sequence data are available at EBI under EBI Metagenomics database with accession no. ERP005612. Community metagenomics revealed total 1802 species belonged to 43 different phyla with dominating Marinobacter (48.7%) and Halobacterium (4.6%) genus in bacterial and archaeal domain respectively. Remarkably, 18.2% sequences in a poorly characterized group and 4% gene for various stress responses along with versatile presence of commercial enzyme were evident in a functional metagenome analysis. PMID:26484162

  20. Metagenomics: The Next Culture-Independent Game Changer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Forbes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A trend towards the abandonment of obtaining pure culture isolates in frontline laboratories is at a crossroads with the ability of public health agencies to perform their basic mandate of foodborne disease surveillance and response. The implementation of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs including nucleic acid and antigen-based assays for acute gastroenteritis is leaving public health agencies without laboratory evidence to link clinical cases to each other and to food or environmental substances. This limits the efficacy of public health epidemiology and surveillance as well as outbreak detection and investigation. Foodborne outbreaks have the potential to remain undetected or have insufficient evidence to support source attribution and may inadvertently increase the incidence of foodborne diseases. Next-generation sequencing of pure culture isolates in clinical microbiology laboratories has the potential to revolutionize the fields of food safety and public health. Metagenomics and other ‘omics’ disciplines could provide the solution to a cultureless future in clinical microbiology, food safety and public health. Data mining of information obtained from metagenomics assays can be particularly useful for the identification of clinical causative agents or foodborne contamination, detection of AMR and/or virulence factors, in addition to providing high-resolution subtyping data. Thus, metagenomics assays may provide a universal test for clinical diagnostics, foodborne pathogen detection, subtyping and investigation. This information has the potential to reform the field of enteric disease diagnostics and surveillance and also infectious diseases as a whole. The aim of this review will be to present the current state of CIDTs in diagnostic and public health laboratories as they relate to foodborne illness and food safety. Moreover, we will also discuss the diagnostic and subtyping utility and concomitant bias limitations of

  1. Metagenomics: The Next Culture-Independent Game Changer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jessica D.; Knox, Natalie C.; Ronholm, Jennifer; Pagotto, Franco; Reimer, Aleisha

    2017-01-01

    A trend towards the abandonment of obtaining pure culture isolates in frontline laboratories is at a crossroads with the ability of public health agencies to perform their basic mandate of foodborne disease surveillance and response. The implementation of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) including nucleic acid and antigen-based assays for acute gastroenteritis is leaving public health agencies without laboratory evidence to link clinical cases to each other and to food or environmental substances. This limits the efficacy of public health epidemiology and surveillance as well as outbreak detection and investigation. Foodborne outbreaks have the potential to remain undetected or have insufficient evidence to support source attribution and may inadvertently increase the incidence of foodborne diseases. Next-generation sequencing of pure culture isolates in clinical microbiology laboratories has the potential to revolutionize the fields of food safety and public health. Metagenomics and other ‘omics’ disciplines could provide the solution to a cultureless future in clinical microbiology, food safety and public health. Data mining of information obtained from metagenomics assays can be particularly useful for the identification of clinical causative agents or foodborne contamination, detection of AMR and/or virulence factors, in addition to providing high-resolution subtyping data. Thus, metagenomics assays may provide a universal test for clinical diagnostics, foodborne pathogen detection, subtyping and investigation. This information has the potential to reform the field of enteric disease diagnostics and surveillance and also infectious diseases as a whole. The aim of this review will be to present the current state of CIDTs in diagnostic and public health laboratories as they relate to foodborne illness and food safety. Moreover, we will also discuss the diagnostic and subtyping utility and concomitant bias limitations of metagenomics and comparable

  2. Metagenomics: The Next Culture-Independent Game Changer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jessica D; Knox, Natalie C; Ronholm, Jennifer; Pagotto, Franco; Reimer, Aleisha

    2017-01-01

    A trend towards the abandonment of obtaining pure culture isolates in frontline laboratories is at a crossroads with the ability of public health agencies to perform their basic mandate of foodborne disease surveillance and response. The implementation of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) including nucleic acid and antigen-based assays for acute gastroenteritis is leaving public health agencies without laboratory evidence to link clinical cases to each other and to food or environmental substances. This limits the efficacy of public health epidemiology and surveillance as well as outbreak detection and investigation. Foodborne outbreaks have the potential to remain undetected or have insufficient evidence to support source attribution and may inadvertently increase the incidence of foodborne diseases. Next-generation sequencing of pure culture isolates in clinical microbiology laboratories has the potential to revolutionize the fields of food safety and public health. Metagenomics and other 'omics' disciplines could provide the solution to a cultureless future in clinical microbiology, food safety and public health. Data mining of information obtained from metagenomics assays can be particularly useful for the identification of clinical causative agents or foodborne contamination, detection of AMR and/or virulence factors, in addition to providing high-resolution subtyping data. Thus, metagenomics assays may provide a universal test for clinical diagnostics, foodborne pathogen detection, subtyping and investigation. This information has the potential to reform the field of enteric disease diagnostics and surveillance and also infectious diseases as a whole. The aim of this review will be to present the current state of CIDTs in diagnostic and public health laboratories as they relate to foodborne illness and food safety. Moreover, we will also discuss the diagnostic and subtyping utility and concomitant bias limitations of metagenomics and comparable

  3. MetAMOS: a modular and open source metagenomic assembly and analysis pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Treangen, Todd J.; Koren, Sergey; Sommer, Daniel D; Liu, Bo; Astrovskaya, Irina; Ondov, Brian; Darling, Aaron E.; Phillippy, Adam M; Pop, Mihai

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We describe MetAMOS, an open source and modular metagenomic assembly and analysis pipeline. MetAMOS represents an important step towards fully automated metagenomic analysis, starting with next-generation sequencing reads and producing genomic scaffolds, open-reading frames and taxonomic or functional annotations. MetAMOS can aid in reducing assembly errors, commonly encountered when assembling metagenomic samples, and improves taxonomic assignment accuracy while also reducing com...

  4. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pride David T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC, where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. Results From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of

  5. MetLab: An In Silico Experimental Design, Simulation and Analysis Tool for Viral Metagenomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norling, Martin; Karlsson-Lindsjö, Oskar E; Gourlé, Hadrien; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Hayer, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics, the sequence characterization of all genomes within a sample, is widely used as a virus discovery tool as well as a tool to study viral diversity of animals. Metagenomics can be considered to have three main steps; sample collection and preparation, sequencing and finally bioinformatics. Bioinformatic analysis of metagenomic datasets is in itself a complex process, involving few standardized methodologies, thereby hampering comparison of metagenomics studies between research groups. In this publication the new bioinformatics framework MetLab is presented, aimed at providing scientists with an integrated tool for experimental design and analysis of viral metagenomes. MetLab provides support in designing the metagenomics experiment by estimating the sequencing depth needed for the complete coverage of a species. This is achieved by applying a methodology to calculate the probability of coverage using an adaptation of Stevens' theorem. It also provides scientists with several pipelines aimed at simplifying the analysis of viral metagenomes, including; quality control, assembly and taxonomic binning. We also implement a tool for simulating metagenomics datasets from several sequencing platforms. The overall aim is to provide virologists with an easy to use tool for designing, simulating and analyzing viral metagenomes. The results presented here include a benchmark towards other existing software, with emphasis on detection of viruses as well as speed of applications. This is packaged, as comprehensive software, readily available for Linux and OSX users at https://github.com/norling/metlab.

  6. Genomics and Metagenomics of Extreme Acidophiles in Biomining Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 160 draft or complete genomes of extreme acidophiles (pH metagenomic studies of such environments. This provides a rich source of latent data that can be exploited for understanding the biology of biomining environments and for advancing biotechnological applications. Genomic and metagenomic data are already yielding valuable insights into cellular processes, including carbon and nitrogen management, heavy metal and acid resistance, iron and sulfur oxido-reduction, linking biogeochemical processes to organismal physiology. The data also allow the construction of useful models of the ecophysiology of biomining environments and provide insight into the gene and genome evolution of extreme acidophiles. Additionally, since most of these acidophiles are also chemoautolithotrophs that use minerals as energy sources or electron sinks, their genomes can be plundered for clues about the evolution of cellular metabolism and bioenergetic pathways during the Archaean abiotic/biotic transition on early Earth. Acknowledgements: Fondecyt 1130683.

  7. Metagenomic approaches to understanding phylogenetic diversity in quorum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of cell–cell communication among bacteria, allows bacteria to synchronize their behaviors at the population level in order to control behaviors such as luminescence, biofilm formation, signal turnover, pigment production, antibiotics production, swarming, and virulence. A better understanding of quorum-sensing systems will provide us with greater insight into the complex interaction mechanisms used widely in the Bacteria and even the Archaea domain in the environment. Metagenomics, the use of culture-independent sequencing to study the genomic material of microorganisms, has the potential to provide direct information about the quorum-sensing systems in uncultured bacteria. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of quorum sensing focused on phylogenetic diversity, and presents examples of studies that have used metagenomic techniques. Future technologies potentially related to quorum-sensing systems are also discussed. PMID:24429899

  8. Further steps in TANGO: improved taxonomic assignment in metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Alemany, Daniel; Barré, Aurélien; Beretta, Stefano; Bonizzoni, Paola; Nikolski, Macha; Valiente, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    TANGO is one of the most accurate tools for the taxonomic assignment of sequence reads. However, because of the differences in the taxonomy structures, performing a taxonomic assignment on different reference taxonomies will produce divergent results. We have improved the TANGO pipeline to be able to perform the taxonomic assignment of a metagenomic sample using alternative reference taxonomies, coming from different sources. We highlight the novel pre-processing step, necessary to accomplish this task, and describe the improvements in the assignment process. We present the new TANGO pipeline in details, and, finally, we show its performance on four real metagenomic datasets and also on synthetic datasets. The new version of TANGO, including implementation improvements and novel developments to perform the assignment on different reference taxonomies, is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/taxoassignment/.

  9. Windshield splatter analysis with the Galaxy metagenomic pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei; Wadhawan, Samir; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Ananda, Guruprasad; Chung, Wen-Yu; Taylor, James; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2009-11-01

    How many species inhabit our immediate surroundings? A straightforward collection technique suitable for answering this question is known to anyone who has ever driven a car at highway speeds. The windshield of a moving vehicle is subjected to numerous insect strikes and can be used as a collection device for representative sampling. Unfortunately the analysis of biological material collected in that manner, as with most metagenomic studies, proves to be rather demanding due to the large number of required tools and considerable computational infrastructure. In this study, we use organic matter collected by a moving vehicle to design and test a comprehensive pipeline for phylogenetic profiling of metagenomic samples that includes all steps from processing and quality control of data generated by next-generation sequencing technologies to statistical analyses and data visualization. To the best of our knowledge, this is also the first publication that features a live online supplement providing access to exact analyses and workflows used in the article.

  10. Wide host-range cloning for functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Margaret; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2010-01-01

    We describe how wide host-range cloning vectors can lead to more flexible and effective procedures to isolate novel genes by screening metagenomic libraries in a range of bacterial hosts, not just the conventionally used Escherichia coli. We give examples of various wide host-range plasmid, cosmid, and BAC cloning vectors and the types of genes and activities that have been successfully obtained to date. We present a detailed protocol that involves the construction and screening of a metagenomic library comprising fragments of bacterial DNA, obtained from a wastewater treatment plant and cloned in a wide host-range cosmid. We also consider future prospects and how techniques and tools can be improved.

  11. Biogeography and individuality shape function in the human skin metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Julia; Byrd, Allyson L; Deming, Clay; Conlan, Sean; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2014-10-02

    The varied topography of human skin offers a unique opportunity to study how the body's microenvironments influence the functional and taxonomic composition of microbial communities. Phylogenetic marker gene-based studies have identified many bacteria and fungi that colonize distinct skin niches. Here metagenomic analyses of diverse body sites in healthy humans demonstrate that local biogeography and strong individuality define the skin microbiome. We developed a relational analysis of bacterial, fungal and viral communities, which showed not only site specificity but also individual signatures. We further identified strain-level variation of dominant species as heterogeneous and multiphyletic. Reference-free analyses captured the uncharacterized metagenome through the development of a multi-kingdom gene catalogue, which was used to uncover genetic signatures of species lacking reference genomes. This work is foundational for human disease studies investigating inter-kingdom interactions, metabolic changes and strain tracking, and defines the dual influence of biogeography and individuality on microbial composition and function.

  12. A metagenomic framework for the study of airborne microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Yooseph

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial content of the air has important scientific, health, and economic implications. While studies have primarily characterized the taxonomic content of air samples by sequencing the 16S or 18S ribosomal RNA gene, direct analysis of the genomic content of airborne microorganisms has not been possible due to the extremely low density of biological material in airborne environments. We developed sampling and amplification methods to enable adequate DNA recovery to allow metagenomic profiling of air samples collected from indoor and outdoor environments. Air samples were collected from a large urban building, a medical center, a house, and a pier. Analyses of metagenomic data generated from these samples reveal airborne communities with a high degree of diversity and different genera abundance profiles. The identities of many of the taxonomic groups and protein families also allows for the identification of the likely sources of the sampled airborne bacteria.

  13. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-01

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of ...

  14. CoMeta: Classification of Metagenomes Using k-mers

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Kawulok; Sebastian Deorowicz

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the study of environmental samples has been developing rapidly. Characterization of the environment composition broadens the knowledge about the relationship between species composition and environmental conditions. An important element of extracting the knowledge of the sample composition is to compare the extracted fragments of DNA with sequences derived from known organisms. In the presented paper, we introduce an algorithm called CoMeta (Classification of metagenomes), which ass...

  15. Bioprospecting Potential of the Soil Metagenome: Novel Enzymes and Bioactivities

    OpenAIRE

    Myung Hwan Lee; Seon-Woo Lee

    2013-01-01

    The microbial diversity in soil ecosystems is higher than in any other microbial ecosystem. The majority of soil microorganisms has not been characterized, because the dominant members have not been readily culturable on standard cultivation media; therefore, the soil ecosystem is a great reservoir for the discovery of novel microbial enzymes and bioactivities. The soil metagenome, the collective microbial genome, could be cloned and sequenced directly from soils to search for novel microbial...

  16. Bioprospecting metagenomics of decaying wood: mining for new glycoside hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li L. L.; van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Blewitt, M. G.; Brunecky, R.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Brumm, P.; Drinkwater, C.; Mead, D. A.; Tringe, S. G.

    2011-08-01

    To efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant plant biomass to fermentable sugars in industrial processes, biocatalysts of higher performance and lower cost are required. The genetic diversity found in the metagenomes of natural microbial biomass decay communities may harbor such enzymes. Our goal was to discover and characterize new glycoside hydrolases (GHases) from microbial biomass decay communities, especially those from unknown or never previously cultivated microorganisms. From the metagenome sequences of an anaerobic microbial community actively decaying poplar biomass, we identified approximately 4,000 GHase homologs. Based on homology to GHase families/activities of interest and the quality of the sequences, candidates were selected for full-length cloning and subsequent expression. As an alternative strategy, a metagenome expression library was constructed and screened for GHase activities. These combined efforts resulted in the cloning of four novel GHases that could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Further characterization showed that two enzymes showed significant activity on p-nitrophenyl-{alpha}-L-arabinofuranoside, one enzyme had significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, and one enzyme showed significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-xylopyranoside. Enzymes were also tested in the presence of ionic liquids. Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes and for screening of cellulolytic enzyme activities. The four GHases that were cloned may have potential application for deconstruction of biomass pretreated with ionic liquids, as they remain active in the presence of up to 20% ionic liquid (except for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate). Alternatively, ionic liquids might be used to immobilize or stabilize these enzymes for minimal solvent processing of biomass.

  17. Recovery of a medieval Brucella melitensis genome using shotgun metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Gemma L; Sergeant, Martin J; Giuffra, Valentina; Bandiera, Pasquale; Milanese, Marco; Bramanti, Barbara; Bianucci, Raffaella; Pallen, Mark J

    2014-07-15

    Shotgun metagenomics provides a powerful assumption-free approach to the recovery of pathogen genomes from contemporary and historical material. We sequenced the metagenome of a calcified nodule from the skeleton of a 14th-century middle-aged male excavated from the medieval Sardinian settlement of Geridu. We obtained 6.5-fold coverage of a Brucella melitensis genome. Sequence reads from this genome showed signatures typical of ancient or aged DNA. Despite the relatively low coverage, we were able to use information from single-nucleotide polymorphisms to place the medieval pathogen genome within a clade of B. melitensis strains that included the well-studied Ether strain and two other recent Italian isolates. We confirmed this placement using information from deletions and IS711 insertions. We conclude that metagenomics stands ready to document past and present infections, shedding light on the emergence, evolution, and spread of microbial pathogens. Importance: Infectious diseases have shaped human populations and societies throughout history. The recovery of pathogen DNA sequences from human remains provides an opportunity to identify and characterize the causes of individual and epidemic infections. By sequencing DNA extracted from medieval human remains through shotgun metagenomics, without target-specific capture or amplification, we have obtained a draft genome sequence of an ~700-year-old Brucella melitensis strain. Using a variety of bioinformatic approaches, we have shown that this historical strain is most closely related to recent strains isolated from Italy, confirming the continuity of this zoonotic infection, and even a specific lineage, in the Mediterranean region over the centuries. Copyright © 2014 Kay et al.

  18. Assessment of Common and Emerging Bioinformatics Pipelines for Targeted Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegwald, Léa; Touzet, Hélène; Lemoine, Yves; Hot, David; Audebert, Christophe; Caboche, Ségolène

    2017-01-01

    Targeted metagenomics, also known as metagenetics, is a high-throughput sequencing application focusing on a nucleotide target in a microbiome to describe its taxonomic content. A wide range of bioinformatics pipelines are available to analyze sequencing outputs, and the choice of an appropriate tool is crucial and not trivial. No standard evaluation method exists for estimating the accuracy of a pipeline for targeted metagenomics analyses. This article proposes an evaluation protocol containing real and simulated targeted metagenomics datasets, and adequate metrics allowing us to study the impact of different variables on the biological interpretation of results. This protocol was used to compare six different bioinformatics pipelines in the basic user context: Three common ones (mothur, QIIME and BMP) based on a clustering-first approach and three emerging ones (Kraken, CLARK and One Codex) using an assignment-first approach. This study surprisingly reveals that the effect of sequencing errors has a bigger impact on the results that choosing different amplified regions. Moreover, increasing sequencing throughput increases richness overestimation, even more so for microbiota of high complexity. Finally, the choice of the reference database has a bigger impact on richness estimation for clustering-first pipelines, and on correct taxa identification for assignment-first pipelines. Using emerging assignment-first pipelines is a valid approach for targeted metagenomics analyses, with a quality of results comparable to popular clustering-first pipelines, even with an error-prone sequencing technology like Ion Torrent. However, those pipelines are highly sensitive to the quality of databases and their annotations, which makes clustering-first pipelines still the only reliable approach for studying microbiomes that are not well described.

  19. Windshield splatter analysis with the Galaxy metagenomic pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei; Wadhawan, Samir; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Ananda, Guruprasad; Chung, Wen-Yu; Taylor, James; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2009-01-01

    How many species inhabit our immediate surroundings? A straightforward collection technique suitable for answering this question is known to anyone who has ever driven a car at highway speeds. The windshield of a moving vehicle is subjected to numerous insect strikes and can be used as a collection device for representative sampling. Unfortunately the analysis of biological material collected in that manner, as with most metagenomic studies, proves to be rather demanding due to the large numb...

  20. Biogeography and individuality shape function in the human skin metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Julia; Byrd, Allyson L.; Deming, Clay; Conlan, Sean; Kong, Heidi H.; Segre, Julia A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The varied topography of human skin offers a unique opportunity to study how the body?s microenvironments influence the functional and taxonomic composition of microbial communities. Phylogenetic marker gene-based studies have identified many bacteria and fungi that colonize distinct skin niches. Here, metagenomic analyses of diverse body sites in healthy humans demonstrate that local biogeography and strong individuality define the skin microbiome. We developed a relational analysis ...

  1. Functional screening of a metagenomic library from algal biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Marjolaine

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgae, and particularly their lignin-free polysaccharides, are increasingly used for their gelling and therapeutic properties and for the production of biofuels and renewable chemical compounds. To extract, hydrolyze and purify this biomass, algae hydrolyzing enzymes are needed. Our work aims to identify and characterize algal biomass hydrolyzing enzymes expressed by microorganisms living on the surface of algae, by functional metagenomics. Therefore, a microbial DNA extraction me...

  2. Bioprospecting metagenomics of decaying wood: mining for new glycoside hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luen-Luen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant plant biomass to fermentable sugars in industrial processes, biocatalysts of higher performance and lower cost are required. The genetic diversity found in the metagenomes of natural microbial biomass decay communities may harbor such enzymes. Our goal was to discover and characterize new glycoside hydrolases (GHases from microbial biomass decay communities, especially those from unknown or never previously cultivated microorganisms. Results From the metagenome sequences of an anaerobic microbial community actively decaying poplar biomass, we identified approximately 4,000 GHase homologs. Based on homology to GHase families/activities of interest and the quality of the sequences, candidates were selected for full-length cloning and subsequent expression. As an alternative strategy, a metagenome expression library was constructed and screened for GHase activities. These combined efforts resulted in the cloning of four novel GHases that could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Further characterization showed that two enzymes showed significant activity on p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside, one enzyme had significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, and one enzyme showed significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside. Enzymes were also tested in the presence of ionic liquids. Conclusions Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes and for screening of cellulolytic enzyme activities. The four GHases that were cloned may have potential application for deconstruction of biomass pretreated with ionic liquids, as they remain active in the presence of up to 20% ionic liquid (except for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate. Alternatively, ionic liquids might be used to immobilize or stabilize these enzymes for minimal solvent processing of biomass.

  3. MOCAT: a metagenomics assembly and gene prediction toolkit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Roat Kultima

    Full Text Available MOCAT is a highly configurable, modular pipeline for fast, standardized processing of single or paired-end sequencing data generated by the Illumina platform. The pipeline uses state-of-the-art programs to quality control, map, and assemble reads from metagenomic samples sequenced at a depth of several billion base pairs, and predict protein-coding genes on assembled metagenomes. Mapping against reference databases allows for read extraction or removal, as well as abundance calculations. Relevant statistics for each processing step can be summarized into multi-sheet Excel documents and queryable SQL databases. MOCAT runs on UNIX machines and integrates seamlessly with the SGE and PBS queuing systems, commonly used to process large datasets. The open source code and modular architecture allow users to modify or exchange the programs that are utilized in the various processing steps. Individual processing steps and parameters were benchmarked and tested on artificial, real, and simulated metagenomes resulting in an improvement of selected quality metrics. MOCAT can be freely downloaded at http://www.bork.embl.de/mocat/.

  4. Reconstruction of ribosomal RNA genes from metagenomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fan

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics has a great potential for describing the 16S rRNA gene diversity of microbial communities. However current approaches using this 16S rRNA gene information to describe community diversity suffer from low taxonomic resolution or chimera problems. Here we describe a new strategy that involves stringent assembly and data filtering to reconstruct full-length 16S rRNA genes from metagenomicpyrosequencing data. Simulations showed that reconstructed 16S rRNA genes provided a true picture of the community diversity, had minimal rates of chimera formation and gave taxonomic resolution down to genus level. The strategy was furthermore compared to PCR-based methods to determine the microbial diversity in two marine sponges. This showed that about 30% of the abundant phylotypes reconstructed from metagenomic data failed to be amplified by PCR. Our approach is readily applicable to existing metagenomic datasets and is expected to lead to the discovery of new microbial phylotypes.

  5. Functional metagenomic selection of RubisCOs from uncultivated bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; North, Justin A.; Witteveen, Briana; Dourado, Manuella N.; Anantharaman, Karthik; Arbing, Mark A.; McCann, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a critical yet severely inefficient enzyme that catalyses the fixation of virtually all of the carbon found on Earth. Here, we report a functional metagenomic selection that recovers physiologically active RubisCO molecules directly from uncultivated and largely unknown members of natural microbial communities. Selection is based on CO2-dependent growth in a host strain capable of expressing environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), precluding the need for pure cultures or screening of recombinant clones for enzymatic activity. Seventeen functional RubisCO-encoded sequences were selected using DNA extracted from soil and river autotrophic enrichments, a photosynthetic biofilm and a subsurface groundwater aquifer. Notably, three related form II RubisCOs were recovered which share high sequence similarity with metagenomic scaffolds from uncultivated members of theGallionellaceae family. One of the Gallionellaceae RubisCOs was purified and shown to possessCO2/O2 specificity typical of form II enzymes. X-ray crystallography determined that this enzyme is a hexamer, only the second form II multimer ever solved and the first RubisCO structure obtained from an uncultivated bacterium. Functional metagenomic selection leverages natural biological diversity and billions of years of evolution inherent in environmental communities, providing a new window into the discovery of CO2-fixing enzymes not previously characterized.

  6. Revealing large metagenomic regions through long DNA fragment hybridization capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Peyret, Pierre

    2017-03-14

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized genomic analysis, including the de novo assembly of whole genomes from single organisms or metagenomic samples. However, due to the limited capacity of short-read sequence data to assemble complex or low coverage regions, genomes are typically fragmented, leading to draft genomes with numerous underexplored large genomic regions. Revealing these missing sequences is a major goal to resolve concerns in numerous biological studies. To overcome these limitations, we developed an innovative target enrichment method for the reconstruction of large unknown genomic regions. Based on a hybridization capture strategy, this approach enables the enrichment of large genomic regions allowing the reconstruction of tens of kilobase pairs flanking a short, targeted DNA sequence. Applied to a metagenomic soil sample targeting the linA gene, the biomarker of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation, our method permitted the enrichment of the gene and its flanking regions leading to the reconstruction of several contigs and complete plasmids exceeding tens of kilobase pairs surrounding linA. Thus, through gene association and genome reconstruction, we identified microbial species involved in HCH degradation which constitute targets to improve biostimulation treatments. This new hybridization capture strategy makes surveying and deconvoluting complex genomic regions possible through large genomic regions enrichment and allows the efficient exploration of metagenomic diversity. Indeed, this approach enables to assign identity and function to microorganisms in natural environments, one of the ultimate goals of microbial ecology.

  7. Metagenomics: Concept, methodology, ecological inference and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagtar; Behal, Arvind; Singla, Neha; Joshi, Amit; Birbian, Niti; Singh, Sukhdeep; Bali, Vandana; Batra, Navneet

    2009-04-01

    Microorganisms constitute two third of the Earth's biological diversity. As many as 99% of the microorganisms present in certain environments cannot be cultured by standard techniques. Culture-independent methods are required to understand the genetic diversity, population structure and ecological roles of the majority of organisms. Metagenomics is the genomic analysis of microorganisms by direct extraction and cloning of DNA from their natural environment. Protocols have been developed to capture unexplored microbial diversity to overcome the existing barriers in estimation of diversity. New screening methods have been designed to select specific functional genes within metagenomic libraries to detect novel biocatalysts as well as bioactive molecules applicable to mankind. To study the complete gene or operon clusters, various vectors including cosmid, fosmid or bacterial artificial chromosomes are being developed. Bioinformatics tools and databases have added much to the study of microbial diversity. This review describes the various methodologies and tools developed to understand the biology of uncultured microbes including bacteria, archaea and viruses through metagenomic analysis.

  8. Culture-independent discovery of natural products from soil metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Micah; Hover, Bradley M; Brady, Sean F

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial natural products have proven to be invaluable starting points in the development of many currently used therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, traditional culture-based methods for natural product discovery have been deemphasized by pharmaceutical companies due in large part to high rediscovery rates. Culture-independent, or "metagenomic," methods, which rely on the heterologous expression of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA), have the potential to provide access to metabolites encoded by a large fraction of the earth's microbial biosynthetic diversity. As soil is both ubiquitous and rich in bacterial diversity, it is an appealing starting point for culture-independent natural product discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of the history of soil metagenome-driven natural product discovery studies and elaborates on the recent development of new tools for sequence-based, high-throughput profiling of environmental samples used in discovering novel natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. We conclude with several examples of these new tools being employed to facilitate the recovery of novel secondary metabolite encoding gene clusters from soil metagenomes and the subsequent heterologous expression of these clusters to produce bioactive small molecules.

  9. PhyloSift: phylogenetic analysis of genomes and metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Darling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Like all organisms on the planet, environmental microbes are subject to the forces of molecular evolution. Metagenomic sequencing provides a means to access the DNA sequence of uncultured microbes. By combining DNA sequencing of microbial communities with evolutionary modeling and phylogenetic analysis we might obtain new insights into microbiology and also provide a basis for practical tools such as forensic pathogen detection.In this work we present an approach to leverage phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data to conduct several types of analysis. First, we present a method to conduct phylogeny-driven Bayesian hypothesis tests for the presence of an organism in a sample. Second, we present a means to compare community structure across a collection of many samples and develop direct associations between the abundance of certain organisms and sample metadata. Third, we apply new tools to analyze the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities and again demonstrate how this can be associated to sample metadata.These analyses are implemented in an open source software pipeline called PhyloSift. As a pipeline, PhyloSift incorporates several other programs including LAST, HMMER, and pplacer to automate phylogenetic analysis of protein coding and RNA sequences in metagenomic datasets generated by modern sequencing platforms (e.g., Illumina, 454.

  10. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Rui; Wang, Bochu; Zhub, Liancai, E-mail: wangbc2000@126.com [Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, (China); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro, E-mail: abei@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  11. Towards diagnostic metagenomics of Campylobacter in fecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Christine; Kiil, Kristoffer; Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    2017-01-01

    The development of diagnostic metagenomics is driven by the need for universal, culture-independent methods for detection and characterization of pathogens to substitute the time-consuming, organism-specific, and often culture-based laboratory procedures for epidemiological source-tracing. Some...... of the challenges in diagnostic metagenomics are, that it requires a great next-generation sequencing depth and unautomated data analysis. DNA from human fecal samples spiked with 7.75 × 101-7.75 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml Campylobacter jejuni and chicken fecal samples spiked with 1 × 102-1 × 106 CFU....../g Campylobacter jejuni was sequenced and data analysis was done by the metagenomic tools Kraken and CLARK. More hits were obtained at higher spiking levels, however with no significant linear correlations (human samples p = 0.12, chicken samples p = 0.10). Therefore, no definite detection limit could...

  12. Challenges of the Unknown: Clinical Application of Microbial Metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast, high throughput and low cost whole genome sequencing holds great promise within public health microbiology, with applications ranging from outbreak detection and tracking transmission events to understanding the role played by microbial communities in health and disease. Within clinical metagenomics, identifying microorganisms from a complex and host enriched background remains a central computational challenge. As proof of principle, we sequenced two metagenomic samples, a known viral mixture of 25 human pathogens and an unknown complex biological model using benchtop technology. The datasets were then analysed using a bioinformatic pipeline developed around recent fast classification methods. A targeted approach was able to detect 20 of the viruses against a background of host contamination from multiple sources and bacterial contamination. An alternative untargeted identification method was highly correlated with these classifications, and over 1,600 species were identified when applied to the complex biological model, including several species captured at over 50% genome coverage. In summary, this study demonstrates the great potential of applying metagenomics within the clinical laboratory setting and that this can be achieved using infrastructure available to nondedicated sequencing centres.

  13. IMG/M: A data management and analysis system for metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Szeto, Ernest; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chu, Ken; Dalevi, Daniel; Chen, I-Min A.; Grechkin,Yuri; Dubchak,Inna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis,Konstantinos; Hug enholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-08-01

    IMG/M is a data management and analysis system for microbial community genomes (metagenomes) hosted at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG/M consists of metagenome data integrated with isolate microbial genomes from the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides IMG's comparative data analysis tools extended to handle metagenome data, together with metagenome-specific analysis tools. IMG/M is available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/m. Studies of the collective genomes (also known as metagenomes) of environmental microbial communities (also known as microbiomes) are expected to lead to advances in environmental cleanup, agriculture, industrial processes, alternative energy production, and human health (1). Metagenomes of specific microbiome samples are sequenced by organizations worldwide, such as the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the Venter Institute and the Washington University in St. Louis using different sequencing strategies, technology platforms, and annotation procedures. According to the Genomes OnLine Database, about 28 metagenome studies have been published to date, with over 60 other projects ongoing and more in the process of being launched (2). The Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is one of the major contributors of metagenome sequence data, currently sequencing more than 50% of the reported metagenome projects worldwide. Due to the higher complexity, inherent incompleteness, and lower quality of metagenome sequence data, traditional assembly, gene prediction, and annotation methods do not perform on these datasets as well as they do on isolate microbial genome sequences (3, 4). In spite of these limitations, metagenome data are amenable to a variety of analyses, as illustrated by several recent studies (5-10). Metagenome data analysis is usually set up in the context of reference isolate genomes and considers the questions of composition and functional or metabolic

  14. Deconvoluting simulated metagenomes: the performance of hard- and soft- clustering algorithms applied to metagenomic chromosome conformation capture (3C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Z. DeMaere

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Chromosome conformation capture, coupled with high throughput DNA sequencing in protocols like Hi-C and 3C-seq, has been proposed as a viable means of generating data to resolve the genomes of microorganisms living in naturally occuring environments. Metagenomic Hi-C and 3C-seq datasets have begun to emerge, but the feasibility of resolving genomes when closely related organisms (strain-level diversity are present in the sample has not yet been systematically characterised. Methods We developed a computational simulation pipeline for metagenomic 3C and Hi-C sequencing to evaluate the accuracy of genomic reconstructions at, above, and below an operationally defined species boundary. We simulated datasets and measured accuracy over a wide range of parameters. Five clustering algorithms were evaluated (2 hard, 3 soft using an adaptation of the extended B-cubed validation measure. Results When all genomes in a sample are below 95% sequence identity, all of the tested clustering algorithms performed well. When sequence data contains genomes above 95% identity (our operational definition of strain-level diversity, a naive soft-clustering extension of the Louvain method achieves the highest performance. Discussion Previously, only hard-clustering algorithms have been applied to metagenomic 3C and Hi-C data, yet none of these perform well when strain-level diversity exists in a metagenomic sample. Our simple extension of the Louvain method performed the best in these scenarios, however, accuracy remained well below the levels observed for samples without strain-level diversity. Strain resolution is also highly dependent on the amount of available 3C sequence data, suggesting that depth of sequencing must be carefully considered during experimental design. Finally, there appears to be great scope to improve the accuracy of strain resolution through further algorithm development.

  15. NeSSM: a Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ben; Xuan, Liming; Cai, Kaiye; Hu, Zhiqiang; Ma, Liangxiao; Wei, Chaochun

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics can reveal the vast majority of microbes that have been missed by traditional cultivation-based methods. Due to its extremely wide range of application areas, fast metagenome sequencing simulation systems with high fidelity are in great demand to facilitate the development and comparison of metagenomics analysis tools. We present here a customizable metagenome simulation system: NeSSM (Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics). Combining complete genomes currently available, a community composition table, and sequencing parameters, it can simulate metagenome sequencing better than existing systems. Sequencing error models based on the explicit distribution of errors at each base and sequencing coverage bias are incorporated in the simulation. In order to improve the fidelity of simulation, tools are provided by NeSSM to estimate the sequencing error models, sequencing coverage bias and the community composition directly from existing metagenome sequencing data. Currently, NeSSM supports single-end and pair-end sequencing for both 454 and Illumina platforms. In addition, a GPU (graphics processing units) version of NeSSM is also developed to accelerate the simulation. By comparing the simulated sequencing data from NeSSM with experimental metagenome sequencing data, we have demonstrated that NeSSM performs better in many aspects than existing popular metagenome simulators, such as MetaSim, GemSIM and Grinder. The GPU version of NeSSM is more than one-order of magnitude faster than MetaSim. NeSSM is a fast simulation system for high-throughput metagenome sequencing. It can be helpful to develop tools and evaluate strategies for metagenomics analysis and it's freely available for academic users at http://cbb.sjtu.edu.cn/~ccwei/pub/software/NeSSM.php.

  16. NeSSM: a Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metagenomics can reveal the vast majority of microbes that have been missed by traditional cultivation-based methods. Due to its extremely wide range of application areas, fast metagenome sequencing simulation systems with high fidelity are in great demand to facilitate the development and comparison of metagenomics analysis tools. RESULTS: We present here a customizable metagenome simulation system: NeSSM (Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics. Combining complete genomes currently available, a community composition table, and sequencing parameters, it can simulate metagenome sequencing better than existing systems. Sequencing error models based on the explicit distribution of errors at each base and sequencing coverage bias are incorporated in the simulation. In order to improve the fidelity of simulation, tools are provided by NeSSM to estimate the sequencing error models, sequencing coverage bias and the community composition directly from existing metagenome sequencing data. Currently, NeSSM supports single-end and pair-end sequencing for both 454 and Illumina platforms. In addition, a GPU (graphics processing units version of NeSSM is also developed to accelerate the simulation. By comparing the simulated sequencing data from NeSSM with experimental metagenome sequencing data, we have demonstrated that NeSSM performs better in many aspects than existing popular metagenome simulators, such as MetaSim, GemSIM and Grinder. The GPU version of NeSSM is more than one-order of magnitude faster than MetaSim. CONCLUSIONS: NeSSM is a fast simulation system for high-throughput metagenome sequencing. It can be helpful to develop tools and evaluate strategies for metagenomics analysis and it's freely available for academic users at http://cbb.sjtu.edu.cn/~ccwei/pub/software/NeSSM.php.

  17. Metagenomics of the subsurface Brazos-Trinity Basin (IODP site 1320): comparison with other sediment and pyrosequenced metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Jennifer F; White, James Robert; Teske, Andreas P; House, Christopher H

    2011-06-01

    The Brazos-Trinity Basin on the slope of the Gulf of Mexico passive margin was drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Progam Expedition 308. The buried anaerobic sediments of this basin are largely organic-poor and have few microbial inhabitants compared with the organic-rich sediments with high cell counts from the Peru Margin that were drilled during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201. Nucleic acids were extracted from Brazos-Trinity Basin sediments and were subjected to whole-genome amplification and pyrosequencing. A comparison of the Brazos-Trinity Basin metagenome, consisting of 105 Mbp, and the existing Peru Margin metagenome revealed trends linking gene content, phylogenetic content, geological location and geochemical regime. The major microbial groups (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota and Chloroflexi) occur consistently throughout all samples, yet their shifting abundances allow for discrimination between samples. The cluster of orthologous groups category abundances for some classes of genes are correlated with geochemical factors, such as the level of ammonia. Here we describe the sediment metagenome from the oligotrophic Brazos-Trinity Basin (Site 1320) and show similarities and differences with the dataset from the Pacific Peru Margin (Site 1229) and other pyrosequenced datasets. The microbial community found at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site 1320 likely represents the subsurface microbial inhabitants of turbiditic slopes that lack substantial upwelling.

  18. Polyketide Synthases in the Microbiome of the Marine Sponge Plakortis halichondrioides: A Metagenomic Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Della Sala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sponge-associated microorganisms are able to assemble the complex machinery for the production of secondary metabolites such as polyketides, the most important class of marine natural products from a drug discovery perspective. A comprehensive overview of polyketide biosynthetic genes of the sponge Plakortis halichondrioides and its symbionts was obtained in the present study by massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing of complex and heterogeneous PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction products amplified from the metagenomic DNA of a specimen of P. halichondrioides collected in the Caribbean Sea. This was accompanied by a survey of the bacterial diversity within the sponge. In line with previous studies, sequences belonging to supA and swfA, two widespread sponge-specific groups of polyketide synthase (PKS genes were dominant. While they have been previously reported as belonging to Poribacteria (a novel bacterial phylum found exclusively in sponges, re-examination of current genomic sequencing data showed supA and swfA not to be present in the poribacterial genome. Several non-supA, non-swfA type-I PKS fragments were also identified. A significant portion of these fragments resembled type-I PKSs from protists, suggesting that bacteria may not be the only source of polyketides from P. halichondrioides, and that protistan PKSs should receive further investigation as a source of novel polyketides.

  19. Evolutionary strategies of viruses, bacteria and archaea in hydrothermal vent ecosystems revealed through metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika E Anderson

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems, a high proportion of which are lysogenic, must also withstand these environmental extremes. Here, we explore the evolutionary strategies of both microorganisms and viruses in hydrothermal systems through comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome, collected by size fractionation of high temperature fluids from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent. We detected a high enrichment of mobile elements and proviruses in the cellular fraction relative to microorganisms in other environments. We observed a relatively high abundance of genes related to energy metabolism as well as cofactors and vitamins in the viral fraction compared to the cellular fraction, which suggest encoding of auxiliary metabolic genes on viral genomes. Moreover, the observation of stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool suggests viral strategies that promote prolonged host integration. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for hydrothermal vent viruses to integrate into hosts, facilitate horizontal gene transfer, and express or transfer genes that manipulate the hosts' functional capabilities.

  20. Metagenomic study of red biofilms from Diamante Lake reveals ancient arsenic bioenergetics in haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascovan, Nicolás; Maldonado, Javier; Vazquez, Martín P; Eugenia Farías, María

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic metabolism is proposed to be an ancient mechanism in microbial life. Different bacteria and archaea use detoxification processes to grow under high arsenic concentration. Some of them are also able to use arsenic as a bioenergetic substrate in either anaerobic arsenate respiration or chemolithotrophic growth on arsenite. However, among the archaea, bioenergetic arsenic metabolism has only been found in the Crenarchaeota phylum. Here we report the discovery of haloarchaea (Euryarchaeota phylum) biofilms forming under the extreme environmental conditions such as high salinity, pH and arsenic concentration at 4589 m above sea level inside a volcano crater in Diamante Lake, Argentina. Metagenomic analyses revealed a surprisingly high abundance of genes used for arsenite oxidation (aioBA) and respiratory arsenate reduction (arrCBA) suggesting that these haloarchaea use arsenic compounds as bioenergetics substrates. We showed that several haloarchaea species, not only from this study, have all genes required for these bioenergetic processes. The phylogenetic analysis of aioA showed that haloarchaea sequences cluster in a novel and monophyletic group, suggesting that the origin of arsenic metabolism in haloarchaea is ancient. Our results also suggest that arsenite chemolithotrophy likely emerged within the archaeal lineage. Our results give a broad new perspective on the haloarchaea metabolism and shed light on the evolutionary history of arsenic bioenergetics.

  1. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  2. Metagenomes obtained by 'deep sequencing' - what do they tell about the enhanced biological phosphorus removal communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron M; Nielsen, Kåre L; Nielsen, Per H

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics enables studies of the genomic potential of complex microbial communities by sequencing bulk genomic DNA directly from the environment. Knowledge of the genetic potential of a community can be used to formulate and test ecological hypotheses about stability and performance. In this study deep metagenomics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to study a full-scale wastewater treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), and the results were compared to an existing EBPR metagenome. EBPR is a widely used process that relies on a complex community of microorganisms to function properly. Insight into community and species level stability and dynamics is valuable for knowledge-driven optimization of the EBPR process. The metagenomes of the EBPR communities were distinct compared to metagenomes of communities from a wide range of other environments, which could be attributed to selection pressures of the EBPR process. The metabolic potential of one of the key microorganisms in the EPBR process, Accumulibacter, was investigated in more detail in the two plants, revealing a potential importance of phage predation on the dynamics of Accumulibacter populations. The results demonstrate that metagenomics can be used as a powerful tool for system wide characterization of the EBPR community as well as for a deeper understanding of the function of specific community members. Furthermore, we discuss and illustrate some of the general pitfalls in metagenomics and stress the need of additional DNA extraction independent information in metagenome studies.

  3. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA

  4. Beyond research: a primer for considerations on using viral metagenomics in the field and clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.J.; Draper, J.L.; Nielsen, F.G.; Dutilh, B.E.

    2015-01-01

    Powered by recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, metagenomics has already unveiled vast microbial biodiversity in a range of environments, and is increasingly being applied in clinics for difficult-to-diagnose cases. It can be tempting to suggest that metagenomics could be used

  5. Viral metagenomics brings further challenges in identification, detection and study of old and new sugarcane pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant viral metagenomics has recently proved effective for studying the collection of viruses associated with plant. Consequently, the advent of metagenomics-based approaches has led to the discovery and characterization of novel plant viruses and helped solving etiologic enigmas. In this chapter, w...

  6. The great screen anomaly--a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; Elsas, Jan Dirk van

    2012-02-01

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been heralded as a promising mining strategy of resources for the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry. However, in spite of innovative work in the field of functional genomics in recent years, yields from function-based metagenomics studies still fall short of producing significant amounts of new products that are valuable for biotechnological processes. Thus, a new set of strategies is required with respect to fostering gene expression in comparison to the traditional work. These new strategies should address a major issue, that is, how to successfully express a set of unknown genes of unknown origin in a foreign host in high throughput. This article is an opinionating review of functional metagenomic screening of natural microbial communities, with a focus on the optimization of new product discovery. It first summarizes current major bottlenecks in functional metagenomics and then provides an overview of the general metagenomic assessment strategies, with a focus on the challenges that are met in the screening for, and selection of, target genes in metagenomic libraries. To identify possible screening limitations, strategies to achieve optimal gene expression are reviewed, examining the molecular events all the way from the transcription level through to the secretion of the target gene product.

  7. A sampling and metagenomic sequencing-based methodology for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in swine herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Patrick; Andersen, Vibe Dalhoff; de Knegt, Leonardo; Jensen, Marie Stengaard; Knudsen, Berith Elkær; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Mordhorst, Hanne; Clasen, Julie; Agersø, Yvonne; Folkesson, Anders; Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Vigre, Håkan; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-02-01

    Reliable methods for monitoring antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and other reservoirs are essential to understand the trends, transmission and importance of agricultural resistance. Quantification of AMR is mostly done using culture-based techniques, but metagenomic read mapping shows promise for quantitative resistance monitoring. We evaluated the ability of: (i) MIC determination for Escherichia coli; (ii) cfu counting of E. coli; (iii) cfu counting of aerobic bacteria; and (iv) metagenomic shotgun sequencing to predict expected tetracycline resistance based on known antimicrobial consumption in 10 Danish integrated slaughter pig herds. In addition, we evaluated whether fresh or manure floor samples constitute suitable proxies for intestinal sampling, using cfu counting, qPCR and metagenomic shotgun sequencing. Metagenomic read-mapping outperformed cultivation-based techniques in terms of predicting expected tetracycline resistance based on antimicrobial consumption. Our metagenomic approach had sufficient resolution to detect antimicrobial-induced changes to individual resistance gene abundances. Pen floor manure samples were found to represent rectal samples well when analysed using metagenomics, as they contain the same DNA with the exception of a few contaminating taxa that proliferate in the extraintestinal environment. We present a workflow, from sampling to interpretation, showing how resistance monitoring can be carried out in swine herds using a metagenomic approach. We propose metagenomic sequencing should be part of routine livestock resistance monitoring programmes and potentially of integrated One Health monitoring in all reservoirs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  8. A highly abundant bacteriophage discovered in the unknown sequences of human faecal metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, Bas E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304546313; Cassman, Noriko; McNair, Katelyn; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Boling, Lance; Barr, Jeremy J; Speth, Daan R; Seguritan, Victor; Aziz, Ramy K; Felts, Ben; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Mokili, John L; Edwards, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics, or sequencing of the genetic material from a complete microbial community, is a promising tool to discover novel microbes and viruses. Viral metagenomes typically contain many unknown sequences. Here we describe the discovery of a previously unidentified bacteriophage present in the

  9. BioCreative Workshops for DOE Genome Sciences: Text Mining for Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cathy H. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology; Hirschman, Lynette [The MITRE Corporation, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2016-10-29

    The objective of this project was to host BioCreative workshops to define and develop text mining tasks to meet the needs of the Genome Sciences community, focusing on metadata information extraction in metagenomics. Following the successful introduction of metagenomics at the BioCreative IV workshop, members of the metagenomics community and BioCreative communities continued discussion to identify candidate topics for a BioCreative metagenomics track for BioCreative V. Of particular interest was the capture of environmental and isolation source information from text. The outcome was to form a “community of interest” around work on the interactive EXTRACT system, which supported interactive tagging of environmental and species data. This experiment is included in the BioCreative V virtual issue of Database. In addition, there was broad participation by members of the metagenomics community in the panels held at BioCreative V, leading to valuable exchanges between the text mining developers and members of the metagenomics research community. These exchanges are reflected in a number of the overview and perspective pieces also being captured in the BioCreative V virtual issue. Overall, this conversation has exposed the metagenomics researchers to the possibilities of text mining, and educated the text mining developers to the specific needs of the metagenomics community.

  10. Constructing and screening a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline extreme environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    as a source of bacteria and enzymes adapted to these conditions. They have also highlighted the limitations of cultivation-based methods in this extreme environment and metagenomic approaches may provide access to novel extremophilic enzymes from the uncultured majority of bacteria. Here, we describe...... the construction and screening of a metagenomic library of the prokaryotic community inhabiting the ikaite columns....

  11. Woods: A fast and accurate functional annotator and classifier of genomic and metagenomic sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok K; Gupta, Ankit; Kumar, Sanjiv; Dhakan, Darshan B; Sharma, Vineet K

    2015-07-01

    Functional annotation of the gigantic metagenomic data is one of the major time-consuming and computationally demanding tasks, which is currently a bottleneck for the efficient analysis. The commonly used homology-based methods to functionally annotate and classify proteins are extremely slow. Therefore, to achieve faster and accurate functional annotation, we have developed an orthology-based functional classifier 'Woods' by using a combination of machine learning and similarity-based approaches. Woods displayed a precision of 98.79% on independent genomic dataset, 96.66% on simulated metagenomic dataset and >97% on two real metagenomic datasets. In addition, it performed >87 times faster than BLAST on the two real metagenomic datasets. Woods can be used as a highly efficient and accurate classifier with high-throughput capability which facilitates its usability on large metagenomic datasets. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Chemical Contaminants Found in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Caretta caretta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athey, S. N.; Seaton, P. J.; Mead, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    Plastic is becoming increasingly more abundant in the marine environment. Plastic ingestion has been shown to be a source of exposure to a variety of harmful compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), bisphenol A (BPA), and phthalates, which are known for their negative physiological effects on the endocrine system as well as their ability to adsorb and leach from plastic into the bodies of marine organisms. The physiological effects of these compounds on loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) still remain unknown. This study investigated the presence of toxicants on marine plastic samples collected from Bermuda, the Sargasso Sea, and the North Atlantic Ocean. Gas chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis showed PAHs were present on many plastic debris samples. Plastic additives such as phthalates and (BPA) were also found. ΣPAH concentrations for anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and benzo[k]fluoranthene for 2013 environmental plastic samples averaged 26.7ng/g of plastic. This study also examined the presence of these compounds in fluids from the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine from two adult loggerhead turtles. GC/MS analysis also showed the presence of BPA and phthalates on plastic samples, as well as in two out of the six gastrointestinal fluids samples. Average ΣPAH concentration for GI fluids for the loggerheads in the study was 58.7 ng/mL. This study showed plastic could be a significant source of PAHs in sea turtles and the first to detect PAHs in sea turtle GI fluid. Loggerhead sea turtles are a long living species and could accumulate high concentrations of these endocrine-disrupting chemicals throughout their lifetime.

  13. Identification of novel open reading frames from metagenomic libraries generated from extremophilic organisms: application of metagenomics and high throughput screening for novel enzyme isolation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Frames from Metagenomic Libraries Generated from Extremophilic Organisms: Application of Metagenomics and High Throughput Screening for Novel Enzyme Isolation 1FRITHA HENNESSY, 1DANIEL F. VISSER, 1VARSHA P. CHHIBA, 1FRANCISCO LAKAY, 2ESTA VAN HEERDEN..., in particular proteases and lipases. Result- ant hits had plasmid DNA isolated; this DNA was sequenced and analysed using BLAST. CONCLUSIONS High variation in hits Duplicate results Smaller inserts still gave activity despite small ORF’s Weak correlation...

  14. Parallel-META: efficient metagenomic data analysis based on high-performance computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoquan; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics method directly sequences and analyses genome information from microbial communities. There are usually more than hundreds of genomes from different microbial species in the same community, and the main computational tasks for metagenomic data analyses include taxonomical and functional component examination of all genomes in the microbial community. Metagenomic data analysis is both data- and computation- intensive, which requires extensive computational power. Most of the current metagenomic data analysis softwares were designed to be used on a single computer or single computer clusters, which could not match with the fast increasing number of large metagenomic projects' computational requirements. Therefore, advanced computational methods and pipelines have to be developed to cope with such need for efficient analyses. In this paper, we proposed Parallel-META, a GPU- and multi-core-CPU-based open-source pipeline for metagenomic data analysis, which enabled the efficient and parallel analysis of multiple metagenomic datasets and the visualization of the results for multiple samples. In Parallel-META, the similarity-based database search was parallelized based on GPU computing and multi-core CPU computing optimization. Experiments have shown that Parallel-META has at least 15 times speed-up compared to traditional metagenomic data analysis method, with the same accuracy of the results http://www.computationalbioenergy.org/parallel-meta.html. The parallel processing of current metagenomic data would be very promising: with current speed up of 15 times and above, binning would not be a very time-consuming process any more. Therefore, some deeper analysis of the metagenomic data, such as the comparison of different samples, would be feasible in the pipeline, and some of these functionalities have been included into the Parallel-META pipeline.

  15. Reconstructing the genomic content of microbiome taxa through shotgun metagenomic deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Rogan; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics has transformed our understanding of the microbial world, allowing researchers to bypass the need to isolate and culture individual taxa and to directly characterize both the taxonomic and gene compositions of environmental samples. However, associating the genes found in a metagenomic sample with the specific taxa of origin remains a critical challenge. Existing binning methods, based on nucleotide composition or alignment to reference genomes allow only a coarse-grained classification and rely heavily on the availability of sequenced genomes from closely related taxa. Here, we introduce a novel computational framework, integrating variation in gene abundances across multiple samples with taxonomic abundance data to deconvolve metagenomic samples into taxa-specific gene profiles and to reconstruct the genomic content of community members. This assembly-free method is not bounded by various factors limiting previously described methods of metagenomic binning or metagenomic assembly and represents a fundamentally different approach to metagenomic-based genome reconstruction. An implementation of this framework is available at http://elbo.gs.washington.edu/software.html. We first describe the mathematical foundations of our framework and discuss considerations for implementing its various components. We demonstrate the ability of this framework to accurately deconvolve a set of metagenomic samples and to recover the gene content of individual taxa using synthetic metagenomic samples. We specifically characterize determinants of prediction accuracy and examine the impact of annotation errors on the reconstructed genomes. We finally apply metagenomic deconvolution to samples from the Human Microbiome Project, successfully reconstructing genus-level genomic content of various microbial genera, based solely on variation in gene count. These reconstructed genera are shown to correctly capture genus-specific properties. With the accumulation of metagenomic

  16. MG-Digger: an automated pipeline to search for giant virus-related sequences in metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eVerneau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a ‘dark matter’. We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase pairs were collected, processed and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and five virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate hundreds of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are

  17. Computational operon prediction in whole-genomes and metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Shujaat Ali; Zhang, Xuegong

    2017-07-01

    Microbial diversity in unique environmental settings enables abrupt responses catalysed by altering the gene regulation and formation of gene clusters called operons. Operons increases bacterial adaptability, which in turn increases their survival. This review article presents the emergence of computational operon prediction methods for whole microbial genomes and metagenomes, and discusses their strengths and limitations. Most of the whole-genome operon prediction methods struggle to generalize on unrelated genomes. The applicability of universal whole-genome operon prediction methods to metagenomic data is an interesting yet less investigated question. We have evaluated the potential of various operon prediction features for genomic and metagenomic data. Most of operon prediction methods with high accuracy have been compiled into databases. Despite of the high predictive performance, the data among many databases are not completely consistent for similar species. We performed a correlation analysis between the computationally predicted operon databases and experimentally validated data for Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Operon prediction for most of the less characterized microbes cannot be verified due to absence of experimentally validated operons. The generation of validated information for other microbes would test the authenticity of operon databases for other less annotated microbes as well. Advances in sequencing technologies and development of better analysis methods will help researchers to overcome the technological hurdles (such as long sequencing reads and improved contig size) and further improve operon predictions and better utilize operonic information. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Comparative analysis of metagenomes of Italian top soil improvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliucci, Federica; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Michelacci, Valeria; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    Biosolids originating from Municipal Waste Water Treatment Plants are proposed as top soil improvers (TSI) for their beneficial input of organic carbon on agriculture lands. Their use to amend soil is controversial, as it may lead to the presence of emerging hazards of anthropogenic or animal origin in the environment devoted to food production. In this study, we used a shotgun metagenomics sequencing as a tool to perform a characterization of the hazards related with the TSIs. The samples showed the presence of many virulence genes associated to different diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes as well as of different antimicrobial resistance-associated genes. The genes conferring resistance to Fluoroquinolones was the most relevant class of antimicrobial resistance genes observed in all the samples tested. To a lesser extent traits associated with the resistance to Methicillin in Staphylococci and genes conferring resistance to Streptothricin, Fosfomycin and Vancomycin were also identified. The most represented metal resistance genes were cobalt-zinc-cadmium related, accounting for 15-50% of the sequence reads in the different metagenomes out of the total number of those mapping on the class of resistance to compounds determinants. Moreover the taxonomic analysis performed by comparing compost-based samples and biosolids derived from municipal sewage-sludges treatments divided the samples into separate populations, based on the microbiota composition. The results confirm that the metagenomics is efficient to detect genomic traits associated with pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in complex matrices and this approach can be efficiently used for the traceability of TSI samples using the microorganisms' profiles as indicators of their origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phylogeny, classification and metagenomic bioprospecting of microbial acetyl xylan esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesioye, Fiyinfoluwa A; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Biely, Peter; Cowan, Don A

    2016-11-01

    Acetyl xylan esterases (AcXEs), also termed xylan deacetylases, are broad specificity Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes) that hydrolyse ester bonds to liberate acetic acid from acetylated hemicellulose (typically polymeric xylan and xylooligosaccharides). They belong to eight families within the Carbohydrate Esterase (CE) class of the CAZy database. AcXE classification is largely based on sequence-dependent phylogenetic relationships, supported in some instances with substrate specificity data. However, some sequence-based predictions of AcXE-encoding gene identity have proved to be functionally incorrect. Such ambiguities can lead to mis-assignment of genes and enzymes during sequence data-mining, reinforcing the necessity for the experimental confirmation of the functional properties of putative AcXE-encoding gene products. Although one-third of all characterized CEs within CAZy families 1-7 and 16 are AcXEs, there is a need to expand the sequence database in order to strengthen the link between AcXE gene sequence and specificity. Currently, most AcXEs are derived from a limited range of (mostly microbial) sources and have been identified via culture-based bioprospecting methods, restricting current knowledge of AcXEs to data from relatively few microbial species. More recently, the successful identification of AcXEs via genome and metagenome mining has emphasised the huge potential of culture-independent bioprospecting strategies. We note, however, that the functional metagenomics approach is still hampered by screening bottlenecks. The most relevant recent reviews of AcXEs have focused primarily on the biochemical and functional properties of these enzymes. In this review, we focus on AcXE phylogeny, classification and the future of metagenomic bioprospecting for novel AcXEs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional Metagenomics of the Bronchial Microbiome in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millares, Laura; Pérez-Brocal, Vicente; Ferrari, Rafaela; Gallego, Miguel; Pomares, Xavier; García-Núñez, Marian; Montón, Concepción; Capilla, Silvia; Monsó, Eduard; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently aggravated by exacerbations, and changes in the composition and activity of the microbiome may be implicated in their appearance. The aim of this study was to analyse the composition and the gene content of the microbial community in bronchial secretions of COPD patients in both stability and exacerbation. Taxonomic data were obtained by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing, and metabolic information through shotgun metagenomics, using the Metagenomics RAST server (MG-RAST), and the PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) programme, which predict metagenomes from 16S data. Eight severe COPD patients provided good quality sputum samples, and no significant differences in the relative abundance of any phyla and genera were found between stability and exacerbation. Bacterial biodiversity (Chao1 and Shannon indexes) did not show statistical differences and beta-diversity analysis (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity index) showed a similar microbial composition in the two clinical situations. Four functional categories showed statistically significant differences with MG-RAST at KEGG level 2: in exacerbation, Cell growth and Death and Transport and Catabolism decreased in abundance [1.6 (0.2-2.3) vs 3.6 (3.3-6.9), p = 0.012; and 1.8 (0-3.3) vs 3.6 (1.8-5.1), p = 0.025 respectively], while Cancer and Carbohydrate Metabolism increased [0.8 (0-1.5) vs 0 (0-0.5), p = 0.043; and 7 (6.4-9) vs 5.9 (6.3-6.1), p = 0.012 respectively]. In conclusion, the bronchial microbiome as a whole is not significantly modified when exacerbation symptoms appear in severe COPD patients, but its functional metabolic capabilities show significant changes in several pathways.

  1. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  2. Managing microbial communities for sequentially reconstruct genomes from complex metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tom O.; Vogel, Timothy M.; Simonet, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Global understanding on environmental microbial communities is currently limited by the bottleneck of genome reconstruction. Soil is a typical example where individual cells are currently mostly uncultured and metagenomic datasets unassembled. In this study, the microbial community composition of a natural grassland soil was managed under several controlled selective pressures to experiment a "multi-evenness" stratagem for sequentially attempt to reconstruct genomes from a complex metagenome. While lowly represented in the natural community, several newly dominant genomes (an enrichment attaining 105 in some cases) were successfully reconstructed under various "harsh" tested conditions. These genomes belong to several genera including (but not restricted to) Leifsonia, Rhodanobacter, Bacillus, Ktedonobacter, Xanthomonas, Streptomyces and Burkholderia. So far, from 10 to 78% of generated metagenomic datasets were reconstructed, so providing access to more than 88 000 genes of known or unknown functions and to their genetic environment. Adaptative genes directly related to selective pressures were found, mostly in large plasmids. Functions of potential industrial interest (e.g., novel polyketide synthase modules in Streptomyces) were also discovered. Furthermore, an important phage infection snapshot (>1500X of coverage for the most represented phage) was observed among the Streptomyces population (three distinct genomes reconstructed) of a particular enrichment (mercury, 0.02g/kg) during the fourth month of incubation. This "divide and conquer" strategy could be applied to other environments and using auxiliary sequencing approaches like single cell to detect, connect and mine taxa and functions of interest while creating an extensive set of reference genomes from across the planet. Next limit could turn out to become our imagination defining novel selective pressures to sequentially make dominant the 1030 cells of the biosphere.

  3. Combining gene prediction methods to improve metagenomic gene annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen Gail L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional gene annotation methods rely on characteristics that may not be available in short reads generated from next generation technology, resulting in suboptimal performance for metagenomic (environmental samples. Therefore, in recent years, new programs have been developed that optimize performance on short reads. In this work, we benchmark three metagenomic gene prediction programs and combine their predictions to improve metagenomic read gene annotation. Results We not only analyze the programs' performance at different read-lengths like similar studies, but also separate different types of reads, including intra- and intergenic regions, for analysis. The main deficiencies are in the algorithms' ability to predict non-coding regions and gene edges, resulting in more false-positives and false-negatives than desired. In fact, the specificities of the algorithms are notably worse than the sensitivities. By combining the programs' predictions, we show significant improvement in specificity at minimal cost to sensitivity, resulting in 4% improvement in accuracy for 100 bp reads with ~1% improvement in accuracy for 200 bp reads and above. To correctly annotate the start and stop of the genes, we find that a consensus of all the predictors performs best for shorter read lengths while a unanimous agreement is better for longer read lengths, boosting annotation accuracy by 1-8%. We also demonstrate use of the classifier combinations on a real dataset. Conclusions To optimize the performance for both prediction and annotation accuracies, we conclude that the consensus of all methods (or a majority vote is the best for reads 400 bp and shorter, while using the intersection of GeneMark and Orphelia predictions is the best for reads 500 bp and longer. We demonstrate that most methods predict over 80% coding (including partially coding reads on a real human gut sample sequenced by Illumina technology.

  4. Novel thermostable amine transferases from hot spring metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandi, Erica Elisa; Previdi, Alessandra; Bassanini, Ivan; Riva, Sergio; Peng, Xu; Monti, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    Hot spring metagenomes, prepared from samples collected at temperatures ranging from 55 to 95 °C, were submitted to an in silico screening aimed at the identification of novel amine transaminases (ATAs), valuable biocatalysts for the preparation of optically pure amines. Three novel (S)-selective ATAs, namely Is3-TA, It6-TA, and B3-TA, were discovered in the metagenome of samples collected from hot springs in Iceland and in Italy, cloned from the corresponding metagenomic DNAs and overexpressed in recombinant form in E. coli. Functional characterization of the novel ATAs demonstrated that they all possess a thermophilic character and are capable of performing amine transfer reactions using a broad range of donor and acceptor substrates, thus suggesting a good potential for practical synthetic applications. In particular, the enzyme B3-TA revealed to be exceptionally thermostable, retaining 85% of activity after 5 days of incubation at 80 °C and more than 40% after 2 weeks under the same condition. These results, which were in agreement with the estimation of an apparent melting temperature around 88 °C, make B3-TA, to the best of our knowledge, the most thermostable natural ATA described to date. This biocatalyst showed also a good tolerance toward different water-miscible and water-immiscible organic solvents. A detailed inspection of the homology-based structural model of B3-TA showed that the overall active site architecture of mesophilic (S)-selective ATAs was mainly conserved in this hyperthermophilic homolog. Additionally, a subfamily of B3-TA-like transaminases, mostly uncharacterized and all from thermophilic microorganisms, was identified and analyzed in terms of phylogenetic relationships and sequence conservation.

  5. Assembling The Marine Metagenome, One Cell At A Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saw, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Senin, Pavel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woyke, Tanja [DOE JOINT GENOME INAT.; Copeland, Alex [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Gonzalez, Jose [UNIV OF LAGUNA, SPAIN; Chatterji, Sourav [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Cheng, Jan - Fang [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Eisen, Jonathan A [DOE JOINT GENOME INST.; Sieracki, Michael E [UNIV OF CA-DAVIS; Stepanauskas, Ramunas [BIGELOW LAB

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex

  6. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  7. Metagenomics and development of the gut microbiota in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallès, Y.; Gosalbes, M. J.; de Vries, Lisbeth Elvira

    2012-01-01

    , the gastrointestinal tract microbiota is often exposed to antibiotics, and may be an important reservoir of resistant strains and of transferable resistance genes from early infancy. We are investigating by means of diverse metagenomic approaches several areas of microbiota development in infants, including......Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18 (Suppl. 4): 21–26 The establishment of a balanced intestinal microbiota is essential for numerous aspects of human health, yet the microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of infants is both complex and highly variable among individuals. In addition...

  8. A feruloyl esterase derived from a leachate metagenome library

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rashamuse, K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available recently reported es- terase estCS2 from compost metagenomic library which also belongs to family VII lipolytic enzyme converted linalyl ace- tate to linalool (19). Interestingly, the estCS2 primary structure contained the G-G-A-F sequence, in contrast... of p-nitrophenol from the specified p-nitrophenyl esters of vari- ous chain lengths (dissolved in isopropanol): p-nitrophenyl ace- tate (C2), p-nitrophenyl butyrate (C4), p-nitrophenyl valarate (C5), p-nitrophenyl caprylate (C8), p...

  9. Large-scale machine learning for metagenomics sequence classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervier, Kévin; Mahé, Pierre; Tournoud, Maud; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Metagenomics characterizes the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities by sequencing DNA directly from an environmental sample. One of the main challenges in metagenomics data analysis is the binning step, where each sequenced read is assigned to a taxonomic clade. Because of the large volume of metagenomics datasets, binning methods need fast and accurate algorithms that can operate with reasonable computing requirements. While standard alignment-based methods provide state-of-the-art performance, compositional approaches that assign a taxonomic class to a DNA read based on the k-mers it contains have the potential to provide faster solutions. We propose a new rank-flexible machine learning-based compositional approach for taxonomic assignment of metagenomics reads and show that it benefits from increasing the number of fragments sampled from reference genome to tune its parameters, up to a coverage of about 10, and from increasing the k-mer size to about 12. Tuning the method involves training machine learning models on about 10(8) samples in 10(7) dimensions, which is out of reach of standard softwares but can be done efficiently with modern implementations for large-scale machine learning. The resulting method is competitive in terms of accuracy with well-established alignment and composition-based tools for problems involving a small to moderate number of candidate species and for reasonable amounts of sequencing errors. We show, however, that machine learning-based compositional approaches are still limited in their ability to deal with problems involving a greater number of species and more sensitive to sequencing errors. We finally show that the new method outperforms the state-of-the-art in its ability to classify reads from species of lineage absent from the reference database and confirm that compositional approaches achieve faster prediction times, with a gain of 2-17 times with respect to the BWA-MEM short read mapper, depending on the number of

  10. Separating metagenomic short reads into genomes via clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaseichuk Olga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metagenomics approach allows the simultaneous sequencing of all genomes in an environmental sample. This results in high complexity datasets, where in addition to repeats and sequencing errors, the number of genomes and their abundance ratios are unknown. Recently developed next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies significantly improve the sequencing efficiency and cost. On the other hand, they result in shorter reads, which makes the separation of reads from different species harder. Among the existing computational tools for metagenomic analysis, there are similarity-based methods that use reference databases to align reads and composition-based methods that use composition patterns (i.e., frequencies of short words or l-mers to cluster reads. Similarity-based methods are unable to classify reads from unknown species without close references (which constitute the majority of reads. Since composition patterns are preserved only in significantly large fragments, composition-based tools cannot be used for very short reads, which becomes a significant limitation with the development of NGS. A recently proposed algorithm, AbundanceBin, introduced another method that bins reads based on predicted abundances of the genomes sequenced. However, it does not separate reads from genomes of similar abundance levels. Results In this work, we present a two-phase heuristic algorithm for separating short paired-end reads from different genomes in a metagenomic dataset. We use the observation that most of the l-mers belong to unique genomes when l is sufficiently large. The first phase of the algorithm results in clusters of l-mers each of which belongs to one genome. During the second phase, clusters are merged based on l-mer repeat information. These final clusters are used to assign reads. The algorithm could handle very short reads and sequencing errors. It is initially designed for genomes with similar abundance levels and then

  11. Metagenomics and the Human Virome in Asymptomatic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascovan, Nicolás; Duraisamy, Raja; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-09-08

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have revolutionized how we think about viruses. Investigators can now go beyond pathogenic viruses and have access to the thousands of viruses that inhabit our bodies without causing clinical symptoms. By studying their interactions with each other, with other microbes, and with host genetics and immune systems, we can learn how they affect health and disease. This article reviews current knowledge of the composition and diversity of the human virome in physiologically healthy individuals. It focuses on recent results from metagenomics studies and discusses the contribution of bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses to human health.

  12. Marine Microbial Metagenomics: From Individual to the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Tang, Sen-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are the most abundant biological entities on earth, therefore, studying them is important for understanding their roles in global ecology. The science of metagenomics is a relatively young field of research that has enjoyed significant effort since its inception in 1998. Studies using next-generation sequencing techniques on single genomes and collections of genomes have not only led to novel insights into microbial genomics, but also revealed a close association between environmental niches and genome evolution. Herein, we review studies investigating microbial genomics (largely in the marine ecosystem) at the individual and community levels to summarize our current understanding of microbial ecology in the environment. PMID:24857918

  13. Binning sequences using very sparse labels within a metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halgamuge Saman K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In metagenomic studies, a process called binning is necessary to assign contigs that belong to multiple species to their respective phylogenetic groups. Most of the current methods of binning, such as BLAST, k-mer and PhyloPythia, involve assigning sequence fragments by comparing sequence similarity or sequence composition with already-sequenced genomes that are still far from comprehensive. We propose a semi-supervised seeding method for binning that does not depend on knowledge of completed genomes. Instead, it extracts the flanking sequences of highly conserved 16S rRNA from the metagenome and uses them as seeds (labels to assign other reads based on their compositional similarity. Results The proposed seeding method is implemented on an unsupervised Growing Self-Organising Map (GSOM, and called Seeded GSOM (S-GSOM. We compared it with four well-known semi-supervised learning methods in a preliminary test, separating random-length prokaryotic sequence fragments sampled from the NCBI genome database. We identified the flanking sequences of the highly conserved 16S rRNA as suitable seeds that could be used to group the sequence fragments according to their species. S-GSOM showed superior performance compared to the semi-supervised methods tested. Additionally, S-GSOM may also be used to visually identify some species that do not have seeds. The proposed method was then applied to simulated metagenomic datasets using two different confidence threshold settings and compared with PhyloPythia, k-mer and BLAST. At the reference taxonomic level Order, S-GSOM outperformed all k-mer and BLAST results and showed comparable results with PhyloPythia for each of the corresponding confidence settings, where S-GSOM performed better than PhyloPythia in the ≥ 10 reads datasets and comparable in the ≥ 8 kb benchmark tests. Conclusion In the task of binning using semi-supervised learning methods, results indicate S-GSOM to be the best of

  14. Metagenomic mining of feruloyl esterases from termite enteric flora

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rashamuse, K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available cut-off spin column (Zymo Research, USA). 7 Library construction and screening The purified high molecular weight DNA (>30 kb) was subjected to metagenome library creation using the EpiFOS™ Fosmid Library Production Kit (Epicentre... for at least 1 h at 4 oC and precipitated proteins were removed by 9 centrifugation (20 000 x g, 30 min, 4 oC). The supernatant was loaded onto a HiLoadTM 16/10 Phenyl Sepharose high performance hydrophobic interaction column (GE healthcare) pre...

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of the Medicinal Leech Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A Maltz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are trillions of microbes found throughout the human body and they exceed the number of eukaryotic cells by ten-fold. Metagenomic studies have revealed that the majority of these microbes are found within the gut, playing an important role in the host’s digestion and nutrition. The complexity of the animal digestive tract, unculturable microbes and the lack of genetic tools for most culturable microbes make it challenging to explore the nature of theses microbial interactions within this niche. The medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, has been shown to be a useful tool in overcoming these challenges, due to the simplicity of the microbiome and the availability of genetic tools for one of the two dominant gut symbionts, Aeromonas veronii. In this study, we utilize 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to further explore the microbial composition of the leech digestive tract, confirming the dominance of two taxa, the Rikenella-like bacterium and A. veronii. The deep sequencing approach revealed the presence of additional members of the microbial community that suggests the presence of a moderately complex microbial community with a richness of 36 taxa. The presence of a Proteus strain as a newly identified resident in the leech crop was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The metagenome of this community was also pyrosequenced and the contigs were binned into the following taxonomic groups: Rikenella-like (3.1 MB, Aeromonas (4.5 MB, Proteus (2.9 MB, Clostridium (1.8 MB, Eryspelothrix (0.96 MB, Desulfovibrio (0.14 MB and Fusobacterium (0.27 MB. Functional analyses on the leech gut symbionts were explored using the metagenomic data and MG-RAST. A comparison of the COG and KEGG categories of the leech gut metagenome to that of other animal digestive-tract microbiomes revealed that the leech digestive-tract had a similar metabolic potential to the human digestive-tract, supporting the usefulness of this system as a model for studying

  16. Metagenomic analysis of the medicinal leech gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Michele A; Bomar, Lindsey; Lapierre, Pascal; Morrison, Hilary G; McClure, Emily Ann; Sogin, Mitchell L; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    There are trillions of microbes found throughout the human body and they exceed the number of eukaryotic cells by 10-fold. Metagenomic studies have revealed that the majority of these microbes are found within the gut, playing an important role in the host's digestion and nutrition. The complexity of the animal digestive tract, unculturable microbes, and the lack of genetic tools for most culturable microbes make it challenging to explore the nature of these microbial interactions within this niche. The medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, has been shown to be a useful tool in overcoming these challenges, due to the simplicity of the microbiome and the availability of genetic tools for one of the two dominant gut symbionts, Aeromonas veronii. In this study, we utilize 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to further explore the microbial composition of the leech digestive tract, confirming the dominance of two taxa, the Rikenella-like bacterium and A. veronii. The deep sequencing approach revealed the presence of additional members of the microbial community that suggests the presence of a moderately complex microbial community with a richness of 36 taxa. The presence of a Proteus strain as a newly identified resident in the leech crop was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The metagenome of this community was also pyrosequenced and the contigs were binned into the following taxonomic groups: Rikenella-like (3.1 MB), Aeromonas (4.5 MB), Proteus (2.9 MB), Clostridium (1.8 MB), Eryspelothrix (0.96 MB), Desulfovibrio (0.14 MB), and Fusobacterium (0.27 MB). Functional analyses on the leech gut symbionts were explored using the metagenomic data and MG-RAST. A comparison of the COG and KEGG categories of the leech gut metagenome to that of other animal digestive-tract microbiomes revealed that the leech digestive tract had a similar metabolic potential to the human digestive tract, supporting the usefulness of this system as a model for studying digestive

  17. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Mechanisms for Stress Response in Hypoliths from Extreme Hyperarid Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phuong Thi; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Guerrero, Leandro D.; Vikram, Surendra; Van de Peer, Yves; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding microbial adaptation to environmental stressors is crucial for interpreting broader ecological patterns. In the most extreme hot and cold deserts, cryptic niche communities are thought to play key roles in ecosystem processes and represent excellent model systems for investigating microbial responses to environmental stressors. However, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity underlying such functional processes in climatically extreme desert systems. This study presents the first comparative metagenome analysis of cyanobacteria-dominated hypolithic communities in hot (Namib Desert, Namibia) and cold (Miers Valley, Antarctica) hyperarid deserts. The most abundant phyla in both hypolith metagenomes were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes with Cyanobacteria dominating in Antarctic hypoliths. However, no significant differences between the two metagenomes were identified. The Antarctic hypolithic metagenome displayed a high number of sequences assigned to sigma factors, replication, recombination and repair, translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis. In contrast, the Namib Desert metagenome showed a high abundance of sequences assigned to carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Metagenome data analysis also revealed significant divergence in the genetic determinants of amino acid and nucleotide metabolism between these two metagenomes and those of soil from other polar deserts, hot deserts, and non-desert soils. Our results suggest extensive niche differentiation in hypolithic microbial communities from these two extreme environments and a high genetic capacity for survival under environmental extremes. PMID:27503299

  18. Use of whole genome shotgun metagenomics: a practical guide for the microbiome-minded physician scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Prince, Amanda; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) has been increasingly recognized as the most comprehensive and robust approach for metagenomics research. When compared with 16S-based metagenomics, it offers the advantage of identification of species level taxonomy and the estimation of metabolic pathway activities from human and environmental samples. Several large-scale metagenomic projects have been recently conducted or are currently underway utilizing WGS. With the generation of vast amounts of data, the bioinformatics and computational analysis of WGS results become vital for the success of a metagenomics study. However, each step in the WGS data analysis, including metagenome assembly, gene prediction, taxonomy identification, function annotation, and pathway analysis, is complicated by the shear amount of data. Algorithms and tools have been developed specifically to handle WGS-generated metagenomics data with the hope of reducing the requirement on computational time and storage space. Here, we present an overview of the current state of metagenomics through WGS sequencing, challenges frequently encountered, and up-to-date solutions. Several applications that are uniquely applicable to microbiome studies in reproductive and perinatal medicine are also discussed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Revised computational metagenomic processing uncovers hidden and biologically meaningful functional variation in the human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Ohad; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2017-02-08

    Recent metagenomic analyses of the human gut microbiome identified striking variability in its taxonomic composition across individuals. Notably, however, these studies often reported marked functional uniformity, with relatively little variation in the microbiome's gene composition or in its overall metabolic capacity. Here, we address this surprising discrepancy between taxonomic and functional variations and set out to track its origins. Specifically, we demonstrate that the functional uniformity observed in microbiome studies can be attributed, at least partly, to common computational metagenomic processing procedures that mask true functional variation across microbiome samples. We identify several such procedures, including commonly used practices for gene abundance normalization, mapping of gene families to functional pathways, and gene family aggregation. We show that accounting for these factors and using revised metagenomic processing procedures uncovers such hidden functional variation, significantly increasing observed variation in the abundance of functional elements across samples. Importantly, we find that this uncovered variation is biologically meaningful and that it is associated with both host identity and health. Accurate characterization of functional variation in the microbiome is essential for comparative metagenomic analyses in health and disease. Our finding that metagenomic processing procedures mask underlying and biologically meaningful functional variation therefore highlights an important challenge such studies may face. Alternative schemes for metagenomic processing that uncover this hidden functional variation can facilitate improved metagenomic analysis and help pinpoint disease- and host-associated shifts in the microbiome's functional capacity.

  20. Computational workflow for the fine-grained analysis of metagenomic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; Arjona-Medina, Jose A; Torreno, Oscar; Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Trelles, Oswaldo

    2016-10-25

    The field of metagenomics, defined as the direct genetic analysis of uncultured samples of genomes contained within an environmental sample, is gaining increasing popularity. The aim of studies of metagenomics is to determine the species present in an environmental community and identify changes in the abundance of species under different conditions. Current metagenomic analysis software faces bottlenecks due to the high computational load required to analyze complex samples. A computational open-source workflow has been developed for the detailed analysis of metagenomes. This workflow provides new tools and datafile specifications that facilitate the identification of differences in abundance of reads assigned to taxa (mapping), enables the detection of reads of low-abundance bacteria (producing evidence of their presence), provides new concepts for filtering spurious matches, etc. Innovative visualization ideas for improved display of metagenomic diversity are also proposed to better understand how reads are mapped to taxa. Illustrative examples are provided based on the study of two collections of metagenomes from faecal microbial communities of adult female monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for leanness or obesity and their mothers. The proposed workflow provides an open environment that offers the opportunity to perform the mapping process using different reference databases. Additionally, this workflow shows the specifications of the mapping process and datafile formats to facilitate the development of new plugins for further post-processing. This open and extensible platform has been designed with the aim of enabling in-depth analysis of metagenomic samples and better understanding of the underlying biological processes.

  1. FY08 LDRD Final Report Probabilistic Inference of Metabolic Pathways from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' haeseleer, P

    2009-03-01

    Metagenomic 'shotgun' sequencing of environmental microbial communities has the potential to revolutionize microbial ecology, allowing a cultivation-independent, yet sequence-based analysis of the metabolic capabilities and functions present in an environmental sample. Although its intensive sequencing requirements are a good match for the continuously increasing bandwidth at sequencing centers, the complexity, seemingly inexhaustible novelty, and 'scrambled' nature of metagenomic data is also proving a tremendous challenge for analysis. In fact, many metagenomics projects do not go much further than providing a list of novel gene variants and over- or under-represented functional gene categories. In this project, we proposed to develop a set of novel metagenomic sequence analysis tools, including a binning method to group sequences by species, inference of phenotypes and metabolic pathways from these reconstructed species, and extraction of coarse-grained flux models. We proposed to closely collaborate with the DOE Joint Genome Institute to align these tools with their metagenomics analysis needs and the developing IMG/M metagenomics pipeline. Results would be cross-validated with simulated metagenomic data using a testing platform developed at the JGI.

  2. MALINA: a web service for visual analytics of human gut microbiota whole-genome metagenomic reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyakht, Alexander V; Popenko, Anna S; Belenikin, Maxim S; Altukhov, Ilya A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Selezneva, Oksana V; Larin, Andrei K; Karpova, Irina Y; Alexeev, Dmitry G

    2012-12-07

    MALINA is a web service for bioinformatic analysis of whole-genome metagenomic data obtained from human gut microbiota sequencing. As input data, it accepts metagenomic reads of various sequencing technologies, including long reads (such as Sanger and 454 sequencing) and next-generation (including SOLiD and Illumina). It is the first metagenomic web service that is capable of processing SOLiD color-space reads, to authors' knowledge. The web service allows phylogenetic and functional profiling of metagenomic samples using coverage depth resulting from the alignment of the reads to the catalogue of reference sequences which are built into the pipeline and contain prevalent microbial genomes and genes of human gut microbiota. The obtained metagenomic composition vectors are processed by the statistical analysis and visualization module containing methods for clustering, dimension reduction and group comparison. Additionally, the MALINA database includes vectors of bacterial and functional composition for human gut microbiota samples from a large number of existing studies allowing their comparative analysis together with user samples, namely datasets from Russian Metagenome project, MetaHIT and Human Microbiome Project (downloaded from http://hmpdacc.org). MALINA is made freely available on the web at http://malina.metagenome.ru. The website is implemented in JavaScript (using Ext JS), Microsoft .NET Framework, MS SQL, Python, with all major browsers supported.

  3. Unique Down to Our Microbes-Assessment of an Inquiry-Based Metagenomics Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Thomas B; Ott, Laura E; Robertson, Sabrina D; Windsor, Sarah C; Kelley, Joshua B; Wollenberg, Michael S; Dunn, Robert R; Goller, Carlos C

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics is an important method for studying microbial life. However, undergraduate exposure to metagenomics is hindered by associated software, computing demands, and dataset access. In this inquiry-based activity designed for introductory life science majors and nonmajors, students perform an investigation of the bacterial communities inhabiting the human belly button and associated metagenomics data collected through a citizen science project and visualized using an open-access bioinformatics tool. The activity is designed for attainment of the following student learning outcomes: defining terms associated with metagenomics analyses, describing the biological impact of the microbiota on human health, formulating a hypothesis, analyzing and interpreting metagenomics data to compare microbiota, evaluating a specific hypothesis, and synthesizing a conceptual model as to why bacterial populations vary. This activity was implemented in six introductory biology and biotechnology courses across five institutions. Attainment of student learning outcomes was assessed through completion of a quiz and students' presentations of their findings. In presentations, students demonstrated their ability to develop novel hypotheses and analyze and interpret metagenomic data to evaluate their hypothesis. In quizzes, students demonstrated their ability to define key terms and describe the biological impact of the microbiota on human health. Student learning gains assessment also revealed that students perceived gains for all student learning outcomes. Collectively, our assessment demonstrates achievement of the learning outcomes and supports the utility of this inquiry-based activity to engage undergraduates in the scientific process via analyses of metagenomics datasets and associated exploration of a microbial community that lives on the human body.

  4. Detection of Novel Integrons in the Metagenome of Human Saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supathep Tansirichaiya

    Full Text Available Integrons are genetic elements capable of capturing and expressing open reading frames (ORFs embedded within gene cassettes. They are involved in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in clinically important pathogens. Although the ARGs are common in the oral cavity the association of integrons and antibiotic resistance has not been reported there. In this work, a PCR-based approach was used to investigate the presence of integrons and associated gene cassettes in human oral metagenomic DNA obtained from both the UK and Bangladesh. We identified a diverse array of gene cassettes containing ORFs predicted to confer antimicrobial resistance and other adaptive traits. The predicted proteins include a putative streptogramin A O-acetyltransferase, a bleomycin binding protein, cof-like hydrolase, competence and motility related proteins. This is the first study detecting integron gene cassettes directly from oral metagenomic DNA samples. The predicted proteins are likely to carry out a multitude of functions; however, the function of the majority is yet unknown.

  5. Comparative metagenome of a stream impacted by the urbanization phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Julliane Dutra; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Nicolás, Marisa Fabiana; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro de; Coelho, Cíntia Marques

    Rivers and streams are important reservoirs of freshwater for human consumption. These ecosystems are threatened by increasing urbanization, because raw sewage discharged into them alters their nutrient content and may affect the composition of their microbial community. In the present study, we investigate the taxonomic and functional profile of the microbial community in an urban lotic environment. Samples of running water were collected at two points in the São Pedro stream: an upstream preserved and non-urbanized area, and a polluted urbanized area with discharged sewage. The metagenomic DNA was sequenced by pyrosequencing. Differences were observed in the community composition at the two sites. The non-urbanized area was overrepresented by genera of ubiquitous microbes that act in the maintenance of environments. In contrast, the urbanized metagenome was rich in genera pathogenic to humans. The functional profile indicated that the microbes act on the metabolism of methane, nitrogen and sulfur, especially in the urbanized area. It was also found that virulence/defense (antibiotic resistance and metal resistance) and stress response-related genes were disseminated in the urbanized environment. The structure of the microbial community was altered by uncontrolled anthropic interference, highlighting the selective pressure imposed by high loads of urban sewage discharged into freshwater environments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Compressed sensing methods for DNA microarrays, RNA interference, and metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Aditya; P, Deepthi; Renumadhavi, C H; Chandra, M Girish; Srinivasan, Rajgopal

    2015-02-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a sparse signal sampling methodology for efficiently acquiring and reconstructing a signal from relatively few measurements. Recent work shows that CS is well-suited to be applied to problems in genomics, including probe design in microarrays, RNA interference (RNAi), and taxonomic assignment in metagenomics. The principle of using different CS recovery methods in these applications has thus been established, but a comprehensive study of using a wide range of CS methods has not been done. For each of these applications, we apply three hitherto unused CS methods, namely, l1-magic, CoSaMP, and l1-homotopy, in conjunction with CS measurement matrices such as randomly generated CS m matrix, Hamming matrix, and projective geometry-based matrix. We find that, in RNAi, the l1-magic (the standard package for l1 minimization) and l1-homotopy methods show significant reduction in reconstruction error compared to the baseline. In metagenomics, we find that l1-homotopy as well as CoSaMP estimate concentration with significantly reduced time when compared to the GPSR and WGSQuikr methods.

  7. Microbial survival strategies in ancient permafrost: insights from metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Rachel; Burkert, Alexander; Haw, Monica; Mahendrarajah, Tara; Conaway, Christopher H.; Douglas, Thomas A.; Waldrop, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    In permafrost (perennially frozen ground) microbes survive oligotrophic conditions, sub-zero temperatures, low water availability and high salinity over millennia. Viable life exists in permafrost tens of thousands of years old but we know little about the metabolic and physiological adaptations to the challenges presented by life in frozen ground over geologic time. In this study we asked whether increasing age and the associated stressors drive adaptive changes in community composition and function. We conducted deep metagenomic and 16 S rRNA gene sequencing across a Pleistocene permafrost chronosequence from 19 000 to 33 000 years before present (kyr). We found that age markedly affected community composition and reduced diversity. Reconstruction of paleovegetation from metagenomic sequence suggests vegetation differences in the paleo record are not responsible for shifts in community composition and function. Rather, we observed shifts consistent with long-term survival strategies in extreme cryogenic environments. These include increased reliance on scavenging detrital biomass, horizontal gene transfer, chemotaxis, dormancy, environmental sensing and stress response. Our results identify traits that may enable survival in ancient cryoenvironments with no influx of energy or new materials.

  8. Metagenomics workflow analysis of endophytic bacteria from oil palm fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjung, Z. A.; Aditama, R.; Sudania, W. M.; Utomo, C.; Liwang, T.

    2017-05-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) has become a powerful sequencing tool for microbial study especially to lead the establishment of the field area of metagenomics. This study described a workflow to analyze metagenomics data of a Sequence Read Archive (SRA) file under accession ERP004286 deposited by University of Sao Paulo. It was a direct sequencing data generated by 454 pyrosequencing platform originated from oil palm fruits endophytic bacteria which were cultured using oil-palm enriched medium. This workflow used SortMeRNA to split ribosomal reads sequence, Newbler (GS Assembler and GS Mapper) to assemble and map reads into genome reference, BLAST package to identify and annotate contigs sequence, and QualiMap for statistical analysis. Eight bacterial species were identified in this study. Enterobacter cloacae was the most abundant species followed by Citrobacter koseri, Seratia marcescens, Latococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter amalonaticus, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Pseudomonas sp. respectively. All of these species have been reported as endophyte bacteria in various plant species and each has potential as plant growth promoting bacteria or another application in agricultural industries.

  9. Metagenomic characterization of viral communities in Goseong Bay, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinik; Park, So Yun; Park, Mirye; Lee, Sukchan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Cho, Won Kyong; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, seawater samples were collected from Goseong Bay, Korea in March 2014 and viral populations were examined by metagenomics assembly. Enrichment of marine viral particles using FeCl3 followed by next-generation sequencing produced numerous sequences. De novo assembly and BLAST search showed that most of the obtained contigs were unknown sequences and only 0.74% of sequences were associated with known viruses. As a result, 138 viruses, including bacteriophages (87%), viruses infecting algae and others (13%) were identified. The identified 138 viruses were divided into 11 orders, 14 families, 34 genera, and 133 species. The dominant viruses were Pelagibacter phage HTVC010P and Roseobacter phage SIO1. The viruses infecting algae, including the Ostreococcus species, accounted for 9.4% of total identified viruses. In addition, we identified pathogenic herpes viruses infecting fishes and giant viruses infecting parasitic acanthamoeba species. This is a comprehensive study to reveal the viral populations in the Goseong Bay using metagenomics. The information associated with the marine viral community in Goseong Bay, Korea will be useful for comparative analysis in other marine viral communities.

  10. Metagenomic insights into important microbes from the Dead Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, C.; Baker, B.; Seitz, K.; Temperton, B.; Gillies, L.; Rabalais, N. N.; Mason, O. U.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal regions of eutrophication-driven oxygen depletion are widespread and increasing in number. Also known as dead zones, these regions take their name from the deleterious effects of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen less than 2 mg/L) on shrimp, demersal fish, and other animal life. Dead zones result from nutrient enrichment of primary production, concomitant consumption by chemoorganotrophic aerobic microorganisms, and strong stratification that prevents ventilation of bottom water. One of the largest dead zones in the world occurs seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM), where hypoxia can reach up to 22,000 square kilometers. While this dead zone shares many features with more well-known marine oxygen minimum zones, it is nevertheless understudied with regards to the microbial assemblages involved in biogeochemical cycling. We performed metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing on six samples from the 2013 nGOM dead zone from both hypoxic and oxic bottom waters. Assembly and binning led to the recovery of over fifty partial to nearly complete metagenomes from key microbial taxa previously determined to be numerically abundant from 16S rRNA data, such as Thaumarcheaota, Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, SAR406, SAR324, Synechococcus spp., and Planctomycetes. These results provide information about the roles of these taxa in the nGOM dead zone, and opportunities for comparing this region of low oxygen to others around the globe.

  11. Metagenomic analysis of the turkey gut RNA virus community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffler Brian E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral enteric disease is an ongoing economic burden to poultry producers worldwide, and despite considerable research, no single virus has emerged as a likely causative agent and target for prevention and control efforts. Historically, electron microscopy has been used to identify suspect viruses, with many small, round viruses eluding classification based solely on morphology. National and regional surveys using molecular diagnostics have revealed that suspect viruses continuously circulate in United States poultry, with many viruses appearing concomitantly and in healthy birds. High-throughput nucleic acid pyrosequencing is a powerful diagnostic technology capable of determining the full genomic repertoire present in a complex environmental sample. We utilized the Roche/454 Life Sciences GS-FLX platform to compile an RNA virus metagenome from turkey flocks experiencing enteric disease. This approach yielded numerous sequences homologous to viruses in the BLAST nr protein database, many of which have not been described in turkeys. Our analysis of this turkey gut RNA metagenome focuses in particular on the turkey-origin members of the Picornavirales, the Caliciviridae, and the turkey Picobirnaviruses.

  12. Quantitative metagenomics reveals unique gut microbiome biomarkers in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chengping; Zheng, Zhijun; Shao, Tiejuan; Liu, Lin; Xie, Zhijun; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; He, Zhixing; Zhong, Wendi; Fan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Linshuang; Li, Haichang; Wu, Chunyan; Hu, Changfeng; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Jia; Cai, Shunfeng; Wang, Dawei; Huang, Yun; Breban, Maxime; Qin, Nan; Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko

    2017-07-27

    The assessment and characterization of the gut microbiome has become a focus of research in the area of human autoimmune diseases. Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease and evidence showed that ankylosing spondylitis may be a microbiome-driven disease. To investigate the relationship between the gut microbiome and ankylosing spondylitis, a quantitative metagenomics study based on deep shotgun sequencing was performed, using gut microbial DNA from 211 Chinese individuals. A total of 23,709 genes and 12 metagenomic species were shown to be differentially abundant between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls. Patients were characterized by a form of gut microbial dysbiosis that is more prominent than previously reported cases with inflammatory bowel disease. Specifically, the ankylosing spondylitis patients demonstrated increases in the abundance of Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella copri, and Prevotella sp. C561 and decreases in Bacteroides spp. It is noteworthy that the Bifidobacterium genus, which is commonly used in probiotics, accumulated in the ankylosing spondylitis patients. Diagnostic algorithms were established using a subset of these gut microbial biomarkers. Alterations of the gut microbiome are associated with development of ankylosing spondylitis. Our data suggest biomarkers identified in this study might participate in the pathogenesis or development process of ankylosing spondylitis, providing new leads for the development of new diagnostic tools and potential treatments.

  13. Metagenomics reveals flavour metabolic network of cereal vinegar microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin-Huan; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Zong-Min; Yu, Yong-Jian; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Multispecies microbial community formed through centuries of repeated batch acetic acid fermentation (AAF) is crucial for the flavour quality of traditional vinegar produced from cereals. However, the metabolism to generate and/or formulate the essential flavours by the multispecies microbial community is hardly understood. Here we used metagenomic approach to clarify in situ metabolic network of key microbes responsible for flavour synthesis of a typical cereal vinegar, Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, produced by solid-state fermentation. First, we identified 3 organic acids, 7 amino acids, and 20 volatiles as dominant vinegar metabolites. Second, we revealed taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiota by metagenomic shotgun sequencing. A total of 86 201 predicted protein-coding genes from 35 phyla (951 genera) were involved in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of Metabolism (42.3%), Genetic Information Processing (28.3%), and Environmental Information Processing (10.1%). Furthermore, a metabolic network for substrate breakdown and dominant flavour formation in vinegar microbiota was constructed, and microbial distribution discrepancy in different metabolic pathways was charted. This study helps elucidating different metabolic roles of microbes during flavour formation in vinegar microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metagenome of the gut of a malnourished child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sourav

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition, a major health problem, affects a significant proportion of preschool children in developing countries. The devastating consequences of malnutrition include diarrhoea, malabsorption, increased intestinal permeability, suboptimal immune response, etc. Nutritional interventions and dietary solutions have not been effective for treatment of malnutrition till date. Metagenomic procedures allow one to access the complex cross-talk between the gut and its microbial flora and understand how a different community composition affects various states of human health. In this study, a metagenomic approach was employed for analysing the differences between gut microbial communities obtained from a malnourished and an apparently healthy child. Results Our results indicate that the malnourished child gut has an abundance of enteric pathogens which are known to cause intestinal inflammation resulting in malabsorption of nutrients. We also identified a few functional sub-systems from these pathogens, which probably impact the overall metabolic capabilities of the malnourished child gut. Conclusion The present study comprehensively characterizes the microbial community resident in the gut of a malnourished child. This study has attempted to extend the understanding of the basis of malnutrition beyond nutrition deprivation.

  15. Amplicon-Metagenomic Analysis of Fungi from Antarctic Terrestrial Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Baeza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In cold environments such as polar regions, microorganisms play important ecological roles, and most of our knowledge about them comes from studies of cultivable microorganisms. Metagenomic technologies are powerful tools that can give a more comprehensive assessment of microbial communities, and the amplification of rDNA followed by next-generation sequencing has given good results in studies aimed particularly at environmental microorganisms. Culture-independent studies of microbiota in terrestrial habitats of Antarctica, which is considered the driest, coldest climate on Earth, are increasing and indicate that micro-diversity is much higher than previously thought. In this work, the microbial diversity of terrestrial habitats including eight islands of the South Shetland Archipelago, two islands on the Antarctic Peninsula and Union Glacier, was studied by amplicon-metagenome analysis. Molecular analysis of the studied localities clustered together the islands of the South Shetland Archipelago, except Greenwich Island, and separated them from the Litchfield and Lagotellerie islands and Union Glacier, which is in agreement with the latitudinal difference among them. Among fungi, 87 genera and 123 species were found, of which species belonging to 37 fungal genera not previously cultivated from Antarctica were detected. Phylogenetic analysis, including the closest BLAST-hit sequences, clustered fungi in 11 classes being the most represented Lecanoromycetes and Eurotiomycetes.

  16. Comparative metagenome of a stream impacted by the urbanization phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julliane Dutra Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract Rivers and streams are important reservoirs of freshwater for human consumption. These ecosystems are threatened by increasing urbanization, because raw sewage discharged into them alters their nutrient content and may affect the composition of their microbial community. In the present study, we investigate the taxonomic and functional profile of the microbial community in an urban lotic environment. Samples of running water were collected at two points in the São Pedro stream: an upstream preserved and non-urbanized area, and a polluted urbanized area with discharged sewage. The metagenomic DNA was sequenced by pyrosequencing. Differences were observed in the community composition at the two sites. The non-urbanized area was overrepresented by genera of ubiquitous microbes that act in the maintenance of environments. In contrast, the urbanized metagenome was rich in genera pathogenic to humans. The functional profile indicated that the microbes act on the metabolism of methane, nitrogen and sulfur, especially in the urbanized area. It was also found that virulence/defense (antibiotic resistance and metal resistance and stress response-related genes were disseminated in the urbanized environment. The structure of the microbial community was altered by uncontrolled anthropic interference, highlighting the selective pressure imposed by high loads of urban sewage discharged into freshwater environments.

  17. New insight into the gut microbiome through metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boyang Ji, Jens Nielsen Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden Abstract: The human gut is colonized by different types of microorganisms, which are known to play important roles in the human host by maintaining physiological homeostasis. The human host provides a nutrient-rich environment, and the microbiota provides some necessary functions that humans cannot perform. A comprehensive analysis of the human gut microbiome is thus important for revealing the mechanisms of these host–microbe interactions. The development of high-throughput sequencing technology and related computational frameworks enables exploration of the metabolic interactions and their roles in human health and diseases. Herein, we describe the metagenomic methods used in human gut microbiome studies and review the roles of gut microbiota as well as the integrative analyses of metagenomic data with other omics data. Finally, we discuss the application of constraint-based modeling to elucidate the microbe–microbe interaction and host–microbe interaction in the human gut microbiota. Keywords: dysbiosis, host–microbe interaction, metabolic modeling 

  18. Gene prediction in metagenomic fragments: A large scale machine learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenstern Burkhard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics is an approach to the characterization of microbial genomes via the direct isolation of genomic sequences from the environment without prior cultivation. The amount of metagenomic sequence data is growing fast while computational methods for metagenome analysis are still in their infancy. In contrast to genomic sequences of single species, which can usually be assembled and analyzed by many available methods, a large proportion of metagenome data remains as unassembled anonymous sequencing reads. One of the aims of all metagenomic sequencing projects is the identification of novel genes. Short length, for example, Sanger sequencing yields on average 700 bp fragments, and unknown phylogenetic origin of most fragments require approaches to gene prediction that are different from the currently available methods for genomes of single species. In particular, the large size of metagenomic samples requires fast and accurate methods with small numbers of false positive predictions. Results We introduce a novel gene prediction algorithm for metagenomic fragments based on a two-stage machine learning approach. In the first stage, we use linear discriminants for monocodon usage, dicodon usage and translation initiation sites to extract features from DNA sequences. In the second stage, an artificial neural network combines these features with open reading frame length and fragment GC-content to compute the probability that this open reading frame encodes a protein. This probability is used for the classification and scoring of gene candidates. With large scale training, our method provides fast single fragment predictions with good sensitivity and specificity on artificially fragmented genomic DNA. Additionally, this method is able to predict translation initiation sites accurately and distinguishes complete from incomplete genes with high reliability. Conclusion Large scale machine learning methods are well-suited for gene

  19. InteMAP: Integrated metagenomic assembly pipeline for NGS short reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Binbin; Wang, Fumeng; Wang, Xiaoqi; Duan, Liping; Zhu, Huaiqiu

    2015-08-07

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has greatly facilitated metagenomic analysis but also raised new challenges for metagenomic DNA sequence assembly, owing to its high-throughput nature and extremely short reads generated by sequencers such as Illumina. To date, how to generate a high-quality draft assembly for metagenomic sequencing projects has not been fully addressed. We conducted a comprehensive assessment on state-of-the-art de novo assemblers and revealed that the performance of each assembler depends critically on the sequencing depth. To address this problem, we developed a pipeline named InteMAP to integrate three assemblers, ABySS, IDBA-UD and CABOG, which were found to complement each other in assembling metagenomic sequences. Making a decision of which assembling approaches to use according to the sequencing coverage estimation algorithm for each short read, the pipeline presents an automatic platform suitable to assemble real metagenomic NGS data with uneven coverage distribution of sequencing depth. By comparing the performance of InteMAP with current assemblers on both synthetic and real NGS metagenomic data, we demonstrated that InteMAP achieves better performance with a longer total contig length and higher contiguity, and contains more genes than others. We developed a de novo pipeline, named InteMAP, that integrates existing tools for metagenomics assembly. The pipeline outperforms previous assembly methods on metagenomic assembly by providing a longer total contig length, a higher contiguity and covering more genes. InteMAP, therefore, could potentially be a useful tool for the research community of metagenomics.

  20. MetCap: a bioinformatics probe design pipeline for large-scale targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Meerupati, Tejashwari; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-02-28

    Massive sequencing of genes from different environments has evolved metagenomics as central to enhancing the understanding of the wide diversity of micro-organisms and their roles in driving ecological processes. Reduced cost and high throughput sequencing has made large-scale projects achievable to a wider group of researchers, though complete metagenome sequencing is still a daunting task in terms of sequencing as well as the downstream bioinformatics analyses. Alternative approaches such as targeted amplicon sequencing requires custom PCR primer generation, and is not scalable to thousands of genes or gene families. In this study, we are presenting a web-based tool called MetCap that circumvents the limitations of amplicon sequencing of multiple genes by designing probes that are suitable for large-scale targeted metagenomics sequencing studies. MetCap provides a novel approach to target thousands of genes and genomic regions that could be used in targeted metagenomics studies. Automatic analysis of user-defined sequences is performed, and probes specifically designed for metagenome studies are generated. To illustrate the advantage of a targeted metagenome approach, we have generated more than 400,000 probes that match more than 300,000 [corrected] publicly available sequences related to carbon degradation, and used these probes for target sequencing in a soil metagenome study. The results show high enrichment of target genes and a successful capturing of the majority of gene families. MetCap is freely available to users from: http://soilecology.biol.lu.se/metcap/ . MetCap is facilitating probe-based target enrichment as an easy and efficient alternative tool compared to complex primer-based enrichment for large-scale investigations of metagenomes. Our results have shown efficient large-scale target enrichment through MetCap-designed probes for a soil metagenome. The web service is suitable for any targeted metagenomics project that aims to study several genes

  1. Functional metagenomics identifies novel genes ABCTPP, TMSRP1 and TLSRP1 among human gut enterotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Manoj Kumar; Ahmed, Vasim; Gupta, Shashank

    2018-01-01

    is an important aspect of gut microbes for their survival and colonization. Identification of these survival mechanisms is a pivotal step towards understanding genomic suitability of a symbiont for successful human gut colonization. Here we highlight our recent work applying functional metagenomics to study human...... gut microbiome to identify candidate genes responsible for the salt stress tolerance. A plasmid borne metagenomic library of Bacteroidetes enriched human fecal metagenomic DNA led to identification of unique salt osmotolerance clones SR6 and SR7. Subsequent gene analysis combined with functional...

  2. Construction of Small-Insert and Large-Insert Metagenomic Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carola; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of the Earth's biological diversity is hidden in uncultured and yet uncharacterized microbial genomes. The construction of metagenomic libraries is a cultivation-independent molecular approach to assess this unexplored genetic reservoir. High numbers of novel biocatalysts have been identified by function-based or sequence-based screening of metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. Here, we describe detailed protocols for the construction of metagenomic small-insert and large-insert libraries in plasmids and fosmids, respectively, from environmental DNA.

  3. A novel genome signature based on inter-nucleotide distances profiles for visualization of metagenomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xian-Hua; Yu, Zu-Guo; Ma, Yuan-Lin; Han, Guo-Sheng; Anh, Vo

    2017-09-01

    There has been a growing interest in visualization of metagenomic data. The present study focuses on the visualization of metagenomic data using inter-nucleotide distances profile. We first convert the fragment sequences into inter-nucleotide distances profiles. Then we analyze these profiles by principal component analysis. Finally the principal components are used to obtain the 2-D scattered plot according to their source of species. We name our method as inter-nucleotide distances profiles (INP) method. Our method is evaluated on three benchmark data sets used in previous published papers. Our results demonstrate that the INP method is good, alternative and efficient for visualization of metagenomic data.

  4. Toward molecular trait-based ecology through integration of biogeochemical, geographical and metagenomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raes, Jeroen; Letunic, Ivica; Yamada, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    Using metagenomic 'parts lists' to infer global patterns on microbial ecology remains a significant challenge. To deduce important ecological indicators such as environmental adaptation, molecular trait dispersal, diversity variation and primary production from the gene pool of an ecosystem, we...... integrated 25 ocean metagenomes with geographical, meteorological and geophysicochemical data. We find that climatic factors (temperature, sunlight) are the major determinants of the biomolecular repertoire of each sample and the main limiting factor on functional trait dispersal (absence of biogeographic...... composition derived from metagenomes is an important quantitative readout for molecular trait-based biogeography and ecology....

  5. New perspectives in benthic deep-sea microbial ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia eCorinaldesi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest and most remote biome of the biosphere. They play a fundamental role in global biogeochemical cycles and their functions allow existence of life on our planet. In the last 20 years enormous progress has been made in the investigation of deep-sea microbes, but the knowledge of the microbial ecology of the soft bottoms (representing >90% of the deep-sea floor surface is still very limited. Deep-sea sediments host the largest fractions of Bacteria, Archaea and viruses on Earth, and potentially, a high diversity. At the same time, available results from metagenomics suggest that a large fraction of microbial taxa is completely unknown to science. Estimating the diversity of deep-sea benthic microbes and understanding their functions are some of the challenges of absolute priority, not only for deep-sea microbial ecology, but also for the entire research field of life sciences. The achievement of these goals, given the importance of the deep-sea microbial life for the functioning of the global biosphere, will open new perspectives for the comprehension of adaptation processes to the impact of global changes.

  6. Parallel-META 2.0: enhanced metagenomic data analysis with functional annotation, high performance computing and advanced visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoquan; Pan, Weihua; Song, Baoxing; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    The metagenomic method directly sequences and analyses genome information from microbial communities. The main computational tasks for metagenomic analyses include taxonomical and functional structure analysis for all genomes in a microbial community (also referred to as a metagenomic sample). With the advancement of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques, the number of metagenomic samples and the data size for each sample are increasing rapidly. Current metagenomic analysis is both data- and computation- intensive, especially when there are many species in a metagenomic sample, and each has a large number of sequences. As such, metagenomic analyses require extensive computational power. The increasing analytical requirements further augment the challenges for computation analysis. In this work, we have proposed Parallel-META 2.0, a metagenomic analysis software package, to cope with such needs for efficient and fast analyses of taxonomical and functional structures for microbial communities. Parallel-META 2.0 is an extended and improved version of Parallel-META 1.0, which enhances the taxonomical analysis using multiple databases, improves computation efficiency by optimized parallel computing, and supports interactive visualization of results in multiple views. Furthermore, it enables functional analysis for metagenomic samples including short-reads assembly, gene prediction and functional annotation. Therefore, it could provide accurate taxonomical and functional analyses of the metagenomic samples in high-throughput manner and on large scale.

  7. Deep sequencing of the viral phoH gene reveals temporal variation, depth-specific composition, and persistent dominance of the same viral phoH genes in the Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn B. Goldsmith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing of the viral phoH gene, a host-derived auxiliary metabolic gene, was used to track viral diversity throughout the water column at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site in the summer (September and winter (March of three years. Viral phoH sequences reveal differences in the viral communities throughout a depth profile and between seasons in the same year. Variation was also detected between the same seasons in subsequent years, though these differences were not as great as the summer/winter distinctions. Over 3,600 phoH operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% sequence identity were identified. Despite high richness, most phoH sequences belong to a few large, common OTUs whereas the majority of the OTUs are small and rare. While many OTUs make sporadic appearances at just a few times or depths, a small number of OTUs dominate the community throughout the seasons, depths, and years.

  8. An otolith microchemistry study of possible relationships between the origins of leptocephali of European eels in the Sargasso Sea and the continental destinations and relative migration success of glass eels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, J.; Daverat, F.; Pécheyran, C.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which Atlantic eels coming from different European rivers converge on the same spawning site. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial homogeneity of eel spawning area(s) with an otolith microchemistry approach. This work compared the elemental signatures of otolith...

  9. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüke, C.; Speth, D.R.; Kox, M.A.R.; Villanueva, L.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen

  10. A highly optimized grid deployment: the metagenomic analysis example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Gabriel; Blanquer, Ignacio; Hernández, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Computational resources and computationally expensive processes are two topics that are not growing at the same ratio. The availability of large amounts of computing resources in Grid infrastructures does not mean that efficiency is not an important issue. It is necessary to analyze the whole process to improve partitioning and submission schemas, especially in the most critical experiments. This is the case of metagenomic analysis, and this text shows the work done in order to optimize a Grid deployment, which has led to a reduction of the response time and the failure rates. Metagenomic studies aim at processing samples of multiple specimens to extract the genes and proteins that belong to the different species. In many cases, the sequencing of the DNA of many microorganisms is hindered by the impossibility of growing significant samples of isolated specimens. Many bacteria cannot survive alone, and require the interaction with other organisms. In such cases, the information of the DNA available belongs to different kinds of organisms. One important stage in Metagenomic analysis consists on the extraction of fragments followed by the comparison and analysis of their function stage. By the comparison to existing chains, whose function is well known, fragments can be classified. This process is computationally intensive and requires of several iterations of alignment and phylogeny classification steps. Source samples reach several millions of sequences, which could reach up to thousands of nucleotides each. These sequences are compared to a selected part of the "Non-redundant" database which only implies the information from eukaryotic species. From this first analysis, a refining process is performed and alignment analysis is restarted from the results. This process implies several CPU years. The article describes and analyzes the difficulties to fragment, automate and check the above operations in current Grid production environments. This environment has been

  11. Metagenomic analysis reveals Hepatitis A virus in suspected yellow fever cases in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteville, Liliane C; Filippis, Ana Maria B de; Nogueira, Rita Maria R; Mendonça, Marcos César L de; Vicente, Ana Carolina P

    2018-01-01

    Using a metagenomic approach, we identified hepatitis A virus among cases of acute febrile illnesses that occurred in 2008-2012 in Brazil suspected as yellow fever. These findings reinforce the challenge facing routine clinical diagnosis in complex epidemiological scenarios.

  12. Metagenome-Assembled Genome Sequence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris Strain ELI 1980, Commercialized as a Biostimulant

    OpenAIRE

    Crovadore, Julien; Xu, Shoutao; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien; Lukito, Delvia; Calmin, Gautier; Lefort, Fran?ois

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequence of strain ELI 1980 of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, commercialized as a biostimulant for agriculture. The genome was reconstructed from the metagenome of a commercial product containing this strain as its major component.

  13. EBI metagenomics—a new resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sarah; Corbett, Matthew; Denise, Hubert; Fraser, Matthew; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hunter, Christopher; Jones, Philip; Leinonen, Rasko; McAnulla, Craig; Maguire, Eamonn; Maslen, John; Mitchell, Alex; Nuka, Gift; Oisel, Arnaud; Pesseat, Sebastien; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Sterk, Peter; Vaughan, Daniel; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics is a relatively recently established but rapidly expanding field that uses high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies to characterize the microbial communities inhabiting different ecosystems (including oceans, lakes, soil, tundra, plants and body sites). Metagenomics brings with it a number of challenges, including the management, analysis, storage and sharing of data. In response to these challenges, we have developed a new metagenomics resource (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/) that allows users to easily submit raw nucleotide reads for functional and taxonomic analysis by a state-of-the-art pipeline, and have them automatically stored (together with descriptive, standards-compliant metadata) in the European Nucleotide Archive. PMID:24165880

  14. Shotgun metagenomics of 250 adult twins reveals genetic and environmental impacts on the gut microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Hailiang; Guo, Ruijin; Zhong, Huanzi

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been typically viewed as an environmental factor for human health. Twins are well suited for investigating the concordance of their gut microbiomes and decomposing genetic and environmental influences. However, existing twin studies utilizing metagenomic shotgun sequencing...

  15. Comparative metagenomics demonstrating different degradative capacity of activated biomass treating hydrocarbon contaminated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Trilok Chandra; Pal, Rajesh Ramavadh; Shastri, Sunita; Jadeja, Niti B; Kapley, Atya

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the diverse degradative capacity of activated biomass, when exposed to different levels of total dissolved solids (TDS) using a comparative metagenomics approach. The biomass was collected at two time points to examine seasonal variations. Four metagenomes were sequenced on Illumina Miseq platform and analysed using MG-RAST. STAMP tool was used to analyse statistically significant differences amongst different attributes of metagenomes. Metabolic pathways related to degradation of aromatics via the central and peripheral pathways were found to be dominant in low TDS metagenome, while pathways corresponding to central carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen, organic acids were predominant in high TDS sample. Seasonal variation was seen to affect catabolic gene abundance as well as diversity of the microbial community. Degradation of model compounds using activated sludge demonstrated efficient utilisation of single aromatic ring compounds in both samples but cyclic compounds were not efficiently utilised by biomass exposed to high TDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential applications of metagenomics to assess the biological effects of food structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Cano, Raul; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael

    2016-10-12

    Metagenomics, or the collective study of genomes is an important emerging area in microbiology and related fields, and is increasingly being recognized as a tool to characterize the microbial community structure and function of diverse sample types. Metagenomics compares sequences to existing databases to enable the identification of potential microbial reservoirs and predict specific functions; yet, metagenomics has not been widely applied to understand how changes in the food structure and composition affect microbial communities and their function in the human gut. Studies are needed to understand the digestion of food products, and to measure their effectiveness in preserving a healthy microbiome, as well as intestinal function. We suggest the use of metagenomics with validation techniques such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), cloning and functional assays to assess the biological effects of food structure and function.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN-SPECIFIC FECAL METAGENOMIC SEQUENCES USING GENOME FRAGMENT ENRICHMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence analysis of microbial genomes has provided biologists the opportunity to compare genetic differences between closely related microorganisms. While random sequencing has also been used to study natural microbial communities, metagenomic comparisons via sequencing analysis...

  18. Metagenomic evidence for the presence of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria in diverse environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yonghui; Baumbach, Jan; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira

    2016-01-01

    the environmental distribution of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria. To fill this gap, we took advantage of fast growing public metagenomic databases and performed an extensive survey of metagenomes deposited into the NCBI's WGS database, the JGI's IMG webserver, and the MG-RAST webserver. By employing Mg...... protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase (AcsF) as a marker gene, we identified 291 AcsF fragments (24∼361 amino acids long) that are closely related to G. phototrophica from 161 metagenomes originating from various habitats, including air, river waters/sediment, estuarine waters, lake waters...... photosynthesis gene cluster (PGC) with identical gene composition and arrangement to those in G. phototrophica was reconstructed from the Odense wastewater metagenome, only differing in a 7.2 kb long non-photosynthesis-gene insert. These data suggest that phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria are much more...

  19. A sampling and metagenomic sequencing-based methodology for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Patrick; Dalhoff Andersen, Vibe; de Knegt, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable methods for monitoring antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and other reservoirs are essential to understand the trends, transmission and importance of agricultural resistance. Quantification of AMR is mostly done using culture-based techniques, but metagenomic read...... mapping shows promise for quantitative resistance monitoring. Methods We evaluated the ability of: (i) MIC determination for Escherichia coli; (ii) cfu counting of E. coli; (iii) cfu counting of aerobic bacteria; and (iv) metagenomic shotgun sequencing to predict expected tetracycline resistance based...... on known antimicrobial consumption in 10 Danish integrated slaughter pig herds. In addition, we evaluated whether fresh or manure floor samples constitute suitable proxies for intestinal sampling, using cfu counting, qPCR and metagenomic shotgun sequencing. Results Metagenomic read-mapping outperformed...

  20. MetaBinG: using GPUs to accelerate metagenomic sequence classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jia

    Full Text Available Metagenomic sequence classification is a procedure to assign sequences to their source genomes. It is one of the important steps for metagenomic sequence data analysis. Although many methods exist, classification of high-throughput metagenomic sequence data in a limited time is still a challenge. We present here an ultra-fast metagenomic sequence classification system (MetaBinG using graphic processing units (GPUs. The accuracy of MetaBinG is comparable to the best existing systems and it can classify a million of 454 reads within five minutes, which is more than 2 orders of magnitude faster than existing systems. MetaBinG is publicly available at http://cbb.sjtu.edu.cn/~ccwei/pub/software/MetaBinG/MetaBinG.php.

  1. Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    -diversity at genome level and the implications for stable plant operation and P-removal will be an interesting question to investigate further. One current limitation for application of metagenomics and metatranscriptomics on a systems level is the need of more reference genomes that are closely related......Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities? Mads Albertsen1, Aaron M. Saunders1, Kåre L. Nielsen1 and Per H. Nielsen1 1 Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Presenting Author: Mads...... Albertsen Keywords: Metagenomics; Accumulibacter; Micro-diversity; Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Introduction Metagenomics, or environmental genomics, provides comprehensive information about the entire microbial community of a certain ecosystem, e.g. a wastewater treatment plant. So far...

  2. The Characterization of Novel Tissue Microbiota Using an Optimized 16S Metagenomic Sequencing Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Lluch, J?r?me; Servant, Florence; Pa?ss?, Sandrine; Valle, Carine; Vali?re, Sophie; Kuchly, Claire; Vilchez, Ga?lle; Donnadieu, C?cile; Courtney, Michael; Burcelin, R?my; Amar, Jacques; Bouchez, Olivier; Lelouvier, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Substantial progress in high-throughput metagenomic sequencing methodologies has enabled the characterisation of bacteria from various origins (for example gut and skin). However, the recently-discovered bacterial microbiota present within animal internal tissues has remained unexplored due to technical difficulties associated with these challenging samples. Results We have optimized a specific 16S rDNA-targeted metagenomics sequencing (16S metabarcoding) pipeline based on the Illu...

  3. Contamination of the Arctic reflected in microbial metagenomes from the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Cameron, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    interact with contamination in the Arctic is limited. Through shotgun metagenomic data and binned genomes from metagenomes we show that microbial communities, sampled from multiple surface ice locations on the Greenland ice sheet, have the potential for resistance to and degradation of contaminants....... The microbial potential to degrade anthropogenic contaminants, such as toxic and persistent polychlorinated biphenyls, was found to be spatially variable and not limited to regions close to human activities. Binned genomes showed close resemblance to microorganisms isolated from contaminated habitats...

  4. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the...

  5. Exploring variation-aware contig graphs for (comparative) metagenomics using MaryGold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijkamp, Jurgen F.; Pop, Mihai; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Although many tools are available to study variation and its impact in single genomes, there is a lack of algorithms for finding such variation in metagenomes. This hampers the interpretation of metagenomics sequencing datasets, which are increasingly acquired in research on the (human) microbiome, in environmental studies and in the study of processes in the production of foods and beverages. Existing algorithms often depend on the use of reference genomes, which pose a problem when a metagenome of a priori unknown strain composition is studied. In this article, we develop a method to perform reference-free detection and visual exploration of genomic variation, both within a single metagenome and between metagenomes. Results: We present the MaryGold algorithm and its implementation, which efficiently detects bubble structures in contig graphs using graph decomposition. These bubbles represent variable genomic regions in closely related strains in metagenomic samples. The variation found is presented in a condensed Circos-based visualization, which allows for easy exploration and interpretation of the found variation. We validated the algorithm on two simulated datasets containing three respectively seven Escherichia coli genomes and showed that finding allelic variation in these genomes improves assemblies. Additionally, we applied MaryGold to publicly available real metagenomic datasets, enabling us to find within-sample genomic variation in the metagenomes of a kimchi fermentation process, the microbiome of a premature infant and in microbial communities living on acid mine drainage. Moreover, we used MaryGold for between-sample variation detection and exploration by comparing sequencing data sampled at different time points for both of these datasets. Availability: MaryGold has been written in C++ and Python and can be downloaded from http://bioinformatics.tudelft.nl/software Contact: d.deridder@tudelft.nl PMID:24058058

  6. Metagenomics for the discovery of novel biosurfactants of environmental interest from marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen A; Borchert, Erik; O'Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2015-06-01

    Research focused on the search for new biosurfactants aims to replace chemical surfactants, which while being cost-effective are ecologically undesirable. Metagenomics can lead to discovery of novel biosurfactants, tackling issues of low production yields. Recent successes include the heterologous production of biosurfactants. The dearth of biosurfactants discovered to date through metagenomics is puzzling given that good screening systems and heterologous host systems are available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Almeida, Mathieu; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    , such as particular bacterial strains or viruses, remains a largely unsolved problem. Here we present a method, based on binning co-abundant genes across a series of metagenomic samples, that enables comprehensive discovery of new microbial organisms, viruses and co-inherited genetic entities and aids assembly...... affiliations between MGS and hundreds of viruses or genetic entities. Our method provides the means for comprehensive profiling of the diversity within complex metagenomic samples....

  8. CloudLCA: finding the lowest common ancestor in metagenome analysis using cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Liu, Changning; Li, Jing; Yang, Jian; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Runsheng

    2012-01-01

    Estimating taxonomic content constitutes a key problem in metagenomic sequencing data analysis. However, extracting such content from high-throughput data of next-generation sequencing is very time-consuming with the currently available software. Here, we present CloudLCA, a parallel LCA algorithm that significantly improves the efficiency of determining taxonomic composition in metagenomic data analysis. Results show that CloudLCA (1) has a running time nearly linear with the increase of dat...

  9. Symbiosis insights through metagenomic analysis of a microbialconsortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman,Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-09-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut, and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model which describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments which it inhabits.

  10. Data Management in Metagenomics: A Risk Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In eScience, where vast data collections are processed in scientific workflows, new risks and challenges are emerging. Those challenges are changing the eScience paradigm, mainly regarding digital preservation and scientific workflows. To address specific concerns with data management in these scenarios, the concept of the Data Management Plan was established, serving as a tool for enabling digital preservation in eScience research projects. We claim risk management can be jointly used with a Data Management Plan, so new risks and challenges can be easily tackled. Therefore, we propose an analysis process for eScience projects using a Data Management Plan and ISO 31000 in order to create a Risk Management Plan that can complement the Data Management Plan. The motivation, requirements and validation of this proposal are explored in the MetaGen-FRAME project, focused in Metagenomics.

  11. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten

    2015-01-01

    a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2......) Presumed stabile atherosclerotic plaques obtained from autopsy from a control group of patients who all died from causes not related to cardiovascular disease. Our data provides evidence that suggest a wide range of microbial agents in atherosclerotic plaques, and an intriguing new observation that shows...... these microbiota displayed differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques as judged from the taxonomic profiles in these two groups of patients. Additionally, functional annotations reveal significant differences in basic metabolic and disease pathway signatures between these groups. CONCLUSIONS: We...

  12. Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Symbionts in a Gutless Worm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman, Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boeffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-05-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here we use a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, thus providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model that describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments that it inhabits.

  13. Monitoring microbial diversity of bioreactors using metagenomic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Joshua T; Sims, Ronald C; Miller, Charles D

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of molecular techniques, particularly 'omics' technologies, the field of microbial ecology is growing rapidly. The applications of next generation sequencing have allowed researchers to produce massive amounts of genetic data on individual microbes, providing information about microbial communities and their interactions through in situ and in vitro measurements. The ability to identify novel microbes, functions, and enzymes, along with developing an understanding of microbial interactions and functions, is necessary for efficient production of useful and high value products in bioreactors. The ability to optimize bioreactors fully and understand microbial interactions and functions within these systems will establish highly efficient industrial processes for the production of bioproducts. This chapter will provide an overview of bioreactors and metagenomic technologies to help the reader understand microbial communities, interactions, and functions in bioreactors.

  14. Metagenomic approach for discovering new pathogens in infection disease outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Giombini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses represent the most abundant biological components on earth.They can be found in every environment, from deep layers of oceans to animal bodies.Although several viruses have been isolated and sequenced, in each environment there are millions of different types of viruses that have not been identified yet.The advent of nextgeneration sequencing technologies with their high throughput capabilities make possible to study in a single experiment all the community of microorganisms present in a particular sample “microbioma”.They made more feasible the application of the metagenomic approach, by which it is also possible to discover and identify new pathogens, that may pose a threat to public health.This paper summarizes the most recent applications of nextgeneration sequencing to discover new viral pathogens during the occurrence of infection disease outbreaks.

  15. Metagenomic exploration of viruses throughout the Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon J Williamson

    Full Text Available The characterization of global marine microbial taxonomic and functional diversity is a primary goal of the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition. As part of this study, 19 water samples were collected aboard the Sorcerer II sailing vessel from the southern Indian Ocean in an effort to more thoroughly understand the lifestyle strategies of the microbial inhabitants of this ultra-oligotrophic region. No investigations of whole virioplankton assemblages have been conducted on waters collected from the Indian Ocean or across multiple size fractions thus far. Therefore, the goals of this study were to examine the effect of size fractionation on viral consortia structure and function and understand the diversity and functional potential of the Indian Ocean virome. Five samples were selected for comprehensive metagenomic exploration; and sequencing was performed on the microbes captured on 3.0-, 0.8- and 0.1 µm membrane filters as well as the viral fraction (<0.1 µm. Phylogenetic approaches were also used to identify predicted proteins of viral origin in the larger fractions of data from all Indian Ocean samples, which were included in subsequent metagenomic analyses. Taxonomic profiling of viral sequences suggested that size fractionation of marine microbial communities enriches for specific groups of viruses within the different size classes and functional characterization further substantiated this observation. Functional analyses also revealed a relative enrichment for metabolic proteins of viral origin that potentially reflect the physiological condition of host cells in the Indian Ocean including those involved in nitrogen metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. A novel classification method, MGTAXA, was used to assess virus-host relationships in the Indian Ocean by predicting the taxonomy of putative host genera, with Prochlorococcus, Acanthochlois and members of the SAR86 cluster comprising the most abundant predictions. This is the first study

  16. Predicted Relative Metabolomic Turnover (PRMT): determining metabolic turnover from a coastal marine metagenomic dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter E; Collart, Frank R; Field, Dawn; Meyer, Folker; Keegan, Kevin P; Henry, Christopher S; McGrath, John; Quinn, John; Gilbert, Jack A

    2011-06-14

    The world's oceans are home to a diverse array of microbial life whose metabolic activity helps to drive the earth's biogeochemical cycles. Metagenomic analysis has revolutionized our access to these communities, providing a system-scale perspective of microbial community interactions. However, while metagenome sequencing can provide useful estimates of the relative change in abundance of specific genes and taxa between environments or over time, this does not investigate the relative changes in the production or consumption of different metabolites. We propose a methodology, Predicted Relative Metabolic Turnover (PRMT) that defines and enables exploration of metabolite-space inferred from the metagenome. Our analysis of metagenomic data from a time-series study in the Western English Channel demonstrated considerable correlations between predicted relative metabolic turnover and seasonal changes in abundance of measured environmental parameters as well as with observed seasonal changes in bacterial population structure. The PRMT method was successfully applied to metagenomic data to explore the Western English Channel microbial metabalome to generate specific, biologically testable hypotheses. Generated hypotheses linked organic phosphate utilization to Gammaproteobactaria, Plantcomycetes, and Betaproteobacteria, chitin degradation to Actinomycetes, and potential small molecule biosynthesis pathways for Lentisphaerae, Chlamydiae, and Crenarchaeota. The PRMT method can be applied as a general tool for the analysis of additional metagenomic or transcriptomic datasets.

  17. Bioprospecting for β-lactam resistance genes using a metagenomics-guided strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Yang, Ying; Che, You; Xia, Yu; Li, Liguan; Xiong, Wenguang; Zhang, Tong

    2017-08-01

    Emergence of new antibiotic resistance bacteria poses a serious threat to human health, which is largely attributed to the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this work, a metagenomics-guided strategy consisting of metagenomic analysis and function validation was proposed for rapidly identifying novel ARGs from hot spots of ARG dissemination, such as wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and animal feces. We used an antibiotic resistance gene database to annotate 76 putative β-lactam resistance genes from the metagenomes of sludge and chicken feces. Among these 76 candidate genes, 25 target genes that shared 40~70% amino acid identity to known β-lactamases were cloned by PCR from the metagenomes. Their resistances to four β-lactam antibiotics were further demonstrated. Furthermore, the validated ARGs were used as the reference sequences to identify novel ARGs in eight environmental samples, suggesting the necessity of re-examining the profiles of ARGs in environmental samples using the validated novel ARG sequences. This metagenomics-guided pipeline does not rely on the activity of ARGs during the initial screening process and may specifically select novel ARG sequences for function validation, which make it suitable for the high-throughput screening of novel ARGs from environmental metagenomes.

  18. An integrated metagenome and -proteome analysis of the microbial community residing in a biogas production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortseifen, Vera; Stolze, Yvonne; Maus, Irena; Sczyrba, Alexander; Bremges, Andreas; Albaum, Stefan P; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Fracowiak, Jochen; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    To study the metaproteome of a biogas-producing microbial community, fermentation samples were taken from an agricultural biogas plant for microbial cell and protein extraction and corresponding metagenome analyses. Based on metagenome sequence data, taxonomic community profiling was performed to elucidate the composition of bacterial and archaeal sub-communities. The community's cytosolic metaproteome was represented in a 2D-PAGE approach. Metaproteome databases for protein identification were compiled based on the assembled metagenome sequence dataset for the biogas plant analyzed and non-corresponding biogas metagenomes. Protein identification results revealed that the corresponding biogas protein database facilitated the highest identification rate followed by other biogas-specific databases, whereas common public databases yielded insufficient identification rates. Proteins of the biogas microbiome identified as highly abundant were assigned to the pathways involved in methanogenesis, transport and carbon metabolism. Moreover, the integrated metagenome/-proteome approach enabled the examination of genetic-context information for genes encoding identified proteins by studying neighboring genes on the corresponding contig. Exemplarily, this approach led to the identification of a Methanoculleus sp. contig encoding 16 methanogenesis-related gene products, three of which were also detected as abundant proteins within the community's metaproteome. Thus, metagenome contigs provide additional information on the genetic environment of identified abundant proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CS-SCORE: Rapid identification and removal of human genome contaminants from metagenomic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Reddy, Chennareddy Venkata Siva Kumar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-08-01

    Metagenomic sequencing data, obtained from host-associated microbial communities, are usually contaminated with host genome sequence fragments. Prior to performing any downstream analyses, it is necessary to identify and remove such contaminating sequence fragments. The time and memory requirements of available host-contamination detection techniques are enormous. Thus, processing of large metagenomic datasets is a challenging task. This study presents CS-SCORE--a novel algorithm that can rapidly identify host sequences contaminating metagenomic datasets. Validation results indicate that CS-SCORE is 2-6 times faster than the current state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, the memory footprint of CS-SCORE is in the range of 2-2.5GB, which is significantly lower than other available tools. CS-SCORE achieves this efficiency by incorporating (1) a heuristic pre-filtering mechanism and (2) a directed-mapping approach that utilizes a novel sequence composition metric (cs-score). CS-SCORE is expected to be a handy 'pre-processing' utility for researchers analyzing metagenomic datasets. For academic users, an implementation of CS-SCORE is freely available at: http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/cs-score (or) https://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/preprocessing/cs-score. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. MetaCAA: A clustering-aided methodology for efficient assembly of metagenomic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Rachamalla Maheedhar; Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Mande, Sharmila S

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in analyzing metagenomics data pertains to assembly of sequenced DNA fragments (i.e. reads) originating from various microbes in a given environmental sample. Several existing methodologies can assemble reads originating from a single genome. However, these methodologies cannot be applied for efficient assembly of metagenomic sequence datasets. In this study, we present MetaCAA - a clustering-aided methodology which helps in improving the quality of metagenomic sequence assembly. MetaCAA initially groups sequences constituting a given metagenome into smaller clusters. Subsequently, sequences in each cluster are independently assembled using CAP3, an existing single genome assembly program. Contigs formed in each of the clusters along with the unassembled reads are then subjected to another round of assembly for generating the final set of contigs. Validation using simulated and real-world metagenomic datasets indicates that MetaCAA aids in improving the overall quality of assembly. A software implementation of MetaCAA is available at https://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/MetaCAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Probabilistic Inference of Biochemical Reactions in Microbial Communities from Metagenomic Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dazhi; Ye, Yuzhen; Tang, Haixu

    2013-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics has been applied to the studies of the functionality of various microbial communities. As a critical analysis step in these studies, biological pathways are reconstructed based on the genes predicted from metagenomic shotgun sequences. Pathway reconstruction provides insights into the functionality of a microbial community and can be used for comparing multiple microbial communities. The utilization of pathway reconstruction, however, can be jeopardized because of imperfect functional annotation of genes, and ambiguity in the assignment of predicted enzymes to biochemical reactions (e.g., some enzymes are involved in multiple biochemical reactions). Considering that metabolic functions in a microbial community are carried out by many enzymes in a collaborative manner, we present a probabilistic sampling approach to profiling functional content in a metagenomic dataset, by sampling functions of catalytically promiscuous enzymes within the context of the entire metabolic network defined by the annotated metagenome. We test our approach on metagenomic datasets from environmental and human-associated microbial communities. The results show that our approach provides a more accurate representation of the metabolic activities encoded in a metagenome, and thus improves the comparative analysis of multiple microbial communities. In addition, our approach reports likelihood scores of putative reactions, which can be used to identify important reactions and metabolic pathways that reflect the environmental adaptation of the microbial communities. Source code for sampling metabolic networks is available online at http://omics.informatics.indiana.edu/mg/MetaNetSam/. PMID:23555216

  2. Grid-Assembly: An oligonucleotide composition-based partitioning strategy to aid metagenomic sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mehra, Varun; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-06-01

    Metagenomics approach involves extraction, sequencing and characterization of the genomic content of entire community of microbes present in a given environment. In contrast to genomic data, accurate assembly of metagenomic sequences is a challenging task. Given the huge volume and the diverse taxonomic origin of metagenomic sequences, direct application of single genome assembly methods on metagenomes are likely to not only lead to an immense increase in requirements of computational infrastructure, but also result in the formation of chimeric contigs. A strategy to address the above challenge would be to partition metagenomic sequence datasets into clusters and assemble separately the sequences in individual clusters using any single-genome assembly method. The current study presents such an approach that uses tetranucleotide usage patterns to first represent sequences as points in a three dimensional (3D) space. The 3D space is subsequently partitioned into "Grids". Sequences within overlapping grids are then progressively assembled using any available assembler. We demonstrate the applicability of the current Grid-Assembly method using various categories of assemblers as well as different simulated metagenomic datasets. Validation results indicate that the Grid-Assembly approach helps in improving the overall quality of assembly, in terms of the purity and volume of the assembled contigs.

  3. Diversity Indices as Measures of Functional Annotation Methods in Metagenomics Studies

    KAUST Repository

    Jankovic, Boris R.

    2016-01-26

    Applications of high-throughput techniques in metagenomics studies produce massive amounts of data. Fragments of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic molecules are all found in metagenomics samples. Laborious and meticulous effort in sequencing and functional annotation are then required to, amongst other objectives, reconstruct a taxonomic map of the environment that metagenomics samples were taken from. In addition to computational challenges faced by metagenomics studies, the analysis is further complicated by the presence of contaminants in the samples, potentially resulting in skewed taxonomic analysis. The functional annotation in metagenomics can utilize all available omics data and therefore different methods that are associated with a particular type of data. For example, protein-coding DNA, non-coding RNA or ribosomal RNA data can be used in such an analysis. These methods would have their advantages and disadvantages and the question of comparison among them naturally arises. There are several criteria that can be used when performing such a comparison. Loosely speaking, methods can be evaluated in terms of computational complexity or in terms of the expected biological accuracy. We propose that the concept of diversity that is used in the ecosystems and species diversity studies can be successfully used in evaluating certain aspects of the methods employed in metagenomics studies. We show that when applying the concept of Hill’s diversity, the analysis of variations in the diversity order provides valuable clues into the robustness of methods used in the taxonomical analysis.

  4. Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics enables studies of the genomic potential of complex microbial communities by sequencing bulk genomic DNA directly from the environment. Knowledge of the genetic potential of a community can be used to formulate and test ecological hypotheses about stability and performance. In this s......Metagenomics enables studies of the genomic potential of complex microbial communities by sequencing bulk genomic DNA directly from the environment. Knowledge of the genetic potential of a community can be used to formulate and test ecological hypotheses about stability and performance....... In this study deep metagenomics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to study a full-scale wastewater treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) and compared to an existing EBPR metagenome. EBPR is a widely used process that relies on a complex community...... of microorganisms to function properly. Insight into community and species level stability and dynamics is valuable for knowledge driven optimization of the EBPR process. The metagenomes of the EBPR communities were distinct compared to metagenomes of communities from a wide range of other environments, which could...

  5. A statistical toolbox for metagenomics: assessing functional diversity in microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handelsman Jo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 99% of bacteria in the environment that are recalcitrant to culturing have spurred the development of metagenomics, a culture-independent approach to sample and characterize microbial genomes. Massive datasets of metagenomic sequences have been accumulated, but analysis of these sequences has focused primarily on the descriptive comparison of the relative abundance of proteins that belong to specific functional categories. More robust statistical methods are needed to make inferences from metagenomic data. In this study, we developed and applied a suite of tools to describe and compare the richness, membership, and structure of microbial communities using peptide fragment sequences extracted from metagenomic sequence data. Results Application of these tools to acid mine drainage, soil, and whale fall metagenomic sequence collections revealed groups of peptide fragments with a relatively high abundance and no known function. When combined with analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments from the same communities these tools enabled us to demonstrate that although there was no overlap in the types of 16S rRNA gene sequence observed, there was a core collection of operational protein families that was shared among the three environments. Conclusion The results of comparisons between the three habitats were surprising considering the relatively low overlap of membership and the distinctively different characteristics of the three habitats. These tools will facilitate the use of metagenomics to pursue statistically sound genome-based ecological analyses.

  6. Red Sea as a source for bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-12-12

    King-Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is located on the shores of the Red Sea in Saudi Arabia. The Red Sea is well known for its unique environment, harboring various microbes capable of surviving in salty brines. We collected sediment samples from brine pool adjacent to the Thuwal cold seeps in the Red Sea. The taxonomic analysis showed the diversity and abundance of bacterial and archaeal operational taxonomic units (OUT). Recently we established in the laboratory a microdroplet technology to encapsulate single cells. This technology enables us to analyze single-cell genomes and perform the high-throughput screening. The genomes of both cultivable and uncultivable organisms can be analyzed. We envision the collection of complimentary data, obtained by various techniques, such as single-cell genomics, metagenomics, and transcriptomics. That will enable us not only to understand the environment and microorganism communities but also will allow to discover the previously unknown genes, pathways, and whole genomes. These data will facilitate the enhancement of biological and chemical producers, and pave the way for bioprospecting.

  7. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on 'sequence capture' reveals functional diversity in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-12-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  8. MIPE: A metagenome-based community structure explorer and SSU primer evaluation tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zou

    Full Text Available An understanding of microbial community structure is an important issue in the field of molecular ecology. The traditional molecular method involves amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. However, PCR-based amplicon approaches are affected by primer bias and chimeras. With the development of high-throughput sequencing technology, unbiased SSU rRNA gene sequences can be mined from shotgun sequencing-based metagenomic or metatranscriptomic datasets to obtain a reflection of the microbial community structure in specific types of environment and to evaluate SSU primers. However, the use of short reads obtained through next-generation sequencing for primer evaluation has not been well resolved. The software MIPE (MIcrobiota metagenome Primer Explorer was developed to adapt numerous short reads from metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. Using metagenomic or metatranscriptomic datasets as input, MIPE extracts and aligns rRNA to reveal detailed information on microbial composition and evaluate SSU rRNA primers. A mock dataset, a real Metagenomics Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST test dataset, two PrimerProspector test datasets and a real metatranscriptomic dataset were used to validate MIPE. The software calls Mothur (v1.33.3 and the SILVA database (v119 for the alignment and classification of rRNA genes from a metagenome or metatranscriptome. MIPE can effectively extract shotgun rRNA reads from a metagenome or metatranscriptome and is capable of classifying these sequences and exhibiting sensitivity to different SSU rRNA PCR primers. Therefore, MIPE can be used to guide primer design for specific environmental samples.

  9. Metagenomic analysis of viral diversity in respiratory samples from patients with respiratory tract infections in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Nada; Al-Nakib, Widad; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Habibi, Nazima

    2018-03-01

    A metagenomic approach based on target independent next-generation sequencing has become a known method for the detection of both known and novel viruses in clinical samples. This study aimed to use the metagenomic sequencing approach to characterize the viral diversity in respiratory samples from patients with respiratory tract infections. We have investigated 86 respiratory samples received from various hospitals in Kuwait between 2015 and 2016 for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections. A metagenomic approach using the next-generation sequencer to characterize viruses was used. According to the metagenomic analysis, an average of 145, 019 reads were identified, and 2% of these reads were of viral origin. Also, metagenomic analysis of the viral sequences revealed many known respiratory viruses, which were detected in 30.2% of the clinical samples. Also, sequences of non-respiratory viruses were detected in 14% of the clinical samples, while sequences of non-human viruses were detected in 55.8% of the clinical samples. The average genome coverage of the viruses was 12% with the highest genome coverage of 99.2% for respiratory syncytial virus, and the lowest was 1% for torque teno midi virus 2. Our results showed 47.7% agreement between multiplex Real-Time PCR and metagenomics sequencing in the detection of respiratory viruses in the clinical samples. Though there are some difficulties in using this method to clinical samples such as specimen quality, these observations are indicative of the promising utility of the metagenomic sequencing approach for the identification of respiratory viruses in patients with respiratory tract infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. MP3: a software tool for the prediction of pathogenic proteins in genomic and metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Kapil, Rohan; Dhakan, Darshan B; Sharma, Vineet K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of virulent proteins in any de-novo sequenced genome is useful in estimating its pathogenic ability and understanding the mechanism of pathogenesis. Similarly, the identification of such proteins could be valuable in comparing the metagenome of healthy and diseased individuals and estimating the proportion of pathogenic species. However, the common challenge in both the above tasks is the identification of virulent proteins since a significant proportion of genomic and metagenomic proteins are novel and yet unannotated. The currently available tools which carry out the identification of virulent proteins provide limited accuracy and cannot be used on large datasets. Therefore, we have developed an MP3 standalone tool and web server for the prediction of pathogenic proteins in both genomic and metagenomic datasets. MP3 is developed using an integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach to carry out highly fast, sensitive and accurate prediction of pathogenic proteins. It displayed Sensitivity, Specificity, MCC and accuracy values of 92%, 100%, 0.92 and 96%, respectively, on blind dataset constructed using complete proteins. On the two metagenomic blind datasets (Blind A: 51-100 amino acids and Blind B: 30-50 amino acids), it displayed Sensitivity, Specificity, MCC and accuracy values of 82.39%, 97.86%, 0.80 and 89.32% for Blind A and 71.60%, 94.48%, 0.67 and 81.86% for Blind B, respectively. In addition, the performance of MP3 was validated on selected bacterial genomic and real metagenomic datasets. To our knowledge, MP3 is the only program that specializes in fast and accurate identification of partial pathogenic proteins predicted from short (100-150 bp) metagenomic reads and also performs exceptionally well on complete protein sequences. MP3 is publicly available at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/mp3/index.php.

  11. MP3: A Software Tool for the Prediction of Pathogenic Proteins in Genomic and Metagenomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Kapil, Rohan; Dhakan, Darshan B.; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of virulent proteins in any de-novo sequenced genome is useful in estimating its pathogenic ability and understanding the mechanism of pathogenesis. Similarly, the identification of such proteins could be valuable in comparing the metagenome of healthy and diseased individuals and estimating the proportion of pathogenic species. However, the common challenge in both the above tasks is the identification of virulent proteins since a significant proportion of genomic and metagenomic proteins are novel and yet unannotated. The currently available tools which carry out the identification of virulent proteins provide limited accuracy and cannot be used on large datasets. Therefore, we have developed an MP3 standalone tool and web server for the prediction of pathogenic proteins in both genomic and metagenomic datasets. MP3 is developed using an integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach to carry out highly fast, sensitive and accu